WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric gravity waves

  1. Convective Generation of Gravity Waves in Venus's Atmosphere: Gravity Wave Spectrum and Momentum Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Leroy, Stephen S.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1995-01-01

    The emission of internal gravity waves from a layer of dry convection embedded within a stable atmosphere with static stability and zonal winds varying in height is calculated. This theory is applied to Venus to investigate whether these waves can help support the westward maximum of angular momentum of Venus's middle atmosphere. The emission mechanism is similar to that suggested for driving the gravity modes of the Sun and relates the amplitude and spectrum of the waves to the amplitude and...

  2. Linking Atmospheric Gravity Wave Research to the Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, J.; Nielsen, K.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves are often generated in the lower atmosphere and can, under favorable atmospheric conditions, propagate into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. As a consequence of this vertical propagation, the waves carry momentum fluxes and energy from the lower atmosphere into the near-space environment, providing a strong coupling across atmospheric layers. While these waves have been observed and studied in details for decades, there are still many questions to be addressed regarding the tropospheric source location and nature of individually observed waves in the mesosphere. In an effort to increase undergraduate student research experiences, we are linking atmospheric gravity wave research and undergraduate curriculum to improve both academic and scholarly experiences by our students. In this particular case, we present a research project addressing the identification of tropospheric source locations of mesospheric waves observed by airglow imagers. The project involves observations, theory, and modeling techniques with a strong emphasis on how each part plays a role in the curriculum. Specifically, a simple ray tracing model is propagating observed waves downwards through the atmosphere until the point of origin is reached. In the process, we apply basic calculus, numerical methods, and simple fluid dynamics related to course taught at the undergraduate level.

  3. Upper atmospheric gravity wave details revealed in nightglow satellite imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven D; Straka, William C; Yue, Jia; Smith, Steven M; Alexander, M Joan; Hoffmann, Lars; Setvák, Martin; Partain, Philip T

    2015-12-01

    Gravity waves (disturbances to the density structure of the atmosphere whose restoring forces are gravity and buoyancy) comprise the principal form of energy exchange between the lower and upper atmosphere. Wave breaking drives the mean upper atmospheric circulation, determining boundary conditions to stratospheric processes, which in turn influence tropospheric weather and climate patterns on various spatial and temporal scales. Despite their recognized importance, very little is known about upper-level gravity wave characteristics. The knowledge gap is mainly due to lack of global, high-resolution observations from currently available satellite observing systems. Consequently, representations of wave-related processes in global models are crude, highly parameterized, and poorly constrained, limiting the description of various processes influenced by them. Here we highlight, through a series of examples, the unanticipated ability of the Day/Night Band (DNB) on the NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership environmental satellite to resolve gravity structures near the mesopause via nightglow emissions at unprecedented subkilometric detail. On moonless nights, the Day/Night Band observations provide all-weather viewing of waves as they modulate the nightglow layer located near the mesopause (∼ 90 km above mean sea level). These waves are launched by a variety of physical mechanisms, ranging from orography to convection, intensifying fronts, and even seismic and volcanic events. Cross-referencing the Day/Night Band imagery with conventional thermal infrared imagery also available helps to discern nightglow structures and in some cases to attribute their sources. The capability stands to advance our basic understanding of a critical yet poorly constrained driver of the atmospheric circulation. PMID:26630004

  4. Middle Atmosphere Dynamics with Gravity Wave Interactions in the Numerical Spectral Model: Tides and Planetary Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Huang, F. T.

    2010-01-01

    As Lindzen (1981) had shown, small-scale gravity waves (GW) produce the observed reversals of the zonal-mean circulation and temperature variations in the upper mesosphere. The waves also play a major role in modulating and amplifying the diurnal tides (DT) (e.g., Waltersheid, 1981; Fritts and Vincent, 1987; Fritts, 1995a). We summarize here the modeling studies with the mechanistic numerical spectral model (NSM) with Doppler spread parameterization for GW (Hines, 1997a, b), which describes in the middle atmosphere: (a) migrating and non-migrating DT, (b) planetary waves (PW), and (c) global-scale inertio gravity waves. Numerical experiments are discussed that illuminate the influence of GW filtering and nonlinear interactions between DT, PW, and zonal mean variations. Keywords: Theoretical modeling, Middle atmosphere dynamics, Gravity wave interactions, Migrating and non-migrating tides, Planetary waves, Global-scale inertio gravity waves.

  5. Atmospheric gravity waves in the Red Sea: a new hotspot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Magalhaes

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The region of the Middle East around the Red Sea (between 32° E and 44° E longitude and 12° N and 28° N latitude is a currently undocumented hotspot for atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs. Satellite imagery shows evidence that this region is prone to relatively high occurrence of AGWs compared to other areas in the world, and reveals the spatial characteristics of these waves. The favorable conditions for wave propagation in this region are illustrated with three typical cases of AGWs propagating in the lower troposphere over the sea. Using weakly nonlinear long wave theory and the observed characteristic wavelengths we obtain phase speeds which are consistent with those observed and typical for AGWs, with the Korteweg-de Vries theory performing slightly better than Benjamin-Davis-Acrivos-Ono theory as far as phase speeds are concerned. ERS-SAR and Envisat-ASAR satellite data analysis between 1993 and 2008 reveals signatures consistent with horizontally propagating large-scale internal waves. These signatures cover the entire Red Sea and are more frequently observed between April and September, although they also occur during the rest of the year. The region's (seasonal propagation conditions for AGWs, based upon average vertical atmospheric stratification profiles suggest that many of the signatures identified in the satellite images are atmospheric internal waves.

  6. Atmospheric gravity waves in the Red Sea: a new hotspot

    KAUST Repository

    Magalhaes, J. M.

    2011-02-03

    The region of the Middle East around the Red Sea (between 32° E and 44° E longitude and 12° N and 28° N latitude) is a currently undocumented hotspot for atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs). Satellite imagery shows evidence that this region is prone to relatively high occurrence of AGWs compared to other areas in the world, and reveals the spatial characteristics of these waves. The favorable conditions for wave propagation in this region are illustrated with three typical cases of AGWs propagating in the lower troposphere over the sea. Using weakly nonlinear long wave theory and the observed characteristic wavelengths we obtain phase speeds which are consistent with those observed and typical for AGWs, with the Korteweg-de Vries theory performing slightly better than Benjamin-Davis-Acrivos-Ono theory as far as phase speeds are concerned. ERS-SAR and Envisat-ASAR satellite data analysis between 1993 and 2008 reveals signatures consistent with horizontally propagating large-scale internal waves. These signatures cover the entire Red Sea and are more frequently observed between April and September, although they also occur during the rest of the year. The region\\'s (seasonal) propagation conditions for AGWs, based upon average vertical atmospheric stratification profiles suggest that many of the signatures identified in the satellite images are atmospheric internal waves. © Author(s) 2011.

  7. Grazing Occultation reveals Gravity Wave Breaking in Pluto's High Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Susan D.; McCarthy, D. W.; Kulesa, C. A.; Hubbard, W. B.; Person, M. J.; Elliot, J. L.; Gulbis, A. A.

    2007-10-01

    Occultation observations of the star P445.3 (2UCAC 25823784; McDonald & Elliot 2000, AJ 120, 1599) by (134340) Pluto on 2007 March 18.453 UT were simultaneously collected in visible and H-band wavelengths from the 6.5-m MMT (Mt. Hopkins) in Arizona. The event was grazing and slow (6.77 km/s), lasting 4 minutes. These conditions facilitated the detection of large-scale, nearly limb-aligned features in Pluto's atmosphere over a pressure range of 0.1-0.7 μbar (0.01-0.07 Pa; radius range of 1500-1350 km). The data are high signal-to-noise and show these features to be fully resolved and achromatic. The scintillation increases with depth in Pluto's atmosphere and indicates a high-frequency cutoff operating on a broad-band spectrum of gravity waves generated deeper in Pluto's atmosphere. The data are in excellent agreement with atmospheric gravity wave theory (Fritts 1984, RGSP 22, 275). Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of The University of Arizona and the Smithsonian Institution. The integration and alignment of both cameras was funded by the Astronomy Camp science education program. We also acknowledge support from NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program via grants NNG04GE48G and NNG04GF25G.

  8. High resolution IR spectrometry and detection of atmospheric gravity waves in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcheva, K. I.; Barrow, D. J.; Drossart, P.

    2009-12-01

    The Galileo and the Cassini observations at Jupiter returned a large volume of information about the planet's atmosphere. Some of the results posed new questions that need to be addressed. The energy balance of the jovian thermosphere still presents a problem in our understanding of the nature of the energy source that provides for the observed high thermospheric temperatures. The Galileo probe temperature profile showed an imbedded wavelike structure in the thermosphere. The same pressure region has been also sampled through radio occultations. The derived electron density profiles show a system of several narrow peaks in the lower ionosphere. They too have been successfully modeled as signatures of high altitude atmospheric gravity waves. Atmospheric gravity waves are potentially an important mechanism of energy and momentum transport in Jupiter's upper atmosphere. At the moment we have no direct information about the level of wave activity (rate of wave occurrence , amplitudes, horizontal wavelengths, wave periods, global distribution on the planet, direction of propagation, possible sources of waves) in order to be able to assess the role of atmospheric waves in the dynamics of Jupiter's upper atmosphere. We present a study of the effects of atmospheric gravity waves on the H3+ emission of Jupiter and assess the fisability of wave detection through high resolution infrared spectrometry. This study is in support of the science definition of the planed joint NASA/ESA Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM). We have developed a 2-D, time dependent fully nonlinear model of the chemical and the dynamic response of the ionospheric plasma to the propagation of atmospheric gravity waves. The model is coupled with a H3+ radiative transfer model to estimate the magnitude of the expected observable signature in the H3+ IR emission. The detection and the characterization of the gravity wave modes present in the Jovian atmosphere will allow us to estimate the amount of energy

  9. The Role of Gravity Waves in Modulating Atmospheric Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss results for the diurnal and semidiurnal tides obtained from our 3-D, time dependent numerical spectral model (NMS), extending from the ground up into the thermosphere, which incorporates Hines' Doppler spread parameterization of small scale gravity waves (GW). In the DSP, GW momentum (and energy) are conserved as the waves modulate the background flow and are filtered by the flow.As a consequence, the GW interaction tightly couples the dynamic components of the middle atmosphere with strong non-linear interactions between mean zonal circulation, tides and planetary waves to produce complicated patterns of variability much like those observed. The major conclusions are: (1) Since GW momentum is deposited in the altitude regime of increasing winds, the amplitude of the diurnal tide is amplified and its vertical wavelength is reduced at altitudes between 80 and 120 km. Wave filtering by the mean zonal circulation (with peak velocities during solstice) causes the GW flux to peak during equinox, and this produces a large semi-annual variation in the tide that has been observed on UARS. (2) Without the diurnal tide, the semidiurnal tide would also be modulated in this way. But the diurnal tide filters out the GW preferentially during equinox, so that the semidiurnal tide, at higher altitudes, tends to peak during solstice. (3) Under the influence of GW, the tides are modulated also significantly by planetary waves, with periods between 2 and 30 days, which are generated preferentially during solstice in part due to baroclinic instability.

  10. Dynamics and Predictability of Deep Propagating Atmospheric Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, J.; Fritts, D. C.; Smith, R.; Eckermann, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    An overview will be provided of the first field campaign that attempts to follow deeply propagating gravity waves (GWs) from their tropospheric sources to their mesospheric breakdown. The DEEP propagating gravity WAVE experiment over New Zealand (DEEPWAVE-NZ) is a comprehensive, airborne and ground-based measurement and modeling program focused on providing a new understanding of GW dynamics and impacts from the troposphere through the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). This program will employ the new NSF/NCAR GV (NGV) research aircraft from a base in New Zealand in a 6-week field measurement campaign in June-July 2014. The NGV will be equipped with new lidar and airglow instruments for the DEEPWAVE measurement program, providing temperatures and vertical winds spanning altitudes from immediately above the NGV flight altitude (~13 km) to ~100 km. The region near New Zealand is chosen since all the relevant GW sources occur strongly here, and upper-level winds in austral winter permit GWs to propagate to very high altitudes. Given large-amplitude GWs that propagate routinely into the MLT, the New Zealand region offers an ideal natural laboratory for studying these important GW dynamics and effects impacting weather and climate over a much deeper atmospheric layer than previous campaigns have attempted (0-100 km altitude). The logistics of making measurements in the vicinity of New Zealand are potentially easier than from the Andes and Drake Passage region. A suite of GW-focused modeling and predictability tools will be used to guide NGV flight planning to GW events of greatest scientific significance. These models will also drive scientific interpretation of the GW measurements, together providing answers to the key science questions posed by DEEPWAVE about GW dynamics, morphology, predictability and impacts from 0-100 km. Preliminary results will be presented from high-resolution and adjoint models applied over areas featuring deep wave propagation. The high

  11. Investigating gravity waves evidences in the Venus upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Alessandra; Altieri, Francesca; Shakun, Alexey; Zasova, Ludmila; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Bellucci, Giancarlo; Grassi, Davide

    2014-05-01

    We present a method to investigate gravity waves properties in the upper mesosphere of Venus, through the O2 nightglow observations acquired with the imaging spectrometer VIRTIS on board Venus Express. Gravity waves are important dynamical features that transport energy and momentum. They are related to the buoyancy force, which lifts air particles. Then, the vertical displacement of air particles produces density changes that cause gravity to act as restoring force. Gravity waves can manifest through fluctuations on temperature and density fields, and hence on airglow intensities. We use the O2 nightglow profiles showing double peaked structures to study the influence of gravity waves in shaping the O2 vertical profiles and infer the waves properties. In analogy to the Earth's and Mars cases, we use a well-known theory to model the O2 nightglow emissions affected by gravity waves propagation. Here we propose a statistical discussion of the gravity waves characteristics, namely vertical wavelength and wave amplitude, with respect to local time and latitude. The method is applied to about 30 profiles showing double peaked structures, and acquired with the VIRTIS/Venus Express spectrometer, during the mission period from 2006-07-05 to 2008-08-15.

  12. On the role of dust storms in triggering atmospheric gravity waves observed in the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Das

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Lower atmospheric perturbations often produce measurable effects in the middle and upper atmosphere. The present study demonstrates the response of the middle atmospheric thermal structure to the significant enhancement of the lower atmospheric heating effect caused by dust storms observed over the Thar Desert, India. Our study from multi-satellite observations of two dust storm events that occurred on 3 and 8 May 2007 suggests that dust storm events produce substantial changes in the lower atmospheric temperatures as hot spots which can become sources for gravity waves observed in the middle atmosphere.

  13. Propagation of linear gravity waves in a relativistic atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The propagation of gravity waves in the presence of massive stella winds is studied under the assumption of small departures from the equilibrium configuration. These waves exhibit singular properties at critical levels which act like valves so that waves may travel through these levels attenuated or amplified. The primary conclusion is that relativity increases the possibility of valve effect. (author). 4 refs

  14. Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar and GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    The wind velocity and temperature profiles observed in the middle atmosphere (altitude: 10–100 km) show perturbations resulting from superposition of various atmospheric waves, including atmospheric gravity waves. Atmospheric gravity waves are known to play an important role in determining the general circulation in the middle atmosphere by dynamical stresses caused by gravity wave breaking. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the middle...

  15. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. I. ACOUSTIC AND INERTIA-GRAVITY WAVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the first of a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases when the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this first part, only waves that are direct solutions of the generic dispersion relation are studied—acoustic and inertia-gravity waves. Concerning inertia-gravity waves, we found that in the cases of short horizontal wavelengths, null background wind, or propagation in the equatorial region, only pure gravity waves are possible, while for the limit of large horizontal wavelengths and/or null static stability, the waves are inertial. The correspondence between classical atmospheric approximations and wave filtering has been examined too, and we carried out a classification of the mesoscale waves found in the clouds of Venus at different vertical levels of its atmosphere. Finally, the classification of waves in exoplanets is discussed and we provide a list of possible candidates with cyclostrophic regimes

  16. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. I. ACOUSTIC AND INERTIA-GRAVITY WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía, 18008 Granada (Spain); Imamura, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Read, P. L. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Luz, D. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa (CAAUL), Observatório Astronómico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisboa (Portugal); Piccialli, A., E-mail: peralta@iaa.es [LATMOS, UVSQ, 11 bd dAlembert, 78280 Guyancourt (France)

    2014-07-01

    This paper is the first of a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases when the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this first part, only waves that are direct solutions of the generic dispersion relation are studied—acoustic and inertia-gravity waves. Concerning inertia-gravity waves, we found that in the cases of short horizontal wavelengths, null background wind, or propagation in the equatorial region, only pure gravity waves are possible, while for the limit of large horizontal wavelengths and/or null static stability, the waves are inertial. The correspondence between classical atmospheric approximations and wave filtering has been examined too, and we carried out a classification of the mesoscale waves found in the clouds of Venus at different vertical levels of its atmosphere. Finally, the classification of waves in exoplanets is discussed and we provide a list of possible candidates with cyclostrophic regimes.

  17. Atmospheric gravity waves due to the Tohoku-Oki tsunami observed in the thermosphere by GOCE

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, R.F.; Doornbos, E.N.; Bruinsma, S.; Hebert, H.

    2014-01-01

    Oceanic tsunami waves couple with atmospheric gravity waves, as previously observedthrough ionospheric and airglow perturbations. Aerodynamic velocities and density variations are computed from Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometer and thruster data during Tohoku-Oki tsunami propagation. High-frequency perturbations of these parameters are observed during three expected crossings of the tsunami-generated gravity waves by the GOCE satellite. From theore...

  18. Short period gravity waves in the Arctic atmosphere over Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Negale, Michael; Nielsen, Kim; Taylor, Mike; Irving, Britta; Collins, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The propagation nature and sources of short-period gravity waves have been studied extensively at low and mid-latitudes, while their extent and nature at the polar regions are less known. During the last decade, observations from select sites on the Antarctic continent have revealed a significant presence of these waves over the southern Polar Region as well as shown unexpected dynamical behavior. In contrast, observations over the Arctic region are few and the dynamical behavior is unknown. ...

  19. A numerical simulation of nonlinear propagation of gravity wave packet in three-dimension compressible atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Shaoping(吴少平); YI; Fan(易帆)

    2002-01-01

    By using FICE scheme, a numerical simulation of nonlinear propagation of gravity wave packet in three-dimension compressible atmosphere is presented. The whole nonlinear propagation process of the gravity wave packet is shown; the basic characteristics of nonlinear propagation and the influence of the ambient winds on the propagation are analyzed. The results show that FICE scheme can be extended in three-dimension by which the calculation is steady and kept for a long time; the increase of wave amplitude is faster than the exponential increase according to the linear gravity theory; nonlinear propagation makes the horizontal perturbation velocity increase greatly which can lead to enhancement of the local ambient winds; the propagation path and the propagation velocity of energy are different from the results expected by the linear gravity waves theory, the nonlinearity causes the change in propagation characteristics of gravity wave; the ambient winds alter the propagation path and group velocity of gravity wave.

  20. On the nonlinear shaping mechanism for gravity wave spectrum in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Chunchuzov

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear mechanism of shaping of a high vertical wave number spectral tail in the field of a few discrete internal gravity waves in the atmosphere is studied in this paper. The effects of advection of fluid parcels by interacting gravity waves are taken strictly into account by calculating wave field in Lagrangian variables, and performing a variable transformation from Lagrangian to Eulerian frame. The vertical profiles and vertical wave number spectra of the Eulerian displacement field are obtained for both the case of resonant and non-resonant wave-wave interactions. The evolution of these spectra with growing parameter of nonlinearity of the internal wave field is studied and compared to that of a broad band spectrum of gravity waves with randomly independent amplitudes and phases. The calculated vertical wave number spectra of the vertical displacements or relative temperature fluctuations are found to be consistent with the observed spectra in the middle atmosphere.

  1. Detection of traveling ionospheric disturbances induced by atmospheric gravity waves using the global positioning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiri, Sassan; Hajj, George A.

    Natural and man-made events like earthquakes and nuclear explosions launch atmospheric gravity waves (AGW) into the atmosphere. Since the particle density decreases exponentially with height, the gravity waves increase exponentially in amplitude as they propagate toward the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. As atmospheric gravity waves approach the ionospheric heights, the neutral particles carried by gravity waves collide with electrons and ions, setting these particles in motion. This motion of charged particles manifests itself by wave-like fluctuations and disturbances that are known as traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID). The perturbation in the total electron content due to TID's is derived analytically from first principles. Using the tilted dipole magnetic field approximation and a Chapman layer distribution for the electron density, the variations of the total electron content versus the line-of-sight direction are numerically analyzed. The temporal variation associated with the total electron content measurements due to AGW's can be used as a means of detecting characteristics of the gravity waves. As an example, detection of tsunami generated earthquakes from their associated atmospheric gravity waves using the Global Positioning System is simulated.

  2. Gravity Waves in Polar Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere Revealed in a Whole-atmospheric Global Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, I. S.; Jee, G.; Kim, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale gravity waves are simulated by carrying out the specified chemistry whole atmosphere community climate model (SC-WACCM) at the horizontal resolution of about 25 km to understand the origin of gravity waves in the polar mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) and their propagation properties throughout the whole atmosphere. Modeled gravity waves are also compared with gravity-wave activities estimated from meteor radar observations made in Antarctica by Korea Polar Research Institute. For this comparison, SC-WACCM is initialized at a specific date and time using atmospheric state variables from the ground to the thermosphere obtained from various data sets such as operational analyses and empirical wind and temperature model results. Model initial conditions are corrected for mass and dynamical balance to reduce spurious waves due to initial shocks. At conference, preliminary results of the mesoscale SC-WACCM simulation and its comparison with observations will be presented.

  3. Vertical resolution dependence of gravity wave momentum flux simulated by an atmospheric general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Watanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the gravity wave spectra of energy and momentum flux on the horizontal resolution and time step of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs has been thoroughly investigated in the past. In contrast, much less attention has been given to the dependence of these gravity wave parameters on models' vertical resolutions. The present study demonstrates the dependence of gravity wave momentum flux in the stratosphere and mesosphere on the model's vertical resolution, which is evaluated using an AGCM with a horizontal resolution of about 0.56°. We performed a series of sensitivity test simulations changing only the model's vertical resolution above a height of 8 km, and found that inertial gravity waves with short vertical wavelengths simulated at higher vertical resolutions likely play an important role in determining the gravity wave momentum flux in the stratosphere and mesosphere.

  4. Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar and GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    The wind velocity and temperature profiles observed in the middle atmosphere (altitude: 10-100 km) show perturbations resulting from superposition of various atmospheric waves, including atmospheric gravity waves. Atmospheric gravity waves are known to play an important role in determining the general circulation in the middle atmosphere by dynamical stresses caused by gravity wave breaking. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan, as well as novel satellite data obtained from global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) measurements. In particular, we focus on the behavior of gravity waves in the mesosphere (50-90 km), where considerable gravity wave attenuation occurs. We also report on the global distribution of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere (10-50 km), highlighting various excitation mechanisms such as orographic effects, convection in the tropics, meteorological disturbances, the subtropical jet and the polar night jet. PMID:24492645

  5. Gravity wave propagation in the realistic atmosphere based on a three-dimensional transfer function model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sun

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the filter effect of the background winds on the propagation of gravity waves, a three-dimensional transfer function model is developed on the basis of the complex dispersion relation of internal gravity waves in a stratified dissipative atmosphere with background winds. Our model has successfully represented the main results of the ray tracing method, e.g. the trend of the gravity waves to travel in the anti-windward direction. Furthermore, some interesting characteristics are manifest as follows: (1 The method provides the distribution characteristic of whole wave fields which propagate in the way of the distorted concentric circles at the same altitude under the control of the winds. (2 Through analyzing the frequency and wave number response curve of the transfer function, we find that the gravity waves in a wave band of about 15–30 min periods and of about 200–400 km horizontal wave lengths are most likely to propagate to the 300-km ionospheric height. Furthermore, there is an obvious frequency deviation for gravity waves propagating with winds in the frequency domain. The maximum power of the transfer function with background winds is smaller than that without background winds. (3 The atmospheric winds may act as a directional filter that will permit gravity wave packets propagating against the winds to reach the ionospheric height with minimum energy loss.

  6. A review of atmospheric gravity waves and travelling ionospheric disturbances: 1982-1995

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hocke

    Full Text Available Recent investigations of atmospheric gravity waves (AGW and travelling ionospheric disturbances (TID in the Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere are reviewed. In the past decade, the generation of gravity waves at high latitudes and their subsequent propagation to low latitudes have been studied by several global model simulations and coordinated observation campaigns such as the Worldwide Atmospheric Gravity-wave Study (WAGS, the results are presented in the first part of the review. The second part describes the progress towards understanding the AGW/TID characteristics. It points to the AGW/TID relationship which has been recently revealed with the aid of model-data comparisons and by the application of new inversion techniques. We describe the morphology and climatology of gravity waves and their ionospheric manifestations, TIDs, from numerous new observations.

  7. Convective cells of internal gravity waves in the earth's atmosphere with finite temperature gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Onishchenko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated vortex structures (e.g. convective cells of internal gravity waves (IGWs in the earth's atmosphere with a finite vertical temperature gradient. A closed system of nonlinear equations for these waves and the condition for existence of solitary convective cells are obtained. In the atmosphere layers where the temperature decreases with height, the presence of IGW convective cells is shown. The typical parameters of such structures in the earth's atmosphere are discussed.

  8. Optimizing an Infrared Camera for Observing Atmospheric Gravity Waves from a CubeSat Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Rønning, Snorre Stavik

    2012-01-01

    The NTNU Test Satellite (NUTS) is a double CubeSat deigned by master students at NTNU. The goal of the project is to image atmospheric gravity waves in the OH airglow layer. This thesis explores the theory behind gravity waves and discuss the design of an infrared camera as a payload onboard. Different requirement based on scientific and mechanical limitations are presented. Based on this a suitable infrared camera is presented.

  9. Theoretical and observational aspects of convection generated internal atmospheric gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokuluwa, Ramkumar

    2012-07-01

    Even though atmospheric gravity waves generated from convection contributes significantly to the middle atmospheric circulation and momentum balances, yet they have to be fully parameterized in general circulation models. The major constraint comes because of inadequacies in the exact measurement of four dimensional (including time) latent heating of the atmosphere occurring through condensation of water vapor. Satellite like TRMM measures the latent heating of the atmosphere but it is sparse in nature (both spatial and time) because of the continual shift in the azimuths of orbital plane of the satellite about the earth. Doppler weather radar is a good alternative in this sense but the poor signal to noise ratio of echoes with distance from the center of the radar and other simpler assumptions employed in deriving the latent heating, through using empirical relationship between the radar echoes and rain drop size distribution, rain rate and other precipitation characteristics, makes the estimation of latent heating of the atmospheric highly ambiguous. In such cases, it is essential to make comparative studies between theoretically estimated and observationally made convection generated gravity waves in the process of parameterizing the gravity waves. Here we report the theoretically estimated spectral characteristics of convection generated gravity waves and their comparison with observations made using Doppler weather radar (DWR) and MST radar (VHF, 53 MHz), which are located in the eastern coast of Southern India adjacent to the Bay of Bengal where tropical cyclones are forming. The determined latent heating of the atmosphere, using the DWR measurements, will be compared to that determined by the TRMM and other satellites. This determined heating will be utilized as inputs for the thermodynamics equations of high frequency gravity waves, the propagating nature of which can be determined using the MST radar at NARL, Gadanki. As this radar can give wind

  10. Atmospheric gravity waves observed by an international network of micro-barographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) manages an international network of forty-two operational infra-sound stations recording the pressure fluctuations produced at the ground surface by infrasonic waves. This thesis demonstrates that most of these stations also accurately detect the pressure fluctuations in the entire gravity wave band. This work includes carrying out and analyzing several metrological laboratory experiments and a field campaign (M2008) in Mongolia in 2008. The layout of the experiments as well as the interpretation of their results gave rise to the development of a new linear spectral numerical model able to simulate the generation and propagation of gravity waves. This model was used to quantify the gravity waves produced by the atmospheric cooling that occurs during solar eclipses. The pressure fluctuations expected at ground level were estimated and compared to the data recorded during the 1 August 2008 solar eclipse by the CTBTO and M2008 stations. A detailed data analysis reveals two waves with similar time-frequency characteristics to those simulated for a stratospheric and tropospheric cooling. This constitutes, to our knowledge, a unique result. The validation of worldwide and pluri-annual pressure measurements in the entire gravity wave band allowed the statistical study of gravity wave spectra and atmospheric tides. The work presented throughout this thesis has led to the publication of two articles. A third one is in the drafting process. (author)

  11. Modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation through the atmosphere with spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2014-12-01

    Low-frequency events such as tsunamis generate acoustic and gravity waves which quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Since the atmospheric density decreases exponentially as the altitude increases and from the conservation of the kinetic energy, those waves see their amplitude raise (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), allowing their detection in the upper atmosphere. Various tools have been developed through years to model this propagation, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but none offer a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling.A modeling tool is worthy interest since there are many different phenomena, from quakes to atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool.Starting from the SPECFEM program that already propagate waves in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, this work offers a tool with the ability to model acoustic and gravity waves propagation in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source.Atmospheric attenuation is required in a proper modeling framework since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented due to its ability to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's surface (that vibrates when a surface wave go through it) but also huge atmospheric events.

  12. A regional study of atmospheric gravity waves using the USArray Transportable Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlin, M. A. H.; Stephan, C. C.; de Groot-Hedlin, C. D.; Alexander, M. J.; Hoffmann, L.

    2015-12-01

    The USArray Transportable Array (TA) is a network of approximately 400 seismo-acoustic stations deployed on a 70 km Cartesian grid covering an area of 2,000,000 km2 in the continental United States. The network moves eastward through station redeployments and is now located on the Atlantic coast. This dense network has provided unprecedented opportunities for research in seismology, infrasound and atmospheric science. We have developed a novel technique to investigate gravity wave occurrence and propagation across the network and have applied it to atmospheric pressure data recorded from Jan 1, 2010 through 2014. We divided the stations in this time range into 3,600 non-overlapping triangular arrays (triads). Each triad is most sensitive to propagating gravity waves in the 1-6 hour period range. We report two lines of research with this new dataset. First, we study individual large events in which atmospheric gravity waves are observed to cross the TA. We also study the long-term occurrence statistics of gravity waves and compare them to satellite observations of convective clouds and gravity waves in the stratosphere. We discuss plans for future work when the network is redeployed in Alaska.

  13. Seasonal variation of gravity waves in the Equatorial Middle Atmosphere: results from ISRO's Middle Atmospheric Dynamics (MIDAS) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, G.; Antonita, T. M.; Bhavani Kumar, Y.; Venkata Kumar, H.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2006-10-01

    Altitude profiles of temperature in the stratospheric and mesopheric region from lidar observations at NARL, Gadanki, India, during December 2002-April 2005, as part of ISRO's Middle Atmospheric Dynamics - "MIDAS (2002-2005)" program are used to study the characteristics of gravity waves and their seasonal variation. Month-to-month variation of the gravity wave activity observed during the period of December 2002-April 2005 show maximum wave activity, with primary peaks in May 2003, August 2004 and March 2005 and secondary peaks in February 2003 and November 2004. This month-to-month variation in gravity wave activity is linked to the variation in the strength of the sources, viz. convection and wind shear, down below at the tropospheric region, estimated from MST radar measurements at the same location. Horizontal wind shear is found to be mostly correlated with wave activity than convection, and sometimes both sources are found to contribute towards the wave activity.

  14. Numerical modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation in the atmosphere using a spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roland; Brissaud, Quentin; Garcia, Raphael; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    During low-frequency events such as tsunamis, acoustic and gravity waves are generated and quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Due to the exponential decrease of the atmospheric density with the altitude, the conservation of the kinetic energy imposes that the amplitude of those waves increases (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), which allows their detection in the upper atmosphere. This propagation bas been modelled for years with different tools, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling is still crucially needed. A modeling tool is worth of interest since there are many different sources, as earthquakes or atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool. By adding some developments to the SPECFEM package that already models wave propagation in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, we show here that acoustic and gravity waves propagation can now be modelled in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's vibrating surfaces but also huge atmospheric events. Atmospheric attenuation is also introduced since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals.

  15. Interseasonal Variations in the Middle Atmosphere Forced by Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Drob, D. P.; Porter, H. S.; Chan, K. L.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM), which incorporates Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization, gravity waves (GW) propagating in the east/west direction can generate the essential features of the observed equatorial oscillations in the zonal circulation and in particular the QBO (quasi-biennial oscillation) extending from the stratosphere into the upper mesosphere. We report here that the NSM also produces inter-seasonal variations in the zonally symmetric (m = 0) meridional circulation. A distinct but variable meridional wind oscillation (MWO) is generated, which appears to be the counterpart to the QBO. With a vertical grid-point resolution of about 0.5 km, the NSM produces the MWO through momentum deposition of GWs propagating in the north/south direction. The resulting momentum source represents a third (generally odd) order non-linear function of the meridional winds, and this enables the oscillation, as in the case of the QBO for the zonal winds. Since the meridional winds are relatively small compared to the zonal winds, however, the vertical wavelength that maintains the MWO is much smaller, i.e., only about 10 km instead of 40 km for the QBO. Consistent with the associated increase of the viscous stress, the period of the MWO is then short compared with that of the QBO, i.e., only about two to four months. Depending on the strength of the GW forcing, the computed amplitudes of the MWO are typically 4 m/s in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, and the associated temperature amplitudes are between about 2 and 3 K. These amplitudes may be observable with the instruments on the TIMED spacecraft. Extended computer simulations with the NSM in 2D (two-dimensional) and 3D (three-dimensional) reveal that the MWO is modulated by and in turn influences the QBO.

  16. Studies on atmospheric gravity wave activity in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over a tropical station at Gadanki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Subba Reddy

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available MST radars are powerful tools to study the mesosphere, stratosphere and troposphere and have made considerable contributions to the studies of the dynamics of the upper, middle and lower atmosphere. Atmospheric gravity waves play a significant role in controlling middle and upper atmospheric dynamics. To date, frontal systems, convection, wind shear and topography have been thought to be the sources of gravity waves in the troposphere. All these studies pointed out that it is very essential to understand the generation, propagation and climatology of gravity waves. In this regard, several campaigns using Indian MST Radar observations have been carried out to explore the gravity wave activity over Gadanki in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere. The signatures of the gravity waves in the wind fields have been studied in four seasons viz., summer, monsoon, post-monsoon and winter. The large wind fluctuations were more prominent above 10 km during the summer and monsoon seasons. The wave periods are ranging from 10 min-175 min. The power spectral densities of gravity waves are found to be maximum in the stratospheric region. The vertical wavelength and the propagation direction of gravity waves were determined using hodograph analysis. The results show both down ward and upward propagating waves with a maximum vertical wave length of 3.3 km. The gravity wave associated momentum fluxes show that long period gravity waves carry more momentum flux than the short period waves and this is presented.

  17. Multi-component interactions of gravity waves in global atmospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.-J.

    2009-04-01

    The parameterization of the effects of gravity waves in a global atmospheric model has progressed significantly over the past two decades ever since its need was recognized and its effects were represented in the models. The source of gravity-wave drag considered spans from orography and convective systems to jet streams and frontal systems. The vertical domain of the modeled atmosphere for which drag is applied moved up from the troposphere to include the middle/upper atmosphere. The balance between the drag in the lower and middle atmospheres became important in view of the momentum budget in the models that include the middle atmosphere. The parameterization problem then advances to treat the interactions with other physical processes. The interactions among the various drag processes, such as gravity-wave drag due to orography and convective processes, form drag, friction drag, low-level drag due to blocking, mountain drag due to resolved orography, started being considered important. The interactions are expanded to other physical processes such as the radiation and atmospheric boundary layer processes. The interactions between gravity-wave drag and radiation / boundary layer mixing indeed play an important role in properly representing the drag processes in atmospheric models. These processes strongly interact with one another and should be evaluated collectively as well as individually in atmospheric models. The problem extends further to the interaction between the atmospheric forecast model and the data assimilation model. Because an atmospheric forecast model and a data assimilation model are strongly coupled in a forecast system, independent improvements in one model or the other do not automatically improve forecasts. For example, improved middle-atmospheric physics due to improved gravity-wave drag can degrade forecast skill, if the data assimilation cannot take advantage of the improved physics and rejects more observation data that would have been

  18. Study of atmospheric gravity waves and infrasonic sources using the USArray Transportable Array pressure data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlin, Michael; de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Hoffmann, Lars; Alexander, M. Joan; Stephan, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    The upgrade of the USArray Transportable Array (TA) with microbarometers and infrasound microphones has created an opportunity for a broad range of new studies of atmospheric sources and the large- and small-scale atmospheric structure through which signals from these events propagate. These studies are akin to early studies of seismic events and the Earth's interior structure that were made possible by the first seismic networks. In one early study with the new dataset we use the method of de Groot-Hedlin and Hedlin (2015) to recast the TA as a massive collection of 3-element arrays to detect and locate large infrasonic events. Over 2,000 events have been detected in 2013. The events cluster in highly active regions on land and offshore. Stratospherically ducted signals from some of these events have been recorded more than 2,000 km from the source and clearly show dispersion due to propagation through atmospheric gravity waves. Modeling of these signals has been used to test statistical models of atmospheric gravity waves. The network is also useful for making direct observations of gravity waves. We are currently studying TA and satellite observations of gravity waves from singular events to better understand how the waves near ground level relate to those observed aloft. We are also studying the long-term statistics of these waves from the beginning of 2010 through 2014. Early work using data bandpass filtered from 1-6 hr shows that both the TA and satellite data reveal highly active source regions, such as near the Great Lakes. de Groot-Hedlin and Hedlin, 2015, A method for detecting and locating geophysical events using clusters of arrays, Geophysical Journal International, v203, p960-971, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggv345.

  19. Gravity Waves and Mesospheric Clouds in the Summer Middle Atmosphere: A Comparison of Lidar Measurements and Ray Modeling of Gravity Waves Over Sondrestrom, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, Andrew J.; Kane, Timothy J.; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Thayer, Jeffrey P.

    2004-01-01

    We conducted gravity wave ray-tracing experiments within an atmospheric region centered near the ARCLITE lidar system at Sondrestrom, Greenland (67N, 310 deg E), in efforts to understand lidar observations of both upper stratospheric gravity wave activity and mesospheric clouds during August 1996 and the summer of 2001. The ray model was used to trace gravity waves through realistic three-dimensional daily-varying background atmospheres in the region, based on forecasts and analyses in the troposphere and stratosphere and climatologies higher up. Reverse ray tracing based on upper stratospheric lidar observations at Sondrestrom was also used to try to objectively identify wave source regions in the troposphere. A source spectrum specified by reverse ray tracing experiments in early August 1996 (when atmospheric flow patterns produced enhanced transmission of waves into the upper stratosphere) yielded model results throughout the remainder of August 1996 that agreed best with the lidar observations. The model also simulated increased vertical group propagation of waves between 40 km and 80 km due to intensifying mean easterlies, which allowed many of the gravity waves observed at 40 km over Sondrestrom to propagate quasi-vertically from 40-80 km and then interact with any mesospheric clouds at 80 km near Sondrestrom, supporting earlier experimentally-inferred correlations between upper stratospheric gravity wave activity and mesospheric cloud backscatter from Sondrestrom lidar observations. A pilot experiment of real-time runs with the model in 2001 using weather forecast data as a low-level background produced less agreement with lidar observations. We believe this is due to limitations in our specified tropospheric source spectrum, the use of climatological winds and temperatures in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, and missing lidar data from important time periods.

  20. Observations of atmospheric gravity waves by radio interferometry: are results biased by the observational technique?

    OpenAIRE

    C. Mercier; Jacobson, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we present a quantitative comparison between a large data base of medium-scale atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) observed by radio interferometry of transionospheric radio sources and the results of a numerical simulation of the observed effects. The simulation includes: (i) the propagation and dissipation of AGWs up to ionospheric heights and (ii) the calculation of the subsequent slant TEC perturbations integrated along the path to the radio sources. We show that the observed a...

  1. Influences of non-isothermal atmospheric backgrounds on variations of gravity wave parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao; ZHOU QiHou; YUAN Wei; XU JiYao

    2012-01-01

    Because of the importance of gravity waves (GWs) in coupling different atmospheric regions,further studies are necessary to investigate the characteristics of GW propagation in a non-isothermal atmosphere.Using a nonlinear numerical model,we simulate the propagation of small amplitude GWs with various wavelengths in different non-isothermal atmospheres.Our results show that the GW vertical wavelength undergoes sharp changes above the stratopause and mesopause region.Specifically,for a GW with an initial vertical wavelength of 5 km,the seasonal background temperature structure difference at 50° latitude can cause the vertical wavelength to vary by ~2 km in the mesosphere and by as large as ~4.5 km in the lower thermosphere.In addition,the GW paths exhibit great divergence in the height range of ~65-110 kin.Our results also show that the variations of GW path,vertical wavelength and horizontal phase velocity are not synchronized in a non-isothermal atmosphere as in an isothermal atmosphere.Despite the fact that all GWs change their characteristics as they propagate upward in a non-isothermal atmosphere,the variations relative to the initial parameters at a reference height are similar for different initial vertical wavelengths.Our results indicate that the changing characteristics of a gravity wave in a non-isothermal atmosphere need to be considered when investigating the relationship of GWs at two different heights.

  2. Reflection and Conversion of Magneto-Gravity Waves in the Solar Chromosphere: Windows to the Upper Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Newington, Marie

    2009-01-01

    The detection of upward propagating internal gravity waves in the Sun's chromosphere has recently been reported by Straus et al., who postulated that these may efficiently couple to Alfven waves in magnetic regions. This may be important in transporting energy to higher levels. Here we explore the propagation, reflection and mode conversion of linear gravity waves in a VAL C atmosphere, and find that even weak magnetic fields usually reflect gravity waves back downward as slow magnetoacoustic waves well before they reach the Alfven/acoustic equipartition height at which mode conversion might occur. However, for certain highly inclined magnetic field orientations in which the gravity waves manage to penetrate near or through the equipartition level, there can be substantial conversion to either or both upgoing Alfven and acoustic waves. Wave energy fluxes comparable to the chromospheric radiative losses are expected.

  3. Double atmospheric gravity wave frequency oscillations of sporadic E formed in a horizontal shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new theory of sporadic E density oscillation with double atmospheric gravity wave (AGW) frequency in two-dimensional case taking into account ions ambipolar diffusion is presented. It is found that densities of multi-layered sporadic E, formed under the influence of atmospheric vortical perturbation (with vertical wavelength λz≠0) evolving in the horizontal shear flow (shear wave), can oscillate with up to double Brunt-Vaeisaelae frequency under the action of short-period AGW, in which shear wave is transformed. The formation of multi-layered sporadic E (inside regions with vertical thickness about λz/2) and its density changes in every half AGW period close to ions convergence region occur by combined action of ion-neutral collision and Lorentz forcing and can cause additional accumulation of ions responsible for sporadic E density oscillation with double AGW frequency.

  4. Transition from geostrophic turbulence to inertia-gravity waves in the atmospheric energy spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Bühler, Oliver

    2014-12-01

    Midlatitude fluctuations of the atmospheric winds on scales of thousands of kilometers, the most energetic of such fluctuations, are strongly constrained by the Earth's rotation and the atmosphere's stratification. As a result of these constraints, the flow is quasi-2D and energy is trapped at large scales—nonlinear turbulent interactions transfer energy to larger scales, but not to smaller scales. Aircraft observations of wind and temperature near the tropopause indicate that fluctuations at horizontal scales smaller than about 500 km are more energetic than expected from these quasi-2D dynamics. We present an analysis of the observations that indicates that these smaller-scale motions are due to approximately linear inertia-gravity waves, contrary to recent claims that these scales are strongly turbulent. Specifically, the aircraft velocity and temperature measurements are separated into two components: one due to the quasi-2D dynamics and one due to linear inertia-gravity waves. Quasi-2D dynamics dominate at scales larger than 500 km; inertia-gravity waves dominate at scales smaller than 500 km. PMID:25404349

  5. Observation of acoustic-gravity waves in the upper atmosphere during severe storm activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    A nine-element continuum wave spectrum, high-frequency, Doppler sounder array has been used to detect upper atmospheric wave-like disturbances during periods with severe weather activity, particularly severe thunderstorms and tornadoes. Five events of severe weather activity, including extreme tornado outbreak of April 3, 1974, were chosen for the present study. The analysis of Doppler records shows that both infrasonic waves and gravity waves were excited when severe storms appeared in the north Alabama area. Primarily, in the case of tornado activity, S-shaped Doppler fluctuations or Doppler fold-backs are observed, while quasi-sinusoidal fluctuations are more common in the case of thunderstorm activity. A criterion for the production of Doppler fold-backs is derived and compared with possible tornado conditions.

  6. Rapid propagation of Tsunami-induced gravity waves across the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Oliver; Wei, Chen; Tabak, Esteban

    2014-05-01

    We present theoretical and numerical results on large-scale gravity waves that are forced by Tsunamis at the sea surface and subsequently travel rapidly across the atmosphere until they are detectable by remote sensing in the ionosphere an hour or so after their launch. The theoretical possibility of this phenomenon has been known for some time, but only in recent years has detailed data become available that confirms this effect. This has potential impact for remote sensing applied to Tsunami detection as well as to other near-ground processes. Solving this detailed wave problem requires technology somewhat beyond the standard ray-tracing familiar from wave drag parametrizations, as there is no usable scale separation in the vertical. Our method combines Laplace transforms in time with Fourier transforms in the horizontal, which allows us to satisfy the vertical radiation condition correctly, takes into account back-reflection at the tropopause as well as the influence of wind shear, and provides detailed information about the structure of the first arriving waves at 100 km altitude or so. One unexpected outcome is that there is a clearly observable forerunner wave that arrives at the ionosphere in a manner of minutes, which is an acoustic-gravity wave, so its dynamics goes beyond anelastic models and requires the fully compressible Euler equations instead. These results will be illustrated in a number of idealized examples.

  7. Internal gravity-shear waves in the atmospheric boundary layer from acoustic remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyulyukin, V. S.; Kallistratova, M. A.; Kouznetsov, R. D.; Kuznetsov, D. D.; Chunchuzov, I. P.; Chirokova, G. Yu.

    2015-03-01

    The year-round continuous remote sounding of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) by means of the Doppler acoustic radar (sodar) LATAN-3 has been performed at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station of the Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, since 2008. A visual analysis of sodar echograms for four years revealed a large number of wavelike patterns in the intensity field of a scattered sound signal. Similar patterns were occasionally identified before in sodar, radar, and lidar sounding data. These patterns in the form of quasi-periodic inclined stripes, or cat's eyes, arise under stable stratification and significant vertical wind shears and result from the loss of the dynamic stability of the flow. In the foreign literature, these patterns, which we call internal gravity-shear waves, are often associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz waves. In the present paper, sodar echograms are classified according to the presence or absence of wavelike patterns, and a statistical analysis of the frequency of their occurrence by the year and season was performed. A relationship between the occurrence of the patterns and wind shear and between the wave length and amplitude was investigated. The criteria for the identification of gravity-shear waves, meteorological conditions of their excitation, and issues related to their observations were discussed.

  8. Noise generation in the solid Earth, oceans, and atmosphere, from non-linear interacting surface gravity waves in finite depth

    CERN Document Server

    Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    Oceanic observations, even in very deep water, and atmospheric pressure or seismic records, from anywhere on Earth, contain noise with dominant periods between 3 and 10 seconds, that can be related to surface gravity waves in the oceans. This noise is consistent with a dominant source explained by a nonlinear wave-wave interaction mechanism, and takes the form of surface gravity waves, acoustic or seismic waves. Previous theoretical works on seismic noise focused on surface (Rayleigh) waves, and did not consider finite depth effects on the generating wave kinematics. These finite depth effects are introduced here, which requires the consideration of the direct wave-induced pressure at the ocean bottom, a contribution previously overlooked in the context of seismic noise. That contribution can lead to a considerable reduction of the seismic noise source, which is particularly relevant for noise periods larger than 10 s. The theory is applied to acoustic waves in the atmosphere, extending previous theories that...

  9. Generation and Upper Atmospheric Propagation of Acoustic Gravity Waves according to Numerical Modeling and Radio Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsov, Artem; Andreeva, Elena; Nesterov, Ivan; Padokhin, Artem; Kurbatov, Grigory

    2016-04-01

    The acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere can be generated by a variety of the phenomena in the near-Earth environment and atmosphere as well as by some perturbations of the Earth's ground or ocean surface. For instance, the role of the AGW sources can be played by the earthquakes, explosions, thermal heating, seisches, tsunami waves. We present the examples of AGWs excited by the tsunami waves traveling in the ocean, by seisches, and by ionospheric heating by the high-power radio wave. In the last case, the gravity waves are caused by the pulsed modulation of the heating wave. The AGW propagation in the upper atmosphere induces the variations and irregularities in the electron density distribution of the ionosphere, whose structure can be efficiently reconstructed by the method of the ionospheric radio tomography (RT) based on the data from the global navigational satellite systems (GNSS). The input data for RT diagnostics are composed of the 150/400 MHz radio signals from the low-orbiting (LO) satellites and 1.2-1.5 GHz radio signals from the high-orbiting (HO) satellites with their orbits at ~1000 and ~20000 km above the ground, respectively. These data enable ionospheric imaging on different spatiotemporal scales with different spatiotemporal resolution and coverage, which is suitable, inter alia, for tracking the waves and wave-like features in the ionosphere. In particular, we demonstrate the maps of the ionospheric responses to the tornado at Moore (Oklahoma, USA) of May 20, 2013, which are reconstructed from the HO data. We present the examples of LORT images containing the waves and wavelike disturbances associated with various sources (e.g., auroral precipitation and high-power heating of the ionosphere). We also discuss the results of modeling the AGW generation by the surface and volumetric sources. The millihertz AGW from these sources initiate the ionospheric perturbation with a typical scale of a few hundred km at the

  10. Detection of atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves through ionospheric measurements using dense GPS arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calais, E.; Haase, J. S.; Minster, B.

    2003-12-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is now widely used to measure ionospheric electron content at both global and regional scales. It is also capable of detecting small-scale high-frequency ionospheric disturbances caused by atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves. We show examples of ionospheric perturbations caused by earthquakes, rocket launches, and large surface explosions. The neutral atmospheric waves triggered by these events couple with the motion of free electrons and ionized plasma at ionospheric heights and induce coherent fluctuations of electron densities and ionization layer boundaries that are detectable with GPS. In all cases, the ionospheric perturbations match fairly well observations made through other techniques as well as numerical models. The development of permanent networks of densely spaced and continuously recording GPS stations open up new opportunities for the study of infrasonic waves in the atmosphere and their coupling with small scale processes in the ionosphere. We show examples of infrasonic waves detected using the 250-station GPS network that covers the Los Angeles area (SCIGN). Although the signal-to-noise ratio of these perturbations is relatively small, we show that it can be considerably improved by multi-station array processing techniques derived from seismic array analysis. These techniques can also be used to determine the perturbation propagation azimuth and velocity and, eventually, to recover information about the sources of these perturbations.

  11. Global Propagation of Gravity Waves Generated with the Whole Atmosphere Transfer Function Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Talaat, E. R.; Wolven, B. C.

    2012-12-01

    Gravity waves are ubiquitous phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere, accounting for a significant fraction of its observed variability. These waves, with periods ranging from minutes to hours, are thought to be a major means for exchange of momentum and energy between atmospheric regions. The Transfer Function Model (TFM) describes acoustic gravity waves (AGW) that propagate across the globe in a dissipative static background atmosphere extending from the ground to 700 km. The model is limited to waves with periods force is not important. Formulated in terms of zonal vector spherical harmonics and oscillation frequencies, the linearized equations of energy, mass, and momentum conservation are solved to generate the transfer function (TF) for a chosen height distribution of the excitation source. The model accounts for momentum exchange between atmospheric species (He, O, N2, O2, Ar), which affects significantly the wave amplitudes and phases of thermospheric temperature, densities, and wind fields. Covering a broad range of frequencies and spherical harmonic wave numbers (wavelengths), without limitations, the assembled TF captures the physics that controls the propagation of AGW, and the computational effort is considerable. For a chosen horizontal geometry and impulsive time dependence of the source, however, the global wave response is then obtained in short order. The model is computationally efficient and well suited to serve as an experimental and educational tool for simulating propagating wave patterns on the globe. The model is also semi-analytical and therefore well suited to explore the different wave modes that can be generated under varying dynamical conditions. The TFM has been applied to simulate the AGW, which are generated in the auroral region of the thermosphere by joule heating and momentum coupling due to solar wind induced electric fields [e.g., Mayr et al., Space Science Reviews, 1990]. The auroral source generates three distinct classes of

  12. Turbulent mixing driven by mean-flow shear and internal gravity waves in oceans and atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Baumert, Helmut Z

    2012-01-01

    This study starts with balances deduced by Baumert and Peters (2004, 2005) from results of stratified-shear experiments made in channels and wind tunnels by Itsweire (1984) and Rohr and Van Atta (1987), and of free-decay experiments in a resting stratified tank by Dickey and Mellor (1980). Using a modification of Canuto's (2002) ideas on turbulence and waves, these balances are merged with an (internal) gravity-wave energy balance presented for the open ocean by Gregg (1989), without mean-flow shear. The latter was augmented by a linear (viscous) friction term. Gregg's wave-energy source is interpreted on its long-wave spectral end as internal tides, topography, large-scale wind, and atmospheric low-pressure actions. In addition, internal eigen waves, generated by mean-flow shear, and the aging of the wave field from a virginal (linear) into a saturated state are taken into account. Wave packets and turbulence are treated as particles (vortices, packets) by ensemble kinetics so that the loss terms in all thre...

  13. The Influence of Tropospheric Processes in Modeling the Middle Atmosphere with Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Drob, D. P.; Porter, H. S.

    2002-01-01

    Our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM) extends from the ground up into the thermosphere and has a vertical grid point resolution of about 0.5 km to resolve the interactions of gravity waves (GWs) described with Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization (DSP). This model produces in the stratosphere and mesosphere the major features of QBO, SAO, tides, and planetary waves. The purpose of this paper is to discuss results from an initial study with our 3D model that shows how certain tropospheric processes can affect the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. Under the influence of tropospheric heating, and augmented by GW interactions, two distinct but related processes can be identified. (1) A meridional circulation develops in the stratosphere, with rising motions at low latitudes that are in magnitude comparable to the downward propagation of the QBO. As Dunkerton pointed out, a larger GW source is then required to reproduce the observed QBO, which tends to move us closer to the values recommended for the DSP. This has significant consequences for our model results that describe the upper mesosphere, considering the general importance of GWs for this region and in influencing planetary waves (e.g., 2-day wave) and tides in particular. (2) Tropospheric heating produces zonal jets near the tropopause that are related to latitudinal variations in pressure and reversing temperature variations (resembling the dynamical conditions near the mesopause), which in turn is conducive to generate baroclinic instability. Modeling results show that our ability to generate the QBO critically depends on the magnitude of the temperature reversal that is a measure of this instability. Planetary waves are generated in this process, which can apparently interfere with or augment the GW interactions. As originally demonstrated by Lindzen and Holton, the eastward propagating Kelvin waves and westward propagating Rossby gravity waves (generated by tropospheric convection) can in principle provide

  14. Modulation of Atmospheric Nonisothermality and Wind Shears on the Propagation of Seismic Tsunami-Excited Gravity Waves

    OpenAIRE

    John Z. G. Ma

    2016-01-01

    We study the modulation of atmospheric nonisothermality and wind shears on the propagation of seismic tsunami-excited gravity waves by virtue of the vertical wavenumber, m (with its imaginary and real parts, m i and m r , respectively), within a correlated characteristic range of tsunami wave periods in tens of minutes. A ge...

