WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric inversion

  1. An improved Kalman Smoother for atmospheric inversions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. P. Bruhwiler

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We explore the use of a fixed-lag Kalman smoother for sequential estimation of atmospheric carbon dioxide fluxes. This technique takes advantage of the fact that most of the information about the spatial distribution of sources and sinks is observable within a 5 few months to half of a year of emission. After this period, the spatial structure of sources is diluted by transport and cannot significantly constrain flux estimates. We therefore describe an estimation technique that steps through the observations sequentially, using only the subset of observations and modeled transport fields that most strongly constrain the fluxes at a particular time step. Estimates of each set of fluxes 10 are sequentially updated multiple times, using measurements taken at different times, and the estimates and their uncertainties are shown to quickly converge. Final flux estimates are incorporated into the background state of CO2 and transported forward in time, and the final flux uncertainties and covariances are taken into account when estimating the covariances of the fluxes still being estimated. The computational demands 15 of this technique are greatly reduced in comparison to the standard Bayesian synthesis technique where all observations are used at once with transport fields spanning the entire period of the observations. It therefore becomes possible to solve larger inverse problems with more observations and for fluxes discretized at finer spatial scales. We also discuss the differences between running the inversion simultaneously with the 20 transport model and running it entirely off-line with pre-calculated transport fields. We find that the latter can be done with minimal error if time series of transport fields of adequate length are pre-calculated.

  2. An improved Kalman Smoother for atmospheric inversions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. P. Bruhwiler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We explore the use of a fixed-lag Kalman smoother for sequential estimation of atmospheric carbon dioxide fluxes. This technique takes advantage of the fact that most of the information about the spatial distribution of sources and sinks is observable within a few months to half of a year of emission. After this period, the spatial structure of sources is diluted by transport and cannot significantly constrain flux estimates. We therefore describe an estimation technique that steps through the observations sequentially, using only the subset of observations and modeled transport fields that most strongly constrain the fluxes at a particular time step. Estimates of each set of fluxes are sequentially updated multiple times, using measurements taken at different times, and the estimates and their uncertainties are shown to quickly converge. Final flux estimates are incorporated into the background state of CO2 and transported forward in time, and the final flux uncertainties and covariances are taken into account when estimating the covariances of the fluxes still being estimated. The computational demands of this technique are greatly reduced in comparison to the standard Bayesian synthesis technique where all observations are used at once with transport fields spanning the entire period of the observations. It therefore becomes possible to solve larger inverse problems with more observations and for fluxes discretized at finer spatial scales. We also discuss the differences between running the inversion simultaneously with the transport model and running it entirely off-line with pre-calculated transport fields. We find that the latter can be done with minimal error if time series of transport fields of adequate length are pre-calculated.

  3. Evaluating atmospheric methane inversion model results for Pallas, northern Finland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuruta, Aki; Aalto, Tuula; Backman, Leif; Peters, Wouter; Krol, Maarten; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T.; Hatakka, Juha; Heikkinen, Pauli; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Spahni, Renato; Paramonova, Nina N.

    2015-01-01

    A state-of-the-art inverse model, CarbonTracker Data Assimilation Shell (CTDAS), was used to optimize estimates of methane (CH4) surface fluxes using atmospheric observations of CH4 as a constraint. The model consists of the latest version of the TM5 atmospheric chemistry-transport model and an ense

  4. An improved Kalman Smoother for atmospheric inversions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruhwiler, L.; Michalak, A.; Peters, W.; Baker, D.; Tans, P.P.

    2005-01-01

    We explore the use of a fixed-lag Kalman smoother for sequential estimation of atmospheric carbon dioxide fluxes. This technique takes advantage of the fact that most of the information about the spatial distribution of sources and sinks is observable within a few months to half of a year of emissio

  5. Inversion for atmosphere duct parameters using real radar sea clutter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng Zheng; Fang Han-Xian

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating the lower atmospheric refractivity (M profile) under nonstandard propagation conditions frequently encountered in low altitude maritime radar applications.The vertical structure of the refractive environment is modeled using five parameters and the horizontal structure is modeled using five parameters.The refractivity model is implemented with and without a priori constraint on the duct strength as might be derived from soundings or numerical weather-prediction models.An electromagnetic propagation model maps the refractivity structure into a replica field.Replica fields are compared with the observed clutter using a squared-error objective function.A global search for the 10 environmental parameters is performed using genetic algorithms.The inversion algorithm is implemented on the basis of S-band radar sea-clutter data from Wallops Island,Virginia (SPANDAR).Reference data are from range-dependent refractivity profiles obtained with a helicopter. The inversion is assessed (i) by comparing the propagation predicted from the radar-inferred refractivity profiles with that from the helicopter profiles,(ii) by comparing the refractivity parameters from the helicopter soundings with those estimated.This technique could provide near-real-time estimation of ducting effects.

  6. Atmospheric inverse estimates of methane emissions from Central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hirsch, Adam; MacDonald, Clinton; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Fischer, Marc L.

    2009-08-01

    Methane mixing ratios measured at a tall tower are compared to model predictions to estimate surface emissions of CH4 in Central California for October-December 2007 using an inverse technique. Predicted CH4 mixing ratios are calculated based on spatially resolved a priori CH4 emissions and simulated atmospheric trajectories. The atmospheric trajectories, along with surface footprints, are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. An uncertainty analysis is performed to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated CH4 emissions. Three inverse model estimates of CH4 emissions are reported. First, linear regressions of modeled and measured CH4 mixing ratios obtain slopes of 0.73 ± 0.11 and 1.09 ± 0.14 using California-specific and Edgar 3.2 emission maps, respectively, suggesting that actual CH4 emissions were about 37 ± 21% higher than California-specific inventory estimates. Second, a Bayesian "source" analysis suggests that livestock emissions are 63 ± 22% higher than the a priori estimates. Third, a Bayesian "region" analysis is carried out for CH4 emissions from 13 subregions, which shows that inventory CH4 emissions from the Central Valley are underestimated and uncertainties in CH4 emissions are reduced for subregions near the tower site, yielding best estimates of flux from those regions consistent with "source" analysis results. The uncertainty reductions for regions near the tower indicate that a regional network of measurements will be necessary to provide accurate estimates of surface CH4 emissions for multiple regions.

  7. Atmospheric Inverse Estimates of Methane Emissions from Central California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chuanfeng; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Bianco, Laura; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Hirsch, Adam; MacDonald, Clinton; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Fischer, Marc L.

    2008-11-21

    Methane mixing ratios measured at a tall-tower are compared to model predictions to estimate surface emissions of CH{sub 4} in Central California for October-December 2007 using an inverse technique. Predicted CH{sub 4} mixing ratios are calculated based on spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and simulated atmospheric trajectories. The atmospheric trajectories, along with surface footprints, are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. An uncertainty analysis is performed to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated CH{sub 4} emissions. Three inverse model estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions are reported. First, linear regressions of modeled and measured CH{sub 4} mixing ratios obtain slopes of 0.73 {+-} 0.11 and 1.09 {+-} 0.14 using California specific and Edgar 3.2 emission maps respectively, suggesting that actual CH{sub 4} emissions were about 37 {+-} 21% higher than California specific inventory estimates. Second, a Bayesian 'source' analysis suggests that livestock emissions are 63 {+-} 22% higher than the a priori estimates. Third, a Bayesian 'region' analysis is carried out for CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions, which shows that inventory CH{sub 4} emissions from the Central Valley are underestimated and uncertainties in CH{sub 4} emissions are reduced for sub-regions near the tower site, yielding best estimates of flux from those regions consistent with 'source' analysis results. The uncertainty reductions for regions near the tower indicate that a regional network of measurements will be necessary to provide accurate estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions.

  8. Inversion of Atmospheric Tracer Measurements, Localization of Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issartel, J.-P.; Cabrit, B.; Hourdin, F.; Idelkadi, A.

    When abnormal concentrations of a pollutant are observed in the atmosphere, the question of its origin arises immediately. The radioactivity from Tchernobyl was de- tected in Sweden before the accident was announced. This situation emphasizes the psychological, political and medical stakes of a rapid identification of sources. In tech- nical terms, most industrial sources can be modeled as a fixed point at ground level with undetermined duration. The classical method of identification involves the cal- culation of a backtrajectory departing from the detector with an upstream integration of the wind field. We were first involved in such questions as we evaluated the ef- ficiency of the international monitoring network planned in the frame of the Com- prehensive Test Ban Treaty. We propose a new approach of backtracking based upon the use of retroplumes associated to available measurements. Firstly the retroplume is related to inverse transport processes, describing quantitatively how the air in a sam- ple originates from regions that are all the more extended and diffuse as we go back far in the past. Secondly it clarifies the sensibility of the measurement with respect to all potential sources. It is therefore calculated by adjoint equations including of course diffusive processes. Thirdly, the statistical interpretation, valid as far as sin- gle particles are concerned, should not be used to investigate the position and date of a macroscopic source. In that case, the retroplume rather induces a straightforward constraint between the intensity of the source and its position. When more than one measurements are available, including zero valued measurements, the source satisfies the same number of linear relations tightly related to the retroplumes. This system of linear relations can be handled through the simplex algorithm in order to make the above intensity-position correlation more restrictive. This method enables to manage in a quantitative manner the

  9. Wind farm performance in conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers with varying inversion strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2014-06-01

    In this study we consider large wind farms in a conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer. In large wind farms the energy extracted by the turbines is dominated by downward vertical turbulent transport of kinetic energy from the airflow above the farm. However, atmospheric boundary layers are almost always capped by an inversion layer which slows down the entrainment rate and counteracts boundary layer growth. In a suite of large eddy simulations the effect of the strength of the capping inversion on the boundary layer and on the performance of a large wind farm is investigated. For simulations with and without wind turbines the results indicate that the boundary layer growth is effectively limited by the capping inversion and that the entrainment rate depends strongly on the inversion strength. The power output of wind farms is shown to decrease for increasing inversions.

  10. Four-dimensional variational data assimilation for inverse modelling of atmospheric methane emissions: method and comparison with synthesis inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Meirink

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A four-dimensional variational (4D-Var data assimilation system for inverse modelling of atmospheric methane emissions is presented. The system is based on the TM5 atmospheric transport model. It can be used for assimilating large volumes of measurements, in particular satellite observations and quasi-continuous in-situ observations, and at the same time it enables the optimization of a large number of model parameters, specifically grid-scale emission rates. Furthermore, the variational method allows to estimate uncertainties in posterior emissions. Here, the system is applied to optimize monthly methane emissions over a 1-year time window on the basis of surface observations from the NOAA-ESRL network. The results are rigorously compared with an analogous inversion by Bergamaschi et al. (2007, which was based on the traditional synthesis approach. The posterior emissions as well as their uncertainties obtained in both inversions show a high degree of consistency. At the same time we illustrate the advantage of 4D-Var in reducing aggregation errors by optimizing emissions at the grid scale of the transport model. The full potential of the assimilation system is exploited in Meirink et al. (2008, who use satellite observations of column-averaged methane mixing ratios to optimize emissions at high spatial resolution, taking advantage of the zooming capability of the TM5 model.

  11. Atmospheric CO2 Inversions of the Mid-Continental Intensive (MCI) Region (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, A. E.; Denning, A.; Ogle, S. M.; Corbin, K.; Uliasz, M.; Davis, K. J.; Lauvaux, T.; Miles, N.; Andrews, A. E.; Petron, G.; Huntzinger, D. N.

    2009-12-01

    We combine the SiB3 biosphere model with the RAMS mesoscale meteorology model and associated Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) and use CO2 observations from an extensive tower network in 2007 to correct a priori ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross primary productivity (GPP) fluxes for a domain consisting of most of North America. In particular, eight of these towers are located in a concentrated ring around the Mid-Continent Intensive (MCI) region of the United States providing one of the densest tower networks (CO2) in the world, in the midst of one of the strongest areas of seasonal carbon flux in the world. The unique area combined with dense observations and relatively simple atmospheric transport provides an incredible test-bed to investigate atmospheric CO2 inversions. Multiple inversion approaches are compared and contrasted. The results are then investigated for sensitivity to a priori inversion designs, boundary inflow contributions, and network density.

  12. Nested atmospheric inversion for the terrestrial carbon sources and sinks in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, F.; Wang, H. W.; Chen, J. M.; Zhou, L. X.; Ju, W. M.; Ding, A. J.; Liu, L. X.; Peters, W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we establish a nested atmospheric inversion system with a focus on China using the Bayesian method. The global surface is separated into 43 regions based on the 22 TransCom large regions, with 13 small regions in China. Monthly CO2 concentrations from 130 GlobalView sites and 3 additi

  13. Nested atmospheric inversion for the terrestrial carbon sources and sinks in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, F.; Wang, H.W.; Chen, J.M.; Zhou, L.X.; Ju, W.M.; Peters, W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we establish a~nested atmospheric inversion system with a focus on China using the Bayes theory. The global surface is separated into 43 regions based on the 22 TransCom large regions, with 13 small regions in China. Monthly CO2 concentrations from 130 GlobalView sites and a Hong Kong

  14. Atmospheric inverse modeling with known physical bounds: an example from trace gas emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Miller

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Many inverse problems in the atmospheric sciences involve parameters with known physical constraints. Examples include non-negativity (e.g., emissions of some urban air pollutants or upward limits implied by reaction or solubility constants. However, probabilistic inverse modeling approaches based on Gaussian assumptions cannot incorporate such bounds and thus often produce unrealistic results. The atmospheric literature lacks consensus on the best means to overcome this problem, and existing atmospheric studies rely on a limited number of the possible methods with little examination of the relative merits of each. This paper investigates the applicability of several approaches to bounded inverse problems and is also the first application of Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC to estimation of atmospheric trace gas fluxes. The approaches discussed here are broadly applicable. A common method of data transformations is found to unrealistically skew estimates for the examined example application. The method of Lagrange multipliers and two MCMC methods yield more realistic and accurate results. In general, the examined MCMC approaches produce the most realistic result but can require substantial computational time. Lagrange multipliers offer an appealing alternative for large, computationally intensive problems when exact uncertainty bounds are less central to the analysis. A synthetic data inversion of US anthropogenic methane emissions illustrates the strengths and weaknesses of each approach.

  15. Inverse modelling of national and European CH4 emissions using the atmospheric zoom model TM5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergamaschi, P.; Krol, M.C.; Dentener, F.; Vermeulen, A.; Meinhardt, F.; Graul, R.; Ramonet, M.; Peters, W.; Dlugokencky, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    A synthesis inversion based on the atmospheric zoom model TM5 is used to derive top-down estimates of CH4 emissions from individual European countries for the year 2001. We employ a model zoom over Europe with 1° × 1° resolution that is two-way nested into the global model domain (with resolution of

  16. Bayesian statistical modeling of spatially correlated error structure in atmospheric tracer inverse analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mukherjee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverse modeling applications in atmospheric chemistry are increasingly addressing the challenging statistical issues of data synthesis by adopting refined statistical analysis methods. This paper advances this line of research by addressing several central questions in inverse modeling, focusing specifically on Bayesian statistical computation. Motivated by problems of refining bottom-up estimates of source/sink fluxes of trace gas and aerosols based on increasingly high-resolution satellite retrievals of atmospheric chemical concentrations, we address head-on the need for integrating formal spatial statistical methods of residual error structure in global scale inversion models. We do this using analytically and computationally tractable spatial statistical models, know as conditional autoregressive spatial models, as components of a global inversion framework. We develop Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to explore and fit these spatial structures in an overall statistical framework that simultaneously estimates source fluxes. Additional aspects of the study extend the statistical framework to utilize priors in a more physically realistic manner, and to formally address and deal with missing data in satellite retrievals. We demonstrate the analysis in the context of inferring carbon monoxide (CO sources constrained by satellite retrievals of column CO from the Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT instrument on the TERRA satellite, paying special attention to evaluating performance of the inverse approach using various statistical diagnostic metrics. This is developed using synthetic data generated to resemble MOPITT data to define a~proof-of-concept and model assessment, and then in analysis of real MOPITT data.

  17. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multi-resolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric inversions are frequently used to estimate fluxes of atmospheric greenhouse gases (e.g., biospheric CO2 flux fields) at Earth's surface. These inversions typically assume that flux departures from a prior model are spatially smoothly varying, which are then modeled using a multi-variate Gaussian. When the field being estimated is spatially rough, multi-variate Gaussian models are difficult to construct and a wavelet-based field model may be more suitable. Unfortunately, such models are very high dimensional and are most conveniently used when the estimation method can simultaneously perform data-driven model simplification (removal of model parameters that cannot be reliably estimated) and fitting. Such sparse reconstruction methods are typically not used in atmospheric inversions. In this work, we devise a sparse reconstruction method, and illustrate it in an idealized atmospheric inversion problem for the estimation of fossil fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the USA. Our new method is based on stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), a method used to reconstruct compressively sensed images. Our adaptations bestow three properties to the sparse reconstruction procedure which are useful in atmospheric inversions. We have modified StOMP to incorporate prior information on the emission field being estimated and to enforce non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, though based on wavelets, our method allows for the estimation of fields in non-rectangular geometries, e.g., emission fields inside geographical and political boundaries. Our idealized inversions use a recently developed multi-resolution (i.e., wavelet-based) random field model developed for ffCO2 emissions and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also reduces

  18. New analysis indicates no thermal inversion in the atmosphere of HD 209458b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond-Lowe, Hannah; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bean, Jacob L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Line, Michael R.; Fortney, Jonathan J., E-mail: hdiamondlowe@uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    An important focus of exoplanet research is the determination of the atmospheric temperature structure of strongly irradiated gas giant planets, or hot Jupiters. HD 209458b is the prototypical exoplanet for atmospheric thermal inversions, but this assertion does not take into account recently obtained data or newer data reduction techniques. We reexamine this claim by investigating all publicly available Spitzer Space Telescope secondary-eclipse photometric data of HD 209458b and performing a self-consistent analysis. We employ data reduction techniques that minimize stellar centroid variations, apply sophisticated models to known Spitzer systematics, and account for time-correlated noise in the data. We derive new secondary-eclipse depths of 0.119% ± 0.007%, 0.123% ± 0.006%, 0.134% ± 0.035%, and 0.215% ± 0.008% in the 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 μm bandpasses, respectively. We feed these results into a Bayesian atmospheric retrieval analysis and determine that it is unnecessary to invoke a thermal inversion to explain our secondary-eclipse depths. The data are well fitted by a temperature model that decreases monotonically between pressure levels of 1 and 0.01 bars. We conclude that there is no evidence for a thermal inversion in the atmosphere of HD 209458b.

  19. Inverse diffraction for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Torre, Gabriele; Schwartz, Richard A.; Benvenuto, Federico; Massone, Anna Maria; Piana, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory provides full Sun images every 1 seconds in each of 7 Extreme Ultraviolet passbands. However, for a significant amount of these images, saturation affects their most intense core, preventing scientists from a full exploitation of their physical meaning. In this paper we describe a mathematical and automatic procedure for the recovery of information in the primary saturation region based on a correlation/inversion analysis of t...

  20. Variational approach to direct and inverse problems of atmospheric pollution studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, Vladimir; Tsvetova, Elena; Penenko, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    We present the development of a variational approach for solving interrelated problems of atmospheric hydrodynamics and chemistry concerning air pollution transport and transformations. The proposed approach allows us to carry out complex studies of different-scale physical and chemical processes using the methods of direct and inverse modeling [1-3]. We formulate the problems of risk/vulnerability and uncertainty assessment, sensitivity studies, variational data assimilation procedures [4], etc. A computational technology of constructing consistent mathematical models and methods of their numerical implementation is based on the variational principle in the weak constraint formulation specifically designed to account for uncertainties in models and observations. Algorithms for direct and inverse modeling are designed with the use of global and local adjoint problems. Implementing the idea of adjoint integrating factors provides unconditionally monotone and stable discrete-analytic approximations for convection-diffusion-reaction problems [5,6]. The general framework is applied to the direct and inverse problems for the models of transport and transformation of pollutants in Siberian and Arctic regions. The work has been partially supported by the RFBR grant 14-01-00125 and RAS Presidium Program I.33P. References: 1. V. Penenko, A.Baklanov, E. Tsvetova and A. Mahura . Direct and inverse problems in a variational concept of environmental modeling //Pure and Applied Geoph.(2012) v.169: 447-465. 2. V. V. Penenko, E. A. Tsvetova, and A. V. Penenko Development of variational approach for direct and inverse problems of atmospheric hydrodynamics and chemistry, Izvestiya, Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics, 2015, Vol. 51, No. 3, p. 311-319, DOI: 10.1134/S0001433815030093. 3. V.V. Penenko, E.A. Tsvetova, A.V. Penenko. Methods based on the joint use of models and observational data in the framework of variational approach to forecasting weather and atmospheric composition

  1. Regional inversion of CO2 ecosystem fluxes from atmospheric measurements. Reliability of the uncertainty estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broquet, G.; Chevallier, F.; Breon, F.M.; Yver, C.; Ciais, P.; Ramonet, M.; Schmidt, M. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, UMR8212, IPSL, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Alemanno, M. [Servizio Meteorologico dell' Aeronautica Militare Italiana, Centro Aeronautica Militare di Montagna, Monte Cimone/Sestola (Italy); Apadula, F. [Research on Energy Systems, RSE, Environment and Sustainable Development Department, Milano (Italy); Hammer, S. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer Umweltphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Haszpra, L. [Hungarian Meteorological Service, Budapest (Hungary); Meinhardt, F. [Federal Environmental Agency, Kirchzarten (Germany); Necki, J. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Piacentino, S. [ENEA, Laboratory for Earth Observations and Analyses, Palermo (Italy); Thompson, R.L. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena (Germany); Vermeulen, A.T. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, EEE-EA, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    The Bayesian framework of CO2 flux inversions permits estimates of the retrieved flux uncertainties. Here, the reliability of these theoretical estimates is studied through a comparison against the misfits between the inverted fluxes and independent measurements of the CO2 Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) made by the eddy covariance technique at local (few hectares) scale. Regional inversions at 0.5{sup 0} resolution are applied for the western European domain where {approx}50 eddy covariance sites are operated. These inversions are conducted for the period 2002-2007. They use a mesoscale atmospheric transport model, a prior estimate of the NEE from a terrestrial ecosystem model and rely on the variational assimilation of in situ continuous measurements of CO2 atmospheric mole fractions. Averaged over monthly periods and over the whole domain, the misfits are in good agreement with the theoretical uncertainties for prior and inverted NEE, and pass the chi-square test for the variance at the 30% and 5% significance levels respectively, despite the scale mismatch and the independence between the prior (respectively inverted) NEE and the flux measurements. The theoretical uncertainty reduction for the monthly NEE at the measurement sites is 53% while the inversion decreases the standard deviation of the misfits by 38 %. These results build confidence in the NEE estimates at the European/monthly scales and in their theoretical uncertainty from the regional inverse modelling system. However, the uncertainties at the monthly (respectively annual) scale remain larger than the amplitude of the inter-annual variability of monthly (respectively annual) fluxes, so that this study does not engender confidence in the inter-annual variations. The uncertainties at the monthly scale are significantly smaller than the seasonal variations. The seasonal cycle of the inverted fluxes is thus reliable. In particular, the CO2 sink period over the European continent likely ends later than

  2. Evaluation of wetland methane emissions across North America using atmospheric data and inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scot M.; Commane, Roisin; Melton, Joe R.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Benmergui, Joshua; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Michalak, Anna M.; Sweeney, Colm; Worthy, Doug E. J.

    2016-03-01

    Existing estimates of methane (CH4) fluxes from North American wetlands vary widely in both magnitude and distribution. In light of these differences, this study uses atmospheric CH4 observations from the US and Canada to analyze seven different bottom-up, wetland CH4 estimates reported in a recent model comparison project. We first use synthetic data to explore whether wetland CH4 fluxes are detectable at atmospheric observation sites. We find that the observation network can detect aggregate wetland fluxes from both eastern and western Canada but generally not from the US. Based upon these results, we then use real data and inverse modeling results to analyze the magnitude, seasonality, and spatial distribution of each model estimate. The magnitude of Canadian fluxes in many models is larger than indicated by atmospheric observations. Many models predict a seasonality that is narrower than implied by inverse modeling results, possibly indicating an oversensitivity to air or soil temperatures. The LPJ-Bern and SDGVM models have a geographic distribution that is most consistent with atmospheric observations, depending upon the region and season. These models utilize land cover maps or dynamic modeling to estimate wetland coverage while most other models rely primarily on remote sensing inundation data.

  3. Influence of Uncertainty in Atmospheric Transport Modeling on Regional and Continental Scale Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uliasz, M.; Schuh, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric transport modeling and its uncertainty play a crucial role in inversion studies with a goal to estimate fluxes of trace gases like carbon dioxide from available concentration measurements. Lagrangian particle models (e.g., CSU LPDM, STILT, FLEXPART) driven by regional meteorological models (e.g., WRF, RAMS) are state of the art tools in regional CO2 research including not only inversion studies, but also designing of tower network, or testing and supporting flight scenarios. They are typically used backward in time as an adjoint transport model providing, for each data point, influence functions (footprints) for surface fluxes and inflow fluxes across a domain perimeter. Modeling system used at CSU is based on SiB-RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System with Simple Biosphere model) providing meteorological fields for the LPDM (Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model). Our LPDM can be run both in a forward and backward in time mode. Therefore, we recommend to use the comparison of forward and backward in time simulations as a method to evaluate internal model uncertainty. In addition the LPDM concentration fields can be compared to tracer concentrations simulated directly by RAMS, i.e. Eulerian grid model. We will discuss how simulated concentration fields, and in turn, the results of atmospheric inversions are affected by (1) model simplifications and optimizations, (2) time and space resolution of meteorological fields, and (3) selection of a domain for inversion study. The simulations are performed for the North America and smaller regional domains for a passive tracer and a tracers resulting from different CO2 fluxes (assimilation and respiration). Finally, we would like to propose a framework for inter comparison of different LPDMs coupled to regional meteorological models. This framework includes a sparse matrix format for influence functions to facilitate exchange and further applications of this product by different research groups.

  4. The use of forest stand age information in an atmospheric CO2 inversion applied to North America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, F.; Chen, J.M.; Pan, Y.; Peters, W.; Birdsey, R.; McCullough, K.; Xiao, J.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric inversions have become an important tool in quantifying carbon dioxide (CO2) sinks and sources at a variety of spatiotemporal scales, but associated large uncertainties restrain the inversion research community from reaching agreement on many important subjects. We enhanced an atmospheri

  5. Atmospheric inversion for cost effective quantification of city CO2 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cities, currently covering only a very small portion (2, and are associated with 71–76 % of CO2 emissions from global final energy use. Although many cities have set voluntary climate plans, their CO2 emissions are not evaluated by Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV procedures that play a key role for market- or policy-based mitigation actions. Here we propose a monitoring tool that could support the development of such procedures at the city scale. It is based on an atmospheric inversion method that exploits inventory data and continuous atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements from a network of stations within and around cities to estimate city CO2 emissions. We examine the cost-effectiveness and the performance of such a tool. The instruments presently used to measure CO2 concentrations at research stations are expensive. However, cheaper sensors are currently developed and should be useable for the monitoring of CO2 emissions from a megacity in the near-term. Our assessment of the inversion method is thus based on the use of several types of hypothetical networks, with a range of numbers of sensors sampling at 25 m a.g.l. The study case for this assessment is the monitoring of the emissions of the Paris metropolitan area (~ 12 million inhabitants and 11.4 Tg C emitted in 2010 during the month of January 2011. The performance of the inversion is evaluated in terms of uncertainties in the estimates of total and sectoral CO2 emissions. These uncertainties are compared to a notional ambitious target to diagnose annual total city emissions with an uncertainty of 5 % (2-sigma. We find that, with 10 stations only, which is the typical size of current pilot networks that are deployed in some cities, the uncertainty for the 1-month total city CO2 emissions is significantly reduced by the inversion by ~ 42 % but still corresponds to an annual uncertainty that is two times larger than the target of 5 %. By extending the network from 10 to

  6. Atmospheric inversion for cost effective quantification of city CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Broquet, G.; Ciais, P.; Bellassen, V.; Vogel, F.; Chevallier, F.; Xueref-Remy, I.; Wang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Cities, currently covering only a very small portion (market- or policy-based mitigation actions. Here we propose a monitoring tool that could support the development of such procedures at the city scale. It is based on an atmospheric inversion method that exploits inventory data and continuous atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements from a network of stations within and around cities to estimate city CO2 emissions. We examine the cost-effectiveness and the performance of such a tool. The instruments presently used to measure CO2 concentrations at research stations are expensive. However, cheaper sensors are currently developed and should be useable for the monitoring of CO2 emissions from a megacity in the near-term. Our assessment of the inversion method is thus based on the use of several types of hypothetical networks, with a range of numbers of sensors sampling at 25 m a.g.l. The study case for this assessment is the monitoring of the emissions of the Paris metropolitan area (~ 12 million inhabitants and 11.4 Tg C emitted in 2010) during the month of January 2011. The performance of the inversion is evaluated in terms of uncertainties in the estimates of total and sectoral CO2 emissions. These uncertainties are compared to a notional ambitious target to diagnose annual total city emissions with an uncertainty of 5 % (2-sigma). We find that, with 10 stations only, which is the typical size of current pilot networks that are deployed in some cities, the uncertainty for the 1-month total city CO2 emissions is significantly reduced by the inversion by ~ 42 % but still corresponds to an annual uncertainty that is two times larger than the target of 5 %. By extending the network from 10 to 70 stations, the inversion can meet this requirement. As for major sectoral CO2 emissions, the uncertainties in the inverted emissions using 70 stations are reduced significantly over that obtained using 10 stations by 32 % for commercial and residential buildings, by 33 % for

  7. A New Concept for Atmospheric Reentry Optimal Guidance: An Inverse Problem Inspired Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Abbasi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new concept for atmospheric reentry online optimal guidance and control using a method called MARE G&C that exploits the different time scale featured by reentry dynamics. The new technique reaches a quasi-analytical solution and simplified computations, even considering both lift-to-drag ratio and aerodynamic roll as control variables; in addition, the paper offers a solution for the challenging path constraints issue, getting inspiration from the inverse problem methodology. The final resulting algorithm seems suitable for onboard predictive guidance, a new need for future space missions.

  8. Inverse diffraction for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Torre, Gabriele; Benvenuto, Federico; Massone, Anna Maria; Piana, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory provides full Sun images every 1 seconds in each of 7 Extreme Ultraviolet passbands. However, for a significant amount of these images, saturation affects their most intense core, preventing scientists from a full exploitation of their physical meaning. In this paper we describe a mathematical and automatic procedure for the recovery of information in the primary saturation region based on a correlation/inversion analysis of the diffraction pattern associated to the telescope observations. Further, we suggest an interpolation-based method for determining the image background that allows the recovery of information also in the region of secondary saturation (blooming).

  9. Inverse estimation of radon flux distribution for East Asia using measured atmospheric radon concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, S; Hayashi, R; Moriizumi, J; Yamazawa, H; Tohjima, Y; Mukai, H

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the (222)Rn flux density distribution at surface was estimated in East Asia with the Bayesian synthesis inversion using measurement data and a long-range atmospheric (222)Rn transport model. Surface atmospheric (222)Rn concentrations measured at Hateruma Island in January 2008 were used. The estimated (222)Rn flux densities were generally higher than the prior ones. The area-weighted mean (222)Rn flux density for East Asia in January 2008 was estimated to be 44.0 mBq m(-2) s(-1). The use of the estimated (222)Rn flux density improved the discrepancy of the model-calculated concentrations with the measurements at Hateruma Island.

  10. Methane fluxes in the high northern latitudes estimated using a Bayesian atmospheric inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Rona; Stohl, Andreas; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Sasakawa, Motoki; Machida, Toshinobu; Aalto, Tuula; Dlugokencky, Edward; Worthy, Douglas; Skorokhod, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas after CO2. Atmospheric CH4 increased from pre-industrial concentrations of around 850 ppb (parts-per-billion) to 1773 ppb in the late 1990s and then remained approximately stable until the mid 2000s. However, since 2006 atmospheric CH4 has begun to increase again. The reasons for the stabilization and subsequent increase are likely to be a combination of changes in anthropogenic emissions such as from fossil fuels, as well as natural wetland sources. While global atmospheric inversions indicate that natural wetland sources in the tropics and subtropics have contributed to the recent increase, land surface and ecosystem models generally indicate no increase in these sources. Another potential source for the change in CH4 concentration could be wetlands in the high northern latitudes, which comprise about 44% of global wetland area. These latitudes are also undergoing rapid warming, which will impact wetland emissions of CH4. We present CH4 fluxes for the high northern latitudes (>50°N) from 2005 to 2012 estimated from a Bayesian atmospheric inversion. The inversion incorporates observations from 17 in-situ and 6 discrete-sample sites across North America and Northern Eurasia. Atmospheric transport is based on the Lagrangian particle dispersion model, FLEXPART, run with ECMWF meteorological analyses. Emissions were optimized monthly and on a spatial grid of variable resolution (from 1°×1° to 4°×4°). Background concentrations were estimated by coupling FLEXPART to monthly global 2-D fields of CH4 concentration from a bivariate interpolation of smoothed data from the NOAA ESRL network. We estimate the total mean North American flux (>50°N) to be 18 -- 27 Tg y-1, and the total mean Northern Eurasian flux (>50°N) to be 55 -- 66 Tg y-1, both substantially higher than the prior (based on LPX-Bern for wetland and EDGAR-4.2FT2010 for anthropogenic fluxes). We also find a small trend in the

  11. Multi-year Estimates of Methane Fluxes in Alaska from an Atmospheric Inverse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. M.; Commane, R.; Chang, R. Y. W.; Miller, C. E.; Michalak, A. M.; Dinardo, S. J.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Hartery, S.; Karion, A.; Lindaas, J.; Sweeney, C.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate methane fluxes across Alaska over a multi-year period using observations from a three-year aircraft campaign, the Carbon Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE). Existing estimates of methane from Alaska and other Arctic regions disagree in both magnitude and distribution, and before the CARVE campaign, atmospheric observations in the region were sparse. We combine these observations with an atmospheric particle trajectory model and a geostatistical inversion to estimate surface fluxes at the model grid scale. We first use this framework to estimate the spatial distribution of methane fluxes across the state. We find the largest fluxes in the south-east and North Slope regions of Alaska. This distribution is consistent with several estimates of wetland extent but contrasts with the distribution in most existing flux models. These flux models concentrate methane in warmer or more southerly regions of Alaska compared to the estimate presented here. This result suggests a discrepancy in how existing bottom-up models translate wetland area into methane fluxes across the state. We next use the inversion framework to explore inter-annual variability in regional-scale methane fluxes for 2012-2014. We examine the extent to which this variability correlates with weather or other environmental conditions. These results indicate the possible sensitivity of wetland fluxes to near-term variability in climate.

  12. Inverse modelling of national and European CH4 emissions using the atmospheric zoom model TM5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bergamaschi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A synthesis inversion based on the atmospheric zoom model TM5 is used to derive top-down estimates of CH4 emissions from individual European countries for the year 2001. We employ a model zoom over Europe with 1° × 1° resolution that is two-way nested into the global model domain (with resolution of 6° × 4°. This approach ensures consistent boundary conditions for the zoom domain and thus European top-down estimates consistent with global CH4 observations. The TM5 model, driven by ECMWF analyses, simulates synoptic scale events at most European and global sites fairly well, and the use of high-frequency observations allows exploiting the information content of individual synoptic events. A detailed source attribution is presented for a comprehensive set of 56 monitoring sites, assigning the atmospheric signal to the emissions of individual European countries and larger global regions. The available observational data put significant constraints on emissions from different regions. Within Europe, in particular several Western European countries are well constrained. The inversion results suggest up to 50-90% higher anthropogenic CH4 emissions in 2001 for Germany, France and UK compared to reported UNFCCC values (EEA, 2003. A recent revision of the German inventory, however, resulted in an increase of reported CH4 emissions by 68.5% (EEA, 2004, being now in very good agreement with our top-down estimate. The top-down estimate for Finland is distinctly smaller than the a priori estimate, suggesting much smaller CH4 emissions from Finnish wetlands than derived from the bottom-up inventory. The EU-15 totals are relatively close to UNFCCC values (within 4-30% and appear very robust for different inversion scenarios.

  13. Decadal trends of ocean and land carbon fluxes from a regional joint ocean-atmosphere inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkamp, K.; Gruber, N.

    2015-12-01

    From 1980 until 2010, the combined CO2 sink strengths of ocean and land increased by nearly 50% (-0.55 Pg C yr-1 decade-1), but the spatial distribution of this trend is not well known. We address this by performing a joint cyclostationary ocean-atmosphere inversion for the three decades 1980-1989, 1990-1999, and 2000-2008, using only carbon data from the ocean and atmosphere as constraints, i.e., without applying any prior information about the land fluxes. We find that in the inversion, most of the 30 year sink trend stems from the ocean (-0.44 Pg C yr-1 decade-1). The contribution of the terrestrial biosphere is commensurably smaller but has more decadal variability. First, the land sink strength intensified in the 1990s by 0.4 (±0.3) Pg C yr-1 compared to the 1980s but then weakened slightly by 0.2 (±0.4) Pg C yr-1 in the 2000s. The different land regions contributed very variedly to these global trends. While the northern extratropical land acted as an increasing carbon sink throughout the examined period primarily driven by boreal regions, the tropical land is estimated to have acted as an increasing source of CO2, with source magnitude and trend dominated by enhanced release in tropical America during the Amazon mean wet season. This pattern is largely unchanged if the oceanic inversion constraint, which is based on a stationary ocean circulation, is replaced by an estimate based on simulation results from an ocean biogeochemical general circulation model that includes year-to-year variability in the air-sea CO2 fluxes and also has a trend (-0.07 Pg C yr-1 decade-1) that is at the very low end of current estimates. However, the land/ocean partitioning of the trend contribution is adjusted accordingly. Oceanic carbon data has a major impact on carbon exchange for all tropical regions and southern Africa but also for observationally better constrained regions in North America and temperate Asia. The European trend exhibits a strong sensitivity to the choice

  14. Estimating Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) emissions in China using atmospheric observations and inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Thompson, R.; Saito, T.; Yokouchi, Y.; Li, S.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Park, S.; Graziosi, F.; Stohl, A.

    2013-12-01

    With a global warming potential of around 22800 over a 100-year time horizon, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is one of the greenhouse gases regulated under the Kyoto Protocol. Global SF6 emissions have been increasing since circa the year 2000. The reason for this increase has been inferred to be due to rapidly increasing emissions in developing countries that are not obligated to report their annual emissions to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, notably China. In this study, SF6 emissions during the period 2006-2012 for China and other East Asian countries were determined using in-situ atmospheric measurements and inverse modeling. We performed various inversion sensitivity tests, which show the largest uncertainties in the a posteriori Chinese emissions are associated with the a priori emissions used and their uncertainty, the station network, as well as the meteorological input data. The overall relative uncertainty of the a posteriori emissions in China is estimated to be 17% in 2008. Based on sensitivity tests, we employed the optimal parameters in our inversion setup and performed yearly inversions for the study period. Inversion results show that the total a posteriori SF6 emissions from China increased from 1420 × 245 Mg/yr in 2006 to 2741 × 472 Mg/yr in 2009 and stabilized thereafter. The rapid increase in emissions reflected a fast increase in SF6 consumption in China, a result also found in bottom-up estimates. The a posteriori emission map shows high emissions concentrated in populated parts of China. During the period 2006-2012, emissions in northwestern and northern China peaked around the year 2009, while emissions in eastern, central and northeastern China grew gradually during almost the whole period. Fluctuating emissions are observed for southwestern China. These regional differences should be caused by changes of provincial SF6 usage and by shifts of usage among different sectors. Fig. 1. Footprint emission sensitivity

  15. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multiresolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ray

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a sparse reconstruction scheme that can also be used to ensure non-negativity when fitting wavelet-based random field models to limited observations in non-rectangular geometries. The method is relevant when multiresolution fields are estimated using linear inverse problems. Examples include the estimation of emission fields for many anthropogenic pollutants using atmospheric inversion or hydraulic conductivity in aquifers from flow measurements. The scheme is based on three new developments. Firstly, we extend an existing sparse reconstruction method, Stagewise Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (StOMP, to incorporate prior information on the target field. Secondly, we develop an iterative method that uses StOMP to impose non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, we devise a method, based on compressive sensing, to limit the estimated field within an irregularly shaped domain. We demonstrate the method on the estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 (ffCO2 emissions in the lower 48 states of the US. The application uses a recently developed multiresolution random field model and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also reduces the overall computational cost by a factor of two. Further, the sparse reconstruction scheme imposes non-negativity without introducing strong nonlinearities, such as those introduced by employing log-transformed fields, and thus reaps the benefits of simplicity and computational speed that are characteristic of linear inverse problems.

  16. A new estimation of the recent tropospheric molecular hydrogen budget using atmospheric observations and variational inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Yver

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the recent tropospheric molecular hydrogen (H2 budget with a particular focus on soil uptake and surface emissions. A variational inversion scheme is combined with observations from the RAMCES and EUROHYDROS atmospheric networks, which include continuous measurements performed between mid-2006 and mid-2009. Net H2 surface flux, soil uptake distinct from surface emissions and finally, soil uptake, biomass burning, anthropogenic emissions and N2 fixation-related emissions separately were inverted in several scenarios. The various inversions generate an estimate for each term of the H2 budget. The net H2 flux per region (High Northern Hemisphere, Tropics and High Southern Hemisphere varies between −8 and 8 Tg yr−1. The best inversion in terms of fit to the observations combines updated prior surface emissions and a soil deposition velocity map that is based on soil uptake measurements. Our estimate of global H2 soil uptake is −59 ± 4.0 Tg yr−1. Forty per cent of this uptake is located in the High Northern Hemisphere and 55% is located in the Tropics. In terms of surface emissions, seasonality is mainly driven by biomass burning emissions. The inferred European anthropogenic emissions are consistent with independent H2 emissions estimated using a H2/CO mass ratio of 0.034 and CO emissions considering their respective uncertainties. To constrain a more robust partition of H2 sources and sinks would need additional constraints, such as isotopic measurements.

  17. A new estimation of the recent tropospheric molecular hydrogen budget using atmospheric observations and variational inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Yver

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the recent tropospheric molecular hydrogen (H2 budget with a particular focus on soil uptake and European surface emissions. A variational inversion scheme is combined with observations from the RAMCES and EUROHYDROS atmospheric networks, which include continuous measurements performed between mid-2006 and mid-2009. Net H2 surface flux, then deposition velocity and surface emissions and finally, deposition velocity, biomass burning, anthropogenic and N2 fixation-related emissions were simultaneously inverted in several scenarios. These scenarios have focused on the sensibility of the soil uptake value to different spatio-temporal distributions. The range of variations of these diverse inversion sets generate an estimate of the uncertainty for each term of the H2 budget. The net H2 flux per region (High Northern Hemisphere, Tropics and High Southern Hemisphere varies between −8 and +8 Tg yr−1. The best inversion in terms of fit to the observations combines updated prior surface emissions and a soil deposition velocity map that is based on bottom-up and top-down estimations. Our estimate of global H2 soil uptake is −59±9 Tg yr−1. Forty per cent of this uptake is located in the High Northern Hemisphere and 55% is located in the Tropics. In terms of surface emissions, seasonality is mainly driven by biomass burning emissions. The inferred European anthropogenic emissions are consistent with independent H2 emissions estimated using a H2/CO mass ratio of 0.034 and CO emissions within the range of their respective uncertainties. Additional constraints, such as isotopic measurements would be needed to infer a more robust partition of H2 sources and sinks.

  18. Time-dependent stochastic inversion in acoustic tomography of the atmosphere with reciprocal sound transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-dependent stochastic inversion (TDSI) was recently developed for acoustic travel-time tomography of the atmosphere. This type of tomography allows reconstruction of temperature and wind-velocity fields given the location of sound sources and receivers and the travel times between all source–receiver pairs. The quality of reconstruction provided by TDSI depends on the geometry of the transducer array. However, TDSI has not been studied for the geometry with reciprocal sound transmission. This paper is focused on three aspects of TDSI. First, the use of TDSI in reciprocal sound transmission arrays is studied in numerical and physical experiments. Second, efficiency of time-dependent and ordinary stochastic inversion (SI) algorithms is studied in numerical experiments. Third, a new model of noise in the input data for TDSI is developed that accounts for systematic errors in transducer positions. It is shown that (i) a separation of the travel times into temperature and wind-velocity components in tomography with reciprocal transmission does not improve the reconstruction, (ii) TDSI yields a better reconstruction than SI and (iii) the developed model of noise yields an accurate reconstruction of turbulent fields and estimation of errors in the reconstruction

  19. Mathematics of Radiation Propagation in Planetary Atmospheres: Absorption, Refraction, Time Delay, Occultation, and Abel Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, D. L.

    Forward integration calculation of air mass, refraction, and time delay requires care even for very smooth model atmospheres. The literature abounds in examples of injudicious approximations, assumptions, transformations, variable substitutions, and failures to verify that the formulas work with unlimited accuracy for simple cases and also survive challenges from mathematically pathological but physically realizable cases. A few years ago we addressed the problem of evaluation of the Chapman function for attenuation along a straight line path in an exponential atmosphere. In this presentation we will describe issues and approaches for integration over light paths curved by refraction. The inverse problem, determining the altitude profile of mass density (index of refraction) or the concentration of an individual chemical species (absorption), from occultation data, also has its mathematically interesting (i.e., difficult) aspects. Now we automatically have noise and thus statistical analysis is just as important as calculus and numerical analysis. Here we will describe a new approach of least-squares fitting occultation data to an expansion over compact basis functions. This approach, which avoids numerical differentiation and singular integrals, was originally developed to analyze laboratory imaging data.Forward integration calculation of air mass, refraction, and time delay requires care even for very smooth model atmospheres. The literature abounds in examples of injudicious approximations, assumptions, transformations, variable substitutions, and failures to verify that the formulas work with unlimited accuracy for simple cases and also survive challenges from mathematically pathological but physically realizable cases. A few years ago we addressed the problem of evaluation of the Chapman function for attenuation along a straight line path in an exponential atmosphere. In this presentation we will describe issues and approaches for integration over light paths

  20. Regional atmospheric CO2 inversion reveals seasonal and geographic differences in Amazon net biome exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, Caroline B; Miller, John B; Gatti, Luciana V; Gloor, Manuel M; Guan, Kaiyu; Michalak, Anna M; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T; Touma, Danielle; Andrews, Arlyn; Basso, Luana S; Correia, Caio S C; Domingues, Lucas G; Joiner, Joanna; Krol, Maarten C; Lyapustin, Alexei I; Peters, Wouter; Shiga, Yoichi P; Thoning, Kirk; van der Velde, Ivar R; van Leeuwen, Thijs T; Yadav, Vineet; Diffenbaugh, Noah S

    2016-10-01

    Understanding tropical rainforest carbon exchange and its response to heat and drought is critical for quantifying the effects of climate change on tropical ecosystems, including global climate-carbon feedbacks. Of particular importance for the global carbon budget is net biome exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere (NBE), which represents nonfire carbon fluxes into and out of biomass and soils. Subannual and sub-Basin Amazon NBE estimates have relied heavily on process-based biosphere models, despite lack of model agreement with plot-scale observations. We present a new analysis of airborne measurements that reveals monthly, regional-scale (~1-8 × 10(6)  km(2) ) NBE variations. We develop a regional atmospheric CO2 inversion that provides the first analysis of geographic and temporal variability in Amazon biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange and that is minimally influenced by biosphere model-based first guesses of seasonal and annual mean fluxes. We find little evidence for a clear seasonal cycle in Amazon NBE but do find NBE sensitivity to aberrations from long-term mean climate. In particular, we observe increased NBE (more carbon emitted to the atmosphere) associated with heat and drought in 2010, and correlations between wet season NBE and precipitation (negative correlation) and temperature (positive correlation). In the eastern Amazon, pulses of increased NBE persisted through 2011, suggesting legacy effects of 2010 heat and drought. We also identify regional differences in postdrought NBE that appear related to long-term water availability. We examine satellite proxies and find evidence for higher gross primary productivity (GPP) during a pulse of increased carbon uptake in 2011, and lower GPP during a period of increased NBE in the 2010 dry season drought, but links between GPP and NBE changes are not conclusive. These results provide novel evidence of NBE sensitivity to short-term temperature and moisture extremes in the Amazon, where monthly and sub

  1. Seeing the Forest Through the Trees: Investigating Signal to Noise Problems in Regional Atmospheric Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, A. E.; Denning, A. S.; Corbin, K. D.; Uliasz, M.; Zupanski, D.; Parazoo, N. C.

    2007-12-01

    Estimation of regional carbon fluxes from sparse atmospheric data by transport inversion is complicated by high- frequency variations in surface fluxes in both space and time. We assume that a forward coupled model of the vegetated land surface and atmosphere adequately captures most of the high-frequency variations (SiB-RAMS) as a `preprocessor` of input data from remote sensing and large-scale weather. We then use continuous CO2 observations and backward-in-time Lagrangian particle modeling to estimate persistent multiplicative biases in photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration, constraining the temporal pattern of these fluxes with the forward model. With a sparse network of continuous observing sites in North America, the inverse problem is still badly underconstrained for flux biases on the model grid scale. Previous studies have reduced the dimensionality of this problem by using large `regions` such as biomes or ecoregions, or by seeking a smooth solution in space. This could introduce substantial bias in the solution because the actual flux biases are likely to be quite heterogeneous. We have evaluated the degree to which carbon flux over large regions (500 to 1500 km) can be recovered when the true spatial pattern is not smooth. We performed ensembles of inversions for a 4-month case study in May- August, 2004 over North America with synthetic mid-day CO2 observations from a network of 8 towers. A smooth regional field of model biases was superposed with ensembles of various degrees of grid-scale `noise,` and these were then used to create synthetic concentration data. The pseudodata were then inverted to estimate gridded values of the biases, which were then combined with time-varying model fluxes to create regional maps of sources and sinks. We found that the degree to which corrections in regional fluxes are possible will depend on the relative amount of variance in the regional vs grid scales, but that the system is quite successful in estimating

  2. A new method for the inversion of atmospheric parameters of A/Am stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebran, M.; Farah, W.; Paletou, F.; Monier, R.; Watson, V.

    2016-05-01

    Context. We present an automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g, metallicity [Fe/H], and equatorial projected rotational velocity vsini for "normal" A and Am stars. The procedure is based on the principal component analysis (PCA) inversion method, which we published in a recent paper . Aims: A sample of 322 high-resolution spectra of F0-B9 stars, retrieved from the Polarbase, SOPHIE, and ELODIE databases, were used to test this technique with real data. We selected the spectral region from 4400-5000 Å as it contains many metallic lines and the Balmer Hβ line. Methods: Using three data sets at resolving powers of R = 42 000, 65 000 and 76 000, about ~6.6 × 106 synthetic spectra were calculated to build a large learning database. The online power iteration algorithm was applied to these learning data sets to estimate the principal components (PC). The projection of spectra onto the few PCs offered an efficient comparison metric in a low-dimensional space. The spectra of the well-known A0- and A1-type stars, Vega and Sirius A, were used as control spectra in the three databases. Spectra of other well-known A-type stars were also employed to characterize the accuracy of the inversion technique. Results: We inverted all of the observational spectra and derived the atmospheric parameters. After removal of a few outliers, the PCA-inversion method appeared to be very efficient in determining Teff, [Fe/H], and vsini for A/Am stars. The derived parameters agree very well with previous determinations. Using a statistical approach, deviations of around 150 K, 0.35 dex, 0.15 dex, and 2 km s-1 were found for Teff, log g, [Fe/H], and vsini with respect to literature values for A-type stars. Conclusions: The PCA inversion proves to be a very fast, practical, and reliable tool for estimating stellar parameters of FGK and A stars and for deriving effective temperatures of M stars. Based on data retrieved from the

  3. An Inverse Method to Infer the Global Ocean Paleoventilation from the Atmospheric 14C Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, O.; Hughen, K. A.; Muscheler, R.

    2001-12-01

    We present an inverse method to infer a record of global ocean ventilation (GOV) from records of atmospheric 14C activity (Δ 14C) and production. The method is based on the assimilation of activity and production data in a box model of the 14C cycle in the ocean-atmosphere-land biosphere system using the variational (adjoint) technique. It includes three components: (1) the model code that yields the value of the cost function (a measure of the misfit between observed and modelled Δ 14C); (2) the adjoint code that yields the partial derivatives of the cost function with respect to the parameters describing the temporal evolution of the GOV; and (3) an optimization procedure that yields the parameter values minimizing the cost function. Lagrange multipliers are introduced to simplify the calculation of the partial derivatives of the cost function and to construct the adjoint code directly from the model code. First we describe the method, outlining the formal similarities with the calculus of variation in analytical mechanics. Second we verify the method through the capability to recover a variety of GOV evolutions from the assimilation of artificial data ("twin experiments"). Third we apply the method to the Younger Dryas, using recent high-resolution records of Δ 14C from the Cariaco basin and of 10Be flux from Greenland ice cores. Our results give new insight into the role of the deep ocean circulation during this dramatic and rapid climate change in the circum North Atlantic area.

  4. Characteristics of water-vapour inversions observed over the Arctic by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS and radiosondes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Devasthale

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An accurate characterization of the vertical structure of the Arctic atmosphere is useful in climate change and attribution studies as well as for the climate modelling community to improve projections of future climate over this highly sensitive region. Here, we investigate one of the dominant features of the vertical structure of the Arctic atmosphere, i.e. water-vapour inversions, using eight years of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder data (2002–2010 and radiosounding profiles released from the two Arctic locations (North Slope of Alaska at Barrow and during SHEBA. We quantify the characteristics of clear-sky water vapour inversions in terms of their frequency of occurrence, strength and height covering the entire Arctic for the first time.

    We found that the frequency of occurrence of water-vapour inversions is highest during winter and lowest during summer. The inversion strength is, however, higher during summer. The observed peaks in the median inversion-layer heights are higher during the winter half of the year, at around 850 hPa over most of the Arctic Ocean, Siberia and the Canadian Archipelago, while being around 925 hPa during most of the summer half of the year over the Arctic Ocean. The radiosounding profiles agree with the frequency, location and strength of water-vapour inversions in the Pacific sector of the Arctic. In addition, the radiosoundings indicate that multiple inversions are the norm with relatively few cases without inversions. The amount of precipitable water within the water-vapour inversion structures is estimated and we find a distinct, two-mode contribution to the total column precipitable water. These results suggest that water-vapour inversions are a significant source to the column thermodynamics, especially during the colder winter and spring seasons. We argue that these inversions are a robust metric to test the reproducibility of thermodynamics within climate models. An accurate statistical

  5. Reducing Uncertainty in Life Cycle CH4 Emissions from Natural Gas using Atmospheric Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwietzke, S.; Griffin, W.; Matthews, S.

    2012-12-01

    Methane emissions associated with the production and use of natural gas (NG) are highly uncertain because of challenges to accurately measure fugitive CH4 emissions from NG leaks and venting throughout a large and complex industry. Better understanding the CH4 emissions from the NG life cycle is important for two reasons. First, the rising interest in NG use associated with the recent development of unconventional sources, such as shale gas, may cause a shift in the future energy system from coal towards more NG. Given its relatively high greenhouse gas potency, fugitive CH4 emissions from the NG life cycle have the potential to outweigh lower CO2 emissions compared to coal use in terms of their climate impacts over the next few decades. Second, worldwide NG related CH4 emissions play a key role in understanding the global CH4 budget. According to current atmospheric inversion studies, NG and oil production account for about 12% of global CH4 emissions. However, these results largely depend on prior emissions estimates whose uncertainties are poorly documented. The objective of this research is to analyze which ranges of global fugitive CH4 emissions from the NG life cycle are reasonable given atmospheric observations as a constraint. We establish a prior global CH4 inventory for NG, oil, and coal using emissions data from the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature. This inventory includes uncertainty estimates for different fuels, world regions, and time periods based on LCA literature, which existing inventories do not account for. Furthermore, global CH4 inversion modeling will be used to test bottom-up hypotheses of high NG leakage and venting associated with the upper bound of the prior inventory. Given the use of detailed LCA emissions factors, we will test bottom-up scenarios regarding management and technology improvements over time. The emissions inventory will be established for the past decade, and inversion modeling will be carried out using NOAA

  6. Inverse modelling of European CH4 and N2O emissions 2006-2012 using different inverse models and improved atmospheric observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, Peter; Karstens, Ute; Koffi, Ernest; Saunois, Marielle; Arnold, Timothy; Manning, Alistair; Tsuruta, Aki; Berchet, Antoine; Vermeulen, Alex; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Hammer, Samuel; Levin, Ingeborg; Schmidt, Martina

    2016-04-01

    We present top-down estimates of European CH4 and N2O emissions for 2006-2012, based on the new quality controlled and harmonized data set from 18 European atmospheric monitoring stations generated within the European FP7 project InGOS ("Integrated non-CO2 Greenhouse gas Observing System"). We applied an ensemble of 7 different inverse models for CH4 (and 4 for N2O), and performed four different inversion experiments, investigating the impact of different sets of stations and the use of 'a priori' information on emissions. The inverse models infer total CH4 emissions of 28.4 ± 6.4 (2σ) Tg CH4 yr‑1 for the EU-28 for 2006-2012 from the 4 inversion experiments. For comparison, total anthropogenic CH4 emissions reported to UNFCCC ('bottom-up', based on statistical data and emissions factors) amount to only 19.0 - 20.9 Tg CH4 yr‑1 for the same period. A potential explanation for the discrepancy between the 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' estimates could be the contribution of natural sources, such as peatlands, wetlands, and wet soils, which might have been underestimated in previous analyses. The hypothesis of significant natural emissions is supported by the finding that the inversions yield significant seasonal cycles of derived CH4 emissions with maximum in summer, while anthropogenic CH4 emissions are assumed to have much lower seasonal variability. Furthermore we investigate potential biases of the flux inversions by comparing model simulations with regular aircraft profiles at 4 European sites and the 'Infrastructure for Measurement of the European Carbon Cycle (IMECC)' aircraft campaign. For N2O, for which uncertainties of bottom-up inventories are very large - typically on the order of 100% for the total N2O emissions per country (mainly due to N2O emissions from agricultural soils) - our results demonstrate that atmospheric measurements and inverse modelling can significantly reduce the uncertainties. Despite the large uncertainties in the bottom

  7. Urban scale atmospheric inversion of CO2 emissions using a high-density surface tower network over Indianapolis area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvaux, T.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Davis, K. J.; Deng, A.; Hardesty, R. M.; Shepson, P. B.; Cambaliza, M. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Hillyard, P. W.; Gurney, K. R.; Karion, A.; Mcgowan, L. E.; Possolo, A.; Razlivanov, I. N.; Sarmiento, D.; Sweeney, C.; Turnbull, J. C.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Greenhouse Gas emissions from urban areas represent a significant fraction of the overall release of fossil fuel CO2 from the surface of the globe into the atmosphere. Several ongoing efforts attempt to quantify these emissions over a few major cities across the world (i.e. Indianapolis, Los Angeles, Paris, London, Salt Lake City,...) and demonstrate the concept of atmospheric monitoring of city emissions. The accuracy of the method will highly depend on the inverse modeling framework. The atmospheric transport model and the probabilities assumed in the a priori will be used to extract the information content of surface emissions at very fine scales. But incorrect assumptions in the background emissions and concentrations or systematic errors in the local dynamics can generate artificial trends and seasonal variability in the local emissions. The construction of unbiased atmospheric modeling systems and well-defined prior errors remains a critical step in atmospheric emissions monitoring over urban areas. We present here the first inverse emission estimates over Indianapolis using a high-density surface tower network of CO2 analyzers. In order to minimize transport model errors, we developed a WRF-Chem-FDDA modeling system ingesting surface and profile measurements of horizontal mean wind, temperature and moisture in addition to the original CO2 emissions and boundary conditions. The systematic improvement of the simulated atmospheric conditions thanks to the nudging system is critical to identify and retrieve source locations at high resolution over the area. We then present an ensemble of inverse fluxes generated from varying the configuration of the inverse system in order to more accurately represent the probability space, exploring the assumptions in the a priori (i.e. the prior local urban emissions and the background atmospheric concentrations). We finally discuss the detection of trends or changes in the spatial distribution of sources at decadal time

  8. Joint Inversion of Atmospheric Refractivity Profile Based on Ground-Based GPS Phase Delay and Propagation Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qixiang Liao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a new estimation of the atmospheric refractivity profile combining the scattering signal (electromagnetic wave propagation loss and the direct signal (phase delay. The refractivity profile is modeled using four parameters, i.e., the gradient of the refractivity profile (c1, c2 and the vertical altitude (h1, h2. We apply the NSGA-II (Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II, a multiobjective optimization algorithm, to achieve the goals of joint optimization inversion in the inverting process, and compare this method with traditional individual inversion methods. The anti-noise ability of joint inversion is investigated under the noiseless condition and adding noise condition, respectively. The numerical experiments demonstrate that joint inversion is superior to individual inversion. The adding noise test further suggests that this method can estimate synthesized parameters more efficiently and accurately in different conditions. Finally, a set of measured data is tested in the new way and the consequence of inversion shows the joint optimization inversion algorithm has feasibility, effectiveness and superiority in the retrieval of the refractivity profile.

  9. On the ability of a global atmospheric inversion to constrain variations of CO2 fluxes over Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Molina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The exchanges of carbon, water, and energy between the atmosphere and the Amazon Basin have global implications for current and future climate. Here, the global atmospheric inversion system of the Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate service (MACC was used to further study the seasonal and interannual variations of biogenic CO2 fluxes in Amazonia. The system assimilated surface measurements of atmospheric CO2 mole fractions made over more than 100 sites over the globe into an atmospheric transport model. This study added four surface stations located in tropical South America, a region poorly covered by CO2 observations. The estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE optimized by the inversion were compared to independent estimates of NEE upscaled from eddy-covariance flux measurements in Amazonia, and against reports on the seasonal and interannual variations of the land sink in South America from the scientific literature. We focused on the impact of the interannual variation of the strong droughts in 2005 and 2010 (due to severe and longer-than-usual dry seasons, and of the extreme rainfall conditions registered in 2009. The spatial variations of the seasonal and interannual variability of optimized NEE were also investigated. While the inversion supported the assumption of strong spatial heterogeneity of these variations, the results revealed critical limitations that prevent global inversion frameworks from capturing the data-driven seasonal patterns of fluxes across Amazonia. In particular, it highlighted issues due to the configuration of the observation network in South America and the lack of continuity of the measurements. However, some robust patterns from the inversion seemed consistent with the abnormal moisture conditions in 2009.

  10. Nested atmospheric inversion for the terrestrial carbon sources and sinks in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, F.; Wang, H. W.; Chen, J. M.; Zhou, L. X.; Ju, W. M.; Ding, A. J.; Liu, L. X.; Peters, W.

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we establish a nested atmospheric inversion system with a focus on China using the Bayesian method. The global surface is separated into 43 regions based on the 22 TransCom large regions, with 13 small regions in China. Monthly CO2 concentrations from 130 GlobalView sites and 3 additional China sites are used in this system. The core component of this system is an atmospheric transport matrix, which is created using the TM5 model with a horizontal resolution of 3° × 2°. The net carbon fluxes over the 43 global land and ocean regions are inverted for the period from 2002 to 2008. The inverted global terrestrial carbon sinks mainly occur in boreal Asia, South and Southeast Asia, eastern America and southern South America. Most China areas appear to be carbon sinks, with strongest carbon sinks located in Northeast China. From 2002 to 2008, the global terrestrial carbon sink has an increasing trend, with the lowest carbon sink in 2002. The inter-annual variation (IAV) of the land sinks shows remarkable correlation with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The terrestrial carbon sinks in China also show an increasing trend. However, the IAV in China is not the same as that of the globe. There is relatively stronger land sink in 2002, lowest sink in 2006, and strongest sink in 2007 in China. This IAV could be reasonably explained with the IAVs of temperature and precipitation in China. The mean global and China terrestrial carbon sinks over the period 2002-2008 are -3.20 ± 0.63 and -0.28 ± 0.18 PgC yr-1, respectively. Considering the carbon emissions in the form of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and from the import of wood and food, we further estimate that China's land sink is about -0.31 PgC yr-1.

  11. Simulation of atmospheric temperature inversions over greater cairo using the MM5 Meso-Scale atmospheric model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air pollution episodes have been recorded in Cairo, during the fall season, since 1999, as a result of specific meteorological conditions combined with large quantity of pollutants created by several ground-based sources. The main reason for the smog-like episodes (black clouds) is adverse weather conditions with low and variable winds, high humidity and strong temperature inversions in the few-hundred meters above the ground. The two important types of temperature inversion affecting the air pollution are surface or ground (radiation) inversion and subsidence (elevated) inversion. The surface temperature inversion is associated with a rapid decrease in the ground surface temperature with the simultaneous existence of warm air in the lower troposphere. The inversion develops at dusk and continues until the surface warms again the following day. Pollutants emitted during the night are caught under this inversion lid.Subsidence inversion forms when warm air masses move over colder air masses. The inversion develops with a stagnating high-pressure system (generally associated with fair weather). Under these conditions, the pressure gradient becomes progressively weaker so that winds become light. These light winds greatly reduce the horizontal transport and dispersion of pollutants. At the same time, the subsidence inversion acts as a barrier to the vertical dispersion of the pollutants. In this study, the Penn State/NCAR meso -scale model (MM5) is used to simulate the temperature inversion phenomenon over Greater Cairo region during the fall season of 2004. Accurate computations of the heat transfer at the surface are needed to capture this phenomenon. This can only be achieved by high-resolution simulations in both horizontal and vertical directions. Hence, for accurate simulation of the temperature inversion over Greater Cairo, four nested domains of resolutions of 27 km, 9 km, 3 km and 1 km, respectively, were used in the horizontal planes. Furthermore, 42 levels

  12. Chemical stratification in the atmosphere of Ap star HD 133792. Regularized solution of the vertical inversion problem

    CERN Document Server

    Kochukhov, O; Ryabchikova, T A; Makaganyk, V; Bagnulo, S

    2006-01-01

    High spectral resolution studies of cool Ap stars reveal conspicuous anomalies of the shape and strength of many absorption lines. This is a signature of large atmospheric chemical gradients produced by the selective radiative levitation and gravitational settling of chemical species. Here we present a new approach to mapping the vertical chemical structures in stellar atmospheres. We have developed a regularized chemical inversion procedure that uses all information available in high-resolution stellar spectra. The new technique for the first time allowed us to recover chemical profiles without making a priori assumptions about the shape of chemical distributions. We have derived average abundances and applied the vertical inversion procedure to the high-resolution VLT UVES spectra of the weakly magnetic, cool Ap star HD 133792. Our analysis yielded improved estimates of the atmospheric parameters of HD 133792. We show that this star has negligible vsini and the mean magnetic field modulus =1.1+/-0.1 kG. We ...

  13. Chemical Abundances from Inversions of Stellar Spectra Analysis of Solar-Type Stars with Homogeneous and Static Model Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Allende-Prieto, C; Asplund, M; Cobo, B R; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Barklem, Paul S.; Asplund, Martin; Cobo, Basilio Ruiz

    2001-01-01

    Spectra of late-type stars are usually analyzed with static model atmospheres in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and a homogeneous plane-parallel or spherically symmetric geometry. The energy balance requires particular attention, as two elements which are particularly difficult to model play an important role: line blanketing and convection. Inversion techniques are able to bypass the difficulties of a detailed description of the energy balance. Assuming that the atmosphere is in hydrostatic equilibrium and LTE, it is possible to constrain its structure from spectroscopic observations. Among the most serious approximations still implicit in the method is a static and homogeneous geometry. In this paper, we take advantage of a realistic three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamical simulation of the solar surface to check the systematic errors incurred by an inversion assuming a plane-parallel horizontally-homogeneous atmosphere. The thermal structure recovered resembles the spatial and time average of the...

  14. Assessment of Tikhonov-type regularization methods for solving atmospheric inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Schreier, Franz; Doicu, Adrian; Trautmann, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Inverse problems occurring in atmospheric science aim to estimate state parameters (e.g. temperature or constituent concentration) from observations. To cope with nonlinear ill-posed problems, both direct and iterative Tikhonov-type regularization methods can be used. The major challenge in the framework of direct Tikhonov regularization (TR) concerns the choice of the regularization parameter λ, while iterative regularization methods require an appropriate stopping rule and a flexible λ-sequence. In the framework of TR, a suitable value of the regularization parameter can be generally determined based on a priori, a posteriori, and error-free selection rules. In this study, five practical regularization parameter selection methods, i.e. the expected error estimation (EEE), the discrepancy principle (DP), the generalized cross-validation (GCV), the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), and the L-curve (LC), have been assessed. As a representative of iterative methods, the iteratively regularized Gauss-Newton (IRGN) algorithm has been compared with TR. This algorithm uses a monotonically decreasing λ-sequence and DP as an a posteriori stopping criterion. Practical implementations pertaining to retrievals of vertically distributed temperature and trace gas profiles from synthetic microwave emission measurements and from real far infrared data, respectively, have been conducted. Our numerical analysis demonstrates that none of the parameter selection methods dedicated to TR appear to be perfect and each has its own advantages and disadvantages. Alternatively, IRGN is capable of producing plausible retrieval results, allowing a more efficient manner for estimating λ.

  15. An Assessment of Biases in Satellite CO2 Measurements Using Atmospheric Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. F.; O'Dell, C.

    2014-12-01

    Column-integrated CO2 mixing ratio measurements from satellite should provide a new view of the global carbon cycle, thanks to their ability to measure with great coverage in places that are poorly sampled by the in situ network (e.g. the tropics) using a new approach (full-column averages rather than point measurements). For this new insight to be useful, however, systematic errors in these data must first be identified and removed. Here we use atmospheric transport modeling to perform a global comparison of satellite CO2 measurements to higher-quality reference data (in situ data from flasks and aircraft, column CO2 data from the upward-looking spectrometers of the TCCON network) to assess systematic errors in the satellite data. This broad comparison is meant to complement the more direct validation done at specific TCCON sites. A suite of 3-D CO2 mixing ratio histories are generated across 2009-2014 using combinations of several different a priori fossil fuel, land biospheric, and oceanic CO2 fluxes run through the PCTM off-line atmospheric transport model driven by MERRA 1°x1.25° winds and vertical mixing parameters. Each member of the suite is forced to agree with in situ CO2 measurements (flask, tall tower, and routine light aircraft profiles) through use of a variational carbon data assimilation (4Dvar) system. The optimized 3-D CO2 fields are then compared to ACOS column CO2 retrievals of GOSAT data, with the differences being fit to different independent variables (aerosol optical depth, atmospheric path length, surface albedo, etc.) to derive a GOSAT bias correction. ACOS-GOSAT CO2 retrievals, corrected by this scheme, as well as with the "official" ACOS bias correction, will then be assimilated using the same 4Dvar approach. The benefit of the GOSAT data with and without the bias corrections will then be assessed by comparing the optimized CO2 fields to independent data (TCCON column data, as well as aircraft data left out of the in situ inversions

  16. High-resolution atmospheric inversion of urban CO2 emissions during the dormant season of the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvaux, Thomas; Miles, Natasha L.; Deng, Aijun; Richardson, Scott J.; Cambaliza, Maria O.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Gaudet, Brian; Gurney, Kevin R.; Huang, Jianhua; O'Keefe, Darragh; Song, Yang; Karion, Anna; Oda, Tomohiro; Patarasuk, Risa; Razlivanov, Igor; Sarmiento, Daniel; Shepson, Paul; Sweeney, Colm; Turnbull, Jocelyn; Wu, Kai

    2016-05-01

    Based on a uniquely dense network of surface towers measuring continuously the atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs), we developed the first comprehensive monitoring systems of CO2 emissions at high resolution over the city of Indianapolis. The urban inversion evaluated over the 2012-2013 dormant season showed a statistically significant increase of about 20% (from 4.5 to 5.7 MtC ± 0.23 MtC) compared to the Hestia CO2 emission estimate, a state-of-the-art building-level emission product. Spatial structures in prior emission errors, mostly undetermined, appeared to affect the spatial pattern in the inverse solution and the total carbon budget over the entire area by up to 15%, while the inverse solution remains fairly insensitive to the CO2 boundary inflow and to the different prior emissions (i.e., ODIAC). Preceding the surface emission optimization, we improved the atmospheric simulations using a meteorological data assimilation system also informing our Bayesian inversion system through updated observations error variances. Finally, we estimated the uncertainties associated with undetermined parameters using an ensemble of inversions. The total CO2 emissions based on the ensemble mean and quartiles (5.26-5.91 MtC) were statistically different compared to the prior total emissions (4.1 to 4.5 MtC). Considering the relatively small sensitivity to the different parameters, we conclude that atmospheric inversions are potentially able to constrain the carbon budget of the city, assuming sufficient data to measure the inflow of GHG over the city, but additional information on prior emission error structures are required to determine the spatial structures of urban emissions at high resolution.

  17. Quantifying Black Carbon emissions in high northern latitudes using an Atmospheric Bayesian Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Thompson, Rona; Stohl, Andreas; Shevchenko, Vladimir P.

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the main light absorbing aerosol species and it has important impacts on air quality, weather and climate. The major source of BC is incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and the burning of biomass or bio-fuels (soot). Therefore, to understand to what extent BC affects climate change and pollutant dynamics, accurate knowledge of the emissions, distribution and variation of BC is required. Most commonly, BC emission inventory datasets are built by "bottom up" approaches based on activity data and emissions factors, but these methods are considered to have large uncertainty (Cao et al, 2006). In this study, we have used a Bayesian Inversion to estimate spatially resolved BC emissions. Emissions are estimated monthly for 2014 and over the domain from 180°W to 180°E and 50°N to 90°N. Atmospheric transport is modeled using the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model, FLEXPART (Stohl et al., 1998; 2005), and the inversion framework, FLEXINVERT, developed by Thompson and Stohl, (2014). The study domain is of particular interest concerning the identification and estimation of BC sources. In contrast to Europe and North America, where BC sources are comparatively well documented as a result of intense monitoring, only one station recording BC concentrations exists in the whole of Siberia. In addition, emissions from gas flaring by the oil industry have been geographically misplaced in most emission inventories and may be an important source of BC at high latitudes since a significant proportion of the total gas flared occurs at these high latitudes (Stohl et al., 2013). Our results show large differences with the existing BC inventories, whereas the estimated fluxes improve modeled BC concentrations with respect to observations. References Cao, G. et al. Atmos. Environ., 40, 6516-6527, 2006. Stohl, A. et al. Atmos. Environ., 32(24), 4245-4264, 1998. Stohl, A. et al. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 5(9), 2461-2474, 2005. Stohl, A. et al. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13

  18. Inverse problems using ANN in long range atmospheric dispersion with signature analysis picked scattered numerical sensors from CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalar dispersion in the atmosphere is an important area wherein different approaches are followed in development of good analytical model. The analyses based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes offer an opportunity of model development based on first principles of physics and hence such models have an edge over the existing models. Both forward and backward calculation methods are being developed for atmospheric dispersion around NPPs at BARC Forward modeling methods, which describe the atmospheric transport from sources to receptors, use forward-running transport and dispersion models or computational fluid dynamics models which are run many times, and the resulting dispersion field is compared to observations from multiple sensors. Backward or inverse modeling methods use only one model run in the reverse direction from the receptors to estimate the upwind sources. Inverse modeling methods include adjoint and tangent linear models, Kalman filters, and variational data assimilation, and neural network. The present paper is aimed at developing a new approach where the identified specific signatures at receptor points form the basis for source estimation or inversions. This approach is expected to reduce the large transient data sets to reduced and meaningful data sets. In fact this reduces the inherently transient data set into a time independent mean data set. Forward computation were carried out with CFD code for various case to generate a large set of data to train the ANN. Specific signature analysis was carried out to find the parameters of interest for ANN training like peak concentration, time to reach peak concentration and time to fall, the ANN was trained with data and source strength and location were predicted from ANN. Inverse problem was performed using ANN approach in long range atmospheric dispersion. An illustration of application of CFD code for atmospheric dispersion studies for a hypothetical case is also included in the paper. (author)

  19. A high C/O ratio and weak thermal inversion in the atmosphere of exoplanet WASP-12b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Harrington, Joseph; Stevenson, Kevin B; Nymeyer, Sarah; Campo, Christopher J; Wheatley, Peter J; Deming, Drake; Blecic, Jasmina; Hardy, Ryan A; Lust, Nate B; Anderson, David R; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Britt, Christopher B T; Bowman, William C; Hebb, Leslie; Hellier, Coel; Maxted, Pierre F L; Pollacco, Don; West, Richard G

    2011-01-01

    The carbon-to-oxygen ratio (C/O) in a planet provides critical information about its primordial origins and subsequent evolution. A primordial C/O greater than 0.8 causes a carbide-dominated interior, as opposed to the silicate-dominated composition found on Earth; the atmosphere can also differ from those in the Solar System. The solar C/O is 0.54 (ref. 3). Here we report an analysis of dayside multi-wavelength photometry of the transiting hot-Jupiter WASP-12b (ref. 6) that reveals C/O ≥ 1 in its atmosphere. The atmosphere is abundant in CO. It is depleted in water vapour and enhanced in methane, each by more than two orders of magnitude compared to a solar-abundance chemical-equilibrium model at the expected temperatures. We also find that the extremely irradiated atmosphere (T > 2,500 K) of WASP-12b lacks a prominent thermal inversion (or stratosphere) and has very efficient day-night energy circulation. The absence of a strong thermal inversion is in stark contrast to theoretical predictions for the most highly irradiated hot-Jupiter atmospheres.

  20. A multiresolution spatial parametrization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Jaideep; Lee, Jina; Lefantzi, Sophia; Yadav, Vineet [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; Michalak, Anna M. [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; McKenna, Sean Andrew [IBM Research, Mulhuddart, Dublin 15, Ireland

    2013-04-01

    The estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2) from limited ground-based and satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations will form a key component of the monitoring of treaties aimed at the abatement of greenhouse gas emissions. To that end, we construct a multiresolution spatial parametrization for fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (ffCO2), to be used in atmospheric inversions. Such a parametrization does not currently exist. The parametrization uses wavelets to accurately capture the multiscale, nonstationary nature of ffCO2 emissions and employs proxies of human habitation, e.g., images of lights at night and maps of built-up areas to reduce the dimensionality of the multiresolution parametrization. The parametrization is used in a synthetic data inversion to test its suitability for use in atmospheric inverse problem. This linear inverse problem is predicated on observations of ffCO2 concentrations collected at measurement towers. We adapt a convex optimization technique, commonly used in the reconstruction of compressively sensed images, to perform sparse reconstruction of the time-variant ffCO2 emission field. We also borrow concepts from compressive sensing to impose boundary conditions i.e., to limit ffCO2 emissions within an irregularly shaped region (the United States, in our case). We find that the optimization algorithm performs a data-driven sparsification of the spatial parametrization and retains only of those wavelets whose weights could be estimated from the observations. Further, our method for the imposition of boundary conditions leads to a 10computational saving over conventional means of doing so. We conclude with a discussion of the accuracy of the estimated emissions and the suitability of the spatial parametrization for use in inverse problems with a significant degree of regularization.

  1. Atmospheric transport and chemistry of trace gases in LMDz5B: evaluation and implications for inverse modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Locatelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Representation of atmospheric transport is a major source of error in the estimation of greenhouse gas sources and sinks by inverse modelling. Here we assess the impact on trace gas mole fractions of the new physical parameterisations recently implemented in the Atmospheric Global Climate Model LMDz to improve vertical diffusion, mesoscale mixing by thermal plumes in the planetary boundary layer (PBL, and deep convection in the troposphere. At the same time, the horizontal and vertical resolution of the model used in the inverse system has been increased. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the impact of these developments on the representation of trace gas transport and chemistry, and to anticipate the implications for inversions of greenhouse gas emissions using such an updated model. Comparison of a one-dimensional version of LMDz with large eddy simulations shows that the thermal scheme simulates shallow convective tracer transport in the PBL over land very efficiently, and much better than previous versions of the model. This result is confirmed in three dimensional simulations, by a much improved reproduction of the Radon-222 diurnal cycle. However, the enhanced dynamics of tracer concentrations induces a stronger sensitivity of the new LMDz configuration to external meteorological forcings. At larger scales, the inter-hemispheric exchange is slightly slower when using the new version of the model, bringing them closer to observations. The increase in the vertical resolution (from 19 to 39 layers significantly improves the representation of stratosphere/troposphere exchange. Furthermore, changes in atmospheric thermodynamic variables, such as temperature, due to changes in the PBL mixing, significantly modify chemical reaction rates and the equilibrium value of reactive trace gases. One implication of LMDz model developments for future inversions of greenhouse gas emissions is the ability of the updated system to assimilate a larger

  2. Pluto's atmosphere - Models based on refraction, inversion, and vapor-pressure equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshleman, Von R.

    1989-01-01

    Viking spacecraft radio-occultation measurements indicate that, irrespective of substantial differences, the polar ice cap regions on Mars have inversions similar to those of Pluto, and may also share vapor pressure equilibrium characteristics at the surface. This temperature-inversion phenomenon occurs in a near-surface boundary layer; surface pressure-temperature may correspond to the vapor-pressure equilibrium with CH4 ice, or the temperature may be slightly higher to match the value derived from IRAS data.

  3. High C/O Chemistry and Weak Thermal Inversion in the Extremely Irradiated Atmosphere of Exoplanet WASP-12b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Harrington, Joseph; Nymeyer, Sarah; Campo, Christopher J.; Wheatley, Peter J.; Deming, Drake; Blecie, Jasmina; Hardy, Ryan A.; Lust, Nate B.; Anderson, David R.; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Britt, Christopher B. T.; Bowman, William C.; Hebb, Leslie; Hellier, Coel; Maxted, Pierre F. L.; Pollacco, Don; West, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    The carbon-to-oxygen ratio (C/O) in a planet provides critical information about its primordial origins and subsequent evolution. A primordial C/O greater than 0.8 causes a carbide-dominated interior as opposed to the silicate-dominated composition as found on Earth; the solar C/O is 0.54. Theory, shows that high C/O leads to a diversity of carbon-rich planets that can have very different interiors and atmospheres from those in the solar system. Here we report the detection of C/O greater than or equal to 1 in a planetary atmosphere. The transiting hot Jupiter WASP-12b has a dayside atmosphere depleted in water vapour and enhanced in methane by over two orders of magnitude compared to a solar-abundance chemical equilibrium model at the expected temperatures. The observed concentrations of the prominent molecules CO, CH4, and H2O are consistent with theoretical expectations for an atmosphere with the observed C/O = 1. The C/O ratios are not known for giant planets in the solar system, although they are expected to equal the solar value. If high C/O ratios are common, then extrasolar planets are likely very different in interior composition, and formed very differently, from expectations based on solar composition, potentially explaining the large diversity in observed radii. We also find that the extremely irradiated atmosphere (greater than 2500 K) of WASP-12b lacks a prominent thermal inversion, or a stratosphere, and has very efficient day-night energy circulation. The absence of a strong thermal inversion is in stark contrast to theoretical predictions for the most highly irradiated hot-Jupiter atmospheres.

  4. An assessment of the carbon balance of arctic tundra: comparisons among observations, process models, and atmospheric inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, A.D.; Christensen, T.R.; Hayes, D.; Heroult, A.; Euskirchen, E.; Yi, Y.; Kimball, J.S.; Koven, C.; Lafleur, P.; Miller, P.A.; Oechel, W.; Peylin, P.; Williams, M.

    2012-01-01

    Although arctic tundra has been estimated to cover only 8% of the global land surface, the large and potentially labile carbon pools currently stored in tundra soils have the potential for large emissions of carbon (C) under a warming climate. These emissions as radiatively active greenhouse gases in the form of both CO2 and CH4 could amplify global warming. Given the potential sensitivity of these ecosystems to climate change and the expectation that the Arctic will experience appreciable warming over the next century, it is important to assess whether responses of C exchange in tundra regions are likely to enhance or mitigate warming. In this study we compared analyses of C exchange of Arctic tundra between 1990–1999 and 2000–2006 among observations, regional and global applications of process-based terrestrial biosphere models, and atmospheric inversion models. Syntheses of the compilation of flux observations and of inversion model results indicate that the annual exchange of CO2 between arctic tundra and the atmosphere has large uncertainties that cannot be distinguished from neutral balance. The mean estimate from an ensemble of process-based model simulations suggests that arctic tundra acted as a sink for atmospheric CO2 in recent decades, but based on the uncertainty estimates it cannot be determined with confidence whether these ecosystems represent a weak or a strong sink. Tundra was 0.6 °C warmer in the 2000s compared to the 1990s. The central estimates of the observations, process-based models, and inversion models each identify stronger sinks in the 2000s compared with the 1990s. Similarly, the observations and the applications of regional process-based models suggest that CH4 emissions from arctic tundra have increased from the 1990s to 2000s. Based on our analyses of the estimates from observations, process-based models, and inversion models, we estimate that arctic tundra was a sink for atmospheric CO2 of 110 Tg C yr-1 (uncertainty between a

  5. Atmospheric inverse modeling with known physical bounds: an example from trace gas emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Miller

    2014-02-01

    the relative merits of each. This paper investigates the applicability of several approaches to bounded inverse problems. A common method of data transformations is found to unrealistically skew estimates for the examined example application. The method of Lagrange multipliers and two Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC methods yield more realistic and accurate results. In general, the examined MCMC approaches produce the most realistic result but can require substantial computational time. Lagrange multipliers offer an appealing option for large, computationally intensive problems when exact uncertainty bounds are less central to the analysis. A synthetic data inversion of US anthropogenic methane emissions illustrates the strengths and weaknesses of each approach.

  6. Sensitivity of earthquake source inversions to atmospheric noise and corrections of InSAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Chelsea Phipps; Lohman, Rowena Benfer

    2016-05-01

    Tropospheric phase delays pose a major challenge to InSAR (interferometric synthetic aperture radar)-based studies of tectonic deformation. One approach to the mitigation of effects from tropospheric noise is the application of elevation-dependent corrections based on empirical fits between elevation and interferometric phase. We quantify the effects of corrections with a range of complexity on inferred earthquake source parameters using synthetic interferograms with known atmospheric characteristics. We infer statistical properties of the stratified component of the atmosphere using pressure, temperature, and water vapor data from the North America Regional Reanalysis model over our region of interest in the Basin and Range province of the western United States. The statistics of the simulated atmospheric turbulence are estimated from InSAR and Global Positioning System data. We demonstrate potentially significant improvements in the precision of earthquake magnitude, depth, and dip estimates for several synthetic earthquake focal mechanisms following a correction for spatially variable atmospheric characteristics, relative to cases where the correction is based on a uniform delay versus elevation relationship or where no correction is applied. We apply our approach to the 1992 M5.6 Little Skull Mountain, Nevada, earthquake and demonstrate that the earthquake source parameter error bounds decrease in size after applying the atmospheric corrections. Our approach for evaluating the impact of atmospheric noise on inferred fault parameters is easily adaptable to other regions and source mechanisms.

  7. Thermal Diagnostics with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory: A Validated Method for Differential Emission Measure Inversions

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, Mark C M; Schrijver, C J; Testa, P; Chen, F; Peter, H; Malanushenko, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method for performing differential emission measure (DEM) inversions on narrow-band EUV images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The method yields positive definite DEM solutions by solving a linear program. This method has been validated against a diverse set of thermal models of varying complexity and realism. These include (1) idealized gaussian DEM distributions, (2) 3D models of NOAA Active Region 11158 comprising quasi-steady loop atmospheres in a non-linear force-free field, and (3) thermodynamic models from a fully-compressible, 3D MHD simulation of AR corona formation following magnetic flux emergence. We then present results from the application of the method to AIA observations of Active Region 11158, comparing the region's thermal structure on two successive solar rotations. Additionally, we show how the DEM inversion method can be adapted to simultaneously invert AIA and XRT data, and how supplementing AIA data with the latt...

  8. Atmospheric three-dimensional inverse modeling of regional industrial emissions and global oceanic uptake of carbon tetrachloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, X.; Prinn, R. G.; Fraser, P. J.; Weiss, R. F.; Simmonds, P. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Miller, B. R.; Salameh, P. K.; Harth, C. M.; Krummel, P. B.; Golombek, A.; Porter, L. W.; Butler, J. H.; Elkins, J. W.; Dutton, G. S.; Hall, B. D.; Steele, L. P.; Wang, R. H. J.; Cunnold, D. M.

    2010-11-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) has substantial stratospheric ozone depletion potential and its consumption is controlled under the Montreal Protocol and its amendments. We implement a Kalman filter using atmospheric CCl4 measurements and a 3-dimensional chemical transport model to estimate the interannual regional industrial emissions and seasonal global oceanic uptake of CCl4 for the period of 1996-2004. The Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH), driven by offline National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis meteorological fields, is used to simulate CCl4 mole fractions and calculate their sensitivities to regional sources and sinks using a finite difference approach. High frequency observations from the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) and the Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and low frequency flask observations are together used to constrain the source and sink magnitudes, estimated as factors that multiply the a priori fluxes. Although industry data imply that the global industrial emissions were substantially declining with large interannual variations, the optimized results show only small interannual variations and a small decreasing trend. The global surface CCl4 mole fractions were declining in this period because the CCl4 oceanic and stratospheric sinks exceeded the industrial emissions. Compared to the a priori values, the inversion results indicate substantial increases in industrial emissions originating from the South Asian/Indian and Southeast Asian regions, and significant decreases in emissions from the European and North American regions.

  9. Physical inversion of the full IASI spectra: Assessment of atmospheric parameters retrievals, consistency of spectroscopy and forward modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liuzzi, G.; Masiello, G.; Serio, C.; Venafra, S.; Camy-Peyret, C.

    2016-10-01

    Spectra observed by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI) have been used to assess both retrievals and the spectral quality and consistency of current forward models and spectroscopic databases for atmospheric gas line and continuum absorption. The analysis has been performed with thousands of observed spectra over sea surface in the Pacific Ocean close to the Mauna Loa (Hawaii) validation station. A simultaneous retrieval for surface temperature, atmospheric temperature, H2O, HDO, O3 profiles and gas average column abundance of CO2, CO, CH4, SO2, N2O, HNO3, NH3, OCS and CF4 has been performed and compared to in situ observations. The retrieval system considers the full IASI spectrum (all 8461 spectral channels on the range 645-2760 cm-1). We have found that the average column amount of atmospheric greenhouse gases can be retrieved with a precision better than 1% in most cases. The analysis of spectral residuals shows that, after inversion, they are generally reduced to within the IASI radiometric noise. However, larger residuals still appear for many of the most abundant gases, namely H2O, CH4 and CO2. The H2O ν2 spectral region is in general warmer (higher radiance) than observations. The CO2ν2 and N2O/CO2ν3 spectral regions now show a consistent behavior for channels, which are probing the troposphere. Updates in CH4 spectroscopy do not seem to improve the residuals. The effect of isotopic fractionation of HDO is evident in the 2500-2760 cm-1 region and in the atmospheric window around 1200 cm-1.

  10. Expectation Maximization and the retrieval of the atmospheric extinction coefficients by inversion of Raman lidar data

    CERN Document Server

    Garbarino, Sara; Massone, Anna Maria; Sannino, Alessia; Boselli, Antonella; Wang, Xuan; Spinelli, Nicola; Piana, Michele

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of retrieving the aerosol extinction coefficient from Raman lidar measurements. This is an ill--posed inverse problem that needs regularization, and we propose to use the Expectation--Maximization (EM) algorithm to provide stable solutions. Indeed, EM is an iterative algorithm that imposes a positivity constraint on the solution, and provides regularization if iterations are stopped early enough. We describe the algorithm and propose a stopping criterion inspired by a statistical principle. We then discuss its properties concerning the spatial resolution. Finally, we validate the proposed approach by using both synthetic data and experimental measurements; we compare the reconstructions obtained by EM with those obtained by the Tikhonov method, by the Levenberg-Marquardt method, as well as those obtained by combining data smoothing and numerical derivation.

  11. Expectation maximization and the retrieval of the atmospheric extinction coefficients by inversion of Raman lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, Sara; Sorrentino, Alberto; Massone, Anna Maria; Sannino, Alessia; Boselli, Antonella; Wang, Xuan; Spinelli, Nicola; Piana, Michele

    2016-09-01

    We consider the problem of retrieving the aerosol extinction coefficient from Raman lidar measurements. This is an ill--posed inverse problem that needs regularization, and we propose to use the Expectation--Maximization (EM) algorithm to provide stable solutions. Indeed, EM is an iterative algorithm that imposes a positivity constraint on the solution, and provides regularization if iterations are stopped early enough. We describe the algorithm and propose a stopping criterion inspired by a statistical principle. We then discuss its properties concerning the spatial resolution. Finally, we validate the proposed approach by using both synthetic data and experimental measurements; we compare the reconstructions obtained by EM with those obtained by the Tikhonov method, by the Levenberg-Marquardt method, as well as those obtained by combining data smoothing and numerical derivation.

  12. Retrieval of vertical profiles of atmospheric refraction angles by inversion of optical dilution measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Fussen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we show how the usual change of tangent altitude associated with atmospheric refraction is inseparably connected to a variation of the observed apparent intensity, for extended and pointlike sources. We demonstrate, in the regime of weak refraction angles, that atmospheric optical dilution and image deformation are strictly concomitant. The approach leads to the integration of a simple differential equation related to the observed transmittance in the absence of other absorbing molecules along the optical path. We successfully applied the proposed method to the measurements performed by two past occultation experiments: GOMOS for stellar and ORA for solar occultations. The developed algorithm (named ARID will be applied to the imaging of solar occultations in a forthcoming pico-satellite mission.

  13. Analysis of atmospheric CO2 growth rates at Mauna Loa using CO2 fluxes derived from an inverse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) growth rates are estimated for a period 1959-2004 from atmospheric CO2 measurements at Mauna Loa by the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. Only during a few short periods, 1965-1966, 1972-1973, 1987-1988 and 1997-1998, in the last 45 yr have growth rates of atmospheric CO2 been of a similar magnitude or higher than that due to the total emission from burning of fossil fuels. Using results from a time-dependent inverse (TDI) model, based on observations of atmospheric CO2 at 87 stations, we establish that El Nino-induced climate variations in the tropics and large-scale forest fires in the boreal regions are the main causes of anomalous growth rates of atmospheric CO2. The high growth rate of 2.8 ppm/yr in 2002 can be predicted fairly successfully by using the correlations between (1) the peak-to-trough amplitudes in the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index and tropical flux anomaly, and (2) anomalies in CO2 flux and area burned by fire from the boreal regions. We suggest that the large interannual changes in CO2 growth rates can mostly be explained by natural climate variability. Our analysis also shows that the decadal average growth rate, linked primarily to human activity, has fluctuated around an all-time high value of 1.5 ppm/yr over the past 20 yr. A statistical model analysis is performed to identify the regions which have the maximum influence on the observed growth rate anomaly at Mauna Loa

  14. Atmospheric three-dimensional inverse modeling of regional industrial emissions and global oceanic uptake of carbon tetrachloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xiao

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 has substantial stratospheric ozone depletion potential and its consumption is controlled under the Montreal Protocol and its amendments. We implement a Kalman filter using atmospheric CCl4 measurements and a 3-dimensional chemical transport model to estimate the interannual regional industrial emissions and seasonal global oceanic uptake of CCl4 for the period of 1996–2004. The Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH, driven by offline National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP reanalysis meteorological fields, is used to simulate CCl4 mole fractions and calculate their sensitivities to regional sources and sinks using a finite difference approach. High frequency observations from the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE and the Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA and low frequency flask observations are together used to constrain the source and sink magnitudes, estimated as factors that multiply the a priori fluxes. Although industry data imply that the global industrial emissions were substantially declining with large interannual variations, the optimized results show only small interannual variations and a small decreasing trend. The global surface CCl4 mole fractions were declining in this period because the CCl4 oceanic and stratospheric sinks exceeded the industrial emissions. Compared to the a priori values, the inversion results indicate substantial increases in industrial emissions originating from the South Asian/Indian and Southeast Asian regions, and significant decreases in emissions from the European and North American regions.

  15. Atmospheric inversion of SO2 and primary aerosol emissions for the year 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Huneeus

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural and anthropogenic emissions of primary aerosols and sulphur dioxide (SO2 are estimated for the year 2010 by assimilating daily total and fine mode aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS satellite instrument into a global aerosol model of intermediate complexity. The system adjusts monthly emission fluxes over a set of predefined regions tiling the globe. The resulting aerosol emissions improve the model performance, as measured from usual skill scores, both against the assimilated observations and a set of independent ground-based measurements. The estimated emission fluxes are 67 Tg S yr−1 for SO2, 12 Tg yr−1 for black carbon (BC, 87 Tg yr−1 for particulate organic matter (POM, 17 000 Tg yr−1 for sea salt (SS, estimated at 80 % relative humidity and 1206 Tg yr−1 for desert dust (DD. They represent a difference of +53, +73, +72, +1 and −8%, respectively, with respect to the first guess (FG values. Constant errors throughout the regions and the year were assigned to the a priori emissions. The analysis errors are reduced with respect to the a priori ones for all species and throughout the year, they vary between 3 and 18% for SO2, 1 and 130% for biomass burning, 21 and 90 % for fossil fuel, 1 and 200% for DD and 1 and 5% for SS. The maximum errors on the global-yearly scale for the estimated fluxes (considering temporal error dependence are 3% for SO2, 14% for BC, 11% for POM, 14% for DD and 2% for SS. These values represent a decrease as compared to the global-yearly errors from the FG of 7% for SO2, 40% for BC, 55% for POM, 81% for DD and 300% for SS. The largest error reduction, both monthly and yearly, is observed for SS and the smallest one for SO2. The sensitivity and robustness of the inversion system to the choice of the first guess emission inventory is investigated by using different combinations of inventories for industrial, fossil fuel and biomass burning

  16. A new method for the inversion of atmospheric parameters of A/Am stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gebran, M; Paletou, F; Monier, R; Watson, V

    2016-01-01

    We present an automated procedure that derives simultaneously the effective temperature $T_{eff}$, the surface gravity logg, the metallicity [Fe/H], and the equatorial projected rotational velocity vsini for "normal" A and Am stars. The procedure is based on the principal component analysis inversion method of Paletou et al. (2015a). A sample of 322 high resolution spectra of F0-B9 stars, retrieved from the Polarbase, SOPHIE, and ELODIE databases, were used to test this technique with real data. We have selected the spectral region from 4400-5000\\AA\\ as it contains many metallic lines and the Balmer H$\\beta$ line. Using 3 datasets at resolving powers of R=42000, 65000 and 76000, about 6.6x$10^6$ synthetic spectra were calculated to build a large learning database. The Online Power Iteration algorithm was applied to these learning datasets to estimate the principal components (PC). The projection of spectra onto the few PCs offered an efficient comparison metric in a low dimensional space. The spectra of the w...

  17. Efficiency and Sensitivity Analysis of Observation Networks for Atmospheric Inverse Modelling with Emissions

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xueran; Jacob, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The controllability of advection-diffusion systems, subject to uncertain initial values and emission rates, is estimated, given sparse and error affected observations of prognostic state variables. In predictive geophysical model systems, like atmospheric chemistry simulations, different parameter families influence the temporal evolution of the system.This renders initial-value-only optimisation by traditional data assimilation methods as insufficient. In this paper, a quantitative assessment method on validation of measurement configurations to optimize initial values and emission rates, and how to balance them, is introduced. In this theoretical approach, Kalman filter and smoother and their ensemble based versions are combined with a singular value decomposition, to evaluate the potential improvement associated with specific observational network configurations. Further, with the same singular vector analysis for the efficiency of observations, their sensitivity to model control can be identified by deter...

  18. Atmospheric three-dimensional inverse modeling of regional industrial emissions and global oceanic uptake of carbon tetrachloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xiao

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 has substantial stratospheric ozone depletion potential and its consumption is controlled under the Montreal Protocol and its amendments. We implement a Kalman filter using atmospheric CC14 measurements and a 3-dimensional chemical transport model to estimate the interannual regional industrial emissions and seasonal global oceanic uptake of CCl4 for the period of 1996–2004. The Model of Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry (MATCH, driven by offline National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP reanalysis meteorological fields, is used to simulate CCl4 mole fractions and calculate their sensitivities to regional sources and sinks using a finite difference approach. High frequency observations from the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE and NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL and low frequency flask observations are together used to constrain the source and sink magnitudes, estimated as factors that multiply the a priori fluxes. Although industry data imply that the global industrial emissions were substantially declining with large interannual variations, the optimized results show only small interannual variations and a small decreasing trend. The global surface CCl4 mole fractions were declining in this period because the CCl4 oceanic and stratospheric sinks exceeded the industrial emissions. Compared to the a priori values, the inversion results indicate substantial increases in industrial emissions originating from the South Asian/Indian and Southeast Asian regions, and significant decreases in emissions from the European and North American regions.

  19. An inverse modeling approach for tree-ring-based climate reconstructions under changing atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, É.; Guiot, J.; Hatté, C.; Daux, V.; Danis, P.-A.; Dussouillez, P.

    2013-11-01

    Over the last decades, dendroclimatologists have relied upon linear transfer functions to reconstruct historical climate. Transfer functions need to be calibrated using recent data from periods where CO2 concentrations reached unprecedented levels (near 400 ppm). Based on these transfer functions, dendroclimatologists must then reconstruct a different past, a past where CO2 concentrations were much below 300 ppm. However, relying upon transfer functions calibrated in this way may introduce an unanticipated bias in the reconstruction of past climate, particularly if CO2 levels have had a noticeable fertilizing effect since the beginning of the industrial era. As an alternative to the transfer function approach, we run the MAIDENiso ecophysiological model in an inverse mode to link together climatic variables, atmospheric CO2 concentrations and tree growth parameters. Our approach endeavors to find the optimal combination of meteorological conditions that best simulate observed tree ring patterns. We test our approach in the Fontainebleau forest (France). By comparing two different CO2 scenarios, we present evidence that increasing CO2 concentrations have had a slight, yet significant, effect on reconstruction results. We demonstrate that higher CO2 concentrations augment the efficiency of water use by trees, therefore favoring the reconstruction of a warmer and drier climate. Under elevated CO2 concentrations, trees close their stomata and need less water to produce the same amount of wood. Inverse process-based modeling represents a powerful alternative to the transfer function technique, especially for the study of divergent tree-ring-to-climate relationships. The approach has several advantages, most notably its ability to distinguish between climatic effects and CO2 imprints on tree growth. Therefore our method produces reconstructions that are less biased by anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and that are based on sound ecophysiological knowledge.

  20. Optimal and scalable methods to approximate the solutions of large-scale Bayesian problems: Theory and application to atmospheric inversions and data assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Bousserez, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed theoretical analysis of methods to approximate the solutions of high-dimensional (>10^6) linear Bayesian problems. An optimal low-rank projection that maximizes the information content of the Bayesian inversion is proposed and efficiently constructed using a scalable randomized SVD algorithm. Useful optimality results are established for the associated posterior error covariance matrix and posterior mean approximations, which are further investigated in a numerical experiment consisting of a large-scale atmospheric tracer transport source-inversion problem. This method proves to be a robust and efficient approach to dimension reduction, as well as a natural framework to analyze the information content of the inversion. Possible extensions of this approach to the non-linear framework in the context of operational numerical weather forecast data assimilation systems based on the incremental 4D-Var technique are also discussed, and a detailed implementation of a new Randomized Incr...

  1. Toward an estimation of daily european CO{sub 2} fluxes at high spatial resolution by inversion of atmospheric transport; Vers une estimation des flux de CO{sub 2} journaliers europeens a haute resolution par inversion du transport atmospherique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carouge, C

    2006-04-15

    Since the end of the 1980's, measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide have been used to estimate global and regional fluxes of CO{sub 2}. This is possible because CO{sub 2} concentration variation is directly linked to flux variation by atmospheric transport. We can find the spatial and temporal distribution of fluxes from concentration measurements by 'inverting' the atmospheric transport. Until recently, most CO{sub 2} inversions have used monthly mean CO{sub 2} atmospheric concentration measurements to infer monthly fluxes. Considering the sparseness of the global CO{sub 2} measurement network, fluxes were a priori aggregated on sub-continental regions and distributed on a fixed spatial pattern within these regions. Only one flux coefficient per month for each region was optimized. With this strong constraint, estimated fluxes can be biased by non-perfect distribution of fluxes within each region (aggregation error). Therefore, flux estimation at model resolution is being developed where the hard constraint of a fixed distribution within a region is replaced by a soft constraint of covariances between flux uncertainties. The use of continuous observations from an increasing number of measurement sites offers a new challenge for inverse modelers. We investigate the use of daily averaged observations to infer daily CO{sub 2} fluxes at model resolution over Europe. We have developed a global synthesis Bayesian inversion to invert daily fluxes at model resolution (50 x 50 km over Europe) from daily averaged CO{sub 2} concentrations. We have obtained estimated fluxes for the year 2001 over Europe using the 10 European continuous sites from the AEROCARB network. The global atmospheric model LMDZt is used with a nested grid over Europe. It is necessary to add a priori spatial and temporal correlations between flux errors to constrain the Bayesian inversion. We present the impact on estimated fluxes of three different spatial correlations based on

  2. Thermal Diagnostics with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory: A Validated Method for Differential Emission Measure Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Mark C. M.; Boerner, P.; Schrijver, C. J.; Testa, P.; Chen, F.; Peter, H.; Malanushenko, A.

    2015-07-01

    We present a new method for performing differential emission measure (DEM) inversions on narrow-band EUV images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The method yields positive definite DEM solutions by solving a linear program. This method has been validated against a diverse set of thermal models of varying complexity and realism. These include (1) idealized Gaussian DEM distributions, (2) 3D models of NOAA Active Region 11158 comprising quasi-steady loop atmospheres in a nonlinear force-free field, and (3) thermodynamic models from a fully compressible, 3D MHD simulation of active region (AR) corona formation following magnetic flux emergence. We then present results from the application of the method to AIA observations of Active Region 11158, comparing the region's thermal structure on two successive solar rotations. Additionally, we show how the DEM inversion method can be adapted to simultaneously invert AIA and Hinode X-ray Telescope data, and how supplementing AIA data with the latter improves the inversion result. The speed of the method allows for routine production of DEM maps, thus facilitating science studies that require tracking of the thermal structure of the solar corona in time and space.

  3. Inversion of the Chelyabinsk seismic surface waves and comparative constraints on the generation of seismic waves by atmospheric Impacts on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakostas, F. G.; Rakoto, V.; Lognonne, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    Meteor impacts are a very important seismic source for planetary seismology, since their locations and, in some cases, their occurence times can be accurately known from orbiters, tracking or optical observations. Their importance becomes greater in the case of a seismic experiment with one seismometer, as the SEIS (Seismic Experiment of Interior Structure) of the future Martian mission "InSight", as the known location allows a direct inversion of differential travel times and wave forms in terms of structure. Meteor impacts generate body and surface seismic waves when they reach the surface of a planet. But when they explode into the atmosphere, due to ablation, they generate shock waves, which are converted into linear, seismic waves in the solid part and acoustic waves in the atmosphere. This effect can be modeled when the amplitude of Rayleigh and other Spheroidal normal modes is made with the atmospheric/ground coupling effects. In this study, meteor impacts are modeled as seismic sources in a comparative analysis for the cases of Earth and Mars. Using the computed seismograms, calculated by the summation of the normal modes of the full planet (e.g. with atmosphere) the properties of the seismic source can be obtained. Its duration is typically associated to the radiation duration of shock waves until they reach the linear regime of propagation. These transition times are comparatively analyzed, for providing constraints on the seismic source duration on Earth and Mars. In the case of Earth, we test our approach with the Chelyabinsk superbolide. The computed seismograms are used in order to perform the inversion of the source, by comparison with the data of the Global Seismographic Network. The results are interpreted and compared with other observations. In the case of Mars, equivalent sources are similarly modeled in different atmospheric, impact size and lithospheric conditions.

  4. Mapping pan-Arctic methane emissions at high spatial resolution using an adjoint atmospheric transport and inversion method and process-based wetland and lake biogeochemical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Tan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding methane emissions from the Arctic, a fast warming carbon reservoir, is important for projecting changes in the global methane cycle under future climate scenarios. Here we optimize Arctic methane emissions with a nested-grid high-resolution inverse model by assimilating both high-precision surface measurements and column-average SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals of methane mole fraction. For the first time, methane emissions from lakes are integrated into an atmospheric transport and inversion estimate, together with prior wetland emissions estimated by six different biogeochemical models. We find that, the global methane emissions during July 2004–June 2005 ranged from 496.4 to 511.5 Tg yr−1, with wetland methane emissions ranging from 130.0 to 203.3 Tg yr−1. The Arctic methane emissions during July 2004–June 2005 were in the range of 14.6–30.4 Tg yr−1, with wetland and lake emissions ranging from 8.8 to 20.4 Tg yr−1 and from 5.4 to 7.9 Tg yr−1 respectively. Canadian and Siberian lakes contributed most of the estimated lake emissions. Due to insufficient measurements in the region, Arctic methane emissions are less constrained in northern Russia than in Alaska, northern Canada and Scandinavia. Comparison of different inversions indicates that the distribution of global and Arctic methane emissions is sensitive to prior wetland emissions. Evaluation with independent datasets shows that the global and Arctic inversions improve estimates of methane mixing ratios in boundary layer and free troposphere. The high-resolution inversions provide more details about the spatial distribution of methane emissions in the Arctic.

  5. Increasing summer net CO2 uptake in high northern ecosystems inferred from atmospheric inversions and comparisons to remote-sensing NDVI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, Lisa R.; Patra, Prabir K.; Rödenbeck, Christian; Nemani, Rama; Bi, Jian; Piper, Stephen C.; Keeling, Ralph F.

    2016-07-01

    Warmer temperatures and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last several decades have been credited with increasing vegetation activity and photosynthetic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere in the high northern latitude ecosystems: the boreal forest and arctic tundra. At the same time, soils in the region have been warming, permafrost is melting, fire frequency and severity are increasing, and some regions of the boreal forest are showing signs of stress due to drought or insect disturbance. The recent trends in net carbon balance of these ecosystems, across heterogeneous disturbance patterns, and the future implications of these changes are unclear. Here, we examine CO2 fluxes from northern boreal and tundra regions from 1985 to 2012, estimated from two atmospheric inversions (RIGC and Jena). Both used measured atmospheric CO2 concentrations and wind fields from interannually variable climate reanalysis. In the arctic zone, the latitude region above 60° N excluding Europe (10° W-63° E), neither inversion finds a significant long-term trend in annual CO2 balance. The boreal zone, the latitude region from approximately 50-60° N, again excluding Europe, showed a trend of 8-11 Tg C yr-2 over the common period of validity from 1986 to 2006, resulting in an annual CO2 sink in 2006 that was 170-230 Tg C yr-1 larger than in 1986. This trend appears to continue through 2012 in the Jena inversion as well. In both latitudinal zones, the seasonal amplitude of monthly CO2 fluxes increased due to increased uptake in summer, and in the arctic zone also due to increased fall CO2 release. These findings suggest that the boreal zone has been maintaining and likely increasing CO2 sink strength over this period, despite browning trends in some regions and changes in fire frequency and land use. Meanwhile, the arctic zone shows that increased summer CO2 uptake, consistent with strong greening trends, is offset by increased fall CO2 release, resulting in a net neutral

  6. Mass retrieval and a posteriori error analysis using non-linear inverse modelling techniques applied to atmospheric tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: An account on recent progress in the inverse modelling of pollutants with first order chemistry (tracers, radionuclides, etc.) is given. The methods, which are variational and whose general principles have been presented in earlier EGU assemblies, are fundamentally nonlinear. They are meant to perform efficiently on the reconstruction of sources of accidental type (typically ETEX, Chernobyl.) In this report, the emphasis is put on two recent developments: First, the problem of finding the total released mass through nonlinear methods is first studied. Because the positivity of sources is taken into account, a non-zero prior mass scale appears in the background term. The cost function has a nonquadratic dependence on this parameter. This rules out many known parameter estimation techniques, when one has to choose this parameter prior to the inversion. Secondly, a posterior analysis of the retrieved source and retrieved errors is then conducted. It generalizes well-known data assimilation results that make use of the Hessian of the cost function. Closely related is the second order sensitivity analysis on the source and retrieved errors, of special significance for inverse modelling. (author)

  7. Optical properties of atmospheric particles: complete parameter sets obtained through polar photometry and an improved inversion technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänel, G

    1994-10-20

    Complete sets of optical parameters of dry particles sampled on a Nuclepore filter are derived through interpretation of photometric data with an improved inversion technique. The parameters are the volume-extinction and absorption coefficients, the single-scattering albedo, the asymmetry parameter of the volume scattering function, the apparent complex refractive index, and the apparent soot content. They may serve as input data for solar radiation-budget considerations. Results from preliminary measurements taken in Central Europe and Italy show an extreme variability of the optical parameters. Both large regional and temporal variabilities have been observed caused by the fluctuating midlatitude weather systems and human activities.

  8. On the Structure and Adjustment of Inversion-Capped Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flows: Large-Eddy Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Kelly, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    of a super-geostrophic jet near the top of the boundary layer. The analytical wind-shear models included do not account for such a jet, and the best agreement with simulated wind shear is seen in cases with weak stratification above the boundary layer. Increasing the surface heat flux decreases the magnitude...... and vertical extent of the jet and leads to better agreement between analytical and simulated wind-speed profiles. Over a range of different inversion strengths and surface heat fluxes, we also find good agreement between the performed simulations and models of the equilibrium boundary-layer height......, and of the budget of turbulent kinetic energy integrated across the boundary layer....

  9. Spectroscopic Evidence for a Temperature Inversion in the Dayside Atmosphere of the Hot Jupiter WASP-33b

    CERN Document Server

    Haynes, Korey; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Deming, Drake; Knutson, Heather

    2015-01-01

    We present observations of two occultations of the extrasolar planet WASP-33b using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the HST, which allow us to constrain the temperature structure and composition of its dayside atmosphere. WASP-33b is the most highly irradiated hot Jupiter discovered to date, and the only exoplanet known to orbit a delta-Scuti star. We observed in spatial scan mode to decrease instrument systematic effects in the data, and removed fluctuations in the data due to stellar pulsations. The RMS for our final, binned spectrum is approximately 1.05 times the photon noise. We compare our final spectrum, along with previously published photometric data, to atmospheric models of WASP-33b spanning a wide range in temperature profiles and chemical compositions. We find that the data require models with an oxygen-rich chemical composition and a temperature profile that increases at high altitude. We also find that our spectrum displays an excess in the measured flux towards short wavelengths that is best...

  10. Separation of biospheric and fossil fuel fluxes of CO2 by atmospheric inversion of CO2 and 14CO2 measurements: Observation System Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sourish; Bharat Miller, John; Lehman, Scott

    2016-05-01

    National annual total CO2 emissions from combustion of fossil fuels are likely known to within 5-10 % for most developed countries. However, uncertainties are inevitably larger (by unknown amounts) for emission estimates at regional and monthly scales, or for developing countries. Given recent international efforts to establish emission reduction targets, independent determination and verification of regional and national scale fossil fuel CO2 emissions are likely to become increasingly important. Here, we take advantage of the fact that precise measurements of 14C in CO2 provide a largely unbiased tracer for recently added fossil-fuel-derived CO2 in the atmosphere and present an atmospheric inversion technique to jointly assimilate observations of CO2 and 14CO2 in order to simultaneously estimate fossil fuel emissions and biospheric exchange fluxes of CO2. Using this method in a set of Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), we show that given the coverage of 14CO2 measurements available in 2010 (969 over North America, 1063 globally), we can recover the US national total fossil fuel emission to better than 1 % for the year and to within 5 % for most months. Increasing the number of 14CO2 observations to ˜ 5000 per year over North America, as recently recommended by the National Academy of Science (NAS) (Pacala et al., 2010), we recover monthly emissions to within 5 % for all months for the US as a whole and also for smaller, highly emissive regions over which the specified data coverage is relatively dense, such as for the New England states or the NY-NJ-PA tri-state area. This result suggests that, given continued improvement in state-of-the art transport models, a measurement program similar in scale to that recommended by the NAS can provide for independent verification of bottom-up inventories of fossil fuel CO2 at the regional and national scale. In addition, we show that the dual tracer inversion framework can detect and minimize biases in

  11. Estimation of background CO2 concentrations at the high alpine station Schneefernerhaus by atmospheric observations and inverse modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giemsa, Esther; Jacobeit, Jucundus; Ries, Ludwig; Frank, Gabriele; Hachinger, Stephan; Meyer-Arnek, Julian

    2016-04-01

    In order to estimate the influence of Central European CO2 emissions, a new method to retrieve background concentrations based on statistics of radon-222 and backward trajectories is developed and applied to the CO2 observations at the alpine high-altitude research station Schneefernerhaus (2670 m a.s.l.). The reliable identification of baseline conditions is important for perceiving changes in time as well as in the sources and sinks of greenhouse gases and thereby assessing the efficiency of existing mitigation strategies. In the particular case of Central Europe, the analysis of background concentrations could add further insights on the question why background CO2 concentrations increased in the last few decades, despite a significant decrease in the reported emissions. Ongoing effort to define the baseline conditions has led to a variety of data selection techniques. In this diversity of data filtering concepts, a relatively recent data selection method effectively appropriates observations of radon-222 to reliably and unambiguously identify baseline air masses. Owing to its relatively constant emission rate from the ice-free land surface and its half-life of 3.8 days that is solely achieved through radioactive decay, the tropospheric background concentration of the inert radioactive gas is low and temporal variations caused by changes in atmospheric transport are precisely detectable. For defining the baseline air masses reaching the high alpine research station Schneefernerhaus, an objective analysis approach is applied to the two-hourly radon records. The CO2 values of days by the radon method associated with prevailing atmospheric background conditions result in the CO2 concentrations representing the least land influenced air masses. Additionally, three-dimensional back-trajectories were retrieved using the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) FLEXPART driven by analysis fields of the Global Forecast System (GFS) produced by the National Centers

  12. Inverse modeling for the optimization of primary sources of atmospheric pollution at a regional scale; Modelisation inverse pour l'optimisation des sources primaires de pollution atmospherique a l'echelle regionale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pison, I.

    2005-12-15

    Atmospheric pollution at a regional scale is the result of various interacting processes: emissions, chemistry, transport, mixing and deposition of gaseous species. The forecast of air quality is then performed by models, in which the emissions are taken into account through inventories. The simulated pollutant concentrations depend highly on the emissions that are used. Now inventories that represent them have large uncertainties. Since it would be difficult today to improve their building methodologies, there remains the possibility of adding information to existing inventories. The optimization of emissions uses the information that is available in measurements to get the inventory that minimizes the difference between simulated and measured concentrations. A method for the inversion of anthropogenic emissions at a regional scale, using network measurements and based on the CHIMERE model and its adjoint, was developed and validated. A kriging technique allows us to optimize the use of the information available in the concentration space. Repeated kriging-optimization cycles increase the quality of the results. A dynamical spatial aggregation technique makes it possible to further reduce the size of the problem. The NO{sub x} emissions from the inventory elaborated by AIRPARIF for the Paris area were inverted during the summers of 1998 and 1999, the events of the ESQUIF campaign being studied in detail. The optimization reduces large differences between simulated and measured concentrations. Generally, however, the confidence level of the results decreases with the density of the measurement network. Therefore, the results with the higher confidence level correspond to the most intense emission fluxes of the Paris area. On the whole domain, the corrections to the average emitted mass and to the matching time profiles are consistent with the estimate of 15% obtained during the ESQUIF campaign. (author)

  13. Exchanges of Atmospheric CO2 and 13CO2 with the Terrestrial Biosphere and Oceans from 1978 to 2000. II. A Three-Dimensional Tracer Inversion Model to Deduce Regional Fluxes

    OpenAIRE

    Piper, Stephen C; Keeling, Charles D.; HEIMANN Martin; Stewart, Elisabeth F

    2001-01-01

    A three-dimensional tracer inversion model is described that couples atmospheric CO2 transport with prescribed and adjustable source/sink components of the global car- bon cycle to predict atmospheric CO2 concentration and 13C/12C isotopic ratio taking account of exchange fluxes of atmospheric CO2 with the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans. Industrial CO2 emissions are prescribed from fuel production data. Transport of CO2 is prescribed by a model, TM2, that employs 9 vertical levels from ...

  14. Spatially Distributed Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions in Two U.S. Cities Using Activity Data: Applicability for Global Cities and High-resolution Atmospheric Inversion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P.; Lauvaux, T.; Oda, T.; Tang, J.; Gurney, K. R.; Eldering, A.; Miller, C. E.; Duren, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Urban fossil fuel CO2 (FFCO2) emissions play a significant role in the global C cycle and climate change. To better understand and monitor urban FFCO2 emissions, we need timely estimates at fine spatial resolution. However, currently available global estimates have coarse resolution of 10km or more except for some US cities which have finer FFCO2 estimates at ~250m (Hestia Project; Gurney et al. 2012). We construct an urban sectoral emission model for the U.S. based on multiple cities and spatially disaggregate each sector to arrive at finely resolved emissions data products. We then calibrate our results with other datasets to confirm whether this approach can be applicable in any global urban domain. We acquire 2012 annual emissions estimates from EPA's national emissions inventory for the Los Angeles megacity and Indianapolis and apply our U.S. urban sectoral emission model to derive sectoral estimates. We then spatially distribute these sectoral emissions based on activity and other proxy data. We combine remote sensing and open source data such as national land cover data, population density, impervious surface, and road maps to develop intensity metrics of energy use within each sector. These intensity metrics are then used to spatially allocate emissions within each sector. We incorporate global powerplant emissions data to complete our emissions datasets. We validate our urban FFCO2 emissions datasets, both at sectoral and city scales, against Hestia results for two cities and, in case of Indianapolis, compare to results from inverse modeling of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This study will guide the next phase of research by developing the methodology to determine the spatial variation of FFCO2 emissions in select cities around the world.

  15. 基于Landsat影像的ALEXI模型小流域验证%Evaluation of Atmosphere Land Exchange Inversion Model in Regional Scale based on Landsat Imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡永红; 贾根锁

    2013-01-01

    It is promising way to analyze large scale surface energy balance from two source model, which widely used to map local evapotranspiration pattern, detect regional drought and climate change study. Based on thermal infrared remote sensing image and field meteorological parameters, the Atmosphere-land Exchange Inversion Model (ALEXI) can examine land surface process in continental scale, further the hourly datasets from geostationary platform make possible integrate field measurements and model results. However,such great capacities of ALEXI model have weakness in its validation results that involved in the inappropriate spatial scale between satellite images and field measurements,even Large Aperture Scintillometer (LAS) measurements can't meet the heterogeneous area comparison requirements in 6 km×6 km area. In this study,we assumed that the surface energy balance algorithm for land model (SEBAL) from high resolution image could catch more reasonable regional surface energy balance pattern, which was verified by many studies in local scale. The land surface balance results from SEBAL model based on Landsat images were considered as the data source for ALEXI model (MTSAT satellite platform) validation in the same period. The study showed that ALEXI model and SEBAL model can get a more consistent surface energy exchange patterns,and statistical analysis of the ALXEI model also provided well distribution among different land cover. Combined with geostationary satellite data, ALEXI model can be a promising method for monitoring land-atmospheric interaction. In addition,this study was executed in small watershed over northern China,and the quantitative validation of ALEXI model also need further work to improve the model accuracy in more heterogeneous study area.%基于静止卫星数据开发的陆气相互作用模型(ALEXI模型)为地表能量平衡过程分析提供了大尺度空间拓展,为认识大尺度的陆气相互作用提供了新途径,已被应用于

  16. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  17. Letter to the EditorAbel transform inversion of radio occultation measurements made with a receiver inside the Earth’s atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Haase

    Full Text Available Radio occultation measurements made with a receiver inside the Earth’s atmosphere can be inverted, assuming local spherical symmetry, with an Abel transform to provide an estimate of the atmospheric refractive index profile. The measurement geometry is closely related to problems encountered when inverting seismic time-travel data and solar occultation measurements, where the Abel solution is well known. The method requires measuring both rays that originate from above and below the local horizon of the receiver. The Abel transform operates on a profile of "partial bending angles" found by subtracting the positive elevation measurement from the negative elevation value with the same impact parameter. In principle, the refractive index profile can be derived from measurements with a single frequency GPS receiver because the ionospheric bending is removed when the partial bending angle is evaluated.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (pressure, density and temperature – Radio science (remote sensing

  18. Large-eddy simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer: Influence of unsteady forcing, baroclinicity, inversion strength and stability on the wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard

    above the atmospheric surface layer. Continuous and detailed measurements of mean winds and turbulence above the surface layer are expensive and difficult to obtain. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of the atmospheric flow can be an attractive alternative or supplement to field experiments...... of using LES more directly in applications such as short-term forecasting of the turbulent flow at e.g. wind farm sites is also considered. Two case studies based on measurements from the rural site of Høvsøre, Denmark and a suburban site in Hamburg, Germany demonstrate the need for accurate specification...... facilitate the formation of a super-geostrophic jet near the top of the ABL. It is considered to be a rare phenomena in the real-world ABL, and is not accounted for by the analytical models of the wind shear included in this study. It is furthermore shown that the considered wind profile model can...

  19. Integrative inversion of land surface component temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Wenjie; XU Xiru

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the row winter wheat was selected as the example to study the component temperature inversion method of land surface target in detail. The result showed that the structural pattern of row crop can affect the inversion precision of component temperature evidently. Choosing appropriate structural pattern of row crop can improve the inversion precision significantly. The iterative method combining inverse matrix was a stable method that was fit for inversing component temperature of land surface target. The result of simulation and field experiment showed that the integrative method could remarkably improve the inversion accuracy of the lighted soil surface temperature and the top layer canopy temperature, and enhance inversion stability of components temperature. Just two parameters were sufficient for accurate atmospheric correction of multi-angle and multi-spectral thermal infrared data: atmospheric transmittance and the atmospheric upwelling radiance. If the atmospheric parameters and component temperature can be inversed synchronously, the really and truly accurate atmospheric correction can be achieved. The validation using ATSRII data showed that the method was useful.

  20. Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions, and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Daniel J.; Turner, David P.; Stinson, Graham; McGuire, A. David; Wei, Yaxing; West, Tristram O.; Heath, Linda S.; de Jong, Bernardus; McConkey, Brian G.; Birdsey, Richard A.; Kurz, Werner A.; Jacobson, Andrew R.; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Pan, Yude; Post, W. Mac; Cook, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    We develop an approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using inventory-based information over North America (NA) for a recent 7-year period (ca. 2000–2006). The approach notably retains information on the spatial distribution of NEE, or the vertical exchange between land and atmosphere of all non-fossil fuel sources and sinks of CO2, while accounting for lateral transfers of forest and crop products as well as their eventual emissions. The total NEE estimate of a -327 ± 252 TgC yr-1 sink for NA was driven primarily by CO2 uptake in the Forest Lands sector (-248 TgC yr-1), largely in the Northwest and Southeast regions of the US, and in the Crop Lands sector (-297 TgC yr-1), predominantly in the Midwest US states. These sinks are counteracted by the carbon source estimated for the Other Lands sector (+218 TgC yr-1), where much of the forest and crop products are assumed to be returned to the atmosphere (through livestock and human consumption). The ecosystems of Mexico are estimated to be a small net source (+18 TgC yr-1) due to land use change between 1993 and 2002. We compare these inventory-based estimates with results from a suite of terrestrial biosphere and atmospheric inversion models, where the mean continental-scale NEE estimate for each ensemble is -511 TgC yr-1 and -931 TgC yr-1, respectively. In the modeling approaches, all sectors, including Other Lands, were generally estimated to be a carbon sink, driven in part by assumed CO2 fertilization and/or lack of consideration of carbon sources from disturbances and product emissions. Additional fluxes not measured by the inventories, although highly uncertain, could add an additional -239 TgC yr-1 to the inventory-based NA sink estimate, thus suggesting some convergence with the modeling approaches.

  1. Topological inverse semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yongwen

    2004-01-01

    That the projective limit of any projective system of compact inverse semigroups is also a compact inverse semigroup,the injective limit of any injective system of inverse semigroups is also an inverse semigroup, and that a compact inverse semigroup is topologically isomorphic to a strict projective limit of compact metric inverse semigroups are proved. It is also demonstrated that Horn (S,T) is a topological inverse semigroup provided that S or T is a topological inverse semigroup with some other conditions. Being proved by means of the combination of topological semigroup theory with inverse semigroup theory,all these results generalize the corresponding ones related to topological semigroups or topological groups.

  2. Inversion of GPS meteorology data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hocke

    Full Text Available The GPS meteorology (GPS/MET experiment, led by the Universities Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR, consists of a GPS receiver aboard a low earth orbit (LEO satellite which was launched on 3 April 1995. During a radio occultation the LEO satellite rises or sets relative to one of the 24 GPS satellites at the Earth's horizon. Thereby the atmospheric layers are successively sounded by radio waves which propagate from the GPS satellite to the LEO satellite. From the observed phase path increases, which are due to refraction of the radio waves by the ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere, the atmospheric parameter refractivity, density, pressure and temperature are calculated with high accuracy and resolution (0.5–1.5 km. In the present study, practical aspects of the GPS/MET data analysis are discussed. The retrieval is based on the Abelian integral inversion of the atmospheric bending angle profile into the refractivity index profile. The problem of the upper boundary condition of the Abelian integral is described by examples. The statistical optimization approach which is applied to the data above 40 km and the use of topside bending angle profiles from model atmospheres stabilize the inversion. The retrieved temperature profiles are compared with corresponding profiles which have already been calculated by scientists of UCAR and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL, using Abelian integral inversion too. The comparison shows that in some cases large differences occur (5 K and more. This is probably due to different treatment of the upper boundary condition, data runaways and noise. Several temperature profiles with wavelike structures at tropospheric and stratospheric heights are shown. While the periodic structures at upper stratospheric heights could be caused by residual errors of the ionospheric correction method, the periodic temperature fluctuations at heights below 30 km are most likely caused by atmospheric waves (vertically

  3. Inverse anticipating chaos synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahverdiev, E M; Sivaprakasam, S; Shore, K A

    2002-07-01

    We derive conditions for achieving inverse anticipating synchronization where a driven time-delay chaotic system synchronizes to the inverse future state of the driver. The significance of inverse anticipating chaos in delineating synchronization regimes in time-delay systems is elucidated. The concept is extended to cascaded time-delay systems.

  4. Mesoscale inversion of carbon sources and sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inverse methods at large scales are used to infer the spatial variability of carbon sources and sinks over the continents but their uncertainties remain large. Atmospheric concentrations integrate the surface flux variability but atmospheric transport models at low resolution are not able to simulate properly the local atmospheric dynamics at the measurement sites. However, the inverse estimates are more representative of the large spatial heterogeneity of the ecosystems compared to direct flux measurements. Top-down and bottom-up methods that aim at quantifying the carbon exchanges between the surface and the atmosphere correspond to different scales and are not easily comparable. During this phD, a mesoscale inverse system was developed to correct carbon fluxes at 8 km resolution. The high resolution transport model MesoNH was used to simulate accurately the variability of the atmospheric concentrations, which allowed us to reduce the uncertainty of the retrieved fluxes. All the measurements used here were observed during the intensive regional campaign CERES of May and June 2005, during which several instrumented towers measured CO2 concentrations and fluxes in the South West of France. Airborne measurements allowed us to observe concentrations at high altitude but also CO2 surface fluxes over large parts of the domain. First, the capacity of the inverse system to correct the CO2 fluxes was estimated using pseudo-data experiments. The largest fraction of the concentration variability was attributed to regional surface fluxes over an area of about 300 km around the site locations depending on the meteorological conditions. Second, an ensemble of simulations allowed us to define the spatial and temporal structures of the transport errors. Finally, the inverse fluxes at 8 km resolution were compared to direct flux measurements. The inverse system has been validated in space and time and showed an improvement of the first guess fluxes from a vegetation model

  5. Inverse Kinematics using Quaternions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Knud; Erleben, Kenny; Engell-Nørregård, Morten

    In this project I describe the status of inverse kinematics research, with the focus firmly on the methods that solve the core problem. An overview of the different methods are presented Three common methods used in inverse kinematics computation have been chosen as subject for closer inspection....... suite, developed in this project and in [4]. Source code developed for this project includes the CCD method , improvements on the BFGS method and Jacobian inverse originally developed in [4]....

  6. Acute puerperal uterine inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the frequency, causes, clinical presentations, management and maternal mortality associated with acute puerperal inversion of the uterus. Materials and Methods: All the patients who developed acute puerperal inversion of the uterus either in or outside the JPMC were included in the study. Patients of chronic uterine inversion were not included in the present study. Abdominal and vaginal examination was done to confirm and classify inversion into first, second or third degrees. Results: 57036 deliveries and 36 acute uterine inversions occurred during the study period, so the frequency of uterine inversion was 1 in 1584 deliveries. Mismanagement of third stage of labour was responsible for uterine inversion in 75% of patients. Majority of the patients presented with shock, either hypovolemic (69%) or neurogenic (13%) in origin. Manual replacement of the uterus under general anaesthesia with 2% halothane was successfully done in 35 patients (97.5%). Abdominal hysterectomy was done in only one patient. There were three maternal deaths due to inversion. Conclusion: Proper education and training regarding placental delivery, diagnosis and management of uterine inversion must be imparted to the maternity care providers especially to traditional birth attendants and family physicians to prevent this potentially life-threatening condition. (author)

  7. Dynamical inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Gladwell, Graham ML

    2011-01-01

    The papers in this volume present an overview of the general aspects and practical applications of dynamic inverse methods, through the interaction of several topics, ranging from classical and advanced inverse problems in vibration, isospectral systems, dynamic methods for structural identification, active vibration control and damage detection, imaging shear stiffness in biological tissues, wave propagation, to computational and experimental aspects relevant for engineering problems.

  8. 0-Semidistributive Inverse Semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田振际

    2004-01-01

    @@ For an inverse semigroup S, the set L(S) of all inverse subsemigroups (including the empty set) of S forms a lattice with respect to intersection denoted as usual by ∩ and union, where the union is the inverse subsemigroup generated by inverse subsemigroups A, B of S. The set LF(S) of all full inverse subsemigroups of S forms a complete sublattice of L(S), with Es as zero element (Es is the set of all idempotent of S)(see [3,5,6]). Note, that if S a group, then LF(S)=L(S), its lattice of all subgroups of S. If S = G0 is a group with adjoined zero, then clearly LF(S) ≌ L(G).

  9. Inverse Symmetric Inflationary Attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Odintsov, S D

    2016-01-01

    We present a class of inflationary potentials which are invariant under a special symmetry, which depends on the parameters of the models. As we show, in certain limiting cases, the inverse symmetric potentials are qualitatively similar to the $\\alpha$-attractors models, since the resulting observational indices are identical. However, there are some quantitative differences which we discuss in some detail. As we show, some inverse symmetric models always yield results compatible with observations, but this strongly depends on the asymptotic form of the potential at large $e$-folding numbers. In fact when the limiting functional form is identical to the one corresponding to the $\\alpha$-attractors models, the compatibility with the observations is guaranteed. Also we find the relation of the inverse symmetric models with the Starobinsky model and we highlight the differences. In addition, an alternative inverse symmetric model is studied and as we show, not all the inverse symmetric models are viable. Moreove...

  10. Inversive meadows and divisive meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bergstra; C.A. Middelburg

    2009-01-01

    An inversive meadow is a commutative ring with identity and a total multiplicative inverse operation whose value at 0 is 0. Previously, inversive meadows were shortly called meadows. In this paper, we introduce divisive meadows, which are inversive meadows with the multiplicative inverse operation r

  11. Inversion flachseismischer Wellenfeldspektren

    OpenAIRE

    Forbriger, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    In dieser Arbeit stelle ich ein neues Verfahren zur Inversion flachseismischer Wellenfelder vor. Die Inversion erfolgt in zwei Schritten. Zunächst wird ein Phasenslowness-Frequenz-Spektrum (omega,p-Spektrum) der Seismogramme bestimmt. In einem zweiten Schritt werden dieses Spektrum und die Laufzeiten der Ersteinsätze gemeinsam zu einem rein Tiefen-abhängigen Modell der seismischen Geschwindigkeiten und der Diskontinuitäten des untersuchten Mediums invertiert. Typische flachseismische Messunge...

  12. Inversion of Stokes Profiles with Systematic Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, A Asensio; Gonzalez, M J Martinez; Yabar, A Pastor

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative thermodynamical, dynamical and magnetic properties of the solar and stellar plasmas are obtained by interpreting their emergent non-polarized and polarized spectrum. This inference requires the selection of a set of spectral lines particularly sensitive to the physical conditions in the plasma and a suitable parametric model of the solar/stellar atmosphere. Nonlinear inversion codes are then used to fit the model to the observations. However, the presence of systematic effects like nearby or blended spectral lines, telluric absorption or incorrect correction of the continuum, among others, can strongly affect the results. We present an extension to current inversion codes that can deal with these effects in a transparent way. The resulting algorithm is very simple and can be applied to any existing inversion code with the addition of a few lines of code as an extra step in each iteration.

  13. Generalized emissivity inverse problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, DengMing; Wen, Tao; Dai, XianXi; Dai, JiXin; Evenson, William E

    2002-04-01

    Inverse problems have recently drawn considerable attention from the physics community due to of potential widespread applications [K. Chadan and P. C. Sabatier, Inverse Problems in Quantum Scattering Theory, 2nd ed. (Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1989)]. An inverse emissivity problem that determines the emissivity g(nu) from measurements of only the total radiated power J(T) has recently been studied [Tao Wen, DengMing Ming, Xianxi Dai, Jixin Dai, and William E. Evenson, Phys. Rev. E 63, 045601(R) (2001)]. In this paper, a new type of generalized emissivity and transmissivity inverse (GETI) problem is proposed. The present problem differs from our previous work on inverse problems by allowing the unknown (emissivity) function g(nu) to be temperature dependent as well as frequency dependent. Based on published experimental information, we have developed an exact solution formula for this GETI problem. A universal function set suggested for numerical calculation is shown to be robust, making this inversion method practical and convenient for realistic calculations.

  14. The inverse electroencephalography pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, David Michael

    The inverse electroencephalography (EEG) problem is defined as determining which regions of the brain are active based on remote measurements recorded with scalp EEG electrodes. An accurate solution to this problem would benefit both fundamental neuroscience research and clinical neuroscience applications. However, constructing accurate patient-specific inverse EEG solutions requires complex modeling, simulation, and visualization algorithms, and to date only a few systems have been developed that provide such capabilities. In this dissertation, a computational system for generating and investigating patient-specific inverse EEG solutions is introduced, and the requirements for each stage of this Inverse EEG Pipeline are defined and discussed. While the requirements of many of the stages are satisfied with existing algorithms, others have motivated research into novel modeling and simulation methods. The principal technical results of this work include novel surface-based volume modeling techniques, an efficient construction for the EEG lead field, and the Open Source release of the Inverse EEG Pipeline software for use by the bioelectric field research community. In this work, the Inverse EEG Pipeline is applied to three research problems in neurology: comparing focal and distributed source imaging algorithms; separating measurements into independent activation components for multifocal epilepsy; and localizing the cortical activity that produces the P300 effect in schizophrenia.

  15. Inversive meadows and divisive meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bergstra; C.A. Middelburg

    2011-01-01

    Inversive meadows are commutative rings with a multiplicative identity element and a total multiplicative inverse operation satisfying 0−1=0. Divisive meadows are inversive meadows with the multiplicative inverse operation replaced by a division operation. We give finite equational specifications of

  16. Sharp spatially constrained inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vignoli, Giulio G.; Fiandaca, Gianluca G.; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.;

    2013-01-01

    We present sharp reconstruction of multi-layer models using a spatially constrained inversion with minimum gradient support regularization. In particular, its application to airborne electromagnetic data is discussed. Airborne surveys produce extremely large datasets, traditionally inverted...... by using smoothly varying 1D models. Smoothness is a result of the regularization constraints applied to address the inversion ill-posedness. The standard Occam-type regularized multi-layer inversion produces results where boundaries between layers are smeared. The sharp regularization overcomes......, the results are compatible with the data and, at the same time, favor sharp transitions. The focusing strategy can also be used to constrain the 1D solutions laterally, guaranteeing that lateral sharp transitions are retrieved without losing resolution. By means of real and synthetic datasets, sharp...

  17. Inversion of the radiative transfer equation for polarized light

    CERN Document Server

    Iniesta, Jose Carlos del Toro

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 1970s, inversion techniques have become the most useful tool for inferring the magnetic, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties of the solar atmosphere. The intrinsic model dependence makes it necessary to formulate specific means that include the physics in a properly quantitative way. The core of this physics lies in the radiative transfer equation (RTE), where the properties of the atmosphere are assumed to be known while the unknowns are the four Stokes profiles. The solution of the (differential) RTE is known as the direct or forward problem. From an observational point of view, the problem is rather the opposite: the data are made up of the observed Stokes profiles and the unknowns are the solar physical quantities. Inverting the RTE is therefore mandatory. Indeed, the formal solution of this equation can be considered an integral equation. The solution of such an integral equation is called the inverse problem. Inversion techniques are automated codes aimed at solving the inverse problem...

  18. Calculation of the inverse data space via sparse inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The inverse data space provides a natural separation of primaries and surface-related multiples, as the surface multiples map onto the area around the origin while the primaries map elsewhere. However, the calculation of the inverse data is far from trivial as theory requires infinite time and offset recording. Furthermore regularization issues arise during inversion. We perform the inversion by minimizing the least-squares norm of the misfit function by constraining the $ell_1$ norm of the solution, being the inverse data space. In this way a sparse inversion approach is obtained. We show results on field data with an application to surface multiple removal.

  19. Limits to Nonlinear Inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    For non-linear inverse problems, the mathematical structure of the mapping from model parameters to data is usually unknown or partly unknown. Absence of information about the mathematical structure of this function prevents us from presenting an analytical solution, so our solution depends on ou...

  20. Bayesian seismic AVO inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buland, Arild

    2002-07-01

    A new linearized AVO inversion technique is developed in a Bayesian framework. The objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity and density. Distributions for other elastic parameters can also be assessed, for example acoustic impedance, shear impedance and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio. The inversion algorithm is based on the convolutional model and a linearized weak contrast approximation of the Zoeppritz equation. The solution is represented by a Gaussian posterior distribution with explicit expressions for the posterior expectation and covariance, hence exact prediction intervals for the inverted parameters can be computed under the specified model. The explicit analytical form of the posterior distribution provides a computationally fast inversion method. Tests on synthetic data show that all inverted parameters were almost perfectly retrieved when the noise approached zero. With realistic noise levels, acoustic impedance was the best determined parameter, while the inversion provided practically no information about the density. The inversion algorithm has also been tested on a real 3-D dataset from the Sleipner Field. The results show good agreement with well logs but the uncertainty is high. The stochastic model includes uncertainties of both the elastic parameters, the wavelet and the seismic and well log data. The posterior distribution is explored by Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation using the Gibbs sampler algorithm. The inversion algorithm has been tested on a seismic line from the Heidrun Field with two wells located on the line. The uncertainty of the estimated wavelet is low. In the Heidrun examples the effect of including uncertainty of the wavelet and the noise level was marginal with respect to the AVO inversion results. We have developed a 3-D linearized AVO inversion method with spatially coupled model parameters where the objective is to obtain posterior distributions for P-wave velocity, S

  1. AVO inversion based on inverse operator estimation in trust region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xing-Yao; Deng, Wei; Zong, Zhao-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Amplitude variation with offset (AVO) inversion is widely utilized in exploration geophysics, especially for reservoir prediction and fluid identification. Inverse operator estimation in the trust region algorithm is applied for solving AVO inversion problems in which optimization and inversion directly are integrated. The L1 norm constraint is considered on the basis of reasonable initial model in order to improve effciency and stability during the AVO inversion process. In this study, high-order Zoeppritz approximation is utilized to establish the inversion objective function in which variation of {{v}\\text{p}}/{{v}\\text{s}} with time is taken into consideration. A model test indicates that the algorithm has a relatively higher stability and accuracy than the damp least-squares algorithm. Seismic data inversion is feasible and inversion values of three parameters ({{v}\\text{p}},{{v}\\text{s}},ρ ) maintain good consistency with logging curves.

  2. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly one dimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons

  3. Intersections, ideals, and inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D.W.

    1998-10-01

    Techniques from computational algebra provide a framework for treating large classes of inverse problems. In particular, the discretization of many types of integral equations and of partial differential equations with undetermined coefficients lead to systems of polynomial equations. The structure of the solution set of such equations may be examined using algebraic techniques.. For example, the existence and dimensionality of the solution set may be determined. Furthermore, it is possible to bound the total number of solutions. The approach is illustrated by a numerical application to the inverse problem associated with the Helmholtz equation. The algebraic methods are used in the inversion of a set of transverse electric (TE) mode magnetotelluric data from Antarctica. The existence of solutions is demonstrated and the number of solutions is found to be finite, bounded from above at 50. The best fitting structure is dominantly onedimensional with a low crustal resistivity of about 2 ohm-m. Such a low value is compatible with studies suggesting lower surface wave velocities than found in typical stable cratons.

  4. of Generalized Inverse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyun Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cohen's kappa and weighted kappa statistics are the conventional methods used frequently in measuring agreement for categorical responses. In this paper, through the perspective of a generalized inverse, we propose an alternative general framework of the fixed-effects modeling of Cohen's weighted kappa, proposed by Yang and Chinchilli (2011. Properties of the proposed method are provided. Small sample performance is investigated through bootstrap simulation studies, which demonstrate good performance of the proposed method. When there are only two categories, the proposed method reduces to Cohen's kappa.

  5. Inverse Degree and Connectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiao-ling; TIAN Ying-zhi

    2013-01-01

    Let G be a connected graph with vertex set V(G),order n =丨V(G)丨,minimum degree δ(G) and connectivity κ(G).The graph G is called maximally connected if κ(G) =δ(G).Define the inverse degree of G with no isolated vertices as R(G) =Σv∈V(G)1/d(v),where d(v) denotes the degree of the vertex v.We show that G is maximally connected if R(G) < 1 + 2/δ + n-2δ+1/(n-1)(n-3).

  6. Inversion assuming weak scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Gerstoft, Peter; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The study of weak scattering from inhomogeneous media or interface roughness has long been of interest in sonar applications. In an acoustic backscattering model of a stationary field of volume inhomogeneities, a stochastic description of the field is more useful than a deterministic description...... due to the complex nature of the field. A method based on linear inversion is employed to infer information about the statistical properties of the scattering field from the obtained cross-spectral matrix. A synthetic example based on an active high-frequency sonar demonstrates that the proposed...

  7. Multiscale full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Trampert, Jeannot; Cupillard, Paul; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay; Capdeville, Yann; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    We develop and apply a full waveform inversion method that incorporates seismic data on a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, thereby constraining the details of both crustal and upper-mantle structure. This is intended to further our understanding of crust-mantle interactions that shape the nature of plate tectonics, and to be a step towards improved tomographic models of strongly scale-dependent earth properties, such as attenuation and anisotropy. The inversion for detailed regional earth structure consistently embedded within a large-scale model requires locally refined numerical meshes that allow us to (1) model regional wave propagation at high frequencies, and (2) capture the inferred fine-scale heterogeneities. The smallest local grid spacing sets the upper bound of the largest possible time step used to iteratively advance the seismic wave field. This limitation leads to extreme computational costs in the presence of fine-scale structure, and it inhibits the construction of full waveform tomographic models that describe earth structure on multiple scales. To reduce computational requirements to a feasible level, we design a multigrid approach based on the decomposition of a multiscale earth model with widely varying grid spacings into a family of single-scale models where the grid spacing is approximately uniform. Each of the single-scale models contains a tractable number of grid points, which ensures computational efficiency. The multi-to-single-scale decomposition is the foundation of iterative, gradient-based optimization schemes that simultaneously and consistently invert data on all scales for one multi-scale model. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in a full waveform inversion for Eurasia, with a special focus on Anatolia where coverage is particularly dense. Continental-scale structure is constrained by complete seismic waveforms in the 30-200 s period range. In addition to the well-known structural elements of the Eurasian mantle

  8. Inverse modeling of European CH4 emissions 2001–2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergamaschi, P.; Krol, M.C.; Meirink, J.F.; Dentener, F.; Segers, A.; Aardenne, van J.A.; Monni, S.; Vermeulen, A.T.

    2010-01-01

    European CH4 emissions are estimated for the period 2001–2006 using a fourdimensional variational (4DVAR) inverse modeling system, based on the atmospheric zoom model TM5. Continuous observations are used from various European monitoring stations, complemented by European and global flask samples fr

  9. Statistical perspectives on inverse problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil

    Inverse problems arise in many scientific disciplines and pertain to situations where inference is to be made about a particular phenomenon from indirect measurements. A typical example, arising in diffusion tomography, is the inverse boundary value problem for non-invasive reconstruction...... of the interior of an object from electrical boundary measurements. One part of this thesis concerns statistical approaches for solving, possibly non-linear, inverse problems. Thus inverse problems are recasted in a form suitable for statistical inference. In particular, a Bayesian approach for regularisation...... is obtained by assuming that the a priori beliefs about the solution before having observed any data can be described by a prior distribution. The solution to the statistical inverse problem is then given by the posterior distribution obtained by Bayes' formula. Hence the solution of an ill-posed inverse...

  10. Inversion amalgam chronopotentiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The review deals with the theoretical principles of the method of inversion amalgam chronopotentiometry. The transition times and the potential-time relations for the electrochemical dissolution of amalgams under galvanostatic conditions are analysed and the applications of the method in electroanalytical practise, in the study of the kinetics of electrode processes and adsorption, in the determination of the numbers of electrons involved in the reaction and diffusion coefficients, and in the study of complex formation, corrosion of amalgams, etc. are examined in detail. The fundamentals of the theory of electrode processes complicated by preceding, subsequent, and simultaneous chemical reactions are described. The possibilities and advantages of the method of amalgam chronopotentiometry in relation to other electrochemical procedures are indicated

  11. Dark Radiative Inverse Seesaw

    CERN Document Server

    Ahriche, Amine; Nasri, Salah

    2016-01-01

    We present a minimal model that simultaneously accounts for neutrino masses and the origin of dark matter (DM) and where the electroweak phase transition is strong enough to allow for electroweak baryogenesis. The Standard Model is enlarged with a Majorana fermion, three generations of chiral fermion pairs, and a single complex scalar that plays a central role in DM production and phenomenology, neutrino masses, and the strength of the phase transition. All the new fields are singlets under the SM gauge group. Neutrino masses are generated via a new variant of radiative inverse seesaw where the required small mass term is generated via loops involving DM and no large hierarchy is assumed among the mass scales. The model offers all the advantage of low-scale neutrino mass models as well as a viable dark matter candidate that is testable with direct detection experiments.

  12. Wavelet Sparse Approximate Inverse Preconditioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tony F.; Tang, W.-P.; Wan, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using sparse approximate inverses as preconditioners for Krylov subspace iterative methods. Recent studies of Grote and Huckle and Chow and Saad also show that sparse approximate inverse preconditioner can be effective for a variety of matrices, e.g. Harwell-Boeing collections. Nonetheless a drawback is that it requires rapid decay of the inverse entries so that sparse approximate inverse is possible. However, for the class of matrices that, come from elliptic PDE problems, this assumption may not necessarily hold. Our main idea is to look for a basis, other than the standard one, such that a sparse representation of the inverse is feasible. A crucial observation is that the kind of matrices we are interested in typically have a piecewise smooth inverse. We exploit this fact, by applying wavelet techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse in the wavelet basis. We shall justify theoretically and numerically that our approach is effective for matrices with smooth inverse. We emphasize that in this paper we have only presented the idea of wavelet approximate inverses and demonstrated its potential but have not yet developed a highly refined and efficient algorithm.

  13. Holocaust inversion and contemporary antisemitism.

    OpenAIRE

    Klaff, Lesley D

    2014-01-01

    One of the cruellest aspects of the new antisemitism is its perverse use of the Holocaust as a stick to beat 'the Jews'. This article explains the phenomenon of 'Holocaust Inversion', which involves an 'inversion of reality' (the Israelis are cast as the 'new' Nazis and the Palestinians as the 'new' Jews) and an 'inversion of morality' (the Holocaust is presented as a moral lesson for, or even a moral indictment of, 'the Jews'). Holocaust inversion is a form of soft-core Holocaust denial, yet...

  14. Waveform inversion of acoustic waves for explosion yield estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.; Rodgers, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new waveform inversion technique to estimate the energy of near-surface explosions using atmospheric acoustic waves. Conventional methods often employ air blast models based on a homogeneous atmosphere, where the acoustic wave propagation effects (e.g., refraction and diffraction) are not taken into account, and therefore, their accuracy decreases with increasing source-receiver distance. In this study, three-dimensional acoustic simulations are performed with a finite difference method in realistic atmospheres and topography, and the modeled acoustic Green's functions are incorporated into the waveform inversion for the acoustic source time functions. The strength of the acoustic source is related to explosion yield based on a standard air blast model. The technique was applied to local explosions (structure. The presented method can be extended to explosions recorded at far distance provided proper meteorological specifications.

  15. Lidar measurements of mesospheric temperature inversion at a low latitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Siva Kumar

    Full Text Available The Rayleigh lidar data collected on 119 nights from March 1998 to February 2000 were used to study the statistical characteristics of the low latitude mesospheric temperature inversion observed over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, India. The occurrence frequency of the inversion showed semiannual variation with maxima in the equinoxes and minima in the summer and winter, which was quite different from that reported for the mid-latitudes. The peak of the inversion layer was found to be confined to the height range of 73 to 79 km with the maximum occurrence centered around 76 km, with a weak seasonal dependence that fits well to an annual cycle with a maximum in June and a minimum in December. The magnitude of the temperature deviation associated with the inversion was found to be as high as 32 K, with the most probable value occurring at about 20 K. Its seasonal dependence seems to follow an annual cycle with a maximum in April and a minimum in October. The observed characteristics of the inversion layer are compared with that of the mid-latitudes and discussed in light of the current understanding of the source mechanisms.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (pressure, density and temperature. Meterology and atmospheric dynamics (climatology

  16. Inversion exercises inspired by mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groetsch, C. W.

    2016-02-01

    An elementary calculus transform, inspired by the centroid and gyration radius, is introduced as a prelude to the study of more advanced transforms. Analysis of the transform, including its inversion, makes use of several key concepts from basic calculus and exercises in the application and inversion of the transform provide practice in the use of technology in calculus.

  17. Inverse fracture network modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic problem in analyzing flow and transport in fractured rock is that the flow may be largely governed by a poorly connected network of fractures. Flow in such a system cannot be modeled with traditional modelling techniques. Fracture network models also have a limitation, in that they are based on geological data on fracture geometry even though it is known that only a small portion of fractures observed is hydraulically active. This paper discusses a new technique developed for treating the problem as well as presents a modelling example carried out to apply it. The approach is developed in Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and it treats the fracture zone as an 'equivalent discontinuum'. The discontinuous nature of the problem is represented through flow on a partially filled lattice. An equivalent discontinuum model is constructed by adding and removing conductive elements through a statistical inverse technique called 'simulated annealing'. The fracture network model is 'annealed' until the modified systems behaves like the observed. The further development of the approach continues at LBL and in a joint LBL/VTT collaboration project the possibilities to apply the technique in Finnish conditions are investigated

  18. Inverse problem in hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Jesús; Alcolea, Andrés; Medina, Agustín; Hidalgo, Juan; Slooten, Luit J.

    2005-03-01

    The state of the groundwater inverse problem is synthesized. Emphasis is placed on aquifer characterization, where modelers have to deal with conceptual model uncertainty (notably spatial and temporal variability), scale dependence, many types of unknown parameters (transmissivity, recharge, boundary conditions, etc.), nonlinearity, and often low sensitivity of state variables (typically heads and concentrations) to aquifer properties. Because of these difficulties, calibration cannot be separated from the modeling process, as it is sometimes done in other fields. Instead, it should be viewed as one step in the process of understanding aquifer behavior. In fact, it is shown that actual parameter estimation methods do not differ from each other in the essence, though they may differ in the computational details. It is argued that there is ample room for improvement in groundwater inversion: development of user-friendly codes, accommodation of variability through geostatistics, incorporation of geological information and different types of data (temperature, occurrence and concentration of isotopes, age, etc.), proper accounting of uncertainty, etc. Despite this, even with existing codes, automatic calibration facilitates enormously the task of modeling. Therefore, it is contended that its use should become standard practice. L'état du problème inverse des eaux souterraines est synthétisé. L'accent est placé sur la caractérisation de l'aquifère, où les modélisateurs doivent jouer avec l'incertitude des modèles conceptuels (notamment la variabilité spatiale et temporelle), les facteurs d'échelle, plusieurs inconnues sur différents paramètres (transmissivité, recharge, conditions aux limites, etc.), la non linéarité, et souvent la sensibilité de plusieurs variables d'état (charges hydrauliques, concentrations) des propriétés de l'aquifère. A cause de ces difficultés, le calibrage ne peut êtreséparé du processus de modélisation, comme c'est le

  19. Multiples waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, D. L.

    2013-01-01

    To increase the illumination of the subsurface and to eliminate the dependency of FWI on the source wavelet, we propose multiples waveform inversion (MWI) that transforms each hydrophone into a virtual point source with a time history equal to that of the recorded data. These virtual sources are used to numerically generate downgoing wavefields that are correlated with the backprojected surface-related multiples to give the migration image. Since the recorded data are treated as the virtual sources, knowledge of the source wavelet is not required, and the subsurface illumination is greatly enhanced because the entire free surface acts as an extended source compared to the radiation pattern of a traditional point source. Numerical tests on the Marmousi2 model show that the convergence rate and the spatial resolution of MWI is, respectively, faster and more accurate then FWI. The potential pitfall with this method is that the multiples undergo more than one roundtrip to the surface, which increases attenuation and reduces spatial resolution. This can lead to less resolved tomograms compared to conventional FWI. The possible solution is to combine both FWI and MWI in inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution.

  20. Multiscale Modelling and Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, J; Stuart, A M

    2010-01-01

    The need to blend observational data and mathematical models arises in many applications and leads naturally to inverse problems. Parameters appearing in the model, such as constitutive tensors, initial conditions, boundary conditions, and forcing can be estimated on the basis of observed data. The resulting inverse problems are often ill-posed and some form of regularization is required. These notes discuss parameter estimation in situations where the unknown parameters vary across multiple scales. We illustrate the main ideas using a simple model for groundwater flow. We will highlight various approaches to regularization for inverse problems, including Tikhonov and Bayesian methods. We illustrate three ideas that arise when considering inverse problems in the multiscale context. The first idea is that the choice of space or set in which to seek the solution to the inverse problem is intimately related to whether a homogenized or full multiscale solution is required. This is a choice of regularization. The ...

  1. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...... localities of tensions between matter and the immaterial, the practical and the ideal, and subject and object. In the colloquial language there can, moreover, often seem to be something authentic or genuine about atmosphere, juxtaposing it to staging, which is implied to be something simulated or artificial....... This introduction seeks to outline how a number of scholars have addressed the relationship between staged atmospheres and experience, and thus highlight both the philosophical, social and political aspects of atmospheres...

  2. Multidimensional NMR Inversion without Kronecker Products: Multilinear Inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Medellín, David; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required...

  3. On the feasibility of inversion methods based on models of urban sky glow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-wavelength imaging luminance photometry of sky glow provides a huge amount of information on light pollution. However, the understanding of the measured data involves the combination of different processes and data of radiation transfer, atmospheric physics and atmospheric constitution. State-of-the-art numerical radiation transfer models provide the possibility to define an inverse problem to obtain information on the emission intensity distribution of a city and perhaps the physical properties of the atmosphere. We provide numerical tests on the solvability and feasibility of such procedures. - Highlights: • A method of urban sky glow inversion is introduced based on Monte-Carlo calculations. • Imaging photometry can provide enough information for basic inversions. • The inversion technique can be used to construct maps of light pollution. • The inclusion of multiple scattering in the models plays an important role

  4. Parameter estimation and inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Aster, Richard C; Thurber, Clifford H

    2011-01-01

    Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems, 2e provides geoscience students and professionals with answers to common questions like how one can derive a physical model from a finite set of observations containing errors, and how one may determine the quality of such a model. This book takes on these fundamental and challenging problems, introducing students and professionals to the broad range of approaches that lie in the realm of inverse theory. The authors present both the underlying theory and practical algorithms for solving inverse problems. The authors' treatment is approp

  5. Inverse Doppler Effects in Flute

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiao P; Liu, Song; Shen, Fang L; Li, Lin L; Luo, Chun R

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the observation of the inverse Doppler effects in a flute. It is experimentally verified that, when there is a relative movement between the source and the observer, the inverse Doppler effect could be detected for all seven pitches of a musical scale produced by a flute. Higher tone is associated with a greater shift in frequency. The effect of the inverse frequency shift may provide new insights into why the flute, with its euphonious tone, has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  6. Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S

    2010-01-01

    At the dawn of the first discovery of exoplanets orbiting sun-like stars in the mid-1990s, few believed that observations of exoplanet atmospheres would ever be possible. After the 2002 Hubble Space Telescope detection of a transiting exoplanet atmosphere, many skeptics discounted it as a one-object, one-method success. Nevertheless, the field is now firmly established, with over two dozen exoplanet atmospheres observed today. Hot Jupiters are the type of exoplanet currently most amenable to study. Highlights include: detection of molecular spectral features; observation of day-night temperature gradients; and constraints on vertical atmospheric structure. Atmospheres of giant planets far from their host stars are also being studied with direct imaging. The ultimate exoplanet goal is to answer the enigmatic and ancient question, "Are we alone?" via detection of atmospheric biosignatures. Two exciting prospects are the immediate focus on transiting super Earths orbiting in the habitable zone of M-dwarfs, and u...

  7. Parameter estimation and inverse problems

    CERN Document Server

    Aster, Richard C; Thurber, Clifford H

    2005-01-01

    Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems primarily serves as a textbook for advanced undergraduate and introductory graduate courses. Class notes have been developed and reside on the World Wide Web for faciliting use and feedback by teaching colleagues. The authors'' treatment promotes an understanding of fundamental and practical issus associated with parameter fitting and inverse problems including basic theory of inverse problems, statistical issues, computational issues, and an understanding of how to analyze the success and limitations of solutions to these probles. The text is also a practical resource for general students and professional researchers, where techniques and concepts can be readily picked up on a chapter-by-chapter basis.Parameter Estimation and Inverse Problems is structured around a course at New Mexico Tech and is designed to be accessible to typical graduate students in the physical sciences who may not have an extensive mathematical background. It is accompanied by a Web site that...

  8. Testing earthquake source inversion methodologies

    KAUST Repository

    Page, Morgan T.

    2011-01-01

    Source Inversion Validation Workshop; Palm Springs, California, 11-12 September 2010; Nowadays earthquake source inversions are routinely performed after large earthquakes and represent a key connection between recorded seismic and geodetic data and the complex rupture process at depth. The resulting earthquake source models quantify the spatiotemporal evolution of ruptures. They are also used to provide a rapid assessment of the severity of an earthquake and to estimate losses. However, because of uncertainties in the data, assumed fault geometry and velocity structure, and chosen rupture parameterization, it is not clear which features of these source models are robust. Improved understanding of the uncertainty and reliability of earthquake source inversions will allow the scientific community to use the robust features of kinematic inversions to more thoroughly investigate the complexity of the rupture process and to better constrain other earthquakerelated computations, such as ground motion simulations and static stress change calculations.

  9. Uterine Inversion; A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchikhi, C; Saadi, H; Fakhir, B; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Banani, A; Melhouf, Ma

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supported by clinical symptoms. It is based on three elements: haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. It is based on a medical reanimation associated with firstly a manual reduction then surgical treatment using various techniques. We report an observation of a 25 years old grand multiparous patient with a subacute uterine inversion after delivery at home. PMID:21516244

  10. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses...

  11. Articulating Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily...... experience in space, presented as middle ground experience. In the field of HCI, middle ground experiences complete the unarticulated spectrum between designing for foreground of attention or background awareness. When “Articulating Atmospheres through Middle Ground Experiences in Interaction Design...

  12. -Colour Self-Inverse Compositions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geetika Narang; A K Agarwal

    2006-08-01

    MacMahon’s definition of self-inverse composition is extended to -colour self-inverse composition. This introduces four new sequences which satisfy the same recurrence relation with different initial conditions like the famous Fibonacci and Lucas sequences. For these new sequences explicit formulas, recurrence relations, generating functions and a summation formula are obtained. Two new binomial identities with combinatorial meaning are also given.

  13. Uterine Inversion; A case report

    OpenAIRE

    C, Bouchikhi; H, Saadi; B, Fakhir; H, Chaara; H, Bouguern; A, Banani; Melhouf MA

    2008-01-01

    The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The mechanisms are not completely known. However, extrinsic factors such as oxytocic arrests after a prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction or abdominal expression are pointed. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, various placental localizations, fundic myoma or short umbilical cord were also reported. The diagnosis of the uterine inversion is mainly supporte...

  14. Thermal measurements and inverse techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Orlande, Helcio RB; Maillet, Denis; Cotta, Renato M

    2011-01-01

    With its uncommon presentation of instructional material regarding mathematical modeling, measurements, and solution of inverse problems, Thermal Measurements and Inverse Techniques is a one-stop reference for those dealing with various aspects of heat transfer. Progress in mathematical modeling of complex industrial and environmental systems has enabled numerical simulations of most physical phenomena. In addition, recent advances in thermal instrumentation and heat transfer modeling have improved experimental procedures and indirect measurements for heat transfer research of both natural phe

  15. Pluto's atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne CCD photometer observations of Pluto's June 9, 1988 stellar occultation have yielded an occultation lightcurve, probing two regions on the sunrise limb 2000 km apart, which reveals an upper atmosphere overlying an extinction layer with an abrupt upper boundary. The extinction layer may surround the entire planet. Attention is given to a model atmosphere whose occultation lightcurve closely duplicates observations; fits of the model to the immersion and emersion lightcurves exhibit no significant derived atmosphere-structure differences. Assuming a pure methane atmosphere, surface pressures of the order of 3 microbars are consistent with the occultation data. 43 references

  16. Atmospheric electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, J Alan

    1957-01-01

    Atmospheric Electricity brings together numerous studies on various aspects of atmospheric electricity. This book is composed of 13 chapters that cover the main problems in the field, including the maintenance of the negative charge on the earth and the origin of the charges in thunderstorms. After a brief overview of the historical developments of atmospheric electricity, this book goes on dealing with the general principles, results, methods, and the MKS system of the field. The succeeding chapters are devoted to some aspects of electricity in the atmosphere, such as the occurrence and d

  17. The mesospheric inversion layer and sprites

    CERN Document Server

    Fadnavis, S; Singh, R P

    2009-01-01

    The vertical structure of temperature observed by SABER (Sounding of Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) aboard TIMED (Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics) and sprites observations made during the Eurosprite 2003 to 2007 observational campaign were analyzed. Sprite observations were made at two locations in France, namely Puy de Dome in the French Massif Central and at the Pic du Midi in the French Pyrenees. It is observed that the vertical structure of temperature shows evidence for a Mesospheric Inversion Layer (MIL) on those days on which sprites were observed. A few events are also reported in which sprites were not recorded, although there is evidence of a MIL in the vertical structure of the temperature. It is proposed that breaking gravity waves produced by convective thunderstorms facilitate the production of (a) sprites by modulating the neutral air-density and (b) MILs via the deposition of energy. The same proposition has been used to explain observations of lig...

  18. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  19. Atmospheric echo sounding. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundemann, A. S.

    1980-09-01

    s pertaining to equipment, design, and use of acoustic sounders are presented. Use of the sounders to sense the atmosphere for weather changes, temperature inversions, aircraft wakes, ionospheric properties, and other characteristics is discussed.

  20. Multidimensional NMR inversion without Kronecker products: Multilinear inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellín, David; Ravi, Vivek R.; Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Multidimensional NMR inversion using Kronecker products poses several challenges. First, kernel compression is only possible when the kernel matrices are separable, and in recent years, there has been an increasing interest in NMR sequences with non-separable kernels. Second, in three or more dimensions, the singular value decomposition is not unique; therefore kernel compression is not well-defined for higher dimensions. Without kernel compression, the Kronecker product yields matrices that require large amounts of memory, making the inversion intractable for personal computers. Finally, incorporating arbitrary regularization terms is not possible using the Lawson-Hanson (LH) or the Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD) algorithms. We develop a minimization-based inversion method that circumvents the above problems by using multilinear forms to perform multidimensional NMR inversion without using kernel compression or Kronecker products. The new method is memory efficient, requiring less than 0.1% of the memory required by the LH or BRD methods. It can also be extended to arbitrary dimensions and adapted to include non-separable kernels, linear constraints, and arbitrary regularization terms. Additionally, it is easy to implement because only a cost function and its first derivative are required to perform the inversion.

  1. Cloud detection by inversion of MAX-DOAS measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Nasse, Jan-Marcus; Zielcke, Johannes; Friess, Udo; Lampel, Johannes; König-Langlo, Gert; Platt, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAXDOAS)is a widely used technique for the detection of atmospheric trace gases, e.g. NO2, SO2, but also for the oxygen collision complex O4, whose atmospheric distribution is well known. By comparing measured O4 differential slant column densities (dSCDs) with modelled ones, information on aerosol distributions and optical properties can be gained. In combination with a radiative transfer model, an inversion of measured dSCDs allows th...

  2. Global CO2 flux estimation using GOSAT: An inter-comparison of inversion results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houweling, S.; Basu, S.; Chevallier, F.; Feng, L.; Ganshin, A.; Maksyutov, S.; Palmer, P. I.; Peylin, P.; Poussi, Z.; Takagi, H.; Zhuravlev, R.

    2012-12-01

    A unique global data archive is under construction of total column CO2 measurements retrieved from the Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite, currently spanning more than three years of data. Several groups are investigating the application of these data to global atmospheric inverse modelling for studying the global carbon cycle. It is known from inverse modeling using surface measurements that the robustness of the inversion-estimated fluxes is best analyzed using a multi-model approach. So far, this has not been demonstrated for inversions using satellite data, but but some of the known sources of uncertainty are difficult to account for in a single inversion, such as transport model uncertainties and differences between retrieval methods. We have organized an inversion inter-comparison experiment to investigate whether, despite these uncertainties, robust signals of sources and sinks can be inferred from the GOSAT data. The current experiment allows full freedom in inversion set-up in order to avoid limiting the range of possible outcomes. Each participating group is free to use their preferred inversion set-up, transport model, and measurements, but is asked to report in a common format and for a common time period of one year to allow one-to-one comparison. We will present an overview of the status of the experiment, including a preliminary synthesis of large-scale CO2 fluxes from a statistical analysis of the ensemble of inversion results and verification of the performance of the inversions using independent measurements.

  3. Evaluation of simplified evaporation duct refractivity models for inversion problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeger, J. T.; Grimes, N. G.; Rickard, H. E.; Hackett, E. E.

    2015-10-01

    To assess a radar system's instantaneous performance on any given day, detailed knowledge of the meteorological conditions is required due to the dependency of atmospheric refractivity on thermodynamic properties such as temperature, water vapor, and pressure. Because of the significant challenges involved in obtaining these data, recent efforts have focused on development of methods to obtain the refractivity structure inversely using radar measurements and radar wave propagation models. Such inversion techniques generally use simplified refractivity models in order to reduce the parameter space of the solution. Here the accuracy of three simple refractivity models is examined for the case of an evaporation duct. The models utilize the basic log linear shape classically associated with evaporation ducts, but each model depends on various parameters that affect different aspects of the profile, such as its shape and duct height. The model parameters are optimized using radiosonde data, and their performance is compared to these atmospheric measurements. The optimized models and data are also used to predict propagation using a parabolic equation code with the refractivity prescribed by the models and measured data, and the resulting propagation patterns are compared. The results of this study suggest that the best log linear model formulation for an inversion problem would be a two-layer model that contains at least three parameters: duct height, duct curvature, and mixed layer slope. This functional form permits a reasonably accurate fit to atmospheric measurements as well as embodies key features of the profile required for correct propagation prediction with as few parameters as possible.

  4. Global inversion for anisotropy during full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debens, H. A.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2015-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a powerful tool for quantitative estimation of high-resolution high-fidelity models of subsurface seismic parameters, typically P-wave velocity. The solution to FWI's posed nonlinear inverse problem is obtained via an iterative series of linearized local updates to a start model, assuming this model lies within the basin of attraction to the global minimum. Thanks to many successful published applications to three-dimensional (3D) field datasets, its advance has been rapid and driven in large-part by the oil and gas industry. The consideration of seismic anisotropy during FWI is of vital importance, as it holds influence over both the kinematics and dynamics of seismic waveforms. If not appropriately taken into account then inadequacies in the anisotropy model are likely to manifest as significant error in the recovered velocity model. Conventionally, anisotropic FWI employs either an a priori anisotropy model, held fixed during FWI, or it uses a multi-parameter local inversion scheme to recover the anisotropy as part of the FWI; both of these methods can be problematic. Constructing an anisotropy model prior to FWI often involves intensive (and hence expensive) iterative procedures, such as travel-time tomography or moveout velocity analysis. On the other hand, introducing multiple parameters to FWI itself increases the complexity of what is already an underdetermined inverse problem. We propose that global rather than local FWI can be used to recover the long-wavelength acoustic anisotropy model, and that this can then be followed by more-conventional local FWI to recover the detailed model. We validate this approach using a full 3D field dataset, demonstrating that it avoids problems associated to crosstalk that can bedevil local inversion schemes, and reconciles well with in situ borehole measurements. Although our approach includes a global inversion for anisotropy, it is nonetheless affordable and practical for 3D field data.

  5. {Data and metadata schemes in chains of direct and inverse problems in spectroscopy of water} A.Fazliev (1), A.Kozodoev (1), N.Lavrentiev (1), A.Privezentsev (1), J.Tennyson (2) (1) Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS, Tomsk, Russia, (2) University Col

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazliev, A.

    2009-04-01

    An idea to develop procedure knowledge domain model in a form of task net in information system has been proposed. Tasks solutions are interpreted as data. Solution properties are regarded as metadata. Water spectroscopy is a knowledge domain in which a good approximation for task net would be a pair of chains of direct and inverse tasks. In such an approximation data schemes are the basis of knowledge domain conceptualization. Data scheme represents the next level of water spectroscopy representation granulation. The work describes metadata and data schemes for eight tasks of molecular spectroscopy. The importance of results of water spectroscopy is great. Precise and valid information on water is necessary in many applied knowledge domains such as atmospheric optics, astronomy, atmospheric radiation and so on. The report describes metadata and data layer in W@DIS information system oriented on information representation. An important feature of the ICS is its spectral data validity check realized in the explicit form. The main sets of molecules spectral characteristics available to consumers have been formed in the last forty years. These are such data banks as HITRAN1, GEISA2 and others. Data on spectral line parameters and interfaces for their operation appeared for the first time in the Internet in "Atmospheric gases spectroscopy"3 information system. In the above works this data representation in a form of files and interfaces for their operation hasn't solve the main problem (in our opinion) of spectral data in the information systems. This is the problem of creation of accessible applications developed to check the validity of data gathered in an information system. One of the components necessary for automatic data validity check is the presence of computer processable initial results of measurements and calculations. Bibliographic references that can simplify the solution of this task are present in the explicit form in data files presented by Hitran and

  6. Inversion strategies for visco-acoustic waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, R.; Pratt, R. G.

    2013-08-01

    Visco-acoustic waveform inversion can potentially yield quantitative images of the distribution of both velocity and the attenuation parameters from seismic data. Intrinsic P-wave attenuation has been of particular interest, but has also proven challenging. Frequency-domain inversion allows attenuation and velocity relations to be easily incorporated, and allows a natural multiscale approach. The Laplace-Fourier approach extends this to allow the natural damping of waveforms to enhance early arrivals. Nevertheless, simultaneous inversion of velocity and attenuation leads to significant `cross-talk' between the resulting images, reflecting a lack of parameter resolution and indicating the need for pre-conditioning and regularization of the inverse problem. We analyse the cross-talk issue by partitioning the inversion parameters into two classes; the velocity parameter class, and the attenuation parameter class. Both parameters are defined at a reference frequency, and a dispersion relation is assumed that describes these parameters at any other frequency. We formulate the model gradients at a forward modelling frequency, and convert them to the reference frequency by employing the Jacobian of the coordinate change represented by the dispersion relation. We show that at a given modelling frequency, the Fréchet derivatives corresponding to these two parameter classes differ only by a 90° phase shift, meaning that the magnitudes of resulting model updates will be unscaled, and will not reflect the expected magnitudes in realistic (Q-1 ≪ 1) media. Due to the lack of scaling, cross-talk will be enhanced by poor subsurface illumination, by errors in kinematics, and by data noise. To solve these issues, we introduce an attenuation scaling term (the inverse of a penalty term) that is used to pre-condition the gradient by controlling the magnitudes of the updates to the attenuation parameters. Initial results from a suite of synthetic cross-hole tests using a three

  7. Optimization for nonlinear inverse problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonlinear inversion of geophysical data in general does not yield a unique solution, but a single model, representing the investigated field, is preferred for an easy geological interpretation of the observations. The analyzed region is constituted by a number of sub-regions where the multi-valued nonlinear inversion is applied, which leads to a multi-valued solution. Therefore, combining the values of the solution in each sub-region, many acceptable models are obtained for the entire region and this complicates the geological interpretation of geophysical investigations. In this paper are presented new methodologies, capable to select one model, among all acceptable ones, that satisfies different criteria of smoothness in the explored space of solutions. In this work we focus on the non-linear inversion of surface waves dispersion curves, which gives structural models of shear-wave velocity versus depth, but the basic concepts have a general validity. (author)

  8. A General Systems Theory for Atmospheric Flows and Atmospheric Aerosol Size Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Selvam, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal spacetime fluctuations manifested as the fractal geometry to global cloud cover pattern and inverse power law form for power spectra of meteorological parameters such as windspeed, temperature, rainfall etc. Inverse power law form for power spectra indicate long-range spacetime correlations or non-local connections and is a signature of selforganised criticality generic to dynamical systems in nature such as river flows, population dynamics, heart...

  9. The Transmuted Inverse Exponential Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelumi Oguntunde

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a two-parameter probability model which represents another generalization of the Inverse Exponential distribution by using the quadratic rank transmuted map. The proposed model is named Transmuted Inverse Exponential (TIE distribution and its statistical properties are systematically studied. We provide explicit expressions for its moments, moment generating function, quantile function, reliability function and hazard function. We estimate the parameters of the TIE distribution using the method of maximum likelihood estimation (MLE. The hazard function of the model has an inverted bathtub shape and we propose the usefulness of the TIE distribution in modeling breast cancer and bladder cancer data sets.

  10. Thermoelectric properties of inverse opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, G. D.; Poilvert, N.; Crespi, V. H.

    2016-02-01

    Rayleigh's method [Philos. Mag. Ser. 5 34, 481 (1892)] is used to solve for the classical thermoelectric equations in inverse opals. His theory predicts that in an inverse opal, with periodic holes, the Seebeck coefficient and the figure of merit are identical to that of the bulk material. We also provide a major revision to Rayleigh's method, in using the electrochemical potential as an important variable, instead of the electrostatic potential. We also show that in some cases, the thermal boundary resistance is important in the effective thermal conductivity.

  11. -Dimensional Fractional Lagrange's Inversion Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Abd El-Salam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Riemann-Liouville fractional differential operator, a fractional extension of the Lagrange inversion theorem and related formulas are developed. The required basic definitions, lemmas, and theorems in the fractional calculus are presented. A fractional form of Lagrange's expansion for one implicitly defined independent variable is obtained. Then, a fractional version of Lagrange's expansion in more than one unknown function is generalized. For extending the treatment in higher dimensions, some relevant vectors and tensors definitions and notations are presented. A fractional Taylor expansion of a function of -dimensional polyadics is derived. A fractional -dimensional Lagrange inversion theorem is proved.

  12. Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Fortney, Jonathan; Barman, Travis

    2014-01-01

    The study of exoplanetary atmospheres is one of the most exciting and dynamic frontiers in astronomy. Over the past two decades ongoing surveys have revealed an astonishing diversity in the planetary masses, radii, temperatures, orbital parameters, and host stellar properties of exoplanetary systems. We are now moving into an era where we can begin to address fundamental questions concerning the diversity of exoplanetary compositions, atmospheric and interior processes, and formation histories, just as have been pursued for solar system planets over the past century. Exoplanetary atmospheres provide a direct means to address these questions via their observable spectral signatures. In the last decade, and particularly in the last five years, tremendous progress has been made in detecting atmospheric signatures of exoplanets through photometric and spectroscopic methods using a variety of space-borne and/or ground-based observational facilities. These observations are beginning to provide important constraints...

  13. Atmospheric composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The earth's atmosphere is made up of a number of gases in different relative amounts. Near sea level and up to about 90 km, the amount of these atmospheric gases in clean, relatively dry air is practically constant. Four of these gases, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide, make up 99.99 percent by volume of the atmosphere. Two gases, ozone and water vapor, change in relative amounts, but the total amount of these two is very small compared to the amount of the other gases. The atmospheric composition shown in a table can be considered valid up to 90 km geometric altitude. Above 90 km, mainly because of molecular dissociation and diffusive separation, the composition changes.

  14. Phenomenological description of phase inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piela, K.; Ooms, G.; Sengers, J.V.

    2009-01-01

    We propose an extended Ginzburg-Landau model for a description of the ambivalence region associated with the phenomenon of phase inversion observed in dispersed water-oil flow through a pipe. In analogy to the classical mean-field theory of phase transitions, it is shown that a good quantitative rep

  15. Inversion of the perturbation series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amore, Paolo [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Fernandez, Francisco M [INIFTA (Conicet, UNLP), Division Quimica Teorica, Diag 113 S/N, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2008-01-18

    We investigate the inversion of the perturbation series and its resummation, and prove that it is related to a recently developed parametric perturbation theory. Results for some illustrative examples show that in some cases series reversion may improve the accuracy of the results.

  16. Applications of inverse pattern projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wansong; Bothe, Thorsten; Kalms, Michael K.; von Kopylow, Christoph; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    2003-05-01

    Fast and robust 3D quality control as well as fast deformation measurement is of particular importance for industrial inspection. Additionally a direct response about measured properties is desired. Therefore, robust optical techniques are needed which use as few images as possible for measurement and visualize results in an efficient way. One promising technique for this aim is the inverse pattern projection which has the following advantages: The technique codes the information of a preceding measurement into the projected inverse pattern. Thus, it is possible to do differential measurements using only one camera frame for each state. Additionally, the results are optimized straight fringes for sampling which are independent of the object curvature. The hardware needs are low as just a programmable projector and a standard camera are necessary. The basic idea of inverse pattern projection, necessary algorithms and found optimizations are demonstrated, roughly. Evaluation techniques were found to preserve a high quality phase measurement under imperfect conditions. The different application fields can be sorted out by the type of pattern used for inverse projection. We select two main topics for presentation. One is the incremental (one image per state) deformation measurement which is a promising technique for high speed deformation measurements. A video series of a wavering flag with projected inverse pattern was evaluated to show the complete deformation series. The other application is the optical feature marking (augmented reality) that allows to map any measured result directly onto the object under investigation. Any properties can be visualized directly on the object"s surface which makes inspections easier than with use of a separated indicating device. The general ability to straighten any kind of information on 3D surfaces is shown while preserving an exact mapping of camera image and object parts. In many cases this supersedes an additional monitor to

  17. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  18. Inverse carbon dioxide flux estimates for the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meesters, A.G.C.A.; Tolk, L.F.; Dolman, A.J. [Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, VU University, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Peters, W.; Hutjes, R.W.A.; Vellinga, O.S.; Elbers, J.A. [Department Meteorology and Air Quality, Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen (Netherlands); Vermeulen, A.T. [Biomass, Coal and Environmental Research, Energy research Center of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Van der Laan, S.; Neubert, R.E.M.; Meijer, H.A.J. [Centre for Isotope Research, Energy and Sustainability Research Institute Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-10-26

    CO2 fluxes for the Netherlands and surroundings are estimated for the year 2008, from concentration measurements at four towers, using an inverse model. The results are compared to direct CO2 flux measurements by aircraft, for 6 flight tracks over the Netherlands, flown multiple times in each season. We applied the Regional Atmospheric Mesoscale Modeling system (RAMS) coupled to a simple carbon flux scheme (including fossil fuel), which was run at 10 km resolution, and inverted with an Ensemble Kalman Filter. The domain had 6 eco-regions, and inversions were performed for the four seasons separately. Inversion methods with pixel-dependent and -independent parameters for each eco-region were compared. The two inversion methods, in general, yield comparable flux averages for each eco-region and season, whereas the difference from the prior flux may be large. Posterior fluxes co-sampled along the aircraft flight tracks are usually much closer to the observations than the priors, with a comparable performance for both inversion methods, and with best performance for summer and autumn. The inversions showed more negative CO2 fluxes than the priors, though the latter are obtained from a biosphere model optimized using the Fluxnet database, containing observations from more than 200 locations worldwide. The two different crop ecotypes showed very different CO2 uptakes, which was unknown from the priors. The annual-average uptake is practically zero for the grassland class and for one of the cropland classes, whereas the other cropland class had a large net uptake, possibly because of the abundance of maize there.

  19. Atmospheric thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarne, J V

    1973-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the atmosphere is the subject of several chapters in most textbooks on dynamic meteorology, but there is no work in English to give the subject a specific and more extensive treatment. In writing the present textbook, we have tried to fill this rather remarkable gap in the literature related to atmospheric sciences. Our aim has been to provide students of meteorology with a book that can playa role similar to the textbooks on chemical thermodynamics for the chemists. This implies a previous knowledge of general thermodynamics, such as students acquire in general physics courses; therefore, although the basic principles are reviewed (in the first four chapters), they are only briefly discussed, and emphasis is laid on those topics that will be useful in later chapters, through their application to atmospheric problems. No attempt has been made to introduce the thermodynamics of irreversible processes; on the other hand, consideration of heterogeneous and open homogeneous systems permits a...

  20. Determination of evaporation duct heights by an inverse method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douvenot, R.; Fabbro, V.; Bourlier, C.; Saillard, J.; Fuchs, H.-H.; Essen, H.; Förster, J.

    2007-10-01

    The detection and tracking of naval targets, including low RCS objects like inflatable boats requires a thorough knowledge of the propagation properties of the maritime boundary layer. Models are in existence, which allow a prediction of the propagation factor using the parabolic equation algorithm. As a necessary input the refractive index of the atmosphere has to be known. This parameter, however, is strongly influenced by the actual atmospheric conditions, characterized mainly by air-sea temperature difference, humidity and air pressure. An approach was initiated to retrieve the vertical profile of the refractive index from sea clutter data. The method is based on the LS-SVM (Least-Squares Support Vector Machines) theory and has already been validated on simulated data. Here an inversion method to determine propagation factors is presented based upon data measured during the Vampira campaign conducted as a multinational approach over a transmission path across the Baltic Sea. As the propagation factor has been measured on two reference reflectors mounted onboard a naval vessel at different heights, the results can be combined in order to increase the accuracy of the inversion system. The paper discusses results achieved with the inversion method.

  1. Atmospheric Refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Calculations of atmospheric refraction are generally based on a simplified model of atmospheric density in the troposphere which assumes that the temperature decreases at a constant lapse rate from sea level up to a height equal to eleven km, and that afterwards it remains constant. In this model, the temperature divided by the lapse rate determines the length scale in the calculations for altitudes less than this height. But daily balloon measurements across the U.S.A. reveal that in some cases the air temperature actually increases from sea level up to a height of about one km, and only after reaching a plateau, it decreases at an approximately constant lapse rate. Moreover, in three examples considered here, the temperature does not remain constant at eleven km , but continues to decreases to a minimum at about sixteen kilometers , and then increases at higher altitudes at a lower rate. Calculations of atmospheric refraction based on this atmospheric data is compared with the results of simplified models.

  2. Atmospheric Dispositifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    as a spatial phenomenon, exploring a multiplicity of conditions that constitute their resonant origins – i.e. the production sites from and within they have emerged. The intention is also to argue that despite the fact that atmosphere as an aesthetic category has crystallised over the last few decades...

  3. Analysis of RAE-1 inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedland, D. A.; Degonia, P. K.

    1974-01-01

    The RAE-1 spacecraft inversion performed October 31, 1972 is described based upon the in-orbit dynamical data in conjunction with results obtained from previously developed computer simulation models. The computer simulations used are predictive of the satellite dynamics, including boom flexing, and are applicable during boom deployment and retraction, inter-phase coast periods, and post-deployment operations. Attitude data, as well as boom tip data, were analyzed in order to obtain a detailed description of the dynamical behavior of the spacecraft during and after the inversion. Runs were made using the computer model and the results were analyzed and compared with the real time data. Close agreement between the actual recorded spacecraft attitude and the computer simulation results was obtained.

  4. Southern California Adjoint Source Inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, J.; Kim, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Southern California Centroid-Moment Tensor (CMT) solutions with 9 components (6 moment tensor elements, latitude, longitude, and depth) are sought to minimize a misfit function computed from waveform differences. The gradient of a misfit function is obtained based upon two numerical simulations for each earthquake: one forward calculation for the southern California model, and an adjoint calculation that uses time-reversed signals at the receivers. Conjugate gradient and square-root variable metric methods are used to iteratively improve the earthquake source model while reducing the misfit function. The square-root variable metric algorithm has the advantage of providing a direct approximation to the posterior covariance operator. We test the inversion procedure by perturbing each component of the CMT solution, and see how the algorithm converges. Finally, we demonstrate full inversion capabilities using data for real Southern California earthquakes.

  5. Ultrahigh-intensity inverse bremsstrahlung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Rax, J.-M.

    1999-01-01

    We study inverse bremsstrahlung in the ultrahigh intensity relativistic regime. The fully relativistic ultrahigh intensity absorption (emission) coefficient is derived for an arbitrary scattering potential and small-angle scattering. We find that in the Coulomb field case this absorption (emission) coefficient can be calculated as a function of the quiver energy, drift momentum, and impact parameter in two complementary regimes: (i) for remote collisions when the impact parameter is larger than the amplitude of the quiver motion, and (ii) for instantaneous collisions when the scattering time is shorter than the period of the wave. Both circular and linear polarizations are considered, and this study reveals that in this relativistic regime inverse bremsstrahlung absorption can be viewed as a harmonic Compton resonance heating of the laser-driven electron by the virtual photon of the ion Coulomb field. The relativistic modification of Marcuse's effect [Bell Syst. Tech. J. 41, 1557 (1962)] are also discussed, and relations with previous nonrelativistic results are elucidated.

  6. Phenomenological description of phase inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piela, K; Ooms, G; Sengers, J V

    2009-02-01

    We propose an extended Ginzburg-Landau model for a description of the ambivalence region associated with the phenomenon of phase inversion observed in dispersed water-oil flow through a pipe. In analogy to the classical mean-field theory of phase transitions, it is shown that a good quantitative representation of the ambivalence region is obtained by using the injected phase volume fraction and a friction factor as the appropriate physical parameters.

  7. Inverse Design of Electron Lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The inverae design of electron lens is reelized by two different methods in this paper. One isdamped leastsquare method and the other is the artificial neural network method. Their merits and defects are discussed accordingto our calculation results in the psper. In the condition of selecting the learning samples properly, the artificial neuralnetwork has obvious advantages in the inverse design of electron lens. It is an effective method to solve the inversedesign problem in the electron optic system.

  8. ISIR: Independent Sliced Inverse Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    International audience In this paper we consider a semiparametric regression model involving a $p$-dimensional explanatory variable ${\\mathbf{x}}$ and including a dimension reduction of ${\\mathbf{x}}$ via an index $B'{\\mathbf{x}}$. In this model, the main goal is to estimate $B$ and to predict the real response variable $Y$ conditionally to ${\\mathbf{x}}$. A standard approach is based on sliced inverse regression (SIR). We propose a new version of this method: the independent sliced invers...

  9. Tiling Spaces are Inverse Limits

    OpenAIRE

    Sadun, Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Let M be an arbitrary Riemannian homogeneous space, and let Omega be a space of tilings of M, with finite local complexity (relative to some symmetry group Gamma) and closed in the natural topology. Then Omega is the inverse limit of a sequence of compact finite-dimensional branched manifolds. The branched manifolds are (finite) unions of cells, constructed from the tiles themselves and the group Gamma. This result extends previous results of Anderson and Putnam, of Ormes, Radin and Sadun, of...

  10. Subadditive functions and their (pseudo-)inverses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerdal, Lars Peter

    2006-01-01

    The paper considers non-negative increasing functions on intervals with left endpoint closed at zero and investigates the duality between subadditivity and superadditivity via the inverse function and pseudo-inverses...

  11. From time inversion to nonlinear QED

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Wei Min

    2000-01-01

    In Minkowski flat space-time, it is perceived that time inversion is unitary rather than antiunitary, with energy being a time vector changing sign under time inversion. The Dirac equation, in the case of electromagnetic interaction, is not invariant under unitary time inversion, giving rise to a ``Klein paradox''. To render unitary time inversion invariance, a nonlinear wave equation is constructed, in which the ``Klein paradox'' disappears. In the case of Coulomb interaction, the revised no...

  12. Generalized Inverses of Matrices over Rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩瑞珠; 陈建龙

    1992-01-01

    Let R be a ring,*be an involutory function of the set of all finite matrices over R. In this pa-per,necessary and sufficient conditions are given for a matrix to have a (1,3)-inverse,(1,4)-inverse,or Morre-Penrose inverse,relative to *.Some results about generalized inverses of matrices over division rings are generalized and improved.

  13. SIAM conference on inverse problems: Geophysical applications. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This conference was the second in a series devoted to a particular area of inverse problems. The theme of this series is to discuss problems of major scientific importance in a specific area from a mathematical perspective. The theme of this symposium was geophysical applications. In putting together the program we tried to include a wide range of mathematical scientists and to interpret geophysics in as broad a sense as possible. Our speaker came from industry, government laboratories, and diverse departments in academia. We managed to attract a geographically diverse audience with participation from five continents. There were talks devoted to seismology, hydrology, determination of the earth`s interior on a global scale as well as oceanographic and atmospheric inverse problems.

  14. -Colour even Self-Inverse Compositions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yu-hong Guo

    2010-02-01

    An -colour even self-inverse composition is defined as an -colour self-inverse composition with even parts. In this paper, we get generating functions, explicit formulas and recurrence formulas for -colour even self-inverse compositions. One new binomial identity is also obtained.

  15. Recombination rate predicts inversion size in Diptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, M; Barbadilla, A; Ruiz, A

    1999-09-01

    Most species of the Drosophila genus and other Diptera are polymorphic for paracentric inversions. A common observation is that successful inversions are of intermediate size. We test here the hypothesis that the selected property is the recombination length of inversions, not their physical length. If so, physical length of successful inversions should be negatively correlated with recombination rate across species. This prediction was tested by a comprehensive statistical analysis of inversion size and recombination map length in 12 Diptera species for which appropriate data are available. We found that (1) there is a wide variation in recombination map length among species; (2) physical length of successful inversions varies greatly among species and is inversely correlated with the species recombination map length; and (3) neither the among-species variation in inversion length nor the correlation are observed in unsuccessful inversions. The clear differences between successful and unsuccessful inversions point to natural selection as the most likely explanation for our results. Presumably the selective advantage of an inversion increases with its length, but so does its detrimental effect on fertility due to double crossovers. Our analysis provides the strongest and most extensive evidence in favor of the notion that the adaptive value of inversions stems from their effect on recombination.

  16. Inverse Computation and the Universal Resolving Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We survey fundamental concepts for inverse programming and thenpresent the Uni v ersal Resolving Algorithm, an algorithm for inverse computation in a first-orde r , functional programming language. We discuss the key concepts of the algorithm, including a three-step approach based on the notion of a perfect process tree, and demonstrate our implementation with several examples of inverse computation.

  17. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Locatelli

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on the methane emissions estimated by an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, given by 10 different model outputs from the international TransCom-CH4 model exercise, are combined with a prior scenario of methane emissions and sinks, and integrated into the PYVAR-LMDZ-SACS inverse system to produce 10 different methane emission estimates at the global scale for the year 2005. The same set-up has been used to produce the synthetic observations and to compute flux estimates by inverse modelling, which means that only differences in the modelling of atmospheric transport may cause differences in the estimated fluxes. In our framework, we show that transport model errors lead to a discrepancy of 27 Tg CH4 per year at the global scale, representing 5% of the total methane emissions. At continental and yearly scales, transport model errors have bigger impacts depending on the region, ranging from 36 Tg CH4 in north America to 7 Tg CH4 in Boreal Eurasian (from 23% to 48%. At the model gridbox scale, the spread of inverse estimates can even reach 150% of the prior flux. Thus, transport model errors contribute to significant uncertainties on the methane estimates by inverse modelling, especially when small spatial scales are invoked. Sensitivity tests have been carried out to estimate the impact of the measurement network and the advantage of higher resolution models. The analysis of methane estimated fluxes in these different configurations questions the consistency of transport model errors in current inverse systems. For future methane inversions, an improvement in the modelling of the atmospheric transport would make the estimations more accurate. Likewise, errors of the observation covariance matrix should be more consistently prescribed in future inversions in order to limit the impact of transport model errors on estimated methane

  18. The global atmospheric electrical circuit and climate

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, R G

    2004-01-01

    Evidence is emerging for physical links among clouds, global temperatures, the global atmospheric electrical circuit and cosmic ray ionisation. The global circuit extends throughout the atmosphere from the planetary surface to the lower layers of the ionosphere. Cosmic rays are the principal source of atmospheric ions away from the continental boundary layer: the ions formed permit a vertical conduction current to flow in the fair weather part of the global circuit. Through the (inverse) solar modulation of cosmic rays, the resulting columnar ionisation changes may allow the global circuit to convey a solar influence to meteorological phenomena of the lower atmosphere. Electrical effects on non-thunderstorm clouds have been proposed to occur via the ion-assisted formation of ultrafine aerosol, which can grow to sizes able to act as cloud condensation nuclei, or through the increased ice nucleation capability of charged aerosols. Even small atmospheric electrical modulations on the aerosol size distribution ca...

  19. [Atmospheric Influences Analysis on the Satellite Passive Microwave Remote Sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yu-bao; Shi, Li-juan; Shi, Jian-cheng; Zhao, Shao-jie

    2016-02-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing offers its all-weather work capabilities, but atmospheric influences on satellite microwave brightness temperature were different under different atmospheric conditions and environments. In order to clarify atmospheric influences on Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), atmospheric radiation were simulated based on AMSR-E configuration under clear sky and cloudy conditions, by using radiative transfer model and atmospheric conditions data. Results showed that atmospheric water vapor was the major factor for atmospheric radiation under clear sky condition. Atmospheric transmittances were almost above 0.98 at AMSR-E's low frequencies (vapor needed to be corrected when using microwave high-frequency channels to inverse land surface parameters in clear sky condition. But under cloud cover or cloudy conditions, cloud liquid water was the key factor to cause atmospheric radiation. When sky was covered by typical stratus cloud, atmospheric transmittances at 10.7, 18.7 and 36.5 GHz were 0.942, 0.828 and 0.605 respectively. Comparing with the clear sky condition, the down-welling atmospheric radiation caused by cloud liquid water increased up to 75.365 K at 36.5 GHz. It showed that the atmospheric correction under different clouds covered condition was the primary work to improve the accuracy of land surface parameters inversion of passive microwave remote sensing. The results also provided the basis for microwave atmospheric correction algorithm development. Finally, the atmospheric sounding data was utilized to calculate the atmospheric transmittance of Hailaer Region, Inner Mongolia province, in July 2013. The results indicated that atmospheric transmittances were close to 1 at C-band and X-band. 89 GHz was greatly influenced by water vapor and its atmospheric transmittance was not more than 0.7. Atmospheric transmittances in Hailaer Region had a relatively stable value in summer, but had about 0

  20. Identifing Atmospheric Pollutant Sources Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, F. F.; Campos, H. F.; Luz, E. P.; Carvalho, A. R.

    2008-05-01

    The estimation of the area source pollutant strength is a relevant issue for atmospheric environment. This characterizes an inverse problem in the atmospheric pollution dispersion. In the inverse analysis, an area source domain is considered, where the strength of such area source term is assumed unknown. The inverse problem is solved by using a supervised artificial neural network: multi-layer perceptron. The conection weights of the neural network are computed from delta rule - learning process. The neural network inversion is compared with results from standard inverse analysis (regularized inverse solution). In the regularization method, the inverse problem is formulated as a non-linear optimization approach, whose the objective function is given by the square difference between the measured pollutant concentration and the mathematical models, associated with a regularization operator. In our numerical experiments, the forward problem is addressed by a source-receptor scheme, where a regressive Lagrangian model is applied to compute the transition matrix. The second order maximum entropy regularization is used, and the regularization parameter is calculated by the L-curve technique. The objective function is minimized employing a deterministic scheme (a quasi-Newton algorithm) [1] and a stochastic technique (PSO: particle swarm optimization) [2]. The inverse problem methodology is tested with synthetic observational data, from six measurement points in the physical domain. The best inverse solutions were obtained with neural networks. References: [1] D. R. Roberti, D. Anfossi, H. F. Campos Velho, G. A. Degrazia (2005): Estimating Emission Rate and Pollutant Source Location, Ciencia e Natura, p. 131-134. [2] E.F.P. da Luz, H.F. de Campos Velho, J.C. Becceneri, D.R. Roberti (2007): Estimating Atmospheric Area Source Strength Through Particle Swarm Optimization. Inverse Problems, Desing and Optimization Symposium IPDO-2007, April 16-18, Miami (FL), USA, vol 1, p

  1. High resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yong; Wang Xuben; Li Zhirong; Li Qiong; Li Zhengwen

    2009-01-01

    The high resolution 3D nonlinear integrated inversion method is based on nonlinear theory. Under layer control, the log data from several wells (or all wells) in the study area and seismic trace data adjacent to the wells are input to a network with multiple inputs and outputs and are integratedly trained to obtain an adaptive weight function of the entire study area. Integrated nonlinear mapping relationships are built and updated by the lateral and vertical geologic variations of the reservoirs. Therefore, the inversion process and its inversion results can be constrained and controlled and a stable seismic inversion section with high resolution with velocity inversion, impedance inversion, and density inversion sections, can be gained. Good geologic effects have been obtained in model computation tests and real data processing, which verified that this method has high precision, good practicality, and can be used for quantitative reservoir analysis.

  2. Inverse strategies for molecular design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An 'inverse' molecular design strategy is described to assist in the development of new molecules with optimized properties. This approach is based on a molecular orbital view and can be used to tailor ground state or excited state properties subject to particular constrains. In this scheme, wave functions are sought that optimize a chemical or electronic property, and then a Hamiltonian is constructed that generates these optimized wave functions. Analysis of the chemical properties in the optimized systems may suggest new synthetic targets. Examples are presented that optimize the transition dipole moment in some simple structures. 15 refs., 6 figs

  3. Inverse Problems in Structural Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jing

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the solution of three inverse problems in structural mechanics. The first one is load updating for finite element models (FEMs). A least squares fitting is used to identify the load parameters. The basic studies are made for geometrically linear and nonlinear FEMs of beams or frames by using a four-noded curved beam element, which, for a given precision, may significantly solve the ill-posed problem by reducing the overall number of degrees of freedom (DOF) of t...

  4. Spray formation: an inverse cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, Yue; Tryggvason, Gretar; zaleski, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of droplet formation in a gas-liquid mixing layer using direct numerical simulation. It is seen that two mechanisms compete to generate the droplets: fingering at the tip of the waves and hole formation in the thin liquid sheet. The three dimensional liquid structures are much shorter than the longitudinal wavelength of the instability at the first instant of their formation. As time evolves, the structures evolves to larger and larger scales, in a way similar to the inverse cascade of length scales in droplet impact and impact crown formation.

  5. Inverse Star, Borders, and Palstars

    OpenAIRE

    Rampersad, Narad; Shallit, Jeffrey; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2010-01-01

    A language L is closed if L = L*. We consider an operation on closed languages, L-*, that is an inverse to Kleene closure. It is known that if L is closed and regular, then L-* is also regular. We show that the analogous result fails to hold for the context-free languages. Along the way we find a new relationship between the unbordered words and the prime palstars of Knuth, Morris, and Pratt. We use this relationship to enumerate the prime palstars, and we prove that neither the language of a...

  6. High dimensional linear inverse modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, Fenwick C

    2015-01-01

    We introduce and demonstrate two linear inverse modelling methods for systems of stochastic ODE's with accuracy that is independent of the dimensionality (number of elements) of the state vector representing the system in question. Truncation of the state space is not required. Instead we rely on the principle that perturbations decay with distance or the fact that for many systems, the state of each data point is only determined at an instant by itself and its neighbours. We further show that all necessary calculations, as well as numerical integration of the resulting linear stochastic system, require computational time and memory proportional to the dimensionality of the state vector.

  7. LHC Report: 2 inverse femtobarns!

    CERN Multimedia

    Mike Lamont for the LHC Team

    2011-01-01

    The LHC is enjoying a confluence of twos. This morning (Friday 5 August) we passed 2 inverse femtobarns delivered in 2011; the peak luminosity is now just over 2 x1033 cm-2s-1; and recently fill 2000 was in for nearly 22 hours and delivered around 90 inverse picobarns, almost twice 2010's total.   In order to increase the luminosity we can increase of number of bunches, increase the number of particles per bunch, or decrease the transverse beam size at the interaction point. The beam size can be tackled in two ways: either reduce the size of the injected bunches or squeeze harder with the quadrupole magnets situated on either side of the experiments. Having increased the number of bunches to 1380, the maximum possible with a 50 ns bunch spacing, a one day meeting in Crozet decided to explore the other possibilities. The size of the beams coming from the injectors has been reduced to the minimum possible. This has brought an increase in the peak luminosity of about 50% and the 2 x 1033 cm...

  8. The seismic reflection inverse problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seismic reflection method seeks to extract maps of the Earth's sedimentary crust from transient near-surface recording of echoes, stimulated by explosions or other controlled sound sources positioned near the surface. Reasonably accurate models of seismic energy propagation take the form of hyperbolic systems of partial differential equations, in which the coefficients represent the spatial distribution of various mechanical characteristics of rock (density, stiffness, etc). Thus the fundamental problem of reflection seismology is an inverse problem in partial differential equations: to find the coefficients (or at least some of their properties) of a linear hyperbolic system, given the values of a family of solutions in some part of their domains. The exploration geophysics community has developed various methods for estimating the Earth's structure from seismic data and is also well aware of the inverse point of view. This article reviews mathematical developments in this subject over the last 25 years, to show how the mathematics has both illuminated innovations of practitioners and led to new directions in practice. Two themes naturally emerge: the importance of single scattering dominance and compensation for spectral incompleteness by spatial redundancy. (topical review)

  9. MOSES Inversions using Multiresolution SMART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Thomas; Fox, Lewis; Kankelborg, Charles; Courrier, Hans; Plovanic, Jacob

    2014-06-01

    We present improvements to the SMART inversion algorithm for the MOSES imaging spectrograph. MOSES, the Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph, is a slitless extreme ultraviolet spectrograph designed to measure cotemporal narrowband spectra over a wide field of view via tomographic inversion of images taken at three orders of a concave diffraction grating. SMART, the Smooth Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique, relies on a global chi squared goodness of fit criterion, which enables overfit and underfit regions to "balance out" when judging fit quality. "Good" reconstructions show poor fits at some positions and length scales. Here we take a multiresolution approach to SMART, applying corrections to the reconstruction at positions and scales where correction is warranted based on the noise. The result is improved fit residuals that more closely resemble the expected noise in the images. Within the multiresolution framework it is also easy to include a regularized deconvolution of the instrument point spread functions, which we do. Different point spread functions among MOSES spectral orders results in spurious doppler shifts in the reconstructions, most notable near bright compact emission. We estimate the point spread funtions from the data. Deconvolution is done using the Richardson-Lucy method, which is algorithmically similar to SMART. Regularization results from only correcting the reconstruction at positions and scales where correction is warranted based on the noise. We expect the point spread function deconvolution to increase signal to noise and reduce systematic error in MOSES reconstructions.

  10. Spectral Inversion of Multi-Line Full-Disk Observations of Quiet Sun Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Balthasar, H

    2012-01-01

    Spectral inversion codes are powerful tools to analyze spectropolarimetric observations, and they provide important diagnostics of solar magnetic fields. Inversion codes differ by numerical procedures, approximations of the atmospheric model, and description of radiative transfer. Stokes Inversion based on Response functions (SIR) is an implementation widely used by the solar physics community. It allows to work with different atmospheric components, where gradients of different physical parameters are possible, e.g., magnetic field strength and velocities. The spectropolarimetric full-disk observations were carried out with the Stokesmeter of the Solar Telescope for Operative Predictions (STOP) at the Sayan Observatory on 3 February 2009, when neither an active region nor any other extended flux concentration was present on the Sun. In this study of quiet Sun magnetic fields, we apply the SIR code simultaneously to 15 spectral lines. A tendency is found that weaker magnetic field strengths occur closer to th...

  11. A comparison of different inverse carbon flux estimation approaches for application on a regional domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolk, L. F.; Dolman, A. J.; Meesters, A. G. C. A.; Peters, W.

    2011-01-01

    We have implemented six different inverse carbon flux estimation methods in a regional carbon dioxide (CO2) flux modeling system for the Netherlands. The system consists of the Regional Atmospheric Mesoscale Modeling System (RAMS) coupled to a simple carbon flux scheme which is run in a coupled fash

  12. Generalization of the relaxation method for the inverse solution of nonlinear and linear transfer equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, M. T.

    1977-01-01

    A mapping transformation is derived for the inverse solution of nonlinear and linear integral equations of the types encountered in remote sounding studies. The method is applied to the solution of specific problems for the determination of the thermal and composition structure of planetary atmospheres from a knowledge of their upwelling radiance.

  13. Regional Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange Via Atmospheric Budgets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, K J; Richardson, S J; Miles, N L

    2007-03-07

    Inversions of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio measurements to determine CO2 sources and sinks are typically limited to coarse spatial and temporal resolution. This limits our ability to evaluate efforts to upscale chamber- and stand-level CO2 flux measurements to regional scales, where coherent climate and ecosystem mechanisms govern the carbon cycle. As a step towards the goal of implementing atmospheric budget or inversion methodology on a regional scale, a network of five relatively inexpensive CO2 mixing ratio measurement systems was deployed on towers in northern Wisconsin. Four systems were distributed on a circle of roughly 150-km radius, surrounding one centrally located system at the WLEF tower near Park Falls, WI. All measurements were taken at a height of 76 m AGL. The systems used single-cell infrared CO2 analyzers (Licor, model LI-820) rather than the siginificantly more costly two-cell models, and were calibrated every two hours using four samples known to within ± 0.2 ppm CO2. Tests prior to deployment in which the systems sampled the same air indicate the precision of the systems to be better than ± 0.3 ppm and the accuracy, based on the difference between the daily mean of one system and a co-located NOAA-ESRL system, is consistently better than ± 0.3 ppm. We demonstrate the utility of the network in two ways. We interpret regional CO2 differences using a Lagrangian parcel approach. The difference in the CO2 mixing ratios across the network is at least 2-3 ppm, which is large compared to the accuracy and precision of the systems. Fluxes estimated assuming Lagrangian parcel transport are of the same sign and magnitude as eddy-covariance flux measurements at the centrally-located WLEF tower. These results indicate that the network will be useful in a full inversion model. Second, we present a case study involving a frontal passage through the region. The progression of a front across the network is evident; changes as large as four ppm in one minute

  14. Inverse problems and inverse scattering of plane waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh Roy, Dilip N

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this text is to present the theory and mathematics of inverse scattering, in a simple way, to the many researchers and professionals who use it in their everyday research. While applications range across a broad spectrum of disciplines, examples in this text will focus primarly, but not exclusively, on acoustics. The text will be especially valuable for those applied workers who would like to delve more deeply into the fundamentally mathematical character of the subject matter.Practitioners in this field comprise applied physicists, engineers, and technologists, whereas the theory is almost entirely in the domain of abstract mathematics. This gulf between the two, if bridged, can only lead to improvement in the level of scholarship in this highly important discipline. This is the book''s primary focus.

  15. Solution for Ill-Posed Inverse Kinematics of Robot Arm by Network Inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiko Ogawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of controlling a robot arm with multiple joints, the method of estimating the joint angles from the given end-effector coordinates is called inverse kinematics, which is a type of inverse problems. Network inversion has been proposed as a method for solving inverse problems by using a multilayer neural network. In this paper, network inversion is introduced as a method to solve the inverse kinematics problem of a robot arm with multiple joints, where the joint angles are estimated from the given end-effector coordinates. In general, inverse problems are affected by ill-posedness, which implies that the existence, uniqueness, and stability of their solutions are not guaranteed. In this paper, we show the effectiveness of applying network inversion with regularization, by which ill-posedness can be reduced, to the ill-posed inverse kinematics of an actual robot arm with multiple joints.

  16. Direct inversion of shallow-water bathymetry from EO-1 hyperspectral remote sensing data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhishen Liu; Yan Zhou

    2011-01-01

    @@ Using the US National Aeronautics and space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing-1 Mission (EO-1)hyperion hyperspectral remote sensing data, we study the shallow-water bathymetry inversion in Smith Island Bay.The fast line-of-sight atmospheric analysis of spectral hypercubes module is applied for atmospheric correction, and principal component analysis method combined with scatter diagram and maximum likelihood classification is used for seabed classification.The diffuse attenuation coefficient Kd is derived using quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA), which performs well in optically deep water.Kd obtained from QAA requires correction, particularly those derived in some coastal areas with optically shallow water and calculated by direct inversion based on radiative transfer theory to obtain the bathymetry.The direct inversion method derives the water depth quickly, and matches the results from optimized algorithm.%Using the US National Aeronautics and space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing-1 Mission (EO-1) hyperion hyperspectral remote sensing data, we study the shallow-water bathymetry inversion in Smith Island Bay.The fast line-of-sight atmospheric analysis of spectral hypercubes module is applied for atmospheric correction, and principal component analysis method combined with scatter diagram and maximum likelihood classification is used for seabed classification.The diffuse attenuation coefficient Kd is derived using quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA), which performs well in optically deep water Kd obtained from QAA requires correction, particularly those derived in some coastal areas with optically shallow water and calculated by direct inversion based on radiative transfer theory to obtain the bathymetry.The direct inversion method derives the water depth quickly, and matches the results from optimized algorithm.

  17. Developing a Method for Resolving NOx Emission Inventory Biases Using Discrete Kalman Filter Inversion, Direct Sensitivities, and Satellite-Based Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    An inverse method was developed to integrate satellite observations of atmospheric pollutant column concentrations and direct sensitivities predicted by a regional air quality model in order to discern biases in the emissions of the pollutant precursors.

  18. Optimization and inverse problems in electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Wiak, Sławomir

    2003-01-01

    From 12 to 14 September 2002, the Academy of Humanities and Economics (AHE) hosted the workshop "Optimization and Inverse Problems in Electromagnetism". After this bi-annual event, a large number of papers were assembled and combined in this book. During the workshop recent developments and applications in optimization and inverse methodologies for electromagnetic fields were discussed. The contributions selected for the present volume cover a wide spectrum of inverse and optimal electromagnetic methodologies, ranging from theoretical to practical applications. A number of new optimal and inverse methodologies were proposed. There are contributions related to dedicated software. Optimization and Inverse Problems in Electromagnetism consists of three thematic chapters, covering: -General papers (survey of specific aspects of optimization and inverse problems in electromagnetism), -Methodologies, -Industrial Applications. The book can be useful to students of electrical and electronics engineering, computer sci...

  19. Seasonal variation of the mesospheric inversion layer and thunderstorms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Temperature and ozone volume mixing ratio profiles obtained from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) aboard the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) over India and over the open ocean to the south during the period 1991-2001 are analyzed to study the characteristic features of the Mesospheric Inversion Layer (MIL) at 70 to 85 km altitude and its relation with the ozone mixing ratio at this altitude. We have also analyzed both the number of lightning flashes measured by the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) onboard the MicroLab-1 satellite for the period April 1995 - March 2000 and ground-based thunderstorm data collected from 78 widespread Indian observatories for the same period to show that the MIL amplitude and thunderstorm activity are correlated. All the data sets examined exhibit a semiannual variation. The seasonal variation of MIL amplitude and the frequency of occurrence of the temperature inversion indicate a fairly good correlation with the seasonal variation of thunderstorms and the average ozone volume mixing ratio across the inversion layer. The observed correlation between local thunderstorm activity, MIL amplitude and mesospheric ozone volume mixing ratio are explained by the generation, upward propagation and mesospheric absorption of gravity waves produced by thunderstorms.

  20. Bayesian multitask inverse reinforcement learning

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrakakis, Christos

    2011-01-01

    We generalise the problem of inverse reinforcement learning to multiple tasks, from a set of demonstrations. Each demonstration may represent one expert trying to solve a different task. Alternatively, one may see each demonstration as given by a different expert trying to solve the same task. Our main technical contribution is to solve the problem by formalising it as statistical preference elicitation, via a number of structured priors, whose form captures our biases about the relatedness of different tasks or expert policies. We show that our methodology allows us not only to learn to efficiently from multiple experts but to also effectively differentiate between the goals of each. Possible applications include analysing the intrinsic motivations of subjects in behavioural experiments and imitation learning from multiple teachers.

  1. Inverse Magnetic/Shear Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    McInnes, Brett

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark-Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce ``inverse magnetic catalysis'', signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magne...

  2. Inverse approach to design magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inverse approach is always better to design an optimised magnet, where the field profile is known, rather than tuning the geometry of the magnet till the desired profile is achieved. We have developed an optimizer based on standard multi dimensional Newton-Raphson technique. The optimum geometry of a magnet is obtained by a combination of analytical and numerical methods. This code is versatile and can be used to design various magnets used in different applications. Here we present two different cases to show the efficiency of the code. First, we present the design of a solenoid magnet for a.c. susceptibility set up. Second, we describe the design of two pairs of Helmholtz coils for ion beam deflection. (author)

  3. Inverse Diffusion Theory of Photoacoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Bal, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the reconstruction of diffusion and absorption parameters in an elliptic equation from knowledge of internal data. In the application of photo-acoustics, the internal data are the amount of thermal energy deposited by high frequency radiation propagating inside a domain of interest. These data are obtained by solving an inverse wave equation, which is well-studied in the literature. We show that knowledge of two internal data based on well-chosen boundary conditions uniquely determines two constitutive parameters in diffusion and Schroedinger equations. Stability of the reconstruction is guaranteed under additional geometric constraints of strict convexity. No geometric constraints are necessary when $2n$ internal data for well-chosen boundary conditions are available, where $n$ is spatial dimension. The set of well-chosen boundary conditions is characterized in terms of appropriate complex geometrical optics (CGO) solutions.

  4. Inverse Transport Theory of Photoacoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Bal, Guillaume; Jugnon, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    We consider the reconstruction of optical parameters in a domain of interest from photoacoustic data. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) radiates high frequency electromagnetic waves into the domain and measures acoustic signals emitted by the resulting thermal expansion. Acoustic signals are then used to construct the deposited thermal energy map. The latter depends on the constitutive optical parameters in a nontrivial manner. In this paper, we develop and use an inverse transport theory with internal measurements to extract information on the optical coefficients from knowledge of the deposited thermal energy map. We consider the multi-measurement setting in which many electromagnetic radiation patterns are used to probe the domain of interest. By developing an expansion of the measurement operator into singular components, we show that the spatial variations of the intrinsic attenuation and the scattering coefficients may be reconstructed. We also reconstruct coefficients describing anisotropic scattering of ...

  5. Statistical Inversion of Seismic Noise Inversion statistique du bruit sismique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adler P. M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A systematic investigation of wave propagation in random media is presented. Spectral analysis, inversion of codas and attenuation of the direct wave front are studied for synthetic data obtained in isotropic or anisotropic, 2D or 3D media. A coda inversion process is developed and checked on two sets of real data. In both cases, it is possible to compare the correlation lengths obtained by inversion to characteristic lengths measured on seismic logs, for the full scale seismic survey, or on a thin section, for the laboratory experiment. These two experiments prove the feasibility and the efficiency of the statistical inversion of codas. Correct characteristic lengths can be obtained which cannot be determined by another method. Le problème de la géophysique est la recherche d'informations concernant le sous-sol, dans des signaux sismiques enregistrés en surface ou dans des puits. Ces informations sont habituellement recherchées sous forme déterministe, c'est-à-dire sous la forme de la donnée en chaque point d'une valeur du paramètre étudié. Notre point de vue est différent puisque notre objectif est de déduire certaines propriétés statistiques du milieu, supposé hétérogène, à partir des sismogrammes enregistrés après propagation. Il apparaît alors deux moyens de remplir l'objectif fixé. Le premier est l'analyse spectrale des codas ; cette analyse permet de déterminer les tailles moyennes des hétérogénéités du sous-sol. La deuxième possibilité est l'étude de l'atténuation du front direct de l'onde, qui conduit aussi à la connaissance des longueurs caractéristiques du sous-sol ; contrairement à la première méthode, elle ne semble pas pouvoir être transposée efficacement à des cas réels. Dans la première partie, on teste numériquement la proportionnalité entre le facteur de rétrodiffraction, relié aux propriétés statistiques du milieu, et le spectre des codas. Les distributions de vitesse, à valeur

  6. Supersymmetry and the Moebius inversion function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the Moebius inversion function of number theory can be interpreted as the operator (-1)F in quantum field theory. Consequently, we are able to provide physical interpretations for various properties of the Moebius inversion function. These include a physical understanding of the Moebius Inversion Formula and of a result that is equivalent to the prime number theorem. Supersymmetry and the Witten index play a central role in these constructions. (orig.)

  7. Forward model nonlinearity versus inverse model nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehl, S.

    2007-01-01

    The issue of concern is the impact of forward model nonlinearity on the nonlinearity of the inverse model. The question posed is, "Does increased nonlinearity in the head solution (forward model) always result in increased nonlinearity in the inverse solution (estimation of hydraulic conductivity)?" It is shown that the two nonlinearities are separate, and it is not universally true that increased forward model nonlinearity increases inverse model nonlinearity. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  8. STRUCTURES OF CIRCULANT INVERSE M-MATRICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yurui Lin; Linzhang Lu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we present a useful result on the structures of circulant inverse Mis not a positive matrix and not equal to c0I,then A is an inverse M-matrix if and only if there exists a positive integer k,which is a proper factor of n,such that cjk>0 for The result is then extended to the so-called generalized circulant inverse M-matrices.

  9. The structure of (L)*-inverse semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xueming; SHUM Karping

    2006-01-01

    The concepts of (L)*-inverse semigroups and left wreath products of semigroups are introduced. It is shown that the (L)*-inverse semigroup can be described as the left wreath product of a type A semigroup Γ and a left regular band B together with a mapping which maps the semigroup Γ into the endomorphism semigroup End(B). This result generalizes the structure theorem of Yamada for the left inverse semigroups in the class of regular semigroups.We shall also provide a constructed example for the (L)*-inverse semigroups by using the left wreath products.

  10. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  11. Adaptation through chromosomal inversions in Anopheles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego eAyala

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal inversions have been repeatedly involved in local adaptation in a large number of animals and plants. The ecological and behavioral plasticity of Anopheles species - human malaria vectors - is mirrored by high amounts of polymorphic inversions. The adaptive significance of chromosomal inversions has been consistently attested by strong and significant correlations between their frequencies and a number of phenotypic traits. Here, we provide an extensive literature review of the different adaptive traits associated with chromosomal inversions in the genus Anopheles. Traits having important consequences for the success of present and future vector control measures, such as insecticide resistance and behavioral changes, are discussed.

  12. Signature Inversion in Odd-odd Nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Min-liang; ZHANG Yu-hu; ZHOU Xiao-hong; GUO Ying-xiang; LEI Xiang-guo; GUO Wen-tao

    2009-01-01

    Signature inversion in odd-odd nuclei is investigated by using a proton and a neutron coupling to the coherent state of the core.Two parameters are employed in the Hamiltonian to set the energy scales of rotation,neutron-proton coupling and their competition.Typical level staggering is extracted from the calculated level energies.The calculation can approximately reproduce experimental signature inversion.Signature inversion is attributed to the rotational motion and neutronproton residual interaction having reversed signature splitting rules.It is found signature inversion can appear at axially symmetric shape and high-K band.

  13. Analysis of nonlinear channel friction inverse problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Weiping; LIU Guohua

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Backus-Gilbert inverse theory, the singular value decomposition (SVD) for general inverse matrices and the optimization algorithm are used to solve the channel friction inverse problem. The resolution and covari- ance friction inverse model in matrix form is developed to examine the reliability of solutions. Theoretical analyses demonstrate that the convergence rate of the general Newton optimization algorithm is in the second-order. The Wiggins method is also incorporated into the algorithm. Using the method, noise can be suppressed effectively, and the results are close to accurate solutions with proper control parameters. Also, the numerical stability can be improved.

  14. Laterally constrained inversion for CSAMT data interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruo; Yin, Changchun; Wang, Miaoyue; Di, Qingyun

    2015-10-01

    Laterally constrained inversion (LCI) has been successfully applied to the inversion of dc resistivity, TEM and airborne EM data. However, it hasn't been yet applied to the interpretation of controlled-source audio-frequency magnetotelluric (CSAMT) data. In this paper, we apply the LCI method for CSAMT data inversion by preconditioning the Jacobian matrix. We apply a weighting matrix to Jacobian to balance the sensitivity of model parameters, so that the resolution with respect to different model parameters becomes more uniform. Numerical experiments confirm that this can improve the convergence of the inversion. We first invert a synthetic dataset with and without noise to investigate the effect of LCI applications to CSAMT data, for the noise free data, the results show that the LCI method can recover the true model better compared to the traditional single-station inversion; and for the noisy data, the true model is recovered even with a noise level of 8%, indicating that LCI inversions are to some extent noise insensitive. Then, we re-invert two CSAMT datasets collected respectively in a watershed and a coal mine area in Northern China and compare our results with those from previous inversions. The comparison with the previous inversion in a coal mine shows that LCI method delivers smoother layer interfaces that well correlate to seismic data, while comparison with a global searching algorithm of simulated annealing (SA) in a watershed shows that though both methods deliver very similar good results, however, LCI algorithm presented in this paper runs much faster. The inversion results for the coal mine CSAMT survey show that a conductive water-bearing zone that was not revealed by the previous inversions has been identified by the LCI. This further demonstrates that the method presented in this paper works for CSAMT data inversion.

  15. Atmospheric composition and structure of HD209458b

    CERN Document Server

    Désert, J -M; Etangs, A Lecavelier des; Sing, D; Ehrenreich, D; Hébrard, G; Ferlet, R

    2008-01-01

    Transiting planets like HD209458b offer a unique opportunity to scrutinize their atmospheric composition and structure. Transit spectroscopy probes the transition region between the day and night sides, called limb. We present a re-analysis of existing archived HST/STIS transmission spectra of HD209458b's atmosphere. From these observations we: Identify H2 Rayleigh scattering, derive the absolute Sodium abundance and quantify its depletion in the upper atmosphere, extract a stratospheric T-P profile with a temperature inversion and explain broad band absorptions with the presence of TiO and VO molecules in the atmosphere of this planet.

  16. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence layers with phase screens by JAVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Chen, Wenqin; Yu, Xin; Yan, Jixiang

    2008-03-01

    In multiconjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO), the phase screens are used to simulate atmospheric turbulence layers to study the optimal turbulence delamination and the determination of layer boundary position. In this paper, the method of power spectrum inversion and sub-harmonic compensation were used to simulate atmospheric turbulence layers and results can be shown by grey map. The simulation results showed that, with the increase of turbulence layers, the RMS of adaptive system decreased, but the amplitude diminished. So the atmospheric turbulence can be split into 2-3 layers and be modeled by phase screens. Otherwise, a small simulation atmospheric turbulence delamination system was realized by JAVA.

  17. Inversion, error analysis, and validation of GPS/MET occultation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, A.K.; Kirchengast, G. [Graz Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Meteorologie und Geophysik; Ladreiter, H.P.

    1999-01-01

    The global positioning system meteorology (GPS/MET) experiment was the first practical demonstration of global navigation satellite system (GNSS)-based active limb sounding employing the radio occultation technique. This method measures, as principal observable and with millimetric accuracy, the excess phase path (relative to propagation in vacuum) of GNSS-transmitted radio waves caused by refraction during passage through the Earth`s neutral atmosphere and ionosphere in limb geometry. It shows great potential utility for weather and climate system studies in providing an unique combination of global coverage, high vertical resolution and accuracy, long-term stability, and all-weather capability. We first describe our GPS/MET data processing scheme from excess phases via bending angles to the neutral atmospheric parameters refractivity, density, pressure and temperature. Special emphasis is given to ionospheric correction methodology and the inversion of bending angles to refractivities, where we introduce a matrix inversion technique (instead of the usual integral inversion). The matrix technique is shown to lead to identical results as integral inversion but is more directly extendable to inversion by optimal estimation. The quality of GPS/MET-derived profiles is analyzed with an error estimation analysis employing a Monte Carlo technique. We consider statistical errors together with systematic errors due to upper-boundary initialization of the retrieval by a priori bending angles. Perfect initialization and properly smoothed statistical errors allow for better than 1 K temperature retrieval accuracy up to the stratopause. 28 refs.

  18. An inversion algorithm for general tridiagonal matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-sheng RAN; Ting-zhu HUANG; Xing-ping LIU; Tong-xiang GU

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm for the inverse of a general tridiagonal matrix is presented. For a tridiagonal matrix having the Doolittle factorization, an inversion algorithm is established.The algorithm is then generalized to deal with a general tridiagonal matrix without any restriction. Comparison with other methods is provided, indicating low computational complexity of the proposed algorithm, and its applicability to general tridiagonal matrices.

  19. Interactive inverse kinematics for human motion estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Hauberg, Søren; Lapuyade, Jerome;

    2009-01-01

    We present an application of a fast interactive inverse kinematics method as a dimensionality reduction for monocular human motion estimation. The inverse kinematics solver deals efficiently and robustly with box constraints and does not suffer from shaking artifacts. The presented motion estimat...

  20. Non-Linear Logging Parameters Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The non-linear logging parameters inversion is based on the field theory, information optimization and predication theory. It uses seismic charaoters,geological model and logging data as a restriction to inverse 2D, 3D logging parameters data volume. Using this method,

  1. Inversion in Mathematical Thinking and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Inversion is a fundamental relational building block both within mathematics as the study of structures and within people's physical and social experience, linked to many other key elements such as equilibrium, invariance, reversal, compensation, symmetry, and balance. Within purely formal arithmetic, the inverse relationships between addition and…

  2. Approximation of the Inverse -Frame Operator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Abdollahpour; A Najati

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we introduce the concept of (strong) projection method for -frames which works for all conditional -Riesz frames. We also derive a method for approximation of the inverse -frame operator which is efficient for all -frames. We show how the inverse of -frame operator can be approximated as close as we like using finite-dimensional linear algebra.

  3. Applying inversion to construct rational spiral curves

    OpenAIRE

    Kurnosenko, A.

    2009-01-01

    A method is proposed to construct spiral curves by inversion of a spiral arc of parabola. The resulting curve is rational of 4-th order. Proper selection of the parabolic arc and parameters of inversion allows to match a wide range of boundary conditions, namely, tangents and curvatures at the endpoints, including those, assuming inflection.

  4. A Construction of Weakly Inverse Semigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Jun YU; Yan LI

    2009-01-01

    Let S° be an inverse semigroup with semilattice biordered set E° of idempotents and E a weakly inverse biordered set with a subsemilattice Ep = { e ∈ E |(V) f ∈ E, S(f , e)(C) w(e) } isomorphic to E° by θ:Ep→E°. In this paper, it is proved that if(V)f, g∈E, f ←→ ,g(→) f°θ (ζ)s° g°θand there exists a mapping φ from Ep into the symmetric weakly inverse semigroup (ζξ)(E ∪S°) satisfying six appropriate conditions, then a weakly inverse semigroup ∑ can be constructed in (ζξ)(S°), called the weakly inverse hull of a weakly inverse system (S°, E, θ, φ) with I(∑) ≌ S°, E(∑) (≌) E. Conversely,every weakly inverse semigroup can be constructed in this way. Furthermore, a sufficient and necessary condition for two weakly inverse hulls to be isomorphic is also given.

  5. Metaheuristic optimization of acoustic inverse problems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.V. van Leijen; L. Rothkrantz; F. Groen

    2011-01-01

    Swift solving of geoacoustic inverse problems strongly depends on the application of a global optimization scheme. Given a particular inverse problem, this work aims to answer the questions how to select an appropriate metaheuristic search strategy, and how to configure it for optimal performance. F

  6. Inverse problem in Parker's dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, M Yu

    2015-01-01

    The inverse solution of the 1D Parker dynamo equations is considered. The method is based on minimization of the cost-function, which characterize deviation of the model solution properties from the desired ones. The output is the latitude distribution of the magnetic field generation sources: the $\\alpha$- and $\\omega$-effects. Minimization is made using the Monte-Carlo method. The details of the method, as well as some applications, which can be interesting for the broad dynamo community, are considered: conditions when the invisible for the observer at the surface of the planet toroidal part of the magnetic field is much larger than the poloidal counterpart. It is shown that at some particular distributions of $\\alpha$ and $\\omega$ the well-known thesis that sign of the dynamo-number defines equatorial symmetry of the magnetic field to the equator plane, is violated. It is also demonstrated in what circumstances magnetic field in the both hemispheres have different properties, and simple physical explanati...

  7. Inverse magnetic/shear catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Brett

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that very large magnetic fields are generated when the Quark-Gluon Plasma is formed during peripheral heavy-ion collisions. Lattice, holographic, and other studies strongly suggest that these fields may, for observationally relevant field values, induce "inverse magnetic catalysis", signalled by a lowering of the critical temperature for the chiral/deconfinement transition. The theoretical basis of this effect has recently attracted much attention; yet so far these investigations have not included another, equally dramatic consequence of the peripheral collision geometry: the QGP acquires a large angular momentum vector, parallel to the magnetic field. Here we use holographic techniques to argue that the angular momentum can also, independently, have an effect on transition temperatures, and we obtain a rough estimate of the relative effects of the presence of both a magnetic field and an angular momentum density. We find that the shearing angular momentum reinforces the effect of the magnetic field at low values of the baryonic chemical potential, but that it can actually decrease that effect at high chemical potentials.

  8. Fast wavelet based sparse approximate inverse preconditioner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, W.L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Incomplete LU factorization is a robust preconditioner for both general and PDE problems but unfortunately not easy to parallelize. Recent study of Huckle and Grote and Chow and Saad showed that sparse approximate inverse could be a potential alternative while readily parallelizable. However, for special class of matrix A that comes from elliptic PDE problems, their preconditioners are not optimal in the sense that independent of mesh size. A reason may be that no good sparse approximate inverse exists for the dense inverse matrix. Our observation is that for this kind of matrices, its inverse entries typically have piecewise smooth changes. We can take advantage of this fact and use wavelet compression techniques to construct a better sparse approximate inverse preconditioner. We shall show numerically that our approach is effective for this kind of matrices.

  9. An Introduction to Inverse Problems with Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Moura Neto, Francisco Duarte

    2013-01-01

    Computational engineering/science uses a blend of applications, mathematical models and computations. Mathematical models require accurate approximations of their parameters, which are often viewed as solutions to inverse problems. Thus, the study of inverse problems is an integral part of computational engineering/science. This book presents several aspects of inverse problems along with needed prerequisite topics in numerical analysis and matrix algebra. If the reader has previously studied these prerequisites, then one can rapidly move to the inverse problems in chapters 4-8 on image restoration, thermal radiation, thermal characterization and heat transfer. “This text does provide a comprehensive introduction to inverse problems and fills a void in the literature”. Robert E White, Professor of Mathematics, North Carolina State University

  10. Forward modeling. Route to electromagnetic inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groom, R.; Walker, P. [PetRos EiKon Incorporated, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-05-01

    Inversion of electromagnetic data is a topical subject in the literature, and much time has been devoted to understanding the convergence properties of various inverse methods. The relative lack of success of electromagnetic inversion techniques is partly attributable to the difficulties in the kernel forward modeling software. These difficulties come in two broad classes: (1) Completeness and robustness, and (2) convergence, execution time and model simplicity. If such problems exist in the forward modeling kernel, it was demonstrated that inversion can fail to generate reasonable results. It was suggested that classical inversion techniques, which are based on minimizing a norm of the error between data and the simulated data, will only be successful when these difficulties in forward modeling kernels are properly dealt with. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Recurrent Neural Network for Computing Outer Inverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Živković, Ivan S; Stanimirović, Predrag S; Wei, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Two linear recurrent neural networks for generating outer inverses with prescribed range and null space are defined. Each of the proposed recurrent neural networks is based on the matrix-valued differential equation, a generalization of dynamic equations proposed earlier for the nonsingular matrix inversion, the Moore-Penrose inversion, as well as the Drazin inversion, under the condition of zero initial state. The application of the first approach is conditioned by the properties of the spectrum of a certain matrix; the second approach eliminates this drawback, though at the cost of increasing the number of matrix operations. The cases corresponding to the most common generalized inverses are defined. The conditions that ensure stability of the proposed neural network are presented. Illustrative examples present the results of numerical simulations.

  12. Inverse m-matrices and ultrametric matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Dellacherie, Claude; San Martin, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The study of M-matrices, their inverses and discrete potential theory is now a well-established part of linear algebra and the theory of Markov chains. The main focus of this monograph is the so-called inverse M-matrix problem, which asks for a characterization of nonnegative matrices whose inverses are M-matrices. We present an answer in terms of discrete potential theory based on the Choquet-Deny Theorem. A distinguished subclass of inverse M-matrices is ultrametric matrices, which are important in applications such as taxonomy. Ultrametricity is revealed to be a relevant concept in linear algebra and discrete potential theory because of its relation with trees in graph theory and mean expected value matrices in probability theory. Remarkable properties of Hadamard functions and products for the class of inverse M-matrices are developed and probabilistic insights are provided throughout the monograph.

  13. Using CO2 : CO correlations to improve inverse analyses of carbon fluxes

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Paul I.; Suntharalingam, Parvadha; Jones, Dylan B. A.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Streets, David G.; Fu, Qingyan; Vay, Stephanie A.; Sachse, Glen W.

    2006-01-01

    Observed correlations between atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and CO represent potentially powerful information for improving CO2 surface flux estimates through coupled CO2-CO inverse analyses. We explore the value of these correlations in improving estimates of regional CO2 fluxes in east Asia by using aircraft observations of CO2 and CO from the TRACE-P campaign over the NW Pacific in March 2001. Our inverse model uses regional CO2 and CO surface fluxes as the state vector, separating bio...

  14. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, R.; Bousquet, P.; Chevallier, F.; Fortems-Cheney, A.; Szopa, S.; Saunois, M.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; Bergmann, D.; Bian, H.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Gloor, E.; Houweling, S.; Kawa, S. R.; Krol, M.; Patra, P. K.; Prinn, R. G.; Rigby, M.; Saito, R.; Wilson, C.

    2013-10-01

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model outputs from the international TransCom-CH4 model inter-comparison exercise, are combined with a prior scenario of methane emissions and sinks, and integrated into the three-component PYVAR-LMDZ-SACS (PYthon VARiational-Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique model with Zooming capability-Simplified Atmospheric Chemistry System) inversion system to produce 10 different methane emission estimates at the global scale for the year 2005. The same methane sinks, emissions and initial conditions have been applied to produce the 10 synthetic observation datasets. The same inversion set-up (statistical errors, prior emissions, inverse procedure) is then applied to derive flux estimates by inverse modelling. Consequently, only differences in the modelling of atmospheric transport may cause differences in the estimated fluxes. In our framework, we show that transport model errors lead to a discrepancy of 27 Tg yr-1 at the global scale, representing 5% of total methane emissions. At continental and annual scales, transport model errors are proportionally larger than at the global scale, with errors ranging from 36 Tg yr-1 in North America to 7 Tg yr-1 in Boreal Eurasia (from 23 to 48%, respectively). At the model grid-scale, the spread of inverse estimates can reach 150% of the prior flux. Therefore, transport model errors contribute significantly to overall uncertainties in emission estimates by inverse modelling, especially when small spatial scales are examined. Sensitivity tests have been carried out to estimate the impact of the measurement network and the advantage of higher horizontal resolution in transport models. The large differences found between methane flux estimates inferred in these different configurations highly question the consistency of

  15. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Locatelli

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model outputs from the international TransCom-CH4 model inter-comparison exercise, are combined with a prior scenario of methane emissions and sinks, and integrated into the three-component PYVAR-LMDZ-SACS (PYthon VARiational-Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique model with Zooming capability-Simplified Atmospheric Chemistry System inversion system to produce 10 different methane emission estimates at the global scale for the year 2005. The same methane sinks, emissions and initial conditions have been applied to produce the 10 synthetic observation datasets. The same inversion set-up (statistical errors, prior emissions, inverse procedure is then applied to derive flux estimates by inverse modelling. Consequently, only differences in the modelling of atmospheric transport may cause differences in the estimated fluxes. In our framework, we show that transport model errors lead to a discrepancy of 27 Tg yr−1 at the global scale, representing 5% of total methane emissions. At continental and annual scales, transport model errors are proportionally larger than at the global scale, with errors ranging from 36 Tg yr−1 in North America to 7 Tg yr−1 in Boreal Eurasia (from 23 to 48%, respectively. At the model grid-scale, the spread of inverse estimates can reach 150% of the prior flux. Therefore, transport model errors contribute significantly to overall uncertainties in emission estimates by inverse modelling, especially when small spatial scales are examined. Sensitivity tests have been carried out to estimate the impact of the measurement network and the advantage of higher horizontal resolution in transport models. The large differences found between methane flux estimates inferred in these different configurations highly

  16. Regularization for Atmospheric Temperature Retrieval Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez-Reyes, Miguel; Galarza-Galarza, Ruben

    1997-01-01

    Passive remote sensing of the atmosphere is used to determine the atmospheric state. A radiometer measures microwave emissions from earth's atmosphere and surface. The radiance measured by the radiometer is proportional to the brightness temperature. This brightness temperature can be used to estimate atmospheric parameters such as temperature and water vapor content. These quantities are of primary importance for different applications in meteorology, oceanography, and geophysical sciences. Depending on the range in the electromagnetic spectrum being measured by the radiometer and the atmospheric quantities to be estimated, the retrieval or inverse problem of determining atmospheric parameters from brightness temperature might be linear or nonlinear. In most applications, the retrieval problem requires the inversion of a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind making this an ill-posed problem. The numerical solution of the retrieval problem requires the transformation of the continuous problem into a discrete problem. The ill-posedness of the continuous problem translates into ill-conditioning or ill-posedness of the discrete problem. Regularization methods are used to convert the ill-posed problem into a well-posed one. In this paper, we present some results of our work in applying different regularization techniques to atmospheric temperature retrievals using brightness temperatures measured with the SSM/T-1 sensor. Simulation results are presented which show the potential of these techniques to improve temperature retrievals. In particular, no statistical assumptions are needed and the algorithms were capable of correctly estimating the temperature profile corner at the tropopause independent of the initial guess.

  17. Complex source rate estimation for atmospheric transport and dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, L.L.

    1993-09-13

    The accuracy associated with assessing the environmental consequences of an accidental atmospheric release of radioactivity is highly dependent on our knowledge of the source release rate which is generally poorly known. This paper reports on a technique that integrates the radiological measurements with atmospheric dispersion modeling for more accurate source term estimation. We construct a minimum least squares methodology for solving the inverse problem with no a priori information about the source rate.

  18. 3rd Annual Workshop on Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This proceeding volume is based on papers presented on the Third Annual Workshop on Inverse Problems which was organized by the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, and took place in May 2013 in Stockholm. The purpose of this workshop was to present new analytical developments and numerical techniques for solution of inverse problems for a wide range of applications in acoustics, electromagnetics, optical fibers, medical imaging, geophysics, etc. The contributions in this volume reflect these themes and will be beneficial to researchers who are working in the area of applied inverse problems.

  19. Regularizing priors for linear inverse problems

    OpenAIRE

    Florens, Jean-Pierre; De Simoni, Anna

    2010-01-01

    We consider statistical linear inverse problems in Hilbert spaces of the type ˆ Y = Kx + U where we want to estimate the function x from indirect noisy functional observations ˆY . In several applications the operator K has an inverse that is not continuous on the whole space of reference; this phenomenon is known as ill-posedness of the inverse problem. We use a Bayesian approach and a conjugate-Gaussian model. For a very general specification of the probability model the posterior distribut...

  20. New recursive algorithm for matrix inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Jianshu; Wang Xuegang

    2008-01-01

    To reduce the computational complexity of matrix inversion, which is the majority of processing in many practical applications, two numerically efficient recursive algorithms (called algorithms Ⅰ and Ⅱ, respectively)are presented. Algorithm Ⅰ is used to calculate the inverse of such a matrix, whose leading principal minors are all nonzero. Algorithm Ⅱ, whereby, the inverse of an arbitrary nonsingular matrix can be evaluated is derived via improving the algorithm Ⅰ. The implementation, for algorithm Ⅱ or Ⅰ, involves matrix-vector multiplications and vector outer products. These operations are computationally fast and highly parallelizable. MATLAB simulations show that both recursive algorithms are valid.

  1. Parallel Algorithm in Surface Wave Waveform Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In Surface wave waveform inversion, we want to reconstruct 3Dshear wav e velocity structure, which calculation beyond the capability of the powerful pr esent day personal computer or even workstation. So we designed a high parallele d algorithm and carried out the inversion on Parallel computer based on the part itioned waveform inversion (PWI). It partitions the large scale optimization pro blem into a number of independent small scale problems and reduces the computati onal effort by several orders of magnitude. We adopted surface waveform inversio n with a equal block(2°×2°) discretization.

  2. Inversion symmetry protected topological insulators and superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dung-Hai; Lu, Yuan-Ming

    2015-03-01

    Three dimensional topological insulator represents a class of novel quantum phases hosting robust gapless boundary excitations, which is protected by global symmetries such as time reversal, charge conservation and spin rotational symmetry. In this work we systematically study another class of topological phases of weakly interacting electrons protected by spatial inversion symmetry, which generally don't support stable gapless boundary states. We classify these inversion-symmetric topological insulators and superconductors in the framework of K-theory, and construct their lattice models. We also discuss quantized response functions of these inversion-protected topological phases, which serve as their experimental signatures.

  3. Voxel inversion of airborne EM data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca G.; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest C A.V.C.;

    2013-01-01

    We present a geophysical inversion algorithm working directly in a voxel grid disconnected from the actual measuring points, which allows for straightforward integration of different data types in joint inversion, for informing geological/hydrogeological models directly and for easier incorporation...... for jointly inverting airborne and ground-based geophysical data. Furthermore, geological and groundwater models most often refer to a regular voxel grid not correlated to the geophysical model space, and incorporating the geophysical data into the geological/hydrological modelling grids is problematic. We...... present a voxel grid inversion routine that overcomes these problems and we discuss in detail the algorithm implementation....

  4. Nonlinear system compound inverse control method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan ZHANG; Zengqiang CHEN; Peng YANG; Zhuzhi YUAN

    2005-01-01

    A compound neural network is utilized to identify the dynamic nonlinear system.This network is composed of two parts: one is a linear neural network,and the other is a recurrent neural network.Based on the inverse theory a compound inverse control method is proposed.The controller has also two parts:a linear controller and a nonlinear neural network controller.The stability condition of the closed-loop neural network-based compound inverse control system is demonstrated based on the Lyapunov theory.Simulation studies have shown that this scheme is simple and has good control accuracy and robustness.

  5. Graph inverse semigroups: their characterization and completion

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, David G

    2011-01-01

    Graph inverse semigroups generalize the polycyclic inverse monoids and play an important role in the theory of C*-algebras. This paper has two main goals: first, to provide an abstract characterization of graph inverse semigroups; and second, to show how they may be completed, under suitable conditions, to form what we call the Cuntz-Krieger semigroup of the graph. This semigroup is the ample semigroup of a topological groupoid associated with the graph, and the semigroup analogue of the Leavitt path algebra of the graph.

  6. Impact of transport and modelling errors on the estimation of methane sources and sinks by inverse modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Robin; Bousquet, Philippe; Chevallier, Frédéric

    2013-04-01

    Since the nineties, inverse modelling by assimilating atmospheric measurements into a chemical transport model (CTM) has been used to derive sources and sinks of atmospheric trace gases. More recently, the high global warming potential of methane (CH4) and unexplained variations of its atmospheric mixing ratio caught the attention of several research groups. Indeed, the diversity and the variability of methane sources induce high uncertainty on the present and the future evolution of CH4 budget. With the increase of available measurement data to constrain inversions (satellite data, high frequency surface and tall tower observations, FTIR spectrometry,...), the main limiting factor is about to become the representation of atmospheric transport in CTMs. Indeed, errors in transport modelling directly converts into flux changes when assuming perfect transport in atmospheric inversions. Hence, we propose an inter-model comparison in order to quantify the impact of transport and modelling errors on the CH4 fluxes estimated into a variational inversion framework. Several inversion experiments are conducted using the same set-up (prior emissions, measurement and prior errors, OH field, initial conditions) of the variational system PYVAR, developed at LSCE (Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, France). Nine different models (ACTM, IFS, IMPACT, IMPACT1x1, MOZART, PCTM, TM5, TM51x1 and TOMCAT) used in TRANSCOM-CH4 experiment (Patra el al, 2011) provide synthetic measurements data at up to 280 surface sites to constrain the inversions performed using the PYVAR system. Only the CTM (and the meteorological drivers which drive them) used to create the pseudo-observations vary among inversions. Consequently, the comparisons of the nine inverted methane fluxes obtained for 2005 give a good order of magnitude of the impact of transport and modelling errors on the estimated fluxes with current and future networks. It is shown that transport and modelling errors

  7. BOOK REVIEW: Inverse Problems. Activities for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2003-06-01

    This book is a valuable introduction to inverse problems. In particular, from the educational point of view, the author addresses the questions of what constitutes an inverse problem and how and why we should study them. Such an approach has been eagerly awaited for a long time. Professor Groetsch, of the University of Cincinnati, is a world-renowned specialist in inverse problems, in particular the theory of regularization. Moreover, he has made a remarkable contribution to educational activities in the field of inverse problems, which was the subject of his previous book (Groetsch C W 1993 Inverse Problems in the Mathematical Sciences (Braunschweig: Vieweg)). For this reason, he is one of the most qualified to write an introductory book on inverse problems. Without question, inverse problems are important, necessary and appear in various aspects. So it is crucial to introduce students to exercises in inverse problems. However, there are not many introductory books which are directly accessible by students in the first two undergraduate years. As a consequence, students often encounter diverse concrete inverse problems before becoming aware of their general principles. The main purpose of this book is to present activities to allow first-year undergraduates to learn inverse theory. To my knowledge, this book is a rare attempt to do this and, in my opinion, a great success. The author emphasizes that it is very important to teach inverse theory in the early years. He writes; `If students consider only the direct problem, they are not looking at the problem from all sides .... The habit of always looking at problems from the direct point of view is intellectually limiting ...' (page 21). The book is very carefully organized so that teachers will be able to use it as a textbook. After an introduction in chapter 1, sucessive chapters deal with inverse problems in precalculus, calculus, differential equations and linear algebra. In order to let one gain some insight

  8. Nonlinear Least Squares for Inverse Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Chavent, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Presents an introduction into the least squares resolution of nonlinear inverse problems. This title intends to develop a geometrical theory to analyze nonlinear least square (NLS) problems with respect to their quadratic wellposedness, that is, both wellposedness and optimizability

  9. The Transmuted Generalized Inverse Weibull Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faton Merovci

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A generalization of the generalized inverse Weibull distribution the so-called transmuted generalized inverse Weibull distribution is proposed and studied. We will use the quadratic rank transmutation map (QRTM in order to generate a flexible family of probability distributions taking the generalized inverseWeibull distribution as the base value distribution by introducing a new parameter that would offer more distributional flexibility. Various structural properties including explicit expressions for the moments, quantiles, and moment generating function of the new distribution are derived. We propose the method of maximum likelihood for estimating the model parameters and obtain the observed information matrix. A real data set are used to compare the flexibility of the transmuted version versus the generalized inverse Weibull distribution.

  10. Computing matrix inversion with optical networks

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Kan; Shum, Perry Ping; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2013-01-01

    With this paper we bring about a discussion on the computing potential of complex optical networks and provide experimental demonstration that an optical fiber network can be used as an analog processor to calculate matrix inversion. A 3x3 matrix is inverted as a proof-of-concept demonstration using a fiber network containing three nodes and operating at telecomm wavelength. For an NxN matrix, the overall solving time (including setting time of the matrix elements and calculation time of inversion) scales as O(N^2), whereas matrix inversion by most advanced computer algorithms requires ~O(N^2.37) computational time. For well-conditioned matrices, the error of the inversion performed optically is found to be less than 3%, limited by the accuracy of measurement equipment.

  11. Acoustic Impedance Inversion VIa Wavelet Transform COnstraints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuiyanZHANG; BainianLU; 等

    1998-01-01

    As is well known,the acoustic impedance inversion problem is,in general.an underdetermined inverse problem and some constraints about the model have to be incorporated in the inversion scheme,In this article,we assume that a prioir scale information about the model is available to constrain the inversion.We then explore another approach by means of the wavelet transform.WT,where we are specifically concerned with the selection and application of a priori scale information in the wavelet domain to reconstruct the acoustic impedance model.A simple example is explored,which show that the WT approach improves results in comparison with the conventional approach.

  12. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  13. Zinc oxide inverse opal enzymatic biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Xueqiu; Pikul, James H.; King, William P.; Pak, James J.

    2013-06-01

    We report ZnO inverse opal- and nanowire (NW)-based enzymatic glucose biosensors with extended linear detection ranges. The ZnO inverse opal sensors have 0.01-18 mM linear detection range, which is 2.5 times greater than that of ZnO NW sensors and 1.5 times greater than that of other reported ZnO sensors. This larger range is because of reduced glucose diffusivity through the inverse opal geometry. The ZnO inverse opal sensors have an average sensitivity of 22.5 μA/(mM cm2), which diminished by 10% after 35 days, are more stable than ZnO NW sensors whose sensitivity decreased by 10% after 7 days.

  14. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-08-31

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  15. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  16. Inversion of hysteresis and creep operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krejci, Pavel, E-mail: krejci@math.cas.cz [Institute of Mathematics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zitna 25, CZ-11567 Praha 1 (Czech Republic); Al Janaideh, Mohammad, E-mail: aljanaideh@gmail.com [Department of Mechatronics Engineering, The University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Deasy, Fergal, E-mail: deasy@math.cas.cz [Institute of Mathematics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zitna 25, CZ-11567 Praha 1 (Czech Republic)

    2012-05-01

    The explicit inversion formula for rate dependent Prandtl-Ishlinskii operators is extended to cases without the threshold dilation condition. This solves a problem in hysteresis and creep modeling of magnetostrictive behavior.

  17. Inverse agonism and its therapeutic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurudas Khilnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs show varying degrees of basal or constitutive activity. This constitutive activity is usually minimal in natural receptors but is markedly observed in wild type and mutated (naturally or induced receptors. According to conventional two-state drug receptor interaction model, binding of a ligand may initiate activity (agonist with varying degrees of positive intrinsic activity or prevent the effect of an agonist (antagonist with zero intrinsic activity. Inverse agonists bind with the constitutively active receptors, stabilize them, and thus reduce the activity (negative intrinsic activity. Receptors of many classes (α-and β-adrenergic, histaminergic, GABAergic, serotoninergic, opiate, and angiotensin receptors have shown basal activity in suitable in vitro models. Several drugs that have been conventionally classified as antagonists (β-blockers, antihistaminics have shown inverse agonist effects on corresponding constitutively active receptors. Nearly all H 1 and H 2 antihistaminics (antagonists have been shown to be inverse agonists. Among the β-blockers, carvedilol and bucindolol demonstrate low level of inverse agonism as compared to propranolol and nadolol. Several antipsychotic drugs (D 2 receptors antagonist, antihypertensive (AT 1 receptor antagonists, antiserotoninergic drugs and opioid antagonists have significant inverse agonistic activity that contributes partly or wholly to their therapeutic value. Inverse agonism may also help explain the underlying mechanism of beneficial effects of carvedilol in congestive failure, naloxone-induced withdrawal syndrome in opioid dependence, clozapine in psychosis, and candesartan in cardiac hypertrophy. Understanding inverse agonisms has paved a way for newer drug development. It is now possible to develop agents, which have only desired therapeutic value and are devoid of unwanted adverse effect. Pimavanserin (ACP-103, a highly selective 5-HT

  18. On some nonlinear inverse problems in elasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Andrieux S.; Bui H.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we make a review of some inverse problems in elasticity, in statics and dynamics, in acoustics, thermoelasticity and viscoelasticity. Crack inverse problems have been solved in closed form, by considering a nonlinear variational equation provided by the reciprocity gap functional. This equation involves the unknown geometry of the crack and the boundary data. It results from the symmetry lost between current fields and adjoint fields which is related to their support. The...

  19. A fluorophosphate-based inverse Keggin structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielden, John; Quasdorf, Kyle; Cronin, Leroy; Kogerler, Paul

    2012-07-17

    An unusual PFO(3)(2-)-templated "inverse Keggin" polyanion, [Mo(12)O(46)(PF)(4)](4-), has been isolated from the degradation reaction of an {Mo(132)}-type Keplerate to [PMo(12)O(40)](3-) by [Cu(MeCN)(4)](PF(6)) in acetonitrile. (31)P-NMR studies suggest a structure-directing role for [Cu(MeCN)(4)](+) in the formation of the highly unusual all-inorganic inverse Keggin structure.

  20. Inverse semigroups the theory of partial symmetries

    CERN Document Server

    Lawson, Mark V

    1998-01-01

    Symmetry is one of the most important organising principles in the natural sciences. The mathematical theory of symmetry has long been associated with group theory, but it is a basic premise of this book that there are aspects of symmetry which are more faithfully represented by a generalization of groups called inverse semigroups. The theory of inverse semigroups is described from its origins in the foundations of differential geometry through to its most recent applications in combinatorial group theory, and the theory tilings.

  1. INVERSE COEFFICIENT PROBLEMS FOR PARABOLIC HEMIVARIATIONAL INEQUALITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhenhai; I.Szántó

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the class of inverse problems for a nonlinear parabolic hemivariational inequality.The unknown coefficient of the operator depends on the gradient of the solution and belongs to a set of admissible coefficients.It is proved that the convergence of solutions for the corresponding direct problems continuously depends on the coefficient convergence.Based on this result the existence of a quasisolution of the inverse problem is obtained.

  2. SVD Analysis of Full Wave Inversion

    OpenAIRE

    F Watson and WRB Lionheart

    2014-01-01

    Full-wave inversion (FWI) is an imaging approach in which we find thequantitative subsurface parameters (such as the dielectric permittivity) whichwould best fit the recorded GPR data. This optimisation problem isnonlinear and ill-posed, and there have been numerous successes inapplying FWI to GPR data. The dominant propertiesof the FWI inversion process can be observed in the Jacobian matrix ofpartial derivatives of the forward map for each acquisition system. Here, weuse singular value d...

  3. Notions of M\\"obius inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Leinster, Tom

    2012-01-01

    M\\"obius inversion, originally a tool in number theory, was generalized to posets for use in group theory and combinatorics. It was later generalized to categories in two different ways, both of which are useful. We provide a unifying abstract framework. This allows us to compare and contrast the two theories of M\\"obius inversion for categories, and advance each of them. Among several side benefits is an improved understanding of the following fact: the Euler characteristic of the classifyin...

  4. Notions of Möbius inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Leinster, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Möbius inversion, originally a tool in number theory, was generalized to posets for use in group theory and combinatorics. It was later generalized to categories in two different ways, both of which are useful. We provide a unifying abstract framework. This allows us to compare and contrast the two theories of Möbius inversion for categories, and advance each of them. Among several side benefits is an improved understanding of the following fact: the Euler characteristic ...

  5. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this article will enable instructors to use inversion recovery as a laboratory activity in applied NMR classes and provide research students with a conveni...

  6. Evidence against a strong thermal inversion in HD 209458 b from high-dispersion spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, Henriette; de Kok, Remco; Birkby, Jayne; Snellen, Ignas

    2015-01-01

    Broadband secondary-eclipse measurements of hot Jupiters have indicated the existence of atmospheric thermal inversions, but their presence is difficult to determine from broadband measurements because of degeneracies between molecular abundances and temperature structure. We apply high-resolution (R = 100 000) infrared spectroscopy to probe the temperature-pressure profile of HD 209458 b. This bright, transiting hot-Jupiter has long been considered the gold standard for a hot Jupiter with an inversion layer, but this has been challenged in recent publications. We observed the thermal dayside emission of HD 209458 b with CRIRES / VLT during three nights, targeting the carbon monoxide band at 2.3 microns. Thermal inversions give rise to emission features, which means that detecting emission lines in the planetary spectrum, as opposed to absorption lines, would be direct evidence of a region in which the temperature increases with altitude. We do not detect any significant absorption or emission of CO in the da...

  7. Atmospheric pressure variations and abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Killeen, S D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) presents with increased frequency in the winter and spring months. Seasonal changes in atmospheric pressure mirrors this pattern. AIM: To establish if there was a seasonal variation in the occurrence of RAAA and to determine if there was any association with atmospheric pressure changes. METHODS: A retrospective cohort-based study was performed. Daily atmospheric pressure readings for the region were obtained. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant monthly variation in RAAA presentation with 107 cases (52.5%) occurring from November to March. The monthly number of RAAA and the mean atmospheric pressure in the previous month were inversely related (r = -0.752, r (2) = 0.566, P = 0.03), and there was significantly greater daily atmospheric pressure variability on days when patients with RAAA were admitted. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest a relationship between atmospheric pressure and RAAA.

  8. Geoacoustic inversion with ships as sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Robert A; Knobles, David P

    2005-02-01

    Estimation of geoacoustic parameters using acoustic data from a surface ship was performed for a shallow water region in the Gulf of Mexico. The data were recorded from hydrophones in a bottom mounted, horizontal line array (HLA). The techniques developed to produce the geoacoustic inversion are described, and an efficient method for geoacoustic inversion with broadband beam cross-spectral data is demonstrated. The performance of cost functions that involve coherent or incoherent sums over frequency and one or multiple time segments is discussed. Successful inversions for the first sediment layer sound speed and thickness and some of the parameters for the deeper layers were obtained with the surface ship at nominal ranges of 20, 30, or 50 water depths. The data for these inversions were beam cross-spectra from four subapertures of the HLA spanning a little more than two water depths. The subaperture beams included ten frequencies equally spaced in the 120-200 Hz band. The values of the geoacoustic parameters from the inversions are validated by comparisons with geophysical observations and with the parameter values from previous inversions by other invesigators, and by comparing transmission loss (TL) measured in the experiment with modeled TL based on the inverted geoacoustic parameters.

  9. An application of sparse inversion on the calculation of the inverse data space of geophysical data

    KAUST Repository

    Saragiotis, Christos

    2011-07-01

    Multiple reflections as observed in seismic reflection measurements often hide arrivals from the deeper target reflectors and need to be removed. The inverse data space provides a natural separation of primaries and surface-related multiples, as the surface multiples map onto the area around the origin while the primaries map elsewhere. However, the calculation of the inverse data is far from trivial as theory requires infinite time and offset recording. Furthermore regularization issues arise during inversion. We perform the inversion by minimizing the least-squares norm of the misfit function and by constraining the 1 norm of the solution, being the inverse data space. In this way a sparse inversion approach is obtained. We show results on field data with an application to surface multiple removal. © 2011 IEEE.

  10. PREFACE: The Second International Conference on Inverse Problems: Recent Theoretical Developments and Numerical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jin; Hon, Yiu-Chung; Seo, Jin Keun; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Inverse Problems: Recent Theoretical Developments and Numerical Approaches was held at Fudan University, Shanghai from 16-21 June 2004. The first conference in this series was held at the City University of Hong Kong in January 2002 and it was agreed to hold the conference once every two years in a Pan-Pacific Asian country. The next conference is scheduled to be held at Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan in July 2006. The purpose of this series of biennial conferences is to establish and develop constant international collaboration, especially among the Pan-Pacific Asian countries. In recent decades, interest in inverse problems has been flourishing all over the globe because of both the theoretical interest and practical requirements. In particular, in Asian countries, one is witnessing remarkable new trends of research in inverse problems as well as the participation of many young talents. Considering these trends, the second conference was organized with the chairperson Professor Li Tat-tsien (Fudan University), in order to provide forums for developing research cooperation and to promote activities in the field of inverse problems. Because solutions to inverse problems are needed in various applied fields, we entertained a total of 92 participants at the second conference and arranged various talks which ranged from mathematical analyses to solutions of concrete inverse problems in the real world. This volume contains 18 selected papers, all of which have undergone peer review. The 18 papers are classified as follows: Surveys: four papers give reviews of specific inverse problems. Theoretical aspects: six papers investigate the uniqueness, stability, and reconstruction schemes. Numerical methods: four papers devise new numerical methods and their applications to inverse problems. Solutions to applied inverse problems: four papers discuss concrete inverse problems such as scattering problems and inverse problems in

  11. Application of the least-squares inversion method: Fourier series versus waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Dong-Joo; Shin, Jungkyun; Shin, Changsoo

    2015-11-01

    We describe an implicit link between waveform inversion and Fourier series based on inversion methods such as gradient, Gauss-Newton, and full Newton methods. Fourier series have been widely used as a basic concept in studies on seismic data interpretation, and their coefficients are obtained in the classical Fourier analysis. We show that Fourier coefficients can also be obtained by inversion algorithms, and compare the method to seismic waveform inversion algorithms. In that case, Fourier coefficients correspond to model parameters (velocities, density or elastic constants), whereas cosine and sine functions correspond to components of the Jacobian matrix, that is, partial derivative wavefields in seismic inversion. In the classical Fourier analysis, optimal coefficients are determined by the sensitivity of a given function to sine and cosine functions. In the inversion method for Fourier series, Fourier coefficients are obtained by measuring the sensitivity of residuals between given functions and test functions (defined as the sum of weighted cosine and sine functions) to cosine and sine functions. The orthogonal property of cosine and sine functions makes the full or approximate Hessian matrix become a diagonal matrix in the inversion for Fourier series. In seismic waveform inversion, the Hessian matrix may or may not be a diagonal matrix, because partial derivative wavefields correlate with each other to some extent, making them semi-orthogonal. At the high-frequency limits, however, the Hessian matrix can be approximated by either a diagonal matrix or a diagonally-dominant matrix. Since we usually deal with relatively low frequencies in seismic waveform inversion, it is not diagonally dominant and thus it is prohibitively expensive to compute the full or approximate Hessian matrix. By interpreting Fourier series with the inversion algorithms, we note that the Fourier series can be computed at an iteration step using any inversion algorithms such as the

  12. Inverse feasibility problems of the inverse maximum flow problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Adrian Deaconu; Eleonor Ciurea

    2013-04-01

    A linear time method to decide if any inverse maximum flow (denoted General Inverse Maximum Flow problems (IMFG)) problem has solution is deduced. If IMFG does not have solution, methods to transform IMFG into a feasible problem are presented. The methods consist of modifying as little as possible the restrictions to the variation of the bounds of the flow. New inverse combinatorial optimization problems are introduced and solved.

  13. An approach to estimating and extrapolating model error based on inverse problem methods: towards accurate numerical weather prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Model error is one of the key factors restricting the accuracy of numerical weather prediction (NWP). Considering the continuous evolution of the atmosphere, the observed data (ignoring the measurement error) can be viewed as a series of solutions of an accurate model governing the actual atmosphere. Model error is represented as an unknown term in the accurate model, thus NWP can be considered as an inverse problem to uncover the unknown error term. The inverse problem models can absorb long periods of observed data to generate model error correction procedures. They thus resolve the deficiency and faultiness of the NWP schemes employing only the initial-time data. In this study we construct two inverse problem models to estimate and extrapolate the time-varying and spatial-varying model errors in both the historical and forecast periods by using recent observations and analogue phenomena of the atmosphere. Numerical experiment on Burgers' equation has illustrated the substantial forecast improvement using inverse problem algorithms. The proposed inverse problem methods of suppressing NWP errors will be useful in future high accuracy applications of NWP. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  14. Understanding the impact of model errors on the inverse modeling of MOPITT CO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhe

    Atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) is a product of incomplete combustion and a byproduct of the oxidation of hydrocarbons. It plays a key role in controlling the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere since it is the main sink for the hydroxyl radical (OH), the primary tropospheric oxidant. As a result of its lifetime, CO is a useful tracer of long-range transport in models. However, estimates of the regional sources of CO are uncertain. Inverse modeling has become a widely used approach for better quantifying the sources, but a fundamental assumption in these inversions, which is typically not valid, is that the observations and models are unbiased. In this thesis, the GEOS-Chem model and observations of CO from the Measurement Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) instrument are employed to study the impact of systematic model errors on inversion analyses of CO. The impact of the treatment of biogenic non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs), aggregation errors, and discrepancies in the meteorological fields and OH distribution on the CO source estimates are examined. The influence of vertical transport errors on the source estimates is assessed using newly available MOPITT version 5 (V5) retrievals in a comparative inversion analysis employing surface level, profile, and column data. To quantify the potential impact of discrepancies in long-range transport on the source estimates, a high-resolution, regional inversion over North America, with optimized lateral boundary conditions, was conducted and compared with the results of a global inversion. The influence of the spatial-temporal distribution of the observations on the source estimates was also assessed through a comparison of the inversion analyses of MOPITT data and aircraft data from the Intercontinental Transport Experiment -- North America, Phase A (INTEX-A) aircraft campaign. The results presented in the thesis provide a more comprehensive understanding of the potential impact of system model

  15. Application of the Backscatter Near-End Solution for the Inversion of Scanning Lidar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, Vladimir; Wold, Cyle; Petkov, Alexander; Hao, Wei Min

    2016-06-01

    The significant issue of the classic multiangle data-processing technique is that the upper boundary height, up to which the multiangle data processing technique allows reliable extraction of optical parameters of the searched atmosphere, is always significantly less than the operative range of the scanning lidar. The existing inversion methodology yields poor accuracy when inverting the far-end data points of the signals measured in and close to zenith. In the report, the data processing technique is considered which allows using the zenith-measured signal to increase the maximal heights of profiling of the atmosphere. Simulated and experimental data are presented that illustrate the specifics of such a technique.

  16. Successful management of recurrent puerperal uterine inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Nambisan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The puerperal uterine inversion is a rare and severe complication occurring in the third stage of labour. The exact mechanisms are unclear. However, extrinsic factors such as prolonged labour, umbilical cord traction, oxytocic use etc. have been mentioned. Other intrinsic factors such as primiparity, uterine hypotonia, different placental localizations, fundal location of a myoma or short umbilical cord have also been reported. The diagnosis of uterine inversion is mainly made on the basis of clinical symptoms which include haemorrhage, shock and a strong pelvic pain. The immediate treatment of the uterine inversion is required. A case of 23 years old, second gravida with one previous spontaneous first trimester abortion, who had a full term normal vaginal delivery but while trying to deliver the placenta after confirmation of placental separation clinically, uterine inversion was diagnosed immediately and manual repositioning of uterus was done under general anaesthesia. On the 6 th post natal day, during the routine postnatal rounds, uterus was not palpable per abdomen and a local examination revealed a mass at the introitus. A diagnosis of grade 3 sub-acute inversion was made and she was taken up for exploratory laparotomy. Reinsertion was done according to the Huntington technique by placing clamps on the round ligament, near its insertion on the uterus, and applying traction upwards while the assistant exerted traction on the contra lateral way through the vagina. As persistent atonicity and diffuse oozing was noted multiple Cho sutures were put over the uterus. Patient had an uneventful postnatal period. This is a rare scenario where the same patient had an acute inversion initially followed by sub-acute inversion. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(10.000: 3619-3621

  17. The ray-tracing mapping operator in an asymmetric atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In a spherically symmetric atmosphere, the refractive index profile is retrieved from bending angle measurements through Abel integral transform. As horizontal refractivity inhomogeneity becomes significant in the moist low atmosphere, the error in refractivity profile obtained from Abel inversion reaches about 10%. One way to avoid this error is to directly assimilate bending angle profile into numerical weather models. This paper discusses the 2D ray-tracing mapping operator for bending angle in an asymmetric atmosphere. Through simulating computations, the retrieval error of the refractivity in horizontal inhomogeneity is assessed. The step length of 4 rank Runge-Kutta method is also tested.

  18. Modeling large wind farms in conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers under varying initial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric boundary layers (ABL) are frequently capped by an inversion layer limiting the entrainment rate and boundary layer growth. Commonly used analytical models state that the entrainment rate is inversely proportional to the inversion strength. The height of the inversion turns out to be a second important parameter. Conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layers (CNBL) are ABLs with zero surface heat flux developing against a stratified free atmosphere. In this regime the inversion-filling process is merely driven by the downward heat flux at the inversion base. As a result, CNBLs are strongly dependent on the heating history of the boundary layer and strong inversions will fail to erode during the course of the day. In case of large wind farms, the power output of the farm inside a CNBL will depend on the height and strength of the inversion above the boundary layer. On the other hand, increased turbulence levels induced by wind farms may partially undermine the rigid lid effect of the capping inversion, enhance vertical entrainment of air into the farm, and increase boundary layer growth. A suite of large eddy simulations (LES) is performed to investigate the effect of the capping inversion on the conventionally neutral atmospheric boundary layer and on the wind farm performance under varying initial conditions. For these simulations our in-house pseudo-spectral LES code SP-Wind is used. The wind turbines are modelled using a non-rotating actuator disk method. In the absence of wind farms, we find that a decrease in inversion strength corresponds to a decrease in the geostrophic angle and an increase in entrainment rate and geostrophic drag. Placing the initial inversion base at higher altitudes further reduces the effect of the capping inversion on the boundary layer. The inversion can be fully neglected once it is situated above the equilibrium height that a truly neutral boundary layer would attain under the same external conditions such as

  19. An estimate of the terrestrial carbon budget of Russia using inventory based, eddy covariance and inversion methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolman, A.J.; Shvidenko, A.; Schepaschenko, D.; Ciais, P.; Tchebakova, N.; Chen, T.; Molen, van der M.K.; Belelli Marchesini, L.; Maximov, T.C.; Maksyutov, S.; Schulze, E.D.

    2012-01-01

    We determine the net land to atmosphere flux of carbon in Russia, including Ukraine, Belarus and Kazakhstan, using inventory-based, eddy covariance, and inversion methods. Our high boundary estimate is -342 Tg C yr-1 from the eddy covariance method, and this is close to the upper bounds of the inven

  20. Non-LTE inversions of the Mg II h&k and UV triplet lines

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez, Jaime de la Cruz; Ramos, Andrés Asensio

    2016-01-01

    The Mg II h&k lines are powerful diagnostics for studying the solar chromosphere. They have become particularly popular with the launch of the IRIS satellite, and a number of studies that include these lines have lead to great progress in understanding chromospheric heating, in many cases thanks to the support from 3D MHD simulations. In this study we utilize another approach to analyze observations: non-LTE inversions of the Mg II h&k and UV triplet lines including the effects of partial redistribution. Our inversion code attempts to construct a model atmosphere that is compatible with the observed spectra. We have assessed the capabilities and limitations of the inversions using the FALC atmosphere and a snapshot from a 3D radiation-MHD simulation. We find that Mg II h&k allow reconstructing a model atmosphere from the middle photosphere to the transition region. We have also explored the capabilities of a multi-line/multi-atom setup, including the Mg II h&k, the Ca II 854.2 nm and the Fe I ...

  1. Fast inversion of Zeeman line profiles using central moments. II. Stokes V moments and determination of vector magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mein, P.; Uitenbroek, H.; Mein, N.; Bommier, V.; Faurobert, M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. In the case of unresolved solar structures or stray light contamination, inversion techniques using four Stokes parameters of Zeeman profiles cannot disentangle the combined contributions of magnetic and nonmagnetic areas to the observed Stokes I. Aims: In the framework of a two-component model atmosphere with filling factor f, we propose an inversion method restricting input data to Q , U, and V profiles, thus overcoming ambiguities from stray light and spatial mixing. Methods: The V-moments inversion (VMI) method uses shifts SV derived from moments of V-profiles and integrals of Q2, U2, and V2 to determine the strength B and inclination ψ of a magnetic field vector through least-squares polynomial fits and with very few iterations. Moment calculations are optimized to reduce data noise effects. To specify the model atmosphere of the magnetic component, an additional parameter δ, deduced from the shape of V-profiles, is used to interpolate between expansions corresponding to two basic models. Results: We perform inversions of HINODE SOT/SP data for inclination ranges 0 VMI inversion are compared with results from the inversion codes UNNOFIT and MERLIN. Conclusions: The VMI inversion method is insensitive to the dependence of Stokes I profiles on the thermodynamic structure in nonmagnetic areas. In the range of Bf products larger than 200 G, mean field strengths exceed 1000 G and there is not a very significant departure from the UNNOFIT results because of differences between magnetic and nonmagnetic model atmospheres. Further improvements might include additional parameters deduced from the shape of Stokes V profiles and from large sets of 3D-MHD simulations, especially for unresolved magnetic flux tubes.

  2. Inversion concept of the origin of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompanichenko, V N

    2012-06-01

    The essence of the inversion concept of the origin of life can be narrowed down to the following theses: 1) thermodynamic inversion is the key transformation of prebiotic microsystems leading to their transition into primary forms of life; 2) this transformation might occur only in the microsystems oscillating around the bifurcation point under far-from-equilibrium conditions. The transformation consists in the inversion of the balance "free energy contribution / entropy contribution", from negative to positive values. At the inversion moment the microsystem radically reorganizes in accordance with the new negentropy (i.e. biological) way of organization. According to this approach, the origin-of-life process on the early Earth took place in the fluctuating hydrothermal medium. The process occurred in two successive stages: a) spontaneous self-assembly of initial three-dimensional prebiotic microsystems composed mainly of hydrocarbons, lipids and simple amino acids, or their precursors, within the temperature interval of 100-300°C (prebiotic stage); b) non-spontaneous synthesis of sugars, ATP and nucleic acids started at the inversion moment under the temperature 70-100°C (biotic stage). Macro- and microfluctuations of thermodynamic and physico-chemical parameters able to sustain this way of chemical conversion have been detected in several contemporary hydrothermal systems. A minimal self-sufficient unit of life on the early Earth was a community of simplest microorganisms (not a separate microorganism).

  3. Unwrapped phase inversion with an exponential damping

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yunseok

    2015-07-28

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from the phase wrapping (cycle skipping) problem when the frequency of data is not low enough. Unless we obtain a good initial velocity model, the phase wrapping problem in FWI causes a result corresponding to a local minimum, usually far away from the true solution, especially at depth. Thus, we have developed an inversion algorithm based on a space-domain unwrapped phase, and we also used exponential damping to mitigate the nonlinearity associated with the reflections. We construct the 2D phase residual map, which usually contains the wrapping discontinuities, especially if the model is complex and the frequency is high. We then unwrap the phase map and remove these cycle-based jumps. However, if the phase map has several residues, the unwrapping process becomes very complicated. We apply a strong exponential damping to the wavefield to eliminate much of the residues in the phase map, thus making the unwrapping process simple. We finally invert the unwrapped phases using the back-propagation algorithm to calculate the gradient. We progressively reduce the damping factor to obtain a high-resolution image. Numerical examples determined that the unwrapped phase inversion with a strong exponential damping generated convergent long-wavelength updates without low-frequency information. This model can be used as a good starting model for a subsequent inversion with a reduced damping, eventually leading to conventional waveform inversion.

  4. QCD-instantons and conformal inversion symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klammer, D.

    2006-07-15

    Instantons are an essential and non-perturbative part of Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory of strong interactions. One of the most relevant quantities in the instanton calculus is the instanton-size distribution, which can be described on the one hand within the framework of instanton perturbation theory and on the other hand investigated numerically by means of lattice computations. A rapid onset of a drastic discrepancy between these respective results indicates that the underlying physics is not yet well understood. In this work we investigate the appealing possibility of a symmetry under conformal inversion of space-time leading to this deviation. The motivation being that the lattice data seem to be invariant under an inversion of the instanton size. Since the instanton solution of a given size turns into an anti-instanton solution having an inverted size under conformal inversion of space-time, we ask in a first investigation, whether this property is transferred to the quantum level. In order to introduce a new scale, which is indicated by the lattice data and corresponds to the average instanton size as inversion radius, we project the instanton calculus onto the four-dimensional surface of a five-dimensional sphere via stereographic projection. The radius of this sphere is associated with the average instanton size. The result for the instanton size-distribution projected onto the sphere agrees surprisingly well with the lattice data at qualitative level. The resulting symmetry under an inversion of the instanton size is almost perfect. (orig.)

  5. Varying prior information in Bayesian inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Matthew; Curtis, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Bayes' rule is used to combine likelihood and prior probability distributions. The former represents knowledge derived from new data, the latter represents pre-existing knowledge; the Bayesian combination is the so-called posterior distribution, representing the resultant new state of knowledge. While varying the likelihood due to differing data observations is common, there are also situations where the prior distribution must be changed or replaced repeatedly. For example, in mixture density neural network (MDN) inversion, using current methods the neural network employed for inversion needs to be retrained every time prior information changes. We develop a method of prior replacement to vary the prior without re-training the network. Thus the efficiency of MDN inversions can be increased, typically by orders of magnitude when applied to geophysical problems. We demonstrate this for the inversion of seismic attributes in a synthetic subsurface geological reservoir model. We also present results which suggest that prior replacement can be used to control the statistical properties (such as variance) of the final estimate of the posterior in more general (e.g., Monte Carlo based) inverse problem solutions.

  6. Inverse kinematic-based robot control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolovich, W. A.; Flueckiger, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    A fundamental problem which must be resolved in virtually all non-trivial robotic operations is the well-known inverse kinematic question. More specifically, most of the tasks which robots are called upon to perform are specified in Cartesian (x,y,z) space, such as simple tracking along one or more straight line paths or following a specified surfacer with compliant force sensors and/or visual feedback. In all cases, control is actually implemented through coordinated motion of the various links which comprise the manipulator; i.e., in link space. As a consequence, the control computer of every sophisticated anthropomorphic robot must contain provisions for solving the inverse kinematic problem which, in the case of simple, non-redundant position control, involves the determination of the first three link angles, theta sub 1, theta sub 2, and theta sub 3, which produce a desired wrist origin position P sub xw, P sub yw, and P sub zw at the end of link 3 relative to some fixed base frame. Researchers outline a new inverse kinematic solution and demonstrate its potential via some recent computer simulations. They also compare it to current inverse kinematic methods and outline some of the remaining problems which will be addressed in order to render it fully operational. Also discussed are a number of practical consequences of this technique beyond its obvious use in solving the inverse kinematic question.

  7. Inverse modeling of CH4 emissions for 2010–2011 using different satellite retrieval products from GOSAT and SCIAMACHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alexe

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Beginning in 2009 new space-borne observations of dry-air column-averaged mole fractions of atmospheric methane (XCH4 became available from the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observations–Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS instrument onboard the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT. Until April 2012 concurrent CH4 measurements were provided by the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY (SCIAMACHY instrument onboard ENVISAT. The GOSAT and SCIAMACHY XCH4 retrievals can be compared during their circa 32 month period of overlap. We estimate monthly average CH4 emissions between January 2010 and December 2011, using the TM5-4DVAR inverse modeling system. Additionally, high-accuracy measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA ESRL global air sampling network are used, providing strong constraints of the remote surface atmosphere. We discuss five inversion scenarios that make use of different GOSAT and SCIAMACHY XCH4 retrieval products, including two sets of GOSAT proxy retrievals processed independently by the Netherlands Institute for Space Research (SRON/Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT, and the University of Leicester (UL, and the RemoTeC "Full-Physics" (FP XCH4 retrievals available from SRON/KIT. 2 year average emission maps show a~good overall agreement among all GOSAT-based inversions, and compared to the SCIAMACHY-based inversion, with consistent flux adjustment patterns, particularly across Equatorial Africa and North America. The inversions are validated against independent shipboard and aircraft observations, and XCH4 measurements available from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON. All GOSAT and SCIAMACHY inversions show very similar validation performance.

  8. On the Block Independence in G-Inverse and Reflexive Inner Inverse of A Partitioned Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Hui LIU; Mu Sheng WEI

    2007-01-01

    By applying the multiple quotient singular value decomposition QQQQQ-SVD, we study the block independence in g-inverse and reflexive inner inverse of 2×2 partitioned matrices, and prove a conjecture in [YijuWang,SIAM J. Matrix Anal. Appl., 19(2), 407-415(1998)].

  9. Interplay of Nitrogen-Atom Inversion and Conformational Inversion in Enantiomerization of 1H-1-Benzazepines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramig, Keith; Subramaniam, Gopal; Karimi, Sasan; Szalda, David J; Ko, Allen; Lam, Aaron; Li, Jeffrey; Coaderaj, Ani; Cavdar, Leyla; Bogdan, Lukasz; Kwon, Kitae; Greer, Edyta M

    2016-04-15

    A series of 2,4-disubstituted 1H-1-benzazepines, 2a-d, 4, and 6, were studied, varying both the substituents at C2 and C4 and at the nitrogen atom. The conformational inversion (ring-flip) and nitrogen-atom inversion (N-inversion) energetics were studied by variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy and computations. The steric bulk of the nitrogen-atom substituent was found to affect both the conformation of the azepine ring and the geometry around the nitrogen atom. Also affected were the Gibbs free energy barriers for the ring-flip and the N-inversion. When the nitrogen-atom substituent was alkyl, as in 2a-c, the geometry of the nitrogen atom was nearly planar and the azepine ring was highly puckered; the result was a relatively high-energy barrier to ring-flip and a low barrier to N-inversion. Conversely, when the nitrogen-atom substituent was a hydrogen atom, as in 2d, 4, and 6, the nitrogen atom was significantly pyramidalized and the azepine ring was less puckered; the result here was a relatively high energy barrier to N-inversion and a low barrier to ring-flip. In these N-unsubstituted compounds, it was found computationally that the lowest-energy stereodynamic process was ring-flip coupled with N-inversion, as N-inversion alone had a much higher energy barrier.

  10. A regional high-resolution carbon flux inversion of North America for 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, A. E.; Denning, A. S.; Corbin, K. D.; Baker, I. T.; Uliasz, M.; Parazoo, N.; Andrews, A. E.; Worthy, D. E. J.

    2010-05-01

    Resolving the discrepancies between NEE estimates based upon (1) ground studies and (2) atmospheric inversion results, demands increasingly sophisticated techniques. In this paper we present a high-resolution inversion based upon a regional meteorology model (RAMS) and an underlying biosphere (SiB3) model, both running on an identical 40 km grid over most of North America. Current operational systems like CarbonTracker as well as many previous global inversions including the Transcom suite of inversions have utilized inversion regions formed by collapsing biome-similar grid cells into larger aggregated regions. An extreme example of this might be where corrections to NEE imposed on forested regions on the east coast of the United States might be the same as that imposed on forests on the west coast of the United States while, in reality, there likely exist subtle differences in the two areas, both natural and anthropogenic. Our current inversion framework utilizes a combination of previously employed inversion techniques while allowing carbon flux corrections to be biome independent. Temporally and spatially high-resolution results utilizing biome-independent corrections provide insight into carbon dynamics in North America. In particular, we analyze hourly CO2 mixing ratio data from a sparse network of eight towers in North America for 2004. A prior estimate of carbon fluxes due to Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (ER) is constructed from the SiB3 biosphere model on a 40 km grid. A combination of transport from the RAMS and the Parameterized Chemical Transport Model (PCTM) models is used to forge a connection between upwind biosphere fluxes and downwind observed CO2 mixing ratio data. A Kalman filter procedure is used to estimate weekly corrections to biosphere fluxes based upon observed CO2. RMSE-weighted annual NEE estimates, over an ensemble of potential inversion parameter sets, show a mean estimate 0.57 Pg/yr sink in North America

  11. A regional high-resolution carbon flux inversion of North America for 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Schuh

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Resolving the discrepancies between NEE estimates based upon (1 ground studies and (2 atmospheric inversion results, demands increasingly sophisticated techniques. In this paper we present a high-resolution inversion based upon a regional meteorology model (RAMS and an underlying biosphere (SiB3 model, both running on an identical 40 km grid over most of North America. Current operational systems like CarbonTracker as well as many previous global inversions including the Transcom suite of inversions have utilized inversion regions formed by collapsing biome-similar grid cells into larger aggregated regions. An extreme example of this might be where corrections to NEE imposed on forested regions on the east coast of the United States might be the same as that imposed on forests on the west coast of the United States while, in reality, there likely exist subtle differences in the two areas, both natural and anthropogenic. Our current inversion framework utilizes a combination of previously employed inversion techniques while allowing carbon flux corrections to be biome independent. Temporally and spatially high-resolution results utilizing biome-independent corrections provide insight into carbon dynamics in North America. In particular, we analyze hourly CO2 mixing ratio data from a sparse network of eight towers in North America for 2004. A prior estimate of carbon fluxes due to Gross Primary Productivity (GPP and Ecosystem Respiration (ER is constructed from the SiB3 biosphere model on a 40 km grid. A combination of transport from the RAMS and the Parameterized Chemical Transport Model (PCTM models is used to forge a connection between upwind biosphere fluxes and downwind observed CO2 mixing ratio data. A Kalman filter procedure is used to estimate weekly corrections to biosphere fluxes based upon observed CO2. RMSE-weighted annual NEE estimates, over an ensemble of potential inversion parameter sets, show a

  12. A Study of the Relationship between Air Pollutants and Inversion in the ABL over the City of Lanzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiang; LI Hongyu

    2011-01-01

    By analyzing the pollutant concentrations over the urban area and over the rural area of the city of Lanzhou, Gansu Province, China, the relationships between the daytime inversion intensity and the pollutant concentration in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are studied with the consideration of wind speed and direction, potential temperature, specific humidity profiles, pollutant concentration in the ABL, the surface temperature, and global radiation on the ground. It was shown that the daytime inversion is a key factor in controlling air pollution concentration. A clear and positive feedback process between the daytime inversion intensity and the air pollutants over the city was found through the analysis of influences of climatic and environmental factors. The mechanisms by which the terrain and air pollutants affect the formation of the daytime inversion are discussed. The solar radiation as the essential energy source to maintain the inversion is analyzed, as are various out-forcing factors affecting the inversion and air pollutants. At last, aphysical frame of relationships of air pollution with daytime inversion and the local and out-forcing factors over Lanzhou is built.

  13. Atmospheric composition change: Ecosystems-Atmosphere interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fowler, D.; Pilegaard, K.; Sutton, M.A.; Ambus, P.; Raivonen, M.; Duyzer, J.; Simpson, D.; Fagerli, H.; Fuzzi, S.; Schjoerring, J.K.; Granier, C.; Neftel, A.; Isaksen, I.S.A.; Laj, P.; Maione, M.; Monks, P.S.; Burkhardt, J.; Daemmgen, U.; Neirynck, J.; Personne, E.; Wichink Kruit, R.J.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Flechard, C.; Tuovinen, J.P.; Coyle, M.; Gerosa, G.; Loubet, B.; Altimir, N.; Gruenhage, L.; Ammann, C.; Cieslik, S.; Paoletti, E.; Mikkelsen, T.N.; Ro-Poulsen, H.; Cellier, P.; Cape, J.N.; Horvath, L.; Loreto, F.; Niinemets, U.; Palmer, P.I.; Rinne, J.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Nilsson, D.; Pryor, S.; Gallagher, M.W.; Vesala, T.; Skiba, U.; Brueggemann, N.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.; Williams, J.; O'Dowd, C.; Facchini, M.C.; Leeuw, de G.; Flossman, A.; Chaumerliac, N.; Erisman, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystems and the atmosphere: This review describes the state of understanding the processes involved in the exchange of trace gases and aerosols between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. The gases covered include NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, NH3, SO2, DMS, Biogenic VOC, O-3, CH4, N2O and particles i

  14. FAST INVERSION OF SOLAR Ca II SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, C. [National Solar Observatory (NSO), 3010 Coronal Loop, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Choudhary, D. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Northridge (CSUN), CA 91330-8268 (United States); Rezaei, R. [Kiepenheuer-Institut für Sonnenphysik (KIS), Schöneckstr. 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Louis, R. E., E-mail: cbeck@nso.edu [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-01-10

    We present a fast (<<1 s per profile) inversion code for solar Ca II lines. The code uses an archive of spectra that are synthesized prior to the inversion under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We show that it can be successfully applied to spectrograph data or more sparsely sampled spectra from two-dimensional spectrometers. From a comparison to a non-LTE inversion of the same set of spectra, we derive a first-order non-LTE correction to the temperature stratifications derived in the LTE approach. The correction factor is close to unity up to log τ ∼ –3 and increases to values of 2.5 and 4 at log τ = –6 in the quiet Sun and the umbra, respectively.

  15. Inversion for seismic anisotropy using genetic algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horne, S. (British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom) Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); MacBeth, C. (Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1994-11-01

    A general inversion scheme based on a genetic algorithm is developed to invert seismic observations for anisotropic parameters. The technique is applied to the inversion of shear-wave observations from two azimuthal VSP data sets from the Conoco test site in Oklahoma. Horizontal polarizations and time-delays are inverted for hexagonal and orthorhombic symmetries. The model solutions are consistent with previous studies using trial and error matching of full waveform synthetics. The shear-wave splitting observations suggest the presence of a shear-wave line singularity and are consistent with a dipping fracture system which is known to exist at the test site. Application of the inversion scheme prior to full waveform modeling demonstrates that a considerable saving in time is possible while retaining the same degree of accuracy.

  16. Estimating stellar mean density through seismic inversions

    CERN Document Server

    Reese, D R; Goupil, M J; Thompson, M J; Deheuvels, S

    2012-01-01

    Determining the mass of stars is crucial both to improving stellar evolution theory and to characterising exoplanetary systems. Asteroseismology offers a promising way to estimate stellar mean density. When combined with accurate radii determinations, such as is expected from GAIA, this yields accurate stellar masses. The main difficulty is finding the best way to extract the mean density from a set of observed frequencies. We seek to establish a new method for estimating stellar mean density, which combines the simplicity of a scaling law while providing the accuracy of an inversion technique. We provide a framework in which to construct and evaluate kernel-based linear inversions which yield directly the mean density of a star. We then describe three different inversion techniques (SOLA and two scaling laws) and apply them to the sun, several test cases and three stars. The SOLA approach and the scaling law based on the surface correcting technique described by Kjeldsen et al. (2008) yield comparable result...

  17. Probabilistic inversion for chicken processing lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Roger M. [Department of Mathematics, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)]. E-mail: r.m.cooke@ewi.tudelft.nl; Nauta, Maarten [Microbiological Laboratory for Health Protection RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Havelaar, Arie H. [Microbiological Laboratory for Health Protection RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Fels, Ine van der [Microbiological Laboratory for Health Protection RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2006-10-15

    We discuss an application of probabilistic inversion techniques to a model of campylobacter transmission in chicken processing lines. Such techniques are indicated when we wish to quantify a model which is new and perhaps unfamiliar to the expert community. In this case there are no measurements for estimating model parameters, and experts are typically unable to give a considered judgment. In such cases, experts are asked to quantify their uncertainty regarding variables which can be predicted by the model. The experts' distributions (after combination) are then pulled back onto the parameter space of the model, a process termed 'probabilistic inversion'. This study illustrates two such techniques, iterative proportional fitting (IPF) and PARmeter fitting for uncertain models (PARFUM). In addition, we illustrate how expert judgement on predicted observable quantities in combination with probabilistic inversion may be used for model validation and/or model criticism.

  18. Optimization and Inverse Design of Pump Impeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyauchi, S.; Zhu, B.; Luo, X.; Piao, B.; Matsumoto, H.; Sano, M.; Kassai, N.

    2012-11-01

    As for pump impellers, the meridional flow channel and blade-to-blade flow channel, which are relatively independent of each other but greatly affect performance, are designed in parallel. And the optimization design is used for the former and the inverse design is used for the latter. To verify this new design method, a mixed-flow impeller was made. Next, we use Tani's inverse design method for the blade loading of inverse design. It is useful enough to change a deceleration rate freely and greatly. And it can integrally express the rear blade loading of various methods by NACA, Zangeneh and Stratford. We controlled the deceleration rate by shape parameter m, and its value became almost same with Tani's recommended value of the laminar airfoil.

  19. Fast inversion of solar Ca II spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, C; Rezaei, R; Louis, R E

    2014-01-01

    We present a fast (<< 1 s per profile) inversion code for solar Ca II lines. The code uses an archive of spectra that are synthesized prior to the inversion under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We show that it can be successfully applied to spectrograph data or more sparsely sampled spectra from two-dimensional spectrometers. From a comparison to a non-LTE inversion of the same set of spectra, we derive a first-order non-LTE correction to the temperature stratifications derived in the LTE approach. The correction factor is close to unity up to log tau ~ -3 and increases to values of 2.5 and 4 at log tau = -6 in the quiet Sun and the umbra, respectively.

  20. Optimization and Inverse Design of Pump Impeller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As for pump impellers, the meridional flow channel and blade-to-blade flow channel, which are relatively independent of each other but greatly affect performance, are designed in parallel. And the optimization design is used for the former and the inverse design is used for the latter. To verify this new design method, a mixed-flow impeller was made. Next, we use Tani's inverse design method for the blade loading of inverse design. It is useful enough to change a deceleration rate freely and greatly. And it can integrally express the rear blade loading of various methods by NACA, Zangeneh and Stratford. We controlled the deceleration rate by shape parameter m, and its value became almost same with Tani's recommended value of the laminar airfoil.

  1. Inverse Scattering Approach to Improving Pattern Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapline, G; Fu, C

    2005-02-15

    The Helmholtz machine provides what may be the best existing model for how the mammalian brain recognizes patterns. Based on the observation that the ''wake-sleep'' algorithm for training a Helmholtz machine is similar to the problem of finding the potential for a multi-channel Schrodinger equation, we propose that the construction of a Schrodinger potential using inverse scattering methods can serve as a model for how the mammalian brain learns to extract essential information from sensory data. In particular, inverse scattering theory provides a conceptual framework for imagining how one might use EEG and MEG observations of brain-waves together with sensory feedback to improve human learning and pattern recognition. Longer term, implementation of inverse scattering algorithms on a digital or optical computer could be a step towards mimicking the seamless information fusion of the mammalian brain.

  2. Inverse osmotic process for radioactive laundry waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To effectively recover the processing amount reduced in a continuous treatment. Method: Laundry waste containing radioactive substances discharged from a nuclear power plant is processed in an inverse osmotic process while adding starch digesting enzymes such as amylase and takadiastase, as well as soft spherical bodies such as sponge balls of a particle diameter capable of flowing in the flow of the liquid wastes along the inverse osmotic membrane pipe and having such a softness and roundness as not to damage the inverse osmotic membrane. This process can remove the floating materials such as thread dusts or hairs deposited on the membrane surface by the action of the soft elastic balls and remove paste or the like through decomposition by the digesting enzymes. Consequently, effective recovery can be attained for the reduced processing amount. (Furukawa, Y.)

  3. Geometric theory of inversion and seismic imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, August

    2015-01-01

    The goal of inversion is to estimate the model which generates the data of observations with a specific modeling equation. One general approach to inversion is to use optimization methods which are algebraic in nature to define an objective function. This is the case for objective functions like minimizing RMS of amplitude, residual traveltime error in tomography, cross correlation and sometimes mixing different norms (e.g. L1 of model + L2 of RMS error). Algebraic objective function assumes that the optimal solution will come up with the correct geometry. It is sometimes difficult to understand how one number (error of the fit) could miraculously come up with the detail geometry of the earth model. If one models the earth as binary rock parameters (only two values for velocity variation), one could see that the geometry of the rugose boundaries of the geobodies might not be solvable by inversion using algebraic objective function.

  4. Error handling strategies in multiphase inverse modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finsterle, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Parameter estimation by inverse modeling involves the repeated evaluation of a function of residuals. These residuals represent both errors in the model and errors in the data. In practical applications of inverse modeling of multiphase flow and transport, the error structure of the final residuals often significantly deviates from the statistical assumptions that underlie standard maximum likelihood estimation using the least-squares method. Large random or systematic errors are likely to lead to convergence problems, biased parameter estimates, misleading uncertainty measures, or poor predictive capabilities of the calibrated model. The multiphase inverse modeling code iTOUGH2 supports strategies that identify and mitigate the impact of systematic or non-normal error structures. We discuss these approaches and provide an overview of the error handling features implemented in iTOUGH2.

  5. Psycholinguistic Evidence for Inverse Scope in Korean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunyoung; O'Grady, William

    2016-08-01

    We use experimental data to shed light on the ongoing question of whether Korean allows inverse scope interpretation in sentences containing an indefinite subject and a universally quantified direct object (e.g., 'Someone bought each loaf of bread at the bakery'). The results of an off-line acceptability judgment task (n = 38) and an online self-paced reading task (n [Formula: see text] 22) indicate that inverse scope interpretations are in fact permitted in Korean as a secondary option, as is also the case in English. We argue that the dispreference for the inverse scope reading reflects processing considerations related to burden on working memory.

  6. Inverse Folding of RNA Pseudoknot Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, James Z M; Reidys, Christian M

    2010-01-01

    Background: RNA exhibits a variety of structural configurations. Here we consider a structure to be tantamount to the noncrossing Watson-Crick and \\pairGU-base pairings (secondary structure) and additional cross-serial base pairs. These interactions are called pseudoknots and are observed across the whole spectrum of RNA functionalities. In the context of studying natural RNA structures, searching for new ribozymes and designing artificial RNA, it is of interest to find RNA sequences folding into a specific structure and to analyze their induced neutral networks. Since the established inverse folding algorithms, {\\tt RNAinverse}, {\\tt RNA-SSD} as well as {\\tt INFO-RNA} are limited to RNA secondary structures, we present in this paper the inverse folding algorithm {\\tt Inv} which can deal with 3-noncrossing, canonical pseudoknot structures. Results: In this paper we present the inverse folding algorithm {\\tt Inv}. We give a detailed analysis of {\\tt Inv}, including pseudocodes. We show that {\\tt Inv} allows to...

  7. Reservoir parameter inversion based on weighted statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Jin-Yong; Gao, Jian-Hu; Yong, Xue-Shan; Li, Sheng-Jun; Liu, Bin-Yang; Zhao, Wan-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Variation of reservoir physical properties can cause changes in its elastic parameters. However, this is not a simple linear relation. Furthermore, the lack of observations, data overlap, noise interference, and idealized models increases the uncertainties of the inversion result. Thus, we propose an inversion method that is different from traditional statistical rock physics modeling. First, we use deterministic and stochastic rock physics models considering the uncertainties of elastic parameters obtained by prestack seismic inversion and introduce weighting coefficients to establish a weighted statistical relation between reservoir and elastic parameters. Second, based on the weighted statistical relation, we use Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations to generate the random joint distribution space of reservoir and elastic parameters that serves as a sample solution space of an objective function. Finally, we propose a fast solution criterion to maximize the posterior probability density and obtain reservoir parameters. The method has high efficiency and application potential.

  8. Trimming and procrastination as inversion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, George E.

    1996-12-01

    By examining the processes of truncating and approximating the model space (trimming it), and by committing to neither the objectivist nor the subjectivist interpretation of probability (procrastinating), we construct a formal scheme for solving linear and non-linear geophysical inverse problems. The necessary prior information about the correct model xE can be either a collection of inequalities or a probability measure describing where xE was likely to be in the model space X before the data vector y0 was measured. The results of the inversion are (1) a vector z0 that estimates some numerical properties zE of xE; (2) an estimate of the error δz = z0 - zE. As y0 is finite dimensional, so is z0, and hence in principle inversion cannot describe all of xE. The error δz is studied under successively more specialized assumptions about the inverse problem, culminating in a complete analysis of the linear inverse problem with a prior quadratic bound on xE. Our formalism appears to encompass and provide error estimates for many of the inversion schemes current in geomagnetism, and would be equally applicable in geodesy and seismology if adequate prior information were available there. As an idealized example we study the magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary, using satellite measurements of field elements at sites assumed to be almost uniformly distributed on a single spherical surface. Magnetospheric currents are neglected and the crustal field is idealized as a random process with rotationally invariant statistics. We find that an appropriate data compression diagonalizes the variance matrix of the crustal signal and permits an analytic trimming of the idealized problem.

  9. Ensemble Kalman methods for inverse problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) was introduced by Evensen in 1994 (Evensen 1994 J. Geophys. Res. 99 10143–62) as a novel method for data assimilation: state estimation for noisily observed time-dependent problems. Since that time it has had enormous impact in many application domains because of its robustness and ease of implementation, and numerical evidence of its accuracy. In this paper we propose the application of an iterative ensemble Kalman method for the solution of a wide class of inverse problems. In this context we show that the estimate of the unknown function that we obtain with the ensemble Kalman method lies in a subspace A spanned by the initial ensemble. Hence the resulting error may be bounded above by the error found from the best approximation in this subspace. We provide numerical experiments which compare the error incurred by the ensemble Kalman method for inverse problems with the error of the best approximation in A, and with variants on traditional least-squares approaches, restricted to the subspace A. In so doing we demonstrate that the ensemble Kalman method for inverse problems provides a derivative-free optimization method with comparable accuracy to that achieved by traditional least-squares approaches. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that the accuracy is of the same order of magnitude as that achieved by the best approximation. Three examples are used to demonstrate these assertions: inversion of a compact linear operator; inversion of piezometric head to determine hydraulic conductivity in a Darcy model of groundwater flow; and inversion of Eulerian velocity measurements at positive times to determine the initial condition in an incompressible fluid. (paper)

  10. Dispersion analysis with inverse dielectric function modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerhöfer, Thomas G; Ivanovski, Vladimir; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    We investigate how dispersion analysis can profit from the use of a Lorentz-type description of the inverse dielectric function. In particular at higher angles of incidence, reflectance spectra using p-polarized light are dominated by bands from modes that have their transition moments perpendicular to the surface. Accordingly, the spectra increasingly resemble inverse dielectric functions. A corresponding description can therefore eliminate the complex dependencies of the dispersion parameters, allow their determination and facilitate a more accurate description of the optical properties of single crystals. PMID:27294550

  11. Inverse problem for axial-deformed potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the literature about Inverse Problems there are no tractable methods for construction of nonspherical potentials from the asymptotic wave function. This problem turned out to be solved in special cases. The methods of reconstruction from scattering data are given for the class of potentials admitting the separation of variables in spheroidal coordinates. This is the first case when the agorithms of the inverse problem solution for spherically-nonsymmetrical local potentials can practically be realised. The modifications of the formalisms of Regge-Newton-Sabatier and finite-difference approximation of Hooshyar-Rasavy are considered

  12. Relative risk regression models with inverse polynomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Yang; Woodward, Mark

    2013-08-30

    The proportional hazards model assumes that the log hazard ratio is a linear function of parameters. In the current paper, we model the log relative risk as an inverse polynomial, which is particularly suitable for modeling bounded and asymmetric functions. The parameters estimated by maximizing the partial likelihood are consistent and asymptotically normal. The advantages of the inverse polynomial model over the ordinary polynomial model and the fractional polynomial model for fitting various asymmetric log relative risk functions are shown by simulation. The utility of the method is further supported by analyzing two real data sets, addressing the specific question of the location of the minimum risk threshold.

  13. Emergent strategies for inverse molecular design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BERATAN; David; N.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular design is essential and ubiquitous in chemistry,physics,biology,and material science.The immense space of available candidate molecules requires novel optimization strategies and algorithms for exploring the space and achieving efficient and effective molecular design.This paper summarizes the current progress toward developing practical theoretical optimization schemes for molecular design.In particular,we emphasize emergent strategies for inverse molecular design.Several representative design examples,based on recently developed strategies,are described to demonstrate the principles of inverse molecular design.

  14. Optimal Transport for Seismic Full Waveform Inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Engquist, Bjorn; Yang, Yunan

    2016-01-01

    Full waveform inversion is a successful procedure for determining properties of the earth from surface measurements in seismology. This inverse problem is solved by a PDE constrained optimization where unknown coefficients in a computed wavefield are adjusted to minimize the mismatch with the measured data. We propose using the Wasserstein metric, which is related to optimal transport, for measuring this mismatch. Several advantageous properties are proved with regards to convexity of the objective function and robustness with respect to noise. The Wasserstein metric is computed by solving a Monge-Ampere equation. We describe an algorithm for computing its Frechet gradient for use in the optimization. Numerical examples are given.

  15. APPROXIMATE AMENABILITY OF CERTAIN INVERSE SEMIGROUP ALGEBRAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehdi ROSTAMI; Abdolrasoul POURABBAS; Morteza ESSMAILI

    2013-01-01

    In this article,the approximate amenability of semigroup algebra e1(S) is investigated,where S is a uniformly locally finite inverse semigroup.Indeed,we show that for a uniformly locally finite inverse semigroup S,the notions of amenability,approximate amenability and bounded approximate amenability of e1 (S) are equivalent.We use this to give a direct proof of the approximate amenability of e1(S) for a Brandt semigroup S.Moreover,we characterize the approximate amenability of e1(S),where S is a uniformly locally finite band semigroup.

  16. Inverse potential scattering in duct acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Barbara J; Pike, E Roy; Sharp, David B; Aktosun, Tuncay

    2006-01-01

    The inverse problem of the noninvasive measurement of the shape of an acoustical duct in which one-dimensional wave propagation can be assumed is examined within the theoretical framework of the governing Klein-Gordon equation. Previous deterministic methods developed over the last 40 years have all required direct measurement of the reflectance or input impedance but now, by application of the methods of inverse quantum scattering to the acoustical system, it is shown that the reflectance can be algorithmically derived from the radiated wave. The potential and area functions of the duct can subsequently be reconstructed. The results are discussed with particular reference to acoustic pulse reflectometry.

  17. 3D geophysical inversion for contact surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelièvre, Peter; Farquharson, Colin

    2014-05-01

    Geologists' interpretations about the Earth typically involve distinct rock units with contacts (interfaces) between them. In contrast, standard minimum-structure volumetric inversions (performed on meshes of space-filling cells) recover smooth models inconsistent with such interpretations. There are several approaches through which geophysical inversion can help recover models with the desired characteristics. Some authors have developed iterative strategies in which several volumetric inversions are performed with regularization parameters changing to achieve sharper interfaces at automatically determined locations. Another approach is to redesign the regularization to be consistent with the desired model characteristics, e.g. L1-like norms or compactness measures. A few researchers have taken approaches that limit the recovered values to lie within particular ranges, resulting in sharp discontinuities; these include binary inversion, level set methods and clustering strategies. In most of the approaches mentioned above, the model parameterization considers the physical properties in each of the many space-filling cells within the volume of interest. The exception are level set methods, in which a higher dimensional function is parameterized and the contact surface is determined from the zero-level of that function. However, even level-set methods rely on an underlying volumetric mesh. We are researching a fundamentally different type of inversion that parameterizes the Earth in terms of the contact surfaces between rock units. 3D geological Earth models typically comprise wireframe surfaces of tessellated triangles or other polygonal planar facets. This wireframe representation allows for flexible and efficient generation of complicated geological structures. Therefore, a natural approach for representing a geophysical model in an inversion is to parameterize the wireframe contact surfaces as the coordinates of the nodes (facet vertices). The geological and

  18. Efficient matrix inversion based on VLIW architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhang,Fu Li,; Guangming Shi

    2014-01-01

    Matrix inversion is a critical part in communication, signal processing and electromagnetic system. A flexible and scal-able very long instruction word (VLIW) processor with clustered architecture is proposed for matrix inversion. A global register file (RF) is used to connect al the clusters. Two nearby clusters share a local register file. The instruction sets are also designed for the VLIW processor. Experimental results show that the proposed VLIW architecture takes only 45 latency to invert a 4 × 4 matrix when running at 150 MHz. The proposed design is roughly five times faster than the DSP solution in processing speed.

  19. Ill-posed inverse problems in economics

    OpenAIRE

    Horowitz, Joel

    2013-01-01

    A parameter of an econometric model is identified if there is a one-to-one or many-to-one mapping from the population distribution of the available data to the parameter. Often, this mapping is obtained by inverting a mapping from the parameter to the population distribution. If the inverse mapping is discontinuous, then estimation of the parameter usually presents an ill-posed inverse problem. Such problems arise in many settings in economics and other fields in which the parameter of intere...

  20. Inverse splicing of a group II intron.

    OpenAIRE

    Jarrell, K A

    1993-01-01

    I describe the self-splicing of an RNA that consists of exon sequences flanked by group II intron sequences. I find that this RNA undergoes accurate splicing in vitro, yielding an excised exon circle. This splicing reaction involves the joining of the 5' splice site at the end of an exon to the 3' splice site at the beginning of the same exon; thus, I term it inverse splicing. Inverse splicing provides a potential mechanism for exon scrambling, for exon deletion in alternative splicing pathwa...

  1. Inversion improves the recognition of facial expression in thatcherized images

    OpenAIRE

    Psalta, Lilia; Andrews, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    The Thatcher illusion provides a compelling example of the face inversion effect. However, the marked effect of inversion in the Thatcher illusion contrasts to other studies that report only a small effect of inversion on the recognition of facial expressions. To address this discrepancy, we compared the effects of inversion and thatcherization on the recognition of facial expressions. We found that inversion of normal faces caused only a small reduction in the recognition of facial expressio...

  2. Application of homotopy parameter inversion method in Miyun Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin; LI Yong; CHEN Duowei

    2009-01-01

    The large-scale convergence of homotopy parametric inversion method on the water quality model parameters calculated was used, with application in parametric inversion calculation of total phosphorus of Beijing Miyun Reservoir. Through calculated and compared the error of sedimentation rate by homotopy parametric inversion method and genetic inversion calculation method, the results indicate that homotopy parametric inversion method has good stability, calculating speed, and even if the initial selection away from the objective function, the solution still has a good convergence.

  3. Acoustic tomography in the atmospheric surface layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ziemann

    Full Text Available Acoustic tomography is presented as a technique for remote monitoring of meteorological quantities. This method and a special algorithm of analysis can directly produce area-averaged values of meteorological parameters. As a result consistent data will be obtained for validation of numerical atmospheric micro-scale models. Such a measuring system can complement conventional point measurements over different surfaces. The procedure of acoustic tomography uses the horizontal propagation of sound waves in the atmospheric surface layer. Therefore, to provide a general overview of sound propagation under various atmospheric conditions a two-dimensional ray-tracing model according to a modified version of Snell's law is used. The state of the crossed atmosphere can be estimated from measurements of acoustic travel time between sources and receivers at different points. Derivation of area-averaged values of the sound speed and furthermore of air temperature results from the inversion of travel time values for all acoustic paths. Thereby, the applied straight ray two-dimensional tomographic model using SIRT (simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique is characterised as a method with small computational requirements, satisfactory convergence and stability properties as well as simple handling, especially, during online evaluation.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (turbulence; instruments and techniques.

  4. Inversion, error analysis, and validation of GPS/MET occultation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Steiner

    Full Text Available The global positioning system meteorology (GPS/MET experiment was the first practical demonstration of global navigation satellite system (GNSS-based active limb sounding employing the radio occultation technique. This method measures, as principal observable and with millimetric accuracy, the excess phase path (relative to propagation in vacuum of GNSS-transmitted radio waves caused by refraction during passage through the Earth's neutral atmosphere and ionosphere in limb geometry. It shows great potential utility for weather and climate system studies in providing an unique combination of global coverage, high vertical resolution and accuracy, long-term stability, and all-weather capability. We first describe our GPS/MET data processing scheme from excess phases via bending angles to the neutral atmospheric parameters refractivity, density, pressure and temperature. Special emphasis is given to ionospheric correction methodology and the inversion of bending angles to refractivities, where we introduce a matrix inversion technique (instead of the usual integral inversion. The matrix technique is shown to lead to identical results as integral inversion but is more directly extendable to inversion by optimal estimation. The quality of GPS/MET-derived profiles is analyzed with an error estimation analysis employing a Monte Carlo technique. We consider statistical errors together with systematic errors due to upper-boundary initialization of the retrieval by a priori bending angles. Perfect initialization and properly smoothed statistical errors allow for better than 1 K temperature retrieval accuracy up to the stratopause. No initialization and statistical errors yield better than 1 K accuracy up to 30 km but less than 3 K accuracy above 40 km. Given imperfect initialization, biases >2 K propagate down to below 30 km height in unfavorable realistic cases. Furthermore, results of a statistical validation of GPS/MET profiles through comparison

  5. Observations, Thermochemical Calculations, and Modeling of Exoplanetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Blecic, Jasmina

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation as a whole aims to provide means to better understand hot-Jupiter planets through observing, performing thermochemical calculations, and modeling their atmospheres. We used Spitzer multi-wavelength secondary-eclipse observations and targets with high signal-to-noise ratios, as their deep eclipses allow us to detect signatures of spectral features and assess planetary atmospheric structure and composition with greater certainty. Chapter 1 gives a short introduction. Chapter 2 presents the Spitzer secondary-eclipse analysis and atmospheric characterization of WASP-14b. WASP-14b is a highly irradiated, transiting hot Jupiter. By applying a Bayesian approach in the atmospheric analysis, we found an absence of thermal inversion contrary to theoretical predictions. Chapter 3 describes the infrared observations of WASP-43b Spitzer secondary eclipses, data analysis, and atmospheric characterization. WASP-43b is one of the closest-orbiting hot Jupiters, orbiting one of the coolest stars with a hot Ju...

  6. Statistics in Atmospheric Science

    OpenAIRE

    Solow, Andrew R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of statistical methods in atmospheric science. The applications covered include the development, assessment and use of numerical physical models of the atmosphere and more empirical analysis unconnected to physical models.

  7. Planetary Atmospheric Electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Leblanc, F; Yair, Y; Harrison, R. G; Lebreton, J. P; Blanc, M

    2008-01-01

    This volume presents our contemporary understanding of atmospheric electricity at Earth and in other solar system atmospheres. It is written by experts in terrestrial atmospheric electricity and planetary scientists. Many of the key issues related to planetary atmospheric electricity are discussed. The physics presented in this book includes ionisation processes in planetary atmospheres, charge generation and separation, and a discussion of electromagnetic signatures of atmospheric discharges. The measurement of thunderstorms and lightning, including its effects and hazards, is highlighted by articles on ground and space based instrumentation, and new missions.Theory and modelling of planetary atmospheric electricity complete this review of the research that is undertaken in this exciting field of space science. This book is an essential research tool for space scientists and geoscientists interested in electrical effects in atmospheres and planetary systems. Graduate students and researchers who are new to t...

  8. Atmospheric Lepton Fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric $\

  9. Mirador - Atmospheric Composition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. Atmospheric Composition is focused on the composition of Earth's atmosphere in relation to climate prediction, solar effects,...

  10. Our shared atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our atmosphere is a precious and fascinating resource, providing air to breath, shielding us from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV), and maintaining a comfortable climate. Since the industrial revolution, people have significantly altered the composition of the atmosphere throu...

  11. On the Stewart-Lyth Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Ayón-Beato, E; Mansilla, R; Terrero-Escalante, C A; Ay\\'on-Beato, Eloy; Garc\\'{\\i}a, Alberto; Mansilla, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the Stewart-Lyth inverse problem is rewritten using the comoving scales as the basic parameter. It is shown that some information on the inflaton potential can be obtained from observations taking into account only the scalar power spectrum.

  12. Modeling and Inversion of Scattered Surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riyanti, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, we present a modeling method based on a domain-type integral representation for waves propagating along the surface of the Earth which have been scattered in the vicinity of the source or the receivers. Using this model as starting point, we formulate an inversion scheme to estimat

  13. Inverse photoemission in strongly correlated electron systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eder, R; Ohta, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Based on exact results for small clusters of t-J models, we point out the existence of several distinct channels in the inverse photoemission (IPSE) spectrum. Holelike quasiparticles can either be annihilated completely or leave behind a variable number of spin excitations, which formed the dressing

  14. Laplace's 1774 Memoir on Inverse Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Stigler, Stephen M.

    1986-01-01

    Laplace's first major article on mathematical statistics was published in 1774. It is arguably the most influential article in this field to appear before 1800, being the first widely read presentation of inverse probability and its application to both binomial and location parameter estimation. After a brief introduction, and English translation of this epochal memoir is given.

  15. The inverse problem of bioelectricity: an evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterom, A. van

    2012-01-01

    This invited paper presents a personal view on the current status of the solution to the inverse problem of bioelectricity. Its focus lies on applications in the field of electrocardiography. The topic discussed is also relevant in other medical domains, such as electroencephalography, electroneurog

  16. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  17. Semi-Inversion of Functional Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Torben Ægidius

    2008-01-01

    Semi-invertering er en generalisering af invertering: Et programs semi-inverse tager nogle af dets inddata og nogen af dets uddata og returnerer de resterende ind- og uddata. Tidligere arbejder har beskrevet semi-invertering af et førsteordens funktionssprog. Vi udvider nu med funktionelle...

  18. Experimental Verification of Acoustic Impedance Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭永刚; 王宁; 林俊轩

    2003-01-01

    Well controlled model experiments were carried out to verify acoustic impedance inversion scheme, and different methods of extracting impulse responses were investigated by practical data. The acoustic impedance profiles reconstructed from impulse responses are in good agreement with the measured value and theoretical value.

  19. Frame approximation of pseudo-inverse operators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole

    2001-01-01

    Let T denote an operator on a Hilbert space (H, [.,.]), and let {f(i)}(i=1)(infinity) be a frame for the orthogonal complement of the kernel NT. We construct a sequence of operators {Phi (n)} of the form Phi (n) (.) = Sigma (n)(i=1) [., g(t)(n)]f(i) which converges to the psuedo-inverse T+ of T i...

  20. Inverse acoustic problem of N homogeneous scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Svend

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional inverse acoustic medium problem of N homogeneous objects with known geometry and location is considered. It is proven that one scattering experiment is sufficient for the unique determination of the complex wavenumbers of the objects. The mapping from the scattered fields...

  1. The role of nonlinearity in inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel

    1998-06-01

    In many practical inverse problems, one aims to retrieve a model that has infinitely many degrees of freedom from a finite amount of data. It follows from a simple variable count that this cannot be done in a unique way. Therefore, inversion entails more than estimating a model: any inversion is not complete without a description of the class of models that is consistent with the data; this is called the appraisal problem. Nonlinearity makes the appraisal problem particularly difficult. The first reason for this is that nonlinear error propagation is a difficult problem. The second reason is that for some nonlinear problems the model parameters affect the way in which the model is being interrogated by the data. Two examples are given of this, and it is shown how the nonlinearity may make the problem more ill-posed. Finally, three attempts are shown to carry out the model appraisal for nonlinear inverse problems that are based on an analytical approach, a numerical approach and a common sense approach.

  2. Sensitivity of the inverse wave crest problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterson, Pearu; Groesen, van E.

    2001-01-01

    In a previous paper [Physica D 141 (3-4) (2000) 316], the inverse problem for wave crests was introduced and a solution strategy for two-wave interactions was given. Here these solutions are actually constructed, in particular for the cases with small interaction angle, moderate phase shifts, and/or

  3. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  4. Deep controls on intraplate basin inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S.B.; Stephenson, Randell Alexander; Schiffer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Basin inversion is an intermediate-scale manifestation of continental intraplate deformation, which produces earthquake activity in the interior of continents. The sedimentary basins of central Europe, inverted in the Late Cretaceous– Paleocene, represent a classic example of this phenomenon. It ...

  5. Inverse scattering problem in turbulent magnetic fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Treumann, R A; Narita, Y

    2016-01-01

    We apply a particular form of the inverse scattering theory to turbulent magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. In the present note we develop the theory, formulate the magnetic fluctuation problem in terms of its electrodynamic turbulent response function, and reduce it to the solution of a special form of the famous Gel$'$fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation of quantum mechanical scattering theory.

  6. Magnetotelluric data inversion with seismic data constraint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Wei-qi; SUN Shan

    2005-01-01

    In the paper we present a new method to invert the interior structure in the basement or ancient hidden hill by using magnetotelluric (MT) data with seismic data constraint. We first obtain the thickness and resistivity of each layer above the basement or buried hill by the inversion of seismic and log data and create a geoelectrical model for the layers above the basement or hidden hill. Then with the reference to the inversion of 1D MT data, a geoelectrical model for the layers below the basement or hidden hill is created. On the basis of the above initial model, we present an effective and practical forward method, i.e., a model-matched approach to conduct forward inversion arithmetic. Finally, by the method of conjugate gradient iteration, a forward and backward iterative calculation is made. Taking No. 618 profile of Shengli Oil Field as an example, we have found out that the tectonic information that is unreflective in the seismic data below the basement is better reflected in the inversion result.

  7. Inverse scattering problem in relativistic quasiclassical approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inverse scattering problem is solved on the basis of quasipotential approach in quantum field theory within the framework of relativistic quasiclassical approximation. Formulas of quasipotential restoration by phase shifts are derived. Cases of non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic approximations are investigated

  8. Auditory model inversion and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Heming; WANG Yongqi; CHEN Xueqin

    2005-01-01

    Auditory model has been applied to several aspects of speech signal processing field, and appears to be effective in performance. This paper presents the inverse transform of each stage of one widely used auditory model. First of all it is necessary to invert correlogram and reconstruct phase information by repetitious iterations in order to get auditory-nerve firing rate. The next step is to obtain the negative parts of the signal via the reverse process of the HWR (Half Wave Rectification). Finally the functions of inner hair cell/synapse model and Gammatone filters have to be inverted. Thus the whole auditory model inversion has been achieved. An application of noisy speech enhancement based on auditory model inversion algorithm is proposed. Many experiments show that this method is effective in reducing noise.Especially when SNR of noisy speech is low it is more effective than other methods. Thus this auditory model inversion method given in this paper is applicable to speech enhancement field.

  9. Nonlinear approximation with dictionaries. II. Inverse Estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribonval, Rémi; Nielsen, Morten

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, which is the sequel to [16], we study inverse estimates of the Bernstein type for nonlinear approximation with structured redundant dictionaries in a Banach space. The main results are for blockwise incoherent dictionaries in Hilbert spaces, which generalize the notion of joint block-diagonal...

  10. Nonlinear approximation with dictionaries,.. II: Inverse estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gribonval, Rémi; Nielsen, Morten

    In this paper we study inverse estimates of the Bernstein type for nonlinear approximation with structured redundant dictionaries in a Banach space. The main results are for separated decomposable dictionaries in Hilbert spaces, which generalize the notion of joint block-diagonal mutually...

  11. Atmospheric refraction : a history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehn, WH; van der Werf, S

    2005-01-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of un

  12. Frnakenstein: multiple target inverse RNA folding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyngsø Rune B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA secondary structure prediction, or folding, is a classic problem in bioinformatics: given a sequence of nucleotides, the aim is to predict the base pairs formed in its three dimensional conformation. The inverse problem of designing a sequence folding into a particular target structure has only more recently received notable interest. With a growing appreciation and understanding of the functional and structural properties of RNA motifs, and a growing interest in utilising biomolecules in nano-scale designs, the interest in the inverse RNA folding problem is bound to increase. However, whereas the RNA folding problem from an algorithmic viewpoint has an elegant and efficient solution, the inverse RNA folding problem appears to be hard. Results In this paper we present a genetic algorithm approach to solve the inverse folding problem. The main aims of the development was to address the hitherto mostly ignored extension of solving the inverse folding problem, the multi-target inverse folding problem, while simultaneously designing a method with superior performance when measured on the quality of designed sequences. The genetic algorithm has been implemented as a Python program called Frnakenstein. It was benchmarked against four existing methods and several data sets totalling 769 real and predicted single structure targets, and on 292 two structure targets. It performed as well as or better at finding sequences which folded in silico into the target structure than all existing methods, without the heavy bias towards CG base pairs that was observed for all other top performing methods. On the two structure targets it also performed well, generating a perfect design for about 80% of the targets. Conclusions Our method illustrates that successful designs for the inverse RNA folding problem does not necessarily have to rely on heavy biases in base pair and unpaired base distributions. The design problem seems to become more

  13. Uncertainty estimations for seismic source inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duputel, Zacharie; Rivera, Luis; Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Kanamori, Hiroo

    2012-08-01

    Source inversion is a widely used practice in seismology. Magnitudes, moment tensors, slip distributions are now routinely calculated and disseminated whenever an earthquake occurs. The accuracy of such models depends on many aspects like the event magnitude, the data coverage and the data quality (instrument response, isolation, timing, etc.). Here, like in any observational problem, the error estimation should be part of the solution. It is however very rare to find a source inversion algorithm which includes realistic error analyses, and the solutions are often given without any estimates of uncertainties. Our goal here is to stress the importance of such estimation and to explore different techniques aimed at achieving such analyses. In this perspective, we use the W phase source inversion algorithm recently developed to provide fast CMT estimations for large earthquakes. We focus in particular on the linear-inverse problem of estimating the moment tensor components at a given source location. We assume that the initial probability densities can be modelled by Gaussian distributions. Formally, we can separate two sources of error which generally contribute to the model parameter uncertainties. The first source of uncertainty is the error introduced by the more or less imperfect data. This is carried by the covariance matrix for the data (Cd). The second source of uncertainty, often overlooked, is associated with modelling error or mismodelling. This is represented by the covariance matrix on the theory, CT. Among the different sources of mismodelling, we focus here on the modelling error associated with the mislocation of the centroid position. Both Cd and CT describe probability densities in the data space and it is well known that it is in fact CD=Cd+CT that should be included into the error propagation process. In source inversion problems, like in many other fields of geophysics, the data covariance (CD) is often considered as diagonal or even proportional

  14. Tectonic forward modelling of positive inversion structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandes, C. [Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie; Schmidt, C. [Landesamt fuer Bergbau, Energie und Geologie (LBEG), Hannover (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    Positive tectonic inversion structures are common features that were recognized in many deformed sedimentary basins (Lowell, 1995). They are characterized by a two phase fault evolution, where initial normal faulting was followed by reverse faulting along the same fault, accompanied by the development of hanging wall deformation. Analysing the evolution of such inversion structures is important for understanding the tectonics of sedimentary basins and the formation of hydrocarbon traps. We used a 2D tectonic forward modelling approach to simulate the stepwise structural evolution of inversion structures in cross-section. The modelling was performed with the software FaultFold Forward v. 6, which is based on trishear kinematics (Zehnder and Allmendinger, 2000). Key aspect of the study was to derive the controlling factors for the geometry of inversion structures. The simulation results show, that the trishear approach is able to reproduce the geometry of tectonic inversion structures in a realistic way. This implies that inversion structures are simply fault-related folds that initiated as extensional fault-propagation folds, which were subsequently transformed into compressional fault-propagation folds when the stress field changed. The hanging wall deformation is a consequence of the decrease in slip towards the tip line of the fault. Trishear angle and propagation-to-slip ratio are the key controlling factors for the geometry of the fault-related deformation. We tested trishear angles in the range of 30 - 60 and propagation-to-slip ratios between 1 and 2 in increments of 0.1. Small trishear angles and low propagation-to-slip ratios produced tight folds, whereas large trishear angles and high propagation-to-slip ratios led to more open folds with concentric shapes. This has a direct effect on the size and geometry of potential hydrocarbon traps. The 2D simulations can be extended to a pseudo 3D approach, where a set of parallel cross-sections is used to describe

  15. CHARACTERIZING TRANSITING EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES WITH JWST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Thomas P. [NASA Ames Research Center, Space Science and Astrobiology Division, M.S. 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Line, Michael R.; Montero, Cezar; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lustig-Yaeger, Jacob [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Luther, Kyle, E-mail: tom.greene@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, University of California, 366 LeConte Hall MC 7300, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    We explore how well spectra from the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will likely constrain bulk atmospheric properties of transiting exoplanets. We start by modeling the atmospheres of archetypal hot Jupiter, warm Neptune, warm sub-Neptune, and cool super-Earth planets with atmospheres that are clear, cloudy, or of high mean molecular weight (HMMW). Next we simulate the λ = 1–11 μm transmission and emission spectra of these systems for several JWST instrument modes for single-transit or single-eclipse events. We then perform retrievals to determine how well temperatures and molecular mixing ratios (CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}) can be constrained. We find that λ = 1–2.5 μm transmission spectra will often constrain the major molecular constituents of clear solar-composition atmospheres well. Cloudy or HMMW atmospheres will often require full 1–11 μm spectra for good constraints, and emission data may be more useful in cases of sufficiently high F{sub p} and high F{sub p}/F{sub *}. Strong temperature inversions in the solar-composition hot-Jupiter atmosphere should be detectable with 1–2.5+ μm emission spectra, and 1–5+ μm emission spectra will constrain the temperature–pressure profiles of warm planets. Transmission spectra over 1–5+ μm will constrain [Fe/H] values to better than 0.5 dex for the clear atmospheres of the hot and warm planets studied. Carbon-to-oxygen ratios can be constrained to better than a factor of 2 in some systems. We expect that these results will provide useful predictions of the scientific value of single-event JWST spectra until its on-orbit performance is known.

  16. Estimating uncertainties in complex joint inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Juan Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Sources of uncertainty affecting geophysical inversions can be classified either as reflective (i.e. the practitioner is aware of her/his ignorance) or non-reflective (i.e. the practitioner does not know that she/he does not know!). Although we should be always conscious of the latter, the former are the ones that, in principle, can be estimated either empirically (by making measurements or collecting data) or subjectively (based on the experience of the researchers). For complex parameter estimation problems in geophysics, subjective estimation of uncertainty is the most common type. In this context, probabilistic (aka Bayesian) methods are commonly claimed to offer a natural and realistic platform from which to estimate model uncertainties. This is because in the Bayesian approach, errors (whatever their nature) can be naturally included as part of the global statistical model, the solution of which represents the actual solution to the inverse problem. However, although we agree that probabilistic inversion methods are the most powerful tool for uncertainty estimation, the common claim that they produce "realistic" or "representative" uncertainties is not always justified. Typically, ALL UNCERTAINTY ESTIMATES ARE MODEL DEPENDENT, and therefore, besides a thorough characterization of experimental uncertainties, particular care must be paid to the uncertainty arising from model errors and input uncertainties. We recall here two quotes by G. Box and M. Gunzburger, respectively, of special significance for inversion practitioners and for this session: "…all models are wrong, but some are useful" and "computational results are believed by no one, except the person who wrote the code". In this presentation I will discuss and present examples of some problems associated with the estimation and quantification of uncertainties in complex multi-observable probabilistic inversions, and how to address them. Although the emphasis will be on sources of uncertainty related

  17. Nonisothermal Pluto atmosphere models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present thermal profile calculation for a Pluto atmosphere model characterized by a high number fraction of CH4 molecules encompasses atmospheric heating by solar UV flux absorption and conductive transport cooling to the surface of Pluto. The stellar occultation curve predicted for an atmosphere of several-microbar surface pressures (which entail the existence of a substantial temperature gradient close to the surface) agrees with observations and implies that the normal and tangential optical depth of the atmosphere is almost negligible. The minimum period for atmospheric methane depletion is calculated to be 30 years. 29 refs

  18. Disaggregating Fossil Fuel Emissions from Biospheric Fluxes: Methodological Improvements for Inverse Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, V.; Shiga, Y. P.; Michalak, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    The accurate spatio-temporal quantification of fossil fuel emissions is a scientific challenge. Atmospheric inverse models have the capability to overcome this challenge and provide estimates of fossil fuel emissions. Observational and computational limitations limit current analyses to the estimations of a combined "biospheric flux and fossil-fuel emissions" carbon dioxide (CO2) signal, at coarse spatial and temporal resolution. Even in these coarse resolution inverse models, the disaggregation of a strong biospheric signal form a weaker fossil-fuel signal has proven difficult. The use of multiple tracers (delta 14C, CO, CH4, etc.) has provided a potential path forward, but challenges remain. In this study, we attempt to disaggregate biospheric fluxes and fossil-fuel emissions on the basis of error covariance models rather through tracer based CO2 inversions. The goal is to more accurately define the underlying structure of the two processes by using a stationary exponential covariance model for the biospheric fluxes, in conjunction with a semi-stationary covariance model derived from nightlights for fossil fuel emissions. A non-negativity constraint on fossil fuel emissions is imposed using a data transformation approach embedded in an iterative quasi-linear inverse modeling algorithm. The study is performed for January and June 2008, using the ground-based CO2 measurement network over North America. The quality of disaggregation is examined by comparing the inferred spatial distribution of biospheric fluxes and fossil-fuel emissions in a synthetic-data inversion. In addition to disaggregation of fluxes, the ability of the covariance models derived from nightlights to explain the fossil-fuel emissions over North America is also examined. The simple covariance model proposed in this study is found to improve estimation and disaggregation of fossil-fuel emissions from biospheric fluxes in the tracer-based inverse models.

  19. Age-dependent forest carbon sink: Estimation via inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Shi, Peijun; Jia, Gensuo; Dai, Yongjiu; Zhao, Xiang; Shangguan, Wei; Du, Ling; Wu, Hao; Luo, Yiqi

    2015-12-01

    Forests have been recognized to sequester a substantial amount of carbon (C) from the atmosphere. However, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the magnitude and time course of the C sink. Revealing the intrinsic relationship between forest age and C sink is crucial for reducing uncertainties in prediction of forest C sink potential. In this study, we developed a stepwise data assimilation approach to combine a process-based Terrestrial ECOsystem Regional model, observations from multiple sources, and stochastic sampling to inversely estimate carbon cycle parameters including carbon sink at different forest ages for evergreen needle-leaved forests in China. The new approach is effective to estimate age-dependent parameter of maximal light-use efficiency (R2 = 0.99) and, accordingly, can quantify a relationship between forest age and the vegetation and soil C sinks. The estimated ecosystem C sink increases rapidly with age, peaks at 0.451 kg C m-2 yr-1 at age 22 years (ranging from 0.421 to 0.465 kg C m-2 yr-1), and gradually decreases thereafter. The dynamic patterns of C sinks in vegetation and soil are significantly different. C sink in vegetation first increases rapidly with age and then decreases. C sink in soil, however, increases continuously with age; it acts as a C source when the age is less than 20 years, after which it acts as a sink. For the evergreen needle-leaved forest, the highest C sink efficiency (i.e., C sink per unit net primary productivity) is approximately 60%, with age between 11 and 43 years. Overall, the inverse estimation of carbon cycle parameters can make reasonable estimates of age-dependent C sequestration in forests.

  20. An equivalence between inverse sumset theorems and inverse conjectures for the U^3 norm

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Ben

    2009-01-01

    We establish a correspondence between inverse sumset theorems (which can be viewed as classifications of approximate (abelian) groups) and inverse theorems for the Gowers norms (which can be viewed as classifications of approximate polynomials). In particular, we show that the inverse sumset theorems of Freiman type are equivalent to the known inverse results for the Gowers U^3 norms, and moreover that the conjectured polynomial strengthening of the former is also equivalent to the polynomial strengthening of the latter. We establish this equivalence in two model settings, namely that of the finite field vector spaces F_2^n, and of the cyclic groups Z/NZ. In both cases the argument involves clarifying the structure of certain types of approximate homomorphism.

  1. SISYPHUS: A high performance seismic inversion factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhberg, Alexey; Simutė, Saulė; Boehm, Christian; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In the recent years the massively parallel high performance computers became the standard instruments for solving the forward and inverse problems in seismology. The respective software packages dedicated to forward and inverse waveform modelling specially designed for such computers (SPECFEM3D, SES3D) became mature and widely available. These packages achieve significant computational performance and provide researchers with an opportunity to solve problems of bigger size at higher resolution within a shorter time. However, a typical seismic inversion process contains various activities that are beyond the common solver functionality. They include management of information on seismic events and stations, 3D models, observed and synthetic seismograms, pre-processing of the observed signals, computation of misfits and adjoint sources, minimization of misfits, and process workflow management. These activities are time consuming, seldom sufficiently automated, and therefore represent a bottleneck that can substantially offset performance benefits provided by even the most powerful modern supercomputers. Furthermore, a typical system architecture of modern supercomputing platforms is oriented towards the maximum computational performance and provides limited standard facilities for automation of the supporting activities. We present a prototype solution that automates all aspects of the seismic inversion process and is tuned for the modern massively parallel high performance computing systems. We address several major aspects of the solution architecture, which include (1) design of an inversion state database for tracing all relevant aspects of the entire solution process, (2) design of an extensible workflow management framework, (3) integration with wave propagation solvers, (4) integration with optimization packages, (5) computation of misfits and adjoint sources, and (6) process monitoring. The inversion state database represents a hierarchical structure with

  2. On MSDT inversion with multi-angle remote sensing data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    With the wavelet transform, image of multi-angle remote sensing is decomposed into multi-resolution. With data of each resolution, we try target-based multi-stages inversion, taking the inversion result of coarse resolution as the prior information of the next inversion. The result gets finer and finer until the resolution of satellite observation. In this way, the target-based multi-stages inversion can be used in remote sensing inversion of large-scaled coverage. With MISR data, we inverse structure parameters of vegetation in semiarid grassland of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. The result proves that this way is efficient.

  3. GENERATING FRACTAL PATTERNS BY USING p-CIRCLE INVERSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, José L.; Rubiano, Gustavo N.; Zlobec, Borut Jurčič

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce the p-circle inversion which generalizes the classical inversion with respect to a circle (p = 2) and the taxicab inversion (p = 1). We study some basic properties and we also show the inversive images of some basic curves. We apply this new transformation to well-known fractals such as Sierpinski triangle, Koch curve, dragon curve, Fibonacci fractal, among others. Then we obtain new fractal patterns. Moreover, we generalize the method called circle inversion fractal be means of the p-circle inversion.

  4. Stratigraphic inversion of pre-stack multicomponent data; Inversion stratigraphique multicomposante avant sommation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agullo, Y.

    2005-09-15

    This thesis present the extension of mono-component seismic pre-stack data stratigraphical inversion method to multicomponent data, with the objective of improving the determination of reservoir elastic parameters. In addiction to the PP pressure waves, the PS converted waves proved their interest for imaging under gas clouds; and their potential is highly significant for the characterization of lithologies, fluids, fractures... Nevertheless the simultaneous use ol PP and PS data remains problematic because of their different the time scales. To jointly use the information contained in PP and PS data, we propose a method in three steps first, mono-component stratigraphic inversions of PP then PS data; second, estimation of the PP to PS time conversion law; third, multicomponent stratigraphic inversion. For the second point, the estimation of the PP to PS conversion law is based on minimizing the difference between the S impedances obtained from PP and PS mono-component stratigraphic inversion. The pre-stack mono-component stratigraphic inversions was adapted to the case of multicomponent data by leaving each type of data in its own time scale in order to avoid the distortion of the seismic wavelet. The results obtained on a realistic synthetic PP-PS case show on one hand that determining PP to PS conversion law (from the mono-component inversion results) is feasible, and on the other hand that the joint inversion of PP and PS data with this conversion law improves the results compared to the mono-component inversion ones. Although this is presented within the framework of the PP and PS multi-component data, the developed methodology adapts directly to PP and SS data for example. (author)

  5. Hybrid inversions of CO2 fluxes at regional scale applied to network design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kountouris, Panagiotis; Gerbig, Christoph; -Thomas Koch, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Long term observations of atmospheric greenhouse gas measuring stations, located at representative regions over the continent, improve our understanding of greenhouse gas sources and sinks. These mixing ratio measurements can be linked to surface fluxes by atmospheric transport inversions. Within the upcoming years new stations are to be deployed, which requires decision making tools with respect to the location and the density of the network. We are developing a method to assess potential greenhouse gas observing networks in terms of their ability to recover specific target quantities. As target quantities we use CO2 fluxes aggregated to specific spatial and temporal scales. We introduce a high resolution inverse modeling framework, which attempts to combine advantages from pixel based inversions with those of a carbon cycle data assimilation system (CCDAS). The hybrid inversion system consists of the Lagrangian transport model STILT, the diagnostic biosphere model VPRM and a Bayesian inversion scheme. We aim to retrieve the spatiotemporal distribution of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) at a high spatial resolution (10 km x 10 km) by inverting for spatially and temporally varying scaling factors for gross ecosystem exchange (GEE) and respiration (R) rather than solving for the fluxes themselves. Thus the state space includes parameters for controlling photosynthesis and respiration, but unlike in a CCDAS it allows for spatial and temporal variations, which can be expressed as NEE(x,y,t) = λG(x,y,t) GEE(x,y,t) + λR(x,y,t) R(x,y,t) . We apply spatially and temporally correlated uncertainties by using error covariance matrices with non-zero off-diagonal elements. Synthetic experiments will test our system and select the optimal a priori error covariance by using different spatial and temporal correlation lengths on the error statistics of the a priori covariance and comparing the optimized fluxes against the 'known truth'. As 'known truth' we use independent fluxes

  6. Bayesian-inversion adjusted methane fluxes in Colombia and Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, O. J.; Jimenez, R.; Lin, J. C.; Diskin, G. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Kort, E. A.; Kaplan, J. O.

    2011-12-01

    Methane is the second most important long lived greenhouse gas (GHG) in the Earth's atmosphere accounting for ~20% of the positive radiative forcing. The first step towards developing GHG mitigation strategies is to obtain sufficiently accurate and detailed source and sinks estimations. While ~2/3 of the global methane emissions are anthropogenic, the wetlands are the single largest source. Therefore, in many cases, wetland emissions must be included in inverse modeling calculations aimed at validating anthropogenic emission inventories from ambient air concentration measurements. High accuracy and precision methane measurements carried out in 2007 during NASA's TC4 mission revealed elevated enhancements over Colombia and Panama (up to ~500 ppbv CH4 over Uraba, Colombia). Aiming at identifying the origin of these enhancements and at validating the anthropogenic emission inventory, we used STILT to estimate methane mixing ratios based on surface fluxes at regional level over four regions of both Colombia and Panama. STILT was applied along with assimilated (GDAS and ECMWF) meteorological fields and a priori methane inventories for anthropogenic (EDGAR) and wetland emissions (Kaplan's and Matthews and Fung's). The modeled mixing ratios were compared to the TC4 mission measurements. A Bayesian inversion analysis allowed us to scale prior fluxes taking into account the uncertainty on modeled mixing ratios due to transport errors, which were calculated by comparison with meteorological observations. We obtained flux scaling factors for the whole domain of study and for each one of the four regions. Overall, the Bayesian inversion indicates that the prior anthropogenic inventory is reasonably accurate and the a priori wetland methane fluxes are overestimated almost by a factor 2. Although the posterior enhancements show a better agreement with measurements, the discrepancies cannot be reduced for 4 regions simultaneously, which points to the calculated meteorological

  7. Gravity inversion in spherical coordinates using tesseroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uieda, Leonardo; Barbosa, Valeria C. F.

    2014-05-01

    Satellite observations of the gravity field have provided geophysicists with exceptionally dense and uniform coverage of data over vast areas. This enables regional or global scale high resolution geophysical investigations. Techniques like forward modeling and inversion of gravity anomalies are routinely used to investigate large geologic structures, such as large igneous provinces, suture zones, intracratonic basins, and the Moho. Accurately modeling such large structures requires taking the sphericity of the Earth into account. A reasonable approximation is to assume a spherical Earth and use spherical coordinates. In recent years, efforts have been made to advance forward modeling in spherical coordinates using tesseroids, particularly with respect to speed and accuracy. Conversely, traditional space domain inverse modeling methods have not yet been adapted to use spherical coordinates and tesseroids. In the literature there are a range of inversion methods that have been developed for Cartesian coordinates and right rectangular prisms. These include methods for estimating the relief of an interface, like the Moho or the basement of a sedimentary basin. Another category includes methods to estimate the density distribution in a medium. The latter apply many algorithms to solve the inverse problem, ranging from analytic solutions to random search methods as well as systematic search methods. We present an adaptation for tesseroids of the systematic search method of "planting anomalous densities". This method can be used to estimate the geometry of geologic structures. As prior information, it requires knowledge of the approximate densities and positions of the structures. The main advantage of this method is its computational efficiency, requiring little computer memory and processing time. We demonstrate the shortcomings and capabilities of this approach using applications to synthetic and field data. Performing the inversion of gravity and gravity gradient

  8. A Bayesian method for microseismic source inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, D. J.; White, R. S.; Christie, P. A. F.

    2016-08-01

    Earthquake source inversion is highly dependent on location determination and velocity models. Uncertainties in both the model parameters and the observations need to be rigorously incorporated into an inversion approach. Here, we show a probabilistic Bayesian method that allows formal inclusion of the uncertainties in the moment tensor inversion. This method allows the combination of different sets of far-field observations, such as P-wave and S-wave polarities and amplitude ratios, into one inversion. Additional observations can be included by deriving a suitable likelihood function from the uncertainties. This inversion produces samples from the source posterior probability distribution, including a best-fitting solution for the source mechanism and associated probability. The inversion can be constrained to the double-couple space or allowed to explore the gamut of moment tensor solutions, allowing volumetric and other non-double-couple components. The posterior probability of the double-couple and full moment tensor source models can be evaluated from the Bayesian evidence, using samples from the likelihood distributions for the two source models, producing an estimate of whether or not a source is double-couple. Such an approach is ideally suited to microseismic studies where there are many sources of uncertainty and it is often difficult to produce reliability estimates of the source mechanism, although this can be true of many other cases. Using full-waveform synthetic seismograms, we also show the effects of noise, location, network distribution and velocity model uncertainty on the source probability density function. The noise has the largest effect on the results, especially as it can affect other parts of the event processing. This uncertainty can lead to erroneous non-double-couple source probability distributions, even when no other uncertainties exist. Although including amplitude ratios can improve the constraint on the source probability

  9. Temperature inversions in the vicinity of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as characterized by tethersonde data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasing, T.J.; Wang, J.C.; Lombardi, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Accidental releases of hazardous materials to the atmosphere may result from fires that create a buoyant plume which may rise several hundred meters above the ground. For such buoyant release cases, estimates of ground-level concentrations may be as much as a factor of 100 lower than similar, nonbuoyant releases. For the Oak Ridge Reservation, safety analyses often examine buoyant release accident scenarios and resulting downwind, ground-level consequence estimates. For these analyses, careful consideration of buoyant plume rise is important. Plume rise can be limited by a stable vertical atmospheric temperature profile, commonly called an inversion, where the air temperature increases with height. There is a concern that inversions may interact with the complex terrain on the Oak Ridge Reservation, particularly at the Y-12 Plant, which is located in a relatively shallow but narrow valley, to trap the plume and increase ground-level consequences. The purpose of this paper is to review the available meteorological data that provide information on inversions in the Oak Ridge area.

  10. Temperature inversions in the vicinity of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as characterized by tethersonde data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accidental releases of hazardous materials to the atmosphere may result from fires that create a buoyant plume which may rise several hundred meters above the ground. For such buoyant release cases, estimates of ground-level concentrations may be as much as a factor of 100 lower than similar, nonbuoyant releases. For the Oak Ridge Reservation, safety analyses often examine buoyant release accident scenarios and resulting downwind, ground-level consequence estimates. For these analyses, careful consideration of buoyant plume rise is important. Plume rise can be limited by a stable vertical atmospheric temperature profile, commonly called an inversion, where the air temperature increases with height. There is a concern that inversions may interact with the complex terrain on the Oak Ridge Reservation, particularly at the Y-12 Plant, which is located in a relatively shallow but narrow valley, to trap the plume and increase ground-level consequences. The purpose of this paper is to review the available meteorological data that provide information on inversions in the Oak Ridge area

  11. An Inversion Analysis of Recent Variability in Natural CO2 Fluxes Using GOSAT and In Situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Baker, D. F.; Collatz, G. J.; Ott, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    About one-half of the global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and deforestation accumulates in the atmosphere, where it contributes to global warming. The rest is taken up by vegetation and the ocean. The precise contribution of the two sinks, and their location and year-to-year variability are, however, not well understood. We use two different approaches, batch Bayesian synthesis inversion and variational data assimilation, to deduce the global spatiotemporal distributions of CO2 fluxes during 2009-2010. One of our objectives is to assess different sources of uncertainties in inferred fluxes, including uncertainties in prior flux estimates and observations, and differences in inversion techniques. For prior constraints, we utilize fluxes and uncertainties from the CASA-GFED model of the terrestrial biosphere and biomass burning driven by satellite observations and interannually varying meteorology. We also use measurement-based ocean flux estimates and two sets of fixed fossil CO2 emissions. Here, our inversions incorporate column CO2 measurements from the GOSAT satellite (ACOS retrieval, filtered and bias-corrected) and in situ observations (individual flask and afternoon-average continuous observations) to estimate fluxes in 108 regions over 8-day intervals for the batch inversion and at 3° x 3.75° weekly for the variational system. Relationships between fluxes and atmospheric concentrations are derived consistently for the two inversion systems using the PCTM atmospheric transport model driven by meteorology from the MERRA reanalysis. We compare the posterior fluxes and uncertainties derived using different data sets and the two inversion approaches, and evaluate the posterior atmospheric concentrations against independent data including aircraft measurements. The optimized fluxes generally resemble those from other studies. For example, the results indicate that the terrestrial biosphere is a net CO2 sink, and a GOSAT-only inversion suggests a

  12. Inverse modelling of CH4 emissions for 2010-2011 using different satellite retrieval products from GOSAT and SCIAMACHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexe, M.; Bergamaschi, P.; Segers, A.; Detmers, R.; Butz, A.; Hasekamp, O.; Guerlet, S.; Parker, R.; Boesch, H.; Frankenberg, C.; Scheepmaker, R. A.; Dlugokencky, E.; Sweeney, C.; Wofsy, S. C.; Kort, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    At the beginning of 2009 new space-borne observations of dry-air column-averaged mole fractions of atmospheric methane (XCH4) became available from the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observations-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) instrument on board the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). Until April 2012 concurrent {methane (CH4) retrievals} were provided by the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY (SCIAMACHY) instrument on board the ENVironmental SATellite (ENVISAT). The GOSAT and SCIAMACHY XCH4 retrievals can be compared during the period of overlap. We estimate monthly average CH4 emissions between January 2010 and December 2011, using the TM5-4DVAR inverse modelling system. In addition to satellite data, high-accuracy measurements from the Cooperative Air Sampling Network of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA ESRL) are used, providing strong constraints on the remote surface atmosphere. We discuss five inversion scenarios that make use of different GOSAT and SCIAMACHY XCH4 retrieval products, including two sets of GOSAT proxy retrievals processed independently by the Netherlands Institute for Space Research (SRON)/Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), and the University of Leicester (UL), and the RemoTeC "Full-Physics" (FP) XCH4 retrievals available from SRON/KIT. The GOSAT-based inversions show significant reductions in the root mean square (rms) difference between retrieved and modelled XCH4, and require much smaller bias corrections compared to the inversion using SCIAMACHY retrievals, reflecting the higher precision and relative accuracy of the GOSAT XCH4. Despite the large differences between the GOSAT and SCIAMACHY retrievals, 2-year average emission maps show overall good agreement among all satellite-based inversions, with consistent flux adjustment patterns, particularly across equatorial Africa and North America. Over North

  13. Control of a high beta maneuvering reentry vehicle using dynamic inversion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, Alfred Chapman

    2005-05-01

    The design of flight control systems for high performance maneuvering reentry vehicles presents a significant challenge to the control systems designer. These vehicles typically have a much higher ballistic coefficient than crewed vehicles like as the Space Shuttle or proposed crew return vehicles such as the X-38. Moreover, the missions of high performance vehicles usually require a steeper reentry flight path angle, followed by a pull-out into level flight. These vehicles then must transit the entire atmosphere and robustly perform the maneuvers required for the mission. The vehicles must also be flown with small static margins in order to perform the required maneuvers, which can result in highly nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics that frequently transition from being aerodynamically stable to unstable as angle of attack increases. The control system design technique of dynamic inversion has been applied successfully to both high performance aircraft and low beta reentry vehicles. The objective of this study was to explore the application of this technique to high performance maneuvering reentry vehicles, including the basic derivation of the dynamic inversion technique, followed by the extension of that technique to the use of tabular trim aerodynamic models in the controller. The dynamic inversion equations are developed for high performance vehicles and augmented to allow the selection of a desired response for the control system. A six degree of freedom simulation is used to evaluate the performance of the dynamic inversion approach, and results for both nominal and off nominal aerodynamic characteristics are presented.

  14. Regression tools for CO{sub 2} inversions: application of a shrinkage estimator to process attribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaby, Benjamin A.; Field, Christopher B. [Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Global Ecology

    2006-09-15

    In this study we perform an atmospheric inversion based on a shrinkage estimator. This method is used to estimate surface fluxes of CO{sub 2}, first partitioned according to constituent geographic regions, and then according to constituent processes that are responsible for the total flux. Our approach differs from previous approaches in two important ways. The first is that the technique of linear Bayesian inversion is recast as a regression problem. Seen as such, standard regression tools are employed to analyse and reduce errors in the resultant estimates. A shrinkage estimator, which combines standard ridge regression with the linear 'Bayesian inversion' model, is introduced. This method introduces additional bias into the model with the aim of reducing variance such that errors are decreased overall. Compared with standard linear Bayesian inversion, the ridge technique seems to reduce both flux estimation errors and prediction errors. The second divergence from previous studies is that instead of dividing the world into geographically distinct regions and estimating the CO{sub 2} flux in each region, the flux space is divided conceptually into processes that contribute to the total global flux. Formulating the problem in this manner adds to the interpretability of the resultant estimates and attempts to shed light on the problem of attributing sources and sinks to their underlying mechanisms.

  15. Approximate inverse preconditioners for general sparse matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, E.; Saad, Y. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Preconditioned Krylov subspace methods are often very efficient in solving sparse linear matrices that arise from the discretization of elliptic partial differential equations. However, for general sparse indifinite matrices, the usual ILU preconditioners fail, often because of the fact that the resulting factors L and U give rise to unstable forward and backward sweeps. In such cases, alternative preconditioners based on approximate inverses may be attractive. We are currently developing a number of such preconditioners based on iterating on each column to get the approximate inverse. For this approach to be efficient, the iteration must be done in sparse mode, i.e., we must use sparse-matrix by sparse-vector type operatoins. We will discuss a few options and compare their performance on standard problems from the Harwell-Boeing collection.

  16. Optoacoustic inversion via Volterra kernel reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Melchert, O; Roth, B

    2016-01-01

    In this letter we address the numeric inversion of optoacoustic signals to initial stress profiles. Therefore we put under scrutiny the optoacoustic kernel reconstruction problem in the paraxial approximation of the underlying wave-equation. We apply a Fourier-series expansion of the optoacoustic Volterra kernel and obtain the respective expansion coefficients for a given "apparative" setup by performing a gauge procedure using synthetic input data. The resulting effective kernel is subsequently used to solve the optoacoustic source reconstruction problem for general signals. We verify the validity of the proposed inversion protocol for synthetic signals and explore the feasibility of our approach to also account for the diffraction transformation of signals beyond the paraxial approximation.

  17. Compression scheme for geophysical electromagnetic inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, A.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a model-compression scheme for improving the efficiency of the regularized Gauss-Newton inversion algorithm for geophysical electromagnetic applications. In this scheme, the unknown model parameters (the conductivity/resistivity distribution) are represented in terms of a basis such as Fourier and wavelet (Haar and Daubechies). By applying a truncation criterion, the model may then be approximated by a reduced number of basis functions, which is usually much less than the number of the model parameters. Further, because the geophysical electromagnetic measurements have low resolution, it is sufficient for inversion to only keep the low-spatial frequency part of the image. This model-compression scheme accelerates the computational time and also reduces the memory usage of the Gauss-Newton method. We are able to significantly reduce the algorithm computational complexity without compromising the quality of the inverted models.

  18. Space-time inversion and its consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelnokov, M.

    2016-07-01

    The article discusses some new aspects of both the inversion of space and the inversion of time. It is shown that behind the mirror is not symmetric to in front of the mirror. It, in its turn, leads to nonconservation of spatial parity. The same situation takes place in the combined CP-parity. Further, the article shows that from the point of view of different reference systems of the Universe (from the point of view of different galaxies or accumulation of galaxies) time flows not just differently, and, in some cases, in the opposite directions. It leads to major changes in the picture of the Universe. In particular, the concept of the age of the Universe loses its meaning, serious doubts about the idea of the Big Bang and so on.

  19. Analog fault diagnosis by inverse problem technique

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Rania F.

    2011-12-01

    A novel algorithm for detecting soft faults in linear analog circuits based on the inverse problem concept is proposed. The proposed approach utilizes optimization techniques with the aid of sensitivity analysis. The main contribution of this work is to apply the inverse problem technique to estimate the actual parameter values of the tested circuit and so, to detect and diagnose single fault in analog circuits. The validation of the algorithm is illustrated through applying it to Sallen-Key second order band pass filter and the results show that the detecting percentage efficiency was 100% and also, the maximum error percentage of estimating the parameter values is 0.7%. This technique can be applied to any other linear circuit and it also can be extended to be applied to non-linear circuits. © 2011 IEEE.

  20. Supersymmetry and the LHC Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Arkani-Hamed, N; Thaler, J; Wang, L T; Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Kane, Gordon L.; Thaler, Jesse; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2006-01-01

    Given experimental evidence at the LHC for physics beyond the standard model, how can we determine the nature of the underlying theory? We initiate an approach to studying the "inverse map" from the space of LHC signatures to the parameter space of theoretical models within the context of low-energy supersymmetry, using 1808 LHC observables including essentially all those suggested in the literature and a 15 dimensional parametrization of the supersymmetric standard model. We show that the inverse map of a point in signature space consists of a number of isolated islands in parameter space, indicating the existence of "degeneracies"--qualitatively different models with the same LHC signatures. The degeneracies have simple physical characterizations, largely reflecting discrete ambiguities in electroweak-ino spectrum, accompanied by small adjustments for the remaining soft parameters. The number of degeneracies falls in the range 1

  1. Lasing without inversion in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthaler, M; Utsumi, Y; Golubev, D S; Shnirman, A; Schön, Gerd

    2011-08-26

    We study the photon generation in a transmission line oscillator coupled to a driven qubit in the presence of a dissipative electromagnetic environment. It has been demonstrated previously that a population inversion in the qubit can lead to a lasing state of the oscillator. Here we show that the circuit can also exhibit the effect of "lasing without inversion." It arises since the coupling to the dissipative environment enhances photon emission as compared to absorption, similar to the recoil effect predicted for atomic systems. While the recoil effect is very weak, and so far elusive, the effect described here should be observable with realistic circuits. We analyze the requirements for system parameters and environment.

  2. Population inversion in monolayer and bilayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent demonstration of saturable absorption and negative optical conductivity in the Terahertz range in graphene has opened up new opportunities for optoelectronic applications based on this and other low dimensional materials. Recently, population inversion across the Dirac point has been observed directly by time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (tr-ARPES), revealing a relaxation time of only ∼130 femtoseconds. This severely limits the applicability of single layer graphene to, for example, Terahertz light amplification. Here we use tr-ARPES to demonstrate long-lived population inversion in bilayer graphene. The effect is attributed to the small band gap found in this compound. We propose a microscopic model for these observations and speculate that an enhancement of both the pump photon energy and the pump fluence may further increase this lifetime. (paper)

  3. 3D Gravity Inversion using Tikhonov Regularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toushmalani Reza

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Subsalt exploration for oil and gas is attractive in regions where 3D seismic depth-migration to recover the geometry of a salt base is difficult. Additional information to reduce the ambiguity in seismic images would be beneficial. Gravity data often serve these purposes in the petroleum industry. In this paper, the authors present an algorithm for a gravity inversion based on Tikhonov regularization and an automatically regularized solution process. They examined the 3D Euler deconvolution to extract the best anomaly source depth as a priori information to invert the gravity data and provided a synthetic example. Finally, they applied the gravity inversion to recently obtained gravity data from the Bandar Charak (Hormozgan, Iran to identify its subsurface density structure. Their model showed the 3D shape of salt dome in this region

  4. Direct and inverse problems of infrared tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sizikov, Valery S.; Evseev, Vadim; Fateev, Alexander;

    2016-01-01

    and passive (OFF) without one. Received light intensities on detectors are modeled in the direct problem or measured in the experiment whereas integral equations with respect to the absorption coefficient and Planck function (which yields the temperature profile of the medium) are solved in the inverse...... regularization. A software package in MATLAB has been developed. Two numerical examples-with modeled and real input data-were solved. The proposed methodology avoids the necessity of elaborate determination of the absorption coefficient by direct (point) measurements or calculation using spectroscopic databases......The problems of infrared tomography-direct (the modeling of measured functions) and inverse (the reconstruction of gaseous medium parameters)-are considered with a laboratory burner flame as an example of an application. The two measurement modes are used: active (ON) with an external IR source...

  5. Sparse Matrix Inversion with Scaled Lasso

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Tingni

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new method of learning a sparse nonnegative-definite target matrix. Our primary example of the target matrix is the inverse of a population covariance matrix or correlation matrix. The algorithm first estimates each column of the matrix by scaled Lasso, a joint estimation of regression coefficients and noise level, and then adjusts the matrix estimator to be symmetric. The procedure is efficient in the sense that the penalty level of the scaled Lasso for each column is completely determined by the data via convex minimization, without using cross-validation. We prove that this method guarantees the fastest proven rate of convergence in the spectrum norm under conditions of weaker form than those in the existing analyses of other $\\ell_1$ algorithms, and has faster guaranteed rate of convergence when the ratio of the $\\ell_1$ and spectrum norms of the target inverse matrix diverges to infinity. A simulation study also demonstrates the competitive performance of the proposed estimator.

  6. The Stewart-Lyth Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Ayón-Beato, E; Mansilla, R; Terrero-Escalante, C A; Ay\\'on-Beato, Eloy; Garc\\'{\\i}a, Alberto; Mansilla, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the Stewart-Lyth inverse problem is introduced. It consists of solving two non-linear differential equations for the first slow-roll parameter and finding the inflaton potential. The equations are derived from the Stewart-Lyth equations for the scalar and tensorial perturbations produced during the inflationary period. The geometry of the phase planes transverse to the trajectories is analyzed, and conclusions about the possible behaviour for general solutions are drawn.

  7. Regularizing Priors for Linear Inverse Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Pierre Florens; Anna Simoni

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a new Bayesian approach for estimating, nonparametrically, functional parameters in econometric models that are characterized as the solution of a linear inverse problem. By using a Gaussian process prior distribution we propose the posterior mean as an estimator and prove frequentist consistency of the posterior distribution. The latter provides the frequentist validation of our Bayesian procedure. We show that the minimax rate of contraction of the posterior distribution...

  8. Sucrose Inversion An Experiment on Heterogeneous Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Adélio Mendes; Magalhães, Fernão D.; Luis M. Madeira

    2003-01-01

    llustration of heterogeneous catalysis concepts in laboratory courses is not usually simple or economical. For our undergraduate senior lab course we have developed an environmentally friendly experiment dealing with several aspects of heterogeneous catalysis, having in mind the use of readily available and relatively inexpensive equipment, and chemicals on a compact setup, which students can safely operate. The experiment deals with the acid-catalyzed sucrose inversion, performed in packed b...

  9. On the inverse problem of fractal compression

    OpenAIRE

    Hartenstein, Hannes; Ruhl, Matthias; Saupe, Dietmar; Vrscay, Edward R.

    2001-01-01

    The inverse problem of fractal compression amounts to determining a contractive operator such that the corresponding fixed point approximates a given target function. The standard method based on the collage coding strategy is known to represent a suboptimal method. Why does one not search for optimal fractal codes? We will prove that optimal fractal coding, when considered as a discrete optimization problem, constitutes an NP-hard problem, i.e., it cannot be solved in a practical amount of t...

  10. Classical geometry Euclidean, transformational, inversive, and projective

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, I E; Liu, A C F; Tokarsky, G W

    2014-01-01

    Features the classical themes of geometry with plentiful applications in mathematics, education, engineering, and science Accessible and reader-friendly, Classical Geometry: Euclidean, Transformational, Inversive, and Projective introduces readers to a valuable discipline that is crucial to understanding bothspatial relationships and logical reasoning. Focusing on the development of geometric intuitionwhile avoiding the axiomatic method, a problem solving approach is encouraged throughout. The book is strategically divided into three sections: Part One focuses on Euclidean geometry, which p

  11. Inversion identities for inhomogeneous face models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frahm, Holger; Karaiskos, Nikos

    2014-10-15

    We derive exact inversion identities satisfied by the transfer matrix of inhomogeneous interaction-round-a-face (IRF) models with arbitrary boundary conditions using the underlying integrable structure and crossing properties of the local Boltzmann weights. For the critical restricted solid-on-solid (RSOS) models these identities together with some information on the analytical properties of the transfer matrix determine the spectrum completely and allow to derive the Bethe equations for both periodic and general open boundary conditions.

  12. Full-waveform inversion: Filling the gaps

    KAUST Repository

    Beydoun, Wafik B.

    2015-09-01

    After receiving an outstanding response to its inaugural workshop in 2013, SEG once again achieved great success with its 2015 SEG Middle East Workshop, “Full-waveform inversion: Filling the gaps,” which took place 30 March–1 April 2015 in Abu Dhabi, UAE. The workshop was organized by SEG, and its partner sponsors were Saudi Aramco (gold sponsor), ExxonMobil, and CGG. Read More: http://library.seg.org/doi/10.1190/tle34091106.1

  13. Inversion identities for inhomogeneous face models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Holger; Karaiskos, Nikos

    2014-10-01

    We derive exact inversion identities satisfied by the transfer matrix of inhomogeneous interaction-round-a-face (IRF) models with arbitrary boundary conditions using the underlying integrable structure and crossing properties of the local Boltzmann weights. For the critical restricted solid-on-solid (RSOS) models these identities together with some information on the analytical properties of the transfer matrix determine the spectrum completely and allow to derive the Bethe equations for both periodic and general open boundary conditions.

  14. Anatomy of an Inversion - Argon Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamick, L.; Sharon, Y. Y.; Robinson, S. J. Q.

    2012-02-01

    Two different interactions give similar results for excitation energies and g factors of 2+1 states for most even-even argon isotopes except 46Ar. This is explained in terms of an inversion in J = ½+ and levels in 47K which is successfully obtained by one of the interactions but not the other. This example shows the possible dangers of nuclear astrophysics extrapolations.

  15. Numerical linear algebra for reconstruction inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachaoui, Abdeljalil

    2004-01-01

    Our goal in this paper is to discuss various issues we have encountered in trying to find and implement efficient solvers for a boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation of an iterative method for solving a reconstruction problem. We survey some methods from numerical linear algebra, which are relevant for the solution of this class of inverse problems. We motivate the use of our constructing algorithm, discuss its implementation and mention the use of preconditioned Krylov methods.

  16. InAR:Inverse Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Hao; Cui, Hainan

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality is the art to seamlessly fuse virtual objects into real ones. In this short note, we address the opposite problem, the inverse augmented reality, that is, given a perfectly augmented reality scene where human is unable to distinguish real objects from virtual ones, how the machine could help do the job. We show by structure from motion (SFM), a simple 3D reconstruction technique from images in computer vision, the real and virtual objects can be easily separated in the recon...

  17. Differential equations inverse and direct problems

    CERN Document Server

    Favini, Angelo

    2006-01-01

    DEGENERATE FIRST ORDER IDENTIFICATION PROBLEMS IN BANACH SPACES A NONISOTHERMAL DYNAMICAL GINZBURG-LANDAU MODEL OF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY. EXISTENCE AND UNIQUENESS THEOREMSSOME GLOBAL IN TIME RESULTS FOR INTEGRODIFFERENTIAL PARABOLIC INVERSE PROBLEMSFOURTH ORDER ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL OPERATORS WITH GENERAL WENTZELL BOUNDARY CONDITIONSTUDY OF ELLIPTIC DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS IN UMD SPACESDEGENERATE INTEGRODIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS OF PARABOLIC TYPE EXPONENTIAL ATTRACTORS FOR SEMICONDUCTOR EQUATIONSCONVERGENCE TO STATIONARY STATES OF SOLUTIONS TO THE SEMILINEAR EQUATION OF VISCOELASTICITY ASYMPTOTIC BEHA

  18. INVERSE SCATTERING PROBLEMS BY SINGULAR SOURCE METHODS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The inverse scattering problems are to detect the property of obstacles from the measurements outside the obstacles. One of important research areas in this topic is the recovery of boundary property for impenetrable obstacles. In this paper, we would like to give a brief review about the recently developed singular source methods. There are three different methods in this category, namely, linear sampling method, pointsource method and probe method. We also present some recent new results about the probe method.

  19. The inverse maximum dynamic flow problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAGHERIAN; Mehri

    2010-01-01

    We consider the inverse maximum dynamic flow (IMDF) problem.IMDF problem can be described as: how to change the capacity vector of a dynamic network as little as possible so that a given feasible dynamic flow becomes a maximum dynamic flow.After discussing some characteristics of this problem,it is converted to a constrained minimum dynamic cut problem.Then an efficient algorithm which uses two maximum dynamic flow algorithms is proposed to solve the problem.

  20. Inversion Copulas from Nonlinear State Space Models

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Michael Stanley; Maneesoonthorn, Worapree

    2016-01-01

    While copulas constructed from inverting latent elliptical, or skew-elliptical, distributions are popular, they can be inadequate models of serial dependence in time series. As an alternative, we propose an approach to construct copulas from the inversion of latent nonlinear state space models. This allows for new time series copula models that have the same serial dependence structure as a state space model, yet have an arbitrary marginal distribution - something that is difficult to achieve...

  1. Services innovation: assimilation, differentiation, inversion and integration

    OpenAIRE

    Gallouj, FaÏz

    2002-01-01

    This chapter aims to provide a review of the literature on innovation in services and to focus on the analytical strategies carried out in order to fill in the innovation gap in the service economy (i.e. the difference between what the traditional innovation indicators are capable of capturing, and the reality of innovation activities undertaken in a given economy). Four analytical perspectives are distinguished in this chapter, which are labeled: assimilation, differentiation, inversion and ...

  2. Inverse scattering problem for quantum graph vertices

    CERN Document Server

    Cheon, Taksu; Turek, Ondrej

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate how the inverse scattering problem of a quantum star graph can be solved by means of diagonalization of Hermitian unitary matrix when the vertex coupling is of the scale invariant (or F\\"ul\\H{o}p-Tsutsui) form. This enables the construction of quantum graphs with desired properties in a tailor-made fashion. The procedure is illustrated on the example of quantum vertices with equal transmission probabilities.

  3. Voltammetry: mathematical modelling and Inverse Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Koshev, N A; Kuzina, V V

    2016-01-01

    We propose the fast semi-analytical method of modelling the polarization curves in the voltammetric experiment. The method is based on usage of the special func- tions and shows a big calculation speed and a high accuracy and stability. Low computational needs of the proposed algorithm allow us to state the set of Inverse Problems of voltammetry for the reconstruction of metal ions concentrations or the other parameters of the electrolyte under investigation.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Elastography: Inversions in Bounded Media

    OpenAIRE

    Kolipaka, Arunark; McGee, Kiaran P.; Manduca, Armando; Romano, Anthony J; Glaser, Kevin J.; Araoz, Philip A; Ehman, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of quantifying and spatially resolving the shear stiffness of soft tissues by visualization of synchronized mechanical wave displacement fields. However, MRE inversions generally assume that the measured tissue motion consists primarily of shear waves propagating in a uniform, infinite medium. This assumption is not valid in organs such as the heart, eye, bladder, skin, fascia, bone and spinal cord in which the s...

  5. 3D Inverse problem: Seawater intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steklova, K.; Haber, E.

    2013-12-01

    Modeling of seawater intrusions (SWI) is challenging as it involves solving the governing equations for variable density flow, multiple time scales and varying boundary conditions. Due to the nonlinearity of the equations and the large aquifer domains, 3D computations are a costly process, particularly when solving the inverse SWI problem. In addition the heads and concentration measurements are difficult to obtain due to mixing, saline wedge location is sensitive to aquifer topography, and there is general uncertainty in initial and boundary conditions and parameters. Some of these complications can be overcome by using indirect geophysical data next to standard groundwater measurements, however, the inverse problem is usually simplified, e.g. by zonation for the parameters based on geological information, steady state substitution of the unknown initial conditions, decoupling the equations or reducing the amount of unknown parameters by covariance analysis. In our work we present a discretization of the flow and solute mass balance equations for variable groundwater (GW) flow. A finite difference scheme is to solve pressure equation and a Semi - Lagrangian method for solute transport equation. In this way we are able to choose an arbitrarily large time step without losing stability up to an accuracy requirement coming from the coupled character of the variable density flow equations. We derive analytical sensitivities of the GW model for parameters related to the porous media properties and also the initial solute distribution. Analytically derived sensitivities reduce the computational cost of inverse problem, but also give insight for maximizing information in collected data. If the geophysical data are available it also enables simultaneous calibration in a coupled hydrogeophysical framework. The 3D inverse problem was tested on artificial time dependent data for pressure and solute content coming from a GW forward model and/or geophysical forward model. Two

  6. An inverse and analytic lens design method

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yang; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2016-01-01

    Traditional lens design is a numerical and forward process based on ray tracing and aberration theory. This method has limitations because the initial configuration of the lens has to be specified and the aberrations of the lenses have to considered. This paper is an initial attempt to investigate an analytic and inverse lens design method, called Lagrange, to overcome these barriers. Lagrange method tries to build differential equations in terms of the system parameters and the system input ...

  7. Inverse amplitude method and Adler zeros

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez Nicola, Ángel; Peláez Sagredo, José Ramón; Rios, G.

    2008-01-01

    The inverse amplitude method is a powerful unitarization technique to enlarge the energy applicability region of effective Lagrangians. It has been widely used to describe resonances in hadronic physics, combined with chiral perturbation theory, as well as in the strongly interacting symmetry breaking sector. In this work we show how it can be slightly modified to also account for the subthreshold region, incorporating correctly the Adler zeros required by chiral symmetry and eliminating spur...

  8. Geoacoustic inversion using the vector field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Steven E.

    The main goal of this project was to study the use of the acoustic vector field, separately or in combination with the scalar field, to estimate the depth dependent geoacoustic properties of the seafloor via non-linear inversion. The study was performed in the context of the Sediment Acoustics Experiment 2004 (SAX04) conducted in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) where a small number of acoustic vector sensors were deployed in close proximity to the seafloor. A variety of acoustic waveforms were transmitted into the seafloor at normal incidence. The acoustic vector sensors were located both above and beneath the seafloor interface where they measured the acoustic pressure and the acoustic particle acceleration. Motion data provided by the buried vector sensors were affected by a suspension response that was sensitive to the mass properties of the sensor, the sediment density and sediment elasticity (e.g., shear wave speed). The suspension response for the buried vector sensors included a resonance within the analysis band of 0.4 to 2.0 kHz. The suspension resonance represented an unknown complex transfer function between the acoustic vector field in the seabed and data representing that field. Therefore, inverse methods developed for this study were required to 1) estimate dynamic properties of the sensor suspension resonance and 2) account for the associated corruption of vector field data. A method to account for the vector sensor suspense response function was integrated directly into the inversion methods such that vector channel data corruption was reduced and an estimate of the shear wave speed in the sediment was returned. Inversions of real and synthetic data sets indicated that information about sediment shear wave speed was carried by the suspension response of the buried sensors, as opposed to being contained inherently within the acoustic vector field.

  9. Difference inversion model of wave equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-ming

    2008-01-01

    A numerical iterative model was derived from the difference method and a perturbation assumption to calculate the coefficient function of a wave equation.The method Was used to solve the disaccord problem of numerical precision between the direct problem model and inverse problem model,and its serial problems using the old method.Numerical simulation calculation shows that the method is feasible and effective.

  10. Global optimization in inverse problem of scatterometry

    OpenAIRE

    Afraites, Lekbir; Hazart, Jérôme; Schiavone, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    International audience In the current work, we consider the inverse problem in scatterometry which consists in determining the feature shape from an experimental ellipsometric signature. The reformulation of the given nonlinear identification problem was considered as a parametric optimization problem using the Least Square criterion. In this work, a design procedure for global robust optimization is developed using Kriging and global optimization approaches. Robustness is determined by Kr...

  11. Universal spectrum for atmospheric aerosol size distribution: comparison with pcasp-b observations of vocals 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric flows exhibit self-similar fractal space-time fluctuations on all space-time scales in association with inverse power law distribution for power spectra of meteorological parameters such as wind, temperature, etc., and thus implies long-range correlations, identified as self-organized criticality generic to dynamical systems in nature. A general systems theory developed by the author visualizes the fractal fluctuations to result from the coexistence of eddy fluctuations in an eddy continuum, the larger scale eddies being the integrated mean of enclosed smaller scale eddies. The model predicts that the probability distributions of component eddy amplitudes and the corresponding variances (power spectra) are quantified by the same universal inverse power law distribution incorporating the golden mean. Atmospheric particulates are held in suspension by the vertical velocity distribution spectrum. The atmospheric particulate size spectrum is derived in terms of the model predicted universal inverse po...

  12. Approximate inverse preconditioning of iterative methods for nonsymmetric linear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzi, M. [Universita di Bologna (Italy); Tuma, M. [Inst. of Computer Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1996-12-31

    A method for computing an incomplete factorization of the inverse of a nonsymmetric matrix A is presented. The resulting factorized sparse approximate inverse is used as a preconditioner in the iterative solution of Ax = b by Krylov subspace methods.

  13. Inverse Dynamics of Flexible Manipulators - A DAE Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Moberg, Stig; Hanssen, Sven

    2008-01-01

    The inverse dynamics for a flexible manipulator can be formulated as a differential-algebraic equation (DAE). The the inverse dynamics is, e.g., used for feedforward control. This work investigates different methods for analyzing and solving these equations.

  14. INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartoloni, Fernando Heering; Monteiro Leite Ciscato, Luiz Francisco; Augusto, Felipe Alberto; Baader, Wilhelm Josef

    2010-01-01

    INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS. Chemiluminescence properties of the peroxyoxalate reaction in the presence of activators bearing electron withdrawing substituents were studied, to evaluate the possible occurrence of an inverse electron tr

  15. An overview of joint inversion in earthquake source imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koketsu, Kazuki

    2016-06-01

    We reviewed joint inversion studies of the rupture processes of significant earthquakes, using the definition of a joint inversion in earthquake source imaging as a source inversion of multiple kinds of datasets (waveform, geodetic, or tsunami). Yoshida and Koketsu (Geophys J Int 103:355-362, 1990), and Wald and Heaton (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:668-691, 1994) independently initiated joint inversion methods, finding that joint inversion provides more reliable rupture process models than single-dataset inversion, leading to an increase of joint inversion studies. A list of these studies was made using the finite-source rupture model database (Mai and Thingbaijam in Seismol Res Lett 85:1348-1357, 2014). Outstanding issues regarding joint inversion were also discussed.

  16. Computationally efficient Bayesian inference for inverse problems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzouk, Youssef M.; Najm, Habib N.; Rahn, Larry A.

    2007-10-01

    Bayesian statistics provides a foundation for inference from noisy and incomplete data, a natural mechanism for regularization in the form of prior information, and a quantitative assessment of uncertainty in the inferred results. Inverse problems - representing indirect estimation of model parameters, inputs, or structural components - can be fruitfully cast in this framework. Complex and computationally intensive forward models arising in physical applications, however, can render a Bayesian approach prohibitive. This difficulty is compounded by high-dimensional model spaces, as when the unknown is a spatiotemporal field. We present new algorithmic developments for Bayesian inference in this context, showing strong connections with the forward propagation of uncertainty. In particular, we introduce a stochastic spectral formulation that dramatically accelerates the Bayesian solution of inverse problems via rapid evaluation of a surrogate posterior. We also explore dimensionality reduction for the inference of spatiotemporal fields, using truncated spectral representations of Gaussian process priors. These new approaches are demonstrated on scalar transport problems arising in contaminant source inversion and in the inference of inhomogeneous material or transport properties. We also present a Bayesian framework for parameter estimation in stochastic models, where intrinsic stochasticity may be intermingled with observational noise. Evaluation of a likelihood function may not be analytically tractable in these cases, and thus several alternative Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) schemes, operating on the product space of the observations and the parameters, are introduced.

  17. An inverse approach for elucidating dendritic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Torben-Nielsen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We outline an inverse approach for investigating dendritic function-structure relationships by optimizing dendritic trees for a-priori chosen computational functions. The inverse approach can be applied in two different ways. First, we can use it as a `hypothesis generator' in which we optimize dendrites for a function of general interest. The optimization yields an artificial dendrite that is subsequently compared to real neurons. This comparison potentially allows us to propose hypotheses about the function of real neurons. In this way, we investigated dendrites that optimally perform input-order detection. Second, we can use it as a `function confirmation' by optimizing dendrites for functions hypothesized to be performed by classes of neurons. If the optimized, artificial, dendrites resemble the dendrites of real neurons the artificial dendrites corroborate the hypothesized function of the real neuron. Moreover, properties of the artificial dendrites can lead to predictions about yet unmeasured properties. In this way, we investigated wide-field motion integration performed by the VS cells of the fly visual system. In outlining the inverse approach and two applications, we also elaborate on the nature of dendritic function. We furthermore discuss the role of optimality in assigning functions to dendrites and point out interesting future directions.

  18. Representations of Inverse Covariances by Differential Operators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin XU

    2005-01-01

    In the cost function of three- or four-dimensional variational data assimilation, each term is weighted by the inverse of its associated error covariance matrix and the background error covariance matrix is usually much larger than the other covariance matrices. Although the background error covariances are traditionally normalized and parameterized by simple smooth homogeneous correlation functions, the covariance matrices constructed from these correlation functions are often too large to be inverted or even manipulated. It is thus desirable to find direct representations of the inverses of background errorcorrelations. This problem is studied in this paper. In particular, it is shown that the background term can be written into ∫ dx|Dv(x)|2, that is, a squared L2 norm of a vector differential operator D, called the D-operator, applied to the field of analysis increment v(x). For autoregressive correlation functions, the Doperators are of finite orders. For Gaussian correlation functions, the D-operators are of infinite order. For practical applications, the Gaussian D-operators must be truncated to finite orders. The truncation errors are found to be small even when the Gaussian D-operators are truncated to low orders. With a truncated D-operator, the background term can be easily constructed with neither inversion nor direct calculation of the covariance matrix. D-operators are also derived for non-Gaussian correlations and transformed into non-isotropic forms.

  19. TOPICAL REVIEW: Inverse problems in elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Marc; Constantinescu, Andrei

    2005-04-01

    This review is devoted to some inverse problems arising in the context of linear elasticity, namely the identification of distributions of elastic moduli, model parameters or buried objects such as cracks. These inverse problems are considered mainly for three-dimensional elastic media under equilibrium or dynamical conditions, and also for thin elastic plates. The main goal is to overview some recent results, in an effort to bridge the gap between studies of a mathematical nature and problems defined from engineering practice. Accordingly, emphasis is given to formulations and solution techniques which are well suited to general-purpose numerical methods for solving elasticity problems on complex configurations, in particular the finite element method and the boundary element method. An underlying thread of the discussion is the fact that useful tools for the formulation, analysis and solution of inverse problems arising in linear elasticity, namely the reciprocity gap and the error in constitutive equation, stem from variational and virtual work principles, i.e., fundamental principles governing the mechanics of deformable solid continua. In addition, the virtual work principle is shown to be instrumental for establishing computationally efficient formulae for parameter or geometrical sensitivity, based on the adjoint solution method. Sensitivity formulae are presented for various situations, especially in connection with contact mechanics, cavity and crack shape perturbations, thus enriching the already extensive known repertoire of such results. Finally, the concept of topological derivative and its implementation for the identification of cavities or inclusions are expounded.

  20. Forward and Inverse Cascades in EMHD Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jungyeon

    2016-05-01

    Electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) provides a simple fluid-like description of physics below the proton gyro-scale in collisionless plasmas, such as the solar wind. In this paper, we discuss forward and inverse cascades in EMHD turbulence in the presence of a strong mean magnetic field. Similar to Alfvén waves, EMHD waves, or EMHD perturbations, propagate along magnetic field lines. Therefore, two types of EMHD waves can exist: waves moving parallel to and waves moving anti-parallel to the the magnetic field lines. For energy cascade in EMHD turbulence, the relative amplitudes of opposite-traveling waves are important. When the amplitudes are balanced, we will see fully-developed forward cascade with a k -7/3 energy spectrum and a scale-dependent anisotropy. On the other hand, when the amplitudes are imbalanced, we will see inverse cascade, as well as (presumably not fully developed) forward cascade. The underlying physics for the inverse cascade is magnetic helicity conservation.

  1. Inverse problems biomechanical imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberai, Assad A.

    2016-03-01

    It is now well recognized that a host of imaging modalities (a list that includes Ultrasound, MRI, Optical Coherence Tomography, and optical microscopy) can be used to "watch" tissue as it deforms in response to an internal or external excitation. The result is a detailed map of the deformation field in the interior of the tissue. This deformation field can be used in conjunction with a material mechanical response to determine the spatial distribution of material properties of the tissue by solving an inverse problem. Images of material properties thus obtained can be used to quantify the health of the tissue. Recently, they have been used to detect, diagnose and monitor cancerous lesions, detect vulnerable plaque in arteries, diagnose liver cirrhosis, and possibly detect the onset of Alzheimer's disease. In this talk I will describe the mathematical and computational aspects of solving this class of inverse problems, and their applications in biology and medicine. In particular, I will discuss the well-posedness of these problems and quantify the amount of displacement data necessary to obtain a unique property distribution. I will describe an efficient algorithm for solving the resulting inverse problem. I will also describe some recent developments based on Bayesian inference in estimating the variance in the estimates of material properties. I will conclude with the applications of these techniques in diagnosing breast cancer and in characterizing the mechanical properties of cells with sub-cellular resolution.

  2. Inversion of tsunami waveforms and tsunami warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chao

    Ever since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the technique of inversion of tsunami data and the importance of tsunami warning have drawn the attention of many researchers. However, since tsunamis are rare and extreme events, developed inverse techniques lack validation, and open questions rise when they are applied to a real event. In this study, several of those open questions are investigated, i.e., the wave dispersion, bathymetry grid size and subfault division. First, tsunami records from three large tsunami events -- 2010 Maule, 2011 Tohoku and 2012 Haida Gwaii -- are analyzed to extract the main characteristics of the leading tsunami waves. Using the tool of wavelet transforming, the instant wave period can be obtained and thus the dispersive parameter mu2 can be calculated. mu2 is found to be smaller than 0.02 for all records, indicating that the wave dispersion is minor for the propagation of tsunami leading waves. Second, inversions of tsunami data are carried out for three tsunami events -- 2011 Tohoku, 2012 Haida Gwaii and 2014 Iquique. By varying the subfault size and the bathymetry grid size in the inversions, general rules are established for choosing those two parameters. It is found that the choice of bathymetry grid size depends on various parameters, such as the subfault size and the depth of subfaults. The global bathymetry data GEBCO with spatial resolution of 30 arcsec is generally good if the subfault size is larger than 40 km x 40 km; otherwise, bathymetry data with finer resolution is desirable. Detailed instructions of choosing the bathymetry size can be found in Chapter 2. By contrast, the choice of subfault size has much more freedom; our study shows that the subfault size can be very large without significant influence on the predicted tsunami waves. For earthquakes with magnitude of 8.0 ˜ 9.0, the subfault size can be 60 km ˜ 100 km. In our study, the maximum subfault size results in 9 ˜ 16 subfault patches on the ruptured fault surface

  3. Optimal Inverse Littlewood-Offord theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Hoi

    2010-01-01

    Let eta_i be iid Bernoulli random variables, taking values -1,1 with probability 1/2. Given a multiset V of n integers v_1,..., v_n, we define the concentration probability as rho(V) := sup_{x} Pr(v_1 eta_1+...+ v_n eta_n=x). A classical result of Littlewood-Offord and Erdos from the 1940s asserts that if the v_i are non-zero, then rho(V) is O(n^{-1/2}). Since then, many researchers obtained improved bounds by assuming various extra restrictions on V. About 5 years ago, motivated by problems concerning random matrices, Tao and Vu introduced the Inverse Littlewood-Offord problem. In the inverse problem, one would like to give a characterization of the set V, given that rho(V) is relatively large. In this paper, we introduce a new method to attack the inverse problem. As an application, we strengthen a previous result of Tao and Vu, obtaining an optimal characterization for V. This immediately implies several classical theorems, such as those of Sarkozy-Szemeredi and Halasz. The method also applies in the conti...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Elastography: Inversions in Bounded Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolipaka, Arunark; McGee, Kiaran P.; Manduca, Armando; Romano, Anthony J.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Araoz, Philip A.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of quantifying and spatially resolving the shear stiffness of soft tissues by visualization of synchronized mechanical wave displacement fields. However, MRE inversions generally assume that the measured tissue motion consists primarily of shear waves propagating in a uniform, infinite medium. This assumption is not valid in organs such as the heart, eye, bladder, skin, fascia, bone and spinal cord in which the shear wavelength approaches the geometric dimensions of the object. The aim of this study was to develop and test mathematical inversion algorithms capable of resolving shear stiffness from displacement maps of flexural waves propagating in bounded media such as beams, plates and spherical shells using geometry-specific equations of motion. MRE and finite element modeling (FEM) of beam, plate, and spherical shell phantoms of various geometries were performed. Mechanical testing of the phantoms agreed with the stiffness values obtained from FEM and MRE data and a linear correlation of r2 ≥ 0.99 was observed between the stiffness values obtained using MRE and FEM data. In conclusion, we have demonstrated new inversion methods for calculating shear stiffness that may be more appropriate for waves propagating in bounded media. PMID:19780146

  5. Geomechanical paleostress inversion using fracture data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerten, Laurent; Maerten, Frantz; Lejri, Mostfa; Gillespie, Paul

    2016-08-01

    We describe a fast geomechanically-based paleostress inversion technique that uses observed fracture data to constrain stress through multiple simulations. The method assumes that the local stress field around individual fractures is heterogeneous and derives the far field tectonic stress, that we also call the far field boundary conditions. We show how such far field tectonic stress can be recovered through a mechanical stress inversion technique using local observations of natural fractures (i.e. mechanical type, orientation and location). We test the paleostress inversion against outcrop analogues of fractured carbonates from both Nash Point, U.K., where there are well exposed faults and joints and the Matelles, France, where there are well exposed faults, veins and stylolites. We demonstrate through these case studies how the method can be efficiently applied to natural examples and we highlight its advantages and limitations. We discuss how such method could be applied to subsurface problems and how it can provide complementary constraints to drive discrete fracture models for better fractured reservoir characterization and modelling.

  6. Pluto's atmosphere near perihelion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent stellar occultation has confirmed predictions that Pluto has an atmosphere which is sufficiently thick to uniformly envelope the planet and to extend far above the surface. Pluto's atmosphere consists of methane and perhaps other volatile gases at temperatures below their freezing points; it should regulate the surface temperature of its volatile ices to a globally uniform value. As Pluto approaches and passes through perihelion, a seasonal maximum in the atmospheric bulk and a corresponding minimum in the exposed volatile ice abundance is expected to occur. The lag in maximum atmospheric bulk relative to perihelion will be diagnostic of the surface thermal properties. An estimate of Pluto's atmospheric bulk may result if a global darkening (resulting from the disappearance of the seasonally deposited frosts) occurs before the time of maximum atmospheric bulk. The ice deposited shortly after perihelion may be diagnostic of the composition of Pluto's volatile reservoir

  7. Measurement of the Atmospheric $\

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose1, D; Boser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegard, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glusenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Gora, D; Grant, D; Gross, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klas, J; Klein, S R; Kohne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Kopke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lunemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Meszaros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Perez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Radel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schoneberg, S; Schonherr, L; Schonwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoss, A; Strahler, E A; Strom, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge1, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    We report the first observation in a high energy neutrino telescope of cascades induced by atmospheric electron neutrinos and by neutral current interactions of atmospheric neutrinos of all flavors. Using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low energy extension, a sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data. The number of observed cascades is $N_{\\rm cascade} = 496 \\pm 66 (stat.) \\pm 88(syst.)$ and the rest of the sample consists of residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is determined in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV and is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos.

  8. Atmospheric Circulation of Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Showman, Adam P; Menou, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    We survey the basic principles of atmospheric dynamics relevant to explaining existing and future observations of exoplanets, both gas giant and terrestrial. Given the paucity of data on exoplanet atmospheres, our approach is to emphasize fundamental principles and insights gained from Solar-System studies that are likely to be generalizable to exoplanets. We begin by presenting the hierarchy of basic equations used in atmospheric dynamics, including the Navier-Stokes, primitive, shallow-water, and two-dimensional nondivergent models. We then survey key concepts in atmospheric dynamics, including the importance of planetary rotation, the concept of balance, and scaling arguments to show how turbulent interactions generally produce large-scale east-west banding on rotating planets. We next turn to issues specific to giant planets, including their expected interior and atmospheric thermal structures, the implications for their wind patterns, and mechanisms to pump their east-west jets. Hot Jupiter atmospheric d...

  9. Postpartum Prolapsed Leiomyoma with Uterine Inversion Managed by Vaginal Hysterectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Pieh-Holder, Kelly L.; Heidi Bell; Tana Hall; DeVente, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Uterine inversion is a rare, but life threatening, obstetrical emergency which occurs when the uterine fundus collapses into the endometrial cavity. Various conservative and surgical therapies have been outlined in the literature for the management of uterine inversions. Case. We present a case of a chronic, recurrent uterine inversion, which was diagnosed following spontaneous vaginal delivery and recurred seven weeks later. The uterine inversion was likely due to a leiomyoma. Th...

  10. Review of ankle inversion sprain simulators in the biomechanics laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Sophia Chui-Wai Ha; Daniel Tik-Pui Fong; Kai-Ming Chan

    2015-01-01

    Ankle inversion ligamentous sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. The most direct way is to investigate real injury incidents, but it is unethical and impossible to replicate on test participants. Simulators including tilt platforms, trapdoors, and fulcrum devices were designed to mimic ankle inversion movements in laboratories. Inversion angle was the only element considered in early designs; however, an ankle sprain is composed of inversion and plantarflexion in clinical observa...

  11. A regional high-resolution carbon flux inversion of North America for 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Schuh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Resolving the discrepancies between NEE estimates based upon (1 ground studies and (2 atmospheric inversion results, demands increasingly sophisticated techniques. In this paper we present a high-resolution inversion based upon a regional meteorology model (RAMS and an underlying biosphere (SiB3 model, both running on an identical 40 km grid over most of North America. Previous papers have utilized inversion regions formed by collapsing biome-similar grid cells into large aggregated regions. The effect of this is that the NEE correction imposed on forested regions on the east coast of the United States might be the same as that imposed on forests on the west coast of the United States while, in reality, there likely exist subtle differences in the two areas, both natural and anthropogenic. Our current inversion framework utilizes a combination of previously employed inversion techniques while allowing carbon flux corrections to be biome independent. Temporally and spatially high-resolution results utilizing biome-independent corrections provide insight into carbon dynamics in North America. In particular, we analyze hourly CO2 mixing ratio data from a sparse network of eight towers in North America for 2004. A prior estimate of carbon fluxes due to gross primary productivity (GPP and ecosystem respiration (ER is constructed from the SiB3 biosphere model on a 40 km grid. A combination of transport from the RAMS and the parameterized chemical transport model (PCTM models is used to forge a connection between upwind biosphere fluxes and downwind observed CO2 mixing ratio data. A Kalman filter procedure is used to estimate weekly corrections to biosphere fluxes based upon observed CO2. RMSE-weighted annual NEE estimates, over an ensemble of potential inversion parameter sets, show a mean estimate 0.57 Pg/yr sink in North America. We perform the inversion with two independently derived boundary inflow

  12. What causes the inverse relationship between primary production and export efficiency in the Southern Ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moigne, Frédéric A. C.; Henson, Stephanie A.; Cavan, Emma; Georges, Clément; Pabortsava, Katsiaryna; Achterberg, Eric P.; Ceballos-Romero, Elena; Zubkov, Mike; Sanders, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    The ocean contributes to regulating atmospheric CO2 levels, partly via variability in the fraction of primary production (PP) which is exported out of the surface layer (i.e., the e ratio). Southern Ocean studies have found that contrary to global-scale analyses, an inverse relationship exists between e ratio and PP. This relationship remains unexplained, with potential hypotheses being (i) large export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in high PP areas, (ii) strong surface microbial recycling in high PP regions, and/or (iii) grazing-mediated export that varies inversely with PP. We find that the export of DOC has a limited influence in setting the negative e ratio/PP relationship. However, we observed that at sites with low PP and high e ratios, zooplankton-mediated export is large and surface microbial abundance low suggesting that both are important drivers of the magnitude of the e ratio in the Southern Ocean.

  13. Inverse scattering problem in turbulent magnetic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-08-01

    We apply a particular form of the inverse scattering theory to turbulent magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. In the present note we develop the theory, formulate the magnetic fluctuation problem in terms of its electrodynamic turbulent response function, and reduce it to the solution of a special form of the famous Gelfand-Levitan-Marchenko equation of quantum mechanical scattering theory. The last of these applies to transmission and reflection in an active medium. The theory of turbulent magnetic fluctuations does not refer to such quantities. It requires a somewhat different formulation. We reduce the theory to the measurement of the low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuation spectrum, which is not the turbulent spectral energy density. The inverse theory in this form enables obtaining information about the turbulent response function of the medium. The dynamic causes of the electromagnetic fluctuations are implicit to it. Thus, it is of vital interest in low-frequency magnetic turbulence. The theory is developed until presentation of the equations in applicable form to observations of turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations as input from measurements. Solution of the final integral equation should be done by standard numerical methods based on iteration. We point to the possibility of treating power law fluctuation spectra as an example. Formulation of the problem to include observations of spectral power densities in turbulence is not attempted. This leads to severe mathematical problems and requires a reformulation of inverse scattering theory. One particular aspect of the present inverse theory of turbulent fluctuations is that its structure naturally leads to spatial information which is obtained from the temporal information that is inherent to the observation of time series. The Taylor assumption is not needed here. This is a consequence of Maxwell's equations, which couple space and time evolution. The inversion procedure takes advantage of a particular

  14. Inverse problems in classical and quantum physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this thesis is in the area of Applied Mathematics known as Inverse Problems. Inverse problems are those where a set of measured data is analysed in order to get as much information as possible on a model which is assumed to represent a system in the real world. We study two inverse problems in the fields of classical and quantum physics: QCD condensates from tau-decay data and the inverse conductivity problem. Despite a concentrated effort by physicists extending over many years, an understanding of QCD from first principles continues to be elusive. Fortunately, data continues to appear which provide a rather direct probe of the inner workings of the strong interactions. We use a functional method which allows us to extract within rather general assumptions phenomenological parameters of QCD (the condensates) from a comparison of the time-like experimental data with asymptotic space-like results from theory. The price to be paid for the generality of assumptions is relatively large errors in the values of the extracted parameters. Although we do not claim that our method is superior to other approaches, we hope that our results lend additional confidence to the numerical results obtained with the help of methods based on QCD sum rules. EIT is a technology developed to image the electrical conductivity distribution of a conductive medium. The technique works by performing simultaneous measurements of direct or alternating electric currents and voltages on the boundary of an object. These are the data used by an image reconstruction algorithm to determine the electrical conductivity distribution within the object. In this thesis, two approaches of EIT image reconstruction are proposed. The first is based on reformulating the inverse problem in terms of integral equations. This method uses only a single set of measurements for the reconstruction. The second approach is an algorithm based on linearisation which uses more then one set of measurements. A

  15. Inverse problems in classical and quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almasy, A.A.

    2007-06-29

    The subject of this thesis is in the area of Applied Mathematics known as Inverse Problems. Inverse problems are those where a set of measured data is analysed in order to get as much information as possible on a model which is assumed to represent a system in the real world. We study two inverse problems in the fields of classical and quantum physics: QCD condensates from tau-decay data and the inverse conductivity problem. Despite a concentrated effort by physicists extending over many years, an understanding of QCD from first principles continues to be elusive. Fortunately, data continues to appear which provide a rather direct probe of the inner workings of the strong interactions. We use a functional method which allows us to extract within rather general assumptions phenomenological parameters of QCD (the condensates) from a comparison of the time-like experimental data with asymptotic space-like results from theory. The price to be paid for the generality of assumptions is relatively large errors in the values of the extracted parameters. Although we do not claim that our method is superior to other approaches, we hope that our results lend additional confidence to the numerical results obtained with the help of methods based on QCD sum rules. EIT is a technology developed to image the electrical conductivity distribution of a conductive medium. The technique works by performing simultaneous measurements of direct or alternating electric currents and voltages on the boundary of an object. These are the data used by an image reconstruction algorithm to determine the electrical conductivity distribution within the object. In this thesis, two approaches of EIT image reconstruction are proposed. The first is based on reformulating the inverse problem in terms of integral equations. This method uses only a single set of measurements for the reconstruction. The second approach is an algorithm based on linearisation which uses more then one set of measurements. A

  16. Levitating atmospheres of Eddington-luminosity neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wielgus, Maciek; Kluzniak, Wlodek; Abramowicz, Marek; Narayan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    We construct models of static, spherically symmetric shells supported by the radiation flux of a luminous neutron star in the Schwarzschild metric. The atmospheres are disconnected from the star and levitate above its surface. Gas pressure and density inversion appear in the inner region of these atmospheres, which is a purely relativistic phenomenon. We account for the scattering opacity dependence on temperature and utilize the relativistic M1 closure scheme for the radiation tensor, hence allowing for a fully GR-consistent treatment of the photon flux and radiation tensor anisotropy. In this way we are able to address atmospheres of both large and moderate/low optical depths with the same set of equations. We discuss properties of the levitating atmospheres and find that they may indeed be optically thick, with the distance between star surface and the photosphere expanding as luminosity increases. These results may be relevant for the photosphereric radius expansion X-ray bursts.

  17. Levitating atmospheres of Eddington-luminosity neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgus, Maciek; Sądowski, Aleksander; Kluźniak, Włodek; Abramowicz, Marek; Narayan, Ramesh

    2016-06-01

    We construct models of static, spherically symmetric shells supported by the radiation flux of a luminous neutron star in the Schwarzschild metric. The atmospheres are disconnected from the star and levitate above its surface. Gas pressure and density inversion appear in the inner region of these atmospheres, which is a purely relativistic phenomenon. We account for the scattering opacity dependence on temperature green by using the Klein-Nishina formula. The relativistic M1 closure scheme for the radiation tensor provides a general relativity-consistent treatment of the photon flux and radiation tensor anisotropy. In this way, we are able to address atmospheres of both large and moderate/low optical depths with the same set of equations. We discuss properties of the levitating atmospheres and find that they may indeed be optically thick, with the distance between star surface and the photosphere expanding as luminosity increases. These results may be relevant for the photosphereric radius expansion X-ray bursts.

  18. Retrieving Atmospheric Precipitable Water Vapor Using Artificial Neural Network Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Discussing of water vapor and its variation is the important issue for synoptic meteorology and meteorology. In physical Atmospheric, the moisture content of the earth atmosphere is one of the most important parameters, it is hard to represent water vapor because of its space-time variation. High-spectral resolution Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS data can be used to retrieve the small scale vertical structure of air temperature, which provided a more accurate and good initial field for the numerical forecasting and the large-scale weather analysis. This paper proposes an artificial neural network to retrieve the clear sky atmospheric radiation data from AIRS and comparing with the AIRS Level-2 standard product, and gain a good inversion results.

  19. Moisture and dynamical interactions maintaining decoupled Arctic mixed-phase stratocumulus in the presence of a humidity inversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Solomon

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Observations suggest that processes maintaining subtropical and Arctic stratocumulus differ, due to the different environments in which they occur. For example, specific humidity inversions (specific humidity increasing with height are frequently observed to occur coincident with temperature inversions in the Arctic, while they do not occur in the subtropics. In this study we use nested LES simulations of decoupled Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus (AMPS clouds observed during the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's Indirect and SemiDirect Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC to analyze budgets of water components, potential temperature, and turbulent kinetic energy. These analyses quantify the processes that maintain decoupled AMPS, including the role of the humidity inversions. The results show the maintenance of liquid clouds in both the shallow upper entrainment zone (temperature and humidity inversion due to a down gradient transport of water vapor by turbulent fluxes into the cloud layer and direct condensation by radiative cooling, and in the updrafts of the mixed-layer eddies below cloud top due to buoyant destabilization. These processes cause at least 20 % of the cloud liquid water to extend into the inversion. The redistribution of water vapor from the top of the humidity inversion to the base of the humidity inversion maintains the cloud layer while the mixed layer-entrainment zone system is continually losing total water. In this decoupled system, the humidity inversion is the only source of water vapor for the cloud system since water vapor from the surface layer is not efficiently transported into the mixed layer. Sedimentation of ice is the dominant sink of moisture from the mixed layer.

  20. Solving and analyzing PD0L inverse process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊勇兵; 陈刚; 董光昌

    2001-01-01

    The importance of L inverse process is emphasized and an algorithm is given to realize PD0L inverse process. On the basis of algorithm analysis, this note discusses the possibility of applying L inverse process to data compression and the difficulties in doing that.

  1. Mechanism and Modeling for Polymerization of Acrylamide in Inverse Microemulsions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiXiao; ZhangWeiying; YuanHuigen

    2004-01-01

    After discussion on the mechanism of polymer particle nucleation and growth in inverse microemulsion polymerization, a schematic physical model for polymerization of acrylamide in inverse microemulsions was presented. Furthermore, several key problems in mathematically modeling of inverse microemulsion polymerization were pointed out.

  2. Strange Horizons: Teaching Usual and Unusual Atmospheric Effects using APOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Unusual Sun and moonsets are not only photogenic -- they are educational. Images appearing on the Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) that demonstrate dramatic examples of the green flash, the Moon illusion, Fata Morgana, and the Etruscan vase effect are discussed in terms of how they demonstrate atmospheric refraction, chromatic aberration, and temperature inversions. A lesson plan is given for undergraduate classrooms as well as estimates of how each effect might alter the perceived time of a common sunset.

  3. Impact of modelled particle characteristics on emissions inferred by inversion of tracer transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Burrows

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Model-simulated transport of atmospheric trace components can be combined with observed concentrations to obtain estimates of ground-based sources using various inversion techniques. These approaches have been applied in the past primarily to obtain source estimates for long-lived trace gases such as CO2. We consider the application of similar techniques to source estimation for atmospheric aerosols, using as a case study the estimation of bacteria emissions from different ecosystem regions in the global atmospheric chemistry and climate model ECHAM5/MESSy-Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC.

    Source estimation via Monte Carlo Markov Chain is applied to a suite of sensitivity simulations and the global mean emissions are estimated. We present an analysis of the uncertainties in the global mean emissions, and a partitioning of the uncertainties that are attributable to particle size, activity as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN, the ice nucleation scavenging ratios for mixed-phase and cold clouds, and measurement error.

    Uncertainty due to CCN activity or to a 1 μm error in particle size is typically between 10% and 40% of the uncertainty due to observation uncertainty, as measured by the 5%-ile to 95%-ile range of the Monte Carlo ensemble. Uncertainty attributable to the ice nucleation scavenging ratio in mixed-phase clouds is as high as 10% to 20% of that attributable to observation uncertainty. Taken together, the four model parameters examined contribute about half as much to the uncertainty in the estimated emissions as do the observations. This was a surprisingly large contribution from model uncertainty in light of the substantial observation uncertainty, which ranges from 81% to 870% of the mean for each of ten ecosystems for this case study. The effects of these and other model parameters in contributing to the uncertainties in the transport of atmospheric aerosol particles should be treated explicitly and

  4. Regional atmospheric CO2 inversion reveals seasonal and geographic differences in Amazon net biome exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alden, C.B.; Miller, J.B.; Gatti, L.V.; Gloor, M.M.; Laan-Luijkx, van der I.T.; Krol, M.C.; Guan, K.; Michalak, A.M.; Touma, T.; Andrew, A.; Basso, L.S.; Correia, C.S.C.; Domingues, L.G.; Joiner, J.; Lyapustin, A.; Peters, W.; Shiga, Y.P.; Thoning, K.; Velde, van der I.R.; Leeuwen van, T.T.; Yadav, V.; Diffenbaugh, N.S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding tropical rainforest carbon exchange and its response to heat and drought is critical for quantifying the effects of climate change on tropical ecosystems, including global climate–carbon feedbacks. Of particular importance
    for the global carbon budget is net biome exchange of CO2 w

  5. Regional atmospheric CO2 inversion reveals seasonal and geographic differences in Amazon net biome exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alden, Caroline B; Miller, John B; Gatti, Luciana V; Gloor, Manuel M; Guan, Kaiyu; Michalak, Anna M; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T; Touma, Danielle; Andrews, Arlyn; Basso, Luana S; Correia, Caio S C; Domingues, Lucas G; Joiner, Joanna; Krol, Maarten C; Lyapustin, Alexei I; Peters, Wouter; Shiga, Yoichi P; Thoning, Kirk; van der Velde, Ivar R; van Leeuwen, Thijs T; Yadav, Vineet; Diffenbaugh, Noah S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding tropical rainforest carbon exchange and its response to heat and drought is critical for quantifying the effects of climate change on tropical ecosystems, including global climate-carbon feedbacks. Of particular importance for the global carbon budget is net biome exchange of CO2 with

  6. Regional-scale geostatistical inverse modeling of North American CO2 fluxes: a synthetic data study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Michalak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of synthetic data experiments is performed to investigate the ability of a regional atmospheric inversion to estimate grid-scale CO2 fluxes during the growing season over North America. The inversions are performed within a geostatistical framework without the use of any prior flux estimates or auxiliary variables, in order to focus on the atmospheric constraint provided by the nine towers collecting continuous, calibrated CO2 measurements in 2004. Using synthetic measurements and their associated concentration footprints, flux and model-data mismatch covariance parameters are first optimized, and then fluxes and their uncertainties are estimated at three different temporal resolutions. These temporal resolutions, which include a four-day average, a four-day-average diurnal cycle with 3-hourly increments, and 3-hourly fluxes, are chosen to help assess the impact of temporal aggregation errors on the estimated fluxes and covariance parameters. Estimating fluxes at a temporal resolution that can adjust the diurnal variability is found to be critical both for recovering covariance parameters directly from the atmospheric data, and for inferring accurate ecoregion-scale fluxes. Accounting for both spatial and temporal a priori covariance in the flux distribution is also found to be necessary for recovering accurate a posteriori uncertainty bounds on the estimated fluxes. Overall, the results suggest that even a fairly sparse network of 9 towers collecting continuous CO2 measurements across the continent, used with no auxiliary information or prior estimates of the flux distribution in time or space, can be used to infer relatively accurate monthly ecoregion scale CO2 surface fluxes over North America within estimated uncertainty bounds. Simulated random transport error is shown to decrease the quality of flux estimates in under-constrained areas at the ecoregion scale, although the uncertainty bounds remain realistic. While these synthetic

  7. Application of Coherence Inversion Method to Shallow Reflection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建成; 曹德欣; 田宗勇

    2001-01-01

    Because of the disturbance of some regular waves, the deformity of reflective wave occurs, making the coherence inversion method unreliable. By using the event time from multi-fold reflective stack the range of model parameters obtained by coherence inversion is limited in coherence inversion. Then by adjusting the initial values of the model parameters to make the waveform from the coherence inversion method be consistent with that from the original reflective gathers, the result of the inversion becomes more reliable. The application of this method in processing the reflective gathers in Songzikou by the Jingjiang River of Hubei demonstrates the efficiency of the method.

  8. Inverse spectral problems for differential operators on spatial networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurko, V. A.

    2016-06-01

    A short survey is given of results on inverse spectral problems for ordinary differential operators on spatial networks (geometrical graphs). The focus is on the most important non-linear inverse problems of recovering coefficients of differential equations from spectral characteristics when the structure of the graph is known a priori. The first half of the survey presents results related to inverse Sturm-Liouville problems on arbitrary compact graphs. Results on inverse problems for differential operators of arbitrary order on compact graphs are then presented. In the conclusion the main results on inverse problems on non-compact graphs are given. Bibliography: 55 titles.

  9. Review of ankle inversion sprain simulators in the biomechanics laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Chui-Wai Ha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ankle inversion ligamentous sprain is one of the most common sports injuries. The most direct way is to investigate real injury incidents, but it is unethical and impossible to replicate on test participants. Simulators including tilt platforms, trapdoors, and fulcrum devices were designed to mimic ankle inversion movements in laboratories. Inversion angle was the only element considered in early designs; however, an ankle sprain is composed of inversion and plantarflexion in clinical observations. Inversion velocity is another parameter that increased the reality of simulation. This review summarised the simulators, and aimed to compare and contrast their features and settings.

  10. Designing Dynamic Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Kinch, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the notion of atmospheres from a designerly perspective, and discusses temporal challenges facing interaction designers when acknowledging the dynamic character of it. As atmospheres are created in the relation between body, space, and time, a pragmatic approach seems useful...

  11. Proterozoic atmospheric oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2014-01-01

    This article is concerned with the evolution of atmospheric oxygen concentrations through the Proterozoic Eon. In particular, this article will seek to place the history of atmospheric oxygenation through the Proterozoic Eon in the context of the evolving physical environment including the history...

  12. Update on Atmospheric Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    González-Garciá, M Concepción; Peres, O L G; Stanev, T; Valle, José W F

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the impact of recent experimental results on the determination of atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. We use all published results on atmospheric neutrinos, including the preliminary large statistics data of Super-Kamiokande. We re-analyze the data in terms of both $\

  13. Inverse transport modeling of volcanic sulfur dioxide emissions using large-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Yi; Hoffmann, Lars; Griessbach, Sabine; Rößler, Thomas; Stein, Olaf

    2016-05-01

    An inverse transport modeling approach based on the concepts of sequential importance resampling and parallel computing is presented to reconstruct altitude-resolved time series of volcanic emissions, which often cannot be obtained directly with current measurement techniques. A new inverse modeling and simulation system, which implements the inversion approach with the Lagrangian transport model Massive-Parallel Trajectory Calculations (MPTRAC) is developed to provide reliable transport simulations of volcanic sulfur dioxide (SO2). In the inverse modeling system MPTRAC is used to perform two types of simulations, i.e., unit simulations for the reconstruction of volcanic emissions and final forward simulations. Both types of transport simulations are based on wind fields of the ERA-Interim meteorological reanalysis of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts. The reconstruction of altitude-dependent SO2 emission time series is also based on Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) satellite observations. A case study for the eruption of the Nabro volcano, Eritrea, in June 2011, with complex emission patterns, is considered for method validation. Meteosat Visible and InfraRed Imager (MVIRI) near-real-time imagery data are used to validate the temporal development of the reconstructed emissions. Furthermore, the altitude distributions of the emission time series are compared with top and bottom altitude measurements of aerosol layers obtained by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) satellite instruments. The final forward simulations provide detailed spatial and temporal information on the SO2 distributions of the Nabro eruption. By using the critical success index (CSI), the simulation results are evaluated with the AIRS observations. Compared to the results with an assumption of a constant flux of SO2 emissions, our inversion approach leads to an improvement

  14. Model atmospheres of irradiated exoplanets: The influence of stellar parameters, metallicity, and the C/O ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Mollière, Paul; Dullemond, Cornelis Petrus; Henning, Thomas; Mordasini, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Many parameters constraining the spectral appearance of exoplanets are still poorly understood. We therefore study the properties of irradiated exoplanet atmospheres over a wide parameter range including metallicity, C/O ratio and host spectral type. We calculate a grid of 1-d radiative-convective atmospheres and emission spectra. We perform the calculations with our new Pressure-Temperature Iterator and Spectral Emission Calculator for Planetary Atmospheres (PETIT) code, assuming chemical equilibrium. The atmospheric structures and spectra are made available online. We find that atmospheres of planets with C/O ratios $\\sim$ 1 and $T_{\\rm eff}$ $\\gtrsim$ 1500 K can exhibit inversions due to heating by the alkalis because the main coolants CH$_4$, H$_2$O and HCN are depleted. Therefore, temperature inversions possibly occur without the presence of additional absorbers like TiO and VO. At low temperatures we find that the pressure level of the photosphere strongly influences whether the atmospheric opacity is d...

  15. VLSI Design of Inverse Scan and Inverse Quantisation for MPEG—2 Decoder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUDi; HUMingzeng; DENGLei; JIZhenzhou

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a new architecture style for the design of inverse scan and inverse quantisa-tion for MPEG-2 video decoder, based on the description of their algorithm according to MPEG-2 standard. For inverse quantisation, a modified partial product generator based on Modified Booth's Algorithm is introduced, and the partial products are summed up by Wallace tree. The design implementation is described in high level RTL (reg-ister transfer level) code, which is completely technology independent and can be easily converted from one tech-nology to another. For the verification purpose, the core,synthesized by 0.35pm CMOS cells library, costs only 2,800gates when it works in 80 MHz. Therefore, it can be used in MPEG-2 video decoder operating in real time.

  16. On the potential of GHG emissions estimation by multi-species inverse modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbig, Christoph; Boschetti, Fabio; Filges, Annette; Marshall, Julia; Koch, Frank-Thomas; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Nedelec, Philippe; Thouret, Valerie; Karstens, Ute

    2016-04-01

    Reducing anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases is one of the most important elements in mitigating climate change. However, as emission reporting is often incomplete or incorrect, there is a need to independently monitor the emissions. Despite this, in the case of CO2 one typically assumes that emissions from fossil fuel burning are well known, and only natural fluxes are constrained by atmospheric measurements via inverse modelling. On the other hand, species such as CO2, CH4, and CO often have common emission patterns, and thus share part of the uncertainties, both related to the prior knowledge of emissions, and to model-data mismatch error. We implemented the Lagrangian transport model STILT driven by ECMWF analysis and short-term forecast meteorological fields together with emission sector and fuel-type specific emissions of CO2, CH4 and CO from EDGARv4.3 at a spatial resolution of 0.1 x 0.1 deg., providing an atmospheric fingerprint of anthropogenic emissions for multiple trace gases. We combine the regional STILT simulations with lateral boundary conditions for CO2 and CO from MACC forecasts and CH4 from TM3 simulations. Here we apply this framework to airborne in-situ measurements made in the context of IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System) and in the context of a HALO mission conducted for testing the active remote sensing system CHARM-F during April/May 2015 over central Europe. Simulated tracer distributions are compared to observed profiles of CO2, CH4, and CO, and the potential for a multi-species inversion using synergies between different tracers is assessed with respect to the uncertainty reduction in retrieved emission fluxes. Implications for inversions solving for anthropogenic emissions using atmospheric observations from ICOS (Integrated Carbon Observing System) are discussed.

  17. Causative Mechanisms of Tropical (10°N-15°N) Mesospheric Inversion Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Karanam; Sundararajan, Sridharan; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.

    2016-07-01

    The inversion of temperature gradient from negative to positive superimposed upon the characteristically decreasing mesospheric thermal structure is known as Mesospheric Inversion Layer (MIL). Gravity wave breaking, planetary wave critical level interaction and the chemical heating have been suggested as potential causative mechanisms for the occurrence of the MILs. Although the morphological characteristics of MIL have been studied in detail at different sites using various instrumental techniques, their causative mechanisms are still unknown. In the present study, nearly all these major causative mechanisms have been addressed through a few case studies observed from Rayleigh lidar and TIMED-SABER (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics - Sounding of Atmosphere by Broadband Emission Radiometry) nightly temperatures over a tropical site, Gadanki (13.5°N,79.2°E). A few large MILs are observed above ˜80 km with amplitude and thickness of ˜50 K and ˜5 km respectively in 2007 and 2011 which are found to be predominantly due to gravity wave breaking and large chemical heating rate (˜15 K/day) by the exothermic reaction, H+O _{3}->OH+O _{2} respectively. It is also found that the SABER shows larger ozone (O _{3}) mixing ratios at the inversion heights (˜80-85 km) during the MIL events in 2011. In another special case study, a triple layered MIL event with three inversion layers at ˜70 km (˜11 K), 80 km (˜44 K), 90 km (˜109 K) has been observed in September 2011 over Gadanki region. It is found that these three inversion layers are respectively due to planetary wave breaking, gravity wave tidal interaction and chemical heating by the reaction, O+O+M->O _{2}+M.

  18. Inverse modeling in fractured ground water carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inverse modeling scheme is presented which allows the estimation of model parameters of saturated groundwater flow from measurements made on the system response as well as from prior information on the parameters. An indirect approach to the inverse problem is applied determining the hydro- and hydrogeological parameters of a numerical model by repeated solution of the transient flow equation. This so-called direct problem is solved numerically by the Finite Element Method. The three-dimensional model is especially designed for dealing with fractured media so that elements of lower dimension than the overall model can be included in order to model fault zones. Spatially distributed parameters are considered alternatively by conventional zonation or pointwise definition in connection with a kriging interpolation technique. The inverse problem is formulated in the statistical framework of the maximum-likelihood estimation method which enables one to account for errors of the measurements and for errors of model output. The resulting objective function is minimized by alternative mathematical optimization algorithms where a sequential combination of a gradient method and a Gauss-Newton method has been found to perform best in many cases. With respect to the computational efficiency of the nonlinear optimization problem, the exact gradient (of the numerical problem) as well as the Jacobian matrix, i.e. the partial derivatives of the performance measures, are computed by the adjoint-state method or by direct derivation of the FE-equations, respectively. In addition to potential head measurements which are conventionally used to calibrate flow models, flow rates measured at model boundaries can be considered. (author) figs., tabs., 134 refs

  19. MAP estimators for piecewise continuous inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, M. M.; Stuart, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    We study the inverse problem of estimating a field u a from data comprising a finite set of nonlinear functionals of u a , subject to additive noise; we denote this observed data by y. Our interest is in the reconstruction of piecewise continuous fields u a in which the discontinuity set is described by a finite number of geometric parameters a. Natural applications include groundwater flow and electrical impedance tomography. We take a Bayesian approach, placing a prior distribution on u a and determining the conditional distribution on u a given the data y. It is then natural to study maximum a posterior (MAP) estimators. Recently (Dashti et al 2013 Inverse Problems 29 095017) it has been shown that MAP estimators can be characterised as minimisers of a generalised Onsager-Machlup functional, in the case where the prior measure is a Gaussian random field. We extend this theory to a more general class of prior distributions which allows for piecewise continuous fields. Specifically, the prior field is assumed to be piecewise Gaussian with random interfaces between the different Gaussians defined by a finite number of parameters. We also make connections with recent work on MAP estimators for linear problems and possibly non-Gaussian priors (Helin and Burger 2015 Inverse Problems 31 085009) which employs the notion of Fomin derivative. In showing applicability of our theory we focus on the groundwater flow and EIT models, though the theory holds more generally. Numerical experiments are implemented for the groundwater flow model, demonstrating the feasibility of determining MAP estimators for these piecewise continuous models, but also that the geometric formulation can lead to multiple nearby (local) MAP estimators. We relate these MAP estimators to the behaviour of output from MCMC samples of the posterior, obtained using a state-of-the-art function space Metropolis-Hastings method.

  20. Inverse Kinematics With Closed Form Solution For Denso Robot Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhsan Eka Prasetia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the forward kinematics and inverse kinematics used on the Denso robot manipulator which has a 6-DOF. The forward kinematics will result in the desired position by end-effector, while inverse kinematics produce angel on each joint. Inverse kinematics problem are very difficult, therefor to obtain the solution of inverse kinematics using closed form solution with geometry approach. The simulation result obtained from forward kinematics and inverse kinematics is determining desired position by Denso robot manipulator. Forward kinematics produce the desired position by the end-effector. Inverse kinematics produce joint angle, where the inverse kinematics produce eight conditions obtained from closed form solution with geometry approach to reach the desired position by the end-effector.

  1. Postpartum Prolapsed Leiomyoma with Uterine Inversion Managed by Vaginal Hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L. Pieh-Holder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Uterine inversion is a rare, but life threatening, obstetrical emergency which occurs when the uterine fundus collapses into the endometrial cavity. Various conservative and surgical therapies have been outlined in the literature for the management of uterine inversions. Case. We present a case of a chronic, recurrent uterine inversion, which was diagnosed following spontaneous vaginal delivery and recurred seven weeks later. The uterine inversion was likely due to a leiomyoma. This late-presenting, chronic, recurring uterine inversion was treated with a vaginal hysterectomy. Conclusion. Uterine inversions can occur in both acute and chronic phases. Persistent vaginal bleeding with the appearance of a prolapsing fibroid should prompt further investigation for uterine inversion and may require surgical therapy. A vaginal hysterectomy may be an appropriate management option in select populations and may be considered in women who do not desire to maintain reproductive function.

  2. A NEW INVERSION METHOD OF TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Time-Lapse Seismic improves oil recovery ratio by dynamic reservoir monitoring. Because of the large number of seismic explorations in the process of time-lapse seismic inversion, traditional methods need plenty of inversion calculations which cost high computational works. The method is therefore inefficient. In this paper, in order to reduce the repeating computations in traditional, a new time-lapse seismic inversion method is put forward. Firstly a homotopy-regularization method is proposed for the first time inversion. Secondly, with the first time inversion results as the initial value of following model, a model of the second time inversion is rebuilt by analyzing the characters of time-lapse seismic and localized inversion method is designed by using the model. Finally, through simulation, the comparison between traditional method and the new scheme is given. Our simulation results show that the new scheme could save the algorithm computations greatly.

  3. Linearized inversion of two components seismic data; Inversion linearisee de donnees sismiques a deux composantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, D.

    1997-05-22

    The aim of the dissertation is the linearized inversion of multicomponent seismic data for 3D elastic horizontally stratified media, using Born approximation. A Jacobian matrix is constructed; it will be used to model seismic data from elastic parameters. The inversion technique, relying on single value decomposition (SVD) of the Jacobian matrix, is described. Next, the resolution of inverted elastic parameters is quantitatively studies. A first use of the technique is shown in the frame of an evaluation of a sea bottom acquisition (synthetic data). Finally, a real data set acquired with conventional marine technique is inverted. (author) 70 refs.

  4. Inverse Eigenvalue Problem in Structural Dynamics Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiqing Xie; Hua Dai

    2006-01-01

    A kind of inverse eigenvalue problem in structural dynamics design is considered. The problem is formulated as an optimization problem. The properties of this problem are analyzed, and the existence of the optimum solution is proved. The directional derivative of the objective function is obtained and a necessary condition for a point to be a local minimum point is given. Then a numerical algorithm for solving the problem is presented and a plane-truss problem is discussed to show the applications of the theories and the algorithm.

  5. Inverse spin Hall effect by spin injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S. Y.; Horing, Norman J. M.; Lei, X. L.

    2007-09-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment [S. O. Valenzuela and M. Tinkham, Nature (London) 442, 176 (2006)], the authors present a quantitative microscopic theory to investigate the inverse spin-Hall effect with spin injection into aluminum considering both intrinsic and extrinsic spin-orbit couplings using the orthogonalized-plane-wave method. Their theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. It is also clear that the magnitude of the anomalous Hall resistivity is mainly due to contributions from extrinsic skew scattering.

  6. An inverse scattering formalism for STU supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STU supergravity becomes an integrable system for solutions that effectively only depend on two variables. This class of solutions includes the Kerr solution and its charged generalizations that have been studied in the literature. We here present an inverse scattering method that allows to systematically construct solutions of this integrable system. The method is similar to the one of Belinski and Zakharov for pure gravity but uses a different linear system due to Breitenlohner and Maison and here requires some technical modifications. We illustrate this method by constructing a four-charge rotating solution from flat space. A generalization to other set-ups is also discussed

  7. The inverse problem of the optimal regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, R.; Kinnen, E.

    1972-01-01

    The inverse problem of the optimal regulator is considered for a general class of multi-input systems with integral-type performance indices. A new phase variable canonical form is shown to be convenient for this analysis. The advantage of the canonical form is to separate the state variables into subvectors of directly controlled, indirectly controlled, and uncontrollable components. Necessary and sufficient conditions for optimized performance indices are given. With the nonlinearities of the system restricted to functions of the directly controlled state variables, additional results are developed about the nonnegative property of optimized loss functions.

  8. Fast Parallel Computation Of Manipulator Inverse Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1991-01-01

    Method for fast parallel computation of inverse dynamics problem, essential for real-time dynamic control and simulation of robot manipulators, undergoing development. Enables exploitation of high degree of parallelism and, achievement of significant computational efficiency, while minimizing various communication and synchronization overheads as well as complexity of required computer architecture. Universal real-time robotic controller and simulator (URRCS) consists of internal host processor and several SIMD processors with ring topology. Architecture modular and expandable: more SIMD processors added to match size of problem. Operate asynchronously and in MIMD fashion.

  9. ON THE GENERAL ALGEBRAIC INVERSE EIGENVALUE PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-hai Zhang

    2004-01-01

    A number of new results on sufficient conditions for the solvability and numerical algorithms of the following general algebraic inverse eigenvalue problem are obtained: Given n+1 real n×n matrices A = (aij), Ak = (a(k)ij))(k = 1, 2 , n) and n distinct real numbers λ1, λ2 , λn, find n real numbers c1, c2,..., cn such that the matrix A(c) = A + n∑k=1 ckAk has eigenvalues λ1, λ2,..., λn.

  10. Low-complexity systolic architecture for inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Danshou; Rong Mengtian

    2006-01-01

    A modified extended binary Euclid's algorithm which is more regularly iterative for computing an inversion in GF(2m) is presented. Based on above modified algorithm, a serial-in serial-out architecture is proposed. It has area complexity of O(m), latency of 5m-2, and throughput of 1/m. Compared with other serial systolic architectures, the proposed one has the smallest area complexity, shorter latency. It is highly regular, modular, and thus well suited for high-speed VLSI design.

  11. Tubular inverse opal scaffolds for biomimetic vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ze; Wang, Jie; Lu, Jie; Yu, Yunru; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Liu, Yuxiao; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-07-01

    There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially oriented elliptical pattern microstructures on their surfaces. It is demonstrated that these tailored tubular scaffolds can effectively make endothelial cells to form an integrated hollow tubular structure on their inner surface and induce smooth muscle cells to form a circumferential orientation on their outer surface. These features of our tubular scaffolds make them highly promising for the construction of biomimetic blood vessels.There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially

  12. Dyck tilings, linear extensions, descents, and inversions

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jang Soo; Panova, Greta; Wilson, David B

    2012-01-01

    Dyck tilings were introduced by Kenyon and Wilson in their study of double-dimer pairings. They are certain kinds of tilings of skew Young diagrams with ribbon tiles shaped like Dyck paths. We give two bijections between "cover-inclusive" Dyck tilings and linear extensions of tree posets. The first bijection maps the statistic (area + tiles)/2 to inversions of the linear extension, and the second bijection maps the "discrepancy" between the upper and lower boundary of the tiling to descents of the linear extension.

  13. Inverse Faraday Effect driven by Radiation Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Liseykina, T V; Macchi, A

    2015-01-01

    In the interaction of extremely intense ($>10^{23}~\\mbox{W cm}^{-2}$), circularly polarized laser pulses with thick targets, theory and simulations show that a major fraction of the laser energy is converted into incoherent radiation because of collective electron motion during the "hole boring" dynamics. The effective dissipation due to radiative losses allows the absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum, which in turn leads to the generation of an axial magnetic field of tens of gigagauss value. This peculiar "inverse Faraday effect" is demonstrated in three-dimensional simulations including radiation friction.

  14. Observation of the inverse Doppler effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, N; Bearpark, T

    2003-11-28

    We report experimental observation of an inverse Doppler shift, in which the frequency of a wave is increased on reflection from a receding boundary. This counterintuitive effect has been produced by reflecting a wave from a moving discontinuity in an electrical transmission line. Doppler shifts produced by this system can be varied in a reproducible manner by electronic control of the transmission line and are typically five orders of magnitude greater than those produced by solid objects with kinematic velocities. Potential applications include the development of tunable and multifrequency radiation sources.

  15. Inverse amplitude method and Adler zeros

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inverse amplitude method is a powerful unitarization technique to enlarge the energy applicability region of effective Lagrangians. It has been widely used to describe resonances in hadronic physics, combined with chiral perturbation theory, as well as in the strongly interacting symmetry breaking sector. In this work we show how it can be slightly modified to also account for the subthreshold region, incorporating correctly the Adler zeros required by chiral symmetry and eliminating spurious poles. These improvements produce negligible effects on the physical region.

  16. Quantum Inverse Scattering Method with anyonic grading

    CERN Document Server

    Batchelor, M T; Guan, X-W; Links, J; Zhou, H-Q

    2008-01-01

    We formulate the Quantum Inverse Scattering Method for the case of anyonic grading. This provides a general framework for constructing integrable models describing interacting hard-core anyons. Through this method we reconstruct the known integrable model of hard core anyons associated with the XXX model, and as a new application we construct the anyonic $t-J$ model. The energy spectrum for each model is derived by means of a generalisation of the algebraic Bethe ansatz. The grading parameters implementing the anyonic signature give rise to sector-dependent phase factors in the Bethe ansatz equations.

  17. The Inverse Problem for the Dipole Field

    CERN Document Server

    Epp, V

    2015-01-01

    The Inverse problem for an electromagnetic field produced by a dipole is solved. It is assumed that the field of an arbitrary changing dipole is known. Obtained formulae allow calculation of the position and dynamics of the dipole which produces the measured field. The derived results can be used in investigations on radiative process in solids caused by changing of the charge distribution. For example, generation of the electromagnetic field caused by oscillations of atoms or electron gas at the trace of a particle channeling in a crystal, or fields arising at solids cracking or dislocation formation -- in any case when one is interested in the details of the dipole field source.

  18. Inverse of the String Theory KLT Kernel

    CERN Document Server

    Mizera, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The field theory Kawai-Lewellen-Tye (KLT) kernel, which relates scattering amplitudes of gravitons and gluons, turns out to be the inverse of a matrix whose components are bi-adjoint scalar partial amplitudes. In this note we propose an analogous construction for the string theory KLT kernel. We present simple diagrammatic rules for the computation of the $\\alpha'$-corrected bi-adjoint scalar amplitudes that are exact in $\\alpha'$. We find compact expressions in terms of graphs, where the standard Feynman propagators $1/p^2$ are replaced by either $1/\\sin (\\pi \\alpha' p^2)$ or $1/\\tan (\\pi \\alpha' p^2)$, which is determined by a recursive procedure.

  19. Backward air lasing actions induced by femtosecond laser filamentation: influence of population inversion lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Hongqiang; chu, Wei; Zeng, Bin; Yao, Jinping; Jing, Chenrui; Li, Ziting; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally investigate generation of backward 357 nm N2 laser in a gas mixture of N2/Ar using 800-nm femtosecond laser pulses, and examine the involved gain dynamics based on pump-probe measurements. Our findings show that a minimum lifetime of population inversion in the excited N2 molecules is required for generating intense backward nitrogen lasers, which is ~0.8 ns under our experimental conditions. The results shed new light on the mechanism for generating intense backward lasers from ambient air, which are highly in demand for high sensitivity remote atmospheric sensing application.

  20. Radar Remote Sensing of the Lower Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimian, Ali

    Non-standard radio wave propagation in the atmosphere is caused by anomalous changes of the atmospheric refractivity index. These changes, if not accounted for, can cause major problems in detection of the location of flying targets. Direct sensing of the atmospheric refractivity index by measuring humidity and temperature has been common practice in past. Refractivity from clutter (RFC) was developed in recent years to complement traditional ways of measuring the refractivity profile in maritime environments. The ability to track the refractivity profile in time and space, together with a lower cost and convenience of operations have been the promising factors that brought RFC under consideration. Presented is an overview of the basic concepts, research and achievements in the field of RFC. A multiple angle clutter model is derived that is constructed by angular spectral estimation on the propagating power. This model is shown to perform better than conventional clutter models in remote sensing applications. Examples are either based on synthetically generated radar clutter or a set of S-band radar measurements from Wallops Island, 1998. Finally, an approach for fusing RFC output with evaporation duct characterization based on ensemble forecasts from a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model is examined. Relative humidity at a reference height and air-sea temperature difference (ASTD) are identified as state variables. Probability densities of atmospheric parameters and propagation factor obtained from an NWP ensemble, RFC, and joint inversions are compared. It is demonstrated that characterization of the near surface atmosphere by combining RFC and NWP reduces the estimation uncertainty of the refractivity index structure in an evaporation duct using either method alone.