WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric gravity waves

  1. Random coupling of acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Christophe; Lott, Francois; Haynes, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    In numerical modeling of long-range acoustic propagation in the atmosphere, the effect of gravity waves on low-frequency acoustic waves is often ignored. As the sound speed far exceeds the gravity wave phase speed, these two types of waves present different spatial scales and their linear coupling is weak. It is possible, however, to obtain relatively strong couplings via sound speed profile changes with altitude. In the present study, this scenario is analyzed for realistic gravity wave fields and the incident acoustic wave is modeled as a narrow-banded acoustic pulse. The gravity waves are represented as a random field using a stochastic multiwave parameterization of non-orographic gravity waves. The parameterization provides independent monochromatic gravity waves, and the gravity wave field is obtained as the linear superposition of the waves produced. When the random terms are retained, a more generalized wave equation is obtained that both qualitatively and quantitatively agrees with the observations of several highly dispersed stratospheric wavetrains. Here, we show that the cumulative effect of gravity wave breakings makes the sensitivity of ground-based acoustic signals large, in that small changes in the parameterization can create or destroy an acoustic wavetrain.

  2. Gravity-Wave Dynamics in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    of wave-induced downslope winds. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 32(2):320–339, 1975. [12] P. K. Kundu and I. M. Cohen. Fluid Mechanics . Elsevier...Wave Beams and Local Generation of Solitary Waves in the Ocean Thermocline”, Journal of Fluid Mechanics , 593, 297-313 (2007) Akylas, T. R. & Druecke...334–348, 1992. [4] T. H. Bell. Lee waves in stratified flows with simple harmonic time-dependence. Journal of Fluid Mechanics , 67(FEB25):705–722

  3. Gravity Waves in the Atmospheres of Mars and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellmann, Silvia; Paetzold, Martin; Häusler, Bernd; Bird, Michael K.; Tyler, G. Leonard; Hinson, David P.; Imamura, Takeshi

    2016-10-01

    Gravity waves are ubiquitous in all stably stratified planetary atmospheres and play a major role in the redistribution of energy and momentum. Gravity waves can be excited by many different mechanisms, e.g. by airflow over orographic obstacles or by convection in an adjacent layer.Gravity waves on Mars were observed in the lower atmosphere [1,2] but are also expected to play a major role in the cooling of the thermosphere [3] and the polar warming [4]. They might be excited by convection in the daytime boundary layer or by strong winter jets in combination with the pronounced topographic diversity on Mars.On Venus, gravity waves play an important role in the mesosphere above the cloud layer [5] and probably below. Convection in the cloud layer is one of the most important source mechanisms but certain correlations with topography were observed by different experiments [6,7,8].Temperature height profiles from the radio science experiments on Mars Express (MaRS) [9] and Venus Express (VeRa) [10] have the exceptionally high vertical resolution necessary to study small-scale vertical gravity waves, their global distribution, and possible source mechanisms.Atmospheric instabilities, which are clearly identified in the data, can be investigated to gain further insight into possible atmospheric processes contributing to the excitation of gravity waves.[1] Creasey, J. E., et al.,(2006), Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L01803, doi:10.1029/2005GL024037.[2]Tellmann, S., et al.(2013), J. Geophys. Res. Planets, 118, 306–320, doi:10.1002/jgre.20058.[3]Medvedev, A. S., et al.(2015), J. Geophys. Res. Planets, 120, 913–927. doi:10.1002/2015JE004802.[4] Barnes, J. R. (1990), J. Geophys. Res., 95, B2, 1401–1421.[5] Tellmann, S., et al. (2012), Icarus, 221, 471 – 480.[6] Blamont, J.E. et al., (1986) 231, 1422–1425.[7] Bertaux J.-L., et al. (2016), J. Geophys. Res., Planets, in press.[8] Piccialli, A., et al. (2014), Icarus, 227, 94 – 111.[9] Pätzold, M., et al. (2016), Planet

  4. Atmospheric gravity waves due to the Tohoku-Oki tsunami observed in the thermosphere by GOCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, R.F.; Doornbos, E.N.; Bruinsma, S.; Hebert, H.

    2014-01-01

    Oceanic tsunami waves couple with atmospheric gravity waves, as previously observed through ionospheric and airglow perturbations. Aerodynamic velocities and density variations are computed from Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometer and thruster data during T

  5. Atmospheric gravity waves in the Red Sea: a new hotspot

    KAUST Repository

    Magalhaes, J. M.

    2011-02-03

    The region of the Middle East around the Red Sea (between 32° E and 44° E longitude and 12° N and 28° N latitude) is a currently undocumented hotspot for atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs). Satellite imagery shows evidence that this region is prone to relatively high occurrence of AGWs compared to other areas in the world, and reveals the spatial characteristics of these waves. The favorable conditions for wave propagation in this region are illustrated with three typical cases of AGWs propagating in the lower troposphere over the sea. Using weakly nonlinear long wave theory and the observed characteristic wavelengths we obtain phase speeds which are consistent with those observed and typical for AGWs, with the Korteweg-de Vries theory performing slightly better than Benjamin-Davis-Acrivos-Ono theory as far as phase speeds are concerned. ERS-SAR and Envisat-ASAR satellite data analysis between 1993 and 2008 reveals signatures consistent with horizontally propagating large-scale internal waves. These signatures cover the entire Red Sea and are more frequently observed between April and September, although they also occur during the rest of the year. The region\\'s (seasonal) propagation conditions for AGWs, based upon average vertical atmospheric stratification profiles suggest that many of the signatures identified in the satellite images are atmospheric internal waves. © Author(s) 2011.

  6. Studies of Gravity Wave Propagation in the Middle Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    34 . . . . . • * * . , . • :’ . . . , ",.,,- -. ’’’ " . ’-- o p - %"""" * " AFOSR.TR. 85-0505 physical dynamics,inc. PD-NW-85-330R L n STUDIES OF GRAVITY WAVE PROPAGATION IN...8217.. , .,- - -. ( %’. , .;: :..............,....... .-... . ~.b .. .. - ..... ,......... ..-. ....-.. PD-NW-85-330R STUDIES OF GRAVITY WAVE PROPAGATION...Include SewftY CsuiclUon STUDIES OF GRAVITY WAVE PROPAGATION IN THE MIDD E 12. PERSONAL AUTHORE) TMOPHU. r Timothy J. Dunkerton a13a. TYPE OF REPORT I3k

  7. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. I. ACOUSTIC AND INERTIA-GRAVITY WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía, 18008 Granada (Spain); Imamura, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Read, P. L. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Luz, D. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa (CAAUL), Observatório Astronómico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisboa (Portugal); Piccialli, A., E-mail: peralta@iaa.es [LATMOS, UVSQ, 11 bd dAlembert, 78280 Guyancourt (France)

    2014-07-01

    This paper is the first of a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases when the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this first part, only waves that are direct solutions of the generic dispersion relation are studied—acoustic and inertia-gravity waves. Concerning inertia-gravity waves, we found that in the cases of short horizontal wavelengths, null background wind, or propagation in the equatorial region, only pure gravity waves are possible, while for the limit of large horizontal wavelengths and/or null static stability, the waves are inertial. The correspondence between classical atmospheric approximations and wave filtering has been examined too, and we carried out a classification of the mesoscale waves found in the clouds of Venus at different vertical levels of its atmosphere. Finally, the classification of waves in exoplanets is discussed and we provide a list of possible candidates with cyclostrophic regimes.

  8. Numerical study of the propagation of small-amplitude atmospheric gravity wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Xianchang; YI Fan; LIU Yingjie; LI Fang

    2005-01-01

    By using a two-dimensional fully nonlinear compressible atmospheric dynamic numerical model, the propagation of a small amplitude gravity wave packet is simulated. A corresponding linear model is also developed for comparison. In an isothermal atmosphere, the simulations show that the nonlinear effects impacting on the propagation of a small amplitude gravity wave are negligible. In the nonisothermal atmosphere, however, the nonlinear effects are remarkable. They act to slow markedly down the propagation velocity of wave energy and therefore reduce the growth ratio of the wave amplitude with time. But the energy is still conserved. A proof of this is provided by the observations in the middle atmosphere.

  9. Transparency of the Atmosphere to Short Horizontal Wavelength Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-16

    Suzuki, S., K. Shiokawa , Y. Otsuka, T. Ogawa, K. Nakamura, and T. Nakamura (2007a), A concentric gravity wave structure in the meso- spheric airglow images...J. Geophys. Res., 112, D02102, doi:10.1029/ 2005JD006558. Suzuki, S., K. Shiokawa , Y. Otsuka, T. Ogawa, M. Kubota, M. Tsutsumi, T. Nakamura, and D

  10. A numerical simulation of nonlinear propagation of gravity wave packet in three-dimension compressible atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Shaoping(吴少平); YI; Fan(易帆)

    2002-01-01

    By using FICE scheme, a numerical simulation of nonlinear propagation of gravity wave packet in three-dimension compressible atmosphere is presented. The whole nonlinear propagation process of the gravity wave packet is shown; the basic characteristics of nonlinear propagation and the influence of the ambient winds on the propagation are analyzed. The results show that FICE scheme can be extended in three-dimension by which the calculation is steady and kept for a long time; the increase of wave amplitude is faster than the exponential increase according to the linear gravity theory; nonlinear propagation makes the horizontal perturbation velocity increase greatly which can lead to enhancement of the local ambient winds; the propagation path and the propagation velocity of energy are different from the results expected by the linear gravity waves theory, the nonlinearity causes the change in propagation characteristics of gravity wave; the ambient winds alter the propagation path and group velocity of gravity wave.

  11. On the nonlinear shaping mechanism for gravity wave spectrum in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Chunchuzov

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear mechanism of shaping of a high vertical wave number spectral tail in the field of a few discrete internal gravity waves in the atmosphere is studied in this paper. The effects of advection of fluid parcels by interacting gravity waves are taken strictly into account by calculating wave field in Lagrangian variables, and performing a variable transformation from Lagrangian to Eulerian frame. The vertical profiles and vertical wave number spectra of the Eulerian displacement field are obtained for both the case of resonant and non-resonant wave-wave interactions. The evolution of these spectra with growing parameter of nonlinearity of the internal wave field is studied and compared to that of a broad band spectrum of gravity waves with randomly independent amplitudes and phases. The calculated vertical wave number spectra of the vertical displacements or relative temperature fluctuations are found to be consistent with the observed spectra in the middle atmosphere.

  12. Gravity wave propagation in the realistic atmosphere based on a three-dimensional transfer function model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sun

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the filter effect of the background winds on the propagation of gravity waves, a three-dimensional transfer function model is developed on the basis of the complex dispersion relation of internal gravity waves in a stratified dissipative atmosphere with background winds. Our model has successfully represented the main results of the ray tracing method, e.g. the trend of the gravity waves to travel in the anti-windward direction. Furthermore, some interesting characteristics are manifest as follows: (1 The method provides the distribution characteristic of whole wave fields which propagate in the way of the distorted concentric circles at the same altitude under the control of the winds. (2 Through analyzing the frequency and wave number response curve of the transfer function, we find that the gravity waves in a wave band of about 15–30 min periods and of about 200–400 km horizontal wave lengths are most likely to propagate to the 300-km ionospheric height. Furthermore, there is an obvious frequency deviation for gravity waves propagating with winds in the frequency domain. The maximum power of the transfer function with background winds is smaller than that without background winds. (3 The atmospheric winds may act as a directional filter that will permit gravity wave packets propagating against the winds to reach the ionospheric height with minimum energy loss.

  13. Internal Gravity Waves in the Magnetized Solar Atmosphere. I. Magnetic Field Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigeesh, G.; Jackiewicz, J.; Steiner, O.

    2017-02-01

    Observations of the solar atmosphere show that internal gravity waves are generated by overshooting convection, but are suppressed at locations of magnetic flux, which is thought to be the result of mode conversion into magnetoacoustic waves. Here, we present a study of the acoustic-gravity wave spectrum emerging from a realistic, self-consistent simulation of solar (magneto)convection. A magnetic field free, hydrodynamic simulation and a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation with an initial, vertical, homogeneous field of 50 G flux density were carried out and compared with each other to highlight the effect of magnetic fields on the internal gravity wave propagation in the Sun’s atmosphere. We find that the internal gravity waves are absent or partially reflected back into the lower layers in the presence of magnetic fields and argue that the suppression is due to the coupling of internal gravity waves to slow magnetoacoustic waves still within the high-β region of the upper photosphere. The conversion to Alfvén waves is highly unlikely in our model because there is no strongly inclined magnetic field present. We argue that the suppression of internal waves observed within magnetic flux concentrations may also be due to nonlinear breaking of internal waves due to vortex flows that are ubiquitously present in the upper photosphere and the chromosphere.

  14. Numerical Simulations of Magnetoacoustic-Gravity Waves in the Solar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Murawski, K; McLaughlin, J A; Oliver, R

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the excitation of magnetoacoustic-gravity waves generated from localized pulses in the gas pressure as well as in vertical component of velocity. These pulses are initially launched at the top of the solar photosphere that is permeated by a weak magnetic field. We investigate three different configurations of the background magnetic field lines: horizontal, vertical and oblique to the gravitational force. We numerically model magnetoacoustic-gravity waves by implementing a realistic (VAL-C) model of solar temperature. We solve two-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations numerically with the use of the FLASH code to simulate the dynamics of the lower solar atmosphere. The initial pulses result in shocks at higher altitudes. Our numerical simulations reveal that a small-amplitude initial pulse can produce magnetoacoustic-gravity waves, which are later reflected from the transition region due to the large temperature gradient. The atmospheric cavities in the lower solar atmosphere are foun...

  15. Modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation through the atmosphere with spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2014-12-01

    Low-frequency events such as tsunamis generate acoustic and gravity waves which quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Since the atmospheric density decreases exponentially as the altitude increases and from the conservation of the kinetic energy, those waves see their amplitude raise (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), allowing their detection in the upper atmosphere. Various tools have been developed through years to model this propagation, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but none offer a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling.A modeling tool is worthy interest since there are many different phenomena, from quakes to atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool.Starting from the SPECFEM program that already propagate waves in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, this work offers a tool with the ability to model acoustic and gravity waves propagation in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source.Atmospheric attenuation is required in a proper modeling framework since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented due to its ability to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's surface (that vibrates when a surface wave go through it) but also huge atmospheric events.

  16. Numerical modeling of acoustic and gravity waves propagation in the atmosphere using a spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roland; Brissaud, Quentin; Garcia, Raphael; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    During low-frequency events such as tsunamis, acoustic and gravity waves are generated and quickly propagate in the atmosphere. Due to the exponential decrease of the atmospheric density with the altitude, the conservation of the kinetic energy imposes that the amplitude of those waves increases (to the order of 105 at 200km of altitude), which allows their detection in the upper atmosphere. This propagation bas been modelled for years with different tools, such as normal modes modeling or to a greater extent time-reversal techniques, but a low-frequency multi-dimensional atmospheric wave modelling is still crucially needed. A modeling tool is worth of interest since there are many different sources, as earthquakes or atmospheric explosions, able to propagate acoustic and gravity waves. In order to provide a fine modeling of the precise observations of these waves by GOCE satellite data, we developed a new numerical modeling tool. By adding some developments to the SPECFEM package that already models wave propagation in solid, porous or fluid media using a spectral element method, we show here that acoustic and gravity waves propagation can now be modelled in a stratified attenuating atmosphere with a bottom forcing or an atmospheric source. The bottom forcing feature has been implemented to easily model the coupling with the Earth's or ocean's vibrating surfaces but also huge atmospheric events. Atmospheric attenuation is also introduced since it has a crucial impact on acoustic wave propagation. Indeed, it plays the role of a frequency filter that damps high-frequency signals.

  17. Studies on atmospheric gravity wave activity in the troposphere and lower stratosphere over a tropical station at Gadanki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Subba Reddy

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available MST radars are powerful tools to study the mesosphere, stratosphere and troposphere and have made considerable contributions to the studies of the dynamics of the upper, middle and lower atmosphere. Atmospheric gravity waves play a significant role in controlling middle and upper atmospheric dynamics. To date, frontal systems, convection, wind shear and topography have been thought to be the sources of gravity waves in the troposphere. All these studies pointed out that it is very essential to understand the generation, propagation and climatology of gravity waves. In this regard, several campaigns using Indian MST Radar observations have been carried out to explore the gravity wave activity over Gadanki in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere. The signatures of the gravity waves in the wind fields have been studied in four seasons viz., summer, monsoon, post-monsoon and winter. The large wind fluctuations were more prominent above 10 km during the summer and monsoon seasons. The wave periods are ranging from 10 min-175 min. The power spectral densities of gravity waves are found to be maximum in the stratospheric region. The vertical wavelength and the propagation direction of gravity waves were determined using hodograph analysis. The results show both down ward and upward propagating waves with a maximum vertical wave length of 3.3 km. The gravity wave associated momentum fluxes show that long period gravity waves carry more momentum flux than the short period waves and this is presented.

  18. Study of atmospheric gravity waves and infrasonic sources using the USArray Transportable Array pressure data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlin, Michael; de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine; Hoffmann, Lars; Alexander, M. Joan; Stephan, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    The upgrade of the USArray Transportable Array (TA) with microbarometers and infrasound microphones has created an opportunity for a broad range of new studies of atmospheric sources and the large- and small-scale atmospheric structure through which signals from these events propagate. These studies are akin to early studies of seismic events and the Earth's interior structure that were made possible by the first seismic networks. In one early study with the new dataset we use the method of de Groot-Hedlin and Hedlin (2015) to recast the TA as a massive collection of 3-element arrays to detect and locate large infrasonic events. Over 2,000 events have been detected in 2013. The events cluster in highly active regions on land and offshore. Stratospherically ducted signals from some of these events have been recorded more than 2,000 km from the source and clearly show dispersion due to propagation through atmospheric gravity waves. Modeling of these signals has been used to test statistical models of atmospheric gravity waves. The network is also useful for making direct observations of gravity waves. We are currently studying TA and satellite observations of gravity waves from singular events to better understand how the waves near ground level relate to those observed aloft. We are also studying the long-term statistics of these waves from the beginning of 2010 through 2014. Early work using data bandpass filtered from 1-6 hr shows that both the TA and satellite data reveal highly active source regions, such as near the Great Lakes. de Groot-Hedlin and Hedlin, 2015, A method for detecting and locating geophysical events using clusters of arrays, Geophysical Journal International, v203, p960-971, doi: 10.1093/gji/ggv345.

  19. Transition from geostrophic turbulence to inertia-gravity waves in the atmospheric energy spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Bühler, Oliver

    2014-12-02

    Midlatitude fluctuations of the atmospheric winds on scales of thousands of kilometers, the most energetic of such fluctuations, are strongly constrained by the Earth's rotation and the atmosphere's stratification. As a result of these constraints, the flow is quasi-2D and energy is trapped at large scales—nonlinear turbulent interactions transfer energy to larger scales, but not to smaller scales. Aircraft observations of wind and temperature near the tropopause indicate that fluctuations at horizontal scales smaller than about 500 km are more energetic than expected from these quasi-2D dynamics. We present an analysis of the observations that indicates that these smaller-scale motions are due to approximately linear inertia-gravity waves, contrary to recent claims that these scales are strongly turbulent. Specifically, the aircraft velocity and temperature measurements are separated into two components: one due to the quasi-2D dynamics and one due to linear inertia-gravity waves. Quasi-2D dynamics dominate at scales larger than 500 km; inertia-gravity waves dominate at scales smaller than 500 km.

  20. Noise generation in the solid Earth, oceans, and atmosphere, from non-linear interacting surface gravity waves in finite depth

    CERN Document Server

    Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    Oceanic observations, even in very deep water, and atmospheric pressure or seismic records, from anywhere on Earth, contain noise with dominant periods between 3 and 10 seconds, that can be related to surface gravity waves in the oceans. This noise is consistent with a dominant source explained by a nonlinear wave-wave interaction mechanism, and takes the form of surface gravity waves, acoustic or seismic waves. Previous theoretical works on seismic noise focused on surface (Rayleigh) waves, and did not consider finite depth effects on the generating wave kinematics. These finite depth effects are introduced here, which requires the consideration of the direct wave-induced pressure at the ocean bottom, a contribution previously overlooked in the context of seismic noise. That contribution can lead to a considerable reduction of the seismic noise source, which is particularly relevant for noise periods larger than 10 s. The theory is applied to acoustic waves in the atmosphere, extending previous theories that...

  1. Turbulent mixing driven by mean-flow shear and internal gravity waves in oceans and atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Baumert, Helmut Z

    2012-01-01

    This study starts with balances deduced by Baumert and Peters (2004, 2005) from results of stratified-shear experiments made in channels and wind tunnels by Itsweire (1984) and Rohr and Van Atta (1987), and of free-decay experiments in a resting stratified tank by Dickey and Mellor (1980). Using a modification of Canuto's (2002) ideas on turbulence and waves, these balances are merged with an (internal) gravity-wave energy balance presented for the open ocean by Gregg (1989), without mean-flow shear. The latter was augmented by a linear (viscous) friction term. Gregg's wave-energy source is interpreted on its long-wave spectral end as internal tides, topography, large-scale wind, and atmospheric low-pressure actions. In addition, internal eigen waves, generated by mean-flow shear, and the aging of the wave field from a virginal (linear) into a saturated state are taken into account. Wave packets and turbulence are treated as particles (vortices, packets) by ensemble kinetics so that the loss terms in all thre...

  2. Instability of combined gravity-inertial-Rossby waves in atmospheres and oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The properties of the instability of combined gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane are investigated. The wave-energy exchange equation shows that there is an exchange of energy with the background stratified medium. The energy source driving the instability lies in the background enthalpy released by the gravitational buoyancy force.

    It is shown that if the phase speed of the westward propagating low frequency-long wavelength Rossby wave exceeds the Poincaré-Kelvin (or "equivalent" shallow water wave speed, instability arises from the merging of Rossby and Poincaré modes. There are two key parameters in this instability condition; namely, the equatorial/rotational Mach (or Froude number M and the latitude θ0 of the β-plane. In general waves equatorward of a critical latitude for given M can be driven unstable, with corresponding growth rates of the order of a day or so. Although these conclusions may only be safely drawn for short wavelengths corresponding to a JWKB wave packet propagating internally and located far from boundaries, nevertheless such a local instability may play a significant role in atmosphere-ocean dynamics.

  3. Atmospheric Layers in Response to the Propagation of Gravity Waves under Nonisothermal, Wind-shear, and Dissipative Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, John Z. G.

    2016-01-01

    We study the atmospheric structure in response to the propagation of gravity waves under nonisothermal (nonzero vertical temperature gradient), wind-shear (nonzero vertical zonal/meridional wind speed gradients), and dissipative (nonzero molecular viscosity and thermal conduction) conditions. As an alternative to the “complex wave-frequency” model proposed by Vadas and Fritts, we employ the traditional “complex vertical wave-number” approach to solving an eighth-order complex polynomial dispe...

  4. The influence of time-dependent wind on gravity-wave propagation in the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhong

    Full Text Available Ray-tracing techniques are used to computationally investigate the propagation of gravity waves through the middle atmosphere, as characterized by the vertically varying CIRA-86 wind and temperature models, plus a tidal wind model that varies temporally as well as vertically. For the wave parameters studied here, the background wind variation has a much stronger influence on the ray path and changes in wave characteristics than does the temperature variation. The temporal variation of the tidal component of the wind changes the observed frequency, sometimes substantially, while leaving the intrinsic frequency unaltered. It also renders temporary any critical levels that occur in the tidal region. Different starting times for the rays relative to the tidal phase provide different propagation environments, so that the temporary critical levels appear at different heights. The lateral component of the tidal wind is shown to advect propagating wave packets; the maximum lateral displacement of a packet varies inversely with its vertical group velocity. Time-dependent effects are more pronounced in local winter than in summer.

  5. Solar wind Alfvén waves: a source of pulsed ionospheric convection and atmospheric gravity waves

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    P. Prikryl

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A case study of medium-scale travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs that are correlated with solar wind Alfvén waves is presented. The HF radar ground-scatter signatures of TIDs caused by atmospheric gravity waves with periods of 20-40min are traced to a source at high latitudes, namely pulsed ionospheric flows (PIFs due to bursts in the convection electric field and/or the associated ionospheric current fluctuations inferred from ground magnetic field perturbations. The significance of PIFs and TIDs in the context of solar-terrestrial interaction is that Alfvénic fluctuations of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF observed in the solar wind plasma streaming from a coronal hole correlate with PIFs and TIDs. The link between the solar wind Alfvén waves and TIDs is corroborated by the ground magnetic field signatures of ionospheric current fluctuations that are associated with the IMF-By oscillations and TIDs. The observed PIFs and the associated negative-to-positive deflections of the ground magnetic field X component are interpreted as ionospheric signatures of magnetic reconnection pulsed by solar wind Alfvén waves at the dayside magnetopause. Although the clarity of the radar line-of-sight velocity data may have been affected by anomalous HF propagation due to intervening TIDs, the application of a pure state filtering technique to analyze the radar data time series reveals a one-to-one correspondence between PIFs, TIDs and solar wind Alfvén waves. The spectra of solar wind and ground magnetic field perturbations are similar to those of PIFs and TIDs. The ground-scatter signatures indicate TID wavelengths, phase velocities and travel times that are consistent with ray tracing, which shows a subset of possible gravity wave group paths that reach the F region from a source in the E region after the wave energy first travel downward to the upper mesosphere where the waves are reflected upward. The observed one

  6. Atmospheric Layers in Response to the Propagation of Gravity Waves under Nonisothermal, Wind-shear, and Dissipative Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Z. G. Ma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the atmospheric structure in response to the propagation of gravity waves under nonisothermal (nonzero vertical temperature gradient, wind-shear (nonzero vertical zonal/meridional wind speed gradients, and dissipative (nonzero molecular viscosity and thermal conduction conditions. As an alternative to the “complex wave-frequency” model proposed by Vadas and Fritts, we employ the traditional “complex vertical wave-number” approach to solving an eighth-order complex polynomial dispersion equation. The empirical neutral atmospheric models of NRLMSISE-00 and HWM93 are employed to provide mean-field properties. In response to the propagation of gravity waves, the atmosphere is driven into three sandwich-like layers: the adiabatic layer (0–130 km, the dissipation layer (130–230 km and the pseudo-adiabatic layer (above 230 km. In the lower layer, (extended-Hines’ mode or ordinary dissipative wave modes exist, whereas viscous dissipation and thermal conduction fail to exert perceptible influences; in the middle layer, Hines’ mode ceases to exist, and both ordinary and extraordinary dissipative wave modes flourish; in the top layer, only extraordinary wave modes survive, and dissipations affect the real part of the vertical wavenumber ( m r substantially; however, they contribute little to the imaginary part, which is the vertical growth rate ( m i . We also analyze the transition of Hines’ classical mode to ordinary dissipative wave modes, describe both the upward and downward modes of gravity waves and illustrate nonisothermal and wind-shear effects on the propagation of gravity waves of different modes.

  7. Evidence of gravity waves into the atmosphere during the March 2006 total solar eclipse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Zerefos

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at providing experimental evidence, to support the hypothesis according to which the movement of the moon's shadow sweeping the ozone layer at supersonic speed, during a solar eclipse, creates gravity waves in the atmosphere. An experiment was conducted to study eclipse induced thermal fluctuations in the ozone layer (via measurements of total ozone column, ozone photolysis rates and UV irradiance, the ionosphere (Ionosonde Total Electron Content – ITEC, peak electron density height – hmF2, and the troposphere (temperature, relative humidity, before, during and after the total solar eclipse of 29 March 2006. We found the existence of eclipse induced dominant oscillations in the parameters related to the ozone layer and the ionosphere, with periods ranging between 30–40 min. Cross-spectrum analyses resulted to statistically significant square coherences between the observed oscillations, strengthening thermal stratospheric ozone forcing as the main mechanism for GWs. Additional support for a source below the ionosphere was provided by the amplitude of the oscillations in the ionospheric electron density, which increased upwards from 160 to 220 km height. Even though similar oscillations were shown in surface temperature and relative humidity data, no clear evidence for tropospheric influence could be derived from this study, due to the modest amplitude of these waves and the manifold rationale inside the boundary layer.

  8. Evidence of gravity waves into the atmosphere during the March 2006 total solar eclipse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Zerefos

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at testing the hypothesis according to which the movement of the moon's shadow sweeping the ozone layer at supersonic speed during a solar eclipse creates gravity waves in the atmosphere. An experiment was conducted to study fluctuations of the ozone layer, the Ionosonde Total Electron Content (ITEC and the peak electron density height (hmF2 in the ionosphere, as well as at a number of other parameters before, during and after the total solar eclipse. We found the existence of dominant oscillations with periods ranging between 30–40 min in most of the parameters. Cross-spectrum analyses between total ozone and various atmospheric parameters resulted to statistically significant square coherences between the observed oscillations, while the respective phase spectra show that the perturbation originates in the stratosphere and reaches the various layers at speeds around 20 km min−1. Additional evidence supporting these findings was provided by the amplitude of the oscillations in the ionospheric electron density, which increased upwards from 160 to 220 km height.

  9. Convectively Forced Gravity Waves and their Sensitivity to Heating Profile and Atmospheric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Oliver; Parker, Douglas; Griffiths, Stephen; Vosper, Simon; Stirling, Alison

    2016-04-01

    It has been known for some time that convective heating is communicated to its environment by gravity waves. Despite this, the radiation of gravity waves in macro-scale models, which are typically forced at the grid-scale by meso-scale parameterization schemes, is not well understood. We present here theoretical work directed toward improving our fundamental understanding of convectively forced gravity wave effects at the meso-scale, in order to begin to address this problem. Starting with the hydrostatic, non-rotating, 2D, Boussinesq equations in a slab geometry, we find a radiating, analytical solution to prescribed sensible heat forcing for both the vertical velocity and potential temperature response. Both Steady and pulsed heating with adjustable horizontal structure is considered. From these solutions we construct a simple model capable of interrogating the spatial and temporal sensitivity to chosen heating functions of the remote forced response in particular. By varying the assumed buoyancy frequency, the influence of the model stratosphere on the upward radiation of gravity waves, and in turn, on the tropospheric response can be understood. Further, we find that the macro-scale response to convection is highly dependent on the radiation characteristics of gravity waves, which are in turn dependent upon the temporal and spatial structure of the source, and upper boundary condition of the domain.

  10. Analysis of vertical wave number spectrum of atmospheric gravity waves in the stratosphere using COSMIC GPS radio occultation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsuda

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available GPS radio occultation (RO is characterized by high accuracy and excellent height resolution, which has great advantages in analyzing atmospheric structures including small-scale vertical fluctuations. The vertical resolution of the geometrical optics (GO method in the stratosphere is about 1.5 km due to Fresnel radius limitations, but full spectrum inversion (FSI can provide superior resolutions. We applied FSI to COSMIC GPS-RO profiles from ground level up to 30 km altitude, although basic retrieval at UCAR/CDAAC sets the sewing height from GO to FSI below the tropopause. We validated FSI temperature profiles with routine high-resolution radiosonde data in Malaysia and North America collected within 400 km and about 30 min of the GPS RO events. The average discrepancy at 10–30 km altitude was less than 0.5 K, and the bias was equivalent with the GO results.

    Using the FSI results, we analyzed the vertical wave number spectrum of normalized temperature fluctuations in the stratosphere at 20–30 km altitude, which exhibits good consistency with the model spectra of saturated gravity waves. We investigated the white noise floor that tends to appear at high wave numbers, and the substantial vertical resolution of the FSI method was estimated as about 100–200 m in the lower stratosphere. We also examined a criterion for the upper limit of the FSI profiles, beyond which bending angle perturbations due to system noises, etc, could exceed atmospheric excess phase fluctuations. We found that the FSI profiles can be used up to about 28 km in studies of temperature fluctuations with vertical wave lengths as short as 0.5 km.

  11. Analysis of vertical wave number spectrum of atmospheric gravity waves in the stratosphere using COSMIC GPS radio occultation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tsuda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available GPS radio occultation (RO is characterized by high accuracy and excellent height resolution, which has great advantages in analyzing atmospheric structures including small-scale vertical fluctuations. The vertical resolution of the geometrical optics (GO method in the stratosphere is about 1.5 km due to Fresnel radius limitations, but full spectrum inversion (FSI can provide superior resolutions. We applied FSI to COSMIC GPS-RO profiles from ground level up to 30 km altitude, although basic retrieval at UCAR/CDAAC sets the sewing height from GO to FSI below the tropopause. We validated FSI temperature profiles with routine high-resolution radiosonde data in Malaysia and North America collected within 400 km and about 30 min of the GPS RO events. The average discrepancy at 10–30 km altitude was less than 0.5 K, and the bias was equivalent with the GO results.

    Using the FSI results, we analyzed the vertical wave number spectrum of normalized temperature fluctuations in the stratosphere at 20–30 km altitude, which exhibits good consistency with the model spectra of saturated gravity waves. We investigated the white noise floor that tends to appear at high wave numbers, and the substantial vertical resolution of the FSI method was estimated as about 100–200 m in the lower stratosphere. We also examined a criterion for the upper limit of the FSI profiles, beyond which bending angle perturbations due to system noises, etc., could exceed atmospheric excess phase fluctuations. We found that the FSI profiles can be used up to about 28 km in studies of temperature fluctuations with vertical wave lengths as short as 0.5 km.

  12. Finite-Difference Modeling of Acoustic and Gravity Wave Propagation in Mars Atmosphere: Application to Infrasounds Emitted by Meteor Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Raphael F.; Brissaud, Quentin; Rolland, Lucie; Martin, Roland; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Spiga, Aymeric; Lognonné, Philippe; Banerdt, Bruce

    2016-12-01

    The propagation of acoustic and gravity waves in planetary atmospheres is strongly dependent on both wind conditions and attenuation properties. This study presents a finite-difference modeling tool tailored for acoustic-gravity wave applications that takes into account the effect of background winds, attenuation phenomena (including relaxation effects specific to carbon dioxide atmospheres) and wave amplification by exponential density decrease with height. The simulation tool is implemented in 2D Cartesian coordinates and first validated by comparison with analytical solutions for benchmark problems. It is then applied to surface explosions simulating meteor impacts on Mars in various Martian atmospheric conditions inferred from global climate models. The acoustic wave travel times are validated by comparison with 2D ray tracing in a windy atmosphere. Our simulations predict that acoustic waves generated by impacts can refract back to the surface on wind ducts at high altitude. In addition, due to the strong nighttime near-surface temperature gradient on Mars, the acoustic waves are trapped in a waveguide close to the surface, which allows a night-side detection of impacts at large distances in Mars plains. Such theoretical predictions are directly applicable to future measurements by the INSIGHT NASA Discovery mission.

  13. Application of higher-order KdV-mKdV model with higher-degree nonlinear terms to gravity waves in atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zi-Liang

    2009-01-01

    Higher-order Korteweg-de Vries (KdV)-modified KdV (mKdV) equations with a higher-degree of nonlinear terms are derived from a simple incompressible non-hydrostatic Boussinesq equation set in atmosphere and are used to investigate gravity waves in atmosphere. By taking advantage of the auxiliary nonlinear ordinary differential equation, periodic wave and solitary wave solutions of the fifth-order KdV-mKdV models with higher-degree nonlinear terms are obtained under some constraint conditions. The analysis shows that the propagation and the periodic structures of gravity waves depend on the properties of the slope of line of constant phase and atmospheric stability. The Jacobi elliptic function wave and solitary wave solutions with slowly varying amplitude are transformed into triangular waves with the abruptly varying amplitude and breaking gravity waves under the effect of atmospheric instability.

  14. Some characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed by radio-interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Mercier

    Full Text Available Observations of atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs are considered through their effect on the horizontal gradient G of the slant total electron content (slant TEC, which can be directly obtained from two-dimensional radio-interferometric observations of cosmic radio-sources with the Nançay radioheligraph (2.2°E, 47.3°N. Azimuths of propagation can be deduced (modulo 180°. The total database amounts to about 800 h of observations at various elevations, local time and seasons. The main results are:

    a AGWs are partially directive, confirming our previous results.

    b The propagation azimuths considered globally are widely scattered with a preference towards the south.

    c They show a bimodal time distribution with preferential directions towards the SE during daytime and towards the SW during night-time (rather than a clockwise rotation as reported by previous authors.

    d The periods are scattered but are larger during night-time than during daytime by about 60%.

    e The effects observed with the solar radio-sources are significantly stronger than with other radio-sources (particularly at higher elevations, showing the role of the geometry in line of sight-integrated observations.

  15. Gravity wave effects in the thermosphere during sudden stratospheric warmings and vertical coupling between the lower and upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiǧit, Erdal; Medvedev, Alexander S.

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves are primarily generated in the lower atmosphere, propagate upward, and have profound effects not only in the middle atmosphere but also at much higher altitudes. However, their effects in the upper atmosphere beyond the turbopause ( 105 km) have not been sufficiently studied. Using a general circulating model extending from the lower atmosphere to upper thermosphere and incorporating a whole atmosphere nonlinear parameterization of small-scale GWs developed by Yiǧit et al. (2008)}, we demonstrate that not only GWs penetrate into the thermosphere above the turbopause but also produce substantial dynamical and thermal effects that are comparable to ion drag and Joule heating. During sudden stratospheric warmings, GW propagation in the thermosphere is enhanced by more than a factor of three (Yiǧit and Medvedev, 2012)}, producing appreciable body forcing of up to 600 m s^{-1} day^{-1} around 250-300 km. The resultant impact on the variability of the thermospheric circulation can exceed ± 50% depending on the phase of the sudden warming (Yiǧit et al., 2014)}. References: Yiǧit, E., and A. S. Medvedev (2012), Gravity waves in the thermosphere during a sudden stratospheric warming, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L21101, doi:10.1029/2012GL053812. Yiǧit, E., A. D. Aylward, and A. S. Medvedev (2008), Parameterization of the effects of vertically propagating gravity waves for thermosphere general circulation models: Sensitivity study, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D19106, doi:10.1029/2008JD010135. Yiǧit, E., A. S. Medvedev, S. L. England, and T. J. Immel (2014), Simulated vari- ability of the high-latitude thermosphere induced by small-scale gravity waves during a sudden stratospheric warming, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 119, doi:10.1002/2013JA019283.

  16. A global view of gravity waves in the Martian atmosphere inferred from a high-resolution general circulation model

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Yiğit, Erdal; Hartogh, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Global characteristics of the small-scale gravity wave (GW) field in the Martian atmosphere obtained from a high-resolution general circulation model (GCM) are presented for the first time. The simulated GW-induced temperature variances are in a good agreement with available radio occultation data in the lower atmosphere between 10 and 30 km. The model reveals a latitudinal asymmetry with stronger wave generation in the winter hemisphere, and two distinctive sources of GWs: mountainous regions and the meandering winter polar jet. Orographic GWs are filtered while propagating upward, and the mesosphere is primarily dominated by harmonics with faster horizontal phase velocities. Wave fluxes are directed mainly against the local wind. GW dissipation in the upper mesosphere generates body forces of tens of m~s$^{-1}$~sol$^{-1}$, which tend to close the simulated jets. The results represent a realistic surrogate for missing observations, which can be used for constraining GW parameterizations and validating GCM si...

  17. Instability of coupled gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in solar system atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves on a β-plane in the Boussinesq approximation. The wave equation for the system is fifth order in space and time and demonstrates how gravity-inertial waves on the one hand are coupled to Rossby waves on the other through the combined effects of β, the stratification characterized by the Väisälä-Brunt frequency N, the Coriolis frequency f at a given latitude, and vertical propagation which permits buoyancy modes to interact with westward propagating Rossby waves. The corresponding dispersion equation shows that the frequency of a westward propagating gravity-inertial wave is reduced by the coupling, whereas the frequency of a Rossby wave is increased. If the coupling is sufficiently strong these two modes coalesce giving rise to an instability. The instability condition translates into a curve of critical latitude Θc versus effective equatorial rotational Mach number M, with the region below this curve exhibiting instability. "Supersonic" fast rotators are unstable in a narrow band of latitudes around the equator. For example Θc~12° for Jupiter. On the other hand slow "subsonic" rotators (e.g. Mercury, Venus and the Sun's Corona are unstable at all latitudes except very close to the poles where the β effect vanishes. "Transonic" rotators, such as the Earth and Mars, exhibit instability within latitudes of 34° and 39°, respectively, around the Equator. Similar results pertain to Oceans. In the case of an Earth's Ocean of depth 4km say, purely westward propagating waves are unstable up to 26° about the Equator. The nonlinear evolution of this instability which feeds off rotational energy and gravitational buoyancy may play an important role in atmospheric dynamics.

  18. Seasonal variation of gravity waves in the Equatorial Middle Atmosphere: results from ISRO's Middle Atmospheric Dynamics (MIDAS program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ramkumar

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Altitude profiles of temperature in the stratospheric and mesopheric region from lidar observations at NARL, Gadanki, India, during December 2002–April 2005, as part of ISRO's Middle Atmospheric Dynamics – "MIDAS (2002–2005" program are used to study the characteristics of gravity waves and their seasonal variation. Month-to-month variation of the gravity wave activity observed during the period of December 2002–April 2005 show maximum wave activity, with primary peaks in May 2003, August 2004 and March 2005 and secondary peaks in February 2003 and November 2004. This month-to-month variation in gravity wave activity is linked to the variation in the strength of the sources, viz. convection and wind shear, down below at the tropospheric region, estimated from MST radar measurements at the same location. Horizontal wind shear is found to be mostly correlated with wave activity than convection, and sometimes both sources are found to contribute towards the wave activity.

  19. Gravity waves and high-altitude CO$_2$ ice cloud formation in the Martian atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Yiğit, Erdal; Hartogh, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We present the first general circulation model simulations that quantify and reproduce patches of extremely cold air required for CO$_2$ condensation and cloud formation in the Martian mesosphere. They are created by subgrid-scale gravity waves (GWs) accounted for in the model with the interactively implemented spectral parameterization. Distributions of GW-induced temperature fluctuations and occurrences of supersaturation conditions are in a good agreement with observations of high-altitude CO$_2$ ice clouds. Our study confirms the key role of GWs in facilitating CO$_2$ cloud formation, discusses their tidal modulation, and predicts clouds at altitudes higher than have been observed to date.

  20. Parametric Excitation of Internal Gravity Waves in Ocean and Atmosphere as Precursors of Strong Earthquakes and Tsunami

    CERN Document Server

    Chefranov, Sergey G

    2013-01-01

    The condition of internal gravity waves (IGW) parametric excitation in the rotating fluid layer heated from above, with the layer vibration along the vertical axis or with periodic modulation in time of the vertical temperature distribution, is obtained. We show the dual role of the molecular dissipative effects that may lead not only to the wave oscillations damping, but also to emergence of hydrodynamic dissipative instability (DI) in some frequency band of IGW. This DI also may take place for the localized in horizontal plane tornado-like disturbances, horizontal scale of which does not exceed the character vertical scale for the fluid layer of the finite depth. Investigated parametric resonance mechanism of IGW generation in ocean and atmosphere during and before earthquakes allows monitoring of such waves (with double period with respect to the period of vibration or temperature gradient modulation) as precursors of these devastating phenomena.

  1. Modeling ionospheric disturbance features in quasi-vertically incident ionograms using 3-D magnetoionic ray tracing and atmospheric gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, M. A.; Harris, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) has initiated an experimental program, Spatial Ionospheric Correlation Experiment, utilizing state-of-the-art DSTO-designed high frequency digital receivers. This program seeks to understand ionospheric disturbances at scales employ a 3-D magnetoionic Hamiltonian ray tracing engine, developed by DSTO, to (1) model the various disturbance features observed on both the O and X polarization modes in our QVI data and (2) understand how they are produced. The ionospheric disturbances which produce the observed features were modeled by perturbing the ionosphere with atmospheric gravity waves.

  2. Assessment of the Impact of Middle-Atmosphere Solar Tides on Gravity Waves in a WKB Gravity-Wave Model Based on Wave-Action Phase-Space Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribstein, Bruno; Achatz, Ulrich; Senf, Fabian

    2014-05-01

    abstract Gravity waves (GWs) and solar tides (STs) are main constituents of the dynamical coupling between troposphere and mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT). Via momentum deposition, GWs control to a large extent the mesospheric mean circulation. STs are large scale waves, mostly due to tropospheric and stratospheric diurnal heating processes, that modulate all dynamical fields in the mesosphere. GWs ant STs also interact strongly with each other. Conventional GW parameterizations used to describe this interaction (e.g. [1]) neglect the time-dependence and horizontal gradients of the background flow, with fatal effects (e.g. [2]). We study here the propagation of GWs in a time-dependent middle-atmosphere background flow, using a new (caustics free) WKB GW model (ray tracer). The background flow is composed by a climatological mean and tidal fields extracted from a general circulation model (HAMMONIA, see [3]). In order to avoid caustics, inevitable in classic ray-tracer implementations, we implemented a new wave-action phase-space density conservation scheme [4, 5]. The scheme attaches to each ray a finite volume in the location & wavenumber phase-space. The location-wavenumber volume is conserved during the propagation, responding in shape to the local stretching and squeezing in wave-number space. From the propagation of GWs we evaluate the deposition of momentum and buoyancy. Rayleigh-friction and temperature-relaxation coefficients are also evaluated. In this extension of the study by [2] it is shown, with an amplitude scheme more stable against numerical instabilities, due to the avoidance of caustics, that STs (and so the time dependence of the background flow) modulate the propagation of GWs. Via Rayleigh-friction and temperature-relaxation coefficients, we also quantify how the pseudo-momentum-, momentum-, and enthalpy-deposition of GWs can influence the amplitude and the phase structure of STs. Finally, we compare momentum and buoyancy fluxes from the

  3. Role of Wind Filtering and Unbalanced Flow Generation in Middle Atmosphere Gravity Wave Activity at Chatanika Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin C. Triplett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The meteorological control of gravity wave activity through filtering by winds and generation by spontaneous adjustment of unbalanced flows is investigated. This investigation is based on a new analysis of Rayleigh LiDAR measurements of gravity wave activity in the upper stratosphere-lower mesosphere (USLM,40–50kmon 152 nights at Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR, Chatanika, Alaska (65◦ N, 147◦ W, over 13 years between 1998 and 2014. The LiDAR measurements resolve inertia-gravity waves with observed periods between 1 h and 4 h and vertical wavelengths between 2 km and 10 km. The meteorological conditions are defined by reanalysis data from the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA. The gravity wave activity shows large night-to-night variability, but a clear annual cycle with a maximum in winter,and systematic interannual variability associated with stratospheric sudden warming events. The USLM gravity wave activity is correlated with the MERRA winds and is controlled by the winds in the lower stratosphere through filtering by critical layer filtering. The USLM gravity wave activity is also correlated with MERRA unbalanced flow as characterized by the residual of the nonlinear balance equation. This correlation with unbalanced flow only appears when the wind conditions are taken into account, indicating that wind filtering is the primary control of the gravity wave activity.

  4. GEODYNAMIC WAVES AND GRAVITY

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    A. V. Vikulin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available  Gravity phenomena related to the Earth movements in the Solar System and through the Galaxy are reviewed. Such movements are manifested by geological processes on the Earth and correlate with geophysical fields of the Earth. It is concluded that geodynamic processes and the gravity phenomena (including those of cosmic nature are related.  The state of the geomedium composed of blocks is determined by stresses with force moment and by slow rotational waves that are considered as a new type of movements [Vikulin, 2008, 2010]. It is shown that the geomedium has typical rheid properties [Carey, 1954], specifically an ability to flow while being in the solid state [Leonov, 2008]. Within the framework of the rotational model with a symmetric stress tensor, which is developed by the authors [Vikulin, Ivanchin, 1998; Vikulin et al., 2012a, 2013], such movement of the geomedium may explain the energy-saturated state of the geomedium and a possibility of its movements in the form of vortex geological structures [Lee, 1928]. The article discusses the gravity wave detection method based on the concept of interactions between gravity waves and crustal blocks [Braginsky et al., 1985]. It is concluded that gravity waves can be recorded by the proposed technique that detects slow rotational waves. It is shown that geo-gravitational movements can be described by both the concept of potential with account of gravitational energy of bodies [Kondratyev, 2003] and the nonlinear physical acoustics [Gurbatov et al., 2008]. Based on the combined description of geophysical and gravitational wave movements, the authors suggest a hypothesis about the nature of spin, i.e. own moment as a demonstration of the space-time ‘vortex’ properties.  

  5. Satellite observations of middle atmosphere gravity wave absolute momentum flux and of its vertical gradient during recent stratospheric warmings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Manfred; Trinh, Quang Thai; Kaufmann, Martin; Krisch, Isabell; Preusse, Peter; Ungermann, Jörn; Zhu, Yajun; Gille, John C.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III; Schwartz, Michael J.; Riese, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Sudden stratospheric warmings (SSWs) are circulation anomalies in the polar region during winter. They mostly occur in the Northern Hemisphere and affect also surface weather and climate. Both planetary waves and gravity waves contribute to the onset and evolution of SSWs. While the role of planetary waves for SSW evolution has been recognized, the effect of gravity waves is still not fully understood, and has not been comprehensively analyzed based on global observations. In particular, information on the gravity wave driving of the background winds during SSWs is still missing.We investigate the boreal winters from 2001/2002 until 2013/2014. Absolute gravity wave momentum fluxes and gravity wave dissipation (potential drag) are estimated from temperature observations of the satellite instruments HIRDLS and SABER. In agreement with previous work, we find that sometimes gravity wave activity is enhanced before or around the central date of major SSWs, particularly during vortex-split events. Often, SSWs are associated with polar-night jet oscillation (PJO) events. For these events, we find that gravity wave activity is strongly suppressed when the wind has reversed from eastward to westward (usually after the central date of a major SSW). In addition, gravity wave potential drag at the bottom of the newly forming eastward-directed jet is remarkably weak, while considerable potential drag at the top of the jet likely contributes to the downward propagation of both the jet and the new elevated stratopause. During PJO events, we also find some indication for poleward propagation of gravity waves. Another striking finding is that obviously localized gravity wave sources, likely mountain waves and jet-generated gravity waves, play an important role during the evolution of SSWs and potentially contribute to the triggering of SSWs by preconditioning the shape of the polar vortex. The distribution of these hot spots is highly variable and strongly depends on the zonal and

  6. Historical detection of atmospheric impacts by large bolides using acoustic-gravity waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ReVelle, D.O.

    1995-05-01

    During the period from about 1960 to the early 1980`s a number of large bolides (meteor-fireballs) entered the atmosphere which were sufficiently large to generate blast waves during their drag interaction with the air. For example, the remnant of the blast wave from a single kiloton class event was subsequently detected by up to six ground arrays of microbarographs which were operated by the U.S. Air Force during this pre-satellite period. Data have also been obtained from other sources during this period as well and are also discussed in this summary of the historical data. The Air Force data have been analyzed in terms of their observable properties in order to infer the influx rate of NEO`s (near-Earth objects) in the energy range from 0.2 to 1100 kt. The determined influx is in reasonable agreement with that determined by other methods currently available such as Rabinowitz (1992), Ceplecha, (1992; 1994b) and by Chapman and Morrison (1994) despite the fact that due to sampling deficiencies only a portion of the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} flux of large bodies has been obtained by this method, i.e., only sources at relatively low elevations have been detected. Thus the weak, fragile cometary bodies which do not penetrate the atmosphere as deeply are less likely to have been sampled by this type of detection system. Future work using the proposed C.T.B.T. (Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty) global scale infrasonic network will be likely to improve upon this early estimate of the global influx of NEO`s considerably.

  7. Atmospheric inertia-gravity waves retrieved from level-2 data of the satellite microwave limb sounder Aura/MLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocke, Klemens; Lainer, Martin; Moreira, Lorena; Hagen, Jonas; Fernandez Vidal, Susana; Schranz, Franziska

    2016-09-01

    The temperature profiles of the satellite experiment Aura/MLS are horizontally spaced by 1.5° or 165 km along the satellite orbit. These level-2 data contain valuable information about horizontal fluctuations in temperature, which are mainly induced by inertia-gravity waves. Wave periods of 2-12 h, horizontal wavelengths of 200-1500 km, and vertical wavelengths of 6-30 km efficiently contribute to the standard deviation of the horizontal temperature fluctuations. The study retrieves and discusses the global distributions of inertia-gravity waves in the stratosphere and mesosphere during July 2015 and January 2016. We find many patterns that were previously present in data of TIMED/SABER, Aura/HIRDLS, and ECMWF analysis. However, it seems that Aura/MLS achieves a higher vertical resolution in the gravity wave maps since the maps are derived from the analysis of horizontal fluctuations along the orbit of the sounding volume. The zonal mean of the inertia-gravity wave distribution shows vertical modulations with scales of 10-20 km. Enhanced wave amplitudes occur in regions of increased zonal wind or in the vicinity of strong wind gradients. Further, we find a banana-like shape of enhanced inertia-gravity waves above the Andes in the winter mesosphere. We find areas of enhanced inertia-gravity wave activity above tropical deep convection zones at 100 hPa (z ˜ 13 km). Finally, we study the temporal evolution of inertia-gravity wave activity at 100 hPa in the African longitude sector from December 2015 to February 2016.

  8. Finite Difference Simulations of Acoustic and Gravity Wave Propagation in Mars Atmosphere: Applications to INSIGHT NASA Mission and Mars Microphone Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R.; Brissaud, Q.; Martin, R.; Rolland, L. M.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    A simulation tool of acoustic and gravity wave propagation through finite differences is applied to the case of Mars atmosphere.The details of the code and its validation for Earth atmosphere are presented in session SA003.The simulations include the modeling of both acoustic and gravity waves in the same run, an effects of exponential density decrease, winds and attenuation.The application to Mars requires the inclusion of a specific attenuation effect related to the relaxation induced by vibrational modes of carbon dioxide molecules.Two different applications are presented demonstrating the ability of the simulation tool to work at very different scale length and frequencies.First the propagation of acoustic and gravity waves due to a bolide explosion in the atmosphere of Mars are simulated.This case has a direct application to the atmospheric pressure and seismic measurements that will be performed by INSIGHT NASA discovery mission next year.Then, we also present simulations of sound wave propagation on a scale of meters that can be used to infer the feasability microphone measurements for future Mars missions.

  9. A Search for Strange Attractors in the Saturation of Middle Atmosphere Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    attractor in surface pressure data, sunshine *duration data and 500 mb zonal wave amplitude data. In a later study 17 (Fraedrich, 1987), he examined...difference in the latter finding. Fraedrich (1986) repeated these calculations for a 30 year record of the number of daily sunshine hours. Again, the...greater if the attractor were of higher dimensions which is very likely. Six hours is practically an eternity for the phenomena we are considering in the

  10. A study of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances and Atmospheric Gravity Waves using EISCAT Svalbard Radar IPY-data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vlasov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical study of Traveling Ionospheric Disturbances (TIDs as observed by the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR during the continuous IPY-run (March 2007–February 2008 with field-aligned measurements. We have developed a semi-automatic routine for searching and extracting Atmospheric Gravity Wave (AGW activity. The collected data shows that AGW-TID signatures are common in the high-latitude ionosphere especially in the field-aligned ion velocity data (244 cases of AGW-TID signatures in daily records, but they can be observed also in electron density (26 cases, electron temperature (12 cases and ion temperature (26 cases. During the IPY campaign (in solar minimum conditions AGW-TID events appear more frequently during summer months than during the winter months. It remains still as a topic for future studies whether the observed seasonal variation is natural or caused by seasonal variation in the performance of the observational method that we use (AGW-TID signature may be more pronounced in a dense ionosphere. In our AGW-TID dataset the distribution of the oscillation periods has two peaks, one around 0.5–0.7 h and the other around 1.1–1.3 h. The diurnal occurrence rate has a deep minimum in the region of magnetic midnight, which might be partly explained by irregular auroral activity obscuring the TID signatures from our detection routines. As both the period and horizontal phase speed estimates (as derived from the classical AGW dispersion relation show values typical both for large scale TIDs and mesoscale TIDs it is difficult to distinguish whether the generator for high-latitude AGW-TIDs resides typically in the troposphere or in the near-Earth space. The results of our statistical analysis give anyway some valuable reference information for the future efforts to learn more about the dominating TID source mechanisms in polar cap conditions, and to improve AGW simulations.

  11. The interaction between atmospheric gravity waves and large-scale flows: an efficient description beyond the non-acceleration paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribstein, Bruno; Bölöni, Gergely; Muraschko, Jewgenija; Sgoff, Christine; Wei, Junhong; Achatz, Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    With the aim of contributing to the improvement of subgrid-scale gravity wave (GW) parameterizations in numerical-weather-prediction and climate models, the comparative relevance in GW drag of direct GW-mean-flow interactions and turbulent wave breakdown are investigated. Of equal interest is how well Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB) theory can capture direct wave-mean-flow interactions, that are excluded by applying the steady-state approximation. WKB is implemented in a very efficient Lagrangian ray-tracing approach that considers wave action density in phasespace, thereby avoiding numerical instabilities due to caustics. It is supplemented by a simple wave-breaking scheme based on a static-instability saturation criterion. Idealized test cases of horizontally homogeneous GW packets are considered where wave-resolving Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) provide the reference. In all of theses cases the WKB simulations including direct GW-mean-flow interactions reproduce the LES data, to a good accuracy, already without wave-breaking scheme. The latter provides a next-order correction that is useful for fully capturing the total-energy balance between wave and mean flow. This is not the case when a steady-state WKB implementation is used, as used in present GW parameterizations.

  12. Atmospheric Gravity Waves (AGWs) as the driver of seismo-ionospheric coupling: recent major earthquakes of Nepal and Imphal - case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta

    2016-07-01

    An important channel of the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling (LAIC) is the acoustic and gravity wave channel where the atmospheric gravity waves (AGW) play the most important part. Atmospheric waves are excited due to seismic gravitational vibrations before earthquakes and their effects on the atmosphere are the sources for seismo-ionospheric coupling which are manifested as perturbations in Very Low Frequency (VLF)/Low Frequency (LF) signal (amplitude/phase). For our study, we chose the recent major earthquakes that took place in Nepal and Imphal. The Nepal earthquake occurred on 12th May, 2015 at 12:50 pm local time (07:05 UTC) with Richter scale magnitude of M = 7.3 and depth 10 km (6.21 miles) at southeast of Kodari. The Imphal earthquake occurred on 4th January, 2016 at 4:35 am local time (23:05 UTC , 3rd January, UTC) with Richter scale magnitude of M = 6.7 and depth 55 km (34.2 miles). The data has been collected from Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Centre (IERC) of Indian Centre for Space Physics (ICSP) transmitted from JJI station of Japan. We performed both Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and wavelet analysis on the VLF data for a couple of days before and after the major earthquakes. For both earthquakes, we observed wave like structures with periods of almost an hour before and after the earthquake day. The wave like oscillations after the earthquake may be due to the aftershock effects. We also observed that the amplitude of the wave like structures depends on the location of the epicenter between the transmitting and the receiving points and also on the depth of the earthquake.

  13. A case study of gravity waves in noctilucent clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dalin

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of a noctilucent cloud (NLC display appearing on 10-11 August 2000 over Northern Sweden. Clear wave structures were visible in the clouds and time-lapse photography was used to derive the parameters characterising the gravity waves which could account for the observed NLC modulation. Using two nearby atmospheric radars, the Esrange MST Radar data and Andoya MF radar, we have identified gravity waves propagating upward from the upper stratosphere to NLC altitudes. The wave parameters derived from the radar measurements support the suggestion that gravity waves are responsible for the observed complex wave dynamics in the NLC.

  14. Shear waves in inhomogeneous, compressible fluids in a gravity field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-03-01

    While elastic solids support compressional and shear waves, waves in ideal compressible fluids are usually thought of as compressional waves. Here, a class of acoustic-gravity waves is studied in which the dilatation is identically zero, and the pressure and density remain constant in each fluid particle. These shear waves are described by an exact analytic solution of linearized hydrodynamics equations in inhomogeneous, quiescent, inviscid, compressible fluids with piecewise continuous parameters in a uniform gravity field. It is demonstrated that the shear acoustic-gravity waves also can be supported by moving fluids as well as quiescent, viscous fluids with and without thermal conductivity. Excitation of a shear-wave normal mode by a point source and the normal mode distortion in realistic environmental models are considered. The shear acoustic-gravity waves are likely to play a significant role in coupling wave processes in the ocean and atmosphere.

  15. Gravity wave reflection: Case study based on rocket data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüst, Sabine; Bittner, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Since gravity waves significantly influence the atmosphere by transporting energy and momentum, it is important to study their wave spectrum and their energy dissipation rates. Besides that, knowledge about gravity wave sources and the propagation of the generated waves is essential. Originating in the lower atmosphere, gravity waves can move upwards; when the background wind field is equal to their phase speed a so-called critical layer is reached. Their breakdown and deposition of energy and momentum is possible. Another mechanism which can take place at critical layers is gravity wave reflection. In this paper, gravity waves which were observed by foil chaff measurements during the DYANA (DYnamics Adapted Network for the Atmosphere) campaign in 1990 in Biscarrosse (44°N, 1°W)--as reported by Wüst and Bittner [2006. Non-linear wave-wave interaction: case studies based on rocket data and first application to satellite data. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 68, 959-976]--are investigated to look for gravity wave reflection processes. Following nonlinear theory, energy dissipation rates according to Weinstock [1980. Energy dissipation rates of turbulence in the stable free atmosphere. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 38, 880-883] are calculated from foil chaff cloud and falling sphere data and compared with the critical layer heights. Enhanced energy dissipation rates are found at those altitudes where the waves' phase speed matches the zonal background wind speeds. Indication of gravity wave trapping is found between two altitudes of around 95 and 86 km.

  16. Global distribution of gravity wave fields and their seasonal dependence in the Martian atmosphere simulated in a high-resolution general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Medvedev, Alexander; Yiğit, Erdal; Hartogh, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) are small-scale atmospheric waves generated by various geophysical processes, such as topography, convection, and dynamical instability. On Mars, several observations and simulations have revealed that GWs strongly affect temperature and wind fields in the middle and upper atmosphere. We have worked with a high-resolution Martian general circulation model (MGCM), with the spectral resolution of T106 (horizontal grid interval of ~67 km), for the investigations of generation and propagation of GWs. We analyzed for three kinds of wavelength ranges, (1) horizontal total wavenumber s=21-30 (wavelength λ~700-1000 km), (2) s=31-60 (λ~350-700 km), and (3) s=61-106 (λ~200-350 km). Our results show that shorter-scale harmonics progressively dominate with height during both equinox and solstice. We have detected two main sources of GWs: mountainous regions and the meandering winter polar jet. In both seasons GW energy in the troposphere due to the shorter-scale harmonics is concentrated in the low latitudes in a good agreement with observations. Orographically-generated GWs contribute significantly to the total energy of disturbances, and strongly decay with height. Thus, the non-orographic GWs of tropospheric origin dominate near the mesopause. The vertical fluxes of wave horizontal momentum are directed mainly against the larger-scale wind. Mean magnitudes of the drag in the middle atmosphere are tens of m s-1 sol-1, while instantaneously they can reach thousands of m s-1 sol-1, which results in an attenuation of the wind jets in the middle atmosphere and in tendency of their reversal.

  17. Waves in vertically inhomogeneous dissipative atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitrienko, I S

    2015-01-01

    A method of construction of solution for acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) above a wave source, taking dissipation throughout the atmosphere into account (Dissipative Solution above Source, DSAS), is proposed. The method is to combine three solutions for three parts of the atmosphere: an analytical solution for the upper isothermal part and numerical solutions for the real non-isothermal dissipative atmosphere in the middle part and for the real non-isothermal small dissipation atmosphere in the lower one. In this paper the method has been carried out for the atmosphere with thermal conductivity but without viscosity. The heights of strong dissipation and the total absorption index in the regions of weak and average dissipation are found. For internal gravity waves the results of test calculations for an isothermal atmosphere and calculations for a real non-isothermal atmosphere are shown in graphical form. An algorithm and appropriate code to calculate DSAS, taking dissipation due to finite thermal conductivity i...

  18. Inherently Unstable Internal Gravity Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Y

    2016-01-01

    Here we show that there exist internal gravity waves that are inherently unstable, that is, they cannot exist in nature for a long time. The instability mechanism is a one-way (irreversible) harmonic-generation resonance that permanently transfers the energy of an internal wave to its higher harmonics. We show that, in fact, there are countably infinite number of such unstable waves. For the harmonic-generation resonance to take place, nonlinear terms in the free surface boundary condition play a pivotal role, and the instability does not obtain if a simplified boundary condition such as rigid lid or linear form is employed. Harmonic-generation resonance presented here also provides a mechanism for the transfer of the energy of the internal waves to the higher-frequency part of the spectrum where internal waves are more prone to breaking, hence losing energy to turbulence and heat and contributing to oceanic mixing.

  19. Further study on the role of atmospheric gravity waves on the seismo-ionospheric perturbations as detected by subionospheric VLF/LF propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Muto

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available As the target earthquake we have taken a huge earthquake (EQ named Miyagi-oki earthquake on 16 August 2005 (with magnitude of 7.2 and we have analyzed the 4 month period including the date of this EQ. In addition to our previous analysis on the nighttime average amplitude (trend and nighttime fluctuation, we have proposed the use of fluctuation power spectra in the frequency rage of atmospheric gravity waves (period=10 min to 100 min as a third parameter of subionospheric VLF/LF propagation characteristics. Then it is found that this third parameter would be of additional importance in confirming the presence of seismo-ionospheric perturbations. Finally, we have discovered an important role of lunar tidal effect in the VLF/LF data, which appears one and two months before this large EQ.

  20. Intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations with AIRS and IASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hoffmann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves are an important driver for the atmospheric circulation and have substantial impact on weather and climate. Satellite instruments offer excellent opportunities to study gravity waves on a global scale. This study focuses on observations from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Aqua satellite and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI onboard the European MetOp satellites. The main aim of this study is an intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations of both instruments. In particular, we analyzed AIRS and IASI 4.3 μm brightness temperature measurements, which directly relate to stratospheric temperature. Three case studies showed that AIRS and IASI provide a clear and consistent picture of the temporal development of individual gravity wave events. Statistical comparisons based on a five-year period of measurements (2008–2012 showed similar spatial and temporal patterns of gravity wave activity. However, the statistical comparisons also revealed systematic differences of variances between AIRS and IASI (about 45% that we attribute to the different spatial measurement characteristics of both instruments. We also found differences between day- and nighttime data (about 30% that are partly due to the local time variations of the gravity wave sources. While AIRS has been used successfully in many previous gravity wave studies, IASI data are applied here for the first time for that purpose. Our study shows that gravity wave observations from different hyperspectral infrared sounders such as AIRS and IASI can be directly related to each other, if instrument-specific characteristics such as different noise levels and spatial resolution and sampling are carefully considered. The ability to combine observations from different satellites provides an opportunity to create a long-term record, which is an exciting prospect for future climatological

  1. Intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations with AIRS and IASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Hoffmann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves are an important driver for the atmospheric circulation and have substantial impact on weather and climate. Satellite instruments offer excellent opportunities to study gravity waves on a global scale. This study focuses on observations from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aqua satellite and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI onboard the European MetOp satellites. The main aim of this study is an intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave observations of both instruments. In particular, we analyzed AIRS and IASI 4.3 μm brightness temperature measurements, which directly relate to stratospheric temperature. Three case studies showed that AIRS and IASI provide a clear and consistent picture of the temporal development of individual gravity wave events. Statistical comparisons based on a 5-year period of measurements (2008–2012 showed similar spatial and temporal patterns of gravity wave activity. However, the statistical comparisons also revealed systematic differences of variances between AIRS and IASI that we attribute to the different spatial measurement characteristics of both instruments. We also found differences between day- and nighttime data that are partly due to the local time variations of the gravity wave sources. While AIRS has been used successfully in many previous gravity wave studies, IASI data are applied here for the first time for that purpose. Our study shows that gravity wave observations from different hyperspectral infrared sounders such as AIRS and IASI can be directly related to each other, if instrument-specific characteristics such as different noise levels and spatial resolution and sampling are carefully considered. The ability to combine observations from different satellites provides an opportunity to create a long-term record, which is an exciting prospect for future climatological studies of stratospheric

  2. On the existence of convectively produced gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Stephen P.; Melfi, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    The Boundary Layer Lidar System (BLLS), together with the gustprobe system onboard the NASA Electra has acquired a unique data set which, for the first time, clearly depicts a gravity wave above a convectively driven planetary boundary layer (PBL). In addition, we believe that the data show the development of a trapped gravity wave over a period of about an hour. If this is the case, it would certainly be the first time that such a process has been seen in the atmosphere. We also conclude that the gravity wave, while being initiated by the convection in the PBL, ultimately acts to organize and control scales in the PBL.

  3. The study and applications of photochemical-dynamical gravity wave model Ⅱ-- The effects of stable gravity wave on chemical species distribution in mesosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jiyao(徐寄遥); MA; Ruiping(马瑞平); A.K.Smith

    2002-01-01

    A nonlinear, compressible, non-isothermal gravity wave model that involves photochemistry is used to study the effects of gravity wave on atmospheric chemical species distributions in this paper. The changes in the distributions of oxygen compound and hydrogen compound density induced by gravity wave propagation are simulated. The results indicate that when a gravity wave propagates through a mesopause region, even if it does not break, it can influence the background distributions of chemical species. The effect of gravity wave on chemical species at night is larger than in daytime.

  4. Nonlinear dynamics of hydrostatic internal gravity waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stechmann, Samuel N.; Majda, Andrew J. [New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, NY (United States); Khouider, Boualem [University of Victoria, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2008-11-15

    Stratified hydrostatic fluids have linear internal gravity waves with different phase speeds and vertical profiles. Here a simplified set of partial differential equations (PDE) is derived to represent the nonlinear dynamics of waves with different vertical profiles. The equations are derived by projecting the full nonlinear equations onto the vertical modes of two gravity waves, and the resulting equations are thus referred to here as the two-mode shallow water equations (2MSWE). A key aspect of the nonlinearities of the 2MSWE is that they allow for interactions between a background wind shear and propagating waves. This is important in the tropical atmosphere where horizontally propagating gravity waves interact together with wind shear and have source terms due to convection. It is shown here that the 2MSWE have nonlinear internal bore solutions, and the behavior of the nonlinear waves is investigated for different background wind shears. When a background shear is included, there is an asymmetry between the east- and westward propagating waves. This could be an important effect for the large-scale organization of tropical convection, since the convection is often not isotropic but organized on large scales by waves. An idealized illustration of this asymmetry is given for a background shear from the westerly wind burst phase of the Madden-Julian oscillation; the potential for organized convection is increased to the west of the existing convection by the propagating nonlinear gravity waves, which agrees qualitatively with actual observations. The ideas here should be useful for other physical applications as well. Moreover, the 2MSWE have several interesting mathematical properties: they are a system of nonconservative PDE with a conserved energy, they are conditionally hyperbolic, and they are neither genuinely nonlinear nor linearly degenerate over all of state space. Theory and numerics are developed to illustrate these features, and these features are

  5. Nonlinear interactions between gravity waves and tides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao; XU JiYao; MA RuiPing

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we present the nonlinear interactions between gravity waves (GWs) and tides by using the 2D numerical model for the nonlinear propagation of GWs in the compressible atmosphere. During the propagation in the tidal background, GWs become instable in three regions, that is z = 75-85 km, z =90-110 km and z= 115-130 km. The vertical wavelength firstly varies gradually from the initial 12 km to 27 km. Then the newly generated longer waves are gradually compressed. The longer and shorter waves occur in the regions where GWs propagate in the reverse and the same direction of the horizontal mean wind respectively. In addition, GWs can propagate above the main breaking region (90-110 km). During GWs propagation, not only the mean wind is accelerated, but also the amplitude of tide is amplified. Especially, after GWs become instable, this amplified effect to the tidal amplitude is much obvious.

  6. Nonlinear interactions between gravity waves and tides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we present the nonlinear interactions between gravity waves (GWs) and tides by using the 2D numerical model for the nonlinear propagation of GWs in the compressible atmosphere. During the propagation in the tidal background, GWs become instable in three regions, that is z = 75―85 km, z = 90―110 km and z = 115―130 km. The vertical wavelength firstly varies gradually from the initial 12 km to 27 km. Then the newly generated longer waves are gradually compressed. The longer and shorter waves occur in the regions where GWs propagate in the reverse and the same direction of the hori-zontal mean wind respectively. In addition, GWs can propagate above the main breaking region (90—110 km). During GWs propagation, not only the mean wind is accelerated, but also the amplitude of tide is amplified. Especially, after GWs become instable, this amplified effect to the tidal amplitude is much obvious.

  7. Atmospheric Gravity Wave Properties for TOMEX as Observed With Na wind/temperature Lidar and Airglow Instrumentation From Albuquerque, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Tang, J.; Liu, A.; Swenson, G.; Gardner, C.

    2002-12-01

    On the night of October 26, 2000, the TOMEX sounding rocket was launched from White Sands rocket range ~5 hours after sunset. Na lidar, airglow imagers, and a Michelson interferometer observed the perturbations in the mesosphere. In addition, the Na lidar measured the winds which were applied to the observed motion field from which intrinsic wave speeds were resolved. The extracted wave field from combined lidar and airglow observations included waves with periods of 5 hours, 1.5 hours, and 13 minutes present for the period leading to, and during the rocket launch. The vertical structures of the 13-minute and 1.5-hour period waves were determined primarily by the thermal structure, which was characterized by a small Brunt-Vaisala frequency between 90 km and 92 km with a strong gradient above and below. The 5-hour period waves exhibited a standing wave pattern, indicative of strong wave reflection in the mesopause region. In addition to the intrinsic wave parameters, the vertical flux of horizontal momentum and acceleration rate as a function of altitude was calculated for each of the waves. Momentum fluxes and accelerations were dominated by contributions from the 13-minute period waves.

  8. Inherently Unstable Internal Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Reza

    2016-11-01

    Here we show that there exist internal gravity waves that are inherently unstable, that is, they cannot exist in nature for a long time. The instability mechanism is a one-way (irreversible) harmonic-generation resonance that permanently transfers the energy of an internal wave to its higher harmonics. We show that, in fact, there are countably infinite number of such unstable waves. For the harmonic-generation resonance to take place, nonlinear terms in the free surface boundary condition play a pivotal role, and the instability does not obtain for a linearly-stratified fluid if a simplified boundary condition such as rigid lid or linear form is employed. Harmonic-generation resonance discussed here also provides a mechanism for the transfer of the energy of the internal waves to the higher-frequency part of the spectrum where internal waves are more prone to breaking, hence losing energy to turbulence and heat and contributing to oceanic mixing. Yong Liang (yong.liang@berkeley.edu).

  9. Wave Propagation in Modified Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Lindroos, Jan Ø; Mota, David F

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of scalar waves induced by matter sources in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity which include screening mechanisms for the scalar degree of freedom. The usual approach when studying these theories in the non-linear regime of cosmological perturbations is based on the assumption that scalar waves travel at the speed of light. Within General Relativity such approximation is good and leads to no loss of accuracy in the estimation of observables. We find, however, that mass terms and non-linearities in the equations of motion lead to propagation and dispersion velocities significantly different from the speed of light. As the group velocity is the one associated to the propagation of signals, a reduction of its value has direct impact on the behavior and dynamics of nonlinear structures within modified gravity theories with screening. For instance, the internal dynamics of galaxies and satellites submerged in large dark matter halos could be affected by the fact that t...

  10. The role of convection, overshoot, and gravity waves for the transport of dust in M dwarf and brown dwarf atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Freytag, Bernd; Ludwig, Hans-Guenter; Homeier, Derek; Steffen, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Observationally, spectra of brown dwarfs indicate the presence of dust in their atmospheres while theoretically it is not clear what prevents the dust from settling and disappearing from the regions of spectrum formation. Consequently, standard models have to rely on ad hoc assumptions about the mechanism that keeps dust grains aloft in the atmosphere. We apply hydrodynamical simulations to develop an improved physical understanding of the mixing properties of macroscopic flows in M dwarf and brown dwarf atmospheres, in particular of the influence of the underlying convection zone. We performed 2D radiation hydrodynamics simulations including a description of dust grain formation and transport with the CO5BOLD code. The simulations cover the very top of the convection zone and the photosphere including the dust layers for effective temperatures between 900K and 2800K, all with logg=5 assuming solar chemical composition. Convective overshoot occurs in the form of exponentially declining velocities with small s...

  11. Stratospheric gravity wave observations of AIRS and HIRDLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Catrin I.; Hoffmann, Lars; Ern, Manfred; Trinh, Thai

    2016-04-01

    The Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provides stratospheric temperature observations for a variety of scientific analyses. However, the horizontal resolution of the operational temperature retrievals is generally not sufficient for studies of gravity waves. The AIRS high-resolution retrieval discussed here provides stratospheric temperature profiles for each individual satellite footprint and therefore has nine times better horizontal sampling than the operational data. The retrieval configuration is optimized so that the results provide a trade-off between spatial resolution and retrieval noise that is considered optimal for gravity wave analysis. To validate the AIRS data we performed an intercomparison with stratospheric temperature measurements of the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS). Selected case studies of gravity wave events are analyzed. AIRS and HIRDLS utilize rather different measurement geometries (nadir and limb) and have different sensitivities to gravity wave horizontal and vertical wavelengths, as indicated by their observational filters. Nevertheless, the wave structures found in the stratosphere in AIRS and HIRDLS data are often in remarkably good agreement. The three-dimensional temperature fields from AIRS allow us to derive the horizontal orientation of the phase fronts, which is a limiting factor for gravity wave analyses based on limb measurements today. In addition, a statistical comparison focuses on temperature variances due to stratospheric gravity wave activity at 20-60 km altitude. The analysis covers monthly zonal averages and time series for the HIRDLS measurement time period (January 2005-March 2008). We found good agreement in the seasonal and latitudinal patterns of gravity wave activity. Time series of gravity wave variances show a strong annual cycle at high latitudes with maxima during wintertime and minima during summertime. Largest variability is found at 60°S during austral

  12. VHF radar observations of gravity waves at a low latitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dutta

    Full Text Available Wind observations made at Gadanki (13.5°N by using Indian MST Radar for few days in September, October, December 1995 and January, 1996 have been analyzed to study gravity wave activity in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Horizontal wind variances have been computed for gravity waves of period (2-6 h from the power spectral density (PSD spectrum. Exponential curves of the form eZ/H have been fitted by least squares technique to these variance values to obtain height variations of the irregular winds upto the height of about 15 km, where Z is the height in kilometers. The value of H, the scale height, as determined from curve fitting is found to be less than the theoretical value of scale height of neutral atmosphere in this region, implying that the waves are gaining energy during their passage in the troposphere. In other words, it indicates that the sources of gravity waves are present in the troposphere. The energy densities of gravity wave fluctuations have been computed. Polynomial fits to the observed values show that wave energy density increases in the troposphere, its source region, and then decreases in the lower stratosphere.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; turbulence; waves and tides

  13. Intensive radiosonde observations of gravity waves in the lower atmosphere over Yichang (111°18´ E, 30°42´ N, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Yu Chen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of dynamical and thermal structures and inertial gravity waves (GWs in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (TLS over Yichang (111°18´ E, 30°42´ N were statistically studied by using the data from intensive radiosonde observations in August 2006 (summer month and January 2007 (winter month on an eight-times-daily basis. The background atmosphere structures observed in different months exhibit evident seasonal differences, and the zonal wind in winter has a prominent tropospheric jet with a maximum wind speed of about 60 ms−1 occurring at the height of 11.5 km. The statistical results of the inertial GWs in our two-month observations are generally consistent with previous observations in the mid-latitudes. In the summer month, the mean intrinsic frequency and vertical wavelength of the inertial GWs in the troposphere are still larger than those in the lower stratosphere with the absence of intensive tropospheric jets, suggesting that the Doppler shifting due to the tropospheric jets cannot completely account for the differences between the GWs in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Compared with the observations in the summer month, some interesting seasonal characteristics of the GWs are revealed by the observations in the winter month: 1 more and stronger tropospheric GWs are observed in the winter month; 2 less and weaker GWs are observed in the lower stratosphere in winter; 3 the ratio of the mean GW kinetic energy density to potential energy density is smaller than 1 in winter, which contrasts to that in summer. Most of the seasonal differences can be explained by the intensive tropospheric jets in winter. In both the summer and winter months, the fitted spectral slopes of the vertical wave number spectra for GWs are generally smaller than the canonical spectral slope of −3. Correlation analyses suggest that the tropospheric jet induced wind shear is the dominant source for GWs in both the troposphere and

  14. Characteristic of gravity waves resolved in ECMWF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preusse, Peter; Eckermann, Stephen; Ern, Manfred; Riese, Martin

    Gravity waves (GWs) influence the circulation of the atmosphere on global scale. Because of insufficient measurements and the difficulty to involve all relevant scales in a single model run, they are one of the chief uncertainties in climate and weather prediction. More information, in particular on global scale, is required. Can we employ global models such as the ECMWF high-resolution GCM to infer quantities of resolved GWs? Does this give us insight for the characteristics and relative importance of real GW sources? And can we use such data safely for, e.g., planning measurement campaigns on GWs? Also trajectory studies of cloud formation (cirrus in the UTLS, PSCs) and related dehydration and denitrification rely heavily on realistic temperature structures due to GWs. We here apply techniques developed for an ESA study proving the scientifc break-through which could be reached by a novel infrared limb imager. The 3D temperature structure of mesoscale GWs is exploited to determine amplitudes and 3D wave vectors of GWs at different levels (25km, 35km and 45km altitude) in the stratosphere. Similar to real observations, GW momentum flux is largest in the winter polar vortex and exhibits a second maximum in the summer subtropics. Based on the 3D wavevectors backward ray-tracing is employed to characterize specific sources. For instance, we find for the northern winter strong GW momentum flux (GWMF) associated with mountain waves from Norway and Greenland as well as waves emitted in the lower troposphere from a storm approaching Norway. Waves from these sources spread up to several thousand km in the stratosphere. Together these three events form a burst in the total hemispheric GWMF of a factor of 3. Strong mountain wave events are also found e.g. at Tierra del Fuego and the Antarctic Peninsula, regions which are in the focus of observational and modeling studies for a decade. Gravity waves in the tropical region are associated with deep convection in the upper

  15. Behavior of gravity waves with limited amplitude in the vicinity of critical layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By using the FICE scheme, a numerical simulation of three-dimensional nonlinear propagation of gravity wave packet in a wind-stratified atmosphere is presented. The whole nonlinear propagation process of the gravity wave packet is shown; the propagation behavior of gravity waves in the vicinity of critical layer is analyzed. The results show that gravity waves encounter the critical layer when propagating in the fair winds whose velocities increase with height, and the height of critical layer propagating nonlinearly is lower than that expected by the linear gravity waves theory; the amplitudes of gravity waves increase with height as a whole before gravity waves encounter the critical layer, but the increasing extent is smaller than the result given by the linear theory of gravity waves, while the amplitudes of gravity waves reduce when gravity waves meet the critical layer; the energy of wave decreases with height, especially at the critical layer; the vertical wavelength reduces with the height increasing, but it does not become zero.

  16. Horizontal structure and propagation characteristics of mesospheric gravity waves observed by Antarctic Gravity Wave Imaging/Instrument Network (ANGWIN), using a 3-D spectral analysis technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Takashi S.; Nakamura, Takuji; Murphy, Damian; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Moffat-Griffin, Tracy; Zhao, Yucheng; Pautet, Pierre-Dominique; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Taylor, Michael

    2016-07-01

    ANGWIN (Antarctic Gravity Wave Imaging/Instrument Network) is an international airglow imager/instrument network in the Antarctic, which commenced observations in 2011. It seeks to reveal characteristics of mesospheric gravity waves, and to study sources, propagation, breaking of the gravity waves over the Antarctic and the effects on general circulation and upper atmosphere. In this study, we compared distributions of horizontal phase velocity of the gravity waves at around 90 km altitude observed in the mesospheric airglow imaging over different locations using our new statistical analysis method of 3-D Fourier transform, developed by Matsuda et al. (2014). Results from the airglow imagers at four stations at Syowa (69S, 40E), Halley (76S, 27W), Davis (69S, 78E) and McMurdo (78S, 156E) out of the ANGWIN imagers have been compared, for the observation period between April 6 and May 21 in 2013. In addition to the horizontal distribution of propagation and phase speed, gravity wave energies have been quantitatively compared, indicating a smaller GW activity in higher latitude stations. We further investigated frequency dependence of gravity wave propagation direction, as well as nightly variation of the gravity wave direction and correlation with the background wind variations. We found that variation of propagation direction is partly due to the effect of background wind in the middle atmosphere, but variation of wave sources could play important role as well. Secondary wave generation is also needed to explain the observed results.

  17. The gravity wave instability induced by photochemistry in summer polar mesopause region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effect of diabatic process due to the photochemical heating and cooling on the gravity wave propagation in middle atmosphere is studied. A linear gravity wave model which considers the diabatic process is established. The unstable region and the growth rate of the gravity wave caused by photochemistry are calculated. And the comparison between the model and the adiabatic gravity wave theory of pure dynamics is made. The results indicate that the photochemical heating process can induce the instability of gravity wave at mesopause. The intensity of the instability becomes stronger as the temperature decreases. The temperature feature and the altitude characteristics of the instability are consistent with the observation. Therefore, the instability of the gravity wave induced by photochemistry may be an important mechanism in polar mesopause region in summer.

  18. The Nonlinear Model of the Response of Airglow to Gravity Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Y. Xu; H. Gao; A.V. Mikhalev

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we develope a timodependent, nonlinear, photochemical-dynamical 2-D model which is composed of 3 models: dynamical gravity wave model, middle atmospheric photochemical model, and airglow layer photochemical model. We use the model to study the effect of the gravity wave propagation on the airglow layer. The comparison between the effects of the different wavelength gravity wave on the airglow emission distributions is made. When the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave is close to or is shorter than the thickness of the airglow layer, the gravity wave can make complex structure of the airglow layer, such as the double and multi-peak structures of the airglow layer. However, the gravity wave that has long vertical wavelength can make large scale perturbation of the airglow emission distribution.

  19. Gravitational wave signal from massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gumrukcuoglu, A Emir; Lin, Chunshan; Mukohyama, Shinji; Tanahashi, Norihiro

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the detectability of gravitational waves with a time dependent mass contribution, by means of the stochastic gravitational wave observations. Such a mass term typically arises in the cosmological solutions of massive gravity theories. We conduct the analysis based on a general quadratic action, and thus the results apply universally to any massive gravity theories in which modification of general relativity appears primarily in the tensor modes. The primary manifestation of the modification in the gravitational wave spectrum is a sharp peak. The position and height of the peak carry information on the present value of the mass term, as well as the duration of the inflationary stage. We also discuss the detectability of such a gravitational wave signal using the future-planned gravitational wave observatories.

  20. A Two-Wave Scheme for Orographic Gravity Wave Drag Parameterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuan; CAI Ninghao; TANG Jinyun

    2008-01-01

    When the magnitude of sub-scale ographic forcing is comparable with explicitly ordinary dynamic forcing, the drag effect reduced by ographic gravity wave is to be significant for maintaining dynamic balance of atmo-spheric circulation, as well as the momentum and energy transport. Such sub-scale ographic forcing should be introduced into numerically atmospheric model by means of drag being parameterized. Furthermore, the currently mature ographic gravity wave drag (OGWD) parameterization, i.e., the so-called first-generation(based on lineal single-wave theoretical framework) or the second-generation drag parameterization (includ-ing an important extra forcing by the contribution of critical level absorption), cannot correctly and effectly describe the vertical profile of wave stress under the influence of ambient wind shearing. Based on aforemen-tioned consideration, a new two-wave scheme was proposed to parameterize the ographic gravity wave drag by means of freely propagating gravity waves. It starts with a second order WKB approximation, and treats the wave stress attenuations caused by either the selective critical level absorption or the classical critical level absorption explicitly; while in the regions where critical levels are absent, it transports the wave stress vertically by two sinusoidal waves and deposits them and then damps them according to the wave saturation criteria. This scheme is thus used to conduct some sample computations over the Dabie Mountain region of East China, as an example. The results showed that the new two-wave scheme is able to model the vertical distribution of the wave stress more realistically.

  1. The physics of orographic gravity wave drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A C Teixeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The drag and momentum fluxes produced by gravity waves generated in flow over orography are reviewed, focusing on adiabatic conditions without phase transitions or radiation effects, and steady mean incoming flow. The orographic gravity wave drag is first introduced in its simplest possible form, for inviscid, linearized, non-rotating flow with the Boussinesq and hydrostatic approximations, and constant wind and static stability. Subsequently, the contributions made by previous authors (primarily using theory and numerical simulations to elucidate how the drag is affected by additional physical processes are surveyed. These include the effect of orography anisotropy, vertical wind shear, total and partial critical levels, vertical wave reflection and resonance, non-hydrostatic effects and trapped lee waves, rotation and nonlinearity. Frictional and boundary layer effects are also briefly mentioned. A better understanding of all of these aspects is important for guiding the improvement of drag parametrization schemes.

  2. p-wave superconductors in dilaton gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, ZhongYing

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study peculiar properties of p-wave superconductors in dilaton gravity. The scale invariance of the bulk geometry is effectively broken due to the existence of dilaton. By coupling the dilaton to the non-Abelian gauge field, i.e., $-\\frac14 e^{-\\beta \\Phi} F^a_{\\mu\

  3. On the unstable mode merging of gravity-inertial waves with Rossby waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We recapitulate the results of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves in a rotating, stratified atmosphere. The system is shown to exhibit a "local" (JWKB instability whenever the phase speed of the low-frequency-long wavelength westward propagating Rossby wave exceeds the phase speed ("Kelvin" speed of the high frequency-short wavelength gravity-inertial wave. This condition ensures that mode merging, leading to instability, takes place in some intermediate band of frequencies and wave numbers. The contention that such an instability is "spurious" is not convincing. The energy source of the instability resides in the background enthalpy which can be released by the action of the gravitational buoyancy force, through the combined wave modes.

  4. Propagation of gravity wave packet near critical level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Xianchang; YI Fan

    2005-01-01

    A couple of two-dimensional linear and fully nonlinear numerical models for compressible atmosphere are used to numerically study the propagation of the gravity wave packet into a mean wind shear. For a linear propagation wave packet, the critical level interactions are in good agreement with the linear critical level theory. The dynamically and convectively unstable regions are formed due to the critical level interaction of a finite-amplitude wave packet, but they would not break. The free exchange of potential energy with kinetic energy in the background atmosphere at rest ceases after entering the mean wind shear. However, it still goes on in the nonlinear propagation. It is shown that the nonlinear effects modify the mean flow markedly, reduce the momentum and energy propagation velocity and drop the elevation of the critical level.The gravity wave packet becomes unstable and breaks down into smaller scales in some regions. It expends much more kinetic energy than potential energy in the early phase of the breakdown. This means that the wave breakdown sets up due to the action of the shear instability rather than a convective one.

  5. Magnetoacoustic surface gravity waves at a spherical interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballai, I.; Forgács-Dajka, E.; Douglas, M.

    2011-03-01

    Aims: The plasma structured by magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere is a perfect medium for the propagation of guided magnetic and magnetoacoustic waves. Geometrical restriction of wave propagation is known to confer a dispersive character for waves. In addition, waves propagating along discontinuities in the medium are known to remain localized. As an extension to theories of guided waves in magnetic slabs and cylinders under solar and stellar conditions, we aim to study the propagation of magnetoacoustic-gravity waves at a spherical interface in the low solar corona (considered here as a density discontinuity), modelling global waves recently observed in the corona in EUV wavelengths. Methods: Using conservation laws at the interface we derive the dispersion relation in spherical geometry with a radially expanding magnetic field in the presence of gravitational stratification. The obtained dispersion relation describing fast magnetoacoustic-gravity surface waves is derived using an approximative method taking into account that propagation takes place near the solar surface. Results: Theoretical results obtained in the present study are applied to investigate the propagation of EIT waves in the low corona. The frequency of waves is shown to increase with decreasing density contrast at the interface. We also show that, for a given azimuthal wavenumber, the magnetic field has a very small effect on the value of the frequency of waves. When plotted against the location of the interface (in the radial direction) the frequency varies inversely proportional to the distance, while for a fixed density ratio and location of the interface the frequency is obtained to be defined in a very narrow region.

  6. Cause of winter gravity wave spectrum saturation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Yongfu; XU; Jiyao

    2005-01-01

    This paper utilizes horizontal velocity measurements observed from 19 chaff rockets and nearly simultaneous temperature measurements collected from 19 falling sphere rockets to study the cause of winter gravity wave spectrum saturation. Results suggest that strong horizontal velocity shears larger than 0.04 s-1 are observed to be present at various heights near the winter mesopause. On one single chaff rocket flight, an extremely strong horizontal velocity shear as high as 0.33 s-1 is observed at 87.4 km and is believed to be the strongest value ever measured in the mesosphere. These strong horizontal velocity shears, together with Brunt-V(a)is(a)l(a) frequency squared obtained from the temperature profile, act collectively to yield two dynamical instability regions of Richardson number smaller than 1/4, suggesting that the saturated gravity wave spectrum observed by the chaff rockets in winter is a result of dynamical instability.

  7. Gravity Waves from Chain Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Ashoorioon, Amjad

    2008-01-01

    Chain inflation proceeds through a series of first order phase transitions, which can release considerable gravitational waves (GW). We demonstrate that bubble collisions can leave an observable signature for future high-frequency probes of GWs, such as advanced LIGO, LISA and BBO. A "smoking gun" for chain inflation would be wiggles in the spectrum (and consequently in the tensor spectral index) due to the multiple phase transitions. The spectrum could also be distinguished from a single first order phase transition by a small difference in the amplitude at low frequency. A second origin of GWs in chain inflation are tensor modes from quantum fluctuations; these GW can dominate and be observed on large scales. The consistency relation between scalar and tensor modes is different for chain inflation than for standard rolling models and is testable by Cosmic Microwave Background experiments. If inflation happened through a series of rapid tunnelings in the string landscape, future high frequency probes of GW c...

  8. Investigation of gravity waves using horizontally resolved radial velocity measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stober

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY on the island Andøya in Northern Norway (69.3° N, 16.0° E observes polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE. These echoes are used as tracers of atmospheric dynamics to investigate the horizontal wind variability at high temporal and spatial resolution. MAARSY has the capability of a pulse-to-pulse beam steering allowing for systematic scanning experiments to study the horizontal structure of the backscatterers as well as to measure the radial velocities for each beam direction. Here we present a method to retrieve gravity wave parameters from these horizontally resolved radial wind variations by applying velocity azimuth display and volume velocity processing. Based on the observations a detailed comparison of the two wind analysis techniques is carried out in order to determine the zonal and meridional wind as well as to measure first order inhomogeneities. Further, we demonstrate the possibility to resolve the horizontal wave properties, e.g. horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and propagation direction. The robustness of the estimated gravity wave parameters is tested by a simple atmospheric model.

  9. Gravity wave vertical energy flux at 95 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, P. G.; Jacka, F.

    1985-01-01

    A three-field photometer (3FP) located at Mt. Torrens near Adelaide, is capable of monitoring different airglow emissions from three spaced fields in the sky. A wheel containing up to six different narrow bandpass interference filters can be rotated, allowing each of the filters to be sequentially placed into each of the three fields. The airglow emission of interest is the 557.7 nm line which has an intensity maximum at 95 km. Each circular field of view is located at the apexes of an equilateral triangle centered on zenith with diameters of 5 km and field separations of 13 km when projected to the 95-km level. The sampling period was 30 seconds and typical data lengths were between 7 and 8 hours. The analysis and results from the interaction of gravity waves on the 557.7 nm emission layer are derived using an atmospheric model similar to that proposed by Hines (1960) where the atmosphere is assumed isothermal and perturbations caused by gravity waves are small and adiabatic, therefore, resulting in linearized equations of motion. In the absence of waves, the atmosphere is also considered stationary. Thirteen nights of quality data from January 1983 to October 1984, covering all seasons, are used in this analysis.

  10. Impact of ENSO on seasonal variations of Kelvin Waves and mixed Rossby-Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhman, Saeful; Lubis, Sandro W.; Setiawan, Sonni

    2017-01-01

    Characteristics of atmospheric equatorial Kelvin waves and mixed Rossby-Gravity (MRG) waves as well as their relationship with tropical convective activity associated with El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) were analyzed. Kelvin waves and MRG waves were identified by using a Space-Time Spectral Analysis (STSA) technique, where the differences in the strength of both waves were quantified by taking the wave spectrum differences for each ENSO phase. Our result showed that Kelvin wave activity is stronger during an El Nino years, whereas the MRG wave activity is stronger during the La Nina years. Seasonal variations of Kelvin wave activity occurs predominantly in MAM over the central to the east Pacific in the El Nino years, while the strongest seasonal variation of MRG wave activity occus in MAM and SON over the northern and southern Pacific during La Nina years. The local variation of Kelvin wave and MRG wave activities are found to be controlled by variation in lower level atmospheric convection induced by sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific Ocean.

  11. Monitoring gravity waves detected by I33MG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randrianarinosy, Fanomezana; Andrianaivoarisora, Jean Bernardo; Tahina Rakotoariza, Andriniaina; Rambolamanana, Gérard; Harifidy Ramanantsoa, Andry

    2013-04-01

    Since September 2001, I33MG has recorded and stored data in the National Data Centre which belongs to the Laboratory of Seismology and Infrasound at the Institute and Observatory of Geophysics in Antananarivo (IOGA). The recorded data allowed us to monitor different sources of infrasound such as microbaroms, lightning, volcanoes, cyclones, mountain associated waves, explosions, etc which can be distinguished as acoustic waves. Besides, in the framework of the ARISE project, atmospheric waves having frequency below the acoustic cut-off frequency, known as gravity waves, are considered. Buoyancy oscillations are observed that fill the atmosphere and ocean and propagate long distances horizontally and vertically, have length scales from meters to thousands of kilometers, time scales from seconds to weeks, and release energy into turbulence by wave breaking. WinPMCC based on the Progressive Multi-Channel Correlation (PMCC) is used to detect and to get the wave parameters. Azimuth variation versus time is observed but events are mostly found from 200° to 360°, 0° to 100° and a few from 100° to 200°.

  12. Wave Propagation in Accretion Disks with Self-Gravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-Ci; YANG Lan-Tian; WU Shao-Ping; DING Shi-Xue

    2001-01-01

    We extend the research by Lubow and Pringle of axisymmetric waves in accretion disks to the case where self gravity of disks should be considered. We derive and analyse the dispersion relations with the effect of self-gravity. Results show that self-gravity extends the forbidden region of the wave propagation: for high frequency p-modes, self-gravity makes the wavelength shorter and the group velocity larger; for low frequency g-modes, the effect is opposite.

  13. Scalar wave scattering from Schwarzschild black holes in modified gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Sibandze, Dan B; Maharaj, Sunil D; Nzioki, Anne Marie; Dunsby, Peter K S

    2016-01-01

    We consider the scattering of gravitational waves off a Schwarzschild Black Hole in $f(R)$ gravity. We find that, while the reflection and transmission coefficients for tensor waves are the same as in General Relativity, a larger fraction of scalar waves are reflected compared to what one obtains for tensors. This may provide a novel observational signature for fourth order gravity.

  14. Conversion of Internal Gravity Waves into Magnetic Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Burns, Keaton J

    2016-01-01

    Asteroseismology probes the interiors of stars by studying oscillation modes at a star's surface. Although pulsation spectra are well understood for solar-like oscillators, a substantial fraction of red giant stars observed by Kepler exhibit abnormally low-amplitude dipole oscillation modes. Fuller et al. (2015) suggests this effect is produced by strong core magnetic fields that scatter dipole internal gravity waves (IGWs) into higher multipole IGWs or magnetic waves. In this paper, we study the interaction of IGWs with a magnetic field to test this mechanism. We consider two background stellar structures: one with a uniform magnetic field, and another with a magnetic field that varies both horizontally and vertically. We derive analytic solutions to the wave propagation problem and validate them with numerical simulations. In both cases, we find perfect conversion from IGWs into magnetic waves when the IGWs propagate into a region exceeding a critical magnetic field strength. Downward propagating IGWs canno...

  15. Conversion of internal gravity waves into magnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoanet, D.; Vasil, G. M.; Fuller, J.; Cantiello, M.; Burns, K. J.

    2017-04-01

    Asteroseismology probes the interiors of stars by studying oscillation modes at a star's surface. Although pulsation spectra are well understood for solar-like oscillators, a substantial fraction of red giant stars observed by Kepler exhibit abnormally low-amplitude dipole oscillation modes. Fuller et al. (2015) suggest this effect is produced by strong core magnetic fields that scatter dipole internal gravity waves (IGWs) into higher multipole IGWs or magnetic waves. In this paper, we study the interaction of IGWs with a magnetic field to test this mechanism. We consider two background stellar structures: one with a uniform magnetic field, and another with a magnetic field that varies both horizontally and vertically. We derive analytic solutions to the wave propagation problem and validate them with numerical simulations. In both cases, we find perfect conversion from IGWs into magnetic waves when the IGWs propagate into a region exceeding a critical magnetic field strength. Downward propagating IGWs cannot reflect into upward propagating IGWs because their vertical wavenumber never approaches zero. Instead, they are converted into upward propagating slow (Alfvénic) waves, and we show they will likely dissipate as they propagate back into weakly magnetized regions. Therefore, strong internal magnetic fields can produce dipole mode suppression in red giants, and gravity modes will likely be totally absent from the pulsation spectra of sufficiently magnetized stars.

  16. On the atmospheric internal ship waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桑建国

    1997-01-01

    The analytical solutions of the atmospheric internal ship waves induced by three-dimensional terrain are obtained by solving the atmospheric wave equation. The solutions show that the waves consist of the untrapped and trapped parts. The patterns of the diverging wave and transverse wave in the untrapped parts are mainly determined by the shape and orientation of the terrain. This kind of wave may transport the wave energy to the upper atmosphere. The patterns of trapped lee waves are decided by the atmospheric conditions such as stratification, mean wind speeds and wind shear.

  17. Direct Numerical Simulations of Small-Scale Gravity Wave Instability Dynamics in Variable Stratification and Shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixa, T.; Fritts, D. C.; Laughman, B.; Wang, L.; Kantha, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple observations provide compelling evidence that gravity wave dissipation events often occur in multi-scale environments having highly-structured wind and stability profiles extending from the stable boundary layer into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Such events tend to be highly localized and thus yield local energy and momentum deposition and efficient secondary gravity wave generation expected to have strong influences at higher altitudes [e.g., Fritts et al., 2013; Baumgarten and Fritts, 2014]. Lidars, radars, and airglow imagers typically cannot achieve the spatial resolution needed to fully quantify these small-scale instability dynamics. Hence, we employ high-resolution modeling to explore these dynamics in representative environments. Specifically, we describe numerical studies of gravity wave packets impinging on a sheet of high stratification and shear and the resulting instabilities and impacts on the gravity wave amplitude and momentum flux for various flow and gravity wave parameters. References: Baumgarten, Gerd, and David C. Fritts (2014). Quantifying Kelvin-Helmholtz instability dynamics observed in noctilucent clouds: 1. Methods and observations. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 119.15, 9324-9337. Fritts, D. C., Wang, L., & Werne, J. A. (2013). Gravity wave-fine structure interactions. Part I: Influences of fine structure form and orientation on flow evolution and instability. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(12), 3710-3734.

  18. Simulation of response of sodium layer to the propagation of gravity wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jiyao

    2004-01-01

    A time-dependent two-dimensional photochemical-dynamical coupling gravity wave model of sodium layer is developed, which combines the sodium photochemical theory, a time-dependent two-dimensional atmospheric photochemical model, a two-dimensional gravity wave model, and the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI-95)with the diabatic process induced by photochemical reactions and the transport of chemical species by gravity waves included. The pseudospectral method is used in the horizontal direction, the finite difference approximations are used in vertical direction z and time t. And FICE method is used to solve the model. The simulation results indicate that intense perturbations of the sodium layer can be induced by the propagation of gravity waves. The results are consistent with the observations.

  19. On the detection and attribution of gravity waves generated by the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlton, G J; Williams, P D; Nicoll, K A

    2016-09-28

    Internal gravity waves are generated as adjustment radiation whenever a sudden change in forcing causes the atmosphere to depart from its large-scale balanced state. Such a forcing anomaly occurs during a solar eclipse, when the Moon's shadow cools part of the Earth's surface. The resulting atmospheric gravity waves are associated with pressure and temperature perturbations, which in principle are detectable both at the surface and aloft. In this study, surface pressure and temperature data from two UK sites at Reading and Lerwick are examined for eclipse-driven gravity wave perturbations during the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse over northwest Europe. Radiosonde wind data from the same two sites are also analysed using a moving parcel analysis method, to determine the periodicities of the waves aloft. On this occasion, the perturbations both at the surface and aloft are found not to be confidently attributable to eclipse-driven gravity waves. We conclude that the complex synoptic weather conditions over the UK at the time of this particular eclipse helped to mask any eclipse-driven gravity waves.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'.

  20. On the detection and attribution of gravity waves generated by the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Internal gravity waves are generated as adjustment radiation whenever a sudden change in forcing causes the atmosphere to depart from its large-scale balanced state. Such a forcing anomaly occurs during a solar eclipse, when the Moon’s shadow cools part of the Earth’s surface. The resulting atmospheric gravity waves are associated with pressure and temperature perturbations, which in principle are detectable both at the surface and aloft. In this study, surface pressure and temperature data from two UK sites at Reading and Lerwick are examined for eclipse-driven gravity wave perturbations during the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse over northwest Europe. Radiosonde wind data from the same two sites are also analysed using a moving parcel analysis method, to determine the periodicities of the waves aloft. On this occasion, the perturbations both at the surface and aloft are found not to be confidently attributable to eclipse-driven gravity waves. We conclude that the complex synoptic weather conditions over the UK at the time of this particular eclipse helped to mask any eclipse-driven gravity waves. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse’. PMID:27550763

  1. Wave Equations for Discrete Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gudder, Stan

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on the covariant causal set ($c$-causet) approach to discrete quantum gravity. A $c$-causet $x$ is a finite partially ordered set that has a unique labeling of its vertices. A rate of change on $x$ is described by a covariant difference operator and this operator acting on a wave function forms the left side of the wave equation. The right side is given by an energy term acting on the wave function. Solutions to the wave equation corresponding to certain pairs of paths in $x$ are added and normalized to form a unique state. The modulus squared of the state gives probabilities that a pair of interacting particles is at various locations given by pairs of vertices in $x$. We illustrate this model for a few of the simplest nontrivial examples of $c$-causets. Three forces are considered, the attractive and repulsive electric forces and the strong nuclear force. Large models get much more complicated and will probably require a computer to analyze.

  2. AdS Waves as Exact Solutions to Quadratic Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gullu, Ibrahim; Sisman, Tahsin Cagri; Tekin, Bayram

    2011-01-01

    We give an exact solution of the quadratic gravity in D dimensions. The solution is a plane fronted wave metric with a cosmological constant. This metric solves not only the full quadratic gravity field equations but also the linearized ones which include the linearized equations of the recently found critical gravity.

  3. Global Ray Tracing Simulations of the SABER Gravity Wave Climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    amplitudes, vertical wave- D08126 PREUSSE ET AL.: GRAVITY WAVES BY SATELLITE AND RAYTRACER 2 of 25 D08126 lengths and phases of the two strongest wave...with the wind ‘‘drift’’ large D08126 PREUSSE ET AL.: GRAVITY WAVES BY SATELLITE AND RAYTRACER 3 of 25 D08126 distances downstream in taking much...factor (IMF) attributed to the single SCEs in generating the composite. D08126 PREUSSE ET AL.: GRAVITY WAVES BY SATELLITE AND RAYTRACER 4 of 25 D08126

  4. Gravity Wave Generation by Largescale Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, A.

    The response of an isothermal atmosphere to small disturbances in entropy is studied taking compressible effects fully into account. The method of Green's functions is applied to solve the linearized hydrodynamic equations by Fourier transformation. A bubble may be created by perturbing the entropy within a finite volume. At first Lamb waves will be then emitted radially and the bubble undergoes a series of Brunt-Väisälä oscillations.

  5. Gravity wave penetration into the thermosphere: sensitivity to solar cycle variations and mean winds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Fritts

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We previously considered various aspects of gravity wave penetration and effects at mesospheric and thermospheric altitudes, including propagation, viscous effects on wave structure, characteristics, and damping, local body forcing, responses to solar cycle temperature variations, and filtering by mean winds. Several of these efforts focused on gravity waves arising from deep convection or in situ body forcing accompanying wave dissipation. Here we generalize these results to a broad range of gravity wave phase speeds, spatial scales, and intrinsic frequencies in order to address all of the major gravity wave sources in the lower atmosphere potentially impacting the thermosphere. We show how penetration altitudes depend on gravity wave phase speed, horizontal and vertical wavelengths, and observed frequencies for a range of thermospheric temperatures spanning realistic solar conditions and winds spanning reasonable mean and tidal amplitudes. Our results emphasize that independent of gravity wave source, thermospheric temperature, and filtering conditions, those gravity waves that penetrate to the highest altitudes have increasing vertical wavelengths and decreasing intrinsic frequencies with increasing altitude. The spatial scales at the highest altitudes at which gravity wave perturbations are observed are inevitably horizontal wavelengths of ~150 to 1000 km and vertical wavelengths of ~150 to 500 km or more, with the larger horizontal scales only becoming important for the stronger Doppler-shifting conditions. Observed and intrinsic periods are typically ~10 to 60 min and ~10 to 30 min, respectively, with the intrinsic periods shorter at the highest altitudes because of preferential penetration of GWs that are up-shifted in frequency by thermospheric winds.

  6. Gravity Waves from Tachyonic Preheating after Hybrid Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Dufaux, Jean Francois; Kofman, Lev; Navros, Olga

    2008-01-01

    We study the stochastic background of gravitational waves produced from preheating in hybrid inflation models. We investigate different dynamical regimes of preheating in these models and we compute the resulting gravity wave spectra using analytical estimates and numerical simulations. We discuss the dependence of the gravity wave frequencies and amplitudes on the various potential parameters. We find that large regions of the parameter space leads to gravity waves that may be observable in upcoming interferometric experiments, including Advanced LIGO, but this generally requires very small coupling constants.

  7. Large-scale gravity wave perturbations in the mesopause region above Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes during autumnal equinox: a joint study by the USU Na lidar and Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xuguang; Yuan, Tao; Liu, Han-Li

    2017-02-01

    To investigate gravity wave (GW) perturbations in the midlatitude mesopause region during boreal equinox, 433 h of continuous Na lidar full diurnal cycle temperature measurements in September between 2011 and 2015 are utilized to derive the monthly profiles of GW-induced temperature variance, T'2, and the potential energy density (PED). Operating at Utah State University (42° N, 112° W), these lidar measurements reveal severe GW dissipation near 90 km, where both parameters drop to their minima (˜ 20 K2 and ˜ 50 m2 s-2, respectively). The study also shows that GWs with periods of 3-5 h dominate the midlatitude mesopause region during the summer-winter transition. To derive the precise temperature perturbations a new tide removal algorithm suitable for all ground-based observations is developed to de-trend the lidar temperature measurements and to isolate GW-induced perturbations. It removes the tidal perturbations completely and provides the most accurate GW perturbations for the ground-based observations. This algorithm is validated by comparing the true GW perturbations in the latest mesoscale-resolving Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) with those derived from the WACCM local outputs by applying this newly developed tidal removal algorithm.

  8. On the Interpretation of Gravity Wave Measurements by Ground-Based Lidars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Dörnbrack

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper asks the simple question: How can we interpret vertical time series of middle atmosphere gravity wave measurements by ground-based temperature lidars? Linear wave theory is used to show that the association of identified phase lines with quasi-monochromatic waves should be considered with great care. The ambient mean wind has a substantial effect on the inclination of the detected phase lines. The lack of knowledge about the wind might lead to a misinterpretation of the vertical propagation direction of the observed gravity waves. In particular, numerical simulations of three archetypal atmospheric mountain wave regimes show a sensitivity of virtual lidar observations on the position relative to the mountain and on the scale of the mountain.

  9. Internal Gravity Wave Excitation by Turbulent Convection

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoanet, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the flux of internal gravity waves (IGWs) generated by turbulent convection in stars. We solve for the IGW eigenfunctions analytically near the radiative-convective interface in a local, Boussinesq, and cartesian domain. We consider both discontinuous and smooth transitions between the radiative and convective regions and derive Green's functions to solve for the IGWs in the radiative region. We find that if the radiative-convective transition is smooth, the IGW flux ~ F_conv (d/H), where F_conv is the flux carried by the convective motions, d is the width of the transition region, and H is the pressure scale height. This can be much larger than the standard result in the literature for a discontinuous radiative-convective transition, which gives a wave flux ~ F_conv M, where M is the convective Mach number. However, in the smooth transition case, the most efficiently excited perturbations will break immediately when they enter the radiative region. The flux of IGWs which do not break and are abl...

  10. Infra-Gravity Wave Generation by the Shoaling Wave Groups over Beaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Yu-Hsien; HWUNG Hwung-Hweng

    2012-01-01

    A physical parameter,μb,which was used to meet the forcing of primary short waves to be off-resonant before wave breaking,has been considered as an applicable parameter in the infra-gravity wave generation.Since a series of modulating wave groups for different wave conditions are performed to proceed with the resonant mechanism of infragravity waves prior to wave breaking,the amplitude growth of incident bound long wave is assumed to be simply controlled by the normalized bed slope,βb.The results appear a large dependence of the growth rate,α,of incident bound long wave,separated by the three-array method,on the normalized bed slope,βb.High spatial resolution of wave records enables identification of the cross-correlation between squared short-wave envelopes and infra-gravity waves.The crossshore structure of infra-gravity waves over beaches presents the mechanics of incident bound- and outgoing free long waves with the formation of free standing long waves in the nearshore region.The wave run-up and amplification of infra-gravity waves in the swash zone appear that the additional long waves generated by the breaking process would modify the cross-shore structure of free standing long waves.Finally,this paper would further discuss the contribution of long wave breaking and bottom friction to the energy dissipation of infra-gravity waves based on different slope conditions.

  11. The response of superpressure balloons to gravity wave motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. A.; Hertzog, A.

    2014-04-01

    Superpressure balloons (SPB), which float on constant density (isopycnic) surfaces, provide a unique way of measuring the properties of atmospheric gravity waves (GW) as a function of wave intrinsic frequency. Here we devise a quasi-analytic method of investigating the SPB response to GW motions. It is shown that the results agree well with more rigorous numerical simulations of balloon motions and provide a better understanding of the response of SPB to GW, especially at high frequencies. The methodology is applied to ascertain the accuracy of GW studies using 12 m diameter SPB deployed in the 2010 Concordiasi campaign in the Antarctic. In comparison with the situation in earlier campaigns, the vertical displacements of the SPB were measured directly using GPS. It is shown using a large number of Monte Carlo-type simulations with realistic instrumental noise that important wave parameters, such as momentum flux, phase speed and wavelengths, can be retrieved with good accuracy from SPB observations for intrinsic wave periods greater than ca. 10 min. The noise floor for momentum flux is estimated to be ca. 10-4 mPa.

  12. LINEAR GRAVITY WAVES ON MAXWELL FLUIDS OF FINITE DEPTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qinghe; SUN Yabin

    2004-01-01

    Linear surface gravity waves on Maxwell viscoelastic fluids with finite depth are studied in this paper. A dispersion equation describing the spatial decay of the gravity wave in finite depth is derived. A dimensionless memory (time) number θ is introduced. The dispersion equation for the pure viscous fluid will be a specific case of the dispersion equation for the viscoelastic fluid as θ = 0. The complex dispersion equation is numerically solved to investigate the dispersion relation. The influences of θ and water depth on the dispersion characteristics and wave decay are discussed. It is found that the role of elasticity for the Maxwell fluid is to make the surface gravity wave on the Maxwell fluid behave more like the surface gravity wave on the inviscid fluid.

  13. Multifractal energy exchange between gravity waves and turbulence in an upper tropospheric front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Steven

    2014-05-01

    Intermittent generation of strong turbulence measured by reconnaissance aircraft occurred in association with a wide spectrum of upward propagating gravity waves above the core of an upper level jet stream. The turbulence generation process could be described as an energy cascade process, initiated as gravity-inertia waves were produced in a region of diagnosed unbalanced upper-level frontogenesis near a tropopause fold. High resolution numerical weather prediction model forecasts produced bimodal waves with dominant wavelengths of 120-216 km and 1-20 km, the latter of which perturbed the atmosphere to create conditions conducive to turbulence generation. Cross spectral, wavelet transformation, and polarization analysis of the in situ aircraft data allowed unambiguous determination of the presence of the spectrum of gravity waves, reconstruction of the waves' evolving character, and identification of intermittent wave packets. Introduction of wavelet cross spectrum into the Stokes parameter theory shed light on how turbulence production was intimately related to increasing levels of polarization, only to be followed by sudden reduction of polarization as turbulence arose. Wavelet and structure function analysis indicated that episodes of high turbulent kinetic energy were the result of upscale feedback effects ("inverse energy cascade" processes linked to wave breaking). The bi-fractal nature of the gravity waves and turbulence suggest new approaches for parameterizing sub grid-scale effects caused by the interaction of waves and turbulence in numerical models.

  14. Acoustic Gravity Wave Chemistry Model for the RAYTRACE Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    AU)-AI56 850 ACOlUSTIC GRAVITY WAVE CHEMISTRY MODEL FOR THE IAYTRACE I/~ CODE(U) MISSION RESEARCH CORP SANTA BARBIARA CA T E OLD Of MAN 84 MC-N-SlS...DNA-TN-S4-127 ONAOOI-BO-C-0022 UNLSSIFIlED F/O 20/14 NL 1-0 2-8 1111 po 312.2 1--I 11111* i •. AD-A 156 850 DNA-TR-84-127 ACOUSTIC GRAVITY WAVE...Hicih Frequency Radio Propaoation Acoustic Gravity Waves 20. ABSTRACT (Continue en reveree mide if tteceeemr and Identify by block number) This

  15. Laser Source for Atomic Gravity Wave Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an Atom Interferometry-based gravity wave detector (vs Optical Interferometry). Characterize a high power laser. Use Goddard Space Flight Center Mission...

  16. Angular Momentum Transport via Internal Gravity Waves in Evolving Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Jim; Cantiello, Matteo; Brown, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Recent asteroseismic advances have allowed for direct measurements of the internal rotation rates of many sub-giant and red giant stars. Unlike the nearly rigidly rotating Sun, these evolved stars contain radiative cores that spin faster than their overlying convective envelopes, but slower than they would in the absence of internal angular momentum transport. We investigate the role of internal gravity waves in angular momentum transport in evolving low mass stars. In agreement with previous results, we find that convectively excited gravity waves can prevent the development of strong differential rotation in the radiative cores of Sun-like stars. As stars evolve into sub-giants, however, low frequency gravity waves become strongly attenuated and cannot propagate below the hydrogen burning shell, allowing the spin of the core to decouple from the convective envelope. This decoupling occurs at the base of the sub-giant branch when stars have surface temperatures of roughly 5500 K. However, gravity waves can s...

  17. The study and applications of photochemical-dynamical gravity wave model Ⅰ--Model description

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jiyao(徐寄遥); MA; Ruiping(马瑞平); A.K.Smith

    2002-01-01

    A two-dimensional, nonlinear, compressible, diabatic, nonhydrostatic photochemical- dynamical gravity wave model has been advanced. The model includes diabetic process produced by photochemistry and the effect of gravity wave on atmospheric chemical species. In the horizontal direction, the pseudospectral method is used. The finite difference approximations are used in vertical direction z and time t. The FICE method is used to solve the model. The model results on small amplitude fluctuation are very close to those of linear theory, which demonstrates the correctness of the model.

  18. Gravity wave activity observed in the mesosphere and ionosphere on September 16th 2015 by an all-sky imager and dTEC maps over Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrasse, Cristiano M.; Gobbi, Delano; Buriti, Ricardo; Bageston, José Valentin; Medeiros, Amauri; Paulino, Igo; Cosme Alexandre Figueiredo, M.; Takahashi, Hisao; Azambuja, Rodrigo

    2016-07-01

    All-sky imager was used to observe the wave activity in the mesosphere and a ground network of GPS receivers were used to make detrended Total Electron Content (dTEC) maps to monitor the ionosphere. The wave activity was observed on September 16th 2015 over the southeast region in Brazil. The gravity wave characteristics and the atmospheric conditions for wave propagation will be presented and discussed. The gravity wave source was associated with strong tropospheric convection.

  19. Interaction of modulated gravity water waves of finite depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoulis, Ioannis

    2016-10-01

    We consider the capillary-gravity water wave problem of finite depth with a flat bottom of one or two horizontal dimensions. We derive the modulation equations of leading and next-to-leading order in the hyperbolic scaling for three weakly amplitude-modulated plane wave solutions of the linearized problem in the absence of quadratic and cubic resonances. We justify the derived system of macroscopic equations in the case of gravity waves using the stability of the finite depth water wave problem on the time scale O (1 / ɛ).

  20. Tidal and gravity waves study from the airglow measurements at Kolhapur (India)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Ghodpage; Devendraa Siingh; R P Singh; G K Mukherjee; P Vohat; A K Singh

    2012-12-01

    Simultaneous photometric measurements of the OI 557.7 nm and OH (7, 2) band from a low latitude station, Kolhapur (16.8°N, 74.2°E) during the period 2004–2007 are analyzed to study the dominant waves present in the 80–100 km altitude region of the atmosphere. The nocturnal intensity variations of different airglow emissions are observed using scanning temperature controlled filter photometers. Waves having period lying between 2 and 12 hours have been recorded. Some of these waves having subharmonic tidal oscillation periods 4, 6, 8 and 12 hours propagate upward with velocity lying in the range 1.6–11.3 m/s and the vertical wave length lying between 28.6 and 163 kms. The other waves may be the upward propagating gravity waves or waves resulting from the interaction of inter-mode tidal oscillations, interaction of tidal waves with planetary waves and gravity waves. Some times, the second harmonic wave has higher vertical velocity than the corresponding fundamental wave. Application of these waves in studying the thermal structure of the region is discussed.

  1. No further gravitational wave modes in F(T) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamba, Kazuharu, E-mail: bamba@kmi.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Capozziello, Salvatore, E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” (Italy); INFN Sez. di Napoli, Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, Edificio G, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); De Laurentis, Mariafelicia, E-mail: felicia@na.infn.it [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” (Italy); INFN Sez. di Napoli, Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, Edificio G, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Nojiri, Shin' ichi, E-mail: nojiri@phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Sáez-Gómez, Diego, E-mail: diego.saezgomez@uct.ac.za [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC) and Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, Cape Town (South Africa); Fisika Teorikoaren eta Zientziaren Historia Saila, Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, 644 Posta Kutxatila, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-11-25

    We explore the possibility of further gravitational wave modes in F(T) gravity, where T is the torsion scalar in teleparallelism. It is explicitly demonstrated that gravitational wave modes in F(T) gravity are equivalent to those in General Relativity. This result is achieved by calculating the Minkowskian limit for a class of analytic function of F(T). This consequence is also confirmed by the preservative analysis around the flat background in the weak field limit with the scalar–tensor representation of F(T) gravity.

  2. Numerical study of Balearic meteotsunami generation and propagation under synthetic gravity wave forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ličer, Matjaž; Mourre, Baptiste; Troupin, Charles; Krietemeyer, Andreas; Jansá, Agusti; Tintoré, Joaquín

    2017-03-01

    We use a high resolution nested ocean modelling system forced by synthetic atmospheric gravity waves to investigate Balearic meteotsunami generation, amplification and propagation properties. We determine how meteotsunami amplitude outside and inside of the Balearic port of Ciutadella depends on forcing gravity wave direction, speed and trajectory. We quantify the contributions of Mallorca shelves and Menorca Channel for different gravity wave forcing angles and speeds. The Channel is demonstrated to be the key build-up region determining meteotsunami amplitude in Ciutadella while northern and southern Mallorca shelves serve mostly as barotropic wave guides but do not significantly contribute to seiche amplitude in Ciutadella. This fact seriously reduces early-warning alert times in cases of locally generated pressure perturbations. We track meteotsunami propagation paths in the Menorca Channel for several forcing velocities and show that the Channel bathymetry serves as a focusing lens for meteotsunami waves whose paths are constrained by the forcing direction. We show that faster meteotsunamis propagate over deeper ocean regions, as required by Proudman resonance. We estimate meteotsunami speed under sub- and supercritical forcing and derive a first order estimate of its magnitude. We show that meteotsunamis, generated by supercritical gravity waves, propagate with a velocity which is equal to an arithmetic mean of the forcing velocity and local barotropic ocean wave speed.

  3. A Multiscale Nested Modeling Framework to Simulate the Interaction of Surface Gravity Waves with Nonlinear Internal Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 A multiscale nested modeling framework to simulate the interaction of surface gravity waves with nonlinear internal gravity waves...Minnesota LONG-TERM GOALS Our long-term goal is to develop a multiscale nested modeling framework that simulates, with the finest resolution...frameworks such as the proposed HYCOM-LZSNFS-SUNTANS-LES nested model are crucial for understanding multiscale processes that are unresolved, and hence

  4. On the parameterization scheme of gravity wave drag effect on the mean zonal flow of mesosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Based on McFarlane's parameterization scheme of gravity wave drag, a refined gravity-wave-drag scheme is presented. Both the drag effect of the momentum flux and the dissipation effect of gravity wave breaking on the mean zonal flow are included in the refined parameterization scheme. The dissipation effect can be formulated with the gravity wave numbers and the mean quantities. The refined parameterization scheme may represent a complete drag effect of stationary gravity wave breaking on the mean zonal flow.

  5. Global climatology of the wind vector rotation - implications for the orographic gravity waves propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisoft, Petr; Sacha, Petr; Kuchar, Ales

    2015-04-01

    The gravity waves spectrum is shaped not only by different sources but it also reflects tropospheric background conditions contributing to filtering of various gravity waves. This could be most easily illustrated for the propagation of the orographic gravity waves that are critically filtered when the wind speed is zero. This condition is ensured in case of the directional shear exceeding 180°. Above regions where it is fulfilled, one can rule out the possibility of orographic GW modes contributing to the observed GW activity and vice versa regions of small wind rotation in the lower levels are often precursors of enhanced GW activity higher. In this study, we have performed a global analysis of the background conditions with a focus on the rotation of the ground level winds. We have analyzed MERRA and JRA-55 time series. The results provided climatology of atmospheric regions with the conditions favorable for the upward propagation of the orographic gravity waves from the troposphere into the stratosphere. The regions are detected mainly over areas where tropospheric and stratospheric jets coincide. The study is supplemented by a global analysis of the fields of potential energy of disturbances as a proxy for gravity waves activity using COSMIC GPS RO data.

  6. Gravity waves observation of wind field in stratosphere based on a Rayleigh Doppler lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruocan; Dou, Xiankang; Sun, Dongsong; Xue, Xianghui; Zheng, Jun; Han, Yuli; Chen, Tingdi; Wang, Guocheng; Zhou, Yingjie

    2016-03-21

    Simultaneous wind and temperature measurements in stratosphere with high time-spatial resolution for gravity waves study are scarce. In this paper we perform wind field gravity waves cases in the stratosphere observed by a mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar. This lidar system with both wind and temperature measurements were implemented for atmosphere gravity waves research in the altitude region 15-60 km. Observations were carried out for two periods of time: 3 months started from November 4, 2014 in Xinzhou, China (38.425°N,112.729°E) and 2 months started from October 7, 2015 in Jiuquan, China (39.741°N, 98.495°E) . The mesoscale fluctuations of the horizontal wind velocity and the two dimensional spectra analysis of these fluctuations show the presence of dominant oscillatory modes with wavelength of 4-14 km and period of around 10 hours in several cases. The simultaneous temperature observations make it possible to identify gravity wave cases from the relationships between different variables: temperature and horizontal wind. The observed cases demonstrate the Rayleigh Doppler Lidar's capacity to study gravity waves.

  7. Gravity wave turbulence revealed by horizontal vibrations of the container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issenmann, B; Falcon, E

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the role of forcing on gravity-capillary wave turbulence. Previous laboratory experiments using spatially localized forcing (vibrating blades) have shown that the frequency power-law exponent of the gravity wave spectrum depends on the forcing parameters. By horizontally vibrating the whole container, we observe a spectrum exponent that does not depend on the forcing parameters for both gravity and capillary regimes. This spatially extended forcing leads to a gravity spectrum exponent in better agreement with the theory than by using a spatially localized forcing. The role of the vessel shape has been also studied. Finally, the wave spectrum is found to scale linearly with the injected power for both regimes whatever the forcing type used.

  8. Characteristics of Mesospheric Gravity Waves Observed in the Central Region of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrasse, Cristiano Max; Messias Almeida, Lazaro; Abalde Guede, Jose Ricardo; Valentin Bageston, José; Pillat, Valdir G.; Lima, Washington L. C.

    Gravity waves observations were carried out at Palmas (10.16o S, 48.26o W) Brazil, between September 2007 and December 2008, using an all-sky airglow imager to measure the OH emis-sion. The gravity waves were divided in two groups following they morphology as band and ripples type waves. The main characteristics of the band type waves are: horizontal wavelength between 10-35 km; observed period raging from 5 to 25 minutes; observed phase speed between 5-60 m/s. Preferential propagation directions of the bands are northward and southward, show-ing a clear anisotropy. For the ripples the main wave parameters are: horizontal wavelength ranging between 5 and 15 km; observed period mainly distributed between 5 and 15 minutes and horizontal phase velocity from 5 to 30 m/s. The ripples showed the same anisotropy as in the preferential propagation direction as the band type waves. The gravity wave characteristics observed at Palmas were compared with other observations carried out in Brazil, showing simi-lar features. In order to explain the seasonal variation of the wave propagation direction, maps of Outgoing Longwave Radiation (ORL) were used to locate regions with intense deep con-vection (OLR < 220 W.m-2 ) in the lower atmosphere. During summer and autumn the wave sources regions are well correlated with deep convection areas located at west and northwest of Palmas.

  9. Gravity waves, Tides and Planetary wave characteristics revealed by network of MLT radars over Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Karanam, Kishore Kumar; Sunkara, Eswaraiah; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.; Subrahmanyam, K. V.; Ramanjaneyulu, L.

    2016-07-01

    Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) mean winds, gravity waves, tidal and planetary wave characteristics are investigated using two years (2013-2015) of advanced meteor radar installed at Tirupathi (13.63oN, 79.4oE), India. The observations reveal the presence of high frequency gravity waves (30-120 minutes), atmospheric tides (diurnal, semi-diurnal and terr-diurnal) along with long period oscillations in both zonal and meridional winds. Background mean zonal winds show clear semi-annual oscillation in the mesosphere, whereas meridional winds are characterized by annual oscillation as expected. Diurnal tide amplitudes are significantly larger (60-80 m/s) than semi-diurnal (10-20 m/s) and terr-diurnal (5-8 m/s) tides and larger in meridional than zonal winds. The measured meridional components are in good agreement with Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM-09) predictions than zonal up to ~90 km in all the seasons, except fall equinox. Diurnal tidal phase matches well than the amplitudes between observations and model predictions. However, no similarity is being found in the semi-diurnal tides between observations and model. The measurements are further compared with nearby Thumba meteor radar (8.5oN, 77oE) observations. Some differences do exist between the measurements from Tirupati and Thumba meteor radar and model outputs at greater heights and the possible reasons are discussed. SVU meteor radar observations clearly showed the dominance of well-known ultra-fast kelvin waves (3.5 days), 5-8 day, 16 day, 27 day, and 30-40 day oscillations. Due to higher meteor count extending up to 110 km, we could investigate the variability of these PWs and oscillations covering wider range (70-110 km) for the first time. Significant change above 100 km is noticed in all the above mentioned PW activity and oscillations. We also used ERA-Interim reanalysis data sets available at 0.125x0.125 degree grids for investigating the characteristics of these PW right from surface to 1 h

  10. Simulation of the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation based on the parameterization of continuously spectral gravity waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG KaiMing; ZHANG ShaoDong; YI Fan; CHEN ZeYu

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of previous parameterization schemes, considering both the wave breaking and absorbed at critical level, a parameterization with a continuous spectrum of gravity waves is realized by intro-ducing a momentum flux density function for the wave spectrum, and then the parameterization scheme of the gravity waves is improved. Choosing parameter values of the background atmosphere and waves based on the observations, a more realistic equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO)driven by the incorporated drag from the planetary and gravity waves can be simulated. The numerical results indicate that the forcing magnitude of the planetary and gravity waves varies with the wind field,and in some phases of the QBO, the contribution of the gravity waves is comparable with that of the planetary waves. After the QBO is steadily formed, its amplitude and period and wind configuration are relevant to the effect of vertical diffusion and the momentum flux distribution with spectrum, however,independent of the initial background wind field. Moreover, for any given nonzero initial background wind, a steady QBO can be finally generated due to the incorporated drag from the planetary and grav-ity waves.

  11. Observation of resonant interactions among surface gravity waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnefoy, F; Michel, G; Semin, B; Humbert, T; Aumaître, S; Berhanu, M; Falcon, E

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally study resonant interactions of oblique surface gravity waves in a large basin. Our results strongly extend previous experimental results performed mainly for perpendicular or collinear wave trains. We generate two oblique waves crossing at an acute angle, while we control their frequency ratio, steepnesses and directions. These mother waves mutually interact and give birth to a resonant wave whose properties (growth rate, resonant response curve and phase locking) are fully characterized. All our experimental results are found in good quantitative agreement with four-wave interaction theory with no fitting parameter. Off-resonance experiments are also reported and the relevant theoretical analysis is conducted and validated.

  12. Finite-difference numerical modelling of gravito-acoustic wave propagation in a windy and attenuating atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    in press; International audience; Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena such as tectonic events or explosions or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modelled in a 3D attenuating and windy atmosphere extending from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to pro...

  13. Educing the emission mechanism of internal gravity waves in the differentially heat rotating annulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Joran; Hien, Steffen; Achatz, Ulrich; Borchert, Sebastian; Fruman, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the lifecycle of gravity waves is fundamental to a good comprehension of the dynamics of the atmosphere. In this lifecycle, the emission mechanisms may be the most elusive. Indeed, while the emission of gravity waves by orography or convection is well understood, the so-called spontaneous emission is still a quite open topic of investigation [1]. This type of emission usually occur very near jet-front systems in the troposphere. In this abstract, we announce our numerical study of the question. Model systems of the atmosphere which can be easily simulated or built in a laboratory have always been an important part of the study of atmospheric dynamics, alongside global simulations, in situ measurements and theory. In the case of the study of the spontaneous emission of gravity waves near jet-front systems, the differentially heated rotating annulus set up has been proposed and extensively used. It comprises of an annular tank containing water: the inner cylinder is kept at a cold temperature while the outer cylinder is kept at a warm temperature. The whole system is rotating. Provided the values of the control parameters (temperature, rotation rate, gap between the cylinders, height of water) are well chosen, the resulting flow mimics the troposphere at midlatitudes: it has a jet stream, and a baroclinic lifecycle develops on top of it. A very reasonable ratio of Brunt-Väisälä frequency over rotation rate of the system can be obtained, so as to be as close to the atmosphere as possible. Recent experiments as well as earlier numerical simulations in our research group have shown that gravity waves are indeed emitted in this set up, in particular near the jet front system of the baroclinic wave [2]. After a first experimental stage of characterising the emitted wavepacket, we focused our work on testing hypotheses on the gravity wave emission mechanism: we have tested and validated the hypothesis of spontaneous imbalance generated by the flow in

  14. Modeling Volcanic Eruption Parameters by Near-Source Internal Gravity Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripepe, M.; Barfucci, G.; de Angelis, S.; Delle Donne, D.; Lacanna, G.; Marchetti, E.

    2016-11-01

    Volcanic explosions release large amounts of hot gas and ash into the atmosphere to form plumes rising several kilometers above eruptive vents, which can pose serious risk on human health and aviation also at several thousands of kilometers from the volcanic source. However the most sophisticate atmospheric models and eruptive plume dynamics require input parameters such as duration of the ejection phase and total mass erupted to constrain the quantity of ash dispersed in the atmosphere and to efficiently evaluate the related hazard. The sudden ejection of this large quantity of ash can perturb the equilibrium of the whole atmosphere triggering oscillations well below the frequencies of acoustic waves, down to much longer periods typical of gravity waves. We show that atmospheric gravity oscillations induced by volcanic eruptions and recorded by pressure sensors can be modeled as a compact source representing the rate of erupted volcanic mass. We demonstrate the feasibility of using gravity waves to derive eruption source parameters such as duration of the injection and total erupted mass with direct application in constraining plume and ash dispersal models.

  15. Gravity wave observations by Doppler wind and temperature lidar measurements in the strato- and mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, Gerd; Fiedler, Jens; Hildebrand, Jens; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2016-04-01

    The observation of wind and temperature perturbations by gravity waves propagating throughout the strato- and mesosphere is a challenging task. Both the kinetic and potential energy density can be derived and yield information about ensemble mean properties of gravity waves. We measure temperatures and winds with the Doppler Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar at the ALOMAR research station in Northern Norway (69N, 16E). Using two independently steerable telescopes and lasers we are able to measure vertical profiles of two wind components and temperatures simultaneously. The observations can be performed even under sunlit conditions, which is essential for measuring atmospheric perturbations over several days and during summer at this location. We report on the first observation of persistent inertia gravity wave signatures in the horizontal wind and temperature. The measurements cover the altitude range from 20 km to about 80 km during night and to about 70 km during daytime. For one case with observations lasting more than 50 hours, we find amplitudes of 5 to 25 m/s and 1 to 8 K in wind and temperature, respectively. The measured kinetic to potential energy density ratio is about 10, indicating that the majority of variability is due to waves with intrinsic frequencies close to the inertial frequency. The entire wave field is mainly characterized by the presence of multiple waves, however quasi-monochromatic waves can be identified at limited times and allow a more detailed analysis of wave properties like propagation direction, amplitudes and the momentum flux.

  16. Gravity wave and tidal structures between 60 and 140 km inferred from space shuttle reentry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, David C.; Wang, Ding-Yi; Blanchard, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of density measurements made using high-resolution accelerometers aboard several space shuttles at altitudes from 60 to 140 km during reentry into the earth's atmosphere. The observed density fluctuations are interpreted in terms of gravity waves and tides and provide evidence of the importance of such motions well into the thermosphere. Height profiles of fractional density variance reveal that wave amplitudes increase at a rate consistent with observations at lower levels up to about 90 km. The rate of amplitude growth decreases at greater heights, however, and appears to cease above about 110 km. Wave amplitudes are nevertheless large at these heights and suggest that gravity waves may play an important role in forcing of the lower thermosphere.

  17. Gravitational wave in Lorentz violating gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xin; Chang, Zhe(State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049, Beijing, China)

    2011-01-01

    By making use of the weak gravitational field approximation, we obtain a linearized solution of the gravitational vacuum field equation in an anisotropic spacetime. The plane-wave solution and dispersion relation of gravitational wave is presented explicitly. There is possibility that the speed of gravitational wave is larger than the speed of light and the casuality still holds. We show that the energy-momentum of gravitational wave in the ansiotropic spacetime is still well defined and cons...

  18. Validation of the CUTLASS HF radar gravity wave observing capability using EISCAT CP-1 data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Arnold

    Full Text Available Quasi-periodic fluctuations in the returned ground-scatter power from the SuperDARN HF radars have been linked to the passage of medium-scale gravity waves. We have applied a technique that extracts the first radar range returns from the F-region to study the spatial extent and characteristics of these waves in the CUTLASS field-of-view. Some ray tracing was carried out to test the applicability of this method. The EISCAT radar facility at Tromsø is well within the CUTLASS field-of-view for these waves and provides a unique opportunity to assess independently the ability of the HF radars to derive gravity wave information. Results from 1st March, 1995, where the EISCAT UHF radar was operating in its CP-1 mode, demonstrate that the radars were in good agreement, especially if one selects the electron density variations measured by EISCAT at around 235 km. CUTLASS and EISCAT gravity wave observations complement each other; the former extends the spatial field of view considerably, whilst the latter provides detailed vertical information about a range of ionospheric parameters.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere – atmosphere interactions · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (thermospheric dynamics · Radio science (ionospheric propagations

  19. Nonlinear gravity-wave interactions in stratified turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmel, Mark; Sukhatme, Jai; Smith, Leslie M.

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the dynamics of gravity waves in stratified Boussinesq flows, a model is derived that consists of all three-gravity-wave-mode interactions (the GGG model), excluding interactions involving the vortical mode. The GGG model is a natural extension of weak turbulence theory that accounts for exact three-gravity-wave resonances. The model is examined numerically by means of random, large-scale, high-frequency forcing. An immediate observation is a robust growth of the so-called vertically sheared horizontal flow (VSHF). In addition, there is a forward transfer of energy and equilibration of the nonzero-frequency (sometimes called "fast") gravity-wave modes. These results show that gravity-wave-mode interactions by themselves are capable of systematic interscale energy transfer in a stratified fluid. Comparing numerical simulations of the GGG model and the full Boussinesq system, for the range of Froude numbers ( Fr) considered (0.05 ≤ Fr ≤ 1), in both systems the VSHF is hardest to resolve. When adequately resolved, VSHF growth is more vigorous in the GGG model. Furthermore, a VSHF is observed to form in milder stratification scenarios in the GGG model than the full Boussinesq system. Finally, fully three-dimensional nonzero-frequency gravity-wave modes equilibrate in both systems and their scaling with vertical wavenumber follows similar power-laws. The slopes of the power-laws obtained depend on Fr and approach -2 (from above) at Fr = 0.05, which is the strongest stratification that can be properly resolved with our computational resources.

  20. Waveguide gravity disturbances in vertically inhomogeneous dissipative atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Rudenko, G V

    2015-01-01

    Trapped atmosphere waves, such as IGW waveguide modes and Lamb modes, are described using dissipative solution above source (DSAS) (Dmitrienko and Rudenko, 2016). Accordingly this description, the modes are disturbances penetrating without limit in the upper atmosphere and dissipating their energy throughout the atmosphere; leakage from a trapping region to the upper atmosphere is taken in consideration. The DSAS results are compared to those based on both accurate and WKB approximated dissipationless equations. It is shown that the spatial and frequency characteristics of modes in the upper atmosphere calculated by any of the methods are close to each other and are in good agreement with the observed characteristics of traveling ionospheric disturbances.

  1. Gravitational Waves in Effective Quantum Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmet, Xavier; Kuntz, Ibere; Mohapatra, Sonali [University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    In this short paper we investigate quantum gravitational effects on Einstein's equations using Effective Field Theory techniques. We consider the leading order quantum gravitational correction to the wave equation. Besides the usual massless mode, we find a pair of modes with complex masses. These massive particles have a width and could thus lead to a damping of gravitational waves if excited in violent astrophysical processes producing gravitational waves such as e.g. black hole mergers. We discuss the consequences for gravitational wave events such as GW 150914 recently observed by the Advanced LIGO collaboration. (orig.)

  2. Observation and backward trajectory of an inertio-gravity wave in the lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hertzog

    Full Text Available A Doppler lidar observation of an inertio-gravity wave in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere is presented. The wave packet characteristics (vertical and horizontal wavenumbers, intrinsic and apparent frequencies are inferred from the analysis of the hodograph of the horizontal wind fluctuations. Those parameters are used as initial conditions for the calculation of the wave packet trajectory backwards in time in the atmosphere. These calculations are realized by ray-tracing techniques, with background fields (wind and stability provided by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting analyses. Sensitivity tests are performed in order to estimate the robustness of the computed trajectory. It is argued that the generation of the wave has taken place in the upper troposphere, where evidence of large synoptic scale Rossby wave disturbances are found. Our results support the fact that geostrophic adjustment (and possibly shear instabilities associated with such disturbances could be an effective mechanism for the generation of inertia-gravity waves in the mid-latitude.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics, mesoscale meteorology, waves and tides, instruments and techniques

  3. Stratospheric gravity waves at Southern Hemisphere orographic hotspots: 2003-2014 AIRS/Aqua observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Lars; Grimsdell, Alison W.; Alexander, M. Joan

    2016-07-01

    Stratospheric gravity waves from small-scale orographic sources are currently not well-represented in general circulation models. This may be a reason why many simulations have difficulty reproducing the dynamical behavior of the Southern Hemisphere polar vortex in a realistic manner. Here we discuss a 12-year record (2003-2014) of stratospheric gravity wave activity at Southern Hemisphere orographic hotspots as observed by the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) aboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Aqua satellite. We introduce a simple and effective approach, referred to as the "two-box method", to detect gravity wave activity from infrared nadir sounder measurements and to discriminate between gravity waves from orographic and other sources. From austral mid-fall to mid-spring (April-October) the contributions of orographic sources to the observed gravity wave occurrence frequencies were found to be largest for the Andes (90 %), followed by the Antarctic Peninsula (76 %), Kerguelen Islands (73 %), Tasmania (70 %), New Zealand (67 %), Heard Island (60 %), and other hotspots (24-54 %). Mountain wave activity was found to be closely correlated with peak terrain altitudes, and with zonal winds in the lower troposphere and mid-stratosphere. We propose a simple model to predict the occurrence of mountain wave events in the AIRS observations using zonal wind thresholds at 3 and 750 hPa. The model has significant predictive skill for hotspots where gravity wave activity is primarily due to orographic sources. It typically reproduces seasonal variations of the mountain wave occurrence frequencies at the Antarctic Peninsula and Kerguelen Islands from near zero to over 60 % with mean absolute errors of 4-5 percentage points. The prediction model can be used to disentangle upper level wind effects on observed occurrence frequencies from low-level source and other influences. The data and methods presented here can help to identify interesting

  4. Colliding waves in metric-affine gravity

    CERN Document Server

    García, A; Macías, A; Mielke, E W; Socorro, J; García, Alberto; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Macías, Alfredo; Mielke, Eckehard W.; Socorro, José

    1998-01-01

    We generalize the formulation of the colliding gravitational waves to metric-affine theories and present an example of such kind of exact solutions. The plane waves are equipped with five symmetries and the resulting geometry after the collision possesses two spacelike Killing vectors.

  5. Wave heating of the solar atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arregui, Iñigo

    2015-05-28

    Magnetic waves are a relevant component in the dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Their significance has increased because of their potential as a remote diagnostic tool and their presumed contribution to plasma heating processes. We discuss our current understanding of coronal heating by magnetic waves, based on recent observational evidence and theoretical advances. The discussion starts with a selection of observational discoveries that have brought magnetic waves to the forefront of the coronal heating discussion. Then, our theoretical understanding of the nature and properties of the observed waves and the physical processes that have been proposed to explain observations are described. Particular attention is given to the sequence of processes that link observed wave characteristics with concealed energy transport, dissipation and heat conversion. We conclude with a commentary on how the combination of theory and observations should help us to understand and quantify magnetic wave heating of the solar atmosphere.

  6. Tropical Gravity Wave Momentum Fluxes and Latent Heating Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Marvin A.; Zhou, Tiehan; Love, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent satellite determinations of global distributions of absolute gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the lower stratosphere show maxima over the summer subtropical continents and little evidence of GW momentum fluxes associated with the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ). This seems to be at odds with parameterizations forGWmomentum fluxes, where the source is a function of latent heating rates, which are largest in the region of the ITCZ in terms of monthly averages. The authors have examined global distributions of atmospheric latent heating, cloud-top-pressure altitudes, and lower-stratosphere absolute GW momentum fluxes and have found that monthly averages of the lower-stratosphere GW momentum fluxes more closely resemble the monthly mean cloud-top altitudes rather than the monthly mean rates of latent heating. These regions of highest cloud-top altitudes occur when rates of latent heating are largest on the time scale of cloud growth. This, plus previously published studies, suggests that convective sources for stratospheric GW momentum fluxes, being a function of the rate of latent heating, will require either a climate model to correctly model this rate of latent heating or some ad hoc adjustments to account for shortcomings in a climate model's land-sea differences in convective latent heating.

  7. Generation of internal gravity waves by penetrative convection

    CERN Document Server

    Pinçon, C; Goupil, M J

    2015-01-01

    The rich harvest of seismic observations over the past decade provides evidence of angular momentum redistribution in stellar interiors that is not reproduced by current evolution codes. In this context, transport by internal gravity waves can play a role and could explain discrepancies between theory and observations. The efficiency of the transport of angular momentum by waves depends on their driving mechanism. While excitation by turbulence throughout the convective zone has already been investigated, we know that penetrative convection into the stably stratified radiative zone can also generate internal gravity waves. Therefore, we aim at developing a semianalytical model to estimate the generation of IGW by penetrative plumes below an upper convective envelope. We derive the wave amplitude considering the pressure exerted by an ensemble of plumes on the interface between the radiative and convective zones as source term in the equation of momentum. We consider the effect of a thermal transition from a c...

  8. Role of the basin boundary conditions in gravity wave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Deike, Luc; Gutiérrez-Matus, Pablo; Jamin, Timothée; Semin, Benoit; Aumaitre, Sébastien; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric; BONNEFOY, Félicien

    2014-01-01

    Gravity wave turbulence is studied experimentally in a large wave basin where irregular waves are generated unidirectionally. The role of the basin boundary conditions (absorbing or reflecting) and of the forcing properties are investigated. To that purpose, an absorbing sloping beach opposite to the wavemaker can be replaced by a reflecting vertical wall. We observe that the wave field properties depend strongly on these boundary conditions. Quasi-one dimensional field of nonlinear waves propagate before to be damped by the beach whereas a more multidirectional wave field is observed with the wall. In both cases, the wave spectrum scales as a frequency-power law with an exponent that increases continuously with the forcing amplitude up to a value close to -4, which is the value predicted by the weak turbulence theory. The physical mechanisms involved are probably different according to the boundary condition used, but cannot be easily discriminated with only temporal measurements. We have also studied freely...

  9. Numerical simulation of the resonantly excited capillary-gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanazaki, Hideshi; Hirata, Motonori; Okino, Shinya

    2015-11-01

    Capillary gravity waves excited by an obstacle are investigated by a direct numerical simulation. In the flow without capillary effects, it is well known that large-amplitude upstream advancing solitary waves are generated periodically under the resonant condition, i.e., when the phase velocity of the long surface waves and the mean flow velocity agrees. With capillary effects, solutions of the Euler equations show the generation of very short waves further upstream of the solitary waves and also in the depression region downstream of the obstacle. The overall characteristics of these waves agree with the solutions of the forced fifth-order KdV equation, while the weakly nonlinear theory generally overestimates the wavelength of the short waves.

  10. Cosmic Tsunamis in Modified Gravity: Scalar waves disrupting screening mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Hagala, R; Mota, D F

    2016-01-01

    Extending General Relativity by adding extra degrees of freedom is a popular approach to explain the accelerated expansion of the universe and to build high energy completions of the theory of gravity. The presence of such new degrees of freedom is, however, tightly constrained from several observations and experiments that aim to test General Relativity in a wide range of scales. The viability of a given modified theory of gravity therefore strongly depends on the existence of a screening mechanism that suppresses the extra degrees of freedom. We perform simulations, and find that waves propagating in the new degrees of freedom can significantly impact the efficiency of the screening mechanisms, thereby spoiling the viability of modified gravity theories. Specifically, we show that the waves produced can increase the amplitude of the fifth force and the Parametrized Post Newtonian parameters by several orders of magnitude.

  11. Resonance vibrations of the Ross Ice Shelf and observations of persistent atmospheric waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Oleg A.; Zabotin, Nikolay A.

    2016-10-01

    Recently reported lidar observations have revealed a persistent wave activity in the Antarctic middle and upper atmosphere that has no counterpart in observations at midlatitude and low-latitude locations. The unusual wave activity suggests a geographically specific source of atmospheric waves with periods of 3-10 h. Here we investigate theoretically the hypothesis that the unusual atmospheric wave activity in Antarctica is generated by the fundamental and low-order modes of vibrations of the Ross Ice Shelf (RIS). Simple models are developed to describe basic physical properties of resonant vibrations of large ice shelves and their coupling to the atmosphere. Dispersion relation of the long surface waves, which propagate in the floating ice sheet and are responsible for its low-order resonances, is found to be similar to the dispersion relation of infragravity waves in the ice-free ocean. The phase speed of the surface waves and the resonant frequencies determine the periods and wave vectors of atmospheric waves that are generated by the RIS resonant oscillations. The altitude-dependent vertical wavelengths and the periods of the acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere are shown to be sensitive to the physical parameters of the RIS, which can be difficult to measure by other means. Predicted properties of the atmospheric waves prove to be in a remarkable agreement with the key features of the observed persistent wave activity.

  12. $pp$-waves in modified gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Baykal, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    The family of metrics corresponding to the plane-fronted gravitational waves with parallel propagation, commonly referred to as the family of pp-wave metrics, is studied in the context of various modified gravitational models in a self-contained and coherent manner by using a variant of the null coframe formulation of Newman and Penrose and the exterior algebra of differential forms on pseudo-Riemannian manifolds.

  13. Active Absorption of Irregular Gravity Waves in BEM-Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael; Frigaard, Peter

    1992-01-01

    The boundary element method is applied to the computation of irregular gravity waves. The boundary conditions at the open boundaries are obtained by a digital filtering technique, where the surface elevations in front of the open boundary are filtered numerically yielding the velocity...

  14. Magnetoacoustic Waves in the Solar Stratified Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑惠南; 王水; 吴式灿; 李波

    2001-01-01

    The propagation of magnetoacoustic waves in the solar atmosphere consisting of the photosphere, chromosphere and corona has been studied numerically by time-dependent multi-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation. Pressure disturbances are introduced at the bottom of the chromosphere and at the bottom of the corona, respectively. The computational results show that incurred fast and slow MHD waves propagate away from the source of the disturbances. The fast MHD wave propagates as an expansive wave in the radial direction, while the slow one steepens and it may evolve into a slow shock. We suggest that the extreme ultraviolet imaging telescope wave observed by the SOHO and Moreton wave are a fast MHD wave propagating in the corona and in the chromosphere, respectively.

  15. Finite-difference numerical modelling of gravitoacoustic wave propagation in a windy and attenuating atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Martin, Roland; Garcia, Raphaël F.; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena such as tectonic events or explosions or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modelled in a 3-D attenuating and windy atmosphere extending from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale, we introduce a finite difference in the time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with a background flow (wind). One significant benefit of such a method is its versatility because it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation, which enables one to observe interactions between them. Simulations can be performed for 2-D or 3-D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere or gravity-wave generation by atmospheric explosions. We validate the computations by comparing them to analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases: an atmospheric explosion, and a ground displacement forcing.

  16. Finite Difference Numerical Modeling of Gravito-Acoustic Wave Propagation in a Windy and Attenuating Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Q.; Garcia, R.; Martin, R.; Komatitsch, D.

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic and gravity waves propagating in the planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena (tectonic events, explosions) or as contributors to the atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physic behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modeled in an attenuating and windy 3D atmosphere from the ground to the upper thermosphere. Thus, In order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or the global scale a high order finite difference time domain (FDTD) approach is proposed that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations (Landau 1959) with non constant physical parameters (density, viscosities and speed of sound) and background velocities (wind). One significant benefit from this code is its versatility. Indeed, it handles both acoustic and gravity waves in the same simulation that enables one to observe correlations between the two. Simulations will also be performed on 2D/3D realistic cases such as tsunamis in a full MSISE-00 atmosphere and gravity-wave generation through atmospheric explosions. Computations are validated by comparison to well-known analytical solutions based on dispersion relations in specific benchmark cases (atmospheric explosion and bottom displacement forcing).

  17. Applications of acoustic-gravity waves numerical modelling to tsunami signals observed by gravimetry satellites in very low orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, Quentin; Garcia, Raphael; Martin, Roland; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Sladen, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic and gravity waves propagating in planetary atmospheres have been studied intensively as markers of specific phenomena (tectonic events, explosions) or as contributors to atmosphere dynamics. To get a better understanding of the physics behind these dynamic processes, both acoustic and gravity waves propagation should be modeled in an attenuating and windy 3D atmosphere from the ground all the way to the upper thermosphere. Thus, in order to provide an efficient numerical tool at the regional or global scale we introduce a high-order finite- difference time domain (FDTD) approach that relies on the linearized compressible Navier-Stokes equations with non constant physical parameters (density, viscosities and speed of sound) and background velocities (wind). We present applications of these simulations to the propagation of gravity waves generated by tsunamis for realistic cases for which atmospheric models are extracted from empirical models including 3D variations of atmospheric parameters, and tsunami forcing at the ocean surface is extracted from finite-fault dislocation simulations. We describe the specific difficulties induced by the size of the simulation, the boundary conditions and the spherical geometry and compare the simulation outputs to data gathered by gravimetric satellites crossing gravity waves generated by tsunamis.

  18. Nonlinear reflection of internal gravity wave onto a slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Keshav; Sommeria, Joel; Staquet, Chantal; Leclair, Matthieu; Grisouard, Nicolas; Gostiaux, Louis

    2016-04-01

    reflected wave. We study the momentum and energy budget of the process in order to understand the mechanism of generation of mean flow, its interaction with the wave and account for the loss of wave energy upon reflection. REFERENCES N. Grisouard, M. Leclair, L. Gostiaux and C. Staquet 2013. Large scale energy transfer from an internal gravity wave reflecting on a simple slope IUTAM Symposium Procedia 8 119-128 M. Leclair, K. Raja and C. Staquet 2016. Nonlinear reflection of a two-dimensional finite-width internal gravity wave onto a slope Journal of Fluid Mechanics. in preparation

  19. Gravity's shadow the search for gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Harry

    2004-01-01

    According to the theory of relativity, we are constantly bathed in gravitational radiation. When stars explode or collide, a portion of their mass becomes energy that disturbs the very fabric of the space-time continuum like ripples in a pond. But proving the existence of these waves has been difficult; the cosmic shudders are so weak that only the most sensitive instruments can be expected to observe them directly. Fifteen times during the last thirty years scientists have claimed to have detected gravitational waves, but so far none of those claims have survived the scrutiny of the scie

  20. Observations of gravity waves from satellite and implications for the wave driving of the SAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Riese, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics at low latitudes in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere is governed by an interplay of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and the semiannual oscillation (SAO) of the zonal wind. It is known that tropical dynamics has significant influence on the atmosphere over a large range of altitudes and latitudes. For example, QBO and SAO effects are seen in the MLT region, and there is a significant influence of the QBO on surface weather and climate in the Northern Hemisphere during winter. Still, global models have large difficulties in simulating a realistic QBO and SAO. One main uncertainty is the wave driving of these oscillations, in particular the driving by gravity waves (GWs). We derive GW temperature variances, GW momentum fluxes and potential GW drag from over three years of High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) satellite data in the stratopause region. These observations are compared with the SAO driving due to planetary waves, as well as the zonal wind tendencies, both determined from the ECMWF ERA-Interim (ERAI) reanalysis. HIRDLS satellite observations and ERAI support the general assumption that, due to selective filtering of the GW spectrum by the QBO in the stratosphere, GWs mainly contribute to the SAO momentum budget during SAO eastward wind shear. However, during SAO westward wind shear the GW contribution is usually smaller, and the wave driving is dominated by planetary waves, probably of extratropical origin. Still, we find indications in both satellite observations and ERAI that sometimes GW drag is important also during SAO westward wind shear.

  1. Capillary-Gravity Waves Generated by a Sudden Object Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Closa, Fabien; Raphael, Elie

    2010-01-01

    We study theoretically the capillary-gravity waves created at the water-air interface by a small object during a sudden accelerated or decelerated rectilinear motion. We analyze the wave resistance corresponding to the transient wave pattern and show that it is nonzero even if the involved velocity (the final one in the accelerated case, the initial one in the decelerated case) is smaller than the minimum phase velocity $c_{min}=23 \\mathrm{cm s^{-1}}$. These results might be important for a better understanding of the propulsion of water-walking insects where accelerated and decelerated motions frequently occur.

  2. Estimating gravity wave parameters from oblique high-frequency backscatter: Modeling and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, W. A.; Greenwald, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    A new technique for estimating electron density perturbation amplitudes of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs), using HF radar data, is presented. TIDs are observed in HF radar data as enhancements of the ground-scattered power which propagate through the radar's field of view. These TIDs are the ionospheric manifestation of atmospheric acoustic-gravity waves. TID electron density perturbation amplitudes were estimated by simulating the radar returns, using HF ray tracing through a model ionosphere perturbed by a model gravity wave. The simulation determined the return power in the ground-scattered portion of the signal as a function of range, and this was compared to HF radar data from the Goose Bay HF radar at a time when evidence of gravity waves was present in the data. By varying the amplitude of the electron density perturbation in the model it was possible to estimate the perturbation of the actual wave. It was found that the perturbations that are observed by the Goose Bay HF radar are of the order of 20% to 35%. It was also found that the number of observable power enhancements, and the relative amplitudes of these enhancements, depended on the vertical thickness of the gravity wave's source region. From the simulations and observations it was estimated that the source region for the case presented here was approximately 20 km thick. In addition, the energy in the wave packet was calculated and compared to an estimate of the available energy in the source region. It was found that the wave energy was about 0.2% of the estimated available source region energy.

  3. Testing Gravity with Gravitational Wave Source Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Calabrese, Erminia; Spergel, David N

    2016-01-01

    We show that the gravitational wave source counts distribution can test how gravitational radiation propagates on cosmological scales. This test does not require obtaining redshifts for the sources. If the signal-to-noise from a gravitational wave source is proportional to the strain then it falls as $R^{-1}$, thus we expect the source counts to follow $dN/dS \\propto S^{-4}$. However, if gravitational waves decay as they propagate or can propagate into other dimensions, then there can be deviations from this generic prediction. We consider the possibility that the signal-to-noise falls as $R^{-\\gamma}$, where $\\gamma=1$ recovers the expected predictions in a Euclidean uniformly-filled universe. We forecast the sensitivity of future observations in constraining gravitational wave physics using this method by simulating sources distributed over a finite range of signal-to-noise. We first consider the case of few objects, 7 sources, with a signal-to-noise from 8 to 24, and impose a lower limit on $\\gamma$, findi...

  4. Primordial Gravitational Waves in Bimetric Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Sakakihara, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    We study primordial tensor power-spectra generated during inflation in bimetric gravity. More precisely, we examine a homogeneous expanding spacetime in a minimal bimetric model with an inflaton and calculate tensor perturbations on the homogeneous background under slow-roll approximation. In terms of the mass eigenstates, only the power-spectrum of the massless state remains constant and both the power-spectrum of the massive state and the cross power-spectrum rapidly decay during inflation. The amplitude of the physical power-spectrum is suppressed due to the flavor mixing. All power-spectra in the flavor eigenstates coincide with each other up to the first order of the slow-roll parameter.

  5. Formation of ice supersaturation by mesoscale gravity waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Spichtinger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the formation and evolution of an ice-supersaturated region (ISSR that was detected by means of an operational radiosonde sounding launched from the meteorological station of Lindenberg on 21 March 2000, 00:00 UTC. The supersaturated layer was 5 situated below the local tropopause, between 320 and 408 hPa altitude. Our investigation uses satellite imagery (METEOSAT, AVHRR and analyses of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF. Mesoscale simulations reveal that the ISSR was formed by a temporary vertical uplift of upper tropospheric air parcels by 20 to 40 hPa in 1 to 2 h. This resulted in a significant local increase of the 10 specific humidity by the moisture transport from below. The ascent was triggered by the superposition of two internal gravity waves, a mountain wave induced by flow past the Erzgebirge and Riesengebirge south of Lindenberg, and an inertial gravity wave excited by the anticyclonically curved jet stream over the Baltic Sea. The wave-induced ISSR was rather thick with a depth of about 2 km. The wave-induced upward motion 15 causing the supersaturation also triggered the formation of a cirrus cloud. METEOSAT imagery shows that the cirrus cloud got optically thick within two hours. During this period another longer lasting thin but extended cirrus existed just beneath the tropopause. The wave-induced ISSR disappeared after about half a day in accordance with the decaying wave activity.

  6. Case study of stratospheric gravity waves of convective origin over Arctic Scandinavia. VHF radar observations and numerical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechou, A. [La Reunion Univ., St. Denis Messag, Ile de La Reunion (France). Lab. de l' Atmosphere et des Cyclones; Arnault, J.; Dalin, P.; Kirkwood, S. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden)

    2013-03-01

    Orography is a well-known source of gravity and inertia-gravity waves in the atmosphere. Other sources, such as convection, are also known to be potentially important but the large amplitude of orographic waves over Scandinavia has generally precluded the possibility to study such other sources experimentally in this region. In order to better understand the origin of stratospheric gravity waves observed by the VHF radar ESRAD (Esrange MST radar) over Kiruna, in Arctic Sweden (67.88 N, 21.10 E), observations have been compared to simulations made using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) with and without the effects of orography and clouds. This case study concerns gravity waves observed from 00:00 UTC on 18 February to 12:00 UTC on 20 February 2007. We focus on the wave signatures in the static stability field and vertical wind deduced from the simulations and from the observations as these are the parameters which are provided by the observations with the best height coverage. As is common at this site, orographic gravity waves were produced over the Scandinavian mountains and observed by the radar. However, at the same time, southward propagation of fronts in the Barents Sea created short-period waves which propagated into the stratosphere and were transported, embedded in the cyclonic winds, over the radar site. (orig.)

  7. Case study of stratospheric gravity waves of convective origin over Arctic Scandinavia – VHF radar observations and numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Réchou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Orography is a well-known source of gravity and inertia-gravity waves in the atmosphere. Other sources, such as convection, are also known to be potentially important but the large amplitude of orographic waves over Scandinavia has generally precluded the possibility to study such other sources experimentally in this region. In order to better understand the origin of stratospheric gravity waves observed by the VHF radar ESRAD (Esrange MST radar over Kiruna, in Arctic Sweden (67.88° N, 21.10° E, observations have been compared to simulations made using the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF with and without the effects of orography and clouds. This case study concerns gravity waves observed from 00:00 UTC on 18 February to 12:00 UTC on 20 February 2007. We focus on the wave signatures in the static stability field and vertical wind deduced from the simulations and from the observations as these are the parameters which are provided by the observations with the best height coverage. As is common at this site, orographic gravity waves were produced over the Scandinavian mountains and observed by the radar. However, at the same time, southward propagation of fronts in the Barents Sea created short-period waves which propagated into the stratosphere and were transported, embedded in the cyclonic winds, over the radar site.

  8. Testing gravity with gravitational wave source counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Battaglia, Nicholas; Spergel, David N.

    2016-08-01

    We show that the gravitational wave source counts distribution can test how gravitational radiation propagates on cosmological scales. This test does not require obtaining redshifts for the sources. If the signal-to-noise ratio (ρ) from a gravitational wave source is proportional to the strain then it falls as {R}-1, thus we expect the source counts to follow {{d}}{N}/{{d}}ρ \\propto {ρ }-4. However, if gravitational waves decay as they propagate or propagate into other dimensions, then there can be deviations from this generic prediction. We consider the possibility that the strain falls as {R}-γ , where γ =1 recovers the expected predictions in a Euclidean uniformly-filled Universe, and forecast the sensitivity of future observations to deviations from standard General Relativity. We first consider the case of few objects, seven sources, with a signal-to-noise from 8 to 24, and impose a lower limit on γ, finding γ \\gt 0.33 at 95% confidence level. The distribution of our simulated sample is very consistent with the distribution of the trigger events reported by Advanced LIGO. Future measurements will improve these constraints: with 100 events, we estimate that γ can be measured with an uncertainty of 15%. We generalize the formalism to account for a range of chirp masses and the possibility that the signal falls as {exp}(-R/{R}0)/{R}γ .

  9. Constraining gravity with hadron physics: neutron stars, modified gravity and gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.

    2017-03-01

    The finding of Gravitational Waves (GW) by the aLIGO scientific and VIRGO collaborations opens opportunities to better test and understand strong interactions, both nuclear-hadronic and gravitational. Assuming General Relativity holds, one can constrain hadron physics at a neutron star. But precise knowledge of the Equation of State and transport properties in hadron matter can also be used to constrain the theory of gravity itself. I review a couple of these opportunities in the context of modified f (R) gravity, the maximum mass of neutron stars, and progress in the Equation of State of neutron matter from the chiral effective field theory of QCD.

  10. Constraining gravity with hadron physics: neutron stars, modified gravity and gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J

    2016-01-01

    The finding of Gravitational Waves by the aLIGO scientific and VIRGO collaborations opens opportunities to better test and understand strong interactions, both nuclear-hadronic and gravitational. Assuming General Relativity holds, one can constrain hadron physics at a neutron star. But precise knowledge of the Equation of State and transport properties in hadron matter can also be used to constrain the theory of gravity itself. I review a couple of these opportunities in the context of modified f(R) gravity, the maximum mass of neutron stars, and progress in the Equation of State of neutron matter from the chiral effective field theory of QCD.

  11. Three-dimensional turbulence-resolving modeling of the Venusian cloud layer and associated gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Maxence; Spiga, Aymeric; Lebonnois, Sebastien

    2016-10-01

    One of the main questions that remains unclear about the dynamics of the atmosphere of Venus and its interaction with the photochemistry is the characterization of the cloud convective layer which mixes momentum, heat, chemical species and generates gravity waves observed by Venus Express. This dynamical forcing induced by the cloud layer has been proposed as a significant contribution to the maintenance of the super-rotation. However these waves develop from regional to local scales and can not be resolved by global circulation models (GCM) developed insofar. Therefore we developed an unprecedented 3D Venusian mesoscale model based on the Martian mesoscale model using the Weather Research and Forecast terrestrial model. We report the first application of this model : simulating convection in the Venusian cloud layer and associated gravity waves by 3D turbulent-resolving simulations (Large-Eddy Simulations). The model employs an offline radiative forcing based on heating rates extracted from the LMD Venus GCM consisting of three distinct kind of rates. Two radiative ones for short wave (solar) and long wave (IR) and one for the adiabatic cooling/warming due to the global dynamics of the atmosphere (mainly the Hadley cell) with 2 different cloud models. Therefore we are able to characterize the convection and associated gravity waves in function of latitude and local time. To assess the impact of the general circulation on the convection we ran simulations with forcing from a 1D radiative model.The resolved convective layer takes place between 1.0 105 and 3.8 104 Pa with vertical wind between ± 3 m/s, is organized as polygonal closed cells of about 8x8km2, and emits gravity waves on either side with temperature perturbations of about 0.5 K with vertical wavelength of 1 km and horizontal wavelength from 1 to almost 20 km. The order of magnitude of the resolved plumes is consistent with observations though underestimated.We are working on coupling the model with a

  12. Global Gravity Wave Variances from Aura MLS: Characteristics and Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    The gravity wave (GW)-resolving capabilities of 118-GHz saturated thermal radiances acquired throughout the stratosphere by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite are investigated and initial results presented. Because the saturated (optically thick) radiances resolve GW perturbations from a given altitude at different horizontal locations, variances are evaluated at 12 pressure altitudes between 21 and 51 km using the 40 saturated radiances found at the bottom of each limb scan. Forward modeling simulations show that these variances are controlled mostly by GWs with vertical wavelengths z 5 km and horizontal along-track wavelengths of y 100-200 km. The tilted cigar-shaped three-dimensional weighting functions yield highly selective responses to GWs of high intrinsic frequency that propagate toward the instrument. The latter property is used to infer the net meridional component of GW propagation by differencing the variances acquired from ascending (A) and descending (D) orbits. Because of improved vertical resolution and sensitivity, Aura MLS GW variances are 5?8 times larger than those from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) MLS. Like UARS MLS variances, monthly-mean Aura MLS variances in January and July 2005 are enhanced when local background wind speeds are large, due largely to GW visibility effects. Zonal asymmetries in variance maps reveal enhanced GW activity at high latitudes due to forcing by flow over major mountain ranges and at tropical and subtropical latitudes due to enhanced deep convective generation as inferred from contemporaneous MLS cloud-ice data. At 21-28-km altitude (heights not measured by the UARS MLS), GW variance in the tropics is systematically enhanced and shows clear variations with the phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation, in general agreement with GW temperature variances derived from radiosonde, rocketsonde, and limb-scan vertical profiles.

  13. Steady periodic gravity waves with surface tension

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider two-dimensional, stratified, steady water waves propagating over an impermeable flat bed and with a free surface. The motion is assumed to be driven by capillarity (that is, surface tension) on the surface and a gravitational force acting on the body of the fluid. We prove the existence of global continua of classical solutions that are periodic and traveling. This is accomplished by first constructing a 1-parameter family of laminar flow solutions, $\\mathcal{T}$, then applying bifurcation theory methods to obtain local curves of small amplitude solutions branching from $\\mathcal{T}$ at an eigenvalue of the linearized problem. Each solution curve is then continued globally by means of a degree theoretic theorem in the spirit of Rabinowitz. Finally, we complement the degree theoretic picture by proving an alternate global bifurcation theorem via the analytic continuation method of Dancer.

  14. A plethora of generalised solitary gravity-capillary water waves

    CERN Document Server

    Clamond, Didier; Duran, Angel

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes, first, an efficient algorithm for computing gravity-capillary solitary waves solutions of the irrotational Euler equations and, second, provides numerical evidences of the existence of (likely) an infinite number of generalised solitary waves (i.e. solitary waves with undamped oscillatory wings). Using conformal mapping, the unknown fluid domain (which is to be determined) is mapped into a uniform strip of the complex plane. A Babenko-like equation is then derived from a Lagrangian expressed in the transformed domain. The Babenko equation is then solved numerically using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Various interesting solutions are computed, some of them being known, some seem to be new. The emergence of generalised solitary waves is shown when the Bond number is increased.

  15. Projected Constraints on Lorentz-Violating Gravity with Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Devin; Yagi, Kent

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational waves are excellent tools to probe the foundations of General Relativity in the strongly dynamical and non-linear regime. One such foundation is Lorentz symmetry, which can be broken in the gravitational sector by the existence of a preferred time direction, and thus, a preferred frame at each spacetime point. This leads to a modification in the orbital decay rate of binary systems, and also in the generation and chirping of their associated gravitational waves. We here study whether waves emitted in the late, quasi-circular inspiral of non-spinning, neutron star binaries can place competitive constraints on two proxies of gravitational Lorentz-violation: Einstein-\\AE{}ther theory and khronometric gravity. We model the waves in the small-coupling (or decoupling) limit and in the post-Newtonian approximation, by perturbatively solving the field equations in small deformations from General Relativity and in the small-velocity/weak-gravity approximation. We assume a gravitational wave consistent wi...

  16. An Internal Wave as a Frequency Filter for Surface Gravity Waves on Water

    CERN Document Server

    Lossow, K

    2010-01-01

    We consider one-dimensional model of the interaction between surface and the internal gravity water waves. The internal wave is modeled by its basic form: a non-dispersive field with a horizontal current that is uniform over all depth, insignificantly affected by the surface waves, while ignoring surface tension and wind growth/decay effects. The depth is infinite. Approximation for the height of the surface wave on the flow by the "elementary quasi stationary" solutions was found. It was shown that the flow acts as a frequency filter for gravitational waves on water.

  17. Resonant nonlinear interactions between atmospheric waves in the polar summer mesopause region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Renqiang; (刘仁强); YI; Fan; (易帆)

    2003-01-01

    Data obtained from the mobile SOUSY VHF radar at And(ya/Norway in summer 1987 have been used to study the nonlinear interactions between planetary waves, tides and gravity waves in the polar mesosphere, and the instability of background atmosphere above the mesopause. It is observed that 35-h planetary wave, diurnal, semidiurnal and terdiurnal tides are the prominent perturbations in the Lomb-Scargle spectra of the zonal wind component. By inspecting the frequency combinations, several triads are identified. By bispectral analysis it is shown that most bispectral peaks stand for quadratic coupling between tidal harmonics or between tide and planetary or gravity wave, and the height dependence of bispectral peaks reflects the variation of wave-wave interactions. Above the mesopause, the occurrence heights of the maximum L-S power spectral peaks corresponding to the prominent wave components tend to increase with their frequencies. This may result from the process in which two low frequency waves interact to generate a high frequency wave. Intensities of the planetary wave and tides increase gradually, arrive at their maxima, and then decay quickly in turn with increasing height. This kind of scene correlates with a "chain" of wave-wave resonant interactions that shifts with height from lower frequency segment to higher frequency segment. By instability analysis, it is observed that above the mesopause, the Richardson number becomes smaller and smaller with height, implying that the turbulent motion grows stronger and stronger and accordingly the background atmosphere more and more instable. It is suggested that the wave-wave sum resonant interaction and the wave dissipation due to instability are two dominant dynamical processes that occur in the mesopause region. The former invokes the energy transfer from lower frequency waves to higher frequency waves. The latter results in the heating of the atmosphere and accelerating of the background flow.

  18. An experimental study of wave coupling in gravity surface wave turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Sommeria, Joel; Viboud, Samuel; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Weak turbulence is a theoretical framework aimed at describing wave turbulence (in the weakly nonlinear limit) i.e. a statistical state involving a large number of nonlinearly coupled waves. For gravity waves at the surface of water, it provides a phenomenology that may describe the formation of the spectrum of the ocean surface. Analytical predictions of the spectra are made based on the fact that energy transfer occurs through 4-wave coupling. By using an advanced stereoscopic imaging technique, we measure in time the deformation of the water surface. We obtain a state of wave turbulence by using two small wedge wavemakers in a 13-m diameter wavetank. We then use high order correlator (bi- and tri-coherence) in order to get evidence of the active wave coupling present in our system as used successfully for gravity-capillary wave turbulence. At odds with the weak turbulence theory we observe 3-wave interaction involving 2 quasi linear wave and a bound wave whose frequency lies on the first harmonics of the linear dispersion relation. We do not observe 4-wave coupling within the accuracy of our measurement. This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant agreement No 647018-WATU).

  19. Cooling of the Martian thermosphere by CO$_2$ radiation and gravity waves: An intercomparison study with two general circulation models

    CERN Document Server

    Medvedev, Alexander S; Yiğit, Erdal; Feofilov, Artem G; Forget, François; Hartogh, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Observations show that the lower thermosphere of Mars ($\\sim$100--140 km) is up to 40 K colder than the current general circulation models (GCMs) can reproduce. Possible candidates for physical processes missing in the models are larger abundances of atomic oxygen facilitating stronger CO$_2$ radiative cooling, and thermal effects of gravity waves. Using two state-of-the-art Martian GCMs, the Laboratoire de M\\'et\\'eorologie Dynamique and Max Planck Institute models that self-consistently cover the atmosphere from the surface to the thermosphere, these physical mechanisms are investigated. Simulations demonstrate that the CO$_2$ radiative cooling with a sufficiently large atomic oxygen abundance, and the gravity wave-induced cooling can alone result in up to 40 K colder temperature in the lower thermosphere. Accounting for both mechanisms produce stronger cooling at high latitudes. However, radiative cooling effects peak above the mesopause, while gravity wave cooling rates continuously increase with height. A...

  20. Experimental study of three-wave interactions among capillary-gravity surface waves

    CERN Document Server

    Haudin, Florence; Deike, Luc; Jamin, Timothée; Falcon, Eric; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In propagating wave systems, three or four-wave resonant interactions constitute a classical non-linear mechanism exchanging energy between the different scales. Here we investigate three-wave interactions for gravity-capillary surface waves in a closed laboratory tank. We generate two crossing wave-trains and we study their interaction. Using two optical methods, a local one (Laser Doppler Vibrometry) and a spatio-temporal one (Diffusive Light Photography), a third wave of smaller amplitude is detected, verifying the three-wave resonance conditions in frequency and in wavenumber. Furthermore, by focusing on the stationary regime and by taking into account viscous dissipation, we directly estimate the growth rate of the resonant mode. The latter is then compared to the predictions of the weakly non-linear triadic resonance interaction theory. The obtained results confirm qualitatively and extend previous experimental results obtained only for collinear wave-trains. Finally, we discuss the relevance of three-w...

  1. Gravity Wave and Turbulence Transport of Heat and Na in the Mesopause Region over the Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yafang; Liu, Alan Z.

    2016-07-01

    The vertical heat and Na fluxes induced by gravity waves and turbulence are derived based on over 600 hours of observations from the Na wind/temperature lidar located at Andes lidar Observatory (ALO), Cerro Pachón, Chile. In the 85-100 km region, the annual mean vertical fluxes by gravity waves show downward heat transport with a maximum of 0.78K m/s at 90 km, and downward Na transport with a maximum of 210 m/s/cm3 at 94km. The maximum cooing rate reaches -24 K/d at 94km. The vertical fluxes have strong seasonal variations, with large differences in magnitudes and altitudes of maximum fluxes between winter and summer. The vertical fluxes due to turbulence eddies are also derived with a novel method that relates turbulence fluctuations of temperature and vertical wind with photon count fluctuations at very high resolution (25 m, 6 s). The results show that the vertical transports are comparable to those by gravity waves and they both play significant roles in the atmospheric thermal structure and constituent distribution. This direct measure of turbulence transport also enables estimate of the eddy diffusivity for heat and constituent in the mesopause region.

  2. Empirical Mode Decomposition of the atmospheric wave field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. McDonald

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the utility of the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD time-series analysis technique to separate the horizontal wind field observed by the Scott Base MF radar (78° S, 167° E into its constituent parts made up of the mean wind, gravity waves, tides, planetary waves and instrumental noise. Analysis suggests that EMD effectively separates the wind field into a set of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs which can be related to atmospheric waves with different temporal scales. The Intrinsic Mode Functions resultant from application of the EMD technique to Monte-Carlo simulations of white- and red-noise processes are compared to those obtained from the measurements and are shown to be significantly different statistically. Thus, application of the EMD technique to the MF radar horizontal wind data can be used to prove that this data contains information on internal gravity waves, tides and planetary wave motions.

    Examination also suggests that the EMD technique has the ability to highlight amplitude and frequency modulations in these signals. Closer examination of one of these regions of amplitude modulation associated with dominant periods close to 12 h is suggested to be related to a wave-wave interaction between the semi-diurnal tide and a planetary wave. Application of the Hilbert transform to the IMFs forms a Hilbert-Huang spectrum which provides a way of viewing the data in a similar manner to the analysis from a continuous wavelet transform. However, the fact that the basis function of EMD is data-driven and does not need to be selected a priori is a major advantage. In addition, the skeleton diagrams, produced from the results of the Hilbert-Huang spectrum, provide a method of presentation which allows quantitative information on the instantaneous period and amplitude squared to be displayed as a function of time. Thus, it provides a novel way to view frequency and amplitude-modulated wave phenomena and potentially non

  3. Recent progress in mesospheric gravity wave studies using nightglow imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Michael J.; Pendleton Junior, William R.; Pautet, Pierre-Dominique; Zhao, Yucheng; Olsen, Chris; Babu, Hema Karnam Surendra [Center for Atmospheric and Space Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, Utah (United States); Medeiros, Amauri F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Unidade Academica de Fisica, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil); Takahashi, Hisao, E-mail: mtaylor@cc.usu.edu, E-mail: wpen@cc.usu.edu, E-mail: dominiquepautet@gmail.com, E-mail: yucheng@cc.usu.edu, E-mail: cmellob@gmail.com, E-mail: hema_sb@rediffmail.com, E-mail: afragoso@df.ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: hisaotak@laser.inpe.br [INPE, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    A variety of optical remote sensing techniques have now revealed a rich spectrum of wave activity in the upper atmosphere. Many of these perturbations, with periodicities ranging from {approx} 5 min to many hours and horizontal scales of a few tens of km to several thousands km, are due to freely propagating atmospheric gravity waves and forced tidal oscillations. Passive optical observations of the spatial and temporal characteristics of these waves in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region ( {approx} 80-100 km) are facilitated by several naturally occurring, vertically distinct nightglow layers. This paper describes the use of state-of-the-art ground-based CCD imaging techniques to detect these waves in intensity and temperature. All-sky (180 deg ) image measurements are used to illustrate the characteristics of small-scale, short period ( < 1 hour) waves and to investigate their seasonal propagation and momentum impact on the MLT region. These results are then contrasted with measurements of mesospheric temperature made using a new temperature mapping imaging system capable of determining induced temperature amplitudes of a large range of wave motions and investigating night-to-night and seasonal variability in mesospheric temperature. (author)

  4. Gravitational Waves and the Fate of Scalar-Tensor Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bettoni, Dario; Hinterbichler, Kurt; Zumalacárregui, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the propagation speed of gravitational waves (GWs) in generic scalar-tensor gravity. A difference in the speed of gravity relative to the speed of light can be caused by the emergence of a disformal geometry in the gravitational sector. This requires the background scalar configuration to both spontaneously break Lorentz symmetry and couple to second derivatives of the metric perturbations through the Weyl tensor or higher derivatives of the scalar. The latter requirement allows a division of gravitational theories into two families: those that predict that GWs propagate exactly at the speed of light and those that allow for anomalous speed. Neutron star binary mergers and other GW events with an associated electromagnetic counterpart can place extremely tight constraints on the speed of GWs relative to the speed of light. However, such observations become impossible if the speed is modified too much, as predicted by some models of cosmic acceleration. Complementary measurements of the speed of...

  5. Characteristics of gravity waves generated in a baroclinic instability simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-H. Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An idealized baroclinic instability case is simulated using a ~ 10 km resolution global model to investigate the characteristics of gravity waves (GWs generated in the baroclinic life cycle. Three groups of GWs (W1–W3 appear around the high-latitude surface trough at the mature stage of the baroclinic wave. They have horizontal and vertical wavelengths of 40–400 and 2.9–9.8 km, respectively, in the upper troposphere. The two-dimensional phase-velocity spectrum of the waves is arc-shaped with a peak at 17 m s−1 eastward, which is difficult for the waves to propagate upward through the tropospheric westerly jet. At the breaking stage of the baroclinic wave, a midlatitude surface low is isolated from the higher-latitude trough, and two groups of quasi-stationary GWs (W4 and W5 appear near the surface low. These waves have horizontal and vertical wavelengths of 60–400 and 4.9–14 km, respectively, and are able to propagate vertically for long distances. The generation mechanism of the simulated GWs is discussed.

  6. Internal gravity waves: Analysis using the periodic, inverse scattering transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Zimmerman

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The discrete periodic inverse scattering transform (DPIST has been shown to provide the salient features of nonlinear Fourier analysis for surface shallow water waves whose dynamics are governed by the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV equation - (1 linear superposition of components with power spectra that are invariants of the motion of nonlinear dispersive waves and (2 nonlinear filtering. As it is well known that internal gravity waves also approximately satisfy the KdV equation in shallow stratified layers, this paper investigates the degree to which DPIST provides a useful nonlinear spectral analysis of internal waves by application to simulations and wave tank experiments of internal wave propagation from localized dense disturbances. It is found that DPIST analysis is sensitive to the quantity λ = (r/6s * (ε/μ2, where the first factor depends parametrically on the Richardson number and the background shear and density profiles and the second factor is the Ursell number-the ratio of the dimensionless wave amplitude to the dimensionless squared wavenumber. Each separate wave component of the decomposition of the initial disturbance can have a different value, and thus there is usually just one component which is an invariant of the motion found by DPIST analysis. However, as the physical applications, e.g. accidental toxic gas releases, are usually concerned with the propagation of the longest wavenumber disturbance, this is still useful information. In cases where only long, monochromatic solitary waves are triggered or selected by the waveguide, the entire DPIST spectral analysis is useful.

  7. First champ mission results for gravity, magnetic and atmospheric studies

    CERN Document Server

    Lühr, Hermann; Schwintzer, Peter

    2003-01-01

    In the summer of 2000 the German geo-research satellite CHAMP was launched into orbit. Its innovative payload arrangement and the low intial orbit allow CHAMP to simultaneously collect and almost continuously analyse precise data relating to gravity and magnetic fields at low altitude. In addition to this CHAMP also measures the neutral atmosphere and ionosphere using GPS techniques. Eighteen months after the launch, CHAMP research groups from all over the world met at the Geo-Forschungs-Zentrum in Potsdam for an initial exchange of experiences and results. The main outcome of this user meeting is summarized in this volume. Apart from technical information about the mission, the book offers a comprehensive insight into the present status of CHAMP data exploitation for Earth system research and practical applications in geodesy, geophysics and meteorology.

  8. Gravitational wave memory: A new approach to study modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Song Ming; Nishizawa, Atsushi

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that two types of gravitational wave memory exist in general relativity (GR): the linear memory and the nonlinear, or Christodoulou, memory. These effects, especially the latter, depend on the specific form of the Einstein equation. It can then be speculated that, in modified theories of gravity, the memory can differ from the GR prediction and provides novel phenomena to study these theories. We support this speculation by considering scalar-tensor theories, for which we find two new types of memory: the T memory and the S memory, which contribute to the tensor and scalar components of a gravitational wave, respectively. Specifically, the former is caused by the burst of energy carried away by scalar radiation, while the latter is intimately related to the no scalar hair property of black holes in scalar-tensor gravity. We estimate the size of these two types of memory in gravitational collapses and formulate a detection strategy for the S memory, which can be singled out from tensor gravitational waves. We show that (i) the S memory exists even in spherical symmetry and is observable under current model constraints, and (ii) while the T memory is usually much weaker than the S memory, it can become comparable in the case of spontaneous scalarization.

  9. The criterion of gravity wave instability induced by photochemistry in summer polar mesopause region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Jiyao(徐寄遥); WU; Yongfu(吴永富); WANG; Yongmei(王咏梅); FU; Liping(傅利平)

    2002-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of photochemistry on the gravity wave instability in summer polar mesopause region. The calculation method of the effects of eddy viscosity, conductivity and eddy diffusion of chemical species on the gravity wave instability induced by photochemistry are studied. The critical wavelength of the instability is given in this paper. The influences of some parameters on it are discussed. The study shows that the gravity wave instability induced by photochemistry is sensitive to the temperature and atomic oxygen profiles.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Hydrodynamic Behaviors of Gravity Cage in Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yun-peng; LI Yu-cheng; DONG Guo-hai; GUI Fu-kun

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims at investigation of the dynamic properties of gravity cage exposed to waves by use of a numerical model. The numerical model is developed, based on lumped mass method to set up the equations of motion of the whole cage; meanwhile the solutions of equations are solved by the Runge-Kutta-Verner fifth-order and sixth-order method. Physical model tests have been carried out to examine the validity of the numerical model. The results by the numerical simulation agree well with the experimental data.

  11. Gravity wave driving of the QBO estimated from satellite observations and ERA-Interim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Kalisch, Silvio; Ploeger, Felix; Riese, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) of the zonal wind in the tropical stratosphere is an important process in atmospheric dynamics. The QBO has effect on atmospheric dynamics over a large range of altitudes and latitudes. Effects of the QBO are found, for example, in the mesosphere, and selective filtering of upward propagating waves plays an important role for the stratopause semiannual oscillation (SAO). The QBO also influences the extratropics and even surface weather and climate. Still, climate models have large difficulties in reproducing a realistic QBO. Atmospheric waves play an important role in the driving of the QBO. Both global scale waves and mesoscale gravity waves (GWs) contribute. We derive GW temperature variances, GW momentum fluxes and potential GW drag from three years of High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) and from 11 years of Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) satellite data. These observations are compared with the drag that is still missing in the tropical momentum budget of the ECMWF ERA-Interim (ERAI) reanalysis after considering zonal wind tendency, Coriolis force, advection terms, and the drag due to resolved global-scale waves. Being strongly constrained by data assimilation, the meteorological fields of ERAI are quite realistic. Therefore this missing drag can be attributed to small scale GWs not resolved by the model. We find good qualitative agreement between observed GW drag and the missing drag due to waves not resolved in ERAI. During eastward QBO wind shear even the magnitude of observed and ERAI missing drag are in good agreement. During westward shear, however, observed drag is much weaker than the ERAI missing drag. This asymmetry might hint at uncertainties in the advection terms of ERAI. Further, observed GW spectra indicate that QBO-related GW dissipation is mainly due to critical level filtering.

  12. Long-period unstable gravity-waves and associated VHF radar echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Worthington

    Full Text Available VHF atmospheric radar is used to measure the wind velocity and radar echo power related to long-period wind perturbations, including gravity waves, which are observed commonly in the lower stratosphere and tropopause region, and sometimes in the troposphere. These wind structures have been identified previously as either inertia-gravity waves, often associated with jet streams, or mountain waves. At heights of peak wind shear, imbalances are found between the echo powers of a symmetric pair of radar beams, which are expected to be equal. The largest of these power differences are found for conditions of simultaneous high wind shear and high aspect sensitivity. It is suggested that the effect might arise from tilted specular reflectors or anisotropic turbulent scatterers, a result of, for example, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities generated by the strong wind shears. This radar power-difference effect could offer information about the onset of saturation in long-period waves, and the formation of thin layers of turbulence.

  13. Multi-instrument investigation of a mesospheric gravity wave event absorbed into background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakandan, M.; Taori, A.; Sathishkumar, S.; Jayaraman, A.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate a gravity wave event exhibiting dissipation noted in the mesospheric O(1S) airglow emission image measurements, over Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), on 16 March 2012 (during 16:20-16:45 UT). These gravity waves were found to propagate from south-west to north-east directions at ~65° azimuth in OH as well as in O(1S) images. These waves had horizontal wavelength ~21.5 km with apparent horizontal phase speed ~49 m s-1 and period ~7.3 min. These waves were noted to fizzle out in turbulent patches within 15 min. To identify the causative mechanism of this event, we analyze the background wind and temperature data using the medium-frequency radar wind from Tirunelveli (8.7°N, 77.8°E), ground-based Rayleigh lidar temperature data with improved capability over Gadanki, and spaceborne Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry/Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics temperature data (20:30 UT) for a latitude-longitude grid of 3-23°N, 60-100°E. Our analysis reveals that convective instability was responsible for the observed event.

  14. Spatiotemporal measurement of surfactant distribution on gravity-capillary waves

    CERN Document Server

    Strickland, Stephen L; Daniels, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Materials adsorbed to the surface of a fluid -- for instance, crude oil, biogenic slicks, or industrial/medical surfactants -- will move in response to surface waves. Due to the difficulty of non-invasive measurement of the spatial distribution of a molecular monolayer, little is known about the dynamics that couple the surface waves and the evolving density field. Here, we report measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the density field of an insoluble surfactant driven by gravity-capillary waves in a shallow cylindrical container. Standing Faraday waves and traveling waves generated by the meniscus are superimposed to create a non-trivial surfactant density field. We measure both the height field of the surface using moir\\'e-imaging, and the density field of the surfactant via the fluorescence of NBD-tagged phosphatidylcholine, a lipid. Through phase-averaging stroboscopically-acquired images of the density field, we determine that the surfactant accumulates on the leading edge of the traveling menis...

  15. Linear theory of the response of Na mixing ratio to gravity waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jiyao; JI Qiao; WU Mingliang

    2003-01-01

    The influence of gravity waves on the sodium layer is studied by using a linear photochemical-dynamical coupling gravity wave model. The model includes the background photochemistry and the photochemical reactions in the sodium layer. The amplitude and phase difference of the response of sodium mixing ratio to gravity waves are calculated. The results indicate that the lower part of sodium layer is the most sensitive region responding to gravity waves. The perturbation of sodium mixing ratio is in phase with temperature in the lower part of the layer. However, it is out of phase with temperature fluctuation in the upper part.

  16. Mesospheric gravity waves observed near equatorial and low–middle latitude stations: wave characteristics and reverse ray tracing results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Achmad

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Gravity wave signatures were extracted from OH airglow observations using all-sky CCD imagers at four different stations: Cachoeira Paulista (CP (22.7° S, 45° W and São João do Cariri (7.4° S, 36.5° W, Brazil; Tanjungsari (TJS (6.9° S, 107.9° E, Indonesia and Shigaraki (34.9° N, 136° E, Japan. The gravity wave parameters are used as an input in a reverse ray tracing model to study the gravity wave vertical propagation trajectory and to estimate the wave source region. Gravity waves observed near the equator showed a shorter period and a larger phase velocity than those waves observed at low-middle latitudes. The waves ray traced down into the troposphere showed the largest horizontal wavelength and phase speed. The ray tracing results also showed that at CP, Cariri and Shigaraki the majority of the ray paths stopped in the mesosphere due to the condition of m2m2m|→∞, which suggests the presence of ducting waves and/or waves generated in-situ. In the troposphere, the possible gravity wave sources are related to meteorological front activities and cloud convections at CP, while at Cariri and TJS tropical cloud convections near the equator are the most probable gravity wave sources. The tropospheric jet stream and the orography are thought to be the major responsible sources for the waves observed at Shigaraki.

  17. Modulational development of nonlinear gravity-wave groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereskin, T. K.; Mollo-Christensen, E.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of the development of nonlinear surface gravity-wave groups are presented, and the amplitude and phase modulations are calculated using Hilbert-transform techniques. With increasing propagation distance and wave steepness, the phase modulation develops local phase reversals whose locations correspond to amplitude minima or nodes. The concomitant frequency modulation develops jumps or discontinuities. The observations are compared with recent similar results for wavetrains. The observations are modelled numerically using the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation. The motivation is twofold: to examine quantitatively the evolution of phase as well as amplitude modulation, and to test the inviscid predictions for the asymptotic behavior of groups versus long-time observations. Although dissipation rules out the recurrence, there is a long-time coherence of the groups. The phase modulation is found to distinguish between dispersive and soliton behavior.

  18. What gravity waves are telling about quantum spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Arzano, Michele

    2016-01-01

    We discuss various modified dispersion relations motivated by quantum gravity which might affect the propagation of the recently observed gravitational-wave signal of the event GW150914. We find that the bounds set by the data on the characteristic quantum-gravity mass scale $M$ are too weak to constrain these scenarios and, in general, much weaker than the expected $M> 10^4\\,\\text{eV}$ for a correction to the dispersion relation linear in $1/M$. We illustrate this issue by giving lower bounds on $M$, plus an upper bound coming from constraints on the size of a quantum ergosphere. We also show that a phenomenological dispersion relation $\\omega^2 = k^2(1+\\alpha k^n/M^n)$ is compatible with observations and, at the same time, has a phenomenologically and theoretically viable mass $10\\,\\text{TeV}gravity models.

  19. Recent Developments in Gravity-Wave Effects in Climate Models and the Global Distribution of Gravity-Wave Momentum Flux from Observations and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    waves occur over the Himalayas , the drag that these waves produce occurs as a result of wave-breaking above the subtropical jet maximum. As climate...positive ρ̄u′w′ is observed only in the Indian and African monsoon regions. Westward winds are dominant in the lower stratosphere of this region. Gravity

  20. Gravitational Wave Memory: A New Approach to Study Modified Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Song Ming

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that two types of gravitational wave memory exist in general relativity (GR): the linear memory and the non-linear, or Christodoulou memory. These effects, especially the latter, depend on the specific form of Einstein equation. It can then be speculated that in modified theories of gravity, the memory can differ from the GR prediction, and provides novel phenomena to study these theories. We support this speculation by considering scalar-tensor theories, for which we find two new types of memory: the T memory and the S memory, which contribute to the tensor and scalar components of gravitational wave, respectively. In particular, the former is caused by the burst of energy carried away by scalar radiation, while the latter is intimately related to the no scalar hair property of black holes in scalar-tensor gravity. We estimate the size of these two types of memory in gravitational collapses, and formulate a detection strategy for the S memory, which can be singled out from tensor gravitation...

  1. High-altitude gravity waves in the Martian thermosphere observed by MAVEN/NGIMS and modeled by a gravity wave scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Yiğit, Erdal; Liu, Guiping; Medvedev, Alexander S; Mahaffy, Paul R; Kuroda, Takeshi; Jakosky, Bruce M

    2015-01-01

    First high-altitude observations of gravity wave (GW)-induced CO$_2$ density perturbations in the Martian thermosphere retrieved from NASA's NGIMS instrument on board the MAVEN satellite are presented and interpreted using the extended GW parameterization of Yi\\u{g}it et al. [2008] and the Mars Climate Database as an input. Observed relative density perturbations between 180-220 km of 20-40 % demonstrate appreciable local time, latitude, and altitude variations. Modeling for the spatiotemporal conditions of the MAVEN observations suggests that GWs can directly propagate from the lower atmosphere to the thermosphere, produce appreciable dynamical effects, and likely contribute to the observed fluctuations. Modeled effects are somewhat smaller than the observed but their highly variable nature is in qualitative agreement with observations. Possible reasons for discrepancies between modeling and measurements are discussed.

  2. The effect of breaking gravity waves on the dynamics and chemistry of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (invited review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of breaking gravity waves on the dynamics and chemical composition of the 60 to 110 km region is investigated with a two dimensional model that includes a parameterization of gravity wave momentum deposition and diffusion. The dynamical model is described by Garcia and Solomon (1983) and Solomon and Garcia (1983) and includes a complete chemical scheme for the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The parameterization of Lindzen (1981) is used to calculate the momentum deposited and the turbulent diffusion produced by the gravity waves. It is found that wave momentum deposition drives a very vigorous mean meridional circulation, produces a very cold summer mesopause and reverse the zonal wind jets above about 85 km. The seasonal variation of the turbulent diffusion coefficient is consistent with the behavior of mesospheric turbulences inferred from MST radar echoes. The large degree of consistency between model results and various types of dynamical and chemical data supports very strongly the hypothesis that breaking gravity waves play a major role in determining the zonally-averaged dynamical and chemical structure of the 60 to 110 km region of the atmosphere.

  3. Identification of gravity wave sources using reverse ray tracing over Indian region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pramitha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Reverse ray tracing method is successfully implemented for the first time in the Indian region for identification of the sources and propagation characteristics of the gravity waves observed using airglow emissions from Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E and Hyderabad (17.5° N, 78.5° E. Wave amplitudes are also traced back for these wave events by including both radiative and diffusive damping. Background temperature and wind data obtained from MSISE-90 and HWM-07 models, respectively, are used for the ray tracing. For Gadanki region suitability of these models is tested. Further, a climatological model of background atmosphere for Gadanki region has been developed using a long-term of nearly 30 years of observations available from a variety of ground-based (MST radar, radiosonde, MF radar, rocket-, and satellite-borne measurements. For considering real-time atmospheric inputs, ERA-Interim products are utilized. By this reverse ray method, the source locations for nine wave events could be identified to be in the upper troposphere, whereas, for five other events the waves seem to have been ducted in the mesosphere itself. Uncertainty in locating the terminal points in the horizontal direction is estimated to be within 50–100 and 150–300 km for Gadanki and Hyderabad wave events, respectively. This uncertainty arises mainly due to non-consideration of the day-to-day variability in tidal amplitudes. As no convection in-and-around the terminal points are noticed, it is unlikely to be the source. Interestingly, large (~9 m s−1 km−1 vertical shear in the horizontal wind is noted near the ray terminal points (at 10–12 km altitude and is identified to be the source for generating the nine wave events. Conditions prevailing at the terminal points for each of the 14 events are also provided. These events provide leads to a greater understanding of the tropical lower and upper atmospheric coupling through gravity waves.

  4. Observations of acoustic-gravity waves in the troposphere by lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchevkina, Olga; Karpov, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Many experimental researches reveal disturbances of the parameters of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere caused by the development of strong weather disturbances, seismic events on the surface, a tsunami generated by an underwater earthquake. The physical mechanisms that implement these various communication layers of the atmosphere and determine the morphological characteristics of ionospheric disturbances, remain insufficiently understood. Hypotheses about the influence of the processes in the lower atmosphere on the condition of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere are based on the concept of generation of acoustic-gravity (AGW) and internal gravity (IGW) waves in the lower atmosphere and their distribution in the upper atmosphere. That is why, the study of the processes of generation AGW in the lower atmosphere is interest to confirm the validity of such representations. Regular source of perturbations of all layers of the atmosphere is the solar terminator (ST). Observations perturbation parameters of the atmosphere and ionosphere during the passage of the ST will determine the frequency spectrum of the resulting disturbances. The paper presents the results of experimental researches, which demonstrating an increase of wave activity with periods of AGW and IGW in the observations of the lower atmosphere during the passage of the solar terminator. Observations of variations in the parameters of the lower atmosphere during the passage of ST were performed by the lidar. The observations were carried out in Kaliningrad (52N, 22 E) in 2012-2014. Analysis of the observations focused on the allocation of variations with periods ranging from 2 to 20 min., caused by the generation of AGW in ST. The duration of each observation was for several hours. This allows us to consider the dynamics of changes in the characteristics of such variations during observations. Analysis of the results of observations revealed a number of features in the dynamics of AGW during the

  5. Turbulence-particle interactions under surface gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskyabi, Mostafa Bakhoday

    2016-11-01

    The dispersion and transport of single inertial particles through an oscillatory turbulent aquatic environment are examined numerically by a Lagrangian particle tracking model using a series of idealised test cases. The turbulent mixing is incorporated into the Lagrangian model by the means of a stochastic scheme in which the inhomogeneous turbulent quantities are governed by a one-dimensional k- ɛ turbulence closure scheme. This vertical mixing model is further modified to include the effects of surface gravity waves including Coriolis-Stokes forcing, wave breaking, and Langmuir circulations. To simplify the complex interactions between the deterministic and the stochastic phases of flow, we assume a time-invariant turbulent flow field and exclude the hydrodynamic biases due to the effects of ambient mean current. The numerical results show that the inertial particles acquire perturbed oscillations traced out as time-varying sinking/rising orbits in the vicinity of the sea surface under linear and cnoidal waves and acquire a non-looping single arc superimposed with the high-frequency fluctuations beneath the nonlinear solitary waves. Furthermore, we briefly summarise some recipes through the course of this paper on the implementation of the stochastic particle tracking models to realistically describe the drift and suspension of inertial particles throughout the water column.

  6. Reflection and Ducting of Gravity Waves Inside the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    MacGregor, K B

    2011-01-01

    Internal gravity waves excited by overshoot at the bottom of the convection zone can be influenced by rotation and by the strong toroidal magnetic field that is likely to be present in the solar tachocline. Using a simple Cartesian model, we show how waves with a vertical component of propagation can be reflected when traveling through a layer containing a horizontal magnetic field with a strength that varies with depth. This interaction can prevent a portion of the downward-traveling wave energy flux from reaching the deep solar interior. If a highly reflecting magnetized layer is located some distance below the convection zone base, a duct or wave guide can be set up, wherein vertical propagation is restricted by successive reflections at the upper and lower boundaries. The presence of both upward- and downward-traveling disturbances inside the duct leads to the existence of a set of horizontally propagating modes that have significantly enhanced amplitudes. We point out that the helical structure of these ...

  7. Frontal instability and the radiation of inertia gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flór, J.-B.; Scolan, H.

    2009-04-01

    In this experimental study we consider the instability of a density front in a differentially rotating two-layer fluid. Within the rotating frame the upper layer is accelerated by the differential rotation of a lid at the surface. In contrast to former comparable experiments of this type, we consider miscible fluids in a relatively wide annular tank. Velocity and dye measurements (PIV and LIF) allow for the measurements of the velocity and density fields. In the parameter space set by rotational Froude number and dissipation (i.e. ratio of spin-down time to disk rotation time), different flow regimes are observed, ranging from axisymmetric to irregular baroclinic instable flows. The different regimes more or less adjoin those found for immiscible fluids by Williams et al. (J. Fluid Mech. 2005). In the present experiments, we find a new type of instability that is due to the resonant interaction between Kelvin and Rossby waves (first studied Sakai, J. Fluid Mech 1989) and compare our experimental results with the analytical results obtained on an annular domain by Gula, Zeitlin and Plougonven (2009). Further, observations in the unstable flow regimes suggest 'spontaneous emission' of inertia gravity waves. The origin of these waves is discussed in the light of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability Hölmböe instability, and geostrophic adjustment waves.

  8. Simultaneous observations of storm-generated sprite and gravity wave over Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chien-Chung; Dai, Jeff; Kuo, Cheng-Ling; Huang, Tai-Yin

    2016-09-01

    We report simultaneous observations of sprite and gravity wave generated by a storm over Bangladesh. The origin of a concentric gravity wave can be traced to the storm region on 27 April 2014 over Bangladesh with a low cloud top surface temperature (175 K). After data analysis, the time period of the concentric gravity wave is found to be 8.8-8.9 min. The horizontal wavelength is found to be 50 km for red emissions ( 55 km for green emissions), and the horizontal phase velocity is 94.4 ± 31.7 m s-1 for red emissions (102.6 ± 29.4 m s-1 for green emissions). Using the dispersion relation of gravity wave, the elevation angle of wave propagation direction is found to be 53.3°. The sprite associated with the gravity wave was also recorded at 1534 UT on 27 April 2014. The initiation time of storm-generated gravity wave is estimated to be 1454 UT at which lightning activity was relatively low using lightning data. At time 1534 UT of the recorded sprite, the lightning rate was close to its maximum value. The storm-generated gravity wave could be thought as a precursor phenomenon for lightning and sprites since one of the necessary conditions for gravity wave, lightning, and sprites is strong convection inside storms.

  9. Characteristics of equatorial gravity waves derived from mesospheric airglow imaging observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Suzuki

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the characteristics of small-scale (<100 km gravity waves in the equatorial mesopause region derived from OH airglow imaging observations at Kototabang (100.3° E, 0.2° S, Indonesia, from 2002 to 2005. We adopted a method that could automatically detect gravity waves in the airglow images using two-dimensional cross power spectra of gravity waves. The propagation directions of the waves were likely controlled by zonal filtering due to stratospheric mean winds that show a quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO and the presence of many wave sources in the troposphere.

  10. Characteristics of equatorial gravity waves derived from mesospheric airglow imaging observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, S. [Univ. of Electro-Communications, Chofu, Tokyo (Japan). Sugadaira Space Radio Observatory; Shiokawa, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Ogawa, T. [Nagoya Univ., Aichi (Japan). Solar-Terrestrial Environment Lab.; Liu, A.Z. [Illinois Univ., Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Nakamura, T. [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Research Inst. for Sustainable Humanosphere

    2009-07-01

    We present the characteristics of small-scale (<100 km) gravity waves in the equatorial mesopause region derived from OH airglow imaging observations at Kototabang (100.3 E, 0.2 S), Indonesia, from 2002 to 2005. We adopted a method that could automatically detect gravity waves in the airglow images using two-dimensional cross power spectra of gravity waves. The propagation directions of the waves were likely controlled by zonal filtering due to stratospheric mean winds that show a quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and the presence of many wave sources in the troposphere. (orig.)

  11. Inertia gravity wave in the stratosphere and mesosphere observed by Doppler wind and temperature lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, G.; Fiedler, J.; Hildebrand, J.; Lübken, F.-J.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the first observation of persistent inertia gravity wave signatures in the horizontal wind and temperature by Doppler Rayleigh lidar in the middle atmosphere. The observations were performed at the Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research station in northern Norway (69°N,16°E) between 21 and 23 January 2012. The measurements cover the altitude range from 20 km to about 80 km during nighttime and to about 70 km during daytime. We observe amplitudes of 5 to 25 m/s and 1 to 8 K in wind and temperature, respectively. The measured kinetic to potential energy density ratio is about 10, indicating that the majority of variability is due to waves with intrinsic frequencies close to the inertial frequency. The entire wavefield is mainly characterized by the presence of multiple waves; however, quasi-monochromatic waves could be identified at limited times around 60 km altitude with a mean momentum flux in direction of propagation of 3.8 m2/s2.

  12. Multi-instrument investigation of troposphere-ionosphere coupling through gravity waves and the role of gravity waves in the formation of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakandan, Mani; Patra, Amit; Sripathi, Samireddipelle; Thokuluwa, Ramkumar; Paulino, Igo; Taori, Alok; Kandula, Niranjan

    2016-07-01

    Equatorial plasma bubble (EPB) occurs in the equatorial ionosphere in pre-mid night (most of the time) as well as post-midnight (rarely) hours. The generation of EPBs by Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) due to seeding of gravity wave perturbation (polarization electric field) have well been explained theoretically by several authors but experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis is very limited. Using co-located observations from Gadanki (13.5oN, 79.2o E) using an all sky airglow imager and Gadanki Ionospheric Radar Interferometer (GIRI) and Ionosonde observations from Tirunelveli (8.7o N, 77.8o E), we investigate the role of gravity waves in the generation EPB during geomagnetic quiet conditions. To avoid any changes occurring in the background ionosphere owing to the large scale features (e.g., seasonal variation), we use four consecutive nights (03-06, February, 2014). Out of these four nights on two nights we have noted very strong plasma depletions in the OI 630 nm airglow emission and radar plumes. We analyse data to identify cases where, 1) EPBs occurred with large amplitudes of mesospheric gravity waves, 2) Occurrence of EPBs without large amplitudes of mesospheric gravity waves, and 3) identifiable mesospheric gravity waves without occurrence of EPBs. In order to calculate the mesospheric gravity wave parameter we used mesospheric OH airglow emission imager data, to identify their propagation to the E-region, we used E-region observations made using the MST radar which resembled the gravity wave signatures. Together with these, by using ray tracing techniques, we have identified the source region of the noted gravity wave events also. These results are discussed in detail in the present study.

  13. Orographic Gravity Waves above Small Islands in the Southern Ocean and Their Role in Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M.; Grimsdell, A.

    2012-12-01

    Most of today's climate models struggle with systematic westerly biases in the stratospheric circulation that lead to a delayed breakdown of the stratospheric vortex in spring and associated effects on temperature and ozone loss. Ozone loss in recent decades and predicted ozone recovery in the 21st century has a first-order impact on surface winds and climate, highlighting the importance of these common model biases in stratospheric winds. The cause is long believed to be that the Southern Hemisphere lacks sources for orographic gravity waves and associated wave drag relative to the Northern Hemisphere. Some models include hemispherically asymmetric non-orographic gravity wave momentum fluxes in their parameterizations despite any clear observational or theoretical justification for such differences other than the need to obtain more realistic stratospheric simulations. Our work examines the role of orographic gravity waves above small islands in the Southern Ocean, which are too small to be resolved in most climate models. Orographic waves above these small islands have been observed as temperature anomalies in radiance observations of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on the Aqua satellite. A previously analyzed case study with AIRS data concluded such waves above South Georgia Island in the South Atlantic can have a considerable impact on the stratospheric circulation, yet these effects are omitted in most climate models. In the present work, we use AIRS observations to examine occurrence frequencies and momentum fluxes above six island groups in the Southern Ocean. Further, detailed seasonal and interannual variations and areal maps of time-mean momentum fluxes are examined for two of these groups: South Georgia/Sandwich Islands and Heard/Kerguelen Islands. We examine the effects of winds at the surface and winds in the stratosphere to infer the relative roles of source intermittency, propagation effects, and observational filter effects on the

  14. Examining Traveling Waves in Mars Atmosphere Reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greybush, Steven J.; Wilson, R. John

    2015-11-01

    Synoptic-scale eddies (traveling waves) are a key feature of the variability of Mars atmosphere weather in the extratropics, and are linked to the initiation of dust storms. Mars reanalyses, which combine satellite observations with simulations from a Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM), provide a four-dimensional picture of the evolution of these waves in terms of temperature, winds, pressure, and aerosol fields. The Ensemble Mars Atmosphere Reanalysis System (EMARS) has created multiple years of Mars weather maps through the assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) temperature profiles using the ensemble Kalman filter and the GFDL MGCM. We investigate the robustness of the synoptic eddies to changes in the aerosol fields, model parameters, data assimilation system design, and observation dataset (TES vs. MCS). We examine the evolution of wavenumber regimes, their seasonal evolution, and interannual variability. Finally, reanalysis fields are combined with spacecraft visible imagery (e.g. MGS Mars Orbital Camera), demonstrating the link between meteorological fields (temperature, pressure, and wind) and dust fronts.

  15. Analytical and numerical investigation of nonlinear internal gravity waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Kshevetskii

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of long, weakly nonlinear internal waves in a stratified gas is studied. Hydrodynamic equations for an ideal fluid with the perfect gas law describe the atmospheric gas behaviour. If we neglect the term Ͽ dw/dt (product of the density and vertical acceleration, we come to a so-called quasistatic model, while we name the full hydro-dynamic model as a nonquasistatic one. Both quasistatic and nonquasistatic models are used for wave simulation and the models are compared among themselves. It is shown that a smooth classical solution of a nonlinear quasistatic problem does not exist for all t because a gradient catastrophe of non-linear internal waves occurs. To overcome this difficulty, we search for the solution of the quasistatic problem in terms of a generalised function theory as a limit of special regularised equations containing some additional dissipation term when the dissipation factor vanishes. It is shown that such solutions of the quasistatic problem qualitatively differ from solutions of a nonquasistatic nature. It is explained by the fact that in a nonquasistatic model the vertical acceleration term plays the role of a regularizator with respect to a quasistatic model, while the solution qualitatively depends on the regularizator used. The numerical models are compared with some analytical results. Within the framework of the analytical model, any internal wave is described as a system of wave modes; each wave mode interacts with others due to equation non-linearity. In the principal order of a perturbation theory, each wave mode is described by some equation of a KdV type. The analytical model reveals that, in a nonquasistatic model, an internal wave should disintegrate into solitons. The time of wave disintegration into solitons, the scales and amount of solitons generated are important characteristics of the non-linear process; they are found with the help of analytical and numerical investigations. Satisfactory

  16. Scattering of gravity waves in subcritical flows over an obstacle

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, Scott; Parentani, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study the scattering coefficients of linear water waves on stationary flows above a localized obstacle. We compare the scattering on trans- and subcritical flows, and then focus on the latter which have been used in recent analog gravity experiments. The main difference concerns the magnitude of the mode amplification: whereas transcritical flows display a large amplification (which is generally in good agreement with the Hawking prediction), this effect is heavily suppressed in subcritical flows. This is due to the transmission across the obstacle for frequencies less than some critical value. As a result, subcritical flows display high- and low-frequency behaviors separated by a narrow band around the critical frequency. In the low-frequency regime, transmission of long wavelengths is accompanied by non-adiabatic scattering into short wavelengths, whose spectrum is approximately linear in frequency. By contrast, in the high-frequency regime, no simple description seems to exist. In particular...

  17. Holographic p-wave superfluid in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Shancheng; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-01-01

    We construct the holographic p-wave superfluid in Gauss-Bonnet gravity via a Maxwell complex vector field model and investigate the effect of the curvature correction on the superfluid phase transition in the probe limit. We obtain the rich phase structure and find that the higher curvature correction hinders the condensate of the vector field but makes it easier for the appearance of translating point from the second-order transition to the first-order one or for the emergence of the Cave of Winds. Moreover, for the supercurrents versus the superfluid velocity, we observe that our results near the critical temperature are independent of the Gauss-Bonnet parameter and agree well with the Ginzburg-Landau prediction.

  18. Plane wave holonomies in quantum gravity. II. A sine wave solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Donald E.

    2015-08-01

    This paper constructs an approximate sinusoidal wave packet solution to the equations of canonical gravity. The theory uses holonomy-flux variables with support on a lattice (LHF =lattice-holonomy flux ). There is an SU(2) holonomy on each edge of the LHF simplex, and the goal is to study the behavior of these holonomies under the influence of a passing gravitational wave. The equations are solved in a small sine approximation: holonomies are expanded in powers of sines and terms beyond sin2 are dropped; also, fields vary slowly from vertex to vertex. The wave is unidirectional and linearly polarized. The Hilbert space is spanned by a set of coherent states tailored to the symmetry of the plane wave case. Fixing the spatial diffeomorphisms is equivalent to fixing the spatial interval between vertices of the loop quantum gravity lattice. This spacing can be chosen such that the eigenvalues of the triad operators are large, as required in the small sine limit, even though the holonomies are not large. Appendices compute the energy of the wave, estimate the lifetime of the coherent state packet, discuss circular polarization and coarse-graining, and determine the behavior of the spinors used in the U(N) SHO realization of LQG.

  19. Axisymmetric Waves in Isothermal Accretion Discs with Vertical Self-Gravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiao-Ci; YANG Lan-Tian; WU Shao-Ping; DING Shi-Xue

    2001-01-01

    We extend the research of axisymmetric waves in accretion discs with three-dimensional structure to the case that vertical self-gravity of the discs is included. We derive and analyze the dispersion relation and solve the eigenfunctions numerically. The following results have been reached: vertical self-gravity expands the forbidden region of the wave propagation. As the influence of the vertical self-gravity increases, the group velocities of the waves get smaller and the vertical nodes of the wave shrink to the middle plane of the disc.

  20. Dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in a stellar atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Ariste, A; Collados, M; Khomenko, E

    2013-08-23

    We describe the presence of wave front dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in stratified stellar atmospheres. Scalar dislocations such as edges and vortices can appear in Alfvén waves, as well as in general magnetoacoustic waves. We detect those dislocations in observations of magnetohydrodynamic waves in sunspots in the solar chromosphere. Through the measured charge of all the dislocations observed, we can give for the first time estimates of the modal contribution in the waves propagating along magnetic fields in solar sunspots.

  1. Joint Geophysical Imaging of the Utah Area Using Seismic Body Waves, Surface Waves and Gravity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Maceira, M.; Toksoz, M. N.; Burlacu, R.; Yang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    We present a joint geophysical imaging method that makes use of seismic body wave arrival times, surface wave dispersion measurements, and gravity data to determine three-dimensional (3D) Vp and Vs models. An empirical relationship mapping densities to Vp and Vs for earth materials is used to link them together. The joint inversion method takes advantage of strengths of individual data sets and is able to better constrain the velocity models from shallower to greater depths. Combining three different data sets to jointly invert for the velocity structure is equivalent to a multiple-objective optimization problem. Because it is unlikely that the different “objectives” (data types) would be optimized by the same parameter choices, some trade-off between the objectives is needed. The optimum weighting scheme for different data types is based on relative uncertainties of individual observations and their sensitivities to model parameters. We will apply this joint inversion method to determine 3D Vp and Vs models of the Utah area. The seismic body wave arrival times are assembled from waveform data recorded by the University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) regional network for the past 7 years. The surface wave dispersion measurements are obtained from the ambient noise tomography study by the University of Colorado group using EarthScope/USArray stations. The gravity data for the Utah area is extracted from the North American Gravity Database managed by the University of Texas at El Paso. The preliminary study using the seismic body wave arrival times indicates strong low velocity anomalies in middle crust beneath some known geothermal sites in Utah. The joint inversion is expected to produce a reasonably well-constrained velocity structure of the Utah area, which is helpful for characterizing and exploring existing and potential geothermal reservoirs.

  2. Differences in gravity wave drag between realistic oblique and assumed vertical propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Silvio; Preusse, Peter; Ern, Manfred; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Riese, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Gravity wave (GW) parametrizations for general circulation models (GCMs) restrict the propagation of GWs to the vertical direction. The influence of this vertical-only propagation assumption on the distribution of GW drag (GWD) has not yet been investigated. Thus, we present results of two global GW ray tracing simulations, one with full three-dimensional propagation (GWO) and a second one with vertical-only propagation (GWV) of GWs for January and July 2008. The Gravity wave Regional Or Global RAy Tracer (GROGRAT) was used to perform these simulations with a global homogeneous and isotropic launch distribution. Both simulations, GWO and GWV, are analyzed with respect to GWD in the zonal and meridional direction. The location of zonal GWD maxima changes. GWO shows in comparison to GWV a poleward shift of zonal GWD in both seasons with increased GWD at the summer stratopause. The meridional GWD is much stronger in the GWO case, spatially correlated with the zonal drag, and is generally poleward directed. These features in zonal and meridional drag are consistent with a general prevalence of poleward propagation of GWs. Additional simulations suggest that this is due to the Coriolis effect as well as wind filtering around the tropopause, allowing more GWs to propagate into the middle atmosphere. We infer how GWs of different horizontal wavelengths and phase speeds cause the main differences in GWD in the middle atmosphere. A simple test for GCMs is proposed to assess the effects of the altered meridional drag on the general circulation and the interaction with planetary waves.

  3. Slope wavenumber spectrum models of capillary and capillary-gravity waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾永君; 张杰; 王岩峰

    2010-01-01

    Capillary and capillary-gravity waves possess a random character, and the slope wavenumber spectra of them can be used to represent mean distributions of wave energy with respect to spatial scale of variability. But simple and practical models of the slope wavenumber spectra have not been put forward so far. In this article, we address the accurate definition of the slope wavenumber spectra of water surface capillary and capillary-gravity waves. By combining the existing slope wavenumber models and using th...

  4. A two-dimensional Stockwell transform for gravity wave analysis of AIRS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindley, Neil P.; Smith, Nathan D.; Wright, Corwin J.; Rees, D. Andrew S.; Mitchell, Nicholas J.

    2016-06-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) play a crucial role in the dynamics of the earth's atmosphere. These waves couple lower, middle and upper atmospheric layers by transporting and depositing energy and momentum from their sources to great heights. The accurate parameterisation of GW momentum flux is of key importance to general circulation models but requires accurate measurement of GW properties, which has proved challenging. For more than a decade, the nadir-viewing Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite has made global, two-dimensional (2-D) measurements of stratospheric radiances in which GWs can be detected. However, one problem with current one-dimensional methods for GW analysis of these data is that they can introduce significant unwanted biases. Here, we present a new analysis method that resolves this problem. Our method uses a 2-D Stockwell transform (2DST) to measure GW amplitudes, horizontal wavelengths and directions of propagation using both the along-track and cross-track dimensions simultaneously. We first test our new method and demonstrate that it can accurately measure GW properties in a specified wave field. We then show that by using a new elliptical spectral window in the 2DST, in place of the traditional Gaussian, we can dramatically improve the recovery of wave amplitude over the standard approach. We then use our improved method to measure GW properties and momentum fluxes in AIRS measurements over two regions known to be intense hotspots of GW activity: (i) the Drake Passage/Antarctic Peninsula and (ii) the isolated mountainous island of South Georgia. The significance of our new 2DST method is that it provides more accurate, unbiased and better localised measurements of key GW properties compared to most current methods. The added flexibility offered by the scaling parameter and our new spectral window presented here extend the usefulness of our 2DST method to other areas of geophysical data analysis and beyond.

  5. On the Importance of High Frequency Gravity Waves for Ice Nucleation in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigations of the influence of atmospheric waves on ice nucleation in cirrus have identified a number of key processes and sensitivities: (1) ice concentrations produced by homogeneous freezing are strongly dependent on cooling rates, with gravity waves dominating upper tropospheric cooling rates; (2) rapid cooling driven by high-frequency waves are likely responsible for the rare occurrences of very high ice concentrations in cirrus; (3) sedimentation and entrainment tend to decrease ice concentrations as cirrus age; and (4) in some situations, changes in temperature tendency driven by high-frequency waves can quench ice nucleation events and limit ice concentrations. Here we use parcel-model simulations of ice nucleation driven by long-duration, constant-pressure balloon temperature time series, along with an extensive dataset of cold cirrus microphysical properties from the recent ATTREX high-altitude aircraft campaign, to statistically examine the importance of high-frequency waves as well as the consistency between our theoretical understanding of ice nucleation and observed ice concentrations. The parcel-model simulations indicate common occurrence of peak ice concentrations exceeding several hundred per liter. Sedimentation and entrainment would reduce ice concentrations as clouds age, but 1-D simulations using a wave parameterization (which underestimates rapid cooling events) still produce ice concentrations higher than indicated by observations. We find that quenching of nucleation events by high-frequency waves occurs infrequently and does not prevent occurrences of large ice concentrations in parcel simulations of homogeneous freezing. In fact, the high-frequency variability in the balloon temperature data is entirely responsible for production of these high ice concentrations in the simulations.

  6. Inertia-gravity waves in the troposphere and lower stratosphere associated with a jet stream exit region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomas

    Full Text Available Radar measurements at Aberystwyth (52.4° N, 4.1° W of winds at tropospheric and lower stratospheric heights are shown for 12-13 March 1994 in a region of highly curved flow, downstream of the jet maximum. The perturbations of horizontal velocity have comparable amplitudes in the troposphere and lower stratosphere with downward and upward phase propagation, respectively, in these two height regions. The sense of rotation with increasing height in hodographs of horizontal perturbation velocity derived for hourly intervals show downwards propagation of energy in the troposphere and upward propagation in the lower stratosphere with vertical wavelengths of 1.7 to 2.3 km. The results indicate inertia-gravity waves propagating in a direction similar to that of the jet stream but at smaller velocities. Some of the features observed contrast with those of previous observations of inertia-gravity waves propagating transverse to the jet stream. The interpretation of the hodographs to derive wave parameters has taken account of the vertical shear of the background wind transverse to the direction of wave propagation.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (mesoscale meteorology; middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides

  7. The propagation of orographic gravity waves into the stratosphere. Linear theory, idealized and realistic numerical simulation; Die Ausbreitung orographisch angeregter Schwerewellen in die Stratosphaere. Lineare Theorie, idealisierte und realitaetsnahe numerische Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leutbecher, M. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Wessling (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1998-07-01

    Flow over mountains in the stably stratified atmosphere excites gravity waves. The three-dimensional propagation of these waves into the stratosphere is studied using linear theority as well as idealized and realistic numerical simulations. Stagnation, momentum fluxes and temperature anomalies are analyzed for idealized types of flow. Isolated mountains with elliptical contours are considered. The unperturbed atmosphere has constant wind speed and constant static stability or two layers (troposphere/stratosphere) of constant stability each. Real flow over orography is investigated where gravity waves in the stratosphere have been observed. Characteristics of the gravity wave event over the southern tip of Greenland on 6 January 1992 were recorded on a flight of the ER-2 at an altitude of 20 km. In the second case polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) were observed by an airborne Lidar over Northern Scandinavia on 9 January 1997. The PSC were induced by temperature anomalies in orographic gravity waves. (orig.)

  8. Dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in a stellar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Ariste, A López; Khomenko, E

    2013-01-01

    We describe the presence of wavefront dislocations in magnetohydrodynamic waves in stratified stellar atmospheres. Scalar dislocations such as edges and vortices can appear in Alfv\\'en waves, as well as in general magneto-acoustic waves. We detect those dislocations in observations of magnetohydrodynamic waves in sunspots in the solar chromosphere. Through the measured charge of all the dislocations observed, we can give for the first time estimates of the modal contribution in the waves propagating along magnetic fields in solar sunspots.

  9. HIRDLS observations of global gravity wave absolute momentum fluxes: A wavelet based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Sherine Rachel; Kishore Kumar, Karanam

    2016-02-01

    Using wavelet technique for detection of height varying vertical and horizontal wavelengths of gravity waves, the absolute values of gravity wave momentum fluxes are estimated from High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) temperature measurements. Two years of temperature measurements (2005 December-2007 November) from HIRDLS onboard EOS-Aura satellite over the globe are used for this purpose. The least square fitting method is employed to extract the 0-6 zonal wavenumber planetary wave amplitudes, which are removed from the instantaneous temperature profiles to extract gravity wave fields. The vertical and horizontal wavelengths of the prominent waves are computed using wavelet and cross correlation techniques respectively. The absolute momentum fluxes are then estimated using prominent gravity wave perturbations and their vertical and horizontal wavelengths. The momentum fluxes obtained from HIRDLS are compared with the fluxes obtained from ground based Rayleigh LIDAR observations over a low latitude station, Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) and are found to be in good agreement. After validation, the absolute gravity wave momentum fluxes over the entire globe are estimated. It is found that the winter hemisphere has the maximum momentum flux magnitudes over the high latitudes with a secondary maximum over the summer hemispheric low-latitudes. The significance of the present study lies in introducing the wavelet technique for estimating the height varying vertical and horizontal wavelengths of gravity waves and validating space based momentum flux estimations using ground based lidar observations.

  10. Energy Conservation and Gravity Waves in Sound-proof Treatments of Stellar Interiors: Part I Anelastic Approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Benjamin P

    2012-01-01

    Typical flows in stellar interiors are much slower than the speed of sound. To follow the slow evolution of subsonic motions, various sound-proof equations are in wide use, particularly in stellar astrophysical fluid dynamics. These low-Mach number equations include the anelastic equations. Generally, these equations are valid in nearly adiabatically stratified regions like stellar convection zones, but may not be valid in the sub-adiabatic, stably stratified stellar radiative interiors. Understanding the coupling between the convection zone and the radiative interior is a problem of crucial interest and may have strong implications for solar and stellar dynamo theories as the interface between the two, called the tachocline in the Sun, plays a crucial role in many solar dynamo theories. Here we study the properties of gravity waves in stably-stratified atmospheres. In particular, we explore how gravity waves are handled in various sound-proof equations. We find that some anelastic treatments fail to conserve...

  11. Dynamical influence of gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains in Antarctica: radar observations, fine-scale modelling and kinetic energy budget analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Arnault

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains (in western Droning Maud Land, Antarctica, southwest of the Finnish/Swedish Aboa/Wasa station have been observed with the Moveable atmospheric radar for Antarctica (MARA during the SWEDish Antarctic Research Programme (SWEDARP in December 2007/January 2008. These radar observations are compared with a 2-month Weather Research Forecast (WRF model experiment operated at 2 km horizontal resolution. A control simulation without orography is also operated in order to separate unambiguously the contribution of the mountain waves on the simulated atmospheric flow. This contribution is then quantified with a kinetic energy budget analysis computed in the two simulations. The results of this study confirm that mountain waves reaching lower-stratospheric heights break through convective overturning and generate inertia gravity waves with a smaller vertical wavelength, in association with a brief depletion of kinetic energy through frictional dissipation and negative vertical advection. The kinetic energy budget also shows that gravity waves have a strong influence on the other terms of the budget, i.e. horizontal advection and horizontal work of pressure forces, so evaluating the influence of gravity waves on the mean-flow with the vertical advection term alone is not sufficient, at least in this case. We finally obtain that gravity waves generated by the Vestfjella Mountains reaching lower stratospheric heights generally deplete (create kinetic energy in the lower troposphere (upper troposphere–lower stratosphere, in contradiction with the usual decelerating effect attributed to gravity waves on the zonal circulation in the upper troposphere–lower stratosphere.

  12. Towards a coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere four dimensional data assimilation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngodock, Hans; Carrier, Matthew; Amerault, Clark; Campbell, Timothy; Holt, Teddy; Xu, Liang; Rowley, Clark

    2015-04-01

    Individual 4dvar systems have been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for the ocean model (Navy coastal ocean model, NCOM), the wave model (simulating waves in the nearshore, SWAN) and the atmospheric component of the coupled ocean-atmosphere mesoscale prediction system (COAMPS). Although the three models within COAPMS are coupled in the forward integration, the initialization of each model is done separately. The coupled system forecast is hindered, however, by the lack of a fully coupled and dynamically balanced ocean-atmosphere analysis. A recent work by Ngodock and Carrier (2013) has highlighted this shortcoming with the NCOM-4DVAR, showing that while the NCOM-4DVAR is able to adjust the ocean state properly, the resulting ocean forecast degrades quickly due to the fact that the atmospheric state has not also been adjusted relative to the ocean observations. Likewise, . Currently, the coupled model is initialized using separate analyses for the ocean and atmosphere that do not account for observations in the adjacent fluid. The lack of a coupled analysis produces shocks in the coupled model in the form of gravity waves that degrade the information gained through DA and increase the error in the coupled forecast. The goal of this presentation is to describe ongoing developments at NRL in building a fully coupled ocean-wave-atmosphere four-dimensional variational (4dvar) data assimilation system using the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF).

  13. Evidence for thermospheric gravity waves in the southern polar cap from ground-based vertical velocity and photometric observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Innis

    Full Text Available Zenith-directed Fabry-Perot Spectrometer (FPS and 3-Field Photometer (3FP observations of the λ630 nm emission (~240 km altitude were obtained at Davis station, Antarctica, during the austral winter of 1999. Eleven nights of suitable data were searched for significant periodicities common to vertical winds from the FPS and photo-metric variations from the 3FP. Three wave-like events were found, each of around one or more hours in duration, with periods around 15 minutes, vertical velocity amplitudes near 60 ms–1 , horizontal phase velocities around 300 ms–1 , and horizontal wavelengths from 240 to 400 km. These characteristics appear consistent with polar cap gravity waves seen by other workers, and we conclude this is a likely interpretation of our data. Assuming a source height near 125 km altitude, we determine the approximate source location by calculating back along the wave trajectory using the gravity wave property relating angle of ascent and frequency. The wave sources appear to be in the vicinity of the poleward border of the auroral oval, at magnetic local times up to 5 hours before local magnetic midnight.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (thermospheric dynamics; waves and tides

  14. Some classes of gravitational shock waves from higher order theories of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomou, V. K.

    2017-02-01

    We study the gravitational shock wave generated by a massless high energy particle in the context of higher order gravities of the form F(R,R_{μν}R^{μν},R_{μναβ}R^{μν αβ}). In the case of F(R) gravity, we investigate the gravitational shock wave solutions corresponding to various cosmologically viable gravities, and as we demonstrate the solutions are rescaled versions of the Einstein-Hilbert gravity solution. Interestingly enough, other higher order gravities result to the general relativistic solution, except for some specific gravities of the form F(R_{μν}R^{μν}) and F(R,R_{μν}