  15. Instability of combined gravity-inertial-Rossby waves in atmospheres and oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the instability of combined gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane are investigated. The wave-energy exchange equation shows that there is an exchange of energy with the background stratified medium. The energy source driving the instability lies in the background enthalpy released by the gravitational buoyancy force.

    It is shown that if the phase speed of the westward propagating low frequency-long wavelength Rossby wave exceeds the Poincaré-Kelvin (or "equivalent" shallow water wave speed, instability arises from the merging of Rossby and Poincaré modes. There are two key parameters in this instability condition; namely, the equatorial/rotational Mach (or Froude number M and the latitude θ0 of the β-plane. In general waves equatorward of a critical latitude for given M can be driven unstable, with corresponding growth rates of the order of a day or so. Although these conclusions may only be safely drawn for short wavelengths corresponding to a JWKB wave packet propagating internally and located far from boundaries, nevertheless such a local instability may play a significant role in atmosphere-ocean dynamics.

  16. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomikawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    A possibility of gravity wave propagation from a source region to the airglow layer around the mesopause has been discussed based on the gravity wave blocking diagram taking into account the critical level filtering alone. This paper proposes a new gravity wave transmission diagram in which both the critical level filtering and turning level reflection of gravity waves are considered. It shows a significantly different distribution of gravity wave transmissivity from the blocking diagram.

  17. Scattering of internal gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Leaman Nye, Abigail

    2011-01-01

    Internal gravity waves play a fundamental role in the dynamics of stably stratified regions of the atmosphere and ocean. In addition to the radiation of momentum and energy remote from generation sites, internal waves drive vertical transport of heat and mass through the ocean by wave breaking and the mixing subsequently produced. Identifying regions where internal gravity waves contribute to ocean mixing and quantifying this mixing are therefore important for accurate climate ...

  18. Gravity wave transmission diagram

    OpenAIRE

    Tomikawa, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A new method of obtaining power spectral distribution of gravity waves as a function of ground-based horizontal phase speed and propagation direction from airglow observations has recently been proposed. To explain gravity wave power spectrum anisotropy, a new gravity wave transmission diagram was developed in this study. Gravity wave transmissivity depends on the existence of critical and turning levels for waves that are determined by background horizontal wind distributio...

  19. Gravity Wave Refraction in the Atmosphere: : Ray tracing versus Geometric Location from a Single Image

    OpenAIRE

    Nærø, Karoline

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents two methods of finding the sources of gravity waves observed in the night-time hydroxyl airglow; ray-tracing and geometric localisation by fitting concentric circles onto the curvature of the gravity waves' fronts. The observations were made at Dragvoll, Trondheim during winter season of 2012/2013 using an all-sky camera system with a 45$^\\circ$ field of view. Wintertime in Trondheim has proved to be a good place to study gravity waves by OH nightglow imaging. Nearly...

  20. Nonlinear acoustic-gravity waves and dust particle redistribution in earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekova, Yu. N.; Popel, S. I.; Chen, B. B.

    2015-11-01

    A continuously stratified model of nonadiabatic terrestrial atmosphere with taking into account the temperature profile is developed to study a possibility of instability development of acoustic-gravity (AG-) waves. It is shown that the existence of the regions in the atmosphere where the instability conditions are satisfied is due to the cooperation of thermal flow of solar radiation, infrared emission of the atmosphere, water vapor condensation, as well as thermal conductivity. Large-amplitude vortices in Earth's troposphere and ionosphere and their possible structure as well as redistribution of dust particles in the ionosphere as a result of vortical motions are discussed. The following possibilities for the dust particle redistribution are studied: capture and evolution of dust particles in AG-vortices, formation of dust vortices as a result of involving a great number of dust particles into vortex motions, and formation of vertical and horizontal dust flows (streamers and zonal flows). It is shown that excitation of AG-vortices at the ionospheric altitudes as a result of development of AG-wave instability leads to a substantial transportation of dust particles and their mixing. Layers of dust particles with a thickness of about a kilometer, forming at the altitudes less than 120 km, distribute within the region of the existence of AG-vortical structures. As a result, at altitudes of 110-120 km, dust vortices can appear, and transportation of particles up to altitudes of 130 km becomes possible. One of the ways of transportation of dust particles in the ionosphere is dust flows, which are generated by dust vortices as a result of development of parametric instability.

  1. Acoustic-gravity waves generated by atmospheric and near-surface sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitsyn, Viacheslav E.; Kholodov, Alexander S.; Krysanov, Boris Yu.; Andreeva, Elena S.; Nesterov, Ivan A.; Vorontsov, Artem M.

    2013-04-01

    Numerical simulation of the acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) generated by long-period oscillations of the Earth's (oceanic) surface, earthquakes, explosions, thermal heating, seiches, and tsunami is carried out. Wavelike disturbances are quite frequent phenomena in the atmosphere and ionosphere. These events can be caused by the impacts from space and atmosphere, by oscillations of the Earth'as surface and other near-surface events. These wavelike phenomena in the atmosphere and ionosphere appear as the alternating areas of enhanced and depleted density (in the atmosphere) or electron concentration (in the ionosphere). In the paper, AGW with typical frequencies of a few hertz - millihertz are analyzed. AGW are often observed after the atmospheric perturbations, during the earthquakes, and some time (a few days to hours) in advance of the earthquakes. Numerical simulation of the generation of AGW by long-period oscillations of the Earth's and oceanic surface, earthquakes, explosions, thermal heating, seiches, and tsunami is carried out. The AGW generated by the near-surface phenomena within a few hertz-millihertz frequency range build up at the mid-atmospheric and ionospheric altitudes, where they assume their typical spatial scales of the order of a few hundred kilometers. Oscillations of the ionospheric plasma within a few hertz-millihertz frequency range generate electromagnetic waves with corresponding frequencies as well as travelling ionospheric irregularities (TIDs). Such structures can be successfully monitored using satellite radio tomography (RT) techniques. For the purposes of RT diagnostics, 150/400 MHz transmissions from low-orbiting navigational satellites flying in polar orbits at the altitudes of about 1000 km as well as 1.2-1.5 GHz signals form high-orbiting (orbital altitudes about 20000 km) navigation systems like GPS/GLONASS are used. The results of experimental studies on generation of wavelike disturbances by particle precipitation are presented

  2. Convectively Forced Gravity Waves and their Sensitivity to Heating Profile and Atmospheric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Oliver; Parker, Douglas; Griffiths, Stephen; Vosper, Simon; Stirling, Alison

    2016-04-01

    It has been known for some time that convective heating is communicated to its environment by gravity waves. Despite this, the radiation of gravity waves in macro-scale models, which are typically forced at the grid-scale by meso-scale parameterization schemes, is not well understood. We present here theoretical work directed toward improving our fundamental understanding of convectively forced gravity wave effects at the meso-scale, in order to begin to address this problem. Starting with the hydrostatic, non-rotating, 2D, Boussinesq equations in a slab geometry, we find a radiating, analytical solution to prescribed sensible heat forcing for both the vertical velocity and potential temperature response. Both Steady and pulsed heating with adjustable horizontal structure is considered. From these solutions we construct a simple model capable of interrogating the spatial and temporal sensitivity to chosen heating functions of the remote forced response in particular. By varying the assumed buoyancy frequency, the influence of the model stratosphere on the upward radiation of gravity waves, and in turn, on the tropospheric response can be understood. Further, we find that the macro-scale response to convection is highly dependent on the radiation characteristics of gravity waves, which are in turn dependent upon the temporal and spatial structure of the source, and upper boundary condition of the domain.

  3. Analysis of vertical wave number spectrum of atmospheric gravity waves in the stratosphere using COSMIC GPS radio occultation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsuda

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available GPS radio occultation (RO is characterized by high accuracy and excellent height resolution, which has great advantages in analyzing atmospheric structures including small-scale vertical fluctuations. The vertical resolution of the geometrical optics (GO method in the stratosphere is about 1.5 km due to Fresnel radius limitations, but full spectrum inversion (FSI can provide superior resolutions. We applied FSI to COSMIC GPS-RO profiles from ground level up to 30 km altitude, although basic retrieval at UCAR/CDAAC sets the sewing height from GO to FSI below the tropopause. We validated FSI temperature profiles with routine high-resolution radiosonde data in Malaysia and North America collected within 400 km and about 30 min of the GPS RO events. The average discrepancy at 10–30 km altitude was less than 0.5 K, and the bias was equivalent with the GO results.

    Using the FSI results, we analyzed the vertical wave number spectrum of normalized temperature fluctuations in the stratosphere at 20–30 km altitude, which exhibits good consistency with the model spectra of saturated gravity waves. We investigated the white noise floor that tends to appear at high wave numbers, and the substantial vertical resolution of the FSI method was estimated as about 100–200 m in the lower stratosphere. We also examined a criterion for the upper limit of the FSI profiles, beyond which bending angle perturbations due to system noises, etc, could exceed atmospheric excess phase fluctuations. We found that the FSI profiles can be used up to about 28 km in studies of temperature fluctuations with vertical wave lengths as short as 0.5 km.

  4. Analysis of vertical wave number spectrum of atmospheric gravity waves in the stratosphere using COSMIC GPS radio occultation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsuda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available GPS radio occultation (RO is characterized by high accuracy and excellent height resolution, which has great advantages in analyzing atmospheric structures including small-scale vertical fluctuations. The vertical resolution of the geometrical optics (GO method in the stratosphere is about 1.5 km due to Fresnel radius limitations, but full spectrum inversion (FSI can provide superior resolutions. We applied FSI to COSMIC GPS-RO profiles from ground level up to 30 km altitude, although basic retrieval at UCAR/CDAAC sets the sewing height from GO to FSI below the tropopause. We validated FSI temperature profiles with routine high-resolution radiosonde data in Malaysia and North America collected within 400 km and about 30 min of the GPS RO events. The average discrepancy at 10–30 km altitude was less than 0.5 K, and the bias was equivalent with the GO results.

    Using the FSI results, we analyzed the vertical wave number spectrum of normalized temperature fluctuations in the stratosphere at 20–30 km altitude, which exhibits good consistency with the model spectra of saturated gravity waves. We investigated the white noise floor that tends to appear at high wave numbers, and the substantial vertical resolution of the FSI method was estimated as about 100–200 m in the lower stratosphere. We also examined a criterion for the upper limit of the FSI profiles, beyond which bending angle perturbations due to system noises, etc., could exceed atmospheric excess phase fluctuations. We found that the FSI profiles can be used up to about 28 km in studies of temperature fluctuations with vertical wave lengths as short as 0.5 km.

  5. Application of higher-order KdV-mKdV model with higher-degree nonlinear terms to gravity waves in atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higher-order Korteweg-de Vries (KdV)-modified KdV (mKdV) equations with a higher-degree of nonlinear terms are derived from a simple incompressible non-hydrostatic Boussinesq equation set in atmosphere and are used to investigate gravity waves in atmosphere. By taking advantage of the auxiliary nonlinear ordinary differential equation, periodic wave and solitary wave solutions of the fifth-order KdV-mKdV models with higher-degree nonlinear terms are obtained under some constraint conditions. The analysis shows that the propagation and the periodic structures of gravity waves depend on the properties of the slope of line of constant phase and atmospheric stability. The Jacobi elliptic function wave and solitary wave solutions with slowly varying amplitude are transformed into triangular waves with the abruptly varying amplitude and breaking gravity waves under the effect of atmospheric instability. (general)

  6. Some characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed by radio-interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Mercier

    Full Text Available Observations of atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs are considered through their effect on the horizontal gradient G of the slant total electron content (slant TEC, which can be directly obtained from two-dimensional radio-interferometric observations of cosmic radio-sources with the Nançay radioheligraph (2.2°E, 47.3°N. Azimuths of propagation can be deduced (modulo 180°. The total database amounts to about 800 h of observations at various elevations, local time and seasons. The main results are:

    a AGWs are partially directive, confirming our previous results.

    b The propagation azimuths considered globally are widely scattered with a preference towards the south.

    c They show a bimodal time distribution with preferential directions towards the SE during daytime and towards the SW during night-time (rather than a clockwise rotation as reported by previous authors.

    d The periods are scattered but are larger during night-time than during daytime by about 60%.

    e The effects observed with the solar radio-sources are significantly stronger than with other radio-sources (particularly at higher elevations, showing the role of the geometry in line of sight-integrated observations.

  7. On the role of parametric instability of internal gravity waves in atmospheric radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klostermeyer, J.

    1990-10-01

    Parametric instability of internal gravity waves is discussed on the basis of observational results obtained from an FM-CW tropospheric UHF radar and pulsed mesospheric VHF Doppler radars. At small primary wave amplitudes, the instability modes can be comparable to that of the primary wave, leading to a broadening or continuous wave number spectrum. Long-period primary waves propagate almost vertically and form extended layers moving with the phase velocity of the primary wave. These modes satisfy Taylor's frozen turbulence field hypothesis, so that the Doppler shift of scattered radar signals yields the space and time dependent fluid velocity of the primary wave. At sufficiently large amplitudes, there is a fast-growing instability mode with frequencies near the Vaisala-Brunt frequency, which is reminiscent of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of horizontally stratified time independent shear flows.

  8. A study of atmospheric gravity waves and travelling ionospheric disturbances at equatorial latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Balthazor

    Full Text Available A global coupled thermosphere-ionosphere-plasmasphere model is used to simulate a family of large-scale imperfectly ducted atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs and associated travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs originating at conjugate magnetic latitudes in the north and south auroral zones and subsequently propagating meridionally to equatorial latitudes. A 'fast' dominant mode and two slower modes are identified. We find that, at the magnetic equator, all the clearly identified modes of AGW interfere constructively and pass through to the opposite hemisphere with unchanged velocity. At F-region altitudes the 'fast' AGW has the largest amplitude, and when northward propagating and southward propagating modes interfere at the equator, the TID (as parameterised by the fractional change in the electron density at the F2 peak increases in magnitude at the equator. The amplitude of the TID at the magnetic equator is increased compared to mid-latitudes in both upper and lower F-regions with a larger increase in the upper F-region. The ionospheric disturbance at the equator persists in the upper F-region for about 1 hour and in the lower F-region for 2.5 hours after the AGWs first interfere, and it is suggested that this is due to enhancements of the TID by slower AGW modes arriving later at the magnetic equator. The complex effects of the interplays of the TIDs generated in the equatorial plasmasphere are analysed by examining neutral and ion winds predicted by the model, and are demonstrated to be consequences of the forcing of the plasmasphere along the magnetic field lines by the neutral air pressure wave.

  9. Convectively Generated Gravity Waves In The Tropical Stratosphere: Case Studies And Importance For The Circulation Of The Middle Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Chan, Kwoklong R.; Gary, Bruce; Singh, Hanwant B. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The advent of high altitude aircraft measurements in the stratosphere over tropical convective systems has made it possible to observe the mesoscale disturbances in the temperature field that these systems excite. Such measurements show that these disturbances have horizontal scales comparable to those of the underlying anvils (about 50-100 km) with peak to peak theta surface variations of about 300-400 meters. Moreover, correlative wind measurements from the tropical phase of the Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange Project (STEP) clearly show that these disturbances are gravity waves. We present two case studies of anvil-scale gravity waves over convective systems. Using steady and time-dependent linear models of gravity wave propagation in the stratosphere, we show: (1) that the underlying convective systems are indeed the source of the observed phenomena; and (2) that their generating mechanism can be crudely represented as flow over a time-dependent mountain. We will then discuss the effects gravity waves of the observed amplitudes have on the circulation of the middle atmosphere, particularly the quasi-biennial, and semiannual oscillations.

  10. Statistical study of atmospheric gravity waves in the mesopause region observed by a lidar chain in eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shaohua; Yang, Guotao; Dou, Xiankang; Xu, Jiyao; Chen, Chunxia; Gong, Shunsheng

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric gravity wave activities in the mesopause region have been observed and statistically investigated with a sodium lidar chain in eastern China. In total, there were 471 gravity waves identified from over 5400 h of observations at Hainan (19.99°N, 110.34°E), Hefei (31.87°N, 117.23°E), and Beijing (40.47°N, 115.97°E). These waves typically had vertical wavelengths of λz = 2 - 4 km, observed periods of Tob = 1 - 4 h, amplitude growth factors of β = - 0.025 ~ + 0.05 km-1, and wave amplitudes of Aeβ * 90km = 1.5 - 6 %. Strong systematic parameter relationships were found, and they agree with the predictions of diffusive filtering theory. Statistical results show that the seasonal variability of gravity wave activity had a summer-maximum and winter-minimum characteristics in the mesopause region over eastern China. A qualitative interpretation is proposed regarding the seasonal and geographic variability observed by the lidar chain, based on analysis of source properties and influences from background wind, which vary by season.

  11. Climatology of Gravity Wave Characteristics and Middle Atmosphere Thermal Structure Characteristics over Reunion Islands, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, Vishnu

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, climatological characteristics of the gravity wave activities and thermal structure activities are studied using temperature profiles obtained from Rayleigh lidar located at Reunion Island (20.8°S, 55.5°E) over a period of ~14 years (1994-2007). The study has been performed over the height range from 30 to 65 km. The overall monthly mean temperature shows a maximum of 265-270K at the stratopause height region from ˜44-52km and peaks during the months of March and November. While there is no clear signature of seasonal oscillation in the stratopause height, the stratopause temperature shows distinct maxima during the periods March-April and October-November. The GW characteristics in terms of time (frequency), height (wave number) and GW associated Potential Energy and their seasonal dependences are presented. Generally, the temporal evolution of temperature profile illustrates the downward phase propagation indicating that the energy is propagating upward. The wave activity is clearly visible with the wave periods ranging from 260 min to 32 min. The dominant components have vertical wavelengths in the range of about ~4 km to 35 km. It is found that the seasonal variation of potential energy is maximum during summer in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. A semiannual variation is seen in the gravity wave activity over all height ranges in the months of February and August.

  12. A global view of gravity waves in the Martian atmosphere inferred from a high-resolution general circulation model

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Yiğit, Erdal; Hartogh, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Global characteristics of the small-scale gravity wave (GW) field in the Martian atmosphere obtained from a high-resolution general circulation model (GCM) are presented for the first time. The simulated GW-induced temperature variances are in a good agreement with available radio occultation data in the lower atmosphere between 10 and 30 km. The model reveals a latitudinal asymmetry with stronger wave generation in the winter hemisphere, and two distinctive sources of GWs: mountainous regions and the meandering winter polar jet. Orographic GWs are filtered while propagating upward, and the mesosphere is primarily dominated by harmonics with faster horizontal phase velocities. Wave fluxes are directed mainly against the local wind. GW dissipation in the upper mesosphere generates body forces of tens of m~s$^{-1}$~sol$^{-1}$, which tend to close the simulated jets. The results represent a realistic surrogate for missing observations, which can be used for constraining GW parameterizations and validating GCM si...

  13. Spectral energy transfer of atmospheric gravity waves through sum and difference nonlinear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, K.M. [Wuhan Univ. (China). School of Electronic Information; Chinese Academey of Sciences, Hefei (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment; Embry Riddle Aeronautical Univ., Daytona Beach, FL (United States). Dept. of Physical Science; Ministry of Education, Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment and Geodesy; State Observatory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Wuhan (China); Liu, A.Z.; Li, Z. [Embry Riddle Aeronautical Univ., Daytona Beach, FL (United States). Dept. of Physical Science; Zhang, S.D.; Yi, F. [Wuhan Univ. (China). School of Electronic Information; Ministry of Education, Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment and Geodesy; State Observatory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Wuhan (China)

    2012-07-01

    Nonlinear interactions of gravity waves are studied with a two-dimensional, fully nonlinear model. The energy exchanges among resonant and near-resonant triads are examined in order to understand the spectral energy transfer through interactions. The results show that in both resonant and near-resonant interactions, the energy exchange between two high frequency waves is strong, but the energy transfer from large to small vertical scale waves is rather weak. This suggests that the energy cascade toward large vertical wavenumbers through nonlinear interaction is inefficient, which is different from the rapid turbulence cascade. Because of considerable energy exchange, nonlinear interactions can effectively spread high frequency spectrum, and play a significant role in limiting wave amplitude growth and transferring energy into higher altitudes. In resonant interaction, the interacting waves obey the resonant matching conditions, and resonant excitation is reversible, while near-resonant excitation is not so. Although near-resonant interaction shows the complexity of match relation, numerical experiments show an interesting result that when sum and difference near-resonant interactions occur between high and low frequency waves, the wave vectors tend to approximately match in horizontal direction, and the frequency of the excited waves is also close to the matching value. (orig.)

  14. The effect of gravity waves on the global mean temperature and composition structure of the upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Nikolai M.; Roble, Raymond G.

    1994-01-01

    Formulas are presented that parameterize the heating rate and coefficient of turbulent heat conduction produced by saturated internal gravity waves (IGW) in the upper atmosphere. Estimates of these values are made using observational data. The parameterization of IGW influences are introduced into a one-dimensional model of global mean thermal and composition balances of the upper atmosphere. Computations are performed for different values of IGW energy fluxes entering into the upper atmosphere from below. It is shown that realistic vertical profiles of the global mean temperature can be obtained using different values of IGW energy flux into the upper atmosphere. Increasing the IGW intensity leads not only to an increase of the heating rate due to wave enery dissipation, but also to an increase of the heating rate due to wave energy dissipation, but also to an increase in the coefficient of turbulent heat conduction and cooling rate produced by turbulence generated by the wave. So, near an altitude of 100 km the main part of solar heating is compensated by infrared cooling on one hand, and the main part of wave dissipation heating is compensated by turbulent cooling on the other hand. These quasi-balances generally hold for different values of IGW intensity.

  15. Instability of coupled gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a {beta}-plane in solar system atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, J.F. [KwaZulu-Natal Univ., Durban (South Africa). Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences; Alabama Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Physics, CSPAR; King' s College, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a {beta}-plane in the Boussinesq approximation. The wave equation for the system is fifth order in space and time and demonstrates how gravity-inertial waves on the one hand are coupled to Rossby waves on the other through the combined effects of {beta}-, the stratification characterized by the Vaeisaelae-Brunt frequency N, the Coriolis frequency f at a given latitude, and vertical propagation which permits buoyancy modes to interact with westward propagating Rossby waves. The corresponding dispersion equation shows that the frequency of a westward propagating gravity-inertial wave is reduced by the coupling, whereas the frequency of a Rossby wave is increased. If the coupling is sufficiently strong these two modes coalesce giving rise to an instability. The instability condition translates into a curve of critical latitude {theta}{sub c} versus effective equatorial rotational Mach number M, with the region below this curve exhibiting instability. ''Supersonic'' fast rotators are unstable in a narrow band of latitudes around the equator. For example {theta}{sub c}{proportional_to}12 for Jupiter. On the other hand slow ''subsonic'' rotators (e.g. Mercury, Venus and the Sun's Corona) are unstable at all latitudes except very close to the poles where the {beta}- effect vanishes. ''Transonic'' rotators, such as the Earth and Mars, exhibit instability within latitudes of 34 and 39 , respectively, around the Equator. Similar results pertain to Oceans. In the case of an Earth's Ocean of depth 4km say, purely westward propagating waves are unstable up to 26 about the Equator. The nonlinear evolution of this instability which feeds off rotational energy and gravitational buoyancy may play an important role in atmospheric dynamics. (orig.)

  16. Instability of coupled gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in solar system atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in the Boussinesq approximation. The wave equation for the system is fifth order in space and time and demonstrates how gravity-inertial waves on the one hand are coupled to Rossby waves on the other through the combined effects of β, the stratification characterized by the Väisälä-Brunt frequency N, the Coriolis frequency f at a given latitude, and vertical propagation which permits buoyancy modes to interact with westward propagating Rossby waves. The corresponding dispersion equation shows that the frequency of a westward propagating gravity-inertial wave is reduced by the coupling, whereas the frequency of a Rossby wave is increased. If the coupling is sufficiently strong these two modes coalesce giving rise to an instability. The instability condition translates into a curve of critical latitude Θc versus effective equatorial rotational Mach number M, with the region below this curve exhibiting instability. "Supersonic" fast rotators are unstable in a narrow band of latitudes around the equator. For example Θc~12° for Jupiter. On the other hand slow "subsonic" rotators (e.g. Mercury, Venus and the Sun's Corona are unstable at all latitudes except very close to the poles where the β effect vanishes. "Transonic" rotators, such as the Earth and Mars, exhibit instability within latitudes of 34° and 39°, respectively, around the Equator. Similar results pertain to Oceans. In the case of an Earth's Ocean of depth 4km say, purely westward propagating waves are unstable up to 26° about the Equator. The nonlinear evolution of this instability which feeds off rotational energy and gravitational buoyancy may play an important role in atmospheric dynamics.

  17. Seasonal variation of gravity waves in the Equatorial Middle Atmosphere: results from ISRO's Middle Atmospheric Dynamics (MIDAS program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ramkumar

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Altitude profiles of temperature in the stratospheric and mesopheric region from lidar observations at NARL, Gadanki, India, during December 2002–April 2005, as part of ISRO's Middle Atmospheric Dynamics – "MIDAS (2002–2005" program are used to study the characteristics of gravity waves and their seasonal variation. Month-to-month variation of the gravity wave activity observed during the period of December 2002–April 2005 show maximum wave activity, with primary peaks in May 2003, August 2004 and March 2005 and secondary peaks in February 2003 and November 2004. This month-to-month variation in gravity wave activity is linked to the variation in the strength of the sources, viz. convection and wind shear, down below at the tropospheric region, estimated from MST radar measurements at the same location. Horizontal wind shear is found to be mostly correlated with wave activity than convection, and sometimes both sources are found to contribute towards the wave activity.

  18. Gravity-wave astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theoretical basis for gravity-wave astronomy is described, along with the energy and momentum of gravitational fields. Other topics discussed include:- burst and periodic sources of gravitational waves, the cosmological stochastic background, and the detection of gravitational waves. (U.K.)

  19. Atmospheric gravity waves from the impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, A. P.; Kanamori, H.; Dowling, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    We study the effect of the Jovian water cloud on internal gravity waves generated by the impact of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 (SL9). Vertical structure follows Voyager data to the 1-bar level, a moist adiabat from 1 to 5 bars, and a dry adiabat below the 5-bar level. The waves are trapped in the moist layer and propagate horizontally. Their speed is related to the vertical integral of the Brunt-Vaisala frequency, and varies as the square root of the water abundance (130 m/s for solar composition). The amplitudes are large, e.g., +/- 1 K at a distance of 8000 km for an energy of 10(exp 27) ergs. The circular ripples should be detectable one or two days after the impact in thermal infrared and visible images.

  20. Parametric Excitation of Internal Gravity Waves in Ocean and Atmosphere as Precursors of Strong Earthquakes and Tsunami

    CERN Document Server

    Chefranov, Sergey G

    2013-01-01

    The condition of internal gravity waves (IGW) parametric excitation in the rotating fluid layer heated from above, with the layer vibration along the vertical axis or with periodic modulation in time of the vertical temperature distribution, is obtained. We show the dual role of the molecular dissipative effects that may lead not only to the wave oscillations damping, but also to emergence of hydrodynamic dissipative instability (DI) in some frequency band of IGW. This DI also may take place for the localized in horizontal plane tornado-like disturbances, horizontal scale of which does not exceed the character vertical scale for the fluid layer of the finite depth. Investigated parametric resonance mechanism of IGW generation in ocean and atmosphere during and before earthquakes allows monitoring of such waves (with double period with respect to the period of vibration or temperature gradient modulation) as precursors of these devastating phenomena.

  1. Modulation of Atmospheric Nonisothermality and Wind Shears on the Propagation of Seismic Tsunami-Excited Gravity Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Z. G. Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the modulation of atmospheric nonisothermality and wind shears on the propagation of seismic tsunami-excited gravity waves by virtue of the vertical wavenumber, m (with its imaginary and real parts, m i and m r , respectively, within a correlated characteristic range of tsunami wave periods in tens of minutes. A generalized dispersion relation of inertio-acoustic-gravity (IAG waves is obtained by relaxing constraints on Hines’ idealized locally-isothermal, shear-free and rotation-free model to accommodate a realistic atmosphere featured by altitude-dependent nonisothermality (up to 100 K/km and wind shears (up to 100 m/s per km. The obtained solutions recover all of the known wave modes below the 200-km altitude where dissipative terms are assumed negligible. Results include: (1 nonisothermality and wind shears divide the atmosphere into a sandwich-like structure of five layers within the 200-km altitude in view of the wave growth in amplitudes: Layer I (0–18 km, Layer II (18–87 km, Layer III (87–125 km, Layer IV (125–175 km and Layer V (175–200 km; (2 in Layers I, III and V, the magnitude of m i is smaller than Hines’ imaginary vertical wavenumber ( m i H , referring to an attenuated growth in the amplitudes of upward propagating waves; on the contrary, in Layers II and IV, the magnitude of m i is larger than that of m i H , providing a pumped growth from Hines’ model; (3 nonisothermality and wind shears enhance m r substantially at an ∼100-km altitude for a tsunami wave period T t s longer than 30 min. While Hines’ model provides that the maximal value of m r 2 is ∼0.05 (1/km 2 , this magnitude is doubled by the nonisothermal effect and quadrupled by the joint nonisothermal and wind shear effect. The modulations are weaker at altitudes outside 80–140-km heights; (4 nonisothermality and wind shears expand the definition of the observation-defined “damping factor”, β: relative to Hines’ classical wave

  2. Acoustic-gravity waves in a viscous and thermally conducting isothermal atmosphere (part II: For small Prandtl number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Y. Alkahby

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available In part one of these series we investigated the effect of Newtonian cooling on acoustic-gravity waves in an isothermal atmosphere for large Prandtl number. It was shown that the atmosphere can be divided into two regions connected by an absorbing and reflecting layer, created by the exponential increase of the kinematic viscosity with height, and if Newtonian cooling coefficient goes to infinity the temperature perturbation associated with the wave will be eliminated. In addition all linear relations among the perturbation quantities will be modified. In this paper we will consider the effect of Newtonian cooling on acoustic-gravity waves for small Prandtl number in an isothermal atmosphere. It is shown that if the Newtonian cooling coefficient is small compared to the adiabatic cutoff frequency the atmosphere may be divided into three distinct regions. In the lower region the motion is adiabatic and the effect of the kinematic viscosity and thermal diffusivity are negligible, while the effect of these diffusivities is more pronounced in the upper region. In the middle region the effect of the thermal diffusivity is large, while that of the kinematic viscosity is still negligible. The two lower regions are connected by a semitransparent reflecting layer as a result of the exponential increase of the thermal diffusivity with height. The two upper regions are joined by an absorbing and reflecting barrier created but the exponential increase of the kinematic viscosity. If the Newtonian cooling coefficient is large compared to the adiabatic cutoff frequency, the wavelengths below and above the lower reflecting layer will be equalized. Consequently the reflection produced by the thermal conduction is eliminated completely. This indicates that in the solar photosphere the temperature fluctuations may be smoothed by the transfer of radiation between any two regions with different temperatures. Also the heat transfer by radiation is more dominant than

  3. Modeling the Dynamics of the Middle Atmosphere and Lower Thermosphere Under the Influence of Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM), which extends from the ground up into the thermosphere, is non-linear, time-dependent and has been employed for 2D and 3D applications. The standard version of the NSM incorporates Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization for small scale gravity waves (GW), but planetary waves generated in the troposphere have also been incorporated. The NSM has been applied to describe: (1) the anomalous seasonal variations of the zonal circulation and temperature in the upper mesosphere, (2) the equatorial oscillations (quasi-biennial and semi-annual oscillations (QBO and SAO)) extending from the stratosphere into the upper mesosphere, (3) the diurnal and semi-diurnal tides, and (4) the planetary waves that are excited in the mesosphere. With the emphasis to provide understanding, we present here results from numerical experiments with the NSM that shed light on the GW processes that are of central importance in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. These are our conclusions: (1) The large semiannual variations in the diurnal tide (DT), with peak amplitudes observed around equinox, are produced primarily by GW interactions that involve, in part, planetary waves. The DT, like planetary waves, tends to be amplified by GW momentum deposition, which reduces also the vertical wavelength, but variations in eddy viscosity associated with GW interactions are also important. (2) The semidiurnal tide (SDT) and its phase in particular, is strongly influenced by the mean zonal circulation. The SDT, individually, is also amplified by GW. But the DT filters out GW such that the GW interaction effectively reduces the amplitude of the SDT, producing a strong nonlinear interaction between the DT and SDT. (3) Without external time dependent energy or momentum sources, planetary waves (PW) are generated in the model for zonal wavenumbers 1 to 4, which have amplitudes in the mesosphere above 50 km as large as 40 m/s and periods between 50 and 2 days. The waves are

  4. GEODYNAMIC WAVES AND GRAVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vikulin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available  Gravity phenomena related to the Earth movements in the Solar System and through the Galaxy are reviewed. Such movements are manifested by geological processes on the Earth and correlate with geophysical fields of the Earth. It is concluded that geodynamic processes and the gravity phenomena (including those of cosmic nature are related.  The state of the geomedium composed of blocks is determined by stresses with force moment and by slow rotational waves that are considered as a new type of movements [Vikulin, 2008, 2010]. It is shown that the geomedium has typical rheid properties [Carey, 1954], specifically an ability to flow while being in the solid state [Leonov, 2008]. Within the framework of the rotational model with a symmetric stress tensor, which is developed by the authors [Vikulin, Ivanchin, 1998; Vikulin et al., 2012a, 2013], such movement of the geomedium may explain the energy-saturated state of the geomedium and a possibility of its movements in the form of vortex geological structures [Lee, 1928]. The article discusses the gravity wave detection method based on the concept of interactions between gravity waves and crustal blocks [Braginsky et al., 1985]. It is concluded that gravity waves can be recorded by the proposed technique that detects slow rotational waves. It is shown that geo-gravitational movements can be described by both the concept of potential with account of gravitational energy of bodies [Kondratyev, 2003] and the nonlinear physical acoustics [Gurbatov et al., 2008]. Based on the combined description of geophysical and gravitational wave movements, the authors suggest a hypothesis about the nature of spin, i.e. own moment as a demonstration of the space-time ‘vortex’ properties.  

  5. Historical detection of atmospheric impacts by large bolides using acoustic-gravity waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ReVelle, D.O.

    1995-05-01

    During the period from about 1960 to the early 1980`s a number of large bolides (meteor-fireballs) entered the atmosphere which were sufficiently large to generate blast waves during their drag interaction with the air. For example, the remnant of the blast wave from a single kiloton class event was subsequently detected by up to six ground arrays of microbarographs which were operated by the U.S. Air Force during this pre-satellite period. Data have also been obtained from other sources during this period as well and are also discussed in this summary of the historical data. The Air Force data have been analyzed in terms of their observable properties in order to infer the influx rate of NEO`s (near-Earth objects) in the energy range from 0.2 to 1100 kt. The determined influx is in reasonable agreement with that determined by other methods currently available such as Rabinowitz (1992), Ceplecha, (1992; 1994b) and by Chapman and Morrison (1994) despite the fact that due to sampling deficiencies only a portion of the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} flux of large bodies has been obtained by this method, i.e., only sources at relatively low elevations have been detected. Thus the weak, fragile cometary bodies which do not penetrate the atmosphere as deeply are less likely to have been sampled by this type of detection system. Future work using the proposed C.T.B.T. (Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty) global scale infrasonic network will be likely to improve upon this early estimate of the global influx of NEO`s considerably.

  6. Acoustic-gravity modons in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Stenflo

    Full Text Available It is shown that the equations governing low-frequency acoustic-gravity waves in a stable stratified atmosphere can have localized dipole-vortex solutions (modons. They propagate in the horizontal direction with a speed that is larger than that of all possible linear internal waves.

  7. Gravity wave initiated convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The vertical velocity of convection initiated by gravity waves was investigated. In one particular case, the convective motion-initiated and supported by the gravity wave-induced activity (excluding contributions made by other mechanisms) reached its maximum value about one hour before the production of the funnel clouds. In another case, both rawinsonde and geosynchronous satellite imagery were used to study the life cycles of severe convective storms. Cloud modelling with input sounding data and rapid-scan imagery from GOES were used to investigate storm cloud formation, development and dissipation in terms of growth and collapse of cloud tops, as well as, the life cycles of the penetration of overshooting turrets above the tropopause. The results based on these two approaches are presented and discussed.

  8. The influence of solar wind on extratropical cyclones – Part 2: A link mediated by auroral atmospheric gravity waves?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Sofko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of mesoscale cloud bands in extratropical cyclones are observed a few hours after atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs are launched from the auroral ionosphere. It is suggested that the solar-wind-generated auroral AGWs contribute to processes that release instabilities and initiate slantwise convection thus leading to cloud bands and growth of extratropical cyclones. Also, if the AGWs are ducted to low latitudes, they could influence the development of tropical cyclones. The gravity-wave-induced vertical lift may modulate the slantwise convection by releasing the moist symmetric instability at near-threshold conditions in the warm frontal zone of extratropical cyclones. Latent heat release associated with the mesoscale slantwise convection has been linked to explosive cyclogenesis and severe weather. The circumstantial and statistical evidence of the solar wind influence on extratropical cyclones is further supported by a statistical analysis of high-level clouds (<440 mb extracted from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP D1 dataset. A statistically significant response of the high-level cloud area index (HCAI to fast solar wind from coronal holes is found in mid-to-high latitudes during autumn-winter and in low latitudes during spring-summer. In the extratropics, this response of the HCAI to solar wind forcing is consistent with the effect on tropospheric vorticity found by Wilcox et al. (1974 and verified by Prikryl et al. (2009. In the tropics, the observed HCAI response, namely a decrease in HCAI at the arrival of solar wind stream followed by an increase a few days later, is similar to that in the northern and southern mid-to-high latitudes. The amplitude of the response nearly doubles for stream interfaces associated with the interplanetary magnetic field BZ component shifting southward. When the IMF BZ after the stream interface shifts northward, the autumn-winter effect weakens or shifts to lower (mid latitudes

  9. Seasonal and height variations of gravity waves in the middle atmosphere over Syowa Station (69S, 40E) in the Antarctic using Rayleigh/Raman lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takuji; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Nishiyama, Takanori; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Kogure, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves generated in the lower atmosphere, or near the surface, propagate upward and transfer significant momentum and energy into the middle atmosphere/lower thermosphere. Recently it is known gravity waves are extensively generated in the high latitudes in the southern hemisphere, but not many have been reported on the generation, propagation and dissipation of such waves. In this study, we investigated gravity wave profiles in the high latitude southern hemisphere by potential energy (Ep) in the height range of 15-70 km from May 2011 to October 2013 by using Rayleigh/Raman lidar located at Syowa station (69S, 40E), in the Antarctic. Above 35km altitude, Ep was maximized during winter. The seasonal dependence of Ep over Syowa was similar to those observed at Davis (69S,79E) [Alexander et al., 2011]. Below 35 km altitude, Ep was enhanced in around May, and did not decrease in September. Almost all monthly mean profiles showed similar growth rate (corresponding scale height of about 12-14 km) above 30 km altitude. Furthermore, almost all Ep profiles have a local minimum around 25 km altitude and a local maximum around 20 km altitude, suggesting significant loss of the gravity waves between 20-25 km. In October 2012, The profile of Ep in October 2012 was quite different from those in the other months. Comparisons with zonal wind in the NASA/MERRA reanalysis data suggests that a height region of weak zonal winds descended earlier in 2012 than in the other years. This also suggests gravity waves below stratosphere include waves with slow phase speed.

  10. A study of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and Atmospheric Gravity Waves using EISCAT Svalbard Radar IPY-data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vlasov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical study of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs as observed by the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR during the continuous IPY-run (March 2007–February 2008 with field-aligned measurements. We have developed a semi-automatic routine for searching and extracting Atmospheric Gravity Wave (AGW activity. The collected data shows that AGW-TID signatures are common in the high-latitude ionosphere especially in the field-aligned ion velocity data (244 cases of AGW-TID signatures in daily records, but they can be observed also in electron density (26 cases, electron temperature (12 cases and ion temperature (26 cases. During the IPY campaign (in solar minimum conditions AGW-TID events appear more frequently during summer months than during the winter months. It remains still as a topic for future studies whether the observed seasonal variation is natural or caused by seasonal variation in the performance of the observational method that we use (AGW-TID signature may be more pronounced in a dense ionosphere. In our AGW-TID dataset the distribution of the oscillation periods has two peaks, one around 0.5–0.7 h and the other around 1.1–1.3 h. The diurnal occurrence rate has a deep minimum in the region of magnetic midnight, which might be partly explained by irregular auroral activity obscuring the TID signatures from our detection routines. As both the period and horizontal phase speed estimates (as derived from the classical AGW dispersion relation show values typical both for large scale TIDs and mesoscale TIDs it is difficult to distinguish whether the generator for high-latitude AGW-TIDs resides typically in the troposphere or in the near-Earth space. The results of our statistical analysis give anyway some valuable reference information for the future efforts to learn more about the dominating TID source mechanisms in polar cap conditions, and to improve AGW simulations.

  11. Results of Experimental and Theoretical Studies of the Atmospheric Turbulence, Internal Gravity Waves and Sporadic-E Layers by Resonant Scattering of Radio Waves on Artificial Periodic Irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmetieva, Nataliya V.; Grigoriev; Tolmacheva, Ariadna V.

    Artificial periodic irregularities (API) formed by the powerful standing radio waves in the ionospheric plasma give the good chance for the lower ionosphere comprehensive studies. In this paper we present some applications of the API technique for experimental studies of sporadic E-layers (E _{s}), internal gravity waves and turbulent events in the lower ionosphere. API are formed in the field of the standing radio wave produced by interference of the incident wave and reflected one from the ionosphere (in more details about the API technique one can see in the book Belikovich et al., Ionospheric Research by Means of Artificial Periodic Irregularities - Katlenburg-Lindau, Germany. 2002. Copernicus GmbH. ISBN 3-936586-03-9). The spatial period of the irregular structure is equal to the standing wavelength Lambda or one-half the powerful wavelength lambda/2. API diagnostics are carried out at the API relaxation or decay stage by their sounding of probing radio pulses. Based on the measurement of an amplitude and a phase of the API scattered signal their relaxation time and regular vertical plasma velocity are measured. In the E-region of the ionosphere API are formed as a result of the diffusion redistribution of the non-uniformly heated plasma. The relaxation of the periodic structure is specified by the ambipolar diffusion process. The diffusion time is tau=(K (2) D _{a}) (-1) where K=2pi/Lambda and D _{a} is the ambipolar diffusion rate. The atmospheric turbulence causes reduction of the API relaxation time in comparison the diffusion time. Determination of the turbulent velocity is based on this fact. The vertical plasma velocity is determined by measuring the phase of the scattered signal. Atmospheric waves having the periods from 5-10 minutes to 5-6 hours give the contribution to temporal variations of the velocity. Parameters and effects of atmospheric waves and the turbulence on the API relaxation process are presented. Determination of the masses of the

  12. Atmospheric Gravity Waves (AGWs) as the driver of seismo-ionospheric coupling: recent major earthquakes of Nepal and Imphal - case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta

    2016-07-01

    An important channel of the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling (LAIC) is the acoustic and gravity wave channel where the atmospheric gravity waves (AGW) play the most important part. Atmospheric waves are excited due to seismic gravitational vibrations before earthquakes and their effects on the atmosphere are the sources for seismo-ionospheric coupling which are manifested as perturbations in Very Low Frequency (VLF)/Low Frequency (LF) signal (amplitude/phase). For our study, we chose the recent major earthquakes that took place in Nepal and Imphal. The Nepal earthquake occurred on 12th May, 2015 at 12:50 pm local time (07:05 UTC) with Richter scale magnitude of M = 7.3 and depth 10 km (6.21 miles) at southeast of Kodari. The Imphal earthquake occurred on 4th January, 2016 at 4:35 am local time (23:05 UTC , 3rd January, UTC) with Richter scale magnitude of M = 6.7 and depth 55 km (34.2 miles). The data has been collected from Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Centre (IERC) of Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) transmitted from JJI station of Japan. We performed both Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and wavelet analysis on the VLF data for a couple of days before and after the major earthquakes. For both earthquakes, we observed wave like structures with periods of almost an hour before and after the earthquake day. The wave like oscillations after the earthquake may be due to the aftershock effects. We also observed that the amplitude of the wave like structures depends on the location of the epicenter between the transmitting and the receiving points and also on the depth of the earthquake.

  13. Weak turbulence of gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Dyachenko, A. I.; Korotkevich, A. O.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2003-01-01

    For the first time weak turbulent theory was demonstrated for the surface gravity waves. Direct numerical simulation of the dynamical equations shows Kolmogorov turbulent spectra as predicted by analytical analysis from kinetic equation.

  14. Squids, brains and gravity waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting quantum interference devices are so sensitive to magnetic flux that they can map the tiny magnetic fields emanating from the human brain and detect the submicroscopic motions of gravity-wave detectors

  15. Surface gravity-wave lensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elandt, Ryan B; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-02-01

    Here we show that a nonlinear resonance between oceanic surface waves caused by small seabed features (the so-called Bragg resonance) can be utilized to create the equivalent of lenses and curved mirrors for surface gravity waves. Such gravity wave lenses, which are merely small changes to the seafloor topography and therefore are surface noninvasive, can focus or defocus the energy of incident waves toward or away from any desired focal point. We further show that for a broadband incident wave spectrum (i.e., a wave group composed of a multitude of different-frequency waves), a polychromatic topography (occupying no more than the area required for a monochromatic lens) can achieve a broadband lensing effect. Gravity wave lenses can be utilized to create localized high-energy wave zones (e.g., for wave energy harvesting or creating artificial surf zones) as well as to disperse waves in order to create protected areas (e.g., harbors or areas near important offshore facilities). In reverse, lensing of oceanic waves may be caused by natural seabed features and may explain the frequent appearance of very high amplitude waves in certain bodies of water. PMID:25353576

  16. Internal wave coupling processes in Earth's atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Yiğit, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a contemporary review of vertical coupling in the atmosphere and ionosphere system induced by internal waves of lower atmospheric origin. Atmospheric waves are primarily generated by meteorological processes, possess a broad range of spatial and temporal scales, and can propagate to the upper atmosphere. A brief summary of internal wave theory is given, focusing on gravity waves, solar tides, planetary Rossby and Kelvin waves. Observations of wave signatures in the upper atmosphere, their relationship with the direct propagation of waves into the upper atmosphere, dynamical and thermal impacts as well as concepts, approaches, and numerical modeling techniques are outlined. Recent progress in studies of sudden stratospheric warming and upper atmospheric variability are discussed in the context of wave-induced vertical coupling between the lower and upper atmosphere.

  17. Stabilization of gravity water waves

    OpenAIRE

    Alazard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the stabilization of the incompressible Euler equation with free surface. We study the damping of two-dimensional gravity waves by an absorbing beach where the water-wave energy is dissipated by using the variations of the external pressure.

  18. Magneto-atmospheric waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical treatment of magneto-atmospheric waves is presented and applied to the modelling of waves in the solar atmosphere. The waves arise in compressible, stratified, electrically conductive atmospheres within gravitational fields when permeated by a magnetic field. Compression, buoyancy, and distortion of the magnetic field all contribute to the existence of the waves. Basic linearized equations are introduced to describe the waves and attention is given to plane-stratified atmospheres and their stability. A dispersion relation is defined for wave propagation in a plane-stratified atmosphere when there are no plane-wave solutions. Solutions are found for the full wave equation in the presence of either a vertical or a horizontal magnetic field. The theory is applied to describing waves in sunspots, in penumbrae, and flare-induced coronal disturbances.

  19. Acoustic-gravity waves in a viscous and thermally conducting isothermal atmosphere (part III: for arbitrary Prandtl number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Yahya Alkahby

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will investigate the combined effect of Newtonian cooling, viscosity and thermal condition on upward propagating acoustic waves in an isothermal atmosphere. In part one of this series we considered the case of large Prandtl number, while in part two we investigated the case of small Prandtl number. In those parts we examined only the limiting cases, i.e. the cases of small and large Prandtl number, and it is more interesting to consider the case of arbitrary Prandtl number, which is the subject of this paper, because it is a better representative model. It is shown that if the Newtonian cooling coefficient is small compared to the frequency of the wave, the effect of the thermal conduction is dominated by that of the viscosity. Moreover, the solution can be written as a linear combination of an upward and a downward propagating wave with equal wavelengths and equal damping factors. On the other hand if Newtonian cooling is large compared to the frequency of the wave the effect of thermal conduction will be eliminated completely and the atmosphere will be transformed from the adiabatic form to an isothermal. In addition, all the linear relations among the perturbations quantities will be modified. It follows from the above conclusions and those of the first two parts, that when the effect of Newtonian cooling is negligible thermal conduction influences the propagation of the wave only in the case of small Prandtl number.

  20. A case study of gravity waves in noctilucent clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dalin

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of a noctilucent cloud (NLC display appearing on 10-11 August 2000 over Northern Sweden. Clear wave structures were visible in the clouds and time-lapse photography was used to derive the parameters characterising the gravity waves which could account for the observed NLC modulation. Using two nearby atmospheric radars, the Esrange MST Radar data and Andoya MF radar, we have identified gravity waves propagating upward from the upper stratosphere to NLC altitudes. The wave parameters derived from the radar measurements support the suggestion that gravity waves are responsible for the observed complex wave dynamics in the NLC.

  1. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere. PMID:24606251

  2. Radio scintillations observed during atmospheric occultations of Voyager: Internal gravity waves at Titan and magnetic field orientations at Jupiter and Saturn. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    The refractive index of planetary atmospheres at microwave frequencies is discussed. Physical models proposed for the refractive irregularities in the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere serve to characterize the atmospheric scattering structures, and are used subsequently to compute theoretical scintillation spectra for comparison with the Voyager occultation measurements. A technique for systematically analyzing and interpreting the signal fluctuations observed during planetary occultations is presented and applied to process the dual-wavelength data from the Voyager radio occultations by Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan. Results concerning the plasma irregularities in the upper ionospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are reported. The measured orientation of the irregularities is used to infer the magnetic field direction at several locations in the ionospheres of these two planets; the occultation measurements conflict with the predictions of Jovian magnetic field models, but generally confirm current models of Saturn's field. Wave parameters, including the vertical fluxes of energy and momentum, are estimated, and the source of the internal gravity waves discovered in Titan's upper atmosphere is considered.

  3. The wave of the future - Searching for gravity waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on gravity waves conducted by such scientists as Gamov, Wheeler, Weber and Zel'dovich is discussed. Particular attention is given to current trends in the theoretical analysis of gravity waves carried out by theorists Kip Thorne and Leonid Grishchuk. The problems discussed include the search for gravity waves; calculation of the types of gravity waves; the possibility of detecting gravity waves from localized sources, e.g., from the collision of two black holes in a distant galaxy or the collapse of a star, through the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory; and detection primordial gravity waves from the big bang

  4. The wave of the future - Searching for gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Donald

    1991-04-01

    Research on gravity waves conducted by such scientists as Gamov, Wheeler, Weber and Zel'dovich is discussed. Particular attention is given to current trends in the theoretical analysis of gravity waves carried out by theorists Kip Thorne and Leonid Grishchuk. The problems discussed include the search for gravity waves; calculation of the types of gravity waves; the possibility of detecting gravity waves from localized sources, e.g., from the collision of two black holes in a distant galaxy or the collapse of a star, through the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory; and detection primordial gravity waves from the big bang.

  5. The wave of the future - Searching for gravity waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, D.

    1991-04-01

    Research on gravity waves conducted by such scientists as Gamov, Wheeler, Weber and Zel'dovich is discussed. Particular attention is given to current trends in the theoretical analysis of gravity waves carried out by theorists Kip Thorne and Leonid Grishchuk. The problems discussed include the search for gravity waves; calculation of the types of gravity waves; the possibility of detecting gravity waves from localized sources, e.g., from the collision of two black holes in a distant galaxy or the collapse of a star, through the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory; and detection primordial gravity waves from the big bang.

  6. On the Synchronization of Acoustic Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonngren, Karl E.; Bai, Er-Wei

    Using the model proposed by Stenflo, we demonstrate that acoustic gravity waves found in one region of space can be synchronized with acoustic gravity waves found in another region of space using techniques from modern control theory.

  7. Nonlinear acoustic-gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Stenflo, Lennart; Shukla, P. K.

    2009-01-01

    Previous results on nonlinear acoustic-gravity waves are reconsidered. It turns out that the mathematical techniques used are somewhat similar to those already adopted by the plasma physics community. Consequently, a future interaction between physicists On different fields, e.g in meteorology and plasma physics, can be very fruitful.

  8. A case study of gravity waves in noctilucent clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Dalin, P.; Kirkwood, S.; A. Moström; K. Stebel; Hoffmann, P.; Singer, W.

    2004-01-01

    We present a case study of a noctilucent cloud (NLC) display appearing on 10-11 August 2000 over Northern Sweden. Clear wave structures were visible in the clouds and time-lapse photography was used to derive the parameters characterising the gravity waves which could account for the observed NLC modulation. Using two nearby atmospheric radars, the Esrange MST Radar data and Andoya MF radar, we have identified gravity waves propagating upward from the upper stratosphere to NLC altitudes. The ...

  9. Waves in vertically inhomogeneous dissipative atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitrienko, I S

    2015-01-01

    A method of construction of solution for acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) above a wave source, taking dissipation throughout the atmosphere into account (Dissipative Solution above Source, DSAS), is proposed. The method is to combine three solutions for three parts of the atmosphere: an analytical solution for the upper isothermal part and numerical solutions for the real non-isothermal dissipative atmosphere in the middle part and for the real non-isothermal small dissipation atmosphere in the lower one. In this paper the method has been carried out for the atmosphere with thermal conductivity but without viscosity. The heights of strong dissipation and the total absorption index in the regions of weak and average dissipation are found. For internal gravity waves the results of test calculations for an isothermal atmosphere and calculations for a real non-isothermal atmosphere are shown in graphical form. An algorithm and appropriate code to calculate DSAS, taking dissipation due to finite thermal conductivity i...

  10. Reflection of internal gravity waves from the mesospheric waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequency spectrum of internal gravity waves formed at their incidence at the plane atmospheric layer with Brent increased frequency representing a wave guide for IGW, is studied. The amplitude of reflection (passing) coefficient oscillations increases when frequency of incident wave approaches Brent Frequency. 3 refs

  11. Inherently Unstable Internal Gravity Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Here we show that there exist internal gravity waves that are inherently unstable, that is, they cannot exist in nature for a long time. The instability mechanism is a one-way (irreversible) harmonic-generation resonance that permanently transfers the energy of an internal wave to its higher harmonics. We show that, in fact, there are countably infinite number of such unstable waves. For the harmonic-generation resonance to take place, nonlinear terms in the free surface boundary condition play a pivotal role, and the instability does not obtain if a simplified boundary condition such as rigid lid or linear form is employed. Harmonic-generation resonance presented here also provides a mechanism for the transfer of the energy of the internal waves to the higher-frequency part of the spectrum where internal waves are more prone to breaking, hence losing energy to turbulence and heat and contributing to oceanic mixing.

  12. Exponential asymptotics and gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, S. J.; Vanden-Broeck, J.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of irrotational inviscid incompressible free-surface flow is examined in the limit of small Froude number. Since this is a singular perturbation, singularities in the flow field (or its analytic continuation) such as stagnation points, or corners in submerged objects or on rough beds, lead to a divergent asymptotic expansion, with associated Stokes lines. Recent techniques in exponential asymptotics are employed to observe the switching on of exponentially small gravity waves acro...

  13. Gravity Waves in Three Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Gurses, Metin; Tekin, Bayram

    2015-01-01

    We find the explicit forms of the anti-de Sitter plane, anti-de Sitter spherical, and pp waves that solve both the linearized and exact field equations of the most general higher derivative gravity theory in three dimensions. As a sub-class, we work out the six derivative theory and the critical version of it where the masses of the two spin-2 excitations vanish and the spin-0 excitations decouple.

  14. The study and applications of photochemical-dynamical gravity wave model Ⅱ-- The effects of stable gravity wave on chemical species distribution in mesosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A nonlinear, compressible, non-isothermal gravity wave model that involves photochemistry is used to study the effects of gravity wave on atmospheric chemical species distributions in this paper. The changes in the distributions of oxygen compound and hydrogen compound density induced by gravity wave propagation are simulated. The results indicate that when a gravity wave propagates through a mesopause region, even if it does not break, it can influence the background distributions of chemical species. The effect of gravity wave on chemical species at night is larger than in daytime.

  15. Ionospheric disturbances and gravity waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of ionization to a gravity wave moving through the ionosphere is studied. Hydrodynamic equations are used, and local thermodynamic equilibrium is imposed for simplicity. The treatment involves a perturbation analysis, and the background medium is assumed to be time stationary, horizontally stratified, and known. It is shown that ionization may be locally resonant at each level for certain frequencies and directions, for which condition neutral and ionized particles are considered closely or critically coupled. The phase direction for this critical coupling is always downward in the absence of a magnetic field. A magnetic field results in two resonant directions for the same frequency, and these directions are mostly downward. Observed TID's associated with gravity waves may be indicative of such resonances. It is also noted that strong coupling may occur to neutral acoustic waves at high altitudes. Previous investigations restrict their use of momentum equations to the diffusion equation. The analysis also shows that such restrictions result in the neglect of terms arising from momentum transport due to any background ambipolar diffusion velocity and wave motion. These terms are mostly relevant at higher altitudes

  16. Satellite observations of the QBO wave driving by Kelvin waves and gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Kalisch, Silvio; Riese, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of the zonal wind in the tropical stratosphere is an important process in atmospheric dynamics influencing a wide range of altitudes and latitudes. Effects of the QBO are found also in the mesosphere and in the extra-tropics. The QBO even has influence on the surface weather and climate, for example during winter in the northern hemisphere at midlatitudes. Still, climate models have large difficulties in reproducing a realistic QBO. One reason for this deficiency are uncertainties in the wave driving by planetary waves and, in particular, gravity waves that are usually too small-scale to be resolved in global models. Different global equatorial wave modes (e.g., Kelvin waves) have been identified by longitude-time 2D spectral analysis in Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) satellite temperature data, as well as ECMWF temperatures. We find good agreement between SABER satellite observations and ECMWF wave variances in both QBO-related temporal variations and their magnitude. Slow phase speed waves are strongly modulated by the QBO, higher phase speed waves are almost unaffected by the QBO, and ultra-fast equatorial waves can even reach the MLT region. Momentum fluxes and zonal wind drag due to Kelvin waves are derived, and the relative contribution of Kelvin waves to the QBO wind reversal from westward to eastward wind is estimated to be about 30% of the total wave driving. This is in good agreement with the general assumption that gravity waves (GWs) are probably more important for the QBO driving than global-scale waves. This is further supported by SABER and High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) satellite observations of gravity wave drag in the equatorial region. These observations are compared with the drag still missing in the ECMWF ERA Interim (ERAI) tropical momentum budget after considering zonal wind tendency, Coriolis force, advection terms and drag of resolved global

  17. Nonlinear interactions between gravity waves and tides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao; XU JiYao; MA RuiPing

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we present the nonlinear interactions between gravity waves (GWs) and tides by using the 2D numerical model for the nonlinear propagation of GWs in the compressible atmosphere. During the propagation in the tidal background, GWs become instable in three regions, that is z = 75-85 km, z =90-110 km and z= 115-130 km. The vertical wavelength firstly varies gradually from the initial 12 km to 27 km. Then the newly generated longer waves are gradually compressed. The longer and shorter waves occur in the regions where GWs propagate in the reverse and the same direction of the horizontal mean wind respectively. In addition, GWs can propagate above the main breaking region (90-110 km). During GWs propagation, not only the mean wind is accelerated, but also the amplitude of tide is amplified. Especially, after GWs become instable, this amplified effect to the tidal amplitude is much obvious.

  18. Nonlinear interactions between gravity waves and tides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we present the nonlinear interactions between gravity waves (GWs) and tides by using the 2D numerical model for the nonlinear propagation of GWs in the compressible atmosphere. During the propagation in the tidal background, GWs become instable in three regions, that is z = 75―85 km, z = 90―110 km and z = 115―130 km. The vertical wavelength firstly varies gradually from the initial 12 km to 27 km. Then the newly generated longer waves are gradually compressed. The longer and shorter waves occur in the regions where GWs propagate in the reverse and the same direction of the hori-zontal mean wind respectively. In addition, GWs can propagate above the main breaking region (90—110 km). During GWs propagation, not only the mean wind is accelerated, but also the amplitude of tide is amplified. Especially, after GWs become instable, this amplified effect to the tidal amplitude is much obvious.

  19. Role of gravity waves in vertical coupling during sudden stratospheric warmings

    CERN Document Server

    Yiğit, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Gravity waves are primarily generated in the lower atmosphere, and can reach thermospheric heights in the course of their propagation. This paper reviews the recent progress in understanding the role of gravity waves in vertical coupling during sudden stratospheric warmings. Modeling of gravity wave effects is briefly reviewed, and the recent developments in the field are presented. Then, the impact of these waves on the general circulation of the upper atmosphere is outlined. Finally, the role of gravity waves in vertical coupling between the lower and the upper atmosphere is discussed in the context of sudden stratospheric warmings.

  20. Early Direct Detection of Gravity Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Fakir, Redouane

    1993-01-01

    Recently, the possibility has emerged of an early detection of astrophysical gravity waves. In certain astronomical configurations, and through a new light-deflection effect, gravity waves can cause apparent shifts in stellar angular positions as large as $10^{-7}arcsec$. In these same configurations, the magnitude of the gravity-wave-induced time-delay effect can exceed $10^{-14}$. Both these figures lie just at present-day theoretical limits of detectability. For instance, cases are describ...

  1. Gravity Wave Seeding of Equatorial Plasma Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sardul; Johnson, F. S.; Power, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Some examples from the Atmosphere Explorer E data showing plasma bubble development from wavy ion density structures in the bottomside F layer are described. The wavy structures mostly had east-west wavelengths of 150-800 km, in one example it was about 3000 km. The ionization troughs in the wavy structures later broke up into either a multiple-bubble patch or a single bubble, depending upon whether, in the precursor wavy structure, shorter wavelengths were superimposed on the larger scale wavelengths. In the multiple bubble patches, intrabubble spacings vaned from 55 km to 140 km. In a fully developed equatorial spread F case, east-west wavelengths from 690 km down to about 0.5 km were present simultaneously. The spacings between bubble patches or between bubbles in a patch appear to be determined by the wavelengths present in the precursor wave structure. In some cases, deeper bubbles developed on the western edge of a bubble patch, suggesting an east-west asymmetry. Simultaneous horizontal neutral wind measurements showed wavelike perturbations that were closely associated with perturbations in the plasma horizontal drift velocity. We argue that the wave structures observed here that served as the initial seed ion density perturbations were caused by gravity waves, strengthening the view that gravity waves seed equatorial spread F irregularities.

  2. On the unstable mode merging of gravity-inertial waves with Rossby waves

    OpenAIRE

    Mckenzie, J. F.

    2011-01-01

    We recapitulate the results of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves in a rotating, stratified atmosphere. The system is shown to exhibit a "local" (JWKB) instability whenever the phase speed of the low-frequency-long wavelength westward propagating Rossby wave exceeds the phase speed ("Kelvin" speed) of the high frequency-short wavelength gravity-inertial wave. This condition ensures that mode merging, leading to instability, takes place in some intermediat...

  3. Dissipation of acoustic-gravity waves: an asymptotic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves in the middle and upper atmosphere and long-range propagation of infrasound are strongly affected by air viscosity and thermal conductivity. To characterize the wave dissipation, it is typical to consider idealized environments, which admit plane-wave solutions. Here, an asymptotic approach is developed that relies instead on the assumption that spatial variations of environmental parameters are gradual. It is found that realistic assumptions about the atmosphere lead to rather different predictions for wave damping than do the plane-wave solutions. A modification to the Sutherland-Bass model of infrasound absorption is proposed. PMID:25480091

  4. Wave Propagation in Modified Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Lindroos, Jan Ø; Mota, David F

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of scalar waves induced by matter sources in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity which include screening mechanisms for the scalar degree of freedom. The usual approach when studying these theories in the non-linear regime of cosmological perturbations is based on the assumption that scalar waves travel at the speed of light. Within General Relativity such approximation is good and leads to no loss of accuracy in the estimation of observables. We find, however, that mass terms and non-linearities in the equations of motion lead to propagation and dispersion velocities significantly different from the speed of light. As the group velocity is the one associated to the propagation of signals, a reduction of its value has direct impact on the behavior and dynamics of nonlinear structures within modified gravity theories with screening. For instance, the internal dynamics of galaxies and satellites submerged in large dark matter halos could be affected by the fact that t...

  5. Absorbing boundary conditions for linear gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Dgaygui, Kebir; Joly, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    In this article, we construct, analyze and implement a family of absorbing boundary conditions for linear gravity waves in dimension 2. The main difficulty consists in taking into account the dispersive nature of these waves.

  6. Vain is the pursuit of gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Loinger, A.

    1999-01-01

    The modern apparatuses for the detection of the gravity waves are devised with the purpose to exploit the geodesic deviation generated by them. But the pseudo energy-momentum of these waves cannot exert any physical action on the apparatuses.

  7. Waves in Radial Gravity Using Magnetic Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsen, D. R.; Hart, J. E.; Weidman, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    Terrestrial laboratory experiments studying various fluid dynamical processes are constrained, by being in an Earth laboratory, to have a gravitational body force which is uniform and unidirectional. Therefore fluid free-surfaces are horizontal and flat. Such free surfaces must have a vertical solid boundary to keep the fluid from spreading horizontally along a gravitational potential surface. In atmospheric, oceanic, or stellar fluid flows that have a horizontal scale of about one-tenth the body radius or larger, sphericity is important in the dynamics. Further, fluids in spherical geometry can cover an entire domain without any sidewall effects, i.e. have truly periodic boundary conditions. We describe spherical body-force laboratory experiments using ferrofluid. Ferrofluids are dilute suspensions of magnetic dipoles, for example magnetite particles of order 10 nm diameter, suspended in a carrier fluid. Ferrofluids are subject to an additional body force in the presence of an applied magnetic field gradient. We use this body force to conduct laboratory experiments in spherical geometry. The present study is a laboratory technique improvement. The apparatus is cylindrically axisymmetric. A cylindrical ceramic magnet is embedded in a smooth, solid, spherical PVC ball. The geopotential field and its gradient, the body force, were made nearly spherical by careful choice of magnet height-to-diameter ratio and magnet size relative to the PVC ball size. Terrestrial gravity is eliminated from the dynamics by immersing the "planet" and its ferrofluid "ocean" in an immiscible silicone oil/freon mixture of the same density. Thus the earth gravity is removed from the dynamics of the ferrofluid/oil interface and the only dynamically active force there is the radial magnetic gravity. The entire apparatus can rotate, and waves are forced on the ferrofluid surface by exterior magnets. The biggest improvement in technique is in the wave visualization. Fluorescing dye is added to

  8. Observation of TEC perturbation associated with medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance and possible seeding mechanism of atmospheric gravity wave at a Brazilian sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonah, O. F.; Kherani, E. A.; De Paula, E. R.

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, we document daytime total electron content (TEC) disturbances associated with medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs), on few chosen geomagnetically quiet days over Southern Hemisphere of Brazilian longitude sector. These disturbances are derived from TEC data obtained using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receiver networks. From the keograms and cross-correlation maps, the TEC disturbances are identified as the MSTIDs that are propagating equatorward-eastward, having most of their average wavelengths longer in latitude than in longitude direction. These are the important outcomes of the present study which suggest that the daytime MSTIDs over Southern Hemisphere are similar to their counterparts in the Northern Hemisphere. Another important outcome is that the occurrence characteristics of these MSTIDs and that of atmospheric gravity wave (AGW) activities in the thermosphere are found to be similar on day-to-day basis. This suggests a possible connection between them, confirming the widely accepted AGW forcing mechanism for the generation of these daytime MSTIDs. The source of this AGW is investigated using the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite system (GOES) and Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate satellite data. Finally, we provided evidences that AGWs are generated by convection activities from the tropospheric region.

  9. Gravity Waves on Hot Extrasolar Planets: I. Propagation and Interaction with the Background

    OpenAIRE

    Watkins, Chris; Cho, James Y-K.

    2010-01-01

    We study the effects of gravity waves, or g-modes, on hot extrasolar planets. These planets are expected to possess stably-stratified atmospheres, which support gravity waves. In this paper, we review the derivation of the equation that governs the linear dynamics of gravity waves and describe its application to a hot extrasolar planet, using HD209458 b as a generic example. We find that gravity waves can exhibit a wide range of behaviors, even for a single atmospheric profile. The waves can ...

  10. Gravity wave characteristics in the middle atmosphere during the CESAR campaign at Palma de Mallorca in 2011/2012: Impact of extratropical cyclones and cold fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, R.; Wüst, S.; Schmidt, C.; Bittner, M.

    2015-06-01

    Based on a measuring campaign which was carried out at Mallorca (39.6°N, 2.7°E) as cooperation between Agència Estatal de Meteorologia (AEMET) and Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, engl. 'German Aerospace Center' (DLR) in 2011/2012 (September-January), 143 radiosondes (day and night) providing vertical temperature and wind profiles were released. Additionally, nocturnal mesopause temperature measurements with a temporal resolution of about 1 min were conducted by the infrared (IR) - Ground-based Infrared P-branch Spectrometer (GRIPS) during the campaign period. Strongly enhanced gravity wave activity in the lower stratosphere is observed which can be attributed to a hurricane-like storm (so-called Medicane) and to passing by cold fronts. Statistical features of gravity wave parameters including energy densitiy and momentum fluxes are calculated. Gravity wave momentum fluxes turned out being up to five times larger during severe weather. Moreover, gravity wave horizontal propagation characteristics are derived applying hodograph and Stokes parameter analysis. Preferred directions are of southeast and northwest due to prevailing wind directions at Mallorca.

  11. Transversally periodic solitary gravity-capillary waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, Paul A; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravity-capillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravity-capillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles. PMID:24399922

  12. Role of Gravity Waves in Determining Cirrus Cloud Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    OCStarr, David; Singleton, Tamara; Lin, Ruei-Fong

    2008-01-01

    Cirrus clouds are important in the Earth's radiation budget. They typically exhibit variable physical properties within a given cloud system and from system to system. Ambient vertical motion is a key factor in determining the cloud properties in most cases. The obvious exception is convectively generated cirrus (anvils), but even in this case, the subsequent cloud evolution is strongly influenced by the ambient vertical motion field. It is well know that gravity waves are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and occur over a wide range of scales and amplitudes. Moreover, researchers have found that inclusion of statistical account of gravity wave effects can markedly improve the realism of simulations of persisting large-scale cirrus cloud features. Here, we use a 1 -dimensional (z) cirrus cloud model, to systematically examine the effects of gravity waves on cirrus cloud properties. The model includes a detailed representation of cloud microphysical processes (bin microphysics and aerosols) and is run at relatively fine vertical resolution so as to adequately resolve nucleation events, and over an extended time span so as to incorporate the passage of multiple gravity waves. The prescribed gravity waves "propagate" at 15 m s (sup -1), with wavelengths from 5 to 100 km, amplitudes range up to 1 m s (sup -1)'. Despite the fact that the net gravity wave vertical motion forcing is zero, it will be shown that the bulk cloud properties, e.g., vertically-integrated ice water path, can differ quite significantly from simulations without gravity waves and that the effects do depend on the wave characteristics. We conclude that account of gravity wave effects is important if large-scale models are to generate realistic cirrus cloud property climatology (statistics).

  13. LAICE CubeSat mission for gravity wave studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhoff, John; Earle, Gregory; Bishop, Rebecca; Swenson, Gary R.; Vadas, Sharon; Clemmons, James; Davidson, Ryan; Fanelli, Lucy; Fish, Chad; Garg, Vidur; Ghosh, Alex; Jagannatha, Bindu B.; Kroeker, Erik; Marquis, Peter; Martin, Daniel; Noel, Stephen; Orr, Cameron; Robertson, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The Lower Atmosphere/Ionosphere Coupling Experiment (LAICE) CubeSat mission will focus on understanding the interaction of atmospheric gravity waves generated by weather systems in the lower atmosphere with the mesosphere, lower thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI). Specifically, LAICE will focus on the energy and momentum delivered by these waves and attempt to connect the wave sources and the wave effects in three widely different altitude ranges, substantially adding to our knowledge of critical coupling processes between disparate atmospheric regions. The LAICE mission consists of a 6U CubeSat with a four-instrument payload. The retarding potential analyzer (RPA) will provide in-situ ion density and temperature measurements. A four-channel photometer will measure density and temperature variations in the mesosphere through observations of O2 (0, 0) Atmospheric band and O2 Herzberg I band airglows. There are two pressure sensors that comprise the Space Pressure Suite (SPS): the Space Neutral Pressure Instrument (SNeuPI) and the LAICE Ionization gauge Neutral Atmosphere Sensor (LINAS). Both will provide neutral density measurements, but SNeuPI is a prototype sensor that will be validated by LINAS. This CubeSat mission, scheduled for launch in early 2016 from the International Space Station, provides a cost-effective approach to measuring low altitude in-situ parameters along with simultaneous imaging that is capable of addressing the fundamental questions of atmospheric gravity wave coupling in the MLTI region.

  14. Renormalization of Gravity and Gravitational Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Pardy, Miroslav

    2001-01-01

    Strictly respecting the Einstein equations and supposing space-time is a medium, we derive the deformation of this medium by gravity. We derive the deformation in case of infinite plane, Robertson-Walker manifold, Schwarzschild manifold and gravitational waves. Some singularities are removed or changed. We call this procedure renormalization of gravity. We show that some results following from the classical gravity must be modified.

  15. Primordial gravitational waves from conformal gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations generated during de Sitter inflation in the conformal gravity. Primordial gravitational waves are composed of vector and tensor modes. We obtain the constant vector and tensor power spectra which seems to be correct because the conformal gravity is invariant under conformal transformation like the Maxwell kinetic term.

  16. Nonlinear interaction between acoustic gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    P. Axelsson; J. Larsson; Stenflo, L.

    1996-01-01

    The resonant interaction between three acoustic gravity waves is considered. We improve on the results of previous authors and write the new coupling coefficients in a symmetric form. Particular attention is paid to the low-frequency limit.

  17. Overhanging interfacial gravity waves of large amplitude

    OpenAIRE

    Meiron, D. I.; Saffman, P G

    1983-01-01

    Methods to investigate the existence of overhanging gravity waves of permanent form at the interface between two uniform fluids of different density are discussed. Numerical results which demonstrate their existence are presented.

  18. Gravitational waves in fourth order gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozziello, S.; Stabile, A.

    2015-08-01

    In the post-Minkowskian limit approximation, we study gravitational wave solutions for general fourth-order theories of gravity. Specifically, we consider a Lagrangian with a generic function of curvature invariants . It is well known that when dealing with General Relativity such an approach provides massless spin-two waves as propagating degree of freedom of the gravitational field while this theory implies other additional propagating modes in the gravity spectra. We show that, in general, fourth order gravity, besides the standard massless graviton is characterized by two further massive modes with a finite-distance interaction. We find out the most general gravitational wave solutions in terms of Green functions in vacuum and in presence of matter sources. If an electromagnetic source is chosen, only the modes induced by are present, otherwise, for any gravity model, we have the complete analogy with tensor modes of General Relativity. Polarizations and helicity states are classified in the hypothesis of plane wave.

  19. f(R) gravity constraints from gravity waves

    CERN Document Server

    Vainio, Jaakko

    2016-01-01

    The recent LIGO observation sparked interest in the field of gravity wave signals. Besides the gravity wave observation the LIGO collaboration used the inspiraling black hole pair to constrain the graviton mass. Unlike general relativity, $f(R)$ theories have a characteristic non-zero mass graviton. We apply the constraint on the graviton mass to viable $f(R)$ models to find the effects on model parameters. We find it possible to constrain the parameter space with the gravity wave based observations. We make a case study for the popular Hu-Sawicki model and find a parameter bracket. The result generalizes to other $f(R)$ theories and can be used to contain the parameter space.

  20. Gravity waves from cosmic bubble collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Michael P.; Saraswat, Prashant; Shaghoulian, Edgar

    2013-02-01

    Our local Hubble volume might be contained within a bubble that nucleated in a false vacuum with only two large spatial dimensions. We study bubble collisions in this scenario and find that they generate gravity waves, which are made possible in this context by the reduced symmetry of the global geometry. These gravity waves would produce B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which could in principle dominate over the inflationary background.

  1. Gravity waves from cosmic bubble collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Salem, Michael P; Shaghoulian, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    Our local Hubble volume might be contained within a bubble that nucleated in a false vacuum with only two large spatial dimensions. We study bubble collisions in this scenario and find that they generate gravity waves, which are made possible in this context by the reduced symmetry of the global geometry. These gravity waves would produce B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which could in principle dominate over the inflationary background.

  2. Gravity waves from cosmic bubble collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our local Hubble volume might be contained within a bubble that nucleated in a false vacuum with only two large spatial dimensions. We study bubble collisions in this scenario and find that they generate gravity waves, which are made possible in this context by the reduced symmetry of the global geometry. These gravity waves would produce B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which could in principle dominate over the inflationary background

  3. Buoyancy waves in Pluto's high atmosphere: Implications for stellar occultations

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, W B; Kulesa, C A; Benecchi, S D; Person, M J; Elliot, J L; Gulbis, A A S

    2009-01-01

    We apply scintillation theory to stellar signal fluctuations in the high-resolution, high signal/noise, dual-wavelength data from the MMT observation of the 2007 March 18 occultation of P445.3 by Pluto. A well-defined high wavenumber cutoff in the fluctuations is consistent with viscous-thermal dissipation of buoyancy waves (internal gravity waves) in Pluto's high atmosphere, and provides strong evidence that the underlying density fluctuations are governed by the gravity-wave dispersion relation.

  4. Acoustic-gravity waves, theory and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Usama; Farrell, William E.; Munk, Walter

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) propagate in the ocean under the influence of both the compressibility of sea water and the restoring force of gravity. The gravity dependence vanishes if the wave vector is normal to the ocean surface, but becomes increasingly important as the wave vector acquires a horizontal tilt. They are excited by many sources, including non-linear surface wave interactions, disturbances of the ocean bottom (submarine earthquakes and landslides) and underwater explosions. In this introductory lecture on acoustic-gravity waves, we describe their properties, and their relation to organ pipe modes, to microseisms, and to deep ocean signatures by short surface waves. We discuss the generation of AGW by underwater earthquakes; knowledge of their behaviour with water depth can be applied for the early detection of tsunamis. We also discuss their generation by the non-linear interaction of surface gravity waves, which explains the major role they play in transforming energy from the ocean surface to the crust, as part of the microseisms phenomenon. Finally, they contribute to horizontal water transport at depth, which might affect benthic life.

  5. Behavior of gravity waves with limited amplitude in the vicinity of critical layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By using the FICE scheme, a numerical simulation of three-dimensional nonlinear propagation of gravity wave packet in a wind-stratified atmosphere is presented. The whole nonlinear propagation process of the gravity wave packet is shown; the propagation behavior of gravity waves in the vicinity of critical layer is analyzed. The results show that gravity waves encounter the critical layer when propagating in the fair winds whose velocities increase with height, and the height of critical layer propagating nonlinearly is lower than that expected by the linear gravity waves theory; the amplitudes of gravity waves increase with height as a whole before gravity waves encounter the critical layer, but the increasing extent is smaller than the result given by the linear theory of gravity waves, while the amplitudes of gravity waves reduce when gravity waves meet the critical layer; the energy of wave decreases with height, especially at the critical layer; the vertical wavelength reduces with the height increasing, but it does not become zero.

  6. Background Lamb waves in the Earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Fukao, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Lamb waves of the Earth's atmosphere in the millihertz band have been considered as transient phenomena excited only by large events [e.g. the major volcanic eruption of Krakatoa in 1833, the impact of Siberian meteorite in 1908, the testing of large nuclear tests and the huge earthquakes, Garrett1969]. In a case of the solid Earth, observation of background free oscillations in the millihertz band-now known as Earth's background free oscillations or seismic hum, has been firmly established. Above 5 mHz, their dominant excitation sources are oceanic infragravity waves. At 3.7 and 4.4 mHz an elasto-acoustic resonance between the solid Earth and the atmosphere was observed [Nishida et al., 2000]. These seismic observations show that the contribution of atmospheric disturbances to the seismic hum is dominant below 5 mHz. Such contribution implies background excitations of acoustic-gravity waves in this frequency range. For direct detection of the background acoustic-gravity waves, our group conducted observations using an array of barometers [Nishida et al. 2005]. However, the spatial scale of the array of about 10 km was too small to detect acoustic modes below 10 mHz. Since then, no direct observations of these waves have been reported. In 2011, 337 high-resolution microbarometers were installed on a continental scale at USArray Transportable Array. The large and dense array enables us to detect the background atmospheric waves. Here, we show the first evidence of background Lamb waves in the Earth's atmosphere from 0.2 to 10 mHz, based on the array analysis of microbarometer data from the USArray in 2012. The observations suggest that the excitation sources are atmospheric disturbances in the troposphere. Theoretically, their energy in the troposphere tunnels into the thermosphere at a resonant frequency via thermospheric gravity wave, where the observed amplitudes indeed take a local minimum. The energy leak through the frequency window could partly contribute to

  7. Gravitational waves in geometric scalar gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Toniato, J D

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the description of gravitational waves in the geometric scalar theory of gravity (GSG). The GSG belongs to a class of theories such that gravity is described by a single scalar field and the associated physical metric describing the spacetime is constructed from a disformal transformation of Minkowski geometry. In this theory, gravitational waves have a longitudinal polarization mode, besides others modes that are observer dependent. We examine the orbital variation of a binary system due to the emission of gravitational waves, showing that GSG can also be successful in explaining this phenomena.

  8. Propagation of acoustic gravity waves excited by explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acoustic gravity waves excited by low-altitude nuclear explosions have been observed in the ionosphere, by H.F. Doppler soundings, at horizontal distances from the source between 100 and 1200 km. The characteristics of the initial shock wave, which is observed at short range, are progressively replaced by those of the atmospheric wave guide. In particular, the dispersion properties of the signal observed in the ionosphere at long range are those of the first acoustic and gravity modes. Detailed study of the propagation times to middle and long range shows that the wave guide is mainly excited by the focalisation of acoustic energy which is produced by non-linear mechanisms at an altitude of about 100 km and at a small horizontal distance from the explosion

  9. The gravity wave instability induced by photochemistry in summer polar mesopause region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effect of diabatic process due to the photochemical heating and cooling on the gravity wave propagation in middle atmosphere is studied. A linear gravity wave model which considers the diabatic process is established. The unstable region and the growth rate of the gravity wave caused by photochemistry are calculated. And the comparison between the model and the adiabatic gravity wave theory of pure dynamics is made. The results indicate that the photochemical heating process can induce the instability of gravity wave at mesopause. The intensity of the instability becomes stronger as the temperature decreases. The temperature feature and the altitude characteristics of the instability are consistent with the observation. Therefore, the instability of the gravity wave induced by photochemistry may be an important mechanism in polar mesopause region in summer.

  10. The Nonlinear Model of the Response of Airglow to Gravity Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Y. Xu; H. Gao; A.V. Mikhalev

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we develope a timodependent, nonlinear, photochemical-dynamical 2-D model which is composed of 3 models: dynamical gravity wave model, middle atmospheric photochemical model, and airglow layer photochemical model. We use the model to study the effect of the gravity wave propagation on the airglow layer. The comparison between the effects of the different wavelength gravity wave on the airglow emission distributions is made. When the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave is close to or is shorter than the thickness of the airglow layer, the gravity wave can make complex structure of the airglow layer, such as the double and multi-peak structures of the airglow layer. However, the gravity wave that has long vertical wavelength can make large scale perturbation of the airglow emission distribution.

  11. Nonlocal gravity: damping of linearized gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nonlocal general relativity, linearized gravitational waves are damped as they propagate from the source to the receiver in the Minkowski vacuum. Nonlocal gravity is a generalization of Einstein's theory of gravitation in which nonlocality is due to the gravitational memory of past events. That nonlocal gravity is dissipative is demonstrated in this paper within certain approximation schemes. The gravitational memory drag leads to the decay of the amplitude of gravitational waves given by the exponential damping factor exp (− t/τ), where τ depends on the kernel of nonlocal gravity. The damping time τ is estimated for gravitational waves of current observational interest and is found to be of the order of, or longer than, the age of the universe. (paper)

  12. Numerical simulations of convectively excited gravity waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magneto-convection and gravity waves are numerically simulated with a nonlinear, three-dimensional, time-dependent model of a stratified, rotating, spherical fluid shell heated from below. A Solar-like reference state is specified while global velocity, magnetic field, and thermodynamic perturbations are computed from the anelastic magnetohydrodynamic equations. Convective overshooting from the upper (superadiabatic) part of the shell excites gravity waves in the lower (subadiabatic) part. Due to differential rotation and Coriolis forces, convective cell patterns propagate eastward with a latitudinally dependent phase velocity. The structure of the excited wave motions in the stable region is more time-dependent than that of the convective motions above. The magnetic field tends to be concentrated over giant-cell downdrafts in the convective zone but is affected very little by the wave motion in the stable region

  13. The physics of orographic gravity wave drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MiguelA CTeixeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The drag and momentum fluxes produced by gravity waves generated in flow over orography are reviewed, focusing on adiabatic conditions without phase transitions or radiation effects, and steady mean incoming flow. The orographic gravity wave drag is first introduced in its simplest possible form, for inviscid, linearized, non-rotating flow with the Boussinesq and hydrostatic approximations, and constant wind and static stability. Subsequently, the contributions made by previous authors (primarily using theory and numerical simulations to elucidate how the drag is affected by additional physical processes are surveyed. These include the effect of orography anisotropy, vertical wind shear, total and partial critical levels, vertical wave reflection and resonance, non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves, rotation and nonlinearity. Frictional and boundary layer effects are also briefly mentioned. A better understanding of all of these aspects is important for guiding the improvement of drag parametrization schemes.

  14. Surface gravity waves in deep fluid at vertical shear flows

    OpenAIRE

    Gogoberidze, G.; Samushia, L.; Chagelishvili, G. D.; Lominadze, J. G.; Horton, W

    2005-01-01

    Special features of surface gravity waves in deep fluid flow with constant vertical shear of velocity is studied. It is found that the mean flow velocity shear leads to non-trivial modification of surface gravity wave modes dispersive characteristics. Moreover, the shear induces generation of surface gravity waves by internal vortex mode perturbations. The performed analytical and numerical study provides, that surface gravity waves are effectively generated by the internal perturbations at h...

  15. Comparison of Gravity Wave Temperature Variances from Ray-Based Spectral Parameterization of Convective Gravity Wave Drag with AIRS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Joo; Chun, Hye-Yeong; Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.

    2012-01-01

    The realism of ray-based spectral parameterization of convective gravity wave drag, which considers the updated moving speed of the convective source and multiple wave propagation directions, is tested against the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard the Aqua satellite. Offline parameterization calculations are performed using the global reanalysis data for January and July 2005, and gravity wave temperature variances (GWTVs) are calculated at z = 2.5 hPa (unfiltered GWTV). AIRS-filtered GWTV, which is directly compared with AIRS, is calculated by applying the AIRS visibility function to the unfiltered GWTV. A comparison between the parameterization calculations and AIRS observations shows that the spatial distribution of the AIRS-filtered GWTV agrees well with that of the AIRS GWTV. However, the magnitude of the AIRS-filtered GWTV is smaller than that of the AIRS GWTV. When an additional cloud top gravity wave momentum flux spectrum with longer horizontal wavelength components that were obtained from the mesoscale simulations is included in the parameterization, both the magnitude and spatial distribution of the AIRS-filtered GWTVs from the parameterization are in good agreement with those of the AIRS GWTVs. The AIRS GWTV can be reproduced reasonably well by the parameterization not only with multiple wave propagation directions but also with two wave propagation directions of 45 degrees (northeast-southwest) and 135 degrees (northwest-southeast), which are optimally chosen for computational efficiency.

  16. Upper-ocean mixing due to surface gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lichuan; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik

    2015-12-01

    Surface gravity waves play an important role in the lower layer of the atmosphere and the upper layer of the ocean. Surface waves effect upper-ocean mixing mainly through four processes: wave breaking, Stokes drift interaction with the Coriolis force, Langmuir circulation, and stirring by nonbreaking waves. We introduce the impact of these four processes into a 1-D k-ɛ ocean turbulence model. The parameterizations used are based mainly on existing investigations. Comparison of simulation results and measurements demonstrates that considering all the effects of waves, rather than just one effect, significantly improves model performance. The nonbreaking-wave-induced mixing and Langmuir turbulence are the most important terms when considering the impact of waves on upper-ocean mixing. Under high-wave conditions, the turbulent mixing induced by nonbreaking waves can be of the same order of magnitude as the viscosity induced by other terms at the surface. Nonbreaking waves contribute very little to shear production and their impact is negligible in the models. Sensitivity experiments demonstrate that the vertical profile of the Stokes drift calculated from the 2-D wave spectrum improves model performance significantly compared with other methods of introducing wave effects.

  17. Investigation of resonances in gravity-capillary wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    We report experimental results on nonlinear wave coupling in surface wave turbulence on water at scales close to the crossover between surface gravity waves and capillary waves. We study three-wave correlations either in the frequency domain or in the wave-vector domain. We observe that in a weakly nonlinear regime, the dominant nonlinear interactions correspond to waves that are collinear or close to collinear. Although the resonant coupling of pure gravity waves is supposed to involve four waves, at the capillary crossover we observe a nonlocal coupling between a gravity wave and two capillary waves. Furthermore, nonlinear spectral spreading permits three-gravity wave coupling. These observations raise the question of the relevance of these processes in the oceanographic context and in particular the range of frequencies of gravity waves that may be impacted.

  18. On the unstable mode merging of gravity-inertial waves with Rossby waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We recapitulate the results of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves in a rotating, stratified atmosphere. The system is shown to exhibit a "local" (JWKB instability whenever the phase speed of the low-frequency-long wavelength westward propagating Rossby wave exceeds the phase speed ("Kelvin" speed of the high frequency-short wavelength gravity-inertial wave. This condition ensures that mode merging, leading to instability, takes place in some intermediate band of frequencies and wave numbers. The contention that such an instability is "spurious" is not convincing. The energy source of the instability resides in the background enthalpy which can be released by the action of the gravitational buoyancy force, through the combined wave modes.

  19. Investigation of resonances in gravity-capillary wave turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental results on nonlinear wave coupling in surface wave turbulence on water at scales close to the crossover between surface gravity waves and capillary waves. We study 3-wave correlations either in the frequency domain or in wavevector domain. We observe that in a weakly nonlinear regime, the dominant nonlinear interactions correspond to waves that are collinear or close to collinear. Although the resonant coupling of pure gravity waves is supposed to involve 4 waves, at th...

  20. Solar cycle variation of gravity waves observed in OH airglow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelinas, L. J.; Hecht, J. H.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Reid, I. M.; Woithe, J.; Vincent, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Airglow imaging provides a unique means by which to study many wave-related phenomena in the 80 to 100 km altitude regime. Two-dimensional image observations reveal quasi-monochromatic disturbances associated with atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) as well as small-scale instabilities, often called ripples. Image-averaged temperature and intensity measurements can be used to study the response of the airglow layer to tides and planetary waves, as well as monitor longer-term climatological variations. Here we present results of low and mid-latitude OH airglow observations beginning near solar max of solar cycle 23 and continuing through solar max of cycle 24. Aerospace imagers deployed at Alice Springs (23o42'S, 133o53'E) and Adelaide (34o55'S, 138o36'E) have been operating nearly continuously since ~2001. The imagers employ filters measuring OH Meinel (6, 2) and O2 Atmospheric (0, 1) band emission intensities and temperatures, as well as atmospheric gravity wave parameters. The Aerospace Corporation's Infrared Camera deployed at Maui, HI (20.7N,156.3W), collected more than 700 nights of airglow images from 2002-2005. The camera measures the OH Meinel (4,2) emission at 1.6 um using a 1 second exposure at a 3 second cadence, which allows the study of AGW and ripple features over very short temporal and spatial scales. The camera was relocated to Cerro Pachon, Chile (30.1 S, 70.8 W) and has been operating continuously since 2010. Temperature, intensity and gravity wave climatologies derived from the two Australian airglow imagers span a full solar cycle (solar max to solar max). Emission intensities have been calibrated using background stars, and temperatures have been calibrated with respect to TIMED/SABER temperatures, reducing the influence of instrument degradation on the solar cycle climatology. An automated wave detection algorithm is used to identify quasi monochromatic wave features in the airglow data, including wavelength, wave period and propagation

  1. Investigation of resonances in gravity-capillary wave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Aubourg, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental results on nonlinear wave coupling in surface wave turbulence on water at scales close to the crossover between surface gravity waves and capillary waves. We study 3-wave correlations either in the frequency domain or in wavevector domain. We observe that in a weakly nonlinear regime, the dominant nonlinear interactions correspond to waves that are collinear or close to collinear. Although the resonant coupling of pure gravity waves is supposed to involve 4 waves, at the capillary crossover we observe a nonlocal coupling between a gravity wave and 2 capillary waves. Furthermore nonlinear spectral spreading permits 3-gravity wave coupling. These observations raise the question of the relevance of these processes in the oceanographic context and in particular the range of frequencies of gravity waves that may be impacted.

  2. Observations of in-situ generated gravity waves during a stratospheric temperature enhancement (STE event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Gerrard

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Observations of in-situ generated atmospheric gravity waves associated with a stratospheric temperature enhancement (STE are presented. Two sets of gravity waves are observed by molecular-aerosol lidar in conjunction with the early December 2000 STE event above Sondrestrom, Greenland. The first set of gravity waves shows downward phase progression with a vertical wavelength of ~8 km while the second set shows upward phase progression with a vertical wavelength of ~9 km. With estimates of the background wind fields from synoptic analyses, the various intrinsic gravity wave parameters of these two wave structures are found. The observed waves compare well to numerical modeling predictions, though the potential observation of a downward propagating wave would be unexpected.

  3. Inertio Gravity Waves in the Upper Mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Talaat, E. L.; Porter, H. S.; Chan, K. L.

    2003-01-01

    In the polar region of the upper mesosphere, horizontal wind oscillations have been observed with periods around 10 hours (Hernandez et al., 1992). Such waves are generated in our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM) and appear to be inertio gravity waves (IGW). Like the planetary waves (PW) in the model, the IGWs are generated by instabilities that arise in the mean zonal circulation. In addition to stationary waves for m = 0, eastward and westward propagating waves for m = 1 to 4 appear above 70 km that grow in magnitude up to about 110 km, having periods between 9 and 11 hours. The m = 1 westward propagating IGWs have the largest amplitudes, which can reach at the poles 30 m/s. Like PWs, the IGWs are intermittent but reveal systematic seasonal variations, with the largest amplitudes occurring generally in winter and spring. The IGWs propagate upward with a vertical wavelength of about 20 km.

  4. Gravity Waves, Chaos, and Spinning Compact Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Levin, Janna

    1999-01-01

    Spinning compact binaries are shown to be chaotic in the Post-Newtonian expansion of the two body system. Chaos by definition is the extreme sensitivity to initial conditions and a consequent inability to predict the outcome of the evolution. As a result, the spinning pair will have unpredictable gravitational waveforms during coalescence. This poses a challenge to future gravity wave observatories which rely on a match between the data and a theoretical template.

  5. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stober

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY on the island Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE. These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of a pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g. horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  6. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stober

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY on the island of Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE. These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first-order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g., horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  7. Gravity wave vertical energy flux at 95 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, P. G.; Jacka, F.

    1985-01-01

    A three-field photometer (3FP) located at Mt. Torrens near Adelaide, is capable of monitoring different airglow emissions from three spaced fields in the sky. A wheel containing up to six different narrow bandpass interference filters can be rotated, allowing each of the filters to be sequentially placed into each of the three fields. The airglow emission of interest is the 557.7 nm line which has an intensity maximum at 95 km. Each circular field of view is located at the apexes of an equilateral triangle centered on zenith with diameters of 5 km and field separations of 13 km when projected to the 95-km level. The sampling period was 30 seconds and typical data lengths were between 7 and 8 hours. The analysis and results from the interaction of gravity waves on the 557.7 nm emission layer are derived using an atmospheric model similar to that proposed by Hines (1960) where the atmosphere is assumed isothermal and perturbations caused by gravity waves are small and adiabatic, therefore, resulting in linearized equations of motion. In the absence of waves, the atmosphere is also considered stationary. Thirteen nights of quality data from January 1983 to October 1984, covering all seasons, are used in this analysis.

  8. Gravitational waves in ghost free bimetric gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We obtain a set of exact gravitational wave solutions for the ghost free bimetric theory of gravity. With a flat reference metric, the theory admits the vacuum Brinkmann plane wave solution for suitable choices of the coefficients of different terms in the interaction potential. An exact gravitational wave solution corresponding to a massive scalar mode is also admitted for arbitrary choice of the coefficients with the reference metric being proportional to the spacetime metric. The proportionality factor and the speed of the wave are calculated in terms of the parameters of the theory. We also show that a F(R) extension of the theory admits similar solutions but in general is plagued with ghost instabilities

  9. Nonlinear progressive acoustic-gravity waves: Exact solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    flow will be examined. Implications of the theoretical results for coupling of non-linear acoustic-gravity waves in the oceans and atmosphere will be discussed.

  10. Gravity Wave Forcing of the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere: Mountain and Convective Waves Ascending Vertically (MaCWAVE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, David C.

    2004-01-01

    The specific objectives of this research effort included the following: 1) Quantification of gravity wave propagation throughout the lower and middle atmosphere in order to define the roles of topographic and convective sources and filtering by mean and low-frequency winds in defining the wave field and wave fluxes at greater altitudes; 2) The influences of wave instability processes in constraining wave amplitudes and fluxes and generating turbulence and transport; 3) Gravity wave forcing of the mean circulation and thermal structure in the presence of variable motion fields and wave-wave interactions, since the mean forcing may be a small residual when wave interactions, anisotropy, and momentum and heat fluxes are large; 4) The statistical forcing and variability imposed on the thermosphere at greater altitudes by the strong wave forcing and interactions occurring in the MLTI.

  11. Interpretation of gravity wave signatures in GPS radio occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, P.; de la Torre, A.; Llamedo, P.

    2008-08-01

    The horizontal averaging of global positioning system radio occultation retrievals produces an amplitude attenuation and phase shift in any plane gravity wave, which may lead to significant discrepancies with respect to the original values. In addition, wavelengths cannot be straightforwardly inferred due to the observational characteristics. If the waves produce small departures from spherical symmetry in the background atmosphere and under the assumption that the refractivity kernel may be represented by a delta function, an analytical expression may be derived in order to find how the retrieved amplitudes become weakened (against the original ones). In particular, we study the range of waves that may be detected and the consequent reduction in variance calculation, which is found to be around 19%. A larger discrepancy was obtained when comparing an occultation variance with the one computed from a numerical simulation of that case. Wave amplitudes can be better resolved when the fronts are nearly horizontal or when the angle between the occultation line of sight and the horizontal component of the wave vector approaches π/2. Short horizontal scale waves have a high probability of becoming attenuated or of not being detected at all. We then find geometrical relations in terms of the relative orientation between waves and sounding, so as to appropriately interpret wavelengths extracted from the acquired data. Only inertio-gravity waves, which exhibit nearly horizontal fronts, will show small differences between detected and original vertical wavelengths. Last, we analyze the retrieval effect on wave phase and find a shift between original and detected wave that generally is nonzero and approaches π/4 for the largest horizontal wavelengths.

  12. Buoyancy waves in Pluto's high atmosphere: Implications for stellar occultations

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard, W. B.; McCarthy, D. W.; Kulesa, C. A.; Benecchi, S. D.; Person, M. J.; Elliot, J. L.; Gulbis, A.A.S.

    2009-01-01

    We apply scintillation theory to stellar signal fluctuations in the high-resolution, high signal/noise, dual-wavelength data from the MMT observation of the 2007 March 18 occultation of P445.3 by Pluto. A well-defined high wavenumber cutoff in the fluctuations is consistent with viscous-thermal dissipation of buoyancy waves (internal gravity waves) in Pluto’s high atmosphere, and provides strong evidence that the underlying density fluctuations are governed by the gravity-wave dispersion rela...

  13. Gravity Waves from Tachyonic Preheating after Hybrid Inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Dufaux, Jean-Francois; Felder, Gary; Kofman, Lev; Navros, Olga

    2008-01-01

    We study the stochastic background of gravitational waves produced from preheating in hybrid inflation models. We investigate different dynamical regimes of preheating in these models and we compute the resulting gravity wave spectra using analytical estimates and numerical simulations. We discuss the dependence of the gravity wave frequencies and amplitudes on the various potential parameters. We find that large regions of the parameter space leads to gravity waves that may be observable in ...

  14. Gravity waves in the mesosphere generated by tropospheric convention

    OpenAIRE

    Holton, James R.; Alexander, M Joan

    2011-01-01

    The observed cold temperatures in the summer mesosphere are dynamically maintained primarily through upwelling induced in response to the action of a zonal drag force caused by the breaking of upward propagating gravity waves. Tropospheric convective storms are believed to be important sources of gravity waves in the summer mesosphere, but little is known about the characteristics of mesospheric gravity waves generated by convection. As a first attempt to model such waves a nonhydrostatic clo...

  15. Gravity waves in the mesosphere generated by tropospheric convention

    OpenAIRE

    Holton, James R.; Alexander, M Joan

    2011-01-01

    The observed cold temperatures in the summer mesosphere are dynamically maintained primarilythrough upwelling induced in response to the action of a zonal drag force caused by thebreaking of upward propagating gravity waves. Tropospheric convective storms are believedto be important sources of gravity waves in the summer mesosphere, but little is known aboutthe characteristics of mesospheric gravity waves generated by convection. As a first attempt tomodel such waves a nonhydrostatic cloud-re...

  16. Internal gravity waves from a non-local perturbation source

    OpenAIRE

    Bulatov, Vitaly V.; Vladimirov, Yuriy V.

    2009-01-01

    The internal gravity waves far field exited by a non-local perturbation sources was considered. A separate wave mode asymptomatic presentation was constructed, describing the wave field key features depending on the source geometry.

  17. Does the Madden-Julian Oscillation Modulate Stratospheric Gravity Waves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Andrew; Wright, Corwin; Mitchell, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    The circulation of the stratosphere is strongly influenced by the fluxes of gravity waves propagating from tropospheric sources. In the tropics, these gravity waves are primarily generated by convection. The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) dominates the intra-seasonal variability of this convection. However, the connection between the MJO and the variability of stratospheric gravity waves is largely unknown. Here we examine gravity-wave potential energy at a height of 26 km and the upper tropospheric zonal-wind anomaly of the MJO at the 200 hPa level, sorted by the relative phase of the MJO using the RMM MJO indices. We show that a strong anti-correlation exists between gravity-wave potential energy and the MJO eastward wind anomaly. We propose that this correlation is a result of the filtering of ascending waves by the MJO winds. The study provides evidence that the MJO contributes significantly to the variability of stratospheric gravity waves in the tropics.

  18. Characteristics of acoustic gravity waves obtained from Dynasonde data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrea, Cǎtǎlin; Zabotin, Nikolay; Bullett, Terrence; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Fang, Tzu-Wei; Codrescu, Mihail

    2016-04-01

    Traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are ubiquitous in the thermosphere-ionosphere and are often assumed to be caused by acoustic gravity waves (AGWs). This study performs an analysis of the TID and AGW activity above Wallops Island, VA, during October 2013. The variations in electron density and ionospheric tilts obtained with the Dynasonde technique are used as primary indicators of wave activity. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the data are discussed in detail, using also results of the Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) and the Global Ionosphere Plasmasphere Model (GIP). The full set of propagation parameters (frequency, and the vertical, zonal and meridional wave vector components) of the TIDs is determined over the 160-220 km height range. A test of the self-consistency of these results within the confines of the theoretical AGW dispersion relation is devised. This is applied to a sample data set of 24 October 2013. A remarkable agreement has been achieved for wave periods between 52 and 21 min, for which we can rigorously claim the TIDs are caused by underlying acoustic gravity waves. The Wallops Island Dynasonde can operate for extended periods at a 2 min cadence, allowing determination of the statistical distributions of propagation parameters. A dominant population of TIDs is identified in the frequency band below 1 mHz, and for it, the distributions of the horizontal wavelengths, vertical wavelengths, and horizontal phase speeds are obtained.

  19. Wavelet transforms of meteorological parameters and gravity waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Can

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to analyze some characteristics of gravity waves (GWs, and seasonal variations of atmospheric waves over Istanbul by using wavelet techniques. Daily radiosonda data of Istanbul in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (1000hPa-30hPa between 1993 and 1997 have been considered. Wavelet analysis based on a computer simulation of data is generally close to the real data when Daubechies wavelet series are used. Daily, monthly, seasonal and annual variations of pressure heights, air temperature and deviations from mean values have been analyzed. Variations show the effects of gravity waves for different pressure levels in the troposphere. These waves lead to the meso-scale wave-form structures in spring, autumn and winter. As a result of this study, wavelet series and transforms for data construction, definition of some discontinuities and the local effects on the signal have been compared with the results of previous studies. The most similar structure between temperature, turbulence parameters and geo-potential height deviations has been defined at the 500-hPa pressure level.

  20. Wave Propagation in Accretion Disks with Self-Gravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-Ci; YANG Lan-Tian; WU Shao-Ping; DING Shi-Xue

    2001-01-01

    We extend the research by Lubow and Pringle of axisymmetric waves in accretion disks to the case where self gravity of disks should be considered. We derive and analyse the dispersion relations with the effect of self-gravity. Results show that self-gravity extends the forbidden region of the wave propagation: for high frequency p-modes, self-gravity makes the wavelength shorter and the group velocity larger; for low frequency g-modes, the effect is opposite.

  1. Mesoscale Gravity Wave Variances from AMSU-A Radiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.

    2004-01-01

    A variance analysis technique is developed here to extract gravity wave (GW) induced temperature fluctuations from NOAA AMSU-A (Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A) radiance measurements. By carefully removing the instrument/measurement noise, the algorithm can produce reliable GW variances with the minimum detectable value as small as 0.1 K2. Preliminary analyses with AMSU-A data show GW variance maps in the stratosphere have very similar distributions to those found with the UARS MLS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Microwave Limb Sounder). However, the AMSU-A offers better horizontal and temporal resolution for observing regional GW variability, such as activity over sub-Antarctic islands.

  2. Experimental Observation of Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Xinhua Hu; Jiong Yang; Jian Zi; Chan, C. T.; Kai-Ming Ho

    2013-01-01

    The gravity of Earth is responsible for the formation of water waves and usually difficult to change. Although negative effective gravity was recently predicted theoretically in water waves, it has not yet been observed in experiments and remains a mathematical curiosity which is difficult to understand. Here we experimentally demonstrate that close to the resonant frequency of purposely-designed resonating units, negative effective gravity can occur for water waves passing through an array o...

  3. Deep-water gravity waves: theoretical estimating of wave parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Mindlin, Ilia M

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses deep-water gravity waves of finite amplitude generated by an initial disturbance to the water. It is assumed that the horizontal dimensions of the initially disturbed body of the water are much larger than the magnitude of the free surface displacement in the origin of the waves. Initially the free surface has not yet been displaced from its equilibrium position, but the velocity field has already become different from zero. This means that the water at rest initially is set in motion suddenly by an impulse. Duration of formation of the wave origin and the maximum water elevation in the origin are estimated using the arrival times of the waves and the maximum wave-heights at certain locations obtained from gauge records at the locations, and the distances between the centre of the origin and each of the locations. For points situated at a long distance from the wave origin, forecast is made for the travel time and wave height at the points. The forecast is based on the data recorded by th...

  4. Direct Numerical Simulations of Small-Scale Gravity Wave Instability Dynamics in Variable Stratification and Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixa, T.; Fritts, D. C.; Laughman, B.; Wang, L.; Kantha, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple observations provide compelling evidence that gravity wave dissipation events often occur in multi-scale environments having highly-structured wind and stability profiles extending from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Such events tend to be highly localized and thus yield local energy and momentum deposition and efficient secondary gravity wave generation expected to have strong influences at higher altitudes [e.g., Fritts et al., 2013; Baumgarten and Fritts, 2014]. Lidars, radars, and airglow imagers typically cannot achieve the spatial resolution needed to fully quantify these small-scale instability dynamics. Hence, we employ high-resolution modeling to explore these dynamics in representative environments. Specifically, we describe numerical studies of gravity wave packets impinging on a sheet of high stratification and shear and the resulting instabilities and impacts on the gravity wave amplitude and momentum flux for various flow and gravity wave parameters. References: Baumgarten, Gerd, and David C. Fritts (2014). Quantifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability dynamics observed in noctilucent clouds: 1. Methods and observations. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 119.15, 9324-9337. Fritts, D. C., Wang, L., & Werne, J. A. (2013). Gravity wave-fine structure interactions. Part I: Influences of fine structure form and orientation on flow evolution and instability. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(12), 3710-3734.

  5. Wave Equations for Discrete Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gudder, Stan

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on the covariant causal set ($c$-causet) approach to discrete quantum gravity. A $c$-causet $x$ is a finite partially ordered set that has a unique labeling of its vertices. A rate of change on $x$ is described by a covariant difference operator and this operator acting on a wave function forms the left side of the wave equation. The right side is given by an energy term acting on the wave function. Solutions to the wave equation corresponding to certain pairs of paths in $x$ are added and normalized to form a unique state. The modulus squared of the state gives probabilities that a pair of interacting particles is at various locations given by pairs of vertices in $x$. We illustrate this model for a few of the simplest nontrivial examples of $c$-causets. Three forces are considered, the attractive and repulsive electric forces and the strong nuclear force. Large models get much more complicated and will probably require a computer to analyze.

  6. Simulation of response of sodium layer to the propagation of gravity wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jiyao

    2004-01-01

    A time-dependent two-dimensional photochemical-dynamical coupling gravity wave model of sodium layer is developed, which combines the sodium photochemical theory, a time-dependent two-dimensional atmospheric photochemical model, a two-dimensional gravity wave model, and the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI-95)with the diabatic process induced by photochemical reactions and the transport of chemical species by gravity waves included. The pseudospectral method is used in the horizontal direction, the finite difference approximations are used in vertical direction z and time t. And FICE method is used to solve the model. The simulation results indicate that intense perturbations of the sodium layer can be induced by the propagation of gravity waves. The results are consistent with the observations.

  7. On the detection and attribution of gravity waves generated by the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlton, G J; Williams, P D; Nicoll, K A

    2016-09-28

    Internal gravity waves are generated as adjustment radiation whenever a sudden change in forcing causes the atmosphere to depart from its large-scale balanced state. Such a forcing anomaly occurs during a solar eclipse, when the Moon's shadow cools part of the Earth's surface. The resulting atmospheric gravity waves are associated with pressure and temperature perturbations, which in principle are detectable both at the surface and aloft. In this study, surface pressure and temperature data from two UK sites at Reading and Lerwick are examined for eclipse-driven gravity wave perturbations during the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse over northwest Europe. Radiosonde wind data from the same two sites are also analysed using a moving parcel analysis method, to determine the periodicities of the waves aloft. On this occasion, the perturbations both at the surface and aloft are found not to be confidently attributable to eclipse-driven gravity waves. We conclude that the complex synoptic weather conditions over the UK at the time of this particular eclipse helped to mask any eclipse-driven gravity waves.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. PMID:27550763

  8. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves associated with midlatitude thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, Erin H.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Kendrick, Alexander K.; Carrano, Charles S.

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic waves with periods of 2-4 min and gravity waves with periods of 6-16 min have been detected at ionospheric heights (250-350 km) using GPS total electron content measurements. The area disturbed by these waves and the wave amplitudes have been associated with underlying thunderstorm activity. A statistical study comparing Next Generation Weather Radar thunderstorm measurements with ionospheric acoustic and gravity waves in the midlatitude U.S. Great Plains region was performed for the time period of May-July 2005. An increase of ionospheric acoustic wave disturbed area and amplitude is primarily associated with large thunderstorms (mesoscale convective systems). Ionospheric gravity wave disturbed area and amplitude scale with thunderstorm activity, with even small storms (i.e., individual storm cells) producing an increase of gravity waves.

  9. On the determination of gravity wave momentum flux from GPS radio occultation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, A.; Llamedo, P.; Schmidt, T.; de la Torre, A.; Wickert, J.

    2013-11-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) is a well-established technique for obtaining global gravity wave (GW) information. RO uses GPS signals received by low Earth-orbiting satellites for atmospheric limb sounding. Temperature profiles are derived with high vertical resolution and provide a global coverage under any weather conditions, offering the possibility of global monitoring of the vertical temperature structure and atmospheric wave parameters. The six-satellite constellation COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 delivers approximately 2000 temperature profiles daily. In this study, we use a method to obtain global distributions of horizontal gravity wave wavelengths, to be applied in the determination of the vertical flux of horizontal momentum transported by gravity waves. Here, a method for the determination of the real horizontal wavelength from three vertical profiles is applied to the COSMIC data. The horizontal and vertical wavelength, the specific potential energy (Ep), and the vertical flux of horizontal momentum (MF) are calculated and their global distribution is discussed.

  10. Mesosphere Dynamics with Gravity Wave Forcing. 2; Planetary Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We present results from a non-linear, 3D, time dependent numerical spectral model (NSM) which extends from the ground up into the thermosphere and incorporates Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization for small-scale gravity waves (GW). Our focal point is the mesosphere where wave interactions are playing a dominant role. We discuss planetary waves in the present paper and diurnal and semi-diurnal tides in the companion paper. Without external time dependent energy or momentum sources, planetary waves (PWs) are generated in the model for zonal wavenumbers 1 to 4, which have amplitudes in the mesosphere above 50 km as large as 30 m/s and periods between 2 and 50 days. The waves are generated primarily during solstice conditions, which indicates that the baroclinic instability (associated with the GW driven reversal in the latitudinal temperature gradient) is playing an important role. Results from a numerical experiment show that GWs are also involved directly in generating the PWs. For the zonal wavenumber m = 1, the predominant wave periods in summer are around 4 days and in winter between 6 and 10 days. For m = 2, the periods are in summer and close to 2.5 and 3.5 days respectively For m = 3, 4 the predominant wave periods are in both seasons close to two days. The latter waves have the characteristics of Rossby gravity waves with meridional winds at equatorial latitudes. A common feature of the PWs (m = 1 to 4) generated in summer and winter is that their vertical wavelengths throughout the mesosphere are large which indicates that the waves are not propagating freely but are generated throughout the region. Another common feature is that the PWs propagate preferentially westward in summer and eastward in winter, being launched from the westward and eastward zonal winds that prevail respectively in summer and winter altitudes below 80 km. During spring and fall, for m = 1 and 2 eastward propagating long period PWs are generated that are launched from the smaller

  11. Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In this natural-color image from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar to the ripples that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such 'gravity waves' sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air masses associated with stratocumulus cloud layers are disturbed by a vertical trigger from the underlying terrain, or by a thunderstorm updraft or some other vertical wind shear. The stratocumulus cellular clouds that underlie the wave feature are associated with sinking air that is strongly cooled at the level of the cloud-tops -- such clouds are common over mid-latitude oceans when the air is unperturbed by cyclonic or frontal activity. This image is centered over the Indian Ocean (at about 38.9o South, 80.6o East), and was acquired on October 29, 2003.The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82o north and 82o south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbit 20545. The image covers an area of 245 kilometers x 378 kilometers, and uses data from blocks 121 to 122 within World Reference System-2 path 134.MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  12. New Gravity Wave Treatments for GISS Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Ruedy, Reto; Aleinov, Igor; Nazarenko, Larissa; Tausnev, Nikolai L.; Sun, Shan; Kelley, Maxwell; Cheng, Ye

    2011-01-01

    Previous versions of GISS climate models have either used formulations of Rayleigh drag to represent unresolved gravity wave interactions with the model-resolved flow or have included a rather complicated treatment of unresolved gravity waves that, while being climate interactive, involved the specification of a relatively large number of parameters that were not well constrained by observations and also was computationally very expensive. Here, the authors introduce a relatively simple and computationally efficient specification of unresolved orographic and nonorographic gravity waves and their interaction with the resolved flow. Comparisons of the GISS model winds and temperatures with no gravity wave parameterization; with only orographic gravity wave parameterization; and with both orographic and nonorographic gravity wave parameterizations are shown to illustrate how the zonal mean winds and temperatures converge toward observations. The authors also show that the specifications of orographic and nonorographic gravity waves must be different in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Then results are presented where the nonorographic gravity wave sources are specified to represent sources from convection in the intertropical convergence zone and spontaneous emission from jet imbalances. Finally, a strategy to include these effects in a climate-dependent manner is suggested.

  13. Simulations of Atmospheric Neutral Wave Coupling to the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefring, C. L.; Bernhardt, P. A.

    2005-12-01

    The densities in the E- and F-layer plasmas are much less than the density of background neutral atmosphere. Atmospheric neutral waves are primary sources of plasma density fluctuations and are the sources for triggering plasma instabilities. The neutral atmosphere supports acoustic waves, acoustic gravity waves, and Kelvin Helmholtz waves from wind shears. These waves help determine the structure of the ionosphere by changes in neutral density that affect ion-electron recombination and by neutral velocities that couple to the plasma via ion-neutral collisions. Neutral acoustic disturbances can arise from thunderstorms, chemical factory explosions and intentional high-explosive tests. Based on conservation of energy, acoustic waves grow in amplitude as they propagate upwards to lower atmospheric densities. Shock waves can form in an acoustic pulse that is eventually damped by viscosity. Ionospheric effects from acoustic waves include transient perturbations of E- and F-Regions and triggering of E-Region instabilities. Acoustic-gravity waves affect the ionosphere over large distances. Gravity wave sources include thunderstorms, auroral region disturbances, Space Shuttle launches and possibly solar eclipses. Low frequency acoustic-gravity waves propagate to yield traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID's), triggering of Equatorial bubbles, and possible periodic structuring of the E-Region. Gravity wave triggering of equatorial bubbles is studied numerically by solving the equations for plasma continuity and ion velocity along with Ohms law to provide an equation for the induced electric potential. Slow moving gravity waves provide density depressions on bottom of ionosphere and a gravitational Rayleigh-Taylor instability is initiated. Radar scatter detects field aligned irregularities in the resulting plasma bubble. Neutral Kelvin-Helmholtz waves are produced by strong mesospheric wind shears that are also coincident with the formation of intense E-layers. An

  14. Electromagnetic inertio-gravity waves in the ionospheric E-layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaladze, T D [Physics Department, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Pokhotelov, O A [Automatic Control and Systems Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Stenflo, L [Department of Plasma Physics, Umeaa University, SE-90187 Umeaa (Sweden); Shah, H A [Physics Department, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Jandieri, G V [Physics Department, Georgian Technical University, 77 Kostava Street, 0175 Tbilisi (Georgia)

    2007-10-15

    The effect of the Ampere force on inertio-gravity (IG) waves in the partially ionized ionospheric E-layer is considered. Electromagnetic IG waves are then studied. It is shown that the free energy necessary for linear instability of electromagnetic IG waves arises from the field-aligned current. Furthermore, it is found that atmospheric vortex motions can induce substantial variations in the geomagnetic field and field-aligned currents.

  15. Direct detection of gravity waves through high-precision astrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Fakir, R

    1995-01-01

    It is generally accepted that a first ever direct detection of gravity waves would herald a new era in astronomy and in fundamental physics. Ever since the early sixties, increasingly larger human and material resources are being invested in the detection effort. Unfortunately, the gravity wave effects one has had to exploit so far are extraordinarily small and are usually very many orders of magnitude smaller than the noise involved. The detectors that are presently at the most advanced stage of development hope to register extremely rare, instantaneous longitudinal shifts that are expected to be orders of magnitude smaller than one Fermi. However, it was recently shown that gravity waves can manifest themselves through much larger effects than previously envisaged. One of these new effects is the periodic, apparent shift in a star's angular position due to a foreground gravity wave source. The comparative largeness of this effect stems from its being proportional not to the inverse of the gravity wave sourc...

  16. Rossby Wave Instability with Self-Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Lovelace, R V E

    2012-01-01

    The Rossby wave instability (RWI) in non-self-gravitating discs can be triggered by a bump at a radius $r_0$ in the disc surface mass-density (which is proportional to the inverse potential vorticity). It gives rise to a growing non-axisymmetric perturbation [$\\propto \\exp(im\\phi)$, $m=1,2..$] in the vicinity of $r_0$ consisting of anticyclonic vortices which may facilitate planetesimal growth in protoplanetary discs. Here, we analyze a continuum of thin disc models ranging from self-gravitating to non-selfgravitating. The key quantities determining the stability/instability are: (1) the parameters of the bump (or depression) in the disc surface density, (2) the Toomre $Q$ parameter of the disc (a non-self-gravitating disc has $Q\\gg1$), and (3) the dimensionless azimuthal wavenumber of the perturbation $\\bar{k}_\\phi =mQh/r_0$, where $h$ is the half-thickness of the disc. For discs stable to axisymmetric perturbations ($Q>1$), the self-gravity has a significant role for $\\bar{k}_\\phi \\pi/2$ the self-gravity i...

  17. New image measurements of the gravity wave propagation characteristics from a low latitude Indian station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sivakandan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The image observations of mesospheric O(1S 558 nm have been performed from a low latitude Indian station, Gadanki (13.5° N; 79.2° E using a CCD based all sky camera system. Based on three years (from year 2012 to the year 2014 of image data during March–April, we characterize the small scale gravity wave properties. We noted 50 strong gravity wave event and 19 ripple events to occur. The horizontal wavelengths of the gravity waves are found to vary from 12 to 42 km with the phase velocity ranging from 20 to 90 km. In most cases, these waves were propagating towards north with only a few occasions of southward propagation. The outgoing longwave radiation data suggest that lower atmospheric convection was most possible reason for the generation of the waves observed in the airglow data.

  18. Steep sharp-crested gravity waves on deep water

    OpenAIRE

    Lukomsky, Vasyl'; Gandzha, Ivan,; Lukomsky, Dmytro

    2001-01-01

    A new type of steady steep two-dimensional irrotational symmetric periodic gravity waves on inviscid incompressible fluid of infinite depth is revealed. We demonstrate that these waves have sharper crests in comparison with the Stokes waves of the same wavelength and steepness. The speed of a fluid particle at the crest of new waves is greater than their phase speed.

  19. p-wave superconductors in dilaton gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we study peculiar properties of p-wave superconductors in dilaton gravity. The scale invariance of the bulk geometry is effectively broken due to the existence of a dilaton. By coupling the dilaton to the non-Abelian gauge field, i.e., -1/4 e-βΦFaμνFaμν, we find that the dissipative conductivity of the normal phase decreases and approaches zero at the zero frequency as β increases. Intuitively, the system behaves more and more like an insulator. When the hairy solution is turned on, the system crosses a critical point to the superconducting phase. We find that the critical chemical potential decreases with the increasing of β and the maximum height of the conductivity is suppressed gradually which are consistent with our intuition for insulator/supercondutor transition. (Copyright copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Freely decaying weak turbulence for sea surface gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Onorato, M.; Osborne, A. R.; Resio, D.; Pushkarev, A.; Zakharov, V.; Serio, M.; Brandini, C.

    2002-01-01

    We study numerically the generation of power laws in the framework of weak turbulence theory for surface gravity waves in deep water. Starting from a random wave field, we let the system evolve numerically according to the nonlinear Euler equations for gravity waves in infinitely deep water. In agreement with the theory of Zakharov and Filonenko, we find the formation of a power spectrum characterized by a power law of the form of $|{\\bf k}|^{-2.5}$.

  1. Gravity Wave Emission by Spontaneous Imbalance of Baroclinic Waves in the Continuously Stratified Rotating Annulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchert, Sebastian; Achatz, Ulrich; Rieper, Felix; Fruman, Mark

    2013-04-01

    We use a numerical model of the classic differentially heated rotating annulus experiment to study the spontaneous emission of gravity waves (GWs) from jet stream imbalances, which is a major source of these waves in the atmosphere for which no satisfactory parameterization exists. Atmospheric observations are the main tool for the testing and verification of theoretical concepts but have their limitations. Given their specific potential for yielding reproducible data and for studying process dependence on external system parameters, laboratory experiments are an invaluable complementary tool. Experiments with a rotating annulus exhibiting a jet modulated by large-scale waves due to baroclinic instability have already been used to study GWs: Williams et al (2008) observed spontaneously emitted interfacial GWs in a two-layer flow, and Jacoby et al (2011) detected GWs emitted from boundary-layer instabilities in a differentially heated rotating annulus. Employing a finite-volume code for the numerical simulation of a continuously stratified liquid in a differentially heated rotating annulus, we here investigate the GWs in a wide and shallow annulus with relatively large temperature difference between inner and outer cylinder walls. In this atmosphere-like regime where the Brunt-Vaisala frequency is larger than the inertial frequency, various analyses suggest a distinct gravity wave activity. To identify regions of GW emission we decompose the flow into the geostrophic and ageostrophic part through the inversion of the quasi-geostrophic potential vorticity (e.g. Verkley, 2009). The analysis of the geostrophic sources of the ageostrophic flow indicates that, in addition to boundary layer instabilities, spontaneous imbalance in the jet region acts as an important source mechanism. Jacoby, T. N. L., Read, P. L., Williams, P. D. and Young, R. M. B., 2011: Generation of inertia-gravity waves in the rotating thermal annulus by a localised boundary layer instability. Geophys

  2. A Comparison Between Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes in Observations and Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Alexadner, M. Joan; Love, Peter T.; Bacmeister, Julio; Ern, Manfred; Hertzog, Albert; Manzini, Elisa; Preusse, Peter; Sato, Kaoru; Scaife, Adam A.; Zhou, Tiehan

    2013-01-01

    For the first time, a formal comparison is made between gravity wave momentum fluxes in models and those derived from observations. Although gravity waves occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, the focus of this paper is on scales that are being parameterized in present climate models, sub-1000-km scales. Only observational methods that permit derivation of gravity wave momentum fluxes over large geographical areas are discussed, and these are from satellite temperature measurements, constant-density long-duration balloons, and high-vertical-resolution radiosonde data. The models discussed include two high-resolution models in which gravity waves are explicitly modeled, Kanto and the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5 (CAM5), and three climate models containing gravity wave parameterizations,MAECHAM5, Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model 3 (HadGEM3), and the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) model. Measurements generally show similar flux magnitudes as in models, except that the fluxes derived from satellite measurements fall off more rapidly with height. This is likely due to limitations on the observable range of wavelengths, although other factors may contribute. When one accounts for this more rapid fall off, the geographical distribution of the fluxes from observations and models compare reasonably well, except for certain features that depend on the specification of the nonorographic gravity wave source functions in the climate models. For instance, both the observed fluxes and those in the high-resolution models are very small at summer high latitudes, but this is not the case for some of the climate models. This comparison between gravity wave fluxes from climate models, high-resolution models, and fluxes derived from observations indicates that such efforts offer a promising path toward improving specifications of gravity wave sources in climate models.

  3. Infra-Gravity Wave Generation by the Shoaling Wave Groups over Beaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Yu-Hsien; HWUNG Hwung-Hweng

    2012-01-01

    A physical parameter,μb,which was used to meet the forcing of primary short waves to be off-resonant before wave breaking,has been considered as an applicable parameter in the infra-gravity wave generation.Since a series of modulating wave groups for different wave conditions are performed to proceed with the resonant mechanism of infragravity waves prior to wave breaking,the amplitude growth of incident bound long wave is assumed to be simply controlled by the normalized bed slope,βb.The results appear a large dependence of the growth rate,α,of incident bound long wave,separated by the three-array method,on the normalized bed slope,βb.High spatial resolution of wave records enables identification of the cross-correlation between squared short-wave envelopes and infra-gravity waves.The crossshore structure of infra-gravity waves over beaches presents the mechanics of incident bound- and outgoing free long waves with the formation of free standing long waves in the nearshore region.The wave run-up and amplification of infra-gravity waves in the swash zone appear that the additional long waves generated by the breaking process would modify the cross-shore structure of free standing long waves.Finally,this paper would further discuss the contribution of long wave breaking and bottom friction to the energy dissipation of infra-gravity waves based on different slope conditions.

  4. Buoyancy waves in Pluto’s high atmosphere: Implications for stellar occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, W. B.; McCarthy, D. W.; Kulesa, C. A.; Benecchi, S. D.; Person, M. J.; Elliot, J. L.; Gulbis, A. A. S.

    2009-11-01

    We apply scintillation theory to stellar signal fluctuations in the high-resolution, high signal/noise, dual-wavelength data from the MMT observation of the 2007 March 18 occultation of P445.3 by Pluto. A well-defined high wavenumber cutoff in the fluctuations is consistent with viscous-thermal dissipation of buoyancy waves (internal gravity waves) in Pluto's high atmosphere, and provides strong evidence that the underlying density fluctuations are governed by the gravity-wave dispersion relation.

  5. Possibility of measuring gravity-wave momentum flux by single beam observation of MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Vincent and Reid (1983) proposed a technique to measure gravity-wave momentum fluxes in the atmosphere by mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars using two or more radar beams. Since the vertical momentum fluxes are assumed to be due to gravity waves, it appears possible to make use of the dispersion and polarization relations for gravity waves in extracting useful information from the radar data. In particular, for an oblique radar beam, information about both the vertical and the horizontal velocities associated with the waves are contained in the measured Doppler data. Therefore, it should be possible to extract both V sub Z and V sub h from a single beam observational configuration. A procedure is proposed to perform such an analysis. The basic assumptions are: the measured velocity fluctuations are due to gravity waves and a separable model gravity-wave spectrum of the Garrett-Munk type that is statistically homogeneous in the horizontal plane. Analytical expressions can be derived that relate the observed velocity fluctuations to the wave momentum flux at each range gate. In practice, the uncertainties related to the model parameters and measurement accuracy will affect the results. A MST radar configuration is considered.

  6. LINEAR GRAVITY WAVES ON MAXWELL FLUIDS OF FINITE DEPTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qinghe; SUN Yabin

    2004-01-01

    Linear surface gravity waves on Maxwell viscoelastic fluids with finite depth are studied in this paper. A dispersion equation describing the spatial decay of the gravity wave in finite depth is derived. A dimensionless memory (time) number θ is introduced. The dispersion equation for the pure viscous fluid will be a specific case of the dispersion equation for the viscoelastic fluid as θ = 0. The complex dispersion equation is numerically solved to investigate the dispersion relation. The influences of θ and water depth on the dispersion characteristics and wave decay are discussed. It is found that the role of elasticity for the Maxwell fluid is to make the surface gravity wave on the Maxwell fluid behave more like the surface gravity wave on the inviscid fluid.

  7. Nonlocal resonances in weak turbulence of gravity-capillary waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2015-04-10

    We report a laboratory investigation of weak turbulence of water surface waves in the gravity-capillary crossover. By using time-space-resolved profilometry and a bicoherence analysis, we observe that the nonlinear processes involve three-wave resonant interactions. By studying the solutions of the resonance conditions, we show that the nonlinear interaction is dominantly one dimensional and involves collinear wave vectors. Furthermore, taking into account the spectral widening due to weak nonlinearity explains why nonlocal interactions are possible between a gravity wave and high-frequency capillary ones. We observe also that nonlinear three-wave coupling is possible among gravity waves, and we raise the question of the relevance of this mechanism for oceanic waves. PMID:25910127

  8. Investigating Gravity Wave-Ionosphere Interactions Using The Transfer Function Model And An Ionosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruntz, R. J.; Paxton, L. J.; Miller, E. S.; Bust, G. S.; Mayr, H. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Transfer Function Model (TFM) has been used in numerous studies to simulate gravity waves. In the TFM, the time dependence is formulated in terms of frequencies, and the horizontal wave pattern on the globe is formulated in terms of vector spherical harmonics. For a wide range of frequencies, the equations of mass, energy and momentum conservation are solved to compile a transfer function. The transfer function can then be easily combined with a time-dependent source whose spatial extent is also expressed in spherical harmonics, to produce a global atmospheric response, including gravity waves. This approach has significant benefits in that the solution is grid-independent (without any inherent limits on resolution), and the solutions do not suffer from singularities at the poles. We will show results from our simulations that couple the output of the TFM to an ionospheric model, to predict traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) driven by the simulated gravity waves.

  9. Interactions of cosmological gravity waves and magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Fenu, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    The energy momentum tensor of a magnetic field always contains a spin-2 component in its anisotropic stress and therefore generates gravity waves. It has been argued in the literature (Caprini & Durrer \\cite{CD}) that this gravity wave production can be very strong and that back-reaction cannot be neglected. On the other hand, a gravity wave background does affect the evolution of magnetic fields. It has also been argued (Tsagas \\cite{Tsagas:2005ki}, \\cite{Tsagas:2001ak}) that this can lead to very strong amplification of a primordial magnetic field. In this paper we revisit these claims and study back reaction to second order.

  10. Massive gravitational waves in Chern-Simons modified gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the nondynamical Chern-Simons (nCS) modified gravity, which is regarded as a parity-odd theory of massive gravity in four dimensions. We first find polarization modes of gravitational waves for θ=x/μ in nCS modified gravity by using the Newman-Penrose formalism where the null complex tetrad is necessary to specify gravitational waves. We show that in the Newman–Penrose formalism, the number of polarization modes is one in addition to an unspecified Ψ4, implying three degrees of freedom for θ=x/μ. This compares with two for a canonical embedding of θ=t/μ. Also, if one introduces the Ricci tensor formalism to describe a massive graviton arising from the nCS modified gravity, one finds one massive mode after making second-order wave equations, which is compared to five found from the parity-even Einstein–Weyl gravity

  11. AdS Waves as Exact Solutions to Quadratic Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Gullu, Ibrahim; Gurses, Metin; Sisman, Tahsin Cagri; Tekin, Bayram(Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara, Turkey)

    2011-01-01

    We give an exact solution of the quadratic gravity in D dimensions. The solution is a plane fronted wave metric with a cosmological constant. This metric solves not only the full quadratic gravity field equations but also the linearized ones which include the linearized equations of the recently found critical gravity. A subset of the solutions change the asymptotic structure of the anti-de Sitter space due to their logarithmic behavior.

  12. Symmetry of steady periodic gravity water waves with vorticity

    OpenAIRE

    Constantin, Adrian; Ehrnström, Mats; Wahlén, Erik

    2007-01-01

    We prove that steady periodic two-dimensional rotational gravity water waves with a monotone surface profile between troughs and crests have to be symmetric about the crest, irrespective of the vorticity distribution within the fluid

  13. Laser Source for Atomic Gravity Wave Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an Atom Interferometry-based gravity wave detector (vs Optical Interferometry). Characterize a high power laser. Use Goddard Space Flight Center Mission...

  14. (abstract) Tropospheric Calibration for the Mars Observer Gravity Wave Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Steven J.; Armstrong, John

    1994-01-01

    In spring 1993, microwave radiometer-based tropospheric calibration was provided for the Mars Observer gravitational wave search. The Doppler shifted X-band radio signals propagating between Earth and the Mars Observer satellite were precisely measured to determine path length variations that might signal passage of gravitational waves. Experimental sensitivity was restricted by competing sources of variability in signal transit time. Principally, fluctuations in the solar wind and ionospheric plasma density combined with fluctions in tropospheric refractivity determined the detection limit. Troposphere-induced path delay fluctions are dominated by refractive changes caused by water vapor inhomogeneities blowing through the signal path. Since passive microwave remote sensing techniques are able to determine atmospheric propagation delays, radiometer-based tropospheric calibration was provided at the Deep Space Network Uranus tracking site (DSS-15). Two microwave water vapor radiometers (WVRs), a microwave temperature profiler (MTP), and a ground based meterological station were deployed to determine line-of-sight vapor content and vertical temperature profile concurrently with Mars Observer tracking measurements. This calibration system provided the capability to correct Mars Observer Doppler data for troposphere-induced path variations. We present preliminary analysis of the Doppler and WVR data sets illustrating the utility of WVRs to calibrate Doppler data. This takes an important step toward realizing the ambitious system required to support future Ka-band Cassini satellite gravity wave tropospheric calibration system.

  15. Acoustic-Gravity Waves Interacting with a Rectangular Trench

    OpenAIRE

    Usama Kadri

    2014-01-01

    A mathematical solution of the two-dimensional linear problem of an acoustic-gravity wave interacting with a rectangular trench, in a compressible ocean, is presented. Expressions for the flow field on both sides of the trench are derived. The dynamic bottom pressure produced by the acoustic-gravity waves on both sides of the trench is measurable, though on the transmission side it decreases with the trench depth. A successful recording of the bottom pressures could assist in the early detect...

  16. Modeling the effects of gravity wave momentum deposition on the general circulation above the turbopause

    OpenAIRE

    Yigit, E.; Medvedev, A. S.; Aylward, A. D.; Hartogh, P.; Harris, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinear spectral gravity wave (GW) drag parameterization systematically accounting for breaking and dissipation in the thermosphere developed by Yigit et al. (2008) has been implemented into the University College London Coupled Middle Atmosphere-Thermosphere-2 (CMAT2) general circulation model (GCM). The dynamical role of GWs propagating upward from the lower atmosphere has been studied in a series of GCM tests for June solstice conditions. The results suggest that GW drag is not only no...

  17. Gravity wave activity observed in the mesosphere and ionosphere on September 16th 2015 by an all-sky imager and dTEC maps over Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrasse, Cristiano M.; Gobbi, Delano; Buriti, Ricardo; Bageston, José Valentin; Medeiros, Amauri; Paulino, Igo; Cosme Alexandre Figueiredo, M.; Takahashi, Hisao; Azambuja, Rodrigo

    2016-07-01

    All-sky imager was used to observe the wave activity in the mesosphere and a ground network of GPS receivers were used to make detrended Total Electron Content (dTEC) maps to monitor the ionosphere. The wave activity was observed on September 16th 2015 over the southeast region in Brazil. The gravity wave characteristics and the atmospheric conditions for wave propagation will be presented and discussed. The gravity wave source was associated with strong tropospheric convection.

  18. Magellan radio occultation measurements of atmospheric waves on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, David P.; Jenkins, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Radio occultation experiments were conducted at Venus on three consecutive orbits of the Magellan spacecraft in October 1991. Each occultation occurred over the same topography (67 deg N, 127 deg E) and at the same local time (22 hr 5 min), but the data are sensitive to zonal variations because the atmosphere rotates significantly during one orbit. Through comparisons between observations and predictions of standard wave theory, we have demonstrated that small-scale oscillations in retrieved temperature profiles as well as scintillations in received signal intensity are caused by a spectrum of vertically propagating internal gravity waves. There is a strong similarity between the intensity scintillations observed here and previous measurements, which pertain to a wide range of locations and experiment dates. This implies that the same basic phenomenon underlies all the observations and hence that gravity waves are a persistent, global feature of Venus' atmosphere. We obtained a fairly complete characterization of a gravity wave that appears above the middle cloud in temperature measurements on all three orbits. The amplitude and vertical wavelength are about 4 K and 2.5 km respectively, at 65 km. A model for radiative damping implies that the wave intrinsic frequency is approximately 2 x 10(exp 4) rad/sec, the corresponding ratio between horizontal and vertical wavelengths is approximately 100. The wave is nearly stationary relative to the surface or the Sun. Radiative attenuation limits the wave amplitude at altitudes above approximately 65 km, leading to wave drag on the mean zonal winds of about +0.4 m/sec per day (eastward). The sign, magnitude, and location of this forcing suggest a possible role in explaining the decrease with height in the zonal wind speed that is believed to occur above the cloud tops. Temperature oscillations with larger vertical wavelengths (5-10 km) were also observed on all three orbits, but we are able unable to interpret these

  19. Incompressible wave motion of inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, O. A.

    2012-04-01

    We consider a particular class of linear and non-linear wave motions in fluids, in which pressure remains constant in each moving fluid parcel. The fluid is assumed to be inviscid, and wave motion is considered as an adiabatic thermodynamic process. An exact, analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations is obtained that describes the wave motion in inhomogeneous, compressible, rotating fluids with piece-wise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. The solution is valid under surprisingly general assumptions about the environment and reduces to some classical wave types in appropriate limiting cases. Free waves in bounded and unbounded domains as well as excitation of wave fields by a point source are considered. Edge waves propagating along vertical and inclined rigid boundaries are found in rotating and non-rotating fluids. Allowance for three-dimensional variation of the sound speed and for arbitrary density stratification, including density discontinuities, makes the exact solution an attractive model of acoustic-gravity waves in a coupled ocean-atmosphere system. The new wave type complements classical exact solutions of linearized equations of fluid mechanics known as the Rossby, Lamb, Kelvin, and Poincaré waves, which provide much of the conceptual foundation of geophysical fluid dynamics. In addition to a wide class of exact solutions for linear waves, an exact solution of full non-linear hydrodynamics equations is found that describes a propagating wave in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids with piece-wise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. The fluid may have a free surface and a rigid boundary. Depending on the geometry of the problem, the solution has the meaning of either surface or edge wave. The exact solution describes a finite-amplitude wave in an otherwise quiescent fluid. Extensions to finite-amplitude waves in fluids with background currents are considered. Relation of the new exact solution for the non

  20. Mesospheric airglow and ionospheric responses to upward-propagating acoustic and gravity waves above tropospheric sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snively, J. B.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    The existence of acoustic waves (periods ~1-5 minutes) and gravity waves (periods >4 minutes) in the ionosphere above active tropospheric convection has been appreciated for more than forty years [e.g., Georges, Rev. Geophys. and Space Phys., 11(3), 1973]. Likewise, gravity waves exhibiting cylindrical symmetry and curvature of phase fronts have been observed via imaging of the mesospheric airglow layers [e.g., Yue et al., JGR, 118(8), 2013], clearly associated with tropospheric convection; gravity wave signatures have also recently been detected above convection in ionospheric total electron content (TEC) measurements [Lay et al., GRL, 40, 2013]. We here investigate the observable features of acoustic waves, and their relationship to upward-propagating gravity waves generated by the same sources, as they arrive in the mesosphere, lower-thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI). Numerical simulations using a nonlinear, cylindrically-axisymmetric, compressible atmospheric dynamics model confirm that acoustic waves generated by transient tropospheric sources may produce "concentric ring" signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer that precede the arrival of gravity waves. As amplitudes increase with altitude and decreasing neutral density, the modeled acoustic waves achieve temperature and vertical wind perturbations on the order of ~10s of Kelvin and m/s throughout the E- and F-region. Using a coupled multi-fluid ionospheric model [Zettergren and Semeter, JGR, 117(A6), 2012], extended for low-latitudes using a 2D dipole magnetic field coordinate system, we investigate acoustic wave perturbations to the ionosphere in the meridional direction. Resulting perturbations are predicted to be detectable by ground-based radar and GPS TEC measurements, or via in situ instrumentation. Although transient and short-lived, the acoustic waves' airglow and ionospheric signatures are likely to in some cases be observable, and may provide important insight into the regional

  1. Tidal and gravity waves study from the airglow measurements at Kolhapur (India)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Ghodpage; Devendraa Siingh; R P Singh; G K Mukherjee; P Vohat; A K Singh

    2012-12-01

    Simultaneous photometric measurements of the OI 557.7 nm and OH (7, 2) band from a low latitude station, Kolhapur (16.8°N, 74.2°E) during the period 2004–2007 are analyzed to study the dominant waves present in the 80–100 km altitude region of the atmosphere. The nocturnal intensity variations of different airglow emissions are observed using scanning temperature controlled filter photometers. Waves having period lying between 2 and 12 hours have been recorded. Some of these waves having subharmonic tidal oscillation periods 4, 6, 8 and 12 hours propagate upward with velocity lying in the range 1.6–11.3 m/s and the vertical wave length lying between 28.6 and 163 kms. The other waves may be the upward propagating gravity waves or waves resulting from the interaction of inter-mode tidal oscillations, interaction of tidal waves with planetary waves and gravity waves. Some times, the second harmonic wave has higher vertical velocity than the corresponding fundamental wave. Application of these waves in studying the thermal structure of the region is discussed.

  2. Antarctic MLT Gravity Wave Momentum Flux Observed by the Davis MST Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, P. T.; Murphy, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The MST radar at Davis Station, Antarctica, 68.6 S 78.0 E, was used to make dual coplanar beam measurements of short period (12-60 minutes) gravity wave momentum flux in the mesopause region during the southern hemisphere summer of 2014-2015. Mean zonal and meridional momentum flux estimates are eastward and southward respectively, throughout the region and season, with a bias towards both larger mean flux and number of eastward and southward propagating waves. Lognormal distributions of the absolute momentum flux attributable to individual wave events are broadly consistent with satellite and other middle atmosphere gravity wave observation and modelling techniques, with greater than 40% of the total flux being contributed by the largest 10% of wave events. Estimates of flux divergence are made during periods where sufficient density of observations exist. Ray tracing methods are employed to identify potential source regions and mechanisms to aid the development of meteorologically interactive parameterization schemes for the region.

  3. Electromagnetic internal gravity waves in the Earth's ionospheric E-layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Earth's ionospheric E-layer existence of the new waves connecting with the electromagnetic nature of internal gravity waves is shown. They represent the mixture of the ordinary internal gravity waves and the new type of dispersive Alfven waves. -- Highlights: ► Existence of electromagnetic internal gravity waves in the ionospheric E-layer is shown. ► Electromagnetic nature of internal gravity waves is described. ► Appearance of the new dispersive Alfven waves is shown.

  4. No further gravitational wave modes in F(T) gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explore the possibility of further gravitational wave modes in F(T) gravity, where T is the torsion scalar in teleparallelism. It is explicitly demonstrated that gravitational wave modes in F(T) gravity are equivalent to those in General Relativity. This result is achieved by calculating the Minkowskian limit for a class of analytic function of F(T). This consequence is also confirmed by the preservative analysis around the flat background in the weak field limit with the scalar–tensor representation of F(T) gravity

  5. No further gravitational wave modes in F(T) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamba, Kazuharu, E-mail: bamba@kmi.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Capozziello, Salvatore, E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” (Italy); INFN Sez. di Napoli, Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, Edificio G, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); De Laurentis, Mariafelicia, E-mail: felicia@na.infn.it [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” (Italy); INFN Sez. di Napoli, Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, Edificio G, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Nojiri, Shin' ichi, E-mail: nojiri@phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Sáez-Gómez, Diego, E-mail: diego.saezgomez@uct.ac.za [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC) and Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, Cape Town (South Africa); Fisika Teorikoaren eta Zientziaren Historia Saila, Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, 644 Posta Kutxatila, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-11-25

    We explore the possibility of further gravitational wave modes in F(T) gravity, where T is the torsion scalar in teleparallelism. It is explicitly demonstrated that gravitational wave modes in F(T) gravity are equivalent to those in General Relativity. This result is achieved by calculating the Minkowskian limit for a class of analytic function of F(T). This consequence is also confirmed by the preservative analysis around the flat background in the weak field limit with the scalar–tensor representation of F(T) gravity.

  6. Massive gravitational waves in Chern-Simons modified gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon(Institute of Basic Science and Department of Computer Simulation, Inje University, Gimhae, 621-749, Korea)

    2014-01-01

    We consider the nondynamical Chern-Simons (nCS) modified gravity, which is regarded as a parity-odd theory of massive gravity in four dimensions. We first find polarization modes of gravitational waves for $\\theta=x/\\mu$ in nCS modified gravity by using the Newman-Penrose formalism where the null complex tetrad is necessary to specify gravitational waves. We show that in the Newman-Penrose formalism, the number of polarization modes is one in addition to an unspecified $\\Psi_4$, implying thre...

  7. On the parameterization scheme of gravity wave drag effect on the mean zonal flow of mesosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Based on McFarlane's parameterization scheme of gravity wave drag, a refined gravity-wave-drag scheme is presented. Both the drag effect of the momentum flux and the dissipation effect of gravity wave breaking on the mean zonal flow are included in the refined parameterization scheme. The dissipation effect can be formulated with the gravity wave numbers and the mean quantities. The refined parameterization scheme may represent a complete drag effect of stationary gravity wave breaking on the mean zonal flow.

  8. Gravity waves observation of wind field in stratosphere based on a Rayleigh Doppler lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruocan; Dou, Xiankang; Sun, Dongsong; Xue, Xianghui; Zheng, Jun; Han, Yuli; Chen, Tingdi; Wang, Guocheng; Zhou, Yingjie

    2016-03-21

    Simultaneous wind and temperature measurements in stratosphere with high time-spatial resolution for gravity waves study are scarce. In this paper we perform wind field gravity waves cases in the stratosphere observed by a mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar. This lidar system with both wind and temperature measurements were implemented for atmosphere gravity waves research in the altitude region 15-60 km. Observations were carried out for two periods of time: 3 months started from November 4, 2014 in Xinzhou, China (38.425°N,112.729°E) and 2 months started from October 7, 2015 in Jiuquan, China (39.741°N, 98.495°E) . The mesoscale fluctuations of the horizontal wind velocity and the two dimensional spectra analysis of these fluctuations show the presence of dominant oscillatory modes with wavelength of 4-14 km and period of around 10 hours in several cases. The simultaneous temperature observations make it possible to identify gravity wave cases from the relationships between different variables: temperature and horizontal wind. The observed cases demonstrate the Rayleigh Doppler Lidar's capacity to study gravity waves. PMID:27136878

  9. Gravity wave turbulence revealed by horizontal vibrations of the container

    CERN Document Server

    Issenmann, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally study the role of the forcing on gravity-capillary wave turbulence. Previous laboratory experiments using spatially localized forcing (vibrating blades) have shown that the frequency power-law exponent of the gravity wave spectrum depends on the forcing parameters. By horizontally vibrating the whole container, we observe a spectrum exponent that does not depend on the forcing parameters for both gravity and capillary regimes. This spatially extended forcing leads to a gravity spectrum exponent in better agreement with the theory than by using a spatially localized forcing. The role of the vessel shape has been also studied. Finally, the wave spectrum is found to scale linearly with the injected power for both regimes whatever the forcing type used.

  10. Gravity waves, Tides and Planetary wave characteristics revealed by network of MLT radars over Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Karanam, Kishore Kumar; Sunkara, Eswaraiah; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.; Subrahmanyam, K. V.; Ramanjaneyulu, L.

    2016-07-01

    Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) mean winds, gravity waves, tidal and planetary wave characteristics are investigated using two years (2013-2015) of advanced meteor radar installed at Tirupathi (13.63oN, 79.4oE), India. The observations reveal the presence of high frequency gravity waves (30-120 minutes), atmospheric tides (diurnal, semi-diurnal and terr-diurnal) along with long period oscillations in both zonal and meridional winds. Background mean zonal winds show clear semi-annual oscillation in the mesosphere, whereas meridional winds are characterized by annual oscillation as expected. Diurnal tide amplitudes are significantly larger (60-80 m/s) than semi-diurnal (10-20 m/s) and terr-diurnal (5-8 m/s) tides and larger in meridional than zonal winds. The measured meridional components are in good agreement with Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM-09) predictions than zonal up to ~90 km in all the seasons, except fall equinox. Diurnal tidal phase matches well than the amplitudes between observations and model predictions. However, no similarity is being found in the semi-diurnal tides between observations and model. The measurements are further compared with nearby Thumba meteor radar (8.5oN, 77oE) observations. Some differences do exist between the measurements from Tirupati and Thumba meteor radar and model outputs at greater heights and the possible reasons are discussed. SVU meteor radar observations clearly showed the dominance of well-known ultra-fast kelvin waves (3.5 days), 5-8 day, 16 day, 27 day, and 30-40 day oscillations. Due to higher meteor count extending up to 110 km, we could investigate the variability of these PWs and oscillations covering wider range (70-110 km) for the first time. Significant change above 100 km is noticed in all the above mentioned PW activity and oscillations. We also used ERA-Interim reanalysis data sets available at 0.125x0.125 degree grids for investigating the characteristics of these PW right from surface to 1 h

  11. Observation of resonant interactions among surface gravity waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnefoy, F; Michel, G; Semin, B; Humbert, T; Aumaître, S; Berhanu, M; Falcon, E

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally study resonant interactions of oblique surface gravity waves in a large basin. Our results strongly extend previous experimental results performed mainly for perpendicular or collinear wave trains. We generate two oblique waves crossing at an acute angle, while we control their frequency ratio, steepnesses and directions. These mother waves mutually interact and give birth to a resonant wave whose properties (growth rate, resonant response curve and phase locking) are fully characterized. All our experimental results are found in good quantitative agreement with four-wave interaction theory with no fitting parameter. Off-resonance experiments are also reported and the relevant theoretical analysis is conducted and validated.

  12. The response of plasma density to breaking inertial gravity wave in the lower regions of ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a three-dimensional numerical study for the E and lower F region ionosphere coupled with the neutral atmosphere dynamics. This model is developed based on a previous ionospheric model that examines the transport patterns of plasma density given a prescribed neutral atmospheric flow. Inclusion of neutral dynamics in the model allows us to examine the charge-neutral interactions over the full evolution cycle of an inertial gravity wave when the background flow spins up from rest, saturates and eventually breaks. Using Lagrangian analyses, we show the mixing patterns of the ionospheric responses and the formation of ionospheric layers. The corresponding plasma density in this flow develops complex wave structures and small-scale patches during the gravity wave breaking event

  13. The response of plasma density to breaking inertial gravity wave in the lower regions of ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wenbo, E-mail: Wenbo.Tang@asu.edu; Mahalov, Alex, E-mail: Alex.Mahalov@asu.edu [School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    We present a three-dimensional numerical study for the E and lower F region ionosphere coupled with the neutral atmosphere dynamics. This model is developed based on a previous ionospheric model that examines the transport patterns of plasma density given a prescribed neutral atmospheric flow. Inclusion of neutral dynamics in the model allows us to examine the charge-neutral interactions over the full evolution cycle of an inertial gravity wave when the background flow spins up from rest, saturates and eventually breaks. Using Lagrangian analyses, we show the mixing patterns of the ionospheric responses and the formation of ionospheric layers. The corresponding plasma density in this flow develops complex wave structures and small-scale patches during the gravity wave breaking event.

  14. PP-waves with torsion and metric-affine gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Pasic, Vedad; Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2005-01-01

    A classical pp-wave is a 4-dimensional Lorentzian spacetime which admits a nonvanishing parallel spinor field; here the connection is assumed to be Levi-Civita. We generalise this definition to metric compatible spacetimes with torsion and describe basic properties of such spacetimes. We use our generalised pp-waves for constructing new explicit vacuum solutions of quadratic metric-affine gravity.

  15. Non linear stability and capillary-gravity waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to present a review of the nonlinear effects associated with finite amplitude stability of capillary-gravity waves in hydrodynamics as well as magnetohydrodynamics. The method of multiple scales is used to derive the nonlinear equation of the modulationally unstable waves. (author). 64 refs., 4 figs

  16. Gravity waves at mid and low-latitude Ionosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chum, Jaroslav; Baše, Jiří; Burešová, Dalia; Cabrera, M. A.; Fišer, Jiří; Hruška, František; McKinnell, L.- A.; Šindelářová, Tereza

    Merida: International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, 2013 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1253 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Ionospehre * Gravity waves * Wave propagation * remote sensing Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  17. Angular momentum transport via internal gravity waves in evolving stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent asteroseismic advances have allowed for direct measurements of the internal rotation rates of many subgiant and red giant stars. Unlike the nearly rigidly rotating Sun, these evolved stars contain radiative cores that spin faster than their overlying convective envelopes, but slower than they would in the absence of internal angular momentum transport. We investigate the role of internal gravity waves in angular momentum transport in evolving low-mass stars. In agreement with previous results, we find that convectively excited gravity waves can prevent the development of strong differential rotation in the radiative cores of Sun-like stars. As stars evolve into subgiants, however, low-frequency gravity waves become strongly attenuated and cannot propagate below the hydrogen-burning shell, allowing the spin of the core to decouple from the convective envelope. This decoupling occurs at the base of the subgiant branch when stars have surface temperatures of T ≈ 5500 K. However, gravity waves can still spin down the upper radiative region, implying that the observed differential rotation is likely confined to the deep core near the hydrogen-burning shell. The torque on the upper radiative region may also prevent the core from accreting high angular momentum material and slow the rate of core spin-up. The observed spin-down of cores on the red giant branch cannot be totally attributed to gravity waves, but the waves may enhance shear within the radiative region and thus increase the efficacy of viscous/magnetic torques.

  18. Shock wave mixing in Einstein and dilaton gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider possible mixing of electromagnetic and gravitation shock waves, in the Planckian energy scattering of point particles in Minkowski space. By boosting a Reissner-Nordstroem black hole solution to the velocity of light, it is shown that no mixing of shock waves takes place for arbitrary finite charge carried by the black hole. However, a similar boosting procedure for a charged black hole solution in dilation gravity yields some mixing: the wave function of even a neutral test particle, acquires a small additional phase factor depending on the dilatonic black hole charge. Possible implications for poles in the amplitudes for the dilaton gravity case are discussed. (author). 12 refs

  19. In Situ Observations of PSCs Generated by Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Bui, Paul; Mahoney, M. J.; Gandrud, Bruce; Hipskind, K. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During SOLVE, the bulk of the in-situ observations of PSCs are of large scale extended structures associated with synoptic scale cooling. The nature of these structures is also determined by layers of high relative NOy that have been stretched into thin layers by advective processes. Some of the in situ observations, however, are clearly correlated with gravity wave signatures. The first goal of this work is to examine these cases and evaluate gravity wave parameters. In particular, we are interested in the intrinsic periods of the waves and their temperature amplitude, which are key ingredients in the nucleation process. Secondly, we will examine some rudimentary properties of the particle size distributions and composition, comparing these with in situ observations of the more extended PSC features. Finally, we will attempt to ascertain the mechanism which generates the gravity waves.

  20. Triad resonance between gravity and vorticity waves in vertical shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivas, Theodore D.; Wunsch, Scott

    2016-07-01

    Weakly nonlinear theory is used to explore the effect of vertical shear on surface gravity waves in three dimensions. An idealized piecewise-linear shear profile motivated by wind-driven profiles and ambient currents in the ocean is used. It is shown that shear may mediate weakly nonlinear resonant triad interactions between gravity and vorticity waves. The triad results in energy exchange between gravity waves of comparable wavelengths propagating in different directions. For realistic ocean shears, shear-mediated energy exchange may occur on timescales of minutes for shorter wavelengths, but slows as the wavelength increases. Hence this triad mechanism may contribute to the larger angular spreading (relative to wind direction) for shorter wind-waves observed in the oceans.

  1. Modulation of subtropical stratospheric gravity waves by equatorial rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Naftali Y.; Boos, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Internal gravity waves influence a variety of phenomena in Earth's stratosphere and upper troposphere, including aviation weather turbulence and circulations that set high-altitude distributions of ozone and greenhouse gases. Here coupling between the dominant mode of subseasonal variability of the equatorial atmosphere—the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO)—and subtropical stratospheric gravity waves created by flow over topography is documented for the first time. We use three different meteorological data sets to show that during boreal winter, the MJO modifies the vertical distribution of internal gravity wave drag induced by the Tibetan Plateau and the deposition of momentum into the stratosphere. This interaction, however, has no significant impact on the vertically integrated wave drag. Our findings raise new questions about how future changes in tropical rainfall might affect stratospheric variability and highlight the importance of local processes over Tibet for the circulations that set distributions of climatically important high-altitude trace gases.

  2. Free Internal Waves in Polytropic Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Mikhail I

    2011-01-01

    Free internal waves in polytropic atmospheres are studied (polytropic atmosphere is such one that the temperature of gas linearly depends on altitude). We suppose gas to be ideal and incompressible. Also, we regard the atmosphere of constant height with the "rigid lid" condition on its top to filter internal waves. If temperature, density and pressure of such undisturbed atmosphere do not depend on latitude and longitude then the internal waves are harmonic with apriori unknown eigenfrequencies, the problem permits separation of variables and reduces to the system of two ODE's. The first ODE (the Laplace's tidal equation) is analyzed by author earlier. The second ODE determines the vertical structure of the waves to be considered and has analytical solution for polytropic atmospheres. There are 6 dimensionless numbers, 2 for the Laplace's tidal equation and 4 for the vertical structure equation. The solution is a countable set of the eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions of the vertical structure equation; ever...

  3. A plethora of generalised solitary gravity-capillary water waves

    OpenAIRE

    Clamond, Didier; Dutykh, Denys; Durán, Angel

    2015-01-01

    The present study describes, first, an efficient algorithm for computing capillary-gravity solitary waves solutions of the irrotational Euler equations with a free surface and, second, provides numerical evidences of the existence of (likely) an infinite number of generalised solitary waves (solitary waves with undamped oscillatory wings). Using conformal mapping, the unknown fluid domain, which is to be determined, is mapped into a uniform strip of the complex plane. In the transformed domai...

  4. Efficient computation of capillary-gravity generalized solitary waves

    CERN Document Server

    Dutykh, Denys; Duran, Angel

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the computation of capillary-gravity solitary waves of the irrotational incompressible Euler equations with free surface. The numerical study is a continuation of a previous work in several points: an alternative formulation of the Babenko-type equation for the wave profiles, a detailed description of both the numerical resolution and the analysis of the internal flow structure under a solitary wave. The numerical code used in this study is provided in open source for interested readers.

  5. Reflection and Ducting of Gravity Waves Inside the Sun

    OpenAIRE

    MacGregor, K. B.; Rogers, T.M.

    2011-01-01

    Internal gravity waves excited by overshoot at the bottom of the convection zone can be influenced by rotation and by the strong toroidal magnetic field that is likely to be present in the solar tachocline. Using a simple Cartesian model, we show how waves with a vertical component of propagation can be reflected when traveling through a layer containing a horizontal magnetic field with a strength that varies with depth. This interaction can prevent a portion of the downward-traveling wave en...

  6. Atmospheric Gravity Perturbations Measured by Ground-Based Interferometer with Suspended Mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Rudenko, V N; Tsubono, K

    2003-01-01

    A possibility of geophysical measurements using the large scale laser interferometrical gravitational wave antenna is discussed. An interferometer with suspended mirrors can be used as a gradiometer measuring variations of an angle between gravity force vectors acting on the spatially separated suspensions. We analyze restrictions imposed by the atmospheric noises on feasibility of such measurements. Two models of the atmosphere are invoked: a quiet atmosphere with a hydrostatic coupling of pressure and density and a dynamic model of moving region of the density anomaly (cyclone). Both models lead to similar conclusions up to numerical factors. Besides the hydrostatic approximation, we use a model of turbulent atmosphere with the pressure fluctuation spectrum f^{-7/3} to explore the Newtonian noise in a higher frequency domain (up to 10 Hz) predicting the gravitational noise background for modern gravitational wave detectors. Our estimates show that this could pose a serious problem for realization of such pr...

  7. Gravitational wave asteroseismology in scalar-tensor theory of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study perturbations of relativistic stars in scalar-tensor theory of gravity and examine the effects of the scalar field on the corresponding oscillation spectrum. We show that the frequency of the emitted gravitational waves is shifted proportionally to the scalar field strength. Scalar waves which might be produced from such oscillations can be a unique probe for the theory, but their detectability is questionable if the radiated energy is small. However we show that there is no need for a direct observation of scalar waves: the shift in the gravitational wave spectrum could unambiguously signal the presence of a scalar field. (authors) Keywords: gravitational waves, neutron stars, alternative theories

  8. Properties of surface waves in granular media under gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acoustical waves propagating along the free surface of granular media under gravity are investigated in the framework of elasticity theory. The influence of stress on a surface wave is analyzed. The results have shown that two types of surface waves, namely sagittal and transverse modes exist depending on initial stress states, which may have some influence on the dispersion relations of surface waves, but the influence is not great. Considering that the present experimental accuracy is far from distinguishing this detail, the validity of elasticity theory on the surface waves propagating in granular media can still be maintained. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  9. Fractional Fourier approximations for potential gravity waves on deep water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Lukomsky

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the canonical model of hydrodynamics, where fluid is assumed to be ideal and incompressible, waves are potential, two-dimensional, and symmetric, the authors have recently reported the existence of a new type of gravity waves on deep water besides well studied Stokes waves (Lukomsky et al., 2002b. The distinctive feature of these waves is that horizontal water velocities in the wave crests exceed the speed of the crests themselves. Such waves were found to describe irregular flows with stagnation point inside the flow domain and discontinuous streamlines near the wave crests. In the present work, a new highly efficient method for computing steady potential gravity waves on deep water is proposed to examine the character of singularity of irregular flows in more detail. The method is based on the truncated fractional approximations for the velocity potential in terms of the basis functions 1/(1 - exp(y0 - y -  ixn, y0 being a free parameter. The non-linear transformation of the horizontal scale x = c - g sin c, 0  n(y + ix  was found to be from one to ten decimal orders for steep Stokes waves and up to one decimal digit for irregular flows. The data obtained supports the following conjecture: irregular waves to all appearance represent a family of sharp-crested waves like the limiting Stokes wave but of lesser amplitude.

  10. Gravitational Wave in Lorentz Violating Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By making use of the weak gravitational field approximation, we obtain a linearized solution of the gravitational vacuum field equation in an anisotropic spacetime. The plane-wave solution and dispersion relation of gravitational wave is presented explicitly. There is possibility that the speed of gravitational wave is larger than the speed of light and the casuality still holds. We show that the energy-momentum of gravitational wave in the ansiotropic spacetime is still well defined and conserved. (general)

  11. Gravity-related spontaneous wave function collapse in bulk matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the DP-model, gravity-related spontaneous wave function collapses suppress Schrödinger cat states which are conceptually problematic especially for gravity and space-time. We derive the equations of the model for the hydrodynamic-elastic (acoustic) modes in a bulk. Two particular features are discussed: the universal dominance of spontaneous collapses at large wavelengths, and the reduction of spontaneous heating by a slight refinement of the DP-model. (paper)

  12. Extension of gravity-wave interferometer operation to low frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments relating to concepts for extending interferometer operation, particularly at low frequencies, are discussed. This includes work with suspensions connected by a suspension-point interferometer. A new concept for achieving similar frequency extension without requiring an additional interferometer between suspensions is outlined, as well as a technique for improving positioning of laser beams relative to centres of gravity of test masses in gravity-wave interferometers and other instruments

  13. Testing Relativistic Gravity and Detecting Gravitational Waves in Space

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Wei-Tou

    2010-01-01

    For testing gravity and detecting gravitational waves in space, deep-space laser ranging using drag-free spacecraft is a common method. Deep space provides a large arena and a long integration time. Laser technology provides measurement sensitivity, while drag-free technology ensures that gravitational phenomenon to be measured with least spurious noises. In this talk, we give an overview of motivations and methods of various space missions/proposals testing relativistic gravity and detecting...

  14. Loop quantum gravity corrections to gravitational wave dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    Bojowald, Martin; Hossain, Golam Mortuza

    2007-01-01

    Cosmological tensor perturbations equations are derived for Hamiltonian cosmology based on Ashtekar's formulation of general relativity, including typical quantum gravity effects in the Hamiltonian constraint as they are expected from loop quantum gravity. This translates to corrections of the dispersion relation for gravitational waves. The main application here is the preservation of causality which is shown to be realized due to the absence of anomalies in the effective constraint algebra ...

  15. Mesospheric hydroxyl airglow signatures of acoustic and gravity waves generated by transient tropospheric forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snively, J. B.

    2013-09-01

    Numerical model results demonstrate that acoustic waves generated by tropospheric sources may produce cylindrical "concentric ring" signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer. They may arrive as precursors to upward propagating gravity waves, generated simultaneously by the same sources, and produce strong temperature perturbations in the thermosphere above. Transient and short-lived, the acoustic wave airglow intensity and temperature signatures are predicted to be detectable by ground-based airglow imaging systems and may provide new insight into the forcing of the upper atmosphere from below.

  16. Properties of QBO and SAO Generated by Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Reddy, C. A.; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.

    1999-01-01

    We present an extension for the 2D (zonal mean) version of our Numerical Spectral Mode (NSM) that incorporates Hines' Doppler spread parameterization (DSP) for small scale gravity waves (GW). This model is applied to describe the seasonal variations and the semi-annual and quasi-biennial oscillations (SAO and QBO). Our earlier model reproduced the salient features of the mean zonal circulation in the middle atmosphere, including the QBO extension into the upper mesosphere inferred from UARS measurements. In the present model we incorporate also tropospheric heating to reproduce the upwelling at equatorial latitudes associated with the Brewer-Dobson circulation that affects significantly the dynamics of the stratosphere as Dunkerton had pointed out. Upward vertical winds increase the period of the QBO observed from the ground. To compensate for that, one needs to increase the eddy diffusivity and the GW momentum flux, bringing the latter closer to values recommended in the DSP. The QBO period in the model is 30 months (mo), which is conducive to synchronize this oscillation with the seasonal cycle of solar forcing. Multi-year interannual oscillations are generated through wave filtering by the solar driven annual oscillation in the zonal circulation. Quadratic non-linearities generate interseasonal variations to produce a complicated pattern of variability associated with the QBO. The computed temperature amplitudes for the SAO and QBO are in substantial agreement with observations at equatorial and extratropical latitudes. At high latitudes, however, the observed QBO amplitudes are significantly larger, which may be a signature of propagating planetary waves not included in the present model. The assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium not being imposed, we find that the effects from the vertical Coriolis force associated with the equatorial oscillations are large for the vertical winds and significant for the temperature variations even outside the tropics but are

  17. Mesospheric, Thermospheric, and Ionospheric Responses to Acoustic and Gravity Waves Generated by Transient Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snively, J. B.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Strong acoustic waves with periods ~1-4 minutes have been confirmed to perturb the ionosphere following their generation by earthquakes [e.g., Garcia et al., GRL, 40(5), 2013] and volcanic eruption events [e.g., Heki, GRL, 33, L14303, 2006]. Clear acoustic and gravity wave signatures have also been reported in ionospheric data above strong tropospheric convection [Nishioka, GRL, 40(21), 2013], and prior modeling results suggest that convectively-generated acoustic waves with ~3-4 minute periods are readily detectable above their sources in TEC [Zettergren and Snively, GRL, 40(20), 2013]. These observations have provided quantitative insight into the coupling of processes occurring near Earth's surface with the upper atmosphere and ionosphere over short time-scales. Here, we investigate acoustic waves and short-period gravity waves generated by sources near ground level, and the observable responses of the mesosphere, lower-thermosphere, and ionosphere (MLTI) systems. Numerical simulations are performed using a nonlinear, compressible, atmospheric dynamics model, in cylindrically-axisymmetric coordinates, to investigate wave generation, upward propagation, steepening, and dissipation. Acoustic waves may produce observable signatures in the mesospheric hydroxyl airglow layer [e.g., Snively, GRL, 40(17), 2013], and can strongly perturb the lower-thermosphere and E- and F-region ionosphere, prior to the arrival of simultaneously-generated gravity waves. Using a coupled multi-fluid ionospheric model [Zettergren and Semeter, JGR, 117(A6), 2012], extended for mid and low latitudes using a 2D dipole magnetic field coordinate system [Zettergren and Snively, GRL, 40(20), 2013], we investigate its response to realistic acoustic wave perturbations. In particular, we demonstrate that the MLT and ionospheric responses are significantly and nonlinearly determined by the acoustic wave source geometry, spectrum, and amplitude, in addition to the local ambient state of the

  18. Simultaneous rocket and MST radar observation of an internal gravity wave breaking in the mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. A.; Fritts, D. C.; Balsley, B. B.; Philbrick, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    In June, 1983, the Structure and Atmospheric Turbulence Environment (STATE) rocket and Poker Flat Mesophere-Stratosphere-Troposphere radar campaign was conducted to measure the interaction between turbulence, electron density and electron density gradient that has produced unusually strong MST radar echoes from the summer mesosphere over Poker Flat, Alaska. Analysis or radar wind measurements and a concurrent wind and temperature profile obtained from a rocket probe carrying a three-axis accelerometer are given. The two data sets provide a fairly complete (and in some cases, redundant) picture of the breaking (or more correctly, the saturation) of a large-amplitude, low-frequency, long-wavelength internal gravity wave. The data show that small-scale turbulence and small-scale wave intensity is greatest at those altitudes where the large-scale wave-induced temperature lapse rate is most negative or most nearly unstable, but the wind shear due to the large-scale wave is a minimum. A brief review of linear gravity-wave theory is presented as an aid to the identification of the gravity-wave signature in the radar and rocket data. Analysis of the time and height cross sections of wind speed and turbulence intensity observed by the Poker Flat MST radar follows. Then, the vertical profile of temperature and winds measured by a rocket probe examined. Finally, the use of the independent data sets provided by the rocket and the radar are discussed and implications for theories of wave saturation are presented.

  19. Validation of the CUTLASS HF radar gravity wave observing capability using EISCAT CP-1 data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Arnold

    Full Text Available Quasi-periodic fluctuations in the returned ground-scatter power from the SuperDARN HF radars have been linked to the passage of medium-scale gravity waves. We have applied a technique that extracts the first radar range returns from the F-region to study the spatial extent and characteristics of these waves in the CUTLASS field-of-view. Some ray tracing was carried out to test the applicability of this method. The EISCAT radar facility at Tromsø is well within the CUTLASS field-of-view for these waves and provides a unique opportunity to assess independently the ability of the HF radars to derive gravity wave information. Results from 1st March, 1995, where the EISCAT UHF radar was operating in its CP-1 mode, demonstrate that the radars were in good agreement, especially if one selects the electron density variations measured by EISCAT at around 235 km. CUTLASS and EISCAT gravity wave observations complement each other; the former extends the spatial field of view considerably, whilst the latter provides detailed vertical information about a range of ionospheric parameters.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere – atmosphere interactions · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (thermospheric dynamics · Radio science (ionospheric propagations

  20. Dynamics of Gravity-Capillary Solitary Waves in Deep Water

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhan

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of solitary gravity-capillary water waves propagating on the surface of a three-dimensional fluid domain is studied numerically. In order to accurately compute complex time dependent solutions, we simplify the full potential flow problem by taking a cubic truncation of the scaled Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator for the normal velocity on the free surface. This approximation agrees remarkably well with the full equations for the bifurcation curves, wave profiles and the dynamics of solitary waves for a two-dimensional fluid domain. Fully localised solitary waves are then computed in the three-dimensional problem and the stability and interaction of both line and localized solitary waves are investigated via numerical time integration of the equations. The solitary wave branches are indexed by their finite energy at small amplitude, and the dynamics of the solitary waves is complex involving nonlinear focussing of wave packets, quasi-elastic collisions, and the generation of propagating, spatially lo...

  1. Almost Readily Detectable Time Delays from Gravity Waves?

    OpenAIRE

    Fakir, Redouane

    1993-01-01

    When a source of gravity waves is conveniently placed between the Earth and some source of light, preferably a pulsating source, the magnitude of time delays induced by the gravity waves could, in optimal situations, be not too far out of the reach of already existing technology. Besides the odd case of near-to-perfect alignment one might be lucky enough to encounter in the Galaxy, there exists several astronomical sites where good alignment occurs naturally. A good example is when the light ...

  2. Gravitational Waves in Effective Quantum Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Calmet, Xavier; Kuntz, Iberê; Mohapatra, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    In this short paper we investigate quantum gravitational effects on Einstein's equations using effective field theory techniques. We consider the leading order quantum gravitational correction to the wave equation. Besides the usual massless mode, we find a pair of modes with complex masses. These massive particles have a width and could thus lead to a damping of gravitational waves if excited in violent astrophysical processes producing gravitational waves such as e.g. black hole mergers. We...

  3. Gravitational Waves in Effective Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Calmet, Xavier; Mohapatra, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    In this short paper we investigate quantum gravitational effects on Einstein's equations using effective field theory techniques. We consider the leading order quantum gravitational correction to the wave equation. Besides the usual massless mode, we find a pair of modes with complex masses. These massive particles have a width and could thus lead to a damping of gravitational waves if excited in violent astrophysical processes producing gravitational waves such as e.g. black hole mergers. We discuss the consequences for gravitational wave events such as GW 150914 recently observed by the Advanced LIGO collaboration.

  4. Gravitational Waves in Effective Quantum Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, Xavier; Kuntz, Iberê; Mohapatra, Sonali

    2016-08-01

    In this short paper we investigate quantum gravitational effects on Einstein's equations using Effective Field Theory techniques. We consider the leading order quantum gravitational correction to the wave equation. Besides the usual massless mode, we find a pair of modes with complex masses. These massive particles have a width and could thus lead to a damping of gravitational waves if excited in violent astrophysical processes producing gravitational waves such as e.g. black hole mergers. We discuss the consequences for gravitational wave events such as GW 150914 recently observed by the Advanced LIGO collaboration.

  5. Waveguide gravity disturbances in vertically inhomogeneous dissipative atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Rudenko, G V

    2015-01-01

    Trapped atmosphere waves, such as IGW waveguide modes and Lamb modes, are described using dissipative solution above source (DSAS) (Dmitrienko and Rudenko, 2016). Accordingly this description, the modes are disturbances penetrating without limit in the upper atmosphere and dissipating their energy throughout the atmosphere; leakage from a trapping region to the upper atmosphere is taken in consideration. The DSAS results are compared to those based on both accurate and WKB approximated dissipationless equations. It is shown that the spatial and frequency characteristics of modes in the upper atmosphere calculated by any of the methods are close to each other and are in good agreement with the observed characteristics of traveling ionospheric disturbances.

  6. Nonlinear-internal gravity waves in a rotating fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between internal gravity waves in a rotating frame, and the mean flow, is discussed for the case when the properties of the mean flow vary slowly on a scale determined by the local wave structure. The principle of conservation of wave action is established. It is shown that the main effect of the waves on the Lagrangian mean velocity is due to an appropriate 'radiation stress' tensor. Kelvin's circulation theorem and a potential vorticity equation are derived for the mean velocity. (author)

  7. Colliding waves in metric-affine gravity

    CERN Document Server

    García, A; Macías, A; Mielke, E W; Socorro, J; García, Alberto; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Macías, Alfredo; Mielke, Eckehard W.; Socorro, José

    1998-01-01

    We generalize the formulation of the colliding gravitational waves to metric-affine theories and present an example of such kind of exact solutions. The plane waves are equipped with five symmetries and the resulting geometry after the collision possesses two spacelike Killing vectors.

  8. Investigation of gravity wave activity based on NDMC, NDACC and CTBTO measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Wüst, S.; Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Oberpfaffenhofen (DLR), Germany; Schmidt, C.; Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Oberpfaffenhofen (DLR), Germany; Kramer, R.; Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Oberpfaffenhofen (DLR), Germany; Bittner, M.; Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt Oberpfaffenhofen (DLR), Germany; Hauchecorne, A.; Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), France; Keckhut, P.; Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), France; LePichon, A.; Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA), France; Marchetti, E.; Università degli studi di firenze (UNIFI); Mze, N.; Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), France; Pecora, E.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Catania, Catania, Italia

    2014-01-01

    GRIPS (Ground based Infrared P-branch Spectrometer) airglow measurements allow the derivation of kinetic temperature in the mesopause region during night with a temporal resolution of 10s to 15s. Amongst others, these time series can be used for the investigation of atmospheric dynamics like gravity wave activity. GRIPS measurements are performed in the framework of NDMC – the international Network for the Detection of Mesospheric Change. The project ARISE combines NDMC, NDACC (Network for th...

  9. On the parametric instabilities of internal gravity waves in a density-stratified fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Yuanxun Bill

    2012-01-01

    The parametric instability of a finite-amplitude, internal gravity wave is a widely studied process in atmospheric and oceanic fluid dynamics, and has been extensively investigated through experiments and direct numerical simulations. The mathematical approach of the Floquet-Fourier method leads to a linear algebraic computation of Floquet exponents (stability eigenvalues) as a function of disturbance wavenumbers. The number of numerical eigenvalues is determined by the truncation of the Four...

  10. A mesoscale gravity-wave event observed during CCOPE. IV - Stability analysis and Doppler-derived wave vertical structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Steven E.; Einaudi, F.; Dorian, Paul B.; Lang, Stephen; Heymsfield, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of the results of a detailed study of the vertical structure of mesoscale gravity waves conducted during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE) is presented. Pressure perturbation fields derived from the Doppler wind fields are compared with the vertical structure of eigenfunctions resulting from a solution to the Taylor-Goldstein linear wave equation for an atmosphere whose mean state is described by vertical profiles obtained from a representative CCOPE sounding. An analysis of the potential for shear instability is also performed on all of the soundings taken on this day to assess the representativeness of the one chosen for the linear theoretical analysis.

  11. Generation of internal gravity waves by penetrative convection

    CERN Document Server

    Pinçon, C; Goupil, M J

    2015-01-01

    The rich harvest of seismic observations over the past decade provides evidence of angular momentum redistribution in stellar interiors that is not reproduced by current evolution codes. In this context, transport by internal gravity waves can play a role and could explain discrepancies between theory and observations. The efficiency of the transport of angular momentum by waves depends on their driving mechanism. While excitation by turbulence throughout the convective zone has already been investigated, we know that penetrative convection into the stably stratified radiative zone can also generate internal gravity waves. Therefore, we aim at developing a semianalytical model to estimate the generation of IGW by penetrative plumes below an upper convective envelope. We derive the wave amplitude considering the pressure exerted by an ensemble of plumes on the interface between the radiative and convective zones as source term in the equation of momentum. We consider the effect of a thermal transition from a c...

  12. Tropical Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes and Latent Heating Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Love, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent satellite determinations of global distributions of absolute gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere show maxima over the summer subtropical continents and little evidence of GW momentum fluxes associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This seems to be at odds with parameterizations forGWmomentum fluxes, where the source is a function of latent heating rates, which are largest in the region of the ITCZ in terms of monthly averages. The authors have examined global distributions of atmospheric latent heating, cloud-top-pressure altitudes, and lower-stratosphere absolute GW momentum fluxes and have found that monthly averages of the lower-stratosphere GW momentum fluxes more closely resemble the monthly mean cloud-top altitudes rather than the monthly mean rates of latent heating. These regions of highest cloud-top altitudes occur when rates of latent heating are largest on the time scale of cloud growth. This, plus previously published studies, suggests that convective sources for stratospheric GW momentum fluxes, being a function of the rate of latent heating, will require either a climate model to correctly model this rate of latent heating or some ad hoc adjustments to account for shortcomings in a climate model's land-sea differences in convective latent heating.

  13. Nonlinear interactions between gravity waves and background winds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiao; Xu Jiyao

    2007-01-01

    Using the nonlinear propagating gravity waves (GW) model in the two-dimensional compressible atmosphere and the linear GW theory, the process of GW propagation in different background winds, e.g. the direction of the background wind is opposite to (dead wind) or the same as (tail wind) the direction of the horizontal phase velocity of GW, is studied. The results show that the dead wind prolongs the vertical wavelength and accelerates GW propagation. Therefore, GW propagates up to a higher height becomes instable in a short time and eventually induces an inverse jet flow. Then, the vertical wavelength is becoming short due to the nonlinear interactions between GW and the inverse jet flow. The vertical wavelength and group velocity decrease after GW propagates into the tail wind. The initial instable time is delayed. Although most of GW is trapped in the instable region, some of GW propagates above the instable region.Compared with GW propagation in the tail wind, the nonlinear interactions between GW and the dead wind are also strong. In contrast,the linear GW theory predicts that GW can propagate freely in the dead wind. The vertical wavelength simulated by the nonlinear numerical model is different from that predicted by the linear theory greatly after GW propagates into the dead wind.

  14. Role of the basin boundary conditions in gravity wave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Deike, Luc; Gutiérrez-Matus, Pablo; Jamin, Timothée; Semin, Benoit; Aumaitre, Sébastien; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric; BONNEFOY, Félicien

    2014-01-01

    Gravity wave turbulence is studied experimentally in a large wave basin where irregular waves are generated unidirectionally. The role of the basin boundary conditions (absorbing or reflecting) and of the forcing properties are investigated. To that purpose, an absorbing sloping beach opposite to the wavemaker can be replaced by a reflecting vertical wall. We observe that the wave field properties depend strongly on these boundary conditions. Quasi-one dimensional field of nonlinear waves propagate before to be damped by the beach whereas a more multidirectional wave field is observed with the wall. In both cases, the wave spectrum scales as a frequency-power law with an exponent that increases continuously with the forcing amplitude up to a value close to -4, which is the value predicted by the weak turbulence theory. The physical mechanisms involved are probably different according to the boundary condition used, but cannot be easily discriminated with only temporal measurements. We have also studied freely...

  15. Numerical simulation of the resonantly excited capillary-gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanazaki, Hideshi; Hirata, Motonori; Okino, Shinya

    2015-11-01

    Capillary gravity waves excited by an obstacle are investigated by a direct numerical simulation. In the flow without capillary effects, it is well known that large-amplitude upstream advancing solitary waves are generated periodically under the resonant condition, i.e., when the phase velocity of the long surface waves and the mean flow velocity agrees. With capillary effects, solutions of the Euler equations show the generation of very short waves further upstream of the solitary waves and also in the depression region downstream of the obstacle. The overall characteristics of these waves agree with the solutions of the forced fifth-order KdV equation, while the weakly nonlinear theory generally overestimates the wavelength of the short waves.

  16. Active Absorption of Irregular Gravity Waves in BEM-Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    The boundary element method is applied to the computation of irregular gravity waves. The boundary conditions at the open boundaries are obtained by a digital filtering technique, where the surface elevations in front of the open boundary are filtered numerically yielding the velocity to be...... prescribed at the boundary. By numerical examples it is shown that well designed filters can reduce the wave reflection to a few per cent over a frequency range corresponding to a Jonswap spectrum....

  17. Energy Contents of Gravitational Waves in Teleparallel Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Sharif, M.; Taj, Sumaira

    2009-01-01

    The conserved quantities, that are, gravitational energy-momentum and its relevant quantities are investigated for cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves in the framework of teleparallel equivalent of General Relativity using the Hamiltonian approach. For both cylindrical and spherical gravitational waves, we obtain definite energy and constant momentum. The constant momentum shows consistency with the results available in General Relativity and teleparallel gravity. The angular moment...

  18. Dynamics of Gravity-Capillary Solitary Waves in Deep Water

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhan; Milewski, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of solitary gravity-capillary water waves propagating on the surface of a three-dimensional fluid domain is studied numerically. In order to accurately compute complex time dependent solutions, we simplify the full potential flow problem by taking a cubic truncation of the scaled Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator for the normal velocity on the free surface. This approximation agrees remarkably well with the full equations for the bifurcation curves, wave profiles and the dynamics of ...

  19. Characteristics of Gravity Waves over an Antarctic Ice Sheet during an Austral Summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cava

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available While occurrences of wavelike motion in the stable boundary layer due to the presence of a significant restoring buoyancy force are rarely disputed, their modalities and interaction with turbulence remain a subject of active research. In this work, the characteristics of gravity waves and their impact on flow statistics, including turbulent fluxes, are presented using data collected above an Antarctic Ice sheet during an Austral Summer. Antarctica is an ideal location for exploring the characteristics of gravity waves because of persistent conditions of strong atmospheric stability in the lower troposphere. Periods dominated by wavelike motion have been identified by analysing time series measured by fast response instrumentation. The nature and characteristic of the dominant wavy motions are investigated using Fourier cross-spectral indicators. Moreover, a multi-resolution decomposition has been applied to separate gravity waves from turbulent fluctuations in case of a sufficiently defined spectral gap. Statistics computed after removing wavy disturbances highlight the large impact of gravity waves on second order turbulent quantities including turbulent flux calculations.

  20. Cosmic Tsunamis in Modified Gravity: Scalar waves disrupting screening mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Hagala, R; Mota, D F

    2016-01-01

    Extending General Relativity by adding extra degrees of freedom is a popular approach to explain the accelerated expansion of the universe and to build high energy completions of the theory of gravity. The presence of such new degrees of freedom is, however, tightly constrained from several observations and experiments that aim to test General Relativity in a wide range of scales. The viability of a given modified theory of gravity therefore strongly depends on the existence of a screening mechanism that suppresses the extra degrees of freedom. We perform simulations, and find that waves propagating in the new degrees of freedom can significantly impact the efficiency of the screening mechanisms, thereby spoiling the viability of modified gravity theories. Specifically, we show that the waves produced can increase the amplitude of the fifth force and the Parametrized Post Newtonian parameters by several orders of magnitude.

  1. A new approach to global gravity wave momentum flux determination from GPS radio occultation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, A.; Llamedo, P.; Schmidt, T.; de la Torre, A.; Wickert, J.

    2013-03-01

    GPS Radio Occultation (RO) is a well-established technique for obtaining global gravity wave (GW) information. RO uses GPS signals received aboard low Earth orbiting satellites for atmospheric limb sounding. Temperature profiles are derived with high vertical resolution and provide a global coverage under any weather conditions offering the possibility for global monitoring of the vertical temperature structure and atmospheric wave parameters. The six satellites constellation COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 delivers approximately 2000 temperature profiles daily. In this study, we use a method to obtain global distributions of horizontal gravity wave wavelengths, to be applied in the determination of the vertical flux of horizontal momentum transported by gravity waves. The horizontal wavenumber is derived by the ratio of the phase shift and the spatial distance between adjacent temperature fluctuation profiles at a given altitude, following the method by Ern et al. (2004). A new method for the determination of the real horizontal wavelength from triads of vertical profiles is presented and applied to the COSMIC data. The horizontal and vertical wavelength, the specific potential energy (Ep) and the vertical flux of horizontal momentum (MF) are calculated and their global distribution is discussed.

  2. Gravity Wave Variances and Propagation Derived from AIRS Radiances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jie; Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, S. D.

    2012-01-01

    As the first gravity wave (GW) climatology study using nadir-viewing infrared sounders, 50 Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiance channels are selected to estimate GW variances at pressure levels between 2-100 hPa. The GW variance for each scan in the cross-track direction is derived from radiance perturbations in the scan, independently of adjacent scans along the orbit. Since the scanning swaths are perpendicular to the satellite orbits, which are inclined meridionally at most latitudes, the zonal component of GW propagation can be inferred by differencing the variances derived between the westmost and the eastmost viewing angles. Consistent with previous GW studies using various satellite instruments, monthly mean AIRS variance shows large enhancements over meridionally oriented mountain ranges as well as some islands at winter hemisphere high latitudes. Enhanced wave activities are also found above tropical deep convective regions. GWs prefer to propagate westward above mountain ranges, and eastward above deep convection. AIRS 90 field-of-views (FOVs), ranging from +48 deg. to -48 deg. off nadir, can detect large-amplitude GWs with a phase velocity propagating preferentially at steep angles (e.g., those from orographic and convective sources). The annual cycle dominates the GW variances and the preferred propagation directions for all latitudes. Indication of a weak two-year variation in the tropics is found, which is presumably related to the Quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). AIRS geometry makes its out-tracks capable of detecting GWs with vertical wavelengths substantially shorter than the thickness of instrument weighting functions. The novel discovery of AIRS capability of observing shallow inertia GWs will expand the potential of satellite GW remote sensing and provide further constraints on the GW drag parameterization schemes in the general circulation models (GCMs).

  3. Shock waves and Birkhoff's theorem in Lovelock gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Gravanis, Elias

    2010-01-01

    Spherically symmetric shock waves are shown to exist in Lovelock gravity. They amount to a change of branch of the spherically symmetric solutions across a null hypersurface. The implications of their existence for the status of Birkhoff's theorem in the theory is discussed.

  4. On the kurtosis of deep-water gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Fedele, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit Janssen's (2003) formulation for the dynamic excess kurtosis of weakly nonlinear gravity waves at deep water. For narrowband directional spectra, the formulation is given by a sixfold integral that depends upon the Benjamin-Feir index and the parameter $R=\\sigma_{\\theta}^{2}/2\

  5. Magnetoacoustic Waves in the Solar Stratified Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑惠南; 王水; 吴式灿; 李波

    2001-01-01

    The propagation of magnetoacoustic waves in the solar atmosphere consisting of the photosphere, chromosphere and corona has been studied numerically by time-dependent multi-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation. Pressure disturbances are introduced at the bottom of the chromosphere and at the bottom of the corona, respectively. The computational results show that incurred fast and slow MHD waves propagate away from the source of the disturbances. The fast MHD wave propagates as an expansive wave in the radial direction, while the slow one steepens and it may evolve into a slow shock. We suggest that the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope wave observed by the SOHO and Moreton wave are a fast MHD wave propagating in the corona and in the chromosphere, respectively.

  6. A mesoscale gravity wave event observed during CCOPE. I - Multiscale statistical analysis of wave characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Steven E.; Golus, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical analysis of the characteristics of the wavelike activity that occurred over the north-central United States on July 11-12, 1981, using data from the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment in Montana. In particular, two distinct wave episodes of about 8-h duration within a longer (33 h) period of wave activity were studied in detail. It is demonstrated that the observed phenomena display features consistent with those of mesoscale gravity waves. The principles of statistical methods used to detect and track mesoscale gravity waves are discussed together with their limitations.

  7. Finite-difference numerical modelling of gravitoacoustic wave propagation in a windy and attenuating atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Martin, Roland; Garcia, Raphaël F.; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena such as tectonic events or explosions or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modelled in a 3-D attenuating and windy atmosphere extending from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale, we introduce a finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a background flow (wind). One significant benefit of such a method is its versatility because it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation, which enables one to observe interactions between them. Simulations can be performed for 2-D or 3-D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere or gravity-wave generation by atmospheric explosions. We validate the computations by comparing them to analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases: an atmospheric explosion, and a ground displacement forcing.

  8. Pseudo-local property of gravity water waves system : Pseudo-local property of gravity water waves

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Quang-Huy

    2015-01-01

    By proving a weighted contraction estimate for the flow of gravity water waves, we show that this nonlocal system is in fact pseudo-local in the following sense: locally in time, the dynamic far away from a given bounded region has a small effect on that region (again, in a sense that we will make precise in the article). Our estimate on the flow also implies a new spatial decay property of the waves.

  9. Resonant excitation of internal gravity waves in cluster cooling flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbus, Steven A.

    1990-01-01

    Orbital motions of galaxies in X-ray clusters will resonantly excite internal gravity waves (g-waves) that propagate in the plasma. The resonance corresponds to a match between the local Brunt-Vaisala oscillation frequency in the plasma and the appropriate Fourier component of the galactic gravitational potential. Radiated internal waves have an inward group velocity that carries them to the central region of the flow where they become tightly wrapped, geometrically amplified, and eventually dissipated. Waves transport energy and angular momentum, but probably not in amounts large enough to grossly alter the structure of a cooling flow, should one be present. All physical flow variables are finite at the resonance, and all energy and angular momentum deposited by a galaxy is carried inward by the waves. Nonlinear density and velocity fluctuations are likely to result from wave amplitude growth in the central regions of the flow, and a connection with the formation of emission-line filaments is a possibility.

  10. Gravity's shadow the search for gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Harry

    2004-01-01

    According to the theory of relativity, we are constantly bathed in gravitational radiation. When stars explode or collide, a portion of their mass becomes energy that disturbs the very fabric of the space-time continuum like ripples in a pond. But proving the existence of these waves has been difficult; the cosmic shudders are so weak that only the most sensitive instruments can be expected to observe them directly. Fifteen times during the last thirty years scientists have claimed to have detected gravitational waves, but so far none of those claims have survived the scrutiny of the scie

  11. Dust gravitational drift wave in complex plasma under gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dispersion relation of electrostatic waves in a complex plasma under gravity is presented. It is assumed that the waves propagate parallel to the external fields. The effects of weak electric field, neutral drag force, and ion drag force are also taken into account. The dispersion relation is numerically examined in an appropriate parameter space in which the gravity plays the dominant role in the dynamics of microparticles. The numerical results show that, in the low pressure complex plasma under gravity, a low frequency drift wave can be developed in the long wavelength limit. The stability state of this wave is switched at a certain critical wavenumber in such a way that the damped mode is transformed into a growing one. Furthermore, the influence of the external fields on the dispersion properties is analyzed. It is shown that the wave instability is essentially due to the electrostatic streaming of plasma particles. It is also found that by increasing the electric field strength, the stability switching occurs at smaller wavenumbers

  12. Electromagnetic inertio-gravity waves in the Earth's ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Tsamalashvili, L. V.; Kahlon, L. Z.

    2011-05-01

    Propagation of electromagnetic inertio-gravity (IG) waves in the partially ionized ionospheric E- and F-layers is considered in the shallow water approximation. Accounting of the field-aligned current is the main novelty of the investigation. Existence of two new eigen-frequencies for fast and slow electromagnetic waves is revealed in the ionospheric E-layer. It is shown that in F-layer slowly damping new type of inertial-fast magnetosonic waves can propagate. Slowly damping low-frequency oscillations connected with the field-aligned conductivity are found. Broad spectrum of oscillations is investigated.

  13. A perturbative solution for gravitational waves in quadratic gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We find a gravitational wave solution to the linearized version of quadratic gravity by adding successive perturbations to Einstein's linearized field equations. We show that only the Ricci-squared quadratic invariant contributes to give a different solution to those found in Einstein's general relativity. The perturbative solution is written as a power series in the β parameter, the coefficient of the Ricci-squared term in the quadratic gravitational action. We also show that, for monochromatic waves of a given angular frequency ω, the perturbative solution can be summed out to give an exact solution to the linearized version of quadratic gravity, for 0 1/2. This result may lead to implications for the predictions for gravitational wave backgrounds of cosmological origin

  14. The Binary Pulsar: Gravity Waves Exist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Clifford

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the history of pulsars generally and the 1974 discovery of the binary pulsar by Joe Taylor and Russell Hulse specifically. Details the data collection and analysis used by Taylor and Hulse. Uses this discussion as support for Albert Einstein's theory of gravitational waves. (CW)

  15. Testing Gravity with Gravitational Wave Source Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Calabrese, Erminia; Spergel, David N

    2016-01-01

    We show that the gravitational wave source counts distribution can test how gravitational radiation propagates on cosmological scales. This test does not require obtaining redshifts for the sources. If the signal-to-noise from a gravitational wave source is proportional to the strain then it falls as $R^{-1}$, thus we expect the source counts to follow $dN/dS \\propto S^{-4}$. However, if gravitational waves decay as they propagate or can propagate into other dimensions, then there can be deviations from this generic prediction. We consider the possibility that the signal-to-noise falls as $R^{-\\gamma}$, where $\\gamma=1$ recovers the expected predictions in a Euclidean uniformly-filled universe. We forecast the sensitivity of future observations in constraining gravitational wave physics using this method by simulating sources distributed over a finite range of signal-to-noise. We first consider the case of few objects, 7 sources, with a signal-to-noise from 8 to 24, and impose a lower limit on $\\gamma$, findi...

  16. What gravity waves are telling about quantum spacetime

    OpenAIRE

    Arzano, Michele; Calcagni, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    We discuss various modified dispersion relations motivated by quantum gravity which might affect the propagation of the recently observed gravitational-wave signal of the event GW150914. We find that the bounds set by the data on the characteristic quantum-gravity mass scale $M$ are too weak to constrain these scenarios and, in general, much weaker than the expected $M> 10^4\\,\\text{eV}$ for a correction to the dispersion relation linear in $1/M$. We illustrate this issue by giving lower bound...

  17. Testing gravity with gravitational wave source counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Battaglia, Nicholas; Spergel, David N.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the gravitational wave source counts distribution can test how gravitational radiation propagates on cosmological scales. This test does not require obtaining redshifts for the sources. If the signal-to-noise ratio (ρ) from a gravitational wave source is proportional to the strain then it falls as {R}-1, thus we expect the source counts to follow {{d}}{N}/{{d}}ρ \\propto {ρ }-4. However, if gravitational waves decay as they propagate or propagate into other dimensions, then there can be deviations from this generic prediction. We consider the possibility that the strain falls as {R}-γ , where γ =1 recovers the expected predictions in a Euclidean uniformly-filled Universe, and forecast the sensitivity of future observations to deviations from standard General Relativity. We first consider the case of few objects, seven sources, with a signal-to-noise from 8 to 24, and impose a lower limit on γ, finding γ \\gt 0.33 at 95% confidence level. The distribution of our simulated sample is very consistent with the distribution of the trigger events reported by Advanced LIGO. Future measurements will improve these constraints: with 100 events, we estimate that γ can be measured with an uncertainty of 15%. We generalize the formalism to account for a range of chirp masses and the possibility that the signal falls as {exp}(-R/{R}0)/{R}γ .

  18. Examining Buoyancy Waves in the Martian Atmosphere with Mars Climate Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Robert; Murphy, J.; Teal, D.

    2010-10-01

    Bouyancy ('gravity') waves can potentially play a significant role in the dynamics of the Martian atmosphere (Barnes, 1990). Small wave disturbances created at the surface (i.e. topographically) or at low altitudes (ex. convection) can propagate vertically under the appropriate thermodynamic conditions. To conserve energy, the amplitude of small waves can grow substantially in response to decreasing densities at higher altitudes. Gravity waves in the upper atmosphere have been analyzed from atmospheric densities derived from aerobarking Martian spacecraft (Creasey et al., 2006b & Fritts et al., 2006). Potentially large wave amplitudes aloft can result in wave saturation and wave breaking (Lindzen, 1981). The breaking waves deposit momentum, potentially altering the winds at that breaking level substantially. Creasey et al. (2006a) investigated the amplitudes of Martian atmospheric gravity waves by attempting to determine their manifested temperature perturbations as derived from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation measurements. Their results showed little correlation between topographic variance and gravitational wave energy. Motivated by this result, we are interested in how wave energies derived from Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) limb radiance measurements compare to the MGS Radio Science (RS) results. The continuous nature of the MCS measurements offer the opportunity to systematically investigate buoyancy wave characteristics diurnally, seasonally, and geographically, and to do so to a higher altitude (lower pressure) than the MGS RS profiles afforded. The MCS data used in this work is made publicly available through NASA's Planetary Data System's Atmospheres Node. This work is supported by NSF Grant ATM-0535811 (Univ. of Michigan), NMSU subcontract 3000615888 Barnes, J.R., 1990, JGR, 95, B2, 1401-1421. Creasey, J.E., et al., 2006, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L01803. Creasey, J.E., et al., 2006, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L22814. Fritts, D.C., et al., 2006

  19. Electromagnetic internal gravity waves in the Earth's ionospheric E-layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaladze, T.D., E-mail: tamaz_kaladze@yahoo.com [I. Vekua Institute of Applied Mathematics, Tbilisi State University, 2 University str., 0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Tsamalashvili, L.V.; Kaladze, D.T. [I. Vekua Institute of Applied Mathematics, Tbilisi State University, 2 University str., 0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States)

    2011-12-05

    In the Earth's ionospheric E-layer existence of the new waves connecting with the electromagnetic nature of internal gravity waves is shown. They represent the mixture of the ordinary internal gravity waves and the new type of dispersive Alfven waves. -- Highlights: ► Existence of electromagnetic internal gravity waves in the ionospheric E-layer is shown. ► Electromagnetic nature of internal gravity waves is described. ► Appearance of the new dispersive Alfven waves is shown.

  20. Stratospheric gravity wave activities inferred through the GPS radio occultation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratospheric gravity wave activities were deduced from GPS radio occultation temperature profiles obtained by CHAMP satellite between 2001 and 2005. Potential energy profiles are used to analyze the gravity wave activity over South America. The results showed an inter-annual variation of the potential energy integrated between 24 and 34 km of altitude. The gravity wave activity is more concentrated around the equatorial region. In order to evaluate the seasonal variation of the gravity wave activity, a mean potential energy was determined over (10 deg N-10 deg S) and (100 deg W-20 deg W). The results showed a lower gravity wave activity during winter time, while during spring time the mean potential energy showed an increase in the wave activity. The results of the mean potential energy also showed that the gravity wave activity in the lower stratosphere exhibits a higher wave activity during 2002 and 2004 and a lower wave activity during 2003 and 2005. (author)

  1. Thermospheric gravity waves in Fabry-Perot Interferometer measurements of the 630.0nm OI line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. K. Ford

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves are an important feature of mesosphere - lower thermosphere (MLT dynamics, observed using many techniques and providing an important mechanism for energy transfer between atmospheric regions. It is known that some gravity waves may propagate through the mesopause and reach greater altitudes before eventually "breaking" and depositing energy. The generation, propagation, and breaking of upper thermospheric gravity waves have not been studied directly often. However, their ionospheric counterparts, travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs, have been extensively studied in, for example, radar data. At high latitudes, it is believed localised auroral activity may generate gravity waves in-situ. Increases in sensor efficiency of Fabry-Perot Interferometers (FPIs located in northern Scandinavia have provided higher time resolution measurements of the auroral oval and polar cap atomic oxygen red line emission at 630.0 nm. A Lomb-Scargle analysis of this data has shown evidence of gravity wave activity with periods ranging from a few tens of minutes to several hours. Oscillations are seen in the intensity of the line as well as the temperatures and line of sight winds. Instruments are located in Sodankylä, Finland; Kiruna, Sweden; Skibotn, Norway, and Svalbard in the Arctic Ocean. A case study is presented here, where a wave of 1.8 h period has a phase speed of 250 ms-1 with a propagation angle of 302°, and a horizontal wavelength of 1600 km. All the FPIs are co-located with EISCAT radars, as well as being supplemented by a range of other instrumentation. This allows the waves found in the FPI data to be put in context with the ionosphere and atmosphere system. Consequently, the source region of the gravity waves can be determined.

  2. Global Gravity Wave Variances from Aura MLS: Characteristics and Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    The gravity wave (GW)-resolving capabilities of 118-GHz saturated thermal radiances acquired throughout the stratosphere by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite are investigated and initial results presented. Because the saturated (optically thick) radiances resolve GW perturbations from a given altitude at different horizontal locations, variances are evaluated at 12 pressure altitudes between 21 and 51 km using the 40 saturated radiances found at the bottom of each limb scan. Forward modeling simulations show that these variances are controlled mostly by GWs with vertical wavelengths z 5 km and horizontal along-track wavelengths of y 100-200 km. The tilted cigar-shaped three-dimensional weighting functions yield highly selective responses to GWs of high intrinsic frequency that propagate toward the instrument. The latter property is used to infer the net meridional component of GW propagation by differencing the variances acquired from ascending (A) and descending (D) orbits. Because of improved vertical resolution and sensitivity, Aura MLS GW variances are 5?8 times larger than those from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) MLS. Like UARS MLS variances, monthly-mean Aura MLS variances in January and July 2005 are enhanced when local background wind speeds are large, due largely to GW visibility effects. Zonal asymmetries in variance maps reveal enhanced GW activity at high latitudes due to forcing by flow over major mountain ranges and at tropical and subtropical latitudes due to enhanced deep convective generation as inferred from contemporaneous MLS cloud-ice data. At 21-28-km altitude (heights not measured by the UARS MLS), GW variance in the tropics is systematically enhanced and shows clear variations with the phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation, in general agreement with GW temperature variances derived from radiosonde, rocketsonde, and limb-scan vertical profiles.

  3. Evaluation of uncertainty in gravity wave potential energy calculations through GPS radio occultation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, D.; Alexander, P.; de la Torre, A.

    2013-09-01

    The application of the Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) method to the atmosphere enables the determination of height profiles of temperature, among other variables. From these measurements, gravity wave activity is usually quantified by calculating the potential energy through the integration of the ratio of perturbation and background temperatures between two given altitudes in each profile. The uncertainty in the estimation of wave activity depends on the systematic biases and random errors of the measured temperature, but also on additional factors like the selected vertical integration layer and the separation method between background and perturbation temperatures. In this study, the contributions of different parameters and variables to the uncertainty in the calculation of gravity wave potential energy in the lower stratosphere are investigated and quantified. In particular, a Monte Carlo method is used to evaluate the uncertainty that results from different GPS RO temperature error distributions. In addition, our analysis shows that RO data above 30 km height becomes dubious for gravity waves potential energy calculations.

  4. Electromagnetic internal gravity waves in the Earth's ionospheric E-layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaladze, T. D.; Tsamalashvili, L. V.; Kaladze, D. T.

    2011-12-01

    In the Earth's ionospheric E-layer existence of the new waves connecting with the electromagnetic nature of internal gravity waves is shown. They represent the mixture of the ordinary internal gravity waves and the new type of dispersive Alfven waves.

  5. Viscous damping of gravity waves over a permeable bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. K. Puri

    1978-12-01

    Full Text Available The damping of gravity waves over the surface of a layer of viscous fluid which overlies a porous bed saturated with the same fluid is studied. It is shown that viscosity may not be the dominant influence in the damping mechanism; the damping effects due to percolation in the fixed bed may be of the same or even higher order than those due to viscosity.

  6. A plethora of generalised solitary gravity-capillary water waves

    CERN Document Server

    Clamond, Didier; Duran, Angel

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes, first, an efficient algorithm for computing gravity-capillary solitary waves solutions of the irrotational Euler equations and, second, provides numerical evidences of the existence of (likely) an infinite number of generalised solitary waves (i.e. solitary waves with undamped oscillatory wings). Using conformal mapping, the unknown fluid domain (which is to be determined) is mapped into a uniform strip of the complex plane. A Babenko-like equation is then derived from a Lagrangian expressed in the transformed domain. The Babenko equation is then solved numerically using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Various interesting solutions are computed, some of them being known, some seem to be new. The emergence of generalised solitary waves is shown when the Bond number is increased.

  7. Stochastic excitation of gravity waves in rapidly rotating massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mathis, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic gravity waves have been recently detected and characterised in stars thanks to space asteroseismology and they may play an important role in the evolution of stellar angular momentum. In this context, the observational study of the CoRoT hot Be star HD 51452 suggests a potentially strong impact of rotation on stochastic excitation of gravito-inertial waves in rapidly rotating stars. In this work, we present our results on the action of the Coriolis acceleration on stochastic wave excitation by turbulent convection. We study the change of efficiency of this mechanism as a function of the waves' Rossby number and we demonstrate that the excitation presents two different regimes for super-inertial and sub-inertial frequencies. Consequences for rapidly rotating early-type stars and the transport of angular momentum in their interiors are discussed.

  8. LINEAR THEORY OF GRAVITY WAVES ON A VOIGT VISCOELASTIC MEDIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qinghe; Wu Yongsheng; Zhao Zidan

    2000-01-01

    Linear surface gravity waves on a semi-infinite incompressible Voigt medium are studied in this paper. Three dimensionless parameters, the dimensionless viscoelastic parameter θ, the dimensionless wave number and the dimensionless sur face tension are introduced. A dimensionless characteristic equation describing the waves is derived. This is a sixth order complex algebraic equation which is solved to give the complex dispersion relation. Based on the numerical solution, two critical values of θ, θA = 0.607 and θB = 2.380, which represent the appearance of the cutoff region and the disappearance of the strong dispersion region, are found. The effects of θ on the characteristic equation and the properties of the waves are discussed.

  9. Rossby-gravity waves in tropical total ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, J. L.; Ziemke, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    Randel (1992) has recently reported evidence for Rossby-gravity waves in tropical data fields produced by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The purpose of this paper is to show that similar features are observable in fields of total column ozone from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) satellite instrument. The observed features are episodic, have zonal (east-west) wavelengths of approximately 6,000-10,000 km and oscillate with periods of 5-10 days. The modes exhibit westward phase progression and eastward group velocity. A simple linear model is used to estimate the magnitude of total ozone perturbations induced by Rossby-gravity waves. The model is able to account for the magnitude of observed TOMS features as well as their asymmetry about the equator. The significance of finding Rossby-gravity waves in total ozone fields is that: (1) the report of similar features in ECMWF tropical fields is corroborated with an independent data set; and (2) the TOMS data set is demonstrated to possess surprising versatility and sensitivity to relatively smaller scale tropical phenomena.

  10. Gravity waves signatures from anisotropic preinflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that expanding or contracting Kasner universes are unstable due to the amplification of gravitational waves (GW). As an application of this general relativity effect, we consider a preinflationary anisotropic geometry characterized by a Kasner-like expansion, which is driven dynamically towards inflation by a scalar field. We investigate the evolution of linear metric fluctuations around this background, and calculate the amplification of the long-wavelength GW of a certain polarization during the anisotropic expansion (this effect is absent for another GW polarization, and for scalar fluctuations). These GW are superimposed to the usual tensor modes of quantum origin from inflation, and are potentially observable if the total number of inflationary e-folds exceeds the minimum required to homogenize the observable universe only by a small margin. Their contribution to the temperature anisotropy angular power spectrum decreases with the multipole l as l-p, where p depends on the slope of the initial GW power spectrum. Constraints on the long-wavelength GW can be translated into limits on the total duration of inflation and the initial GW amplitude. The instability of classical GW (and zero-vacuum fluctuations of gravitons) during Kasner-like expansion (or contraction) may have other interesting applications. In particular, if GW become nonlinear, they can significantly alter the geometry before the onset of inflation.

  11. Spatiotemporal measurement of surfactant distribution on gravity-capillary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Stephen; Shearer, Michael; Daniels, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Materials adsorbed to the surface of a fluid - for instance, crude oil, biogenic slicks, or industrial/medical surfactants - will move in response to surface waves. Due to the difficulty of non-invasive measurement of the spatial distribution of a molecular monolayer, little is known about the dynamics that couple the surface waves and the evolving density field. We report measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the density field of an insoluble surfactant driven by gravity-capillary waves in a shallow cylindrical container. Standing Faraday waves and traveling waves generated by the meniscus are superimposed to create a non-trivial surfactant density field. We measure both the height field of the surface using moire-imaging and the density field of the surfactant via the fluorescence of NBD-tagged phosphatidylcholine. Through phase-averaging stroboscopically-acquired images of the density field, we determine that the surfactant accumulates on the leading edge of the traveling meniscus waves and in the troughs of the standing Faraday waves. We fit the spatiotemporal variations in the two fields and report measurements of the wavenumbers as well as a temporal phase shift between the two fields. These measurements suggest that longitudinal waves contribute to the dynamics. Funded by NSF grant DMS-0968258.

  12. Resonant nonlinear interactions between atmospheric waves in the polar summer mesopause region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘仁强; 易帆

    2003-01-01

    Data obtained from the mobile SOUSY VHF radar at And(ya/Norway in summer 1987 have been used to study the nonlinear interactions between planetary waves, tides and gravity waves in the polar mesosphere, and the instability of background atmosphere above the mesopause. It is observed that 35-h planetary wave, diurnal, semidiurnal and terdiurnal tides are the prominent perturbations in the Lomb-Scargle spectra of the zonal wind component. By inspecting the frequency combinations, several triads are identified. By bispectral analysis it is shown that most bispectral peaks stand for quadratic coupling between tidal harmonics or between tide and planetary or gravity wave, and the height dependence of bispectral peaks reflects the variation of wave-wave interactions. Above the mesopause, the occurrence heights of the maximum L-S power spectral peaks corresponding to the prominent wave components tend to increase with their frequencies. This may result from the process in which two low frequency waves interact to generate a high frequency wave. Intensities of the planetary wave and tides increase gradually, arrive at their maxima, and then decay quickly in turn with increasing height. This kind of scene correlates with a "chain" of wave-wave resonant interactions that shifts with height from lower frequency segment to higher frequency segment. By instability analysis, it is observed that above the mesopause, the Richardson number becomes smaller and smaller with height, implying that the turbulent motion grows stronger and stronger and accordingly the background atmosphere more and more instable. It is suggested that the wave-wave sum resonant interaction and the wave dissipation due to instability are two dominant dynamical processes that occur in the mesopause region. The former invokes the energy transfer from lower frequency waves to higher frequency waves. The latter results in the heating of the atmosphere and accelerating of the background flow.

  13. Polarization modes of gravitational waves in three-dimensional massive gravities

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Taeyoon; Myung, Yun Soo

    2011-01-01

    We find polarization modes of gravitational waves in topologically massive and new massive gravities by using the Newman-Penrose formalism where the null real tetrad is necessary to specify gravitational waves. The number of polarization modes is two for the new massive gravity and one for the topologically massive gravity, which is consistent with the metric-perturbation approach.

  14. Evaluation of the linear theory satisfiability limits in propagation of the internal gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Bulatov, Vitaly V.; Vladimirov, Yuriy V.

    2009-01-01

    A problem of finding the linear theory satisfaction limits in propagation of the internal gravity waves is considered. It is evident that internal gravity waves excitation, propagation in actual practice is highly nonlinear phenomenon. However with some reasonable assumptions it is possible to linearize equations of internal waves generation and propagation. It is shown that in interesting for us wavelength range we can use linear approximation during study of internal gravity waves dynamics....

  15. A pseudo-local property of gravity water waves system : Pseudo-local property of gravity water waves

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Quang-Huy

    2016-01-01

    By proving a weighted contraction estimate in uniformly local Sobolev spaces for the flow of gravity water waves, we show that this nonlocal system is in fact pseudo-local in the following sense: locally in time, the dynamic far away from a given bounded region has a small effect on that region (again, in a sense that we will make precise in the article). Our estimate on the flow also implies a new spatial decay property of the waves. To prove this result, we establish a paradifferential calc...

  16. Numerical simulations of waves in a magnetically structured atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinola, Thomas Peter

    A physical model for simulating waves in a stellar atmosphere was developed from a combination of basic fluid mechanics, plasma physics, and electrodynamics. The model was three dimensional and included the effects of gravity, magnetic fields, and viscosity. An algorithm was developed to numerically implement this model. The resulting program used an explicit time integration scheme based on Runge-Kutta and a combination of finite difference and spectral methods to evaluate the spatial derivatives. A number of numerical boundary conditions were developed—the most successful used a modified Sommerfeld radiation condition. The program was written and coded in Fortran on a Vax computer. Additional routines were written to evaluate the required fast fourier transforms and to graph and display the data. The program was tested on a large number of one and two dimensional problems for which the solutions were known. These problems included acoustic waves, Alfvén waves, magnetoacoustic waves, shocks, rarefactions, and contact discontinuities. The numerical results agreed with the analytic solutions of the physical problems to within the precision requested of the simulation. The program proved to be stable and robust for all the problems attempted. This program was then used to simulate three problems for which analytic solutions are not known. All three simulations concerned the propagation of waves in magnetically structured atmospheres and may be applied to outstanding problems in solar physics. First, the interactions of non-linear waves and a flux slab were studied. From the result it is apparent that sources of shocks and rarefactions, such as the solar convection zone, do not concentrate the magnetic field in flux sheaths. Next I used the program to simulate the interaction of non-linear waves with a flux tube. The results suggest that the magnetic fields in flux tubes are also not concentrated by pairs of passing shocks and rarefactions; however, a complete

  17. Formation of ice supersaturation by mesoscale gravity waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Spichtinger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the formation and evolution of an ice-supersaturated region (ISSR that was detected by means of an operational radiosonde sounding launched from the meteorological station of Lindenberg on 21 March 2000, 00:00 UTC. The supersaturated layer was situated below the local tropopause, between 320 and 408 hPa altitude. Our investigation uses satellite imagery from METEOSAT and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR and analyses of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF. Mesoscale simulations reveal that the ISSR was formed by a temporary vertical uplift of upper tropospheric air parcels by 20 to 40 hPa in 1 to 2 h. This resulted in a significant local increase of the specific humidity by the moisture transport from below. The ascent was triggered by the superposition of two internal gravity waves, a mountain wave induced by flow past the Erzgebirge and Riesengebirge south of Lindenberg, and an inertial gravity wave excited by the anti-cyclonically curved jet stream over the Baltic Sea. The wave-induced ISSR was rather thick with a depth of about 2 km. The wave-induced upward motion causing the supersaturation also triggered the formation of a cirrus cloud. METEOSAT imagery shows that the cirrus cloud got optically thick within two hours. During this period another longer lasting thin but extended cirrus existed just beneath the tropopause. The wave-induced ISSR disappeared after about half a day in accordance with the decaying wave activity.

  18. Experimental study of three-wave interactions among capillary-gravity surface waves

    CERN Document Server

    Haudin, Florence; Deike, Luc; Jamin, Timothée; Falcon, Eric; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In propagating wave systems, three or four-wave resonant interactions constitute a classical non-linear mechanism exchanging energy between the different scales. Here we investigate three-wave interactions for gravity-capillary surface waves in a closed laboratory tank. We generate two crossing wave-trains and we study their interaction. Using two optical methods, a local one (Laser Doppler Vibrometry) and a spatio-temporal one (Diffusive Light Photography), a third wave of smaller amplitude is detected, verifying the three-wave resonance conditions in frequency and in wavenumber. Furthermore, by focusing on the stationary regime and by taking into account viscous dissipation, we directly estimate the growth rate of the resonant mode. The latter is then compared to the predictions of the weakly non-linear triadic resonance interaction theory. The obtained results confirm qualitatively and extend previous experimental results obtained only for collinear wave-trains. Finally, we discuss the relevance of three-w...

  19. Geodesic deviation in pp-wave spacetimes of quadratic curvature gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, Edgard C. de Rey

    2003-01-01

    We write the equation of geodesic deviations in the spacetime of $pp$-waves in terms of the Newman-Penrose scalars and apply it to study gravitational waves in quadratic curvature gravity. We show that quadratic curvature gravity $pp$-waves can have a transverse helicity-0 polarization mode and two transverse helicity-2 general relativity-like wave polarizations. A concrete example is given in which we analyze the wave polarizations of an exact impulsive gravitational wave solution to quadrat...

  20. Convective generation and vertical propagation of fast gravity waves on Mars: One- and two-dimensional modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Takeshi; Watanabe, Ayuka; Maejima, Yasumitsu

    2016-03-01

    Generation of gravity waves by convection was studied using a nonlinear two-dimensional model. A boundary-layer convection forced by a horizontally-uniform heating and a plume forced by a localized heating representing a local dust storm were tested. The results suggest that vigorous convection occurs due to the low density of the martian atmosphere and that short-period waves having frequencies near the buoyancy frequency can be preferentially generated. The propagation of those gravity waves to thermospheric heights was studied using a linearized one-dimensional model. Because of the fast vertical propagation the waves attain large amplitudes in the lower thermosphere, being consistent with Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Odyssey's accelerometer measurements and MAVEN's neutral and ion measurements. The heating and cooling caused by the waves are expected to be significant in the energy budget of the thermosphere, and the vertical mixing induced by those gravity waves should influence the homopause height. Since the thermospheric densities of light, minor species increase with the lowering of the homopause, a lower homopause may have enhanced the escape of such species to space for early Mars, where slower, weaker gravity waves should dominate.

  1. Empirical Mode Decomposition of the atmospheric wave field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. McDonald

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the utility of the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD time-series analysis technique to separate the horizontal wind field observed by the Scott Base MF radar (78° S, 167° E into its constituent parts made up of the mean wind, gravity waves, tides, planetary waves and instrumental noise. Analysis suggests that EMD effectively separates the wind field into a set of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs which can be related to atmospheric waves with different temporal scales. The Intrinsic Mode Functions resultant from application of the EMD technique to Monte-Carlo simulations of white- and red-noise processes are compared to those obtained from the measurements and are shown to be significantly different statistically. Thus, application of the EMD technique to the MF radar horizontal wind data can be used to prove that this data contains information on internal gravity waves, tides and planetary wave motions.

    Examination also suggests that the EMD technique has the ability to highlight amplitude and frequency modulations in these signals. Closer examination of one of these regions of amplitude modulation associated with dominant periods close to 12 h is suggested to be related to a wave-wave interaction between the semi-diurnal tide and a planetary wave. Application of the Hilbert transform to the IMFs forms a Hilbert-Huang spectrum which provides a way of viewing the data in a similar manner to the analysis from a continuous wavelet transform. However, the fact that the basis function of EMD is data-driven and does not need to be selected a priori is a major advantage. In addition, the skeleton diagrams, produced from the results of the Hilbert-Huang spectrum, provide a method of presentation which allows quantitative information on the instantaneous period and amplitude squared to be displayed as a function of time. Thus, it provides a novel way to view frequency and amplitude-modulated wave phenomena and potentially non

  2. Picture of the global field of quasi-monochromatic gravity waves observed by stratospheric balloons and MST radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    In MAP observations, it was found that: (1) gravity waves in selected or filtered portions of data are fit for monochromatic structures, whereas (2) those in fully continuous and resolved observations take universal continuous spectra. It is possible to explain (2) by dispersion of quasi-monochromatic (or slowly varying) wave packets observed locally as (1), since the medium atmosphere is unsteady and nonuniform. Complete verification of the wave-mean flow interactions by tracking individual wave packets seems hopeless, because the wave induced flow cannot be distinguished from the basic flow independent of the waves. Instead, the primitive picture is looked at before MAP, that is, the atmosphere is just like an entertainment stage illuminated by cocktail lights of quasi-monochromatic gravity waves. The wave parameters are regarded as functions of time and spatial coordinates. The observational evidences (1) and (2) suggest that the wave parameter field is rather homogeneous, which can be explained by interference of quasi-monochromatic wave packets.

  3. Modulation of Gravity Waves by Tides as Seen in CRISTA Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preusse, P.; Eckermann, S. D.; Oberheide, J.; Hagan, M. E.; Offermann, D.

    2001-01-01

    During shuttle missions STS-66 (November, 1994) and STS-85 (August, 1997) the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere (CRISTA) acquired temperature data with very high spatial resolution. These are analyzed for gravity waves (GW). The altitude range spans the whole middle atmosphere from the tropopause up to the mesopause. In the upper mesosphere tidal amplitudes exceed values of 10 K. Modulation of GW activity by the tides is observed and analyzed using CRISTA temperatures and tidal predictions of the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM). The modulation process is identified as a tidally-induced change of the background buoyancy frequency. The findings agree well with the expectations for saturated GW and are the first global scale observations of this process.

  4. Experimental study of three-wave interactions among capillary-gravity surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haudin, Florence; Cazaubiel, Annette; Deike, Luc; Jamin, Timothée; Falcon, Eric; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In propagating wave systems, three- or four-wave resonant interactions constitute a classical nonlinear mechanism exchanging energy between the different scales. Here we investigate three-wave interactions for gravity-capillary surface waves in a closed laboratory tank. We generate two crossing wave trains and we study their interaction. Using two optical methods, a local one (laser doppler vibrometry) and a spatiotemporal one (diffusive light photography), a third wave of smaller amplitude is detected, verifying the three-wave resonance conditions in frequency and in wave number. Furthermore, by focusing on the stationary regime and by taking into account viscous dissipation, we directly estimate the growth rate of the resonant mode. The latter is then compared to the predictions of the weakly nonlinear triadic resonance interaction theory. The obtained results confirm qualitatively and extend previous experimental results obtained only for collinear wave trains. Finally, we discuss the relevance of three-wave interaction mechanisms in recent experiments studying gravity-capillary turbulence.

  5. Surface waves in higher order visco-elastic media under the influence of gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Animesh Mukherjee; Sengupta, P. R.; Lokenath Debnath

    1991-01-01

    Based upon Biot's [1965] theory of initial stresses of hydrostatic nature produced by the effect of gravity, a study is made of surface waves in higher order visco-elastic media under the influence of gravity. The equation for the wave velocity of Stonely waves in the presence of viscous and gravitational effects is obtained. This is followed by particular cases of surface waves including Rayleigh waves and Love waves in the presence of viscous and gravity effects. In all cases the wave-veloc...

  6. Recent progress in mesospheric gravity wave studies using nightglow imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Michael J.; Pendleton Junior, William R.; Pautet, Pierre-Dominique; Zhao, Yucheng; Olsen, Chris; Babu, Hema Karnam Surendra [Center for Atmospheric and Space Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, Utah (United States); Medeiros, Amauri F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Unidade Academica de Fisica, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Takahashi, Hisao, E-mail: mtaylor@cc.usu.edu, E-mail: wpen@cc.usu.edu, E-mail: dominiquepautet@gmail.com, E-mail: yucheng@cc.usu.edu, E-mail: cmellob@gmail.com, E-mail: hema_sb@rediffmail.com, E-mail: afragoso@df.ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: hisaotak@laser.inpe.br [INPE, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    A variety of optical remote sensing techniques have now revealed a rich spectrum of wave activity in the upper atmosphere. Many of these perturbations, with periodicities ranging from {approx} 5 min to many hours and horizontal scales of a few tens of km to several thousands km, are due to freely propagating atmospheric gravity waves and forced tidal oscillations. Passive optical observations of the spatial and temporal characteristics of these waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region ( {approx} 80-100 km) are facilitated by several naturally occurring, vertically distinct nightglow layers. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art ground-based CCD imaging techniques to detect these waves in intensity and temperature. All-sky (180 deg ) image measurements are used to illustrate the characteristics of small-scale, short period ( < 1 hour) waves and to investigate their seasonal propagation and momentum impact on the MLT region. These results are then contrasted with measurements of mesospheric temperature made using a new temperature mapping imaging system capable of determining induced temperature amplitudes of a large range of wave motions and investigating night-to-night and seasonal variability in mesospheric temperature. (author)

  7. Generation of internal gravity waves by penetrative convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinçon, C.; Belkacem, K.; Goupil, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The rich harvest of seismic observations over the past decade provides evidence of angular momentum redistribution in stellar interiors that is not reproduced by current evolution codes. In this context, transport by internal gravity waves can play a role and could explain discrepancies between theory and observations. Aims: The efficiency of the transport of angular momentum by waves depends on their driving mechanism. While excitation by turbulence throughout the convective zone has already been investigated, we know that penetrative convection into the stably stratified radiative zone can also generate internal gravity waves. Therefore, we aim at developing a semianalytical model to estimate the generation of IGW by penetrative plumes below an upper convective envelope. The formalism is developed with the purpose of being implemented in 1D stellar evolution codes. Methods: We derive the wave amplitude considering the pressure exerted by an ensemble of plumes on the interface between the radiative and convective zones as source term in the equation of momentum. We consider the effect of a thermal transition from a convective gradient to a radiative one on the transmission of the wave into the radiative zone. The plume-induced wave energy flux at the top of the radiative zone is computed for a solar model and is compared to the turbulence-induced one. Results: We show that, for the solar case, penetrative convection generates waves more efficiently than turbulence and that plume-induced waves can modify the internal rotation rate on shorter time scales. The result is solid since it holds despite a wide range of values considered for the parameters of the model. We also show that a smooth thermal transition significatively enhances the wave transmission compared to the case of a steep transition. Conclusions: Driving by penetrative convection must be taken into account as much as turbulence-induced waves for the transport of internal angular momentum. We

  8. Logarithmic AdS waves and Zwei-Dreibein gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that the parameter space of Zwei-Dreibein Gravity (ZDG) in AdS3 exhibits critical points, where massive graviton modes coincide with pure gauge modes and new ‘logarithmic’ modes appear, similar to what happens in New Massive Gravity. The existence of critical points is shown both at the linearized level, as well as by finding AdS wave solutions of the full non-linear theory, that behave as logarithmic modes towards the AdS boundary. In order to find these solutions explicitly, we give a reformulation of ZDG in terms of a single Dreibein, that involves an infinite number of derivatives. At the critical points, ZDG can be conjectured to be dual to a logarithmic conformal field theory with zero central charges, characterized by new anomalies whose conjectured values are calculated

  9. What gravity waves are telling about quantum spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzano, Michele; Calcagni, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    We discuss various modified dispersion relations motivated by quantum gravity which might affect the propagation of the recently observed gravitational-wave signal of the event GW150914. We find that the bounds set by the data on the characteristic quantum-gravity mass scale M are too weak to constrain these scenarios and, in general, much weaker than the expected M >104 eV for a correction to the dispersion relation linear in 1 /M . We illustrate this issue by giving lower bounds on M , plus an upper bound coming from constraints on the size of a quantum ergosphere. We also show that a phenomenological dispersion relation ω2=k2(1 +α kn/Mn) is compatible with observations and, at the same time, has a phenomenologically viable mass M >10 TeV only in the quite restrictive range 0 models.

  10. Gravitational Waves and the Fate of Scalar-Tensor Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bettoni, Dario; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Zumalacárregui, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the propagation speed of gravitational waves (GWs) in generic scalar-tensor gravity. A difference in the speed of gravity relative to the speed of light can be caused by the emergence of a disformal geometry in the gravitational sector. This requires the background scalar configuration to both spontaneously break Lorentz symmetry and couple to second derivatives of the metric perturbations through the Weyl tensor or higher derivatives of the scalar. The latter requirement allows a division of gravitational theories into two families: those that predict that GWs propagate exactly at the speed of light and those that allow for anomalous speed. Neutron star binary mergers and other GW events with an associated electromagnetic counterpart can place extremely tight constraints on the speed of GWs relative to the speed of light. However, such observations become impossible if the speed is modified too much, as predicted by some models of cosmic acceleration. Complementary measurements of the speed of...

  11. A semiclassical Hamiltonian for plane waves in loop quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Neville, Donald E

    2013-01-01

    This is the first of two papers which study the semiclassical limit of a loop quantum gravity (LQG) canonical quantization of unidirectional plane gravity waves. Initially I formulate an exact LQG in which each triad, E^x_X for example, grasps only one of the x holonomies present at the vertex. Field strengths are non-local, constructed from holonomies which connect two neighboring vertices of the spin network. The equations are simplified using a semiclassical approximation, meaning eigenvalues of the volume operator are assumed to be large enough that the [volume, holonomy] commutators may be replaced by their quantum field theory limits. Additionally, SU(2) holonomies are expanded in sines and cosines, sines are assumed small, and terms quadratic in sines are dropped. In the semiclassical limit many non-local features disappear. However, differences replace derivatives with respect to z, the propagation direction; and semiclassical triads grasp both holonomies present at each vertex. Gauge-fixing constrain...

  12. Analyses of the stratospheric dynamics simulated by a GCM with a stochastic nonorographic gravity wave parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serva, Federico; Cagnazzo, Chiara; Riccio, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    The effects of the propagation and breaking of atmospheric gravity waves have long been considered crucial for their impact on the circulation, especially in the stratosphere and mesosphere, between heights of 10 and 110 km. These waves, that in the Earth's atmosphere originate from surface orography (OGWs) or from transient (nonorographic) phenomena such as fronts and convective processes (NOGWs), have horizontal wavelengths between 10 and 1000 km, vertical wavelengths of several km, and frequencies spanning from minutes to hours. Orographic and nonorographic GWs must be accounted for in climate models to obtain a realistic simulation of the stratosphere in both hemispheres, since they can have a substantial impact on circulation and temperature, hence an important role in ozone chemistry for chemistry-climate models. Several types of parameterization are currently employed in models, differing in the formulation and for the values assigned to parameters, but the common aim is to quantify the effect of wave breaking on large-scale wind and temperature patterns. In the last decade, both global observations from satellite-borne instruments and the outputs of very high resolution climate models provided insight on the variability and properties of gravity wave field, and these results can be used to constrain some of the empirical parameters present in most parameterization scheme. A feature of the NOGW forcing that clearly emerges is the intermittency, linked with the nature of the sources: this property is absent in the majority of the models, in which NOGW parameterizations are uncoupled with other atmospheric phenomena, leading to results which display lower variability compared to observations. In this work, we analyze the climate simulated in AMIP runs of the MAECHAM5 model, which uses the Hines NOGW parameterization and with a fine vertical resolution suitable to capture the effects of wave-mean flow interaction. We compare the results obtained with two

  13. Characteristics of gravity waves generated in a baroclinic instability simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-H. Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An idealized baroclinic instability case is simulated using a ~ 10 km resolution global model to investigate the characteristics of gravity waves (GWs generated in the baroclinic life cycle. Three groups of GWs (W1–W3 appear around the high-latitude surface trough at the mature stage of the baroclinic wave. They have horizontal and vertical wavelengths of 40–400 and 2.9–9.8 km, respectively, in the upper troposphere. The two-dimensional phase-velocity spectrum of the waves is arc-shaped with a peak at 17 m s−1 eastward, which is difficult for the waves to propagate upward through the tropospheric westerly jet. At the breaking stage of the baroclinic wave, a midlatitude surface low is isolated from the higher-latitude trough, and two groups of quasi-stationary GWs (W4 and W5 appear near the surface low. These waves have horizontal and vertical wavelengths of 60–400 and 4.9–14 km, respectively, and are able to propagate vertically for long distances. The generation mechanism of the simulated GWs is discussed.

  14. Gravity Waves characteristics and their impact on turbulent transport above an Antarctic Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cava, Daniela; Giostra, Umberto; Katul, Gabriel

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence within the stable boundary layer (SBL) remains a ubiquitous feature of many geophysical flows, especially over glaciers and ice-sheets. Although numerous studies have investigated various aspects of the boundary layer motion during stable atmospheric conditions, a unified picture of turbulent transport within the SBL remains elusive. In a strongly stratified SBL, turbulence generation is frequently associated with interactions with sub-meso scale motions that are often a combination of gravity waves (GWs) and horizontal modes. While some progress has been made in the inclusion of GW parameterisation within global models, description and parameterisation of the turbulence-wave interaction remain an open question. The discrimination between waves and turbulence is a focal point needed to make progress as these two motions have different properties with regards to heat, moisture and pollutant transport. In fact, the occurrence of GWs can cause significant differences and ambiguities in the interpretation of turbulence statistics and fluxes if not a priori filtered from the analysis. In this work, the characteristics of GW and their impact on turbulent statistics were investigated using wind velocity components and scalars collected above an Antarctic Ice sheet during an Austral Summer. Antarctica is an ideal location for exploring the characteristics of GW because of persistent conditions of strongly stable atmospheric stability in the lower troposphere. Periods dominated by wavy motions have been identified by analysing time series measured by fast response instrumentation. The GWs nature and features have been investigated using Fourier cross-spectral indicators. The detected waves were frequently characterised by variable amplitude and period; moreover, they often produced non-stationarity and large intermittency in turbulent fluctuations that can significantly alter the estimation of turbulence statistics in general and fluxes in particular. A multi

  15. Thermo-visco-elastic Rayleigh waves under the influence of couple-stress and gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Lokenath Debnath; Sengupta, P. R.; Tapan Kumar Das

    1991-01-01

    This paper is concerned with thermo-visco-elastic Rayleigh waves under the influence of couple-stresses and gravity. A more general phase velocity equation for these waves is derived. It is shown that the phase velocity equation reduces to that of the classical elastic Rayleigh waves in the absence of the couple-stress parameter, viscosity and gravity.

  16. A Statistical Study of Mid-latitude Thunderstorm Characteristics associated with Acoustic and Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lay, E. H.; Shao, X. M.; Kendrick, A.

    2014-12-01

    Gravity waves with periods greater than 5 minutes and acoustic waves with periods between 3 and 5 minutes have been detected at ionospheric heights (250-350 km) and associated with severe thunderstorms. Modeling results support these findings, indicating that acoustic waves should be able to reach 250-350 km within ~250 km horizontally of the source, and gravity waves should be able to propagate significantly further. However, the mechanism by which the acoustic waves are generated and the ubiquity of occurrence of both types of wave is unknown. We use GPS total electron content measurements to detect gravity and acoustic waves in the ionosphere. We perform a statistical study from 2005 May - July to compare the occurrence rate and horizontal extent of the waves to storm size and convective height from NEXRAD radar measurements. It is found that both gravity waves and acoustic wave horizontal extent is primarily associated with storm size and not convective height.

  17. Gravity wave influence on NLC: experimental results from ALOMAR, 69° N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wilms

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of gravity waves on noctilucent clouds (NLC at ALOMAR (69° N is analysed by relating gravity wave activity to NLC occurrence from common-volume measurements. Gravity wave kinetic energies are derived from MF-radar wind data and filtered into different period ranges by wavelet transformation. From the dataset covering the years 1999–2011, a direct correlation between gravity wave kinetic energy and NLC occurrence is not found, i.e., NLC appear independently of the simultaneously measured gravity wave kinetic energy. In addition, gravity wave activity is divided into weak and strong activity as compared to a 13 yr mean. The NLC occurrence rates during strong and weak activity are calculated separately for a given wave period and compared to each other. Again, for the full dataset no dependence of NLC occurrence on relative gravity wave activity is found. However, concentrating on 12 h of NLC detections during 2008, we do find an NLC-amplification with strong long-period gravity wave occurrence. Our analysis hence confirms previous findings that in general NLC at ALOMAR are not predominantly driven by gravity waves while exceptions to this rule are at least possible.

  18. The criterion of gravity wave instability induced by photochemistry in summer polar mesopause region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jiyao(徐寄遥); WU; Yongfu(吴永富); WANG; Yongmei(王咏梅); FU; Liping(傅利平)

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of photochemistry on the gravity wave instability in summer polar mesopause region. The calculation method of the effects of eddy viscosity, conductivity and eddy diffusion of chemical species on the gravity wave instability induced by photochemistry are studied. The critical wavelength of the instability is given in this paper. The influences of some parameters on it are discussed. The study shows that the gravity wave instability induced by photochemistry is sensitive to the temperature and atomic oxygen profiles.

  19. First champ mission results for gravity, magnetic and atmospheric studies

    CERN Document Server

    Lühr, Hermann; Schwintzer, Peter

    2003-01-01

    In the summer of 2000 the German geo-research satellite CHAMP was launched into orbit. Its innovative payload arrangement and the low intial orbit allow CHAMP to simultaneously collect and almost continuously analyse precise data relating to gravity and magnetic fields at low altitude. In addition to this CHAMP also measures the neutral atmosphere and ionosphere using GPS techniques. Eighteen months after the launch, CHAMP research groups from all over the world met at the Geo-Forschungs-Zentrum in Potsdam for an initial exchange of experiences and results. The main outcome of this user meeting is summarized in this volume. Apart from technical information about the mission, the book offers a comprehensive insight into the present status of CHAMP data exploitation for Earth system research and practical applications in geodesy, geophysics and meteorology.

  20. Spatiotemporal measurement of surfactant distribution on gravity-capillary waves

    CERN Document Server

    Strickland, Stephen L; Daniels, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Materials adsorbed to the surface of a fluid -- for instance, crude oil, biogenic slicks, or industrial/medical surfactants -- will move in response to surface waves. Due to the difficulty of non-invasive measurement of the spatial distribution of a molecular monolayer, little is known about the dynamics that couple the surface waves and the evolving density field. Here, we report measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the density field of an insoluble surfactant driven by gravity-capillary waves in a shallow cylindrical container. Standing Faraday waves and traveling waves generated by the meniscus are superimposed to create a non-trivial surfactant density field. We measure both the height field of the surface using moir\\'e-imaging, and the density field of the surfactant via the fluorescence of NBD-tagged phosphatidylcholine, a lipid. Through phase-averaging stroboscopically-acquired images of the density field, we determine that the surfactant accumulates on the leading edge of the traveling menis...

  1. Quantum Gravity Explanation of the Wave-Particle Duality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2016-03-01

    A quantum gravity explanation of the quantum-mechanical wave-particle duality is given by the watt-less emission of gravitational waves from a particle described by the Dirac equation. This explanation is possible through the existence of negative energy, and hence negative mass solutions of Einstein's gravitational field equations. They permit to understand the Dirac equation as the equation for a gravitationally bound positive-negative mass (pole-dipole particle) two-body configuration, with the mass of the Dirac particle equal to the positive mass of the gravitational field binding the positive with the negative mass particle, and with the positive and negative mass particles making a luminal ``Zitterbewegung'' (quivering motion), emitting a watt-less oscillating positive-negative space curvature wave. Is it shown that this thusly produced ``Zitterbewegung'' reproduces the quantum potential of the Madelung-transformed Schrödinger equation. The watt-less gravitational wave emitted by the quivering particles is conjectured to be the de Broglie pilot wave.

  2. Linear theory of the response of Na mixing ratio to gravity waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jiyao; JI Qiao; WU Mingliang

    2003-01-01

    The influence of gravity waves on the sodium layer is studied by using a linear photochemical-dynamical coupling gravity wave model. The model includes the background photochemistry and the photochemical reactions in the sodium layer. The amplitude and phase difference of the response of sodium mixing ratio to gravity waves are calculated. The results indicate that the lower part of sodium layer is the most sensitive region responding to gravity waves. The perturbation of sodium mixing ratio is in phase with temperature in the lower part of the layer. However, it is out of phase with temperature fluctuation in the upper part.

  3. Constraining modified theories of gravity with gravitational wave stochastic background

    CERN Document Server

    Maselli, Andrea; Ferrari, Valeria; Kokkotas, Kostas; Schneider, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    The direct discovery of gravitational waves has finally opened a new observational window on our Universe, suggesting that the population of coalescing binary black holes is larger than previously expected. These sources produce an unresolved background of gravitational waves, potentially observables by ground-based interferometers. In this paper we investigate how modified theories of gravity, modeled using the ppE formalism, affect the expected signal, and analyze the detectability of the resulting stochastic background by current and future ground-based interferometers. We find the constraints that AdLIGO would be able to set on modified theories, showing that they may significantly improve the current bounds obtained from astrophysical observations of binary pulsars.

  4. What gravity waves are telling about quantum spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Arzano, Michele

    2016-01-01

    We discuss various modified dispersion relations motivated by quantum gravity which might affect the propagation of the recently observed gravitational-wave signal of the event GW150914. We find that the bounds set by the data on the characteristic quantum-gravity mass scale $M$ are too weak to constrain these scenarios and, in general, much weaker than the expected $M> 10^4\\,\\text{eV}$ for a correction to the dispersion relation linear in $1/M$. We illustrate this issue by giving lower bounds on $M$, plus an upper bound coming from constraints on the size of a quantum ergosphere. We also show that a phenomenological dispersion relation $\\omega^2 = k^2(1+\\alpha k^n/M^n)$ is compatible with observations and, at the same time, has a phenomenologically and theoretically viable mass $10\\,\\text{TeV}gravity models.

  5. A comprehensive observational filter for satellite infrared limb sounding of gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Thai; Kalisch, Silvio; Preusse, Peter; Chun, Hye Yeong; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Ern, Manfred; Riese, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Infrared limb sounding provides valuable observations for understanding the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. For the interpretation of gravity wave (GW) observations, the observational filter plays a crucial role. We describe a comprehensive observational filter for this technique. Both instrument visibility and observation geometry are considered in this filter with a high level of accuracy. Four main aspects that influence the GW spectrum are discussed thoroughly. They are: (1) visibility filter, (2) projection of the horizontal wavelength on the tangent-point track, (3) aliasing effect, and (4) calculation of the observed vertical wavelength. Gravity waves simulated by coupling a convective GW source (CGWS) scheme with the gravity wave regional or global ray tracer (GROGRAT) are used as an example for applying the observational filter. The observation geometries of the satellite instruments SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) and HIRDLS (High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder) are considered. The visibility filter is found to be the most important aspect: it strongly influences the GWMF spectrum for both instruments. The second important aspect is aliasing for SABER, and projection on tangent-point track for HIRDLS. It is shown that the retrieval (a part of the "visibility filter" process) significantly affects the vertical wavelength distribution. For some cases, the short-horizontal-scale spectrum might be projected towards longer horizontal wavelengths where the original spectrum was not located. Also, GWMF values at very short horizontal wavelengths were significantly decreased due to the observational filter. In addition, we discuss the interpretation of observed data using this observational filter, as well as its applicability to other types of instruments.

  6. Seasonal dependence of mesospheric gravity waves ( Peach Mountain Observatory, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q.; Killeen, T. L.

    We present results from a 14-month study of all-sky camera observations of the Hydroxyl (OH) nightglow made at the Peach Mountain Observatory, Michigan (42.3°N 83.7°W) Spatial variations in the observed OH airglow images have been used to assess gravity-wave (GW) occurrence frequency at ∼85 km altitude as a function of season. A Strong seasonal dependence of mesospheric GW activity is observed, with peak activity in the summer months and much reduced activity during the winter months. Gravity waves (as defined by observed coherent variations in relative OH brightnesses of >∼7.5) were found to be present on about 70% of the clear-sky nights during the summer months. During the spring, fall, and winter months, however, the observed GW occurrence frequency was very low (<10%). Most of the GWs were observed to propagate towards the eastward hemisphere. We suggest that the tropospherically-generated GWs are anisotropic (eastward) thus passing through to the mesosphere only in the summer and being filtered out by the intervening neutral winds during other seasons. It is also possible that the GWs are able to reach higher altitudes without breaking because of their smaller amplitudes at lower altitudes during the summer season relative to the winter season.

  7. High-altitude gravity waves in the Martian thermosphere observed by MAVEN/NGIMS and modeled by a gravity wave scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Yiğit, Erdal; Liu, Guiping; Medvedev, Alexander S; Mahaffy, Paul R; Kuroda, Takeshi; Jakosky, Bruce M

    2015-01-01

    First high-altitude observations of gravity wave (GW)-induced CO$_2$ density perturbations in the Martian thermosphere retrieved from NASA's NGIMS instrument on board the MAVEN satellite are presented and interpreted using the extended GW parameterization of Yi\\u{g}it et al. [2008] and the Mars Climate Database as an input. Observed relative density perturbations between 180-220 km of 20-40 % demonstrate appreciable local time, latitude, and altitude variations. Modeling for the spatiotemporal conditions of the MAVEN observations suggests that GWs can directly propagate from the lower atmosphere to the thermosphere, produce appreciable dynamical effects, and likely contribute to the observed fluctuations. Modeled effects are somewhat smaller than the observed but their highly variable nature is in qualitative agreement with observations. Possible reasons for discrepancies between modeling and measurements are discussed.

  8. Identification of gravity wave sources using reverse ray tracing over Indian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pramitha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Reverse ray tracing method is successfully implemented for the first time in the Indian region for identification of the sources and propagation characteristics of the gravity waves observed using airglow emissions from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E and Hyderabad (17.5° N, 78.5° E. Wave amplitudes are also traced back for these wave events by including both radiative and diffusive damping. Background temperature and wind data obtained from MSISE-90 and HWM-07 models, respectively, are used for the ray tracing. For Gadanki region suitability of these models is tested. Further, a climatological model of background atmosphere for Gadanki region has been developed using a long-term of nearly 30 years of observations available from a variety of ground-based (MST radar, radiosonde, MF radar, rocket-, and satellite-borne measurements. For considering real-time atmospheric inputs, ERA-Interim products are utilized. By this reverse ray method, the source locations for nine wave events could be identified to be in the upper troposphere, whereas, for five other events the waves seem to have been ducted in the mesosphere itself. Uncertainty in locating the terminal points in the horizontal direction is estimated to be within 50–100 and 150–300 km for Gadanki and Hyderabad wave events, respectively. This uncertainty arises mainly due to non-consideration of the day-to-day variability in tidal amplitudes. As no convection in-and-around the terminal points are noticed, it is unlikely to be the source. Interestingly, large (~9 m s−1 km−1 vertical shear in the horizontal wind is noted near the ray terminal points (at 10–12 km altitude and is identified to be the source for generating the nine wave events. Conditions prevailing at the terminal points for each of the 14 events are also provided. These events provide leads to a greater understanding of the tropical lower and upper atmospheric coupling through gravity waves.

  9. Gravity capillary waves in fluid layers under normal electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T; Petropoulos, Peter G; Vanden-Broeck, Jean-Marc

    2005-11-01

    We study the formation and dynamics of interfacial waves on a perfect dielectric ideal fluid layer of finite depth, wetting a solid wall, when the region above the fluid is hydrodynamically passive but has constant permittivity, for example, air. The wall is held at a constant electric potential and a second electrode having a different potential is placed parallel to the wall and infinitely far from it. In the unperturbed state the interface is flat and the normal horizontally uniform electric field is piecewise constant in the liquid and air. We derive a system of long wave nonlinear evolution equations valid for interfacial amplitudes as large as the unperturbed layer depth and which retain gravity, surface tension and electric field effects. It is shown that for given physical parameters there exists a critical value of the voltage potential difference between electrodes, below which the system is dispersive and above which a band of unstable waves is possible centered around a finite wavenumber. In the former case nonlinear traveling waves are calculated and their stability is studied, while in the latter case the instability leads to thinning of the layer with the interface touching down in finite time. A similarity solution of the second kind is found to be dominant near the singularity, and the scaling exponents are determined using analysis and computations. PMID:16383611

  10. Light amplification by gravitational waves in scalar-tensor theories of gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Faraoni, Valerio

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the amplification of a light beam by gravitational waves in scalar-tensor theories of gravity is a first order effect in the wave amplitudes. In general relativity, instead, the effect is only of second order.

  11. Small divisor problem in the theory of three-dimensional water gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Iooss, Gérard; Plotnikov, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    We consider doubly-periodic travelling waves at the surface of an infinitely deep perfect fluid, only subjected to gravity $g$ and resulting from the nonlinear interaction of two simply periodic travelling waves making an angle $2\\theta $ between them. \

  12. Characteristics of equatorial gravity waves derived from mesospheric airglow imaging observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Suzuki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the characteristics of small-scale (<100 km gravity waves in the equatorial mesopause region derived from OH airglow imaging observations at Kototabang (100.3° E, 0.2° S, Indonesia, from 2002 to 2005. We adopted a method that could automatically detect gravity waves in the airglow images using two-dimensional cross power spectra of gravity waves. The propagation directions of the waves were likely controlled by zonal filtering due to stratospheric mean winds that show a quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO and the presence of many wave sources in the troposphere.

  13. Symmetry breaking in periodic and solitary gravity-capillary waves on water of finite depth

    OpenAIRE

    Zufiria, Juan A.

    1987-01-01

    A weakly nonlinear model is developed from the Hamiltonian formulation of water waves, to study the bifurcation structure of gravity-capillary waves on water of finite depth. It is found that, besides a very rich structure of symmetric solutions, non-symmetric Wilton's ripples exist. They appear via a spontaneous symmetry breaking bifurcation from symmetric solutions. The bifurcation tree is similar to that for gravity waves. The solitary wave with surface tension is studied with the same mod...

  14. Stability of capillary-gravity interfacial waves between two bounded fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulides, Paul; Dias, Frédéric

    1995-12-01

    Two-dimensional periodic capillary-gravity waves at the interface between two bounded fluids of different densities are considered. Based on a variational formulation, the relation between wave frequency and wave amplitude is obtained through a weakly nonlinear analysis. All classes of space-periodic waves are studied: traveling and standing waves as well as a degenerate class of mixed waves. As opposed to water waves, mixed interfacial waves exist even for pure gravity waves. The stability of traveling and standing waves with respect to three-dimensional modulations is then studied. By using the method of multiple scales, Davey-Stewartson-type equations are obtained. A detailed stability analysis is performed in three cases: pure gravity waves, capillary-gravity waves when one layer is infinitely deep, and capillary-gravity waves when both layers are infinitely deep. The main results for oblique (i.e., combined longitudinal and transverse) modulations reveal a mostly stabilizing effect of the density ratio for traveling waves and a destabilizing effect for standing waves.

  15. Modeling the QBO and SAO Driven by Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Chan, K. L.; Porter, H. S.

    1999-01-01

    Hines' Doppler spread parameterization (DSP) for small scale gravity waves (GW) is applied in a global scale numerical spectral model (NSM) to describe the semi-annual and quasi-biennial oscillations (SAO and QBO) as well as the long term interannual variations that are driven by wave mean flow interactions. This model has been successful in simulating the salient features observed near the equator at altitudes above 20 km, including the QBO extension into the upper mesosphere inferred from UARS measurements. The model has now been extended to describe also the mean zonal and meridional circulations of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere that affect the equatorial QBO and its global scale extension. This is accomplished in part through tuning of the GW parameterization, and preliminary results lead to the following conclusions: (1) To reproduce the upwelling at equatorial latitudes associated with the Brewer/Dobson circulation that in part is modulated in the model by the vertical component of the Coriolis force, the eddy diffusivity in the lower stratosphere had to be enhanced and the related GW spectrum modified to bring it in closer agreement with the form recommended for the DSP. (2) To compensate for the required increase in the diffusivity, the observed QBO requires a larger GW source that is closer to the middle of the range recommended for the DSP. (3) Through global scale momentum redistribution, the above developments are conducive to extending the QBO and SAO oscillations to higher latitudes. Multi-year interannual oscillations are generated through wave filtering by the solar driven annual oscillation in the zonal circulation. (4) In a 3D version of the model, wave momentum is absorbed and dissipated by tides and planetary waves. Thus, a somewhat larger GW source is required to generate realistic amplitudes for the QBO and SAO.

  16. Chiral gravitational waves from z=2 Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Myung, Yun Soo

    2009-01-01

    We construct the chiral gravitational waves from the $z=2$ Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity with gravitational Chern-Simons term in the de Sitter and Minkowski backgrounds. These gravitational waves which show a feature of the Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity may be related to the generalized uncertainty principle. In addition, we find the classical and quantum IR-UV transition rules in the $z=2$ Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity.

  17. On reduced models for gravity waves generated by moving bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Trinh, Philippe H

    2015-01-01

    In 1982, Marshall P. Tulin published a report proposing a framework for reducing the equations for gravity waves generated by moving bodies into a single nonlinear differential equation solvable in closed form [Proc. 14th Symp. on Naval Hydrodynamics, 1982, pp.19-51]. Several new and puzzling issues were highlighted by Tulin, notably the existence of weak and strong wave-making regimes, and the paradoxical fact that the theory seemed to be applicable to flows at low speeds, "but not too low speeds". These important issues were left unanswered, and despite the novelty of the ideas, Tulin's report fell into relative obscurity. Now thirty years later, we will revive Tulin's observations, and explain how an asymptotically consistent framework allows us to address these concerns. Most notably, we will explain, using the asymptotic method of steepest descents, how the production of free-surface waves can be related to the arrangement of integration contours connected to the shape of the moving body. This approach p...

  18. Plane wave holonomies in quantum gravity. II. A sine wave solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Donald E.

    2015-08-01

    This paper constructs an approximate sinusoidal wave packet solution to the equations of canonical gravity. The theory uses holonomy-flux variables with support on a lattice (LHF =lattice-holonomy flux ). There is an SU(2) holonomy on each edge of the LHF simplex, and the goal is to study the behavior of these holonomies under the influence of a passing gravitational wave. The equations are solved in a small sine approximation: holonomies are expanded in powers of sines and terms beyond sin2 are dropped; also, fields vary slowly from vertex to vertex. The wave is unidirectional and linearly polarized. The Hilbert space is spanned by a set of coherent states tailored to the symmetry of the plane wave case. Fixing the spatial diffeomorphisms is equivalent to fixing the spatial interval between vertices of the loop quantum gravity lattice. This spacing can be chosen such that the eigenvalues of the triad operators are large, as required in the small sine limit, even though the holonomies are not large. Appendices compute the energy of the wave, estimate the lifetime of the coherent state packet, discuss circular polarization and coarse-graining, and determine the behavior of the spinors used in the U(N) SHO realization of LQG.

  19. Scattering of gravity waves in subcritical flows over an obstacle

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, Scott; Parentani, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the scattering coefficients of linear water waves on stationary flows above a localized obstacle. We compare the scattering on trans- and subcritical flows, and then focus on the latter which have been used in recent analog gravity experiments. The main difference concerns the magnitude of the mode amplification: whereas transcritical flows display a large amplification (which is generally in good agreement with the Hawking prediction), this effect is heavily suppressed in subcritical flows. This is due to the transmission across the obstacle for frequencies less than some critical value. As a result, subcritical flows display high- and low-frequency behaviors separated by a narrow band around the critical frequency. In the low-frequency regime, transmission of long wavelengths is accompanied by non-adiabatic scattering into short wavelengths, whose spectrum is approximately linear in frequency. By contrast, in the high-frequency regime, no simple description seems to exist. In particular...

  20. Gravity Wave Energetics Determined From Coincident Space-Based and Ground-Based Observations of Airglow Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Significant progress was made toward the goals of this proposal in a number of areas during the covered period. Section 5.1 contains a copy of the originally proposed schedule. The tasks listed below have been accomplished: (1) Construction of space-based observing geometry gravity wave model. This model has been described in detail in the paper accompanying this report (Section 5.2). It can simulate the observing geometry of both ground-based, and orbital instruments allowing comparisons to be made between them. (2) Comparisons of relative emission intensity, temperatures, and Krassovsky's ratio for space- and ground-based observing geometries. These quantities are used in gravity wave literature to describe the effects of the waves on the airglow. (3) Rejection of Bates [1992], and Copeland [1994] chemistries for gravity wave modeling purposes. Excessive 02(A(sup 13)(Delta)) production led to overproduction of O2(b(sup 1)(Sigma)), the state responsible for the emission of O2. Atmospheric band. Attempts were made to correct for this behavior, but could not adequately compensate for this. (4) Rejection of MSX dataset due to lack of coincident data, and resolution necessary to characterize the waves. A careful search to identify coincident data revealed only four instances, with only one of those providing usable data. Two high latitude overpasses and were contaminated by auroral emissions. Of the remaining two mid-latitude coincidences, one overflight was obscured by cloud, leaving only one ten minute segment of usable data. Aside from the statistical difficulties involved in comparing measurements taken in this short period, the instrument lacks the necessary resolution to determine the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave. This means that the wave cannot be uniquely characterized from space with this dataset. Since no observed wave can be uniquely identified, model comparisons are not possible.

  1. Large-amplitude gravity waves above the southern Andes, the Drake Passage, and the Antarctic Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, A.; Alexander, P.; Hierro, R.; Llamedo, P.; Rolla, A.; Schmidt, T.; Wickert, J.

    2012-01-01

    Above the southern Andes range and its prolongation in the Antarctic Peninsula, large-amplitude mountain and shear gravity waves observed with Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model simulations during winter 2009 are analyzed. Two specific reasons motivated this study: (1) a decade of satellite observations of temperature fluctuations in the stratosphere, allowing us to infer that this region may be launching the largest-amplitude gravity waves into the upper atmosphere, and (2) the recent design of a research program to investigate these features in detail, the Southern Andes Antarctic Gravity wave Initiative (SAANGRIA). The simulations are forced with ERA-Interim data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. The approach selected for the regional downscaling is based on consecutive integrations with weekly reinitialization with 24 h of spin-up, and the outputs during this period are excluded from the analysis. From 1 June to 31 August 2009, five case studies were selected on the basis of their outstanding characteristics and large wave amplitudes. In general, one or two prevailing modes of oscillation are identified after applying continuous wavelet transforms at constant pressure levels and perpendicularly to the nominal orientation of the dominant wave crests. In all cases, the dominant modes are characterized by horizontal wavelengths around 50 km. Their vertical wavelengths, depending on a usually strong background wind shear, are estimated to be between 2 and 11 km. The corresponding intrinsic periods range between 10 and 140 min. In general, the estimated vertical wavelength (intrinsic period) maximizes (minimizes) around 250-300 hPa. The synoptic circulation for each case is described. Zonal and meridional components of the vertical flux of horizontal momentum are shown in detail for each case, including possible horizontal wavelengths between 12 and 400 km. Large values of this flux are observed at higher pressure

  2. Axisymmetric Waves in Isothermal Accretion Discs with Vertical Self-Gravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-Ci; YANG Lan-Tian; WU Shao-Ping; DING Shi-Xue

    2001-01-01

    We extend the research of axisymmetric waves in accretion discs with three-dimensional structure to the case that vertical self-gravity of the discs is included. We derive and analyze the dispersion relation and solve the eigenfunctions numerically. The following results have been reached: vertical self-gravity expands the forbidden region of the wave propagation. As the influence of the vertical self-gravity increases, the group velocities of the waves get smaller and the vertical nodes of the wave shrink to the middle plane of the disc.

  3. Diffraction and Dissipation of Atmospheric Waves in the Vicinity of Caustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, O. A.

    2015-12-01

    A large and increasing number of ground-based and satellite-borne instruments has been demonstrated to reliably reveal ionospheric manifestations of natural hazards such as large earthquakes, strong tsunamis, and powerful tornadoes. To transition from detection of ionospheric manifestations of natural hazards to characterization of the hazards for the purposes of improving early warning systems and contributing to disaster recovery, it is necessary to relate quantitatively characteristics of the observed ionospheric disturbances and the underlying natural hazard and, in particular, accurately model propagation of atmospheric waves from the ground or ocean surface to the ionosphere. The ray theory has been used extensively to model propagation of atmospheric waves and proved to be very efficient in elucidating the effects of atmospheric variability on ionospheric signatures of natural hazards. However, the ray theory predicts unphysical, divergent values of the wave amplitude and needs to be modified in the vicinity of caustics. This paper presents an asymptotic theory that describes diffraction, focusing and increased dissipation of acoustic-gravity waves in the vicinity of caustics and turning points. Air temperature, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and wind velocity are assumed to vary gradually with height and horizontal coordinates, and slowness of these variations determines the large parameter of the problem. Uniform asymptotics of the wave field are expressed in terms of Airy functions and their derivatives. The geometrical, or Berry, phase, which arises in the consistent WKB approximation for acoustic-gravity waves, plays an important role in the caustic asymptotics. In addition to the wave field in the vicinity of the caustic, these asymptotics describe wave reflection from the caustic and the evanescent wave field beyond the caustic. The evanescent wave field is found to play an important role in ionospheric manifestations of tsunamis.

  4. Global solution for the 3D gravity water waves system above a flat bottom

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xuecheng

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the $3D$ water waves system above a fixed flat bottom (finite depth) with gravity, meanwhile without surface tension (the gravity water waves system). For this system, we prove global existence for suitably small initial data and non-existence of traveling waves below certain level of smallness, which strongly contrasts the behavior of solution of the same system in the $2D$ case.

  5. Slope wavenumber spectrum models of capillary and capillary-gravity waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾永君; 张杰; 王岩峰

    2010-01-01

    Capillary and capillary-gravity waves possess a random character, and the slope wavenumber spectra of them can be used to represent mean distributions of wave energy with respect to spatial scale of variability. But simple and practical models of the slope wavenumber spectra have not been put forward so far. In this article, we address the accurate definition of the slope wavenumber spectra of water surface capillary and capillary-gravity waves. By combining the existing slope wavenumber models and using th...

  6. Scalar gravitational waves from relativistic stars in scalar-tensor gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Sotani, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    Unlike general relativity, the scalar gravitational waves can be excited due to the radial oscillations in scalar-tensor gravity. To examine the scalar gravitational waves in scalar-tensor gravity, we derive the evolution equations of the radial oscillations of neutron stars and determine the specific oscillation frequencies of the matter oscillations and scalar gravitational waves, where we adopt two different numerical approaches, i.e., the mode analysis and direct time evolution. As a resu...

  7. Planetary and gravity wave signatures in the F region ionosphere with impact on radio propagation predictions and variability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Altadill, D.; Apostolov, E. M.; Boška, Josef; Laštovička, Jan; Šauli, Petra

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 47, 2/3 (2004), s. 1109-1119. ISSN 1593-5213. [Final Meeting COST271 Action. Effects of the upper atmosphere on terrestrial and Earth-space communications (EACOS).. Abingdon, 26.08.2004-27.08.2004] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 271.10; GA ČR GA205/01/1071; GA ČR GP205/02/P077 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : ionosphere * planetary waves * gravity waves Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.413, year: 2004

  8. Effects of rotation and mid-troposphere moisture on organized convection and convectively coupled gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Khouider, Boualem; Frenkel, Yevgeniy

    2015-02-01

    Atmospheric convection has the striking capability to organize itself into a hierarchy of cloud clusters and super-clusters on scales ranging from the convective cell of a few kilometres to planetary scale disturbances such as the Madden-Julian oscillation. It is widely accepted that this phenomenon is due in large part to the two-way coupling between convective processes and equatorially trapped waves and planetary scale flows in general. However, the physical mechanisms responsible for this multiscale organization and the associated across-scale interactions are poorly understood. The two main peculiarities of the tropics are the vanishing of the Coriolis force at the equator and the abundance of mid-level moisture. Here we test the effect of these two physical properties on the organization of convection and its interaction with gravity waves in a simplified primitive equation model for flows parallel to the equator. Convection is represented by deterministic as well as stochastic multicloud models that are known to represent organized convection and convectively coupled waves quite well. It is found here that both planetary rotation and mid-troposphere moisture are important players in the diminishing of organized convection and convectively coupled gravity wave activity in the subtropics and mid-latitudes. The meridional mean circulation increases with latitude while the mean zonal circulation is much shallower and is dominated by mid-level jets, reminiscent of a second baroclinic mode circulation associated with a congestus mode instability in the model. This is consistent with the observed shallow Hadley and Walker circulations accompanied by congestus cloud decks in the higher latitude tropics and sub-tropics. Moreover, deep convection activity in the stochastic model simulations becomes very patchy and unorganized as the computational domain is pushed towards the subtropics and mid-latitudes. This is consistent with previous work based on cloud resolving

  9. On the Importance of High Frequency Gravity Waves for Ice Nucleation in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigations of the influence of atmospheric waves on ice nucleation in cirrus have identified a number of key processes and sensitivities: (1) ice concentrations produced by homogeneous freezing are strongly dependent on cooling rates, with gravity waves dominating upper tropospheric cooling rates; (2) rapid cooling driven by high-frequency waves are likely responsible for the rare occurrences of very high ice concentrations in cirrus; (3) sedimentation and entrainment tend to decrease ice concentrations as cirrus age; and (4) in some situations, changes in temperature tendency driven by high-frequency waves can quench ice nucleation events and limit ice concentrations. Here we use parcel-model simulations of ice nucleation driven by long-duration, constant-pressure balloon temperature time series, along with an extensive dataset of cold cirrus microphysical properties from the recent ATTREX high-altitude aircraft campaign, to statistically examine the importance of high-frequency waves as well as the consistency between our theoretical understanding of ice nucleation and observed ice concentrations. The parcel-model simulations indicate common occurrence of peak ice concentrations exceeding several hundred per liter. Sedimentation and entrainment would reduce ice concentrations as clouds age, but 1-D simulations using a wave parameterization (which underestimates rapid cooling events) still produce ice concentrations higher than indicated by observations. We find that quenching of nucleation events by high-frequency waves occurs infrequently and does not prevent occurrences of large ice concentrations in parcel simulations of homogeneous freezing. In fact, the high-frequency variability in the balloon temperature data is entirely responsible for production of these high ice concentrations in the simulations.

  10. Inertia-gravity waves in the troposphere and lower stratosphere associated with a jet stream exit region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomas

    Full Text Available Radar measurements at Aberystwyth (52.4° N, 4.1° W of winds at tropospheric and lower stratospheric heights are shown for 12-13 March 1994 in a region of highly curved flow, downstream of the jet maximum. The perturbations of horizontal velocity have comparable amplitudes in the troposphere and lower stratosphere with downward and upward phase propagation, respectively, in these two height regions. The sense of rotation with increasing height in hodographs of horizontal perturbation velocity derived for hourly intervals show downwards propagation of energy in the troposphere and upward propagation in the lower stratosphere with vertical wavelengths of 1.7 to 2.3 km. The results indicate inertia-gravity waves propagating in a direction similar to that of the jet stream but at smaller velocities. Some of the features observed contrast with those of previous observations of inertia-gravity waves propagating transverse to the jet stream. The interpretation of the hodographs to derive wave parameters has taken account of the vertical shear of the background wind transverse to the direction of wave propagation.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (mesoscale meteorology; middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides

  11. The dynamics of internal gravity waves in the ocean: theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bulatov, Vitaly V

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we consider fundamental processes of the disturbance and propagation of internal gravity waves in the ocean modeled as a vertically stratified, horizontally non-uniform, and non-stationary medium. We develop asymptotic methods for describing the wave dynamics by generalizing the spatiotemporal ray-tracing method (a geometrical optics method). We present analytical and numerical algorithms for calculating the internal gravity wave fields using actual ocean parameters such as physical characteristics of the sea water, topography of its floor, etc. We demonstrate that our mathematical models can realistically describe the internal gravity wave dynamics in the ocean. Our numerical and analytical results show that the internal gravity waves have a significant impact on underwater objects in the ocean.

  12. Sodium Lidar-observed Strong Inertia-gravity Wave Activities in the Mesopause Region over Fort Collins, Colorado (41 deg N, 105 deg W)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; She, C. -Y.; Liu, Han-Li; Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, I. Stuart

    2007-01-01

    In December 2004, the Colorado State University sodium lidar system at Fort Collins, Colorado (41 deg N, 105 deg W), conducted an approximately 80-hour continuous campaign for the simultaneous observations of mesopause region sodium density, temperature, and zonal and meridional winds. This data set reveals the significant inertia-gravity wave activities with a period of approximately 18 hours, which are strong in both wind components since UT day 338 (second day of the campaign), and weak in temperature and sodium density. The considerable variability of wave activities was observed with both wind amplitudes growing up to approximately 40 m/s at 95-100 km in day 339 and then decreasing dramatically in day 340. We also found that the sodium density wave perturbation is correlated in phase with temperature perturbation below 90 km, and approximately 180 deg out of phase above. Applying the linear wave theory, we estimated the wave horizontal propagation direction, horizontal wavelength, and apparent horizontal phase speed to be approximately 25 deg south of west, approximately 1800 +/- 150 km, and approximately 28 +/- 2 m/s, respectively of wave intrinsic period, intrinsic phase speed, and vertical wavelength were also estimated. While the onset of enhanced inertia-gravity wave amplitude in the night of 338 was observed to be in coincidence with short-period gravity wave breaking via convective instability, the decrease of inertia-gravity wave amplitude after noon of day 339 was also observed to coincide with the development of atmospheric dynamical instability layers with downward phase progression clearly correlated with the 18-hour inertia-gravity wave, suggesting likely breaking of this inertia-gravity wave via dynamical (shear) instability.

  13. The propagation of orographic gravity waves into the stratosphere. Linear theory, idealized and realistic numerical simulation; Die Ausbreitung orographisch angeregter Schwerewellen in die Stratosphaere. Lineare Theorie, idealisierte und realitaetsnahe numerische Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leutbecher, M. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1998-07-01

    Flow over mountains in the stably stratified atmosphere excites gravity waves. The three-dimensional propagation of these waves into the stratosphere is studied using linear theority as well as idealized and realistic numerical simulations. Stagnation, momentum fluxes and temperature anomalies are analyzed for idealized types of flow. Isolated mountains with elliptical contours are considered. The unperturbed atmosphere has constant wind speed and constant static stability or two layers (troposphere/stratosphere) of constant stability each. Real flow over orography is investigated where gravity waves in the stratosphere have been observed. Characteristics of the gravity wave event over the southern tip of Greenland on 6 January 1992 were recorded on a flight of the ER-2 at an altitude of 20 km. In the second case polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) were observed by an airborne Lidar over Northern Scandinavia on 9 January 1997. The PSC were induced by temperature anomalies in orographic gravity waves. (orig.)

  14. Capillary-gravity waves on a liquid film of arbitrary depth: analysis of the wave resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wędołowski, Karol; Napiórkowski, Marek

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the wave resistance in the case of an externally perturbed viscous liquid film of arbitrary thickness. Emphasis is placed on the dependence of the wave resistance on the film thickness H, the length scale b characterizing the external perturbation, and its velocity V. In particular, the effectiveness of the mechanisms of capillary-gravity waves and the viscous dissipation localized in the vicinity of the perturbation are compared and discussed as functions of H and V. We show that, in general, the wave resistance is a nonmonotonous function of H with a maximum whose amplitude and position depend on b and V. In the case of small H the wave resistance depends on a parameter S proportional V/H(3). We find three different regimes of this parameter in which the wave resistance behaves like S(r) with the exponent r equal to 1, 1/3, and -1. These results are also obtained independently within the thin liquid film approximation. This allows us to assess the range of validity of the thin liquid film approximation in various cases, in particular its dependence on the perturbation length scale b. PMID:24229283

  15. A survey of atmospheric wave recording at Blacknest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques are described for recording atmospheric waves at the AWRE Blacknest Research Centre. Examples, with interpretative comments, of various types of atmospheric waves observed over a period of several years are illustrated in a series of figures taken from a representative selection of Blacknest records. (author)

  16. Characteristics and sources of gravity waves observed in noctilucent cloud over Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Demissie, T. D.; P. J. Espy; N. H. Kleinknecht; Hatlen, M.; N. Kaifler; G. Baumgarten

    2014-01-01

    Four years of noctilucent cloud (NLC) images from an automated digital camera in Trondheim and results from a ray-tracing model are used to extend the climatology of gravity waves to higher latitudes and to identify their sources during summertime. The climatology of the summertime gravity waves detected in NLC between 64 and 74° N is similar to that observed between 60 and 64° N by Pautet et al. (2011). The direction of propagation of gravity waves observed in the NLC north...

  17. Effects of anisotropy on the frequency spectrum of gravity waves observed by MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    In the investigation of gravity waves using mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radar data, model gravity-wave spectra have been used. In these model spectra, one usually assumes azimuthal symmetry. The effect of spectral anisotropy on the observed spectrum is studied here. It is shown that for a general Garrett-Munk-type spectrum, the anisotropy does not affect the frequency spectrum observed by the vertically beamed radar. For the oblique beam, however, the observed frequency spectrum is changed. A general gravity wave spectrum including azimuthal anisotropy is considered.

  18. Dynamical influence of gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains in Antarctica: radar observations, fine-scale modelling and kinetic energy budget analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Arnault

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains (in western Droning Maud Land, Antarctica, southwest of the Finnish/Swedish Aboa/Wasa station have been observed with the Moveable atmospheric radar for Antarctica (MARA during the SWEDish Antarctic Research Programme (SWEDARP in December 2007/January 2008. These radar observations are compared with a 2-month Weather Research Forecast (WRF model experiment operated at 2 km horizontal resolution. A control simulation without orography is also operated in order to separate unambiguously the contribution of the mountain waves on the simulated atmospheric flow. This contribution is then quantified with a kinetic energy budget analysis computed in the two simulations. The results of this study confirm that mountain waves reaching lower-stratospheric heights break through convective overturning and generate inertia gravity waves with a smaller vertical wavelength, in association with a brief depletion of kinetic energy through frictional dissipation and negative vertical advection. The kinetic energy budget also shows that gravity waves have a strong influence on the other terms of the budget, i.e. horizontal advection and horizontal work of pressure forces, so evaluating the influence of gravity waves on the mean-flow with the vertical advection term alone is not sufficient, at least in this case. We finally obtain that gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains reaching lower stratospheric heights generally deplete (create kinetic energy in the lower troposphere (upper troposphere–lower stratosphere, in contradiction with the usual decelerating effect attributed to gravity waves on the zonal circulation in the upper troposphere–lower stratosphere.

  19. Ionospheric gravity wave measurements with the USU dynasonde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkey, Frank T.; Deng, Jun Yuan

    1992-01-01

    A method for the measurement of ionospheric Gravity Wave (GW) using the USU Dynasonde is outlined. This method consists of a series of individual procedures, which includes functions for data acquisition, adaptive scaling, polarization discrimination, interpolation and extrapolation, digital filtering, windowing, spectrum analysis, GW detection, and graphics display. Concepts of system theory are applied to treat the ionosphere as a system. An adaptive ionogram scaling method was developed for automatically extracting ionogram echo traces from noisy raw sounding data. The method uses the well known Least Mean Square (LMS) algorithm to form a stochastic optimal estimate of the echo trace which is then used to control a moving window. The window tracks the echo trace, simultaneously eliminating the noise and interference. Experimental results show that the proposed method functions as designed. Case studies which extract GW from ionosonde measurements were carried out using the techniques described. Geophysically significant events were detected and the resultant processed results are illustrated graphically. This method was also developed for real time implementation in mind.

  20. Stratospheric gravity wave momentum flux from radio occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, T.; Alexander, P.; Torre, A.

    2016-05-01

    Triples of GPS radio occultation (RO) temperature data are used to derive horizontal and vertical gravity wave (GW) parameters in the stratosphere between 20 km and 40 km from which the vertical flux of horizontal momentum is determined. Compared to previous studies using RO data, better limiting values for the sampling distance (Δd≤250 km) and the time interval (Δt≤15 min) are used. For several latitude bands the mean momentum fluxes (MFs) derived in this study are considerably larger than MF from other satellite missions based on horizontal wavelengths calculated between two adjacent temperature profiles along the satellite track. Error sources for the estimation of MF from RO data and the geometrical setup for the applied method are investigated. Another crucial issue discussed in this paper is the influence of different background separation methods to the final MF. For GW analysis a measured temperature profile is divided into a fluctuation and a background and it is assumed that the fluctuation is caused by GWs only. For the background separation, i.e., the detrending of large-scale processes from the measured temperature profile, several methods exist. In this study we compare different detrending approaches and for the first time an attempt is made to detrend RO data with ERA-Interim data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. We demonstrate that the horizontal detrending based on RO data and ERA-Interim gives more consistent results compared with a vertical detrending.

  1. Long-term MST radar observations of vertical wave number spectra of gravity waves in the tropical troposphere over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E: comparison with model spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vijaya Bhaskara Rao

    2008-06-01

    range of −2 to −2.8. The significance of the present study lies in using the ten years of data to estimate the monthly mean vertical wave number spectra of gravity waves, which will find their application in representing the realistic gravity wave characteristics in atmospheric models.

  2. Evidence for thermospheric gravity waves in the southern polar cap from ground-based vertical velocity and photometric observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Innis

    Full Text Available Zenith-directed Fabry-Perot Spectrometer (FPS and 3-Field Photometer (3FP observations of the λ630 nm emission (~240 km altitude were obtained at Davis station, Antarctica, during the austral winter of 1999. Eleven nights of suitable data were searched for significant periodicities common to vertical winds from the FPS and photo-metric variations from the 3FP. Three wave-like events were found, each of around one or more hours in duration, with periods around 15 minutes, vertical velocity amplitudes near 60 ms–1 , horizontal phase velocities around 300 ms–1 , and horizontal wavelengths from 240 to 400 km. These characteristics appear consistent with polar cap gravity waves seen by other workers, and we conclude this is a likely interpretation of our data. Assuming a source height near 125 km altitude, we determine the approximate source location by calculating back along the wave trajectory using the gravity wave property relating angle of ascent and frequency. The wave sources appear to be in the vicinity of the poleward border of the auroral oval, at magnetic local times up to 5 hours before local magnetic midnight.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides

  3. Ultra-Low Noise Quad Photoreceiver for Space Based Laser Interferometric Gravity Wave Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gravity wave detection using space-based long-baseline laser interferometric sensors imposes stringent noise requirements on the system components, including the...

  4. Background gravity wave activity and its variability as determined from Dynasonde data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrea, C.; Zabotin, N. A.; Bullett, T. W.; Rietveld, M.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of gravity waves for the dynamics of the thermosphere-ionosphere system is a well-known fact. Numerical models of the thermosphere-ionosphere must account for gravity wave effects by using various parameterization schemes with currently unknown levels of accuracy. There are several existing methods allowing for the detection of individual instances of gravity wave manifestations. However, little information exists regarding the background wave spectrum and its variability in the thermosphere. We employ Travelling Ionospheric Disturbances (TID's) as tracers for gravity wave propagation, using results of Dynasonde data analysis as the starting point in our calculations. Data from the Wallops Island (VA), San Juan (Puerto Rico), Boulder (CO), Tromso and Svalbard (Norway) instruments are used. The interval between the sounding sessions is 2 minutes and the NeXtYZ inversion procedure (a part of the Dynasonde software package) allows us to obtain a vertical resolution for the parameters of ionospheric plasma in real height better than 1 km. The full output of the inversion procedure consists of height profiles of electron density, X (East-West) and Y (North-South) tilts of the constant plasma density contours and Doppler velocities, all of which showing persistent signs of gravity wave induced TID's. We demonstrate using a few examples that the characteristics of the observed TID's are in good agreement with the dispersion relation describing gravity waves. The ionospheric tilt measurements allow for determination of the direction of propagation for every wave mode. For each calendar month of 2013, the tilt spectra is obtained as a function of altitude using a Lomb-Scargle Welch implementation. The analysis is applied to all 6 stations proving unprecedented geographical coverage. The result is a complete picture of the altitude, temporal and location variability of gravity wave activity in the accessible thermospheric altitude interval with included

  5. Tuning of a convective gravity wave source scheme based on HIRDLS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Q. T.; Kalisch, S.; Preusse, P.; Ern, M.; Chun, H.-Y.; Eckermann, S. D.; Kang, M.-J.; Riese, M.

    2015-12-01

    Convection as one dominant source of atmospheric gravity waves (GWs) has been in focus of investigation over recent years. However, its spatial and temporal forcing scales are not well known. In this work we address this open issue by a systematic verification of free parameters of the Yonsei convective GW source scheme based on observations from the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS). Observational constraints are taken into account by applying a comprehensive observational filter on the simulated GWs. By this approach, only long horizontal scale convective GWs are addressed. Results show that effects of long horizontal scale convective GWs can be successfully simulated by the superposition of three or four combinations of parameter sets reproducing the observed GW spectrum. These selected parameter sets are different for northern and southern summer. Although long horizontal scale waves are only part of the full spectrum of convective GWs, the momentum flux of these waves are found to be significant and relevant for the driving of the QBO. The zonal momentum balance is considered in vertical cross sections of GW momentum flux (GWMF) and GW drag (GWD). Global maps of the horizontal distribution of GWMF are considered and consistency between simulated results and HIRDLS observations is found. The latitude dependence of the zonal phase speed spectrum of GWMF and its change with altitude is discussed.

  6. Frequency variations of gravity waves interacting with a time-varying tide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, C.M.; Zhang, S.D.; Yi, F.; Huang, K.M.; Gan, Q.; Gong, Y. [Wuhan Univ., Hubei (China). School of Electronic Information; Ministry of Education, Wuhan, Hubei (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment and Geodesy; State Observatory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zhang, Y.H. [Nanjing Univ. of Information Science and Technology (China). College of Hydrometeorolgy

    2013-11-01

    Using a nonlinear, 2-D time-dependent numerical model, we simulate the propagation of gravity waves (GWs) in a time-varying tide. Our simulations show that when aGW packet propagates in a time-varying tidal-wind environment, not only its intrinsic frequency but also its ground-based frequency would change significantly. The tidal horizontal-wind acceleration dominates the GW frequency variation. Positive (negative) accelerations induce frequency increases (decreases) with time. More interestingly, tidal-wind acceleration near the critical layers always causes the GW frequency to increase, which may partially explain the observations that high-frequency GW components are more dominant in the middle and upper atmosphere than in the lower atmosphere. The combination of the increased ground-based frequency of propagating GWs in a time-varying tidal-wind field and the transient nature of the critical layer induced by a time-varying tidal zonal wind creates favorable conditions for GWs to penetrate their originally expected critical layers. Consequently, GWs have an impact on the background atmosphere at much higher altitudes than expected, which indicates that the dynamical effects of tidal-GW interactions are more complicated than usually taken into account by GW parameterizations in global models.

  7. Seasonal variations in lower stratospheric gravity wave energy above the Falkland Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat-Griffin, T.; Jarvis, M. J.; Colwell, S. R.; Kavanagh, A. J.; Manney, G. L.; Daffer, W. H.

    2013-10-01

    gravity wavefield in the lower stratosphere (between 15 km and 22 km altitude) above Mount Pleasant Airport (51°49'S, 58°26'W) on the Falkland Islands is studied using over 2100 high-resolution radiosonde soundings from 2002 to 2010. The seasonal variation in vertical direction of propagation shows a small decrease in numbers of upward propagating waves that is related to critical level filtering; however, there is a very large increase in numbers of downward propagating waves between July and September; this is attributed to the proximity of the edge of the polar vortex. There is a seasonal variation in gravity wave energy density, with a large peak during the austral autumn equinox; this is markedly different to results in the literature both from Rothera, on the Antarctic Peninsula, and stations on the main Antarctic continent. This seasonal pattern has been shown to be linked to variations in the sources of upward propagating gravity waves. The seasonal variation in gravity wave characteristics above Mount Pleasant Airport seen in our results suggests that the gravity wavefield in this region is determined by a combination of different gravity wave sources located above and below the lower stratosphere.

  8. An investigation of the modulation of capillary and short gravity waves in the open ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D. D.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the modulation of capillary and gravity waves by long ocean waves is described. A pressure transducer is used to obtain water surface displacements, and a high-response laser-optical system is used to detect short-wave slopes. Analytical techniques are developed to account for the orbital motion of long waves. The local mean squared wave slope is found to be maximum leeward of the long-wave crests. For the long waves studied here and for short waves from 1 cm to 1 m, the longer a short-wave component is, the more leeward its maximum tends to occur. Also, the shortest waves tend to modulate least. The modulation of short waves is found to be strong enough to be an important component of the synthetic aperture radar image formation mechanism for long ocean waves.

  9. The global distribution of gravity wave energy in the lower stratosphere derived from GPS data and gravity wave modelling: Attempt and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, K.; Schmidt, T.; Ern, M.; Preusse, P.; de La Torre, A.; Wickert, J.; Jacobi, Ch.

    2007-12-01

    Five years of global temperatures retrieved from radio occultations measured by Champ (Challenging Minisatellite Payload) and SAC-C (Satelite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C) are analyzed for gravity waves (GWs). In order to separate GWs from other atmospheric variations, a high-pass filter was applied on the vertical profile. Resulting temperature fluctuations correspond to vertical wavelengths between 400 m (instrumental resolution) and 10 km (limit of the high-pass filter). The temperature fluctuations can be converted into GW potential energy, but for comparison with parameterization schemes GW momentum flux is required. We therefore used representative values for the vertical and horizontal wavelength to infer GW momentum flux from the GPS measurements. The vertical wavelength value is determined by high-pass filtering, the horizontal wavelength is adopted from a latitude-dependent climatology. The obtained momentum flux distributions agree well, both in global distribution and in absolute values, with simulations using the Warner and McIntyre parameterization (WM) scheme. However, discrepancies are found in the annual cycle. Online simulations, implementing the WM scheme in the mechanistic COMMA-LIM (Cologne Model of the Middle Atmosphere—Leipzig Institute for Meteorology) general circulation model (GCM), do not converge, demonstrating that a good representation of GWs in a GCM requires both a realistic launch distribution and an adequate representation of GW breaking and momentum transfer.

  10. Magneto-atmospheric waves from a localized source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, J. A.; Thomas, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    A technique developed by Lighthill (1960, 1965, and 1967) for finding the asymptotic solution of an inhomogeneous wave equation with constant coefficients is applied to the study of wave propagation in magneto-atmospheres. The geometry of the wavenumber surface plays an important role in determining the generation and propagation of various types of magneto-atmospheric waves from a localized forcing region. Examples of these wavenumber surfaces are exhibited for various magnetic-field strengths and wave frequencies. The asymptotic far field is tabulated for a time-harmonic spatially Gaussian localized forcing term.

  11. Wavemaker theories for acoustic-gravity waves over a finite depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Miao; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (hereafter AGWs) in ocean have received much interest recently, mainly with respect to early detection of tsunamis as they travel at near the speed of sound in water which makes them ideal candidates for early detection of tsunamis. While the generation mechanisms of AGWs have been studied from the perspective of vertical oscillations of seafloor (Yamamoto, 1982; Stiassnie, 2010) and triad wave-wave interaction (Longuet-Higgins 1950; Kadri and Stiassnie 2013; Kadri and Akylas 2016), in the current study we are interested in their generation by wave-structure interaction with possible application to the energy sector. Here, we develop two wavemaker theories to analyze different wave modes generated by impermeable (the classic Havelock's theory) and porous (porous wavemaker theory) plates in weakly compressible fluids. Slight modification has been made to the porous theory so that, unlike the previous theory (Chwang, 1983), the new solution depends on the geometry of the plate. The expressions for three different types of plates (piston, flap, delta-function) are introduced. Analytical solutions are also derived for the potential amplitude of the gravity, evanescent, and acoustic-gravity waves, as well as the surface elevation, velocity distribution, and pressure for AGWs. Both theories reduce to previous results for incompressible flow when the compressibility is negligible. We also show numerical examples for AGW generated in a wave flume as well as in deep ocean. Our current study sets the theoretical background towards remote sensing by AGWs, for optimized deep ocean wave-power harnessing, among others. References Chwang, A.T. 1983 A porous-wavemaker theory. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 132, 395- 406. Kadri, U., Stiassnie, M. 2013 Generation of an acoustic-gravity wave by two gravity waves, and their subsequent mutual interaction. J. Fluid Mech. 735, R6. Kadri U., Akylas T.R. 2016 On resonant triad interactions of acoustic-gravity waves. J

  12. Some experimental constraints for spectral parameters used in the Warner and McIntyre gravity wave parameterization scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ern

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to incorporate the effect of gravity waves (GWs on the atmospheric circulation most global circulation models (GCMs employ gravity wave parameterization schemes. To date, GW parameterization schemes in GCMs are used without experimental validation of the set of global parameters assumed for the GW launch spectrum. This paper focuses on the Warner and McIntyre GW parameterization scheme. Ranges of parameters compatible with absolute values of gravity wave momentum flux (GW-MF derived from CRISTA-1 and CRISTA-2 satellite measurements are deduced for several of the parameters and the limitations of both model and measurements are discussed. The findings presented in this paper show that the initial guess of spectral parameters provided by Warner and McIntyre (2001 are some kind of compromise with respect to agreement of absolute values and agreement of the horizontal structures found in both measurements and model results. Better agreement can be achieved by using a vertical wavenumber launch spectrum with a wider saturated spectral range and reduced spectral power in the unsaturated part. Still, even global features of the measurements remain unmatched, and it is inevitable to provide a globally varying source distribution in future.

  13. Extracting Synoptic-Scale Diagnostic Information from Mesoscale Models: The Eta Model, Gravity Waves, and Quasigeostrophic Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Stanley L.; Caracena, Fernando; Marroquin, Adrian

    1996-03-01

    Fine-mesh models, such as the eta model, are producing increasingly detailed predictions about mesoscale atmospheric motions. Mesoscale systems typically produce stronger vertical motions than do synoptic-scale storms, making it more difficult for forecasters to assess the strength of the latter's dynamics when the signals are overwhelmed by mesoscale processes. This paper describes a method for extracting synoptic-scale information from mesoscale model data. Predicted height fields from the 29-km eta model are investigated to determine the filtering and smoothing requirements necessary to resolve synoptic-scale patterns of vertical motions using quasigeostrophic (QG) diagnostics. The selected late-fall case includes a jet stream that enters the continent over the Pacific Northwest, resulting in orographically induced troughs in the lee of the Cascade Range and Rocky Mountains. Gravity waves are found to emanate from this region in arcs that reach Hudson Bay to the northeast and extend to the Caribbean in the southeast. Individual gravity wave crests (240 km apart) are of sufficient amplitude (5 to 10 m at 500 mb) to dominate the expected synoptic-scale vertical motions by two orders of magnitude. A numerical filter based on a two-dimensional diffraction function is designed, tested, and found to eliminate the influence of the gravity waves effectively. The filtered model data are then able to reveal synoptic-scale vertical motion patterns in all areas except the vicinity of the lee troughs, which still dominate QG forcing near the jet axis.

  14. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. II. LAMB, SURFACE, AND CENTRIFUGAL WAVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the second in a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases where the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this second part, we study the waves' solutions when several atmospheric approximations are applied: Lamb, surface, and centrifugal waves. Lamb and surface waves are found to be quite similar to those in a geostrophic regime. By contrast, centrifugal waves turn out to be a special case of Rossby waves that arise in atmospheres in cyclostrophic balance. Finally, we use our results to identify the nature of the waves behind atmospheric periodicities found in polar and lower latitudes of Venus's atmosphere

  15. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. II. LAMB, SURFACE, AND CENTRIFUGAL WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía, 18008 Granada (Spain); Imamura, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Read, P. L. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Luz, D. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa (CAAUL), Observatório Astronómico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisboa (Portugal); Piccialli, A., E-mail: peralta@iaa.es [LATMOS, UVSQ, 11 bd dAlembert, 78280 Guyancourt (France)

    2014-07-01

    This paper is the second in a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases where the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this second part, we study the waves' solutions when several atmospheric approximations are applied: Lamb, surface, and centrifugal waves. Lamb and surface waves are found to be quite similar to those in a geostrophic regime. By contrast, centrifugal waves turn out to be a special case of Rossby waves that arise in atmospheres in cyclostrophic balance. Finally, we use our results to identify the nature of the waves behind atmospheric periodicities found in polar and lower latitudes of Venus's atmosphere.

  16. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency (ν/ω) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption ν/ω = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary ν/ω. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance

  17. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2007-04-01

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency (ν/ω) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption ν/ω = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary ν/ω. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance.

  18. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pencheva, M [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Benova, E [Department for Language Teaching and International Students, Sofia University, 27 Kosta Loulchev Street, BG-1111 Sofia (Bulgaria); Zhelyazkov, I [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2007-04-15

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency ({nu}/{omega}) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption {nu}/{omega} = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary {nu}/{omega}. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance.

  19. Linear surface capillary-gravity short-crested waves on a current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hu

    2008-01-01

    One of the forward situations in the study of water waves is the basic three-dimensional surface wave motion of short-crested waves. Capillary waves result in rich effects concerned closely with remote sensing in the open ocean. Ocean currents experience a complete process in surface wave motion. Based on the above ideas, a linear dynamical system of surface capillary-gravity short-crested waves is developed by considering the current effects, thus leading to the following analytical expressions of the kinematic and dynamic variables: the wave height, the wave steepness, the phase velocity, the wave-particle velocities, accelerations and trajectories and the wave pressure. A number of the classi-cal, typical and latest special wave cases can arise from these expressions.

  20. Numerical modeling study of the momentum deposition of small amplitude gravity waves in the thermosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Henan Normal Univ., Xinxiang (China). College of Mathematics and Information Science; Xu, J. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Yue, J. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States). High Altitude Observatory; Hampton Univ., VA (United States). Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences; Vadas, S.L. [North West Research Associates, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    2013-03-01

    We study the momentum deposition in the thermosphere from the dissipation of small amplitude gravity waves (GWs) within a wave packet using a fully nonlinear two-dimensional compressible numerical model. The model solves the nonlinear propagation and dissipation of a GW packet from the stratosphere into the thermosphere with realistic molecular viscosity and thermal diffusivity for various Prandtl numbers. The numerical simulations are performed for GW packets with initial vertical wavelengths ({lambda}{sub z}) ranging from 5 to 50 km. We show that {lambda}{sub z} decreases in time as a GW packet dissipates in the thermosphere, in agreement with the ray trace results of Vadas and Fritts (2005) (VF05). We also find good agreement for the peak height of the momentum flux (z{sub diss}) between our simulations and VF05 for GWs with initial {lambda}{sub z} {<=} 2{pi}H in an isothermal, windless background, where H is the density scale height.We also confirm that z{sub diss} increases with increasing Prandtl number. We include eddy diffusion in the model, and find that the momentum deposition occurs at lower altitudes and has two separate peaks for GW packets with small initial {lambda}{sub z}. We also simulate GW packets in a non-isothermal atmosphere. The net {lambda}{sub z} profile is a competition between its decrease from viscosity and its increase from the increasing background temperature. We find that the wave packet disperses more in the non-isothermal atmosphere, and causes changes to the momentum flux and {lambda}{sub z} spectra at both early and late times for GW packets with initial {lambda}{sub z} {>=} 10 km. These effects are caused by the increase in T in the thermosphere, and the decrease in T near the mesopause. (orig.)

  1. Asymmetric gravity-capillary solitary waves on deep water

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Wang; Vanden-Broeck, J-M; Milewski, P. A.

    2014-01-01

    We present new families of gravity–capillary solitary waves propagating on the surface of a two-dimensional deep fluid. These spatially localised travelling-wave solutions are non-symmetric in the wave propagation direction. Our computation reveals that these waves appear from a spontaneous symmetry-breaking bifurcation, and connect two branches of multi-packet symmetric solitary waves. The speed–energy bifurcation curve of asymmetric solitary waves features a zigzag behaviour with one or mor...

  2. Submillimeter-Wave Spectroscopic Instruments: Multi-functional Atmospheric Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, I.; Gulkis, S.; Allen, M. A.; Schlecht, E.; Chattopadhyay, G.

    2012-10-01

    Submillimeter-wave spectroscopic instruments provide unique capability in terms of providing quantitative measurements of trace gas compositions in planetary atmospheres. Such instruments also provide temporal and wind velocity mapping capability.

  3. Satellite Detection of Orographic Gravity-wave Activity in the Winter Subtropical Stratosphere over Australia and Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckermann, S. D.; Wu, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    Orographic gravity-wave (OGW) parameterizations in models produce waves over subtropical mountain ranges in Australia and Africa that propagate into the stratosphere during austral winter and deposit momentum, affecting weather and climate. Satellite sensors have measured stratospheric GWs for over a decade, yet find no evidence of these waves. So are parameterizations failing here? Here we argue that the short wavelengths of subtropical OGWs place them near or below the detection limits of satellite sensors. To test this hypothesis, we reanalyze nine years of stratospheric radiances from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite during austral winter, applying new averaging techniques to maximize signal-to-noise and improve thresholds for OGW detection. Deep climatological enhancements in stratospheric OGW variance over specific mountain ranges in Australia and southern Africa are revealed for the first time, which exhibit temporal and vertical variations consistent with predicted OGW responses to varying background winds.

  4. Meteotsunamis: atmospherically induced destructive ocean waves in the tsunami frequency band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Monserrat

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In light of the recent enhanced activity in the study of tsunami waves and their source mechanisms, we consider tsunami-like waves that are induced by atmospheric processes rather than by seismic sources. These waves are mainly associated with atmospheric gravity waves, pressure jumps, frontal passages, squalls and other types of atmospheric disturbances, which normally generate barotropic ocean waves in the open ocean and amplify them near the coast through specific resonance mechanisms (Proudman, Greenspan, shelf, harbour. The main purpose of the present study is to describe this hazardous phenomenon, to show similarities and differences between seismic and meteorological tsunamis and to provide an overview of meteorological tsunamis in the World Ocean. It is shown that tsunamis and meteotsunamis have the same periods, same spatial scales, similar physical properties and affect the coast in a comparably destructive way. Some specific features of meteotsunamis make them akin to landslide-generated tsunamis. The generation efficiency of both phenomena depend on the Froude number (Fr, with resonance taking place when Fr~1.0. Meteotsunamis are much less energetic than seismic tsunamis and that is why they are always local, while seismic tsunamis can have globally destructive effects. Destructive meteotsunamis are always the result of a combination of several resonant factors; the low probability of such a combination is the main reason why major meteotsunamis are infrequent and observed only at some specific locations in the ocean.

  5. Stochastic Background of Gravitational Waves as a Benchmark for Extended Theories of Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Capozziello, S.; De Laurentis, M.; Francaviglia, M.

    2008-01-01

    The cosmological background of gravitational waves can be tuned by Extended Theories of Gravity. In particular, it can be shown that assuming a generic function f(R) of the Ricci scalar R gives a parametric approach to control the evolution and the production mechanism of gravitational waves in the early Universe.

  6. Gravity waves and infrasound in the ionosphere from multi-point Doppler sounding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chum, Jaroslav; Baše, Jiří; Hruška, František; Laštovička, Jan; Šindelářová, Tereza

    New York: AGU, 2012. ST18-A002. ISBN 978-981-07-2049-0 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1253 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Ionosphere * Infrasound * Remote sensing * Gravity waves * Wave propagation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  7. Stochastic background of gravitational waves "tuned" by $f(R)$ gravity

    OpenAIRE

    De Laurentis, M.; Capozziello, S; Izzo, L.

    2009-01-01

    The cosmological background of gravitational waves can be tuned by Extended Theories of Gravity. In particular, it can be shown that assuming a generic function $f(R)$ of the Ricci scalar $R$ gives a parametric approach to control the evolution and the production mechanism of gravitational waves in the early Universe.

  8. Simulation and Observation of Acoustic-Gravity Waves in the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunitsyn, Viacheslav; Andreeva, Elena; Krysanov, Boris; Nesterov, Ivan

    Atmospheric and ionospheric perturbations associated with the acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) with typical frequencies of a few hertz -millihertz are considered. These events may be caused by the influence from space and atmosphere as well as by oscillations of the Earth surface and other near-surface phenomena. The surface sources include long-period oscillations of the Earth's surface, earthquakes, explosions, thermal heating, seisches and tsunami waves. The wavelike phenomena manifest themself as travelling disturbances of air (in the atmosphere) and of electron density (in the ionosphere). Travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) are well detected by radio physical methods. AGW generation by near-surface sources is modeled by the numerical solution of the equation of geophysical fluid dynamics for different sources in two-dimensional non-linear dissipative compressible atmosphere. The numerical calculations are based on the FCT (Flux Corrected Transport) technique of the second order accuracy in time and space. Different scenarios of AGW generation are analyzed. The AGW caused by the surface sources within a few hertz-millihertz frequency band appear at the altitudes of middle atmosphere and ionosphere as the disturbances with typical scales from a few kilometers to several hundreds kilometers. Such structures can be successfully monitored by the methods of satellite radio tomography (RT). For the purposes of RT diagnostics of such disturbances, low-orbiting navigational satellites like Transit and Tsikada and high-orbiting navigation systems GPS/GLONASS are used. The results of numerical modeling of AGW generation by the surface sources are compared with the data of RT sounding. Also, generation of AGW by volumetric sources such as particle precipitation, rocket launching, heating by high-frequency radiation and other are considered. The obtained results proved the capability of RT methods of detecting and distinguishing between TIDs caused by AGW generated by

  9. A solution of nonlinear equation for the gravity wave spectra from Adomian decomposition method: a first approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gledson Goulart

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the equation for the gravity wave spectra in mean atmosphere is analytically solved without linearization by the Adomian decomposition method. As a consequence, the nonlinear nature of problem is preserved and the errors found in the results are only due to the parameterization. The results, with the parameterization applied in the simulations, indicate that the linear solution of the equation is a good approximation only for heights shorter than ten kilometers, because the linearization the equation leads to a solution that does not correctly describe the kinetic energy spectra.

  10. The southern stratospheric gravity-wave hot spot: individual waves and their momentum fluxes measured by COSMIC GPS-RO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Hindley

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available During austral winter the mountains of the southern Andes and Antarctic Peninsula are a known hot spot of intense gravity wave momentum flux. There also exists a long leeward region of increased gravity wave energy that sweeps eastwards from the mountains out over the Southern Ocean, the source of which has historically proved difficult to determine. In this study we use Global Positioning System (GPS Radio Occultation (RO data from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC satellite constellation to investigate the distribution, variability and sources of waves in the hot spot region and over the Southern Ocean. We present evidence that suggests a southward focusing of waves into the stratospheric jet from sources to the north. We also describe a wavelet analysis technique for the quantitative identification of individual waves from COSMIC temperature profiles. This analysis reveals different geographical regimes of wave amplitude and short-timescale variability in the wave field over the Southern Ocean. Finally, we take advantage of the large numbers of closely spaced pairs of profiles from the deployment phase of the COSMIC constellation in 2006 to make estimates of gravity wave horizontal wavelengths. We show that, given sufficient numbers of these pairs, GPS-RO can then produce physically reasonable estimates of stratospheric gravity wave momentum flux in the hot spot region that are consistent with other studies. The results are discussed in the context of previous satellite and modelling studies to build up a better picture of the nature and origins of waves in the southern winter stratosphere.

  11. View-Angle Dependent AIRS Cloud Radiances: Implication for Tropical Gravity Waves and Anvil Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.; Gong, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Tropical anvil clouds play important roles in redistributing energy, water in the troposphere. Interacting with dynamics at a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, they can become organized internally and form structured cells, transporting momentum vertically and laterally. To quantify small-scale structures inside cirrus and anvils, we study view-dependence of the cloud-induced radiance from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) using channels near CO2 absorption line. The analysis of tropical eight-year (30degS-30degN, 2003-2010) data suggests that AIRS east-views observe 10% more anvil clouds than westviews during day (13:30 LST), whereas east-views and westviews observe equally amount of clouds at midnight (1 :30 LST). For entire tropical averages, AIRS oblique views observe more anvils than the nadir views, while the opposite is true for deep convective clouds. The dominance of cloudiness in the east-view cannot be explained by AIRS sampling and cloud microphysical differences. Tilted and banded anvil structures from convective scale to mesoscale are likely the cause of the observed view-dependent cloudiness, and gravity wave-cloud interaction is a plausible explanation for the observed structures. Effects of the tilted and banded cloud features need to be further evaluated and taken into account potentially in large-scale model parameterizations because of the vertical momentum transport through cloud wave breaking.

  12. Atom Interferometry for detection of Gravity Waves-a Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atom interferometers are more sensitive to inertial effects. This is because atoms in their inertial frame are ideal test masses for detection of gravity effects...

  13. Conservation laws of wave action and potential enstrophy for Rossby waves in a stratified atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of wave energy, enstrophy, and wave motion for atmospheric Rossby waves in a variable mean flow are discussed from a theoretical and pedagogic standpoint. In the absence of mean flow gradients, the wave energy density satisfies a local conservation law, with the appropriate flow velocity being the group velocity. In the presence of mean flow variations, wave energy is not conserved, but wave action is, provided the mean flow is independent of longitude. Wave enstrophy is conserved for arbitrary variations of the mean flow. Connections with Eliassen-Palm flux are also discussed.

  14. Observations of gravity wave forcing of themesopause region during the January 2013 major Sudden Stratospheric Warming

    CERN Document Server

    deWit, R J; Espy, P J; Orsolini, Y J; Limpasuvan, V; Kinnison, D E

    2016-01-01

    Studies of vertical and interhemispheric coupling during Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) suggest that gravity wave (GW) momentum flux divergence plays a key role in forcing the middle atmosphere, although observational validation of GW forcing is limited. We present a whole atmosphere view of zonal winds from the surface to 100 km during the January 2013 major SSW, together with observed GW momentum fluxes in the mesopause region derived from uninterrupted high-resolution meteor radar observations from an All-Sky Interferometric Meteor Radar system located at Trondheim, Norway (63.4 $^{\\circ}$N, 10.5 $^{\\circ}$E). Observations show GW momentum flux divergence 6 days prior to the SSW onset, producing an eastward forcing with peak values of $\\sim$+145 $\\pm$ 60m $s^{-1}$ $d^{-1}$. As the SSW evolves, GW forcing turns westward, reaching a minimum of $\\sim$-240 $\\pm$ 70 m $s^{-1}$ $d^{-1}$ $\\sim$+18 days after the SSW onset. These results are discussed in light of previous studies and simulations using the Wh...

  15. Atmospheric boundary layer over steep surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil A.; Druzhinin, Oleg; Kandaurov, Alexander A.; Ermakova, Olga S.; Ezhova, Ekaterina V.; Esau, Igor; Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2014-08-01

    Turbulent air-sea interactions coupled with the surface wave dynamics remain a challenging problem. The needs to include this kind of interaction into the coupled environmental, weather and climate models motivate the development of a simplified approximation of the complex and strongly nonlinear interaction processes. This study proposes a quasi-linear model of wind-wave coupling. It formulates the approach and derives the model equations. The model is verified through a set of laboratory (direct measurements of an airflow by the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique) and numerical (a direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique) experiments. The experiments support the central model assumption that the flow velocity field averaged over an ensemble of turbulent fluctuations is smooth and does not demonstrate flow separation from the crests of the waves. The proposed quasi-linear model correctly recovers the measured characteristics of the turbulent boundary layer over the waved water surface.

  16. Investigation of acoustic gravity waves created by anomalous heat sources: experiments and theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradipta, R.; Lee, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    We have been investigating high-power radio wave-induced acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) at Gakona, Alaska, using the High-frequency Active Aurora Research Program (HAARP) heating facility (i.e. HF heater) and extensive diagnostic instruments. This work was aimed at performing a controlled study of the space plasma turbulence triggered by the AGWs originating from anomalous heat sources, as observed in our earlier experiments at Arecibo, Puerto Rico (Pradipta 2007 MS Thesis MIT Press, Cambridge, MA). The HF heater operated in continuous wave (CW) O-mode can heat ionospheric plasmas effectively to yield a depleted magnetic flux tube as rising plasma bubbles (Lee et al 1998 Geophys. Res. Lett. 25 579). Two processes are responsible for the depletion of the magnetic flux tube: (i) thermal expansion and (ii) chemical reactions caused by heated ions. The depleted plasmas create large density gradients that can augment spread F processes via generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (Lee et al 1999 Geophys. Res. Lett. 26 37). It is thus expected that the temperature of neutral particles in the heated ionospheric region can be increased. Such a heat source in the neutral atmosphere may potentially generate AGWs in the form of traveling ionospheric plasma disturbances (TIPDs). We should point out that these TIPDs have features distinctively different from electric and magnetic field (ExB) drifts of HF wave-induced large-scale non-propagating plasma structures. Moreover, it was noted in our recent study of naturally occurring AGW-induced TIDs that only large-scale AGWs can propagate upward to reach higher altitudes. Thus, in our Gakona experiments we select optimum heating schemes for HF wave-induced AGWs that can be distinguished from the naturally occurring ones. The generation and propagation of AGWs are monitored by MUIR (Modular Ultra high-frequency Ionospheric Radar), Digisonde and GPS/low-earth-orbit satellites. Our theoretical and experimental studies have shown that

  17. Investigation of acoustic gravity waves created by anomalous heat sources: experiments and theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been investigating high-power radio wave-induced acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) at Gakona, Alaska, using the High-frequency Active Aurora Research Program (HAARP) heating facility (i.e. HF heater) and extensive diagnostic instruments. This work was aimed at performing a controlled study of the space plasma turbulence triggered by the AGWs originating from anomalous heat sources, as observed in our earlier experiments at Arecibo, Puerto Rico (Pradipta 2007 MS Thesis MIT Press, Cambridge, MA). The HF heater operated in continuous wave (CW) O-mode can heat ionospheric plasmas effectively to yield a depleted magnetic flux tube as rising plasma bubbles (Lee et al 1998 Geophys. Res. Lett. 25 579). Two processes are responsible for the depletion of the magnetic flux tube: (i) thermal expansion and (ii) chemical reactions caused by heated ions. The depleted plasmas create large density gradients that can augment spread F processes via generalized Rayleigh–Taylor instabilities (Lee et al 1999 Geophys. Res. Lett. 26 37). It is thus expected that the temperature of neutral particles in the heated ionospheric region can be increased. Such a heat source in the neutral atmosphere may potentially generate AGWs in the form of traveling ionospheric plasma disturbances (TIPDs). We should point out that these TIPDs have features distinctively different from electric and magnetic field (ExB) drifts of HF wave-induced large-scale non-propagating plasma structures. Moreover, it was noted in our recent study of naturally occurring AGW-induced TIDs that only large-scale AGWs can propagate upward to reach higher altitudes. Thus, in our Gakona experiments we select optimum heating schemes for HF wave-induced AGWs that can be distinguished from the naturally occurring ones. The generation and propagation of AGWs are monitored by MUIR (Modular Ultra high-frequency Ionospheric Radar), Digisonde and GPS/low-earth-orbit satellites. Our theoretical and experimental studies have shown

  18. Turbulent flow over the wind-induced gravity waves in rectangular duct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow developed over the gravity waves are studied experimentally in rectangular duct. The focus is brought into the secondary flow effect on the mean and turbulence intensity distributions. It is found that the secondary flow is significantly excited by the wave motions and its effect reaches to the area far from the interface. The interaction between the flow and the wave motions are analyzed by the correlation coefficient and the conditional sampling procedures. (author)

  19. Hydrodynamic coefficients of a simplified floating system of gravity cage in waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-wen WU; Fu-kun GUI; Yu-cheng LI; Wei-huan FANG

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulation and experimental tests were carried out to examine the hydrodynamic behaviors of a double-column floating system of gravity cage under wave conditions. A floating system of gravity cage can be treated as a small-sized floating structure when compared with the wavelengths. The main problem in calculating the wave loads on the small-sized floating structure is to obtain the reasonable force coefficients, which may differ from a submerged structure. In this paper, the floating system of gravity cage is simplified to a 2D problem, where the floating system is set symmetrically under wave conditions. The motion equations were deduced under wave conditions and a specific method was proposed to resolve the problem of wave forces acting on a small-sized floating system of gravity cage at water surface. Results of the numerical method were compared with those from model tests and the hydrodynamic coefficients Cn and C?were studied. It is found that Cn ranges from 0.6 to 1.0 while C?is between 0.4 and 0.6 in this study. The results are useful for research on the hydrodynamic behavior of the deep-water gravity sea cages.

  20. Thermal effect on gravity waves in a compressible liquid layer over a solid half-space under initial hydrostatic stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushil Kumar Addy; Nil Ratan Chakraborty

    2005-02-01

    This paper deals with the effect of temperature on gravity waves in a compressible liquid layer over a solid half-space. It has been assumed that the liquid layer is under the action of gravity, while the solid half-space is under the influence of initial compressive hydrostatic stress. When the temperature of the half-space is altered, gravity waves propagate through the liquid layer along with sub-oceanic Rayleigh waves in the system. A new frequency equation has been derived here for gravity waves and sub-oceanic Rayleigh waves. It has been shown graphically that the phase velocity of gravity waves is influenced significantly by the initial compressive hydrostatic stress present in the solid half-space, for a particular value of the phase velocity of sub-oceanic Rayleigh waves and different coupling co-efficients of the temperature.

  1. Effects of eddy viscosity and thermal conduction and Coriolis force in the dynamics of gravity wave driven fluctuations in the OH nightglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, Walterscheid et al. (1987) have described a dynamical-chemical model of wave-driven fluctuations in the OH nightglow which incorporated a five-reaction photochemical scheme and the dynamics of linearized acoustic-gravity waves in an isothermal, motionless atmosphere. The intensity oscillation (δI) about the time-averaged intensity (I0) and the temperature oscillation (δT) about the time-averaged temperature (T0) were related by means of the complex ratio η triple-bond (δI/I0)/(δT/T0). One of the main conclusions of their work was that the inclusion of dynamical effects is absolutely essential for a valid assessment of η at any wave period. In this paper the model of Walterscheid et al. (1987) is modified to include in the gravity wave dynamics the effects of eddy viscosity, eddy thermal conduction, and Coriolis force (with the shallow atmosphere approximation), and calculations are performed for the same nominal case as used by these previous authors (i.e., λx = 100 km and atmospheric conditions pertinent to 83 km altitude), but only gravity wave periods are considered. It is found that for wave periods greater than some 2 or 3 hours the value of η is greatly modified by the inclusion of eddy thermal conduction. Although when acting alone the eddy viscosity is relatively unimportant, it significantly modifies the results when acting in conjunction with the eddy thermal conduction. The inclusion of the Coriolis force is found to be insignificant at any wave period. Although it is for the longest-period waves that the values of η are most modified by the inclusion of dissipation, this dissipation may be severe enough to place an observational constraint on such waves

  2. Buoyancy Wave Interaction with Critical Levels in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rõõm, Rein; Zirk, Marko

    2013-04-01

    General non-linear internal buoyancy wave equation (BWE) is developed, which has the second (differential) order in space but the third order in time. The wave operator splitting method is then applied to the stationary BWE to get the orographically generated buoyancy waves in the thermally stratified atmosphere for altitude-variable wind conditions. The splitting method is further generalized to a critical level (CL) containing atmosphere. The CLs, which appear in the atmosphere (including the planetary boundary layer) if the wind weakens and changes direction or rotates with the altitude, will provide a break-up of the atmosphere to the regular (for BWE) layers separated by singular critical levels at which the differential order of the BWE is lowered. This lowering will cause either partial or full reflection of waves, though in the special fast wind altering case, the CL can prove transparent, too. The wave modelling examples for different CLs are provided. Classification of the wind situations with respect to the various reflection-transparency types of CL is vital for wave stress (vertical flux of mean horizontal momentum) and upper-level wave breaking study. ------------------------------------------------------------------ This research is supported by Estonian Science Foundation Grant 9134 and Estonian Research Council TF Project SF0180038s08.

  3. Current effects on scattering of surface gravity waves by bottom topography

    CERN Document Server

    Magne, R; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Magne, Rudy

    2005-01-01

    Scattering of random surface gravity waves by small amplitude topography in the presence of a uniform current is investigated theoretically. This problem is relevant to ocean waves propagation on shallow continental shelves where tidal currents are often significant. A perturbation expansion of the wave action to second order in powers of the bottom amplitude yields an evolution equation for the wave action spectrum. A scattering source term gives the rate of exchange of the wave action spectrum between wave components, with conservation of the total action at each absolute frequency. With and without current, the scattering term yields reflection coefficients for the amplitudes of waves that converge, in the limit of small bottom amplitudes and small Froude numbers, to the results of previous theories for monochromatic waves propagating in one dimension over sinusoidal bars. Over sandy continental shelves, tidal currents are known to generate sandwaves with scales comparable to those of surface waves. Applic...

  4. A Parabolic Equation Approach to Modeling Acousto-Gravity Waves for Local Helioseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bene, Kevin; Lingevitch, Joseph; Doschek, George

    2016-07-01

    A wide-angle parabolic-wave-equation algorithm is developed and validated for local-helioseismic wave propagation. The parabolic equation is derived from a factorization of the linearized acousto-gravity wave equation. We apply the parabolic-wave equation to modeling acoustic propagation in a plane-parallel waveguide with physical properties derived from helioseismic data. The wavenumber power spectrum and wave-packet arrival-time structure for receivers in the photosphere with separation up to 30° is computed, and good agreement is demonstrated with measured values and a reference spectral model.

  5. A Parabolic Equation Approach to Modeling Acousto-Gravity Waves for Local Helioseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bene, Kevin; Lingevitch, Joseph; Doschek, George

    2016-08-01

    A wide-angle parabolic-wave-equation algorithm is developed and validated for local-helioseismic wave propagation. The parabolic equation is derived from a factorization of the linearized acousto-gravity wave equation. We apply the parabolic-wave equation to modeling acoustic propagation in a plane-parallel waveguide with physical properties derived from helioseismic data. The wavenumber power spectrum and wave-packet arrival-time structure for receivers in the photosphere with separation up to 30° is computed, and good agreement is demonstrated with measured values and a reference spectral model.

  6. Interaction of acoustic-gravity waves with an elastic shelf-break

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Miao; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    In contrast to surface gravity waves that induce flow field which decays exponentially with depth, acoustic-gravity waves oscillate throughout the water column. Their oscillatory profile exerts stresses to the ground which provides a natural explanation for the earth's microseism (Longuet-Higgins, 1950). This work is an extension of the shelf-break problem by Kadri and Stiassnie (2012) who considered the sea floor and the shelf-break to be rigid, and the elastic problem by Eyov et al. (2013) who illustrated the importance of the sea-floor elasticity. In this study we formulate and solve the two-dimensional problem of an incident acoustic-gravity wave mode propagating over an elastic wall and interacting with a shelf-break in a weakly compressible fluid. As the modes approach the shelf-break, part of the energy is reflected whereas the other part is transmitted. A mathematical model is formulated by matching particular solutions for each subregion of constant depth along vertical boundaries; the resulting matrix equation is then solved numerically. The physical properties of these waves are studied, and compared with those for waves over a rigid bottom. The present work broadens our knowledge of acoustic-gravity-waves propagation in realistic environment and can potentially benefit the early detection of tsunami, generated from landslides or submarine earthquakes. References Eyov E., Klar A., Kadri U. , Stiassnie M. 2013 Progressive waves in a compressible-ocean with an elastic bottom. Wave Motion 50, 929-939. Kadri, U., and M. Stiassnie, 2012 Acoustic-Gravity waves interacting with the shelf break. J. Geophys. Res. 117, C03035. Longuet-Higgins, M.S. 1950 A theory of the origin of microseisms. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. A 243, 1-35.

  7. Tomographic retrieval approach for mesoscale gravity wave observations by the PREMIER Infrared Limb-Sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ungermann

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available PREMIER is one of three candidates for ESA's 7th Earth Explorer mission that are currently undergoing feasibility studies. The main mission objective of PREMIER is to quantify processes controlling atmospheric composition in the mid/upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, a region of particular importance for climate change. To achieve this objective, PREMIER will employ the first satellite Fourier transform infrared limb-imager with a 2-D detector array combined with a millimetre-wave limb-sounder. The infrared limb-imager can be operated in a high spatial resolution mode ("dynamics mode" for observations of small-scale structures in atmospheric temperatures and trace gas fields with unprecedented 3-D sampling (0.5 km in the vertical direction, 50 km along track, 25 km across track. In this paper, a fast tomographic retrieval scheme is presented, which is designed to fully exploit the high-resolution radiance observations of the dynamics mode. Based on a detailed analysis of the "observational filter", we show that the dynamics mode provides unique information on global distributions of gravity waves (GW. The achievable vertical resolution for GW observations has values between the vertical sampling (0.5 km of the dynamics mode and the vertical field of view (about 0.75 km. The horizontal across track resolution corresponds to the horizontal across track sampling of 25 km. Since the achievable along track horizontal resolution is about 70 km, the dynamics mode will provide GW limb-observations with a horizontal resolution comparable to nadir sounders. Compared to previous observations, PREMIER will therefore considerably extend the range of detectable GWs in terms of horizontal and vertical wavelength.

  8. Mesospheric Non-Migrating Tides Generated With Planetary Waves: II Influence of Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Talaat, E. L.; Porter, H. S.; Chan, K. L.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrated that, in our model, non-linear interactions between planetary waves (PW) and migrating tides could generate in the upper mesosphere non-migrating tides with amplitudes comparable to those observed. The Numerical Spectral Model (NSM) we employ incorporates Hines Doppler Spread Parameterization for small-scale gravity waves (GW), which affect in numerous ways the dynamics of the mesosphere. The latitudinal (seasonal) reversals in the temperature and zonal circulation, which are largely caused by GWs (Lindzen, 198l), filter the PWs and contribute to the instabilities that generate the PWs. The PWs in turn are amplified by the momentum deposition of upward propagating GWs, as are the migrating tides. The GWs thus affect significantly the migrating tides and PWs, the building blocks of non-migrating tides. In the present paper, we demonstrate that GW filtering also contributes to the non-linear coupling between PWs and tides. Two computer experiments are presented to make this point. In one, we simply turn off the GW source to show the effect. In the second case, we demonstrate the effect by selectively suppressing the momentum source for the m = 0 non-migrating tides.

  9. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Internal Gravity Waves Excited by Turbulent Penetrative Convection in Water Around Its Density Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrard, Stéphane; Le Bars, Michaël; Le Gal, Patrice

    This study is devoted to the experimental and numerical analysis of the excitation of gravity waves by turbulent convection. This situation is representative of many geophysical or astrophysical systems such as the convective bottom layer of the atmosphere that radiates internal waves in the stratosphere, or the interaction between the convective and the radiative zones in stars. In our experiments, we use water as a working fluid as it possesses the remarkable property of having a maximum density at 4 °C. Therefore, when establishing on a water layer a temperature gradient between 0 °C at the bottom and room temperature at the top, a turbulent convective region appears spontaneously under a stably stratified zone. In these conditions, gravity waves are excited by the convective fluid motions penetrating the stratified layer. Although this type of flow, called penetrative convection, has already been described, we present here the first velocity field measurement of wave emission and propagation. We show in particular that an intermediate layer that we call the buffer layer emerges between the convective and the stratified zones. In this buffer layer, the angle of propagation of the waves varies with the altitude since it is slaved to the Brunt-Väisälä frequency which evolves rapidly between the convective and the stratified layer. A minimum angle is reached at the end of the buffer layer. Then we observe that an angle of propagation is selected when the waves travel through the stratified layer. We expect this process of wave selection to take place in natural situations.

  10. A gravitational shock wave generated by a beam of null matter in quadratic gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work we approximate an ultrarelativistic jet by a homogeneous beam of null matter with finite width. Then, we study the influence of this beam over the spacetime metric in the framework of higher-derivative gravity. We find an exact shock wave solution of the quadratic gravity field equations and compare it with the solution to Einstein's gravity. We show that the effect of higher-curvature gravity becomes negligible at large distances from the beam axis. We also observe that only the Ricci-squared term contribute to modify the Einstein's gravity prediction. Furthermore, we note that this higher-curvature term contributes to regularize the discontinuities associated with the solution to Einstein's general relativity

  11. The Role of Gravity Waves in the Formation and Organization of Clouds during TWPICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeder, Michael J. [Monash University; Lane, Todd P. [University of Melbourne; Hankinson, Mai Chi Nguyen [Monash University

    2013-09-27

    All convective clouds emit gravity waves. While it is certain that convectively-generated waves play important parts in determining the climate, their precise roles remain uncertain and their effects are not (generally) represented in climate models. The work described here focuses mostly on observations and modeling of convectively-generated gravity waves, using the intensive observations from the DoE-sponsored Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which took place in Darwin, from 17 January to 13 February 2006. Among other things, the research has implications the part played by convectively-generated gravity waves in the formation of cirrus, in the initiation and organization of further convection, and in the subgrid-scale momentum transport and associated large-scale stresses imposed on the troposphere and stratosphere. The analysis shows two groups of inertia-gravity waves are detected: group L in the middle stratosphere during the suppressed monsoon period, and group S in the lower stratosphere during the monsoon break period. Waves belonging to group L propagate to the south-east with a mean intrinsic period of 35 h, and have vertical and horizontal wavelengths of about 5-6 km and 3000-6000 km, respectively. Ray tracing calculations indicate that these waves originate from a deep convective region near Indonesia. Waves belonging to group S propagate to the south-south-east with an intrinsic period, vertical wavelength and horizontal wavelength of about 45 h, 2 km and 2000-4000 km, respectively. These waves are shown to be associated with shallow convection in the oceanic area within about 1000 km of Darwin. The intrinsic periods of high-frequency waves are estimated to be between 20-40 minutes. The high-frequency wave activity in the stratosphere, defined by mass-weighted variance of the vertical motion of the sonde, has a maximum following the afternoon local convection indicating that these waves are generated by local convection

  12. Stoneley waves in a non-homogeneous orthotropic granular medium under the influence of gravity

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the Stoneley waves in a non-homogeneous orthotropic granular medium under the influence of a gravity field. The frequency equation obtained, in the form of a sixth-order determinantal expression, is in agreement with the corresponding result when both media are elastic. The frequency equation when the gravity field is neglected has been deduced as a particular case.

  13. Stoneley waves in a non-homogeneous orthotropic granular medium under the influence of gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Ahmed

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the Stoneley waves in a non-homogeneous orthotropic granular medium under the influence of a gravity field. The frequency equation obtained, in the form of a sixth-order determinantal expression, is in agreement with the corresponding result when both media are elastic. The frequency equation when the gravity field is neglected has been deduced as a particular case.

  14. Torsion Wave Solutions in Yang-Mielke Theory of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Pasic, Vedad

    2015-01-01

    The approach of metric-affine gravity initially distinguishes it from Einstein's general relativity. Using an independent affine connection produces a theory with 10+64 unknowns. We write down the Yang-Mills action for the affine connection and produce the Yang-Mills equation and the so called complementary Yang-Mills equation by independently varying with respect to the connection and the metric respectively. We call this theory the Yang-Mielke theory of gravity. We construct explicit spacetimes with pp-metric and purely axial torsion and show that they represent a solution of Yang-Mills theory. Finally we compare these spacetimes to existing solutions of metric-affine gravity and present future research possibilities.

  15. Effects of gravity and planetary waves on the lower ionosphere as obtained from radio wave absorption measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laštovička, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 26, 6, Part C (2001), s. 381-386. ISSN 1464-1917 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS3012007; GA AV ČR IAA3042102; GA MŠk OC 271.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : planetary wave * gravity wave * lower ionosphere Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.399, year: 2001

  16. Simulation of breaking gravity waves during the south foehn of 7 - 13 January 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, H.; Doernbrack, A.

    1998-07-01

    A high-resolution mesoscale model with horizontal mesh size of 6 km is applied to simulate upper-level wave breaking above the Alps during a south foehn event in January 1996. The model reproduces the key synoptic and mesoscale features of cross-alpine airflow during foehn. High-resolution radiosonde ascents at Munich and Innsbruck are used to evaluate the quality of the model simulations. The simulations predict breaking gravity waves above the jet stream in a layer between 10 and 15 km altitude where the shear is maximum. In part of the foehn period a critical level is present at about 200 hPa that results in wave steepening below and no wave activity aloft. Regions where aircraft report clear-air turbulence encounters agree reasonably with the simulated locations of gravity wave breaking. (orig.)

  17. Linear mechanism of surface gravity wave generation in horizontally sheared flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis is presented of a linear mechanism of surface gravity wave generation in a horizontally sheared flow in a fluid layer with free boundary. A free-surface flow of this type is found to be algebraically unstable. The development of instability leads to the formation of surface gravity waves whose amplitude grows with time according to a power law. Flow stability is analyzed by using a nonmodal approach in which the behavior of a spatial Fourier harmonic of a disturbance is considered in a semi-Lagrangian frame of reference moving with the flow. Shear-flow disturbances are divided into two classes (wave and vortex disturbances) depending on the value of potential vorticity. It is shown that vortex disturbances decay with time while the energy of wave disturbances increases indefinitely. Transformation of vortex disturbances into wave ones under strong shear is described.

  18. Influence of short gravity waves on thermal radio emission of water surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilin, V. A.; Naumov, A. A.; Rayzer, V. Y.; Filonovich, S. R.; Etkin, V. S.

    1985-06-01

    An experimental study is presented of the thermal radio emission caused by short waves, accompanied by a quantitative interpretation of the data obtained. Emphasis is on an analysis of the variation in radio brightness contrast as a function of steepness of the short gravity waves, measured by means of a high-frequency radiometer operating in the lambda = 0.8 cm range. Waves were artificially generated in a small channel, wavelength 8 to 40 cm, height 0.6 to 3 cm. Due to the high sensitivity of the radiometric apparatus used, effects were recorded which were related to the influence of the profile and steepness of the short gravity waves. The possibility of using the geometrical optics approximation for quantitative interpretation of the experimental data is demonstrated. The model is based on essentially non-Gaussian statistics of slopes corresponding to quasimonochromatic waves of finite amplitude.

  19. Estimations of model parameters for gravity wave spectra observed by MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, A. O.; Liu, C. H.; Franke, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    The general theory of MST radar observations of gravity wave spectra is developed. This effort extends the previous results to include anisotropy and Doppler effects for the spectra, as well as the consequences for the multibeam configuration. The relationships between the observed one- or two-dimensional spectra for the line-of-sight velocity in the gravity wave spectra are derived. Expressions for cross spectra, as well as covariances between velocities observed on different beams, are computed. Using these results, studies are carried out to show how model parameters for gravity wave spectra can be estimated from the observed quantities. Model parameters include the variance, power law indices, anisotropy parameters, Doppler parameters, mean scale sizes, etc. Cases with different numbers of beams are investigated.

  20. THE 1998 NOVEMBER 14 OCCULTATION OF GSC 0622-00345 BY SATURN. II. STRATOSPHERIC THERMAL PROFILE, POWER SPECTRUM, AND GRAVITY WAVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 1998 November 14, Saturn and its rings occulted the star GSC 0622-00345. The occultation latitude was 55.05 S. This paper analyzes the 2.3 μm light curve derived by Harrington and French. A fixed-baseline isothermal fit to the light curve has a temperature of 140 ± 3 K, assuming a mean molecular mass of 2.35 AMU. The thermal profile obtained by numerical inversion is valid between 1 and 60 μbar. The vertical temperature gradient is > 0.2 K km-1 more stable than the adiabatic lapse rate, but it still shows the alternating-rounded-spiked features seen in many temperature gradient profiles from other atmospheric occultations and usually attributed to breaking gravity (buoyancy) waves. We conduct a wavelet analysis of the thermal profile, and show that, even with our low level of noise, scintillation due to turbulence in Earth's atmosphere can produce large temperature swings in light-curve inversions. Spurious periodic features in the 'reliable' region of a wavelet amplitude spectrum can exceed 0.3 K in our data. We also show that gravity-wave model fits to noisy isothermal light curves can lead to convincing wave 'detections'. We provide new significance tests for localized wavelet amplitudes, wave model fits, and global power spectra of inverted occultation light curves by assessing the effects of pre- and post-occultation noise on these parameters. Based on these tests, we detect several significant ridges and isolated peaks in wavelet amplitude, to which we fit a gravity wave model. We also strongly detect the global power spectrum of thermal fluctuations in Saturn's atmosphere, which resembles the 'universal' (modified Desaubies) curve associated with saturated spectra of propagating gravity waves on Earth and Jupiter.

  1. Effects of gravity and planetary waves on the lower ionosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laštovička, Jan

    Praha: Institute of Atmospheric Physics, 2000. s. -. [IAGA Workshop "Lower Atmosphere Effects on the Ionosphere and Upper Atmosphere". 25.07.2000-27.07.2000, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/98/0058; GA MŠk OC 271.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  2. Characterizing the propagation of gravity waves in 3D nonlinear simulations of solar-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvan, L.; Strugarek, A.; Brun, A. S.; Mathis, S.; Garcia, R. A.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The revolution of helio- and asteroseismology provides access to the detailed properties of stellar interiors by studying the star's oscillation modes. Among them, gravity (g) modes are formed by constructive interferences between progressive internal gravity waves (IGWs), propagating in stellar radiative zones. Our new 3D nonlinear simulations of the interior of a solar-like star allows us to study the excitation, propagation, and dissipation of these waves. Aims: The aim of this article is to clarify our understanding of the behavior of IGWs in a 3D radiative zone and to provide a clear overview of their properties. Methods: We use a method of frequency filtering that reveals the path of individual gravity waves of different frequencies in the radiative zone. Results: We are able to identify the region of propagation of different waves in 2D and 3D, to compare them to the linear raytracing theory and to distinguish between propagative and standing waves (g-modes). We also show that the energy carried by waves is distributed in different planes in the sphere, depending on their azimuthal wave number. Conclusions: We are able to isolate individual IGWs from a complex spectrum and to study their propagation in space and time. In particular, we highlight in this paper the necessity of studying the propagation of waves in 3D spherical geometry, since the distribution of their energy is not equipartitioned in the sphere.

  3. Tidal wind as a possible link of coupling between atmospheric waves activity and sporadic E formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakishvili, Giorgi; Didebulidze, Goderdzi G.; Matiashvili, Giorgi

    2016-04-01

    The horizontal tidal wind in the mesosphere lower thermosphere region (MLT) is considered as a source of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) and vortical type perturbations generation. It is shown that at mid-latitude these atmospheric waves, evolving in the tidal wind, can lead to vertical convergence of heavy metallic ions of this region and Formation of sporadic E (Es) layer. The process of sporadic E formation by short-period AGWs (close to Bunt-Vaisala period) and by the stationary type vortical perturbations with the same spatial scale, excited in the horizontal shear flow is demonstrated using numerical simulations. The possibility of oscillation of Es layers electron/ions density by period less than BV period under influence of short-period AGWs is shown and the possible coupling of these processes with quasi-periodic echoes is also noted. In our numerical experiment the mid-latitude nighttime Es layers formed under influence of these atmospheric waves, which are possibly generated by horizontal tidal wind, mostly move downward, this is an observed phenomena. It is noted that investigation of sporadic E formation by atmospheric waves evolving in the tidal wind is important for study of the in situ developing processes in the lower thermosphere determining atmosphere-ionosphere dynamical coupling as well as for revealing their possible dynamical coupling with lower atmosphere. Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by Shota Rustaveli National Science Foundation grant No 31/81 and the Shota Rustaveli National Science Foundation grant No FR/51/6-300/14.

  4. Impact of rotation on stochastic excitation of gravity and gravito-inertial waves in stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, S.; Neiner, C.; Tran Minh, N.

    2014-05-01

    Context. Gravity waves (or their signatures) are detected in stars thanks to helio- and asteroseismology, and they may play an important role in the evolution of stellar angular momentum. Moreover, a previous observational study of the CoRoT target HD 51452 demonstrated the potential strong impact of rotation on the stochastic excitation of gravito-inertial waves in stellar interiors. Aims: Our goal is to explore and unravel the action of rotation on the stochastic excitation of gravity and gravito-inertial waves in stars. Methods: The dynamics of gravito-inertial waves in stellar interiors in both radiation and in convection zones is described with a local non-traditional f-plane model. The coupling of these waves with convective turbulent flows, which leads to their stochastic excitation, is studied in this framework. Results: First, we find that in the super-inertial regime in which the wave frequency is twice as high as the rotation frequency (σ > 2Ω), the evanescence of gravito-inertial waves in convective regions decreases with decreasing wave frequency. Next, in the sub-inertial regime (σ modified by rotation. Indeed, the turbulent energy cascade towards small scales is slowed down, and in the case of rapid rotation, strongly anisotropic turbulent flows are obtained that can be understood as complex non-linear triadic interactions of propagative inertial waves. These different behaviours, due to the action of the Coriolis acceleration, strongly modify the wave coupling with turbulent flows. On one hand, turbulence weakly influenced by rotation is coupled with evanescent gravito-inertial waves. On the other hand, rapidly rotating turbulence is intrinsically and strongly coupled with sub-inertial waves. Finally, to study these mechanisms, the traditional approximation cannot be assumed because it does not properly treat the coupling between gravity and inertial waves in the sub-inertial regime. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the action of rotation on

  5. Measurement of TID and Gravity Wave Parameters Using An HF Doppler System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wene, G. P.; Crowley, G.; Fessler, B. W.; Bronn, J. S.

    2005-05-01

    The manifestation of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) in the ionosphere is called a traveling ionospheric disturbance (TID). TIDs can be thought of as traveling corrugations in the ionosphere, and as such can seriously affect HF radio communications and surveillance systems. They may indirectly play a greater role in disrupting communications by triggering the growth of ionospheric instabilities, resulting in scintillation of radio signals. It is therefore of great interest to monitor TIDs on a routine basis, and to correlate their properties with other phenomena. In this paper, we present data from a unique radio technique for measuring TID properties such as their spectrum, and their spectrally resolved propagation characteristics. One of the most sensitive methods for detecting transient changes in the ionosphere is the HF Doppler technique operating in the 3-10 MHz band. HF Doppler systems have advantages over all other techniques for the measurement of TID characteristics. They are more amenable to analysis than data from ionosonde chains, and their time resolution (30 sec) is much higher than that of ionosondes . Unlike total electron content (TEC) methods, which respond to height-integrated TID effects, the HF Doppler radar responds to TIDs at the altitude of the radio reflection point. Finally, HF Doppler systems have low power consumption, so that both spatial and temporal resolution can be maintained for many days without the costs that would be associated with an incoherent-scatter radar. SwRI recently designed, built and deployed an HF Doppler sounding system in Texas, to investigate TIDs. The TIDDBIT radar consisted of three transmitters (Austin, Uvalde and St. Hedwig) and a receiver in San Antonio, Texas. Using a cross-spectral analysis technique, TID speeds and azimuths were obtained for each wave frequency. We provide a synoptic survey of the TID characteristics observed over Texas during January-March 2002. The Doppler system provides an accurate

  6. A Study of Mesoscale Gravity Waves over the North Atlantic with Satellite Observations and a Mesoscale Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.; Zhang, Fuqing

    2004-01-01

    Satellite microwave data are used to study gravity wave properties and variabilities over the northeastern United States and the North Atlantic in the December-January periods. The gravity waves in this region, found in many winters, can reach the stratopause with growing amplitude. The Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) observations show that the wave occurrences are correlated well with the intensity and location of the tropospheric baroclinic jet front systems. To further investigate the cause(s) and properties of the North Atlantic gravity waves, we focus on a series of wave events during 19-21 January 2003 and compare AMSU-A observations to simulations from a mesoscale model (MM5). The simulated gravity waves compare qualitatively well with the satellite observations in terms of wave structures, timing, and overall morphology. Excitation mechanisms of these large-amplitude waves in the troposphere are complex and subject to further investigations.

  7. Computation of 3D steady Navier-Stokes flow with free-surface gravity waves

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, M. R.; Koren, Barry; Raven, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper an iterative method for the computation of stationary gravity-wave solutions is investigated, using a novel formulation of the free-surface (FS) boundary-value problem. This method requires the solution of a sequence of stationary Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes subproblems employing the so-called quasi free-surface condition. The numerical performance of this new approach is investigated for two test cases. The first test case involves the computation of the 3D gravity-wave pat...

  8. Surface gravity wave transformation across a platform coral reef in the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, S. J.; Churchill, J. H.; Davis, K. A.; Farrar, J. T.

    2016-01-01

    The transformation of surface gravity waves across a platform reef in the Red Sea is examined using 18 months of observations and a wave transformation model developed for beaches. The platform reef is 200 m across, 700 m long, and the water depth varies from 0.3 to 1.2 m. Assuming changes in wave energy flux are due to wave breaking and bottom drag dissipation, the wave transformation model with optimal parameters characterizing the wave breaking (γm = 0.25) and bottom drag (hydrodynamic roughness zo = 0.08 m) accounts for 75%-90% of the observed wave-height variance at four sites. The observations and model indicate that wave breaking dominates the dissipation in a 20-30 m wide surf zone while bottom drag dominates the dissipation over the rest of the reef. Friction factors (drag coefficients) estimated from the observed wave energy balance range from fw = 0.5 to fw = 5 and increase as wave-orbital displacements decrease. The observed dependence on wave-orbital displacement is roughly consistent with extrapolation of an empirical relationship based on numerous laboratory studies of oscillatory flow. As a consequence of the dependence on wave-orbital displacement, wave friction factors vary temporally due to changes in water depth and incident wave heights, and spatially across the reef as the waves decay.

  9. Gravitational and torsion waves in linearised teleparallel gravity

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrade, L. C. Garcia

    2002-01-01

    Spin-2, spin-1 and spin-0 modes in linearised teleparallelism are obtained where the totally skew-symmetric complex contortion tensor generates scalar torsion waves and the symmetric contortion in the last two indices generates gravitational waves as gravitational perturbations of flat spacetime with contortion tensor. A gedanken experiment with this gravitational-torsion wave hitting a ring of spinless particles is proposed which allows us to estimate the contortion of the Earth by making us...

  10. Freely Decaying Weak Turbulence for Sea Surface Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, M.; Osborne, A. R.; Serio, M.; Resio, D.; Pushkarev, A.; Zakharov, V. E.; Brandini, C.

    2002-09-01

    We study the long-time evolution of deep-water ocean surface waves in order to better understand the behavior of the nonlinear interaction processes that need to be accurately predicted in numerical models of wind-generated ocean surface waves. Of particular interest are those nonlinear interactions which are predicted by weak turbulence theory to result in a wave energy spectrum of the form of |k|-2.5. We numerically implement the primitive Euler equations for surface waves and demonstrate agreement between weak turbulence theory and the numerical results.

  11. Observation of strongly non-Gaussian statistics for random sea surface gravity waves in wave flume experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, M.; Osborne, A. R.; Serio, M.; Cavaleri, L.; Brandini, C.; Stansberg, C. T.

    2004-12-01

    We study random surface gravity wave fields and address the formation of large-amplitude waves in a laboratory environment. Experiments are performed in one of the largest wave tank facilities in the world. We present experimental evidence that the tail of the probability density function for wave height strongly depends on the Benjamin-Feir index (BFI)—i.e., the ratio between wave steepness and spectral bandwidth. While for a small BFI the probability density functions obtained experimentally are consistent with the Rayleigh distribution, for a large BFI the Rayleigh distribution clearly underestimates the probability of large events. These results confirm experimentally the fact that large-amplitude waves in random spectra may result from the modulational instability.

  12. The vertical structure of Jupiter's equatorial zonal wind above the cloud deck, derived using mesoscale gravity waves

    CERN Document Server

    Watkins, C; 10.1029/2012GL054368

    2013-01-01

    Data from the Galileo Probe, collected during its descent into Jupiter's atmosphere, is used to obtain a vertical profile of the zonal wind from $\\mathbf{\\sim 0.5}$ bar (upper troposphere) to $\\mathbf{\\sim 0.1\\, \\mu{bar}}$ (lower thermosphere) at the probe entry site. This is accomplished by constructing a map of gravity wave Lomb-Scargle periodograms as a function of altitude. The profile obtained from the map indicates that the wind speed above the visible cloud deck increases with height to $\\mathbf{\\sim 150}$ m\\,s$\\mathbf{^{-1}}$ and then levels off at this value over a broad altitude range. The location of the turbopause, as a region of wide wave spectrum, is also identified from the map. In addition, a cross-equatorial oscillation of a jet, which has previously been linked to the quasi-quadrennial oscillation in the stratosphere, is suggested by the profile.

  13. Extracting gravity wave parameters during the September 2002 Southern Hemisphere major sudden stratospheric warming using a SANAE imaging riometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbatha, N. [South African National Space Agency, Hermanus (South Africa). Space Science; KwaZulu-Natal Univ., Durban (South Africa). School of Chemistry and Physics; Sivakumar, V. [KwaZulu-Natal Univ., Durban (South Africa). School of Chemistry and Physics; Bencherif, H. [La Reunion Univ. UMR 8105 CNRS, Saint-Denis (France). Lab. de l' Atmosphere et des Cyclones; Malinga, S. [South African National Space Agency, Hermanus (South Africa). Space Science

    2013-11-01

    Using absorption data measured by imaging riometer for ionospheric studies (IRIS) located at the South Africa National Antarctic Expedition (SANAE), Antarctica (72 S, 3 W), we extracted the parameters of gravity waves (GW) of periods between 40 and 50 min during late winter/ spring of the year 2002, a period of the unprecedented major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) in the Southern Hemisphere middle atmosphere. During this period, an unprecedented substantial increase of temperature by about 25-30K throughout the stratosphere was observed. During the period of the occurrence of the major stratospheric warming, there was a reduction of both the GW horizontal phase speeds and the horizontal wavelengths at 90 km. The GW phase speeds and horizontal wavelengths were observed to reach minimum values of about 7ms{sup -1} and 19 km, respectively, while during the quiet period the average value of the phase speed and horizontal wavelength was approximately 23ms{sup -1} and 62 km, respectively. The observed event is discussed in terms of momentum flux and also a potential interaction of gravity waves, planetary waves and mean circulation.

  14. Energy spectrum of ensemble of weakly nonlinear gravity-capillary waves on a fluid surface

    CERN Document Server

    Tobisch, Elena

    2014-01-01

    In this Letter we regard nonlinear gravity-capillary waves with parameter of nonlinearity being $\\varepsilon \\sim 0.1 \\div 0.25$. For this nonlinearity time scale separation does not occur and kinetic wave equation does not hold. An energy cascade in this case is built at the dynamic time scale (D-cascade) and is computed by the increment chain equation method first introduced in \\emph{Kartashova, \\emph{EPL} \\textbf{97} (2012), 30004.} We compute for the first time an analytical expression for the energy spectrum of nonlinear gravity-capillary waves as an explicit function depending on the ratio of surface tension to the gravity acceleration. It is shown that its two limits - pure capillary and pure gravity waves on a fluid surface - coincide with the previously obtained results. We also discuss relations of the model of D-cascade with a few known models used in the theory of nonlinear waves such as Zakharov's equation, resonance of the modes with nonlinear Stokes corrected frequencies and Benjamin-Feir index...

  15. Surface Gravity Waves: Resonance in a Fish Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinick, Scott J.; Lynch, John J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, an inexpensive 10-gallon glass aquarium was used to study wave motion in water. The waves travel at speeds comparable to a person walking ([approximately]1 m/s). The scale of the motion allows for distances to be measured with a meterstick and for times to be measured with a stopwatch. For a wide range of water depths, standing waves…

  16. Evolution of surface gravity waves over a submarine canyon

    CERN Document Server

    Magne, R; Herbers, T H C; Ardhuin, F; O'Reilly, W C; Rey, V; Magne, Rudy; Belibassakis, Kostas; Herbers, Thomas H. C.; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Reilly, William C. O'; Rey, Vincent

    2006-01-01

    The effects of a submarine canyon on the propagation of ocean surface waves are examined with a three-dimensional coupled-mode model for wave propagation over steep topography. Whereas the classical geometrical optics approximation predicts an abrupt transition from complete transmission at small incidence angles to no transmission at large angles, the full model predicts a more gradual transition with partial reflection/transmission that is sensitive to the canyon geometry and controlled by evanescent modes for small incidence angles and relatively short waves. Model results for large incidence angles are compared with data from directional wave buoys deployed around the rim and over Scripps Canyon, near San Diego, California, during the Nearshore Canyon Experiment (NCEX). Wave heights are observed to decay across the canyon by about a factor 5 over a distance shorter than a wavelength. Yet, a spectral refraction model predicts an even larger reduction by about a factor 10, because low frequency components c...

  17. Ultralong atmospheric waves and a long-range forecasting

    OpenAIRE

    KURBATKIN, G. P.

    2011-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model of a long-range forecasting of planetary waves is described. In developing this model a priori meteorological information together with the theory of atmospheric instability was used. To solve the filtered multi-level model the spectral method of spherical harmonics was applied. The most large-scale harmonics of “climatic sources” were computed from the acquired data on the state of the atmosphere during a long period of time. Heating and dissipation were estimated with t...

  18. Absolute parallelism, modified gravity, and suppression of gravitational short waves

    CERN Document Server

    Zhogin, I L

    2011-01-01

    There is a unique variant of Absolute Parallelism, which is very simple as it has no free parameters: nothing (nor D=5) can be changed if to keep the theory safe from emerging singularities of solutions. On the contrary, eternal solutions of this theory, due to the linear instability of the trivial solution, should be of great complexity which can in some scenarios (with a set of slowly varying parameters of solutions) provide a few phenomenological models including a modified (better to say, new or another) gravity and an expanding-shell cosmology (the longitudinal polarization gives the anti-Milne model). The former looks (mostly) like a variant of tensor-Ricci-squared gravity on a brane of a huge scale L along the extra-dimension. The correction to Newton's law of gravity, which depends in this theory on two parameters (bi-Laplace equation) and behaves as 1/r on large scales, r>L (kpc>L>pc), can start from zero (the Rindler term vanishes) if a constraint is imposed on these parameters. On further considera...

  19. The instability of counter-propagating kernel gravity waves in a constant shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Umurhan, O M; Harnik, N; Lott, F

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism describing the recently developed notion of kernel gravity waves (KGWs) is reviewed and such structures are employed to interpret the unstable dynamics of an example stratified plane parallel shear flow. This flow has constant vertical shear, is infinite in the vertical extent, and characterized by two density jumps of equal magnitude each decreasing successively with height, in which the jumps are located symmetrically away from the midplane of the system. We find that for a suitably defined bulk-Richardson number there exists a band of horizontal wavenumbers which exhibits normal-mode instability. The instability mechanism closely parallels the mechanism responsible for the instability seen in the problem of counter-propagating Rossby waves. In this problem the instability arises out of the interaction of counter-propagating gravity waves. We argue that the instability meets the Hayashi-Young criterion for wave instability. We also argue that the instability is the simplest one that can arise ...

  20. On the linear approximation of gravity wave saturation in the mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, W. C.; Schoeberl, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Lindzen's model of gravity wave breaking is shown to be inconsistent with the process of convective adjustment and associated turbulent outbreak. The K-theory turbulent diffusion model used by Lindzen implies a spatially uniform turbulent field which is not in agreement with the fact that gravity wave saturation and the associated convection produce turbulence only in restricted zones. The Lindzen model may be corrected to some extent by taking the turbulent Prandtl number for a diffusion acting on the wave itself to be very large. The eddy diffusion coefficients computed by Lindzen then become a factor of 2 larger and eddy transports of heat and constituents by wave fields vanish to first order.

  1. Intercomparisons of HIRDLS, COSMIC and SABER for the detection of stratospheric gravity waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Wright

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Colocated temperature profiles from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC, High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS and the Sounding of the Atmosphere by Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER mission are compared over the years 2006–2007 to assess their relative performances for the detection of stratospheric gravity waves. Two methods are used, one based on a simple comparison of the standard deviations and correlation coefficients of high-pass filtered profiles from each instrument, and the other based on Stockwell transform analyses of the profiles for vertical wavelength and temperature perturbation scales. It is concluded, when allowing for their different vertical resolution capabilites, that the three instruments reproduce each other's results for magnitude and vertical scale of perturbations to within their resolution limits in approximately 50% of cases, but with a positive frequency and temperature bias in the case of COSMIC. This is possibly indicative of a slightly higher vertical resolution being available to the constellation than estimated.

  2. Effect of Gravity Waves Generated in the Monsoon Region on Polar Mesospheric Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurairajah, B.; Bailey, S. M.; Carstens, J. N.; Siskind, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    Gravity Waves (GWs) play an important role in both the formation and destruction of polar mesospheric clouds. In summer, while vertically propagating GWs induce a residual circulation that cools the summer mesosphere and therefore supports the formation of PMCs, observation and modeling studies have also shown that short period GWs can additionally destroy PMCs. In this study we analyze the effect of non-vertical propagation of GWs on PMCs using temperature data from the SABER instrument on TIMED satellite and PMC occurrence frequency from the CIPS instrument on the AIM satellite. During the 2007 PMC season, time series of GWs over the monsoon region at 50 km and PMCs over the polar region at 84 km have a correlation coefficient of 0.9. SABER GW amplitude and momentum flux over the monsoon region show a poleward tilt with altitude. This slanted structure suggests a poleward, but non-vertical, propagation of GWs facilitated by the easterly winds associated with the monsoon circulation, thus indicating a possible source of high latitude middle atmospheric GWs.

  3. Nonlinear internal gravity waves and their interaction with the mean wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of a wave packet of internal gravity waves with the mean wind is investigated, for the case when there is a region of wind shear and hence a critical level. The principal equations are the Doppler-shifted dispersion relation, the equation for conservation of wave action and the mean momentum equation, in which the mean wind is accelerated by a 'radiation stress' tensor, due to the waves. These equations are integrated numerically to study the behaviour of a wave packet approaching a critical level, where the horizontal phase speed matches the mean wind. The results demonstrate the exchange of energy from the waves to the mean wind in the vicinity of the critical level. The interaction between the waves and the mean wind is also studied in the absence of any initial wind shear. (author)

  4. Trapping and instability of directional gravity waves in localized water currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, B; Haas, F

    2014-06-01

    The influence of localized water currents on the nonlinear dynamics and stability of large amplitude, statistically distributed gravity waves is investigated theoretically and numerically by means of an evolution equation for a Wigner function governing the spectrum of waves. It is shown that water waves propagating in the opposite direction of a localized current channel can be trapped in the channel, which can lead to the amplification of the wave intensity. Under certain conditions the wave intensity can be further localized due to a self-focusing (Benjamin-Feir) instability. The localized amplification of the wave intensity may increase the probability of extreme events in the form of freak waves, which have been observed in connection with ocean currents. PMID:25019886

  5. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Harms

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^–23 Hz^–1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our

  6. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^-23 Hz^-1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  7. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2013-08-15

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  8. Acoustic–gravity waves during solar eclipses: Detection and characterization using wavelet transforms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šauli, Petra; Roux, S. G.; Abry, P.; Boška, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 69, 17-18 (2007), s. 2465-2484. ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/06/1619; GA AV ČR IAA300420504 Grant ostatní: CNRS(FR) 18098 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Acoustic–gravity wave * Vertical ionospheric sounding * F-layer * Wavelet transform * Wave-packet characterization Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.566, year: 2007

  9. Seasonal variation of gravity wave activity in the lower ionosphere in Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bošková, Jaroslava; Laštovička, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2001), s. 85-92. ISSN 0039-3169 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS3012007; GA MŠk OC 271.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : lower ionosphere * gravity wave * radio wave absorption Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.680, year: 2001

  10. Horizontal velocities and propagation directions of gravity waves in the ionosphere over the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chum, Jaroslav; Šindelářová, Tereza; Laštovička, Jan; Hruška, František; Burešová, Dalia; Baše, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 115, - (2010), A11322/1-A11322/13. ISSN 0148-0227 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/07/1367; GA ČR GA205/09/1253 Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) M100420901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Ionosphere * gravity waves * wave propagation * remote sensing Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.303, year: 2010

  11. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami

  12. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael

    2013-08-01

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  13. Capillary-gravity waves and the Navier-Stokes equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water waves are a source of great fascination for undergraduates and thus provide an excellent context for introducing some important topics in fluid dynamics. In this paper we introduce the potential theory for incompressible and inviscid flow and derive the differential equation that governs the behaviour of the velocity potential. Next we obtain the harmonic solutions of the velocity potential by a very general argument. These solutions in turn yield the equations for the velocity and displacement of a water element under the action of a harmonic wave. Finally we obtain the dispersion relation for surface waves by requiring that the harmonic solutions satisfy the Navier-Stokes equation. (author)

  14. Numerical modeling study of the momentum deposition of small amplitude gravity waves in the thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the momentum deposition in the thermosphere from the dissipation of small amplitude gravity waves (GWs within a wave packet using a fully nonlinear two-dimensional compressible numerical model. The model solves the nonlinear propagation and dissipation of a GW packet from the stratosphere into the thermosphere with realistic molecular viscosity and thermal diffusivity for various Prandtl numbers. The numerical simulations are performed for GW packets with initial vertical wavelengths (λz ranging from 5 to 50 km. We show that λz decreases in time as a GW packet dissipates in the thermosphere, in agreement with the ray trace results of Vadas and Fritts (2005 (VF05. We also find good agreement for the peak height of the momentum flux (zdiss between our simulations and VF05 for GWs with initial λz ≤ 2π H in an isothermal, windless background, where H is the density scale height. We also confirm that zdiss increases with increasing Prandtl number. We include eddy diffusion in the model, and find that the momentum deposition occurs at lower altitudes and has two separate peaks for GW packets with small initial λz. We also simulate GW packets in a non-isothermal atmosphere. The net λz profile is a competition between its decrease from viscosity and its increase from the increasing background temperature. We find that the wave packet disperses more in the non-isothermal atmosphere, and causes changes to the momentum flux and λz spectra at both early and late times for GW packets with initial λz ≥ 10 km. These effects are caused by the increase in T in the thermosphere, and the decrease in T near the mesopause.

  15. A Coupled Atmospheric and Wave Modeling System for Storm Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Bolanos, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at improving the simulation of wind and waves during storms in connection with wind turbine design and operations in coastal areas. For this particular purpose, we investigated the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System which couples the Weather...... for the coastal condition. With the current model setup, using high spatial resolution gives better results for strong winds both for the open ocean and coastal sites. The signicant wave height (Hm0) is very sensitive to the model resolution and bathymetry data for the coastal zone. In addition, using...

  16. Mars Gravity Field and Upper Atmosphere from MGS, Mars Odyssey, and MRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, A.; Goossens, S. J.; Lemoine, F. G.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA orbital missions Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) have been exploring and monitoring the planet Mars since 1997. MGS executed its mapping mission between 1999 and 2006 in a frozen sun-synchronous, near-circular, polar orbit with the periapsis altitude at ~370 km and the dayside equatorial crossing at 2 pm Local Solar Time (LST). The spacecraft was equipped with onboard instrumentation to acquire radio science data and to measure spacecraft ranges to the Martian surface (Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter). These measurements resulted in static and time-varying gravity field and high-resolution global topography of the planet. ODY and MRO are still orbiting about Mars in two different sun-synchronous orbits, providing radio tracking data that indirectly measure both the static and time-varying gravity field and the atmospheric density. The orbit of ODY has its periapsis at ~390 km altitude and descending node at 4-5 pm LST. However, the spacecraft also collected measurements at lower altitudes (~220 km) in 2002 prior to the mapping phase. Since November 2006, MRO is in a low-altitude orbit with a periapsis altitude of 255 km and descending node at 3 pm LST. Radio data from MRO help improve the resolution of the static gravity field and measure the mass distribution of the polar caps, but the atmospheric drag at those altitudes may limit the benefits of these radio tracking observations. We present a combined solution of the Martian gravity field to degree and order 110 and atmospheric density profiles with radio tracking data from MGS, ODY and MRO. The gravity field solution is combined with the MOLA topography yielding an updated map of Mars crustal thickness. We also show our solution of the Love number k2 and time-variable gravity zonal harmonics (C20 and C30, in particular). The recovered atmospheric density profiles may be used in atmospheric models to constrain the long-term variability of the

  17. Gravitational waves during inflation from a 5D large-scale repulsive gravity model

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes, Luz Marina; Aguilar, José Edgar Madriz; Bellini, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    We investigate, in the transverse traceless (TT) gauge, the generation of the relic background of gravitational waves, generated during an early inflationary stage, on the framework of a large-scale repulsive gravity model. We calculate the spectrum of the tensor metric fluctuations of an effective 4D Schwarzschild-de-Sitter metric, which is obtained after implementing a planar coordinate transformation on a 5D Ricci-flat metric solution, in the context of a non-compact Kaluza-Klein theory of gravity. We found that the spectrum is nearly scale invariant under certain conditions. One interesting aspect of this model is that is possible to derive dynamical field equations for the tensor metric fluctuations, valid not just at cosmological scales, but also at astrophysical scales, from the same theoretical model. The astrophysical and cosmological scales are determined by the gravity- antigravity radius, which is a natural length scale of the model, that indicates when gravity becomes repulsive in nature.

  18. Scalar Gravitational Waves in the Effective Theory of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Mottola, Emil

    2016-01-01

    As a low energy effective field theory, classical General Relativity receives an infrared relevant modification from the conformal trace anomaly of the energy-momentum tensor of massless, or nearly massless, quantum fields. The local form of the effective action associated with the trace anomaly is expressed in terms of a dynamical scalar field that couples to the conformal factor of the spacetime metric, allowing it to propagate over macroscopic distances. Linearized around flat spacetime, this semi-classical EFT admits scalar gravitational wave solutions in addition to the transversely polarized tensor waves of the classical Einstein theory. The amplitude, Hamiltonian, energy flux, and quantization of the scalar wave modes are discussed. Astrophysical sources for scalar gravitational waves are considered, with the excited gluonic condensates in the interiors of neutron stars in merger events with other compact objects likely to provide the strongest burst signals.

  19. Propagation of High Frequency Waves in the Quiet Solar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Andić, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20mHz) have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analysed here. Image sequences are taken using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analyzed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis is performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observe the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10mHz to 13mHz. We also observe propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in regions where magnetic structures are present.

  20. Propagation of High Frequency Waves in the Quiet Solar Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andić, A.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20 mHz have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting for partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analysed here. Image sequences were taken by using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT, Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analysed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis was performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observed the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10 mHz to 13 mHz. We also observed propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in the regions where magnetic structures are present.

  1. Characterizing the propagation of gravity waves in 3D nonlinear simulations of solar-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Alvan, L; Brun, A S; Mathis, S; Garcia, R A

    2015-01-01

    The revolution of helio- and asteroseismology provides access to the detailed properties of stellar interiors by studying the star's oscillation modes. Among them, gravity (g) modes are formed by constructive interferences between progressive internal gravity waves (IGWs), propagating in stellar radiative zones. Our new 3D nonlinear simulations of the interior of a solar-like star allows us to study the excitation, propagation, and dissipation of these waves. The aim of this article is to clarify our understanding of the behavior of IGWs in a 3D radiative zone and to provide a clear overview of their properties. We use a method of frequency filtering that reveals the path of {individual} gravity waves of different frequencies in the radiative zone. We are able to identify the region of propagation of different waves in 2D and 3D, to compare them to the linear raytracing theory and to distinguish between propagative and standing waves (g modes). We also show that the energy carried by waves is distributed in d...

  2. Identification of inertia gravity wave sources observed in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere over a tropical station Gadanki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramitha, M.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Leena, P. P.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Vijaya Bhaskar Rao, S.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, sources for the inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) that are observed in the troposphere and lower stratosphere during different seasons over a tropical station Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), India, have been identified. For this we have used long-term high resolution radiosonde observations of horizontal winds and temperature during May 2006 to March 2014. The IGW parameters are extracted using Stokes method. Rotary analysis is applied to the wind data to find the vertical direction of propagation. Dominant vertical wavelengths for these waves are obtained from FFT in the altitude domain as well as from apparent frequency method. The vertical and horizontal wavelengths are found to be in the range of 2-5 km (1-3 km) and 500-1500 km (1000-2000 km) in the troposphere (stratosphere), respectively. Using Stokes parameter method we have obtained the statistics of the number of the waves which are monochromatic. GROGRAT model with ERA-Interim data as the background atmosphere is used to identify the terminal (and source) points (sources) for the observed waves. In general, 53% of the waves observed over this location have convection as source and for only 38% of the cases vertical shear in the horizontal wind is identified as a source. For the rest of the 9% of the cases, these two sources are not found to be active.

  3. On the analyticity of periodic gravity water waves with integrable vorticity function

    OpenAIRE

    Escher, Joachim; Matioc, Bogdan-Vasile

    2013-01-01

    We prove that the streamlines and the profile of periodic gravity water waves traveling over a flat bed with wavespeed which exceeds the horizontal velocity of all fluid particles are real-analytic graphs if the vorticity function is merely integrable.

  4. Tropospheric events and possible related gravity wave activity effects on the ionosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šauli, Petra; Boška, Josef

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 63, - (2001), s. 945-950. ISSN 0021-9169 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/98/0058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : ionosphere * acoustic gravity waves * cold fronts Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  5. Observations of gravity waves of meteorological origin in the F-region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boška, Josef; Šauli, Petra

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 6 (2001), s. 425-428. ISSN 1464-1917 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/98/0058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911 Keywords : ionosphere * acoustic gravity waves * electron density profiles Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.399, year: 2001

  6. HF Doppler observations of gravity waves during the 16 February 1980 solar eclipse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanuise, C.; Broche, P. (Toulon Univ., 83 (France). Lab. de Sondages Electromagnetiques de l' Environnement Terrestre); Ogubazghi, G. (Addis Ababa Univ. (Ethiopia))

    1982-11-01

    Observations by the HF Doppler technique of the ionospheric effects of the 16 February 1980 solar eclipse in Africa are presented. Some oscillations which are detected at two stations can be attributed to a travelling coherent structure. Its characteristics are consistent with a gravity wave generated by the eclipse.

  7. HF Doppler observations of gravity waves during the 16 February 1980 solar eclipse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations by the HF Doppler technique of the ionospheric effects of the 16 February 1980 solar eclipse in Africa are presented. Some oscillations which are detected at two stations can be attributed to a travelling coherent structure. Its characteristics are consistent with a gravity wave generated by the eclipse. (author)

  8. The electromagnetic afterglows of gravitational waves as a test for Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, M A; Ellis, G F R; Meissner, K A; Wielgus, M

    2016-01-01

    We argue that if particularly powerful electromagnetic afterglows of the gravitational waves bursts will be observed in the future, this could be used as a strong observational support for some suggested quantum alternatives for black holes (e.g., firewalls and gravastars). A universal absence of powerful afterglows should be taken as a suggestive argument against such hypothetical quantum-gravity objects.

  9. A statistical study of variations of internal gravity wave energy characteristics in meteor zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, N. M.; Kalov, E. D.

    1987-01-01

    Internal gravity wave (IGW) parameters obtained by the radiometer method have been considered by many other researchers. The results of the processing of regular radiometeor measurements taken during 1979 to 1980 in Obninsk (55.1 deg N, 36.6 deg E) are presented.

  10. Feasibility study of a zero-gravity (orbital) atmospheric cloud physics experiments laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinden, A. B.; Eaton, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    A feasibility and concepts study for a zero-gravity (orbital) atmospheric cloud physics experiment laboratory is discussed. The primary objective was to define a set of cloud physics experiments which will benefit from the near zero-gravity environment of an orbiting spacecraft, identify merits of this environment relative to those of groundbased laboratory facilities, and identify conceptual approaches for the accomplishment of the experiments in an orbiting spacecraft. Solicitation, classification and review of cloud physics experiments for which the advantages of a near zero-gravity environment are evident are described. Identification of experiments for potential early flight opportunities is provided. Several significant accomplishments achieved during the course of this study are presented.

  11. Gravity-related wave function collapse: mass density resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Diósi, Lajos

    2013-01-01

    Selected issues of the concept of spontaneous collapse are discussed, with the emphasis on the gravity-related model. We point out that without spontaneous collapses the Schr\\"odinger cat states would macroscopically violate the standard conservation laws even in the presence of environmental noise. We prove that the collapse time of condensed matter c.o.m. superpositions is not sensitive to the natural uncertainty of the nuclear locations whereas we formulate the conjecture that superfluid He may show an anomalous low rate of spontaneous collapse compared to common condensed matter.

  12. Generation of Acoustic Gravity Waves by Periodic Radio Transmissions from a High-Power Ionospheric Heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Vladimir; Chernogor, Leonid; Rozumenko, Victor

    The Radiophysical Research Institute (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) and Kharkiv V. N. Karazin National University (Kharkiv, Ukraine) have studied opportunities for the effective generation of acoustic gravity waves (AGWs) in 3 - 180-min period range. The excitation of such waves was conducted for the last several years using the SURA heating facility (Nizhny Novgorod). The detection of the HF-induced AGWs was carried out in the Radiophysical Observatory located near Kharkiv City at a distance of about 960 km from the SURA. A coherent radar for vertical sounding, an ionosonde, and magnetometer chains were used in our measurements. The main results are the following (see [1-5]): 1. Infrasound oscillation trains with a period of 6 min are detected during periodic SURA heater turn-on and -off. Similar oscillation trains are detected after long time pumping, during periodic transmissions with a period of 20 s, as well as after pumping turn-off. The train recordings begin 28 - 54 min after the heater turn-on or -off, and the train propagation speeds are about 300 - 570 m/s, the value of which is close to the sound speed at upper atmospheric altitudes. The amplitude of the Doppler shift frequency is of 10 - 40 mHz, which fits to the 0.1 - 0.3% electron density disturbances at ionospheric altitudes. The amplitude of the infrasound oscillations depends on the SURA mode of operation and the state of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. 2. High-power radio transmissions stimulate the generation (or enhancement) of waves at ionospheric altitudes in the range of internal gravity wave periods. The HF-induced waves propagate with speeds of 360 - 460 m/s and produce changes in electron density with amplitudes of 2 - 3%. The generation of such periodic perturbations is more preferable with periods of 10 - 60 minutes. Their features depend significantly on the heater mode of operation. It should be stressed that perturbation intensity increases when a pumping wave frequency approaches

  13. Gravity waves and the morphology of noctilucent clouds and polar mesosphere summer echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The great majority of all Noctilucent Cloud (NLC) displays show propagating gravity waves (buoyancy waves) of long and medium horizontal wavelengths, but they resemble waves in very shallow water rather than deep water waves, as one might have expected. Many Polar Mesosphere Summer Echo (PMSE) in VHF radar data show single, double or multiple layers of strong echo power which slowly descend and jump to a higher layer from time to time. The descent is in agreement with the assumption of a downward propagating gravity wave, and the jump appears to hop to the same phase one vertical wavelength higher up. Furthermore, precise radar observations of vertical velocity in the PMSE displays indicate significantly more vertical convergence than divergence as well as a slight majority of downward velocities in the volumes with strongest PMSE power. It is known that aerosol particles (ice particles) of typically 20 to 50 nm equivalent radius create the NLC visible by eye and by lidar as well as the Polar Mesosphere Clouds (PMC) observed from satellites. It is also known that the same particles, whether they are large enough to be visible or not, modify the spatial distribution of free electrons and positive ions to create PMSE, when the charge density is large enough. This presentation shows how the air parcel trajectories in a typical gravity wave field near the summer polar mesopause can explain the structure and morphology described above. The NLC and/or PMSE particles tend to collect at certain positions in the gravity field, moving with those positions as the wave propagates horizontally and downward.

  14. Characteristics of high frequency gravity waves observed in OH nightglow from low latitude Indian region during January and February 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The role of short scale high frequency gravity waves in the upper mesosphere lower thermosphere (UMLT) region is now well appreciated. Still their global distribution and source regions are not well known. All-sky imaging of nightglow emissions provide a unique way to study the high frequency waves in the UMLT region. In this work we have studied the characteristics of the waves observed in OH Meinel band emissions over Tirunelveli (8.7degN, 77.8degE) during January and February months of 2007. We have concentrated on the OH band observations because they have better SNR than other emissions and also wave activity is more in OH than other nightglow. From Indian sector, this is the first statistical study of short period waves with nightglow imaging. Our study shows the predominance of meridionally propagating waves indicating wind filtering effects in the lower atmospheric region. Such predominant meridional propagation during solstice periods is also seen from few other sites. Apart from that considerable number of waves propagated towards northwest direction. This may be an indication for existence of strong source region situated to the southeast of the observation site. It should be noted that the strong convective activity over and around Indonesian region is situated southeast to Tirunelveli. The average wavelength and apparent phase velocity of the observed waves are 17.7 km and 52.0 m/s respectively. These parameters are obtained from observations made during winter period only. A wider picture will be available once the characterization is over for a wider dataset covering other seasons also.

  15. Unsteady motion of the parasitic capillary ripples on the gravity-capillary waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parasitic capillary ripples generated on the forward face of the gravity-capillary waves are investigated experimentally. Using the optical technique, the slope angle of the wave is measured with sufficient space and time resolution to characterize the small ripple fluctuations. The ripple generation and its steepness is considered from the point of dominant wave asymmetry. The unsteady motion of ripples is analyzed by the two-points optical measurements. Dominant wave has the same phase speed with ripple on average, however the relative distance to the dominant wave fluctuates which can't be negligible comparing with the ripple wavelength. That is, the non-linear interactions with the dominant wave assumed to be essential. (authors)

  16. Near-Inertial Internal Gravity Waves in the Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Matthew H; MacKinnon, Jennifer A; Simmons, Harper L; Nash, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    We review the physics of near-inertial waves (NIWs) in the ocean and the observations, theory, and models that have provided our present knowledge. NIWs appear nearly everywhere in the ocean as a spectral peak at and just above the local inertial period f, and the longest vertical wavelengths can propagate at least hundreds of kilometers toward the equator from their source regions; shorter vertical wavelengths do not travel as far and do not contain as much energy, but lead to turbulent mixing owing to their high shear. NIWs are generated by a variety of mechanisms, including the wind, nonlinear interactions with waves of other frequencies, lee waves over bottom topography, and geostrophic adjustment; the partition among these is not known, although the wind is likely the most important. NIWs likely interact strongly with mesoscale and submesoscale motions, in ways that are just beginning to be understood. PMID:26331898

  17. Near-Inertial Internal Gravity Waves in the Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Matthew H.; MacKinnon, Jennifer A.; Simmons, Harper L.; Nash, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    We review the physics of near-inertial waves (NIWs) in the ocean and the observations, theory, and models that have provided our present knowledge. NIWs appear nearly everywhere in the ocean as a spectral peak at and just above the local inertial period f, and the longest vertical wavelengths can propagate at least hundreds of kilometers toward the equator from their source regions; shorter vertical wavelengths do not travel as far and do not contain as much energy, but lead to turbulent mixing owing to their high shear. NIWs are generated by a variety of mechanisms, including the wind, nonlinear interactions with waves of other frequencies, lee waves over bottom topography, and geostrophic adjustment; the partition among these is not known, although the wind is likely the most important. NIWs likely interact strongly with mesoscale and submesoscale motions, in ways that are just beginning to be understood.

  18. Statistical characteristics of gravity wave activities observed by an OH airglow imager at Xinglong, in northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Li

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An all-sky airglow imager (ASAI was installed at Xinglong, in northern China (40.2° N, 117.4° E in November 2009 to study the morphology of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT region. Using one year of OH airglow imager data from December 2009 to November 2010, the characteristics of short-period AGWs are investigated and a yearlong AGW climatology in northern China is first ever reported. AGW occurrence frequency in summer and winter is higher than that in equinoctial months. Observed bands mainly have horizontal wavelengths from 10 to 35 km, observed periods from 4 to 14 min and observed horizontal phase speeds in the range of 30 to 60 m s−1. Most of the bands propagate in the meridional direction. The propagation directions of the bands show a strong southwestward preference in winter, while almost all bands propagate northeastward in summer. Although the wind filtering in the middle atmosphere may control AGW propagations in the zonal direction, the non-uniform distribution of wave sources in the lower atmosphere may contribute to the anisotropy in the meridional direction in different seasons. Additionally, as an indication of local instability, the characteristics of ripples are also analyzed. It also shows seasonal variations, occurring more often in summer and winter and mainly moving westward in summer and eastward in winter.

  19. Statistical characteristics of gravity wave activities observed by an OH airglow imager at Xinglong, in northern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Q.; Yuan, W. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Graduate Univ.; Xu, J. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Yue, J. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States). High Altitude Observatory; Liu, X. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). State Key Lab. of Space Weather; Henan Normal Univ., Xinxiang (China). College of Mathematics and Information Science

    2011-07-01

    An all-sky airglow imager (ASAI) was installed at Xinglong, in northern China (40.2 N, 117.4 E) in November 2009 to study the morphology of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region. Using one year of OH airglow imager data from December 2009 to November 2010, the characteristics of short-period AGWs are investigated and a yearlong AGW climatology in northern China is first ever reported. AGW occurrence frequency in summer and winter is higher than that in equinoctial months. Observed bands mainly have horizontal wavelengths from 10 to 35 km, observed periods from 4 to 14 min and observed horizontal phase speeds in the range of 30 to 60ms{sup -1}. Most of the bands propagate in the meridional direction. The propagation directions of the bands show a strong southwestward preference in winter, while almost all bands propagate northeastward in summer. Although the wind filtering in the middle atmosphere may control AGW propagations in the zonal direction, the nonuniform distribution of wave sources in the lower atmosphere may contribute to the anisotropy in the meridional direction in different seasons. Additionally, as an indication of local instability, the characteristics of ripples are also analyzed. It also shows seasonal variations, occurring more often in summer and winter and mainly moving westward in summer and eastward in winter. (orig.)

  20. Local Dynamics of Baroclinic Waves in the Martian Atmosphere

    KAUST Repository

    Kavulich, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    The paper investigates the processes that drive the spatiotemporal evolution of baroclinic transient waves in the Martian atmosphere by a simulation experiment with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Mars general circulation model (GCM). The main diagnostic tool of the study is the (local) eddy kinetic energy equation. Results are shown for a prewinter season of the Northern Hemisphere, in which a deep baroclinic wave of zonal wavenumber 2 circles the planet at an eastward phase speed of about 70° Sol-1 (Sol is a Martian day). The regular structure of the wave gives the impression that the classical models of baroclinic instability, which describe the underlying process by a temporally unstable global wave (e.g., Eady model and Charney model), may have a direct relevance for the description of the Martian baroclinic waves. The results of the diagnostic calculations show, however, that while the Martian waves remain zonally global features at all times, there are large spatiotemporal changes in their amplitude. The most intense episodes of baroclinic energy conversion, which take place in the two great plain regions (Acidalia Planitia and Utopia Planitia), are strongly localized in both space and time. In addition, similar to the situation for terrestrial baroclinic waves, geopotential flux convergence plays an important role in the dynamics of the downstream-propagating unstable waves. © 2013 American Meteorological Society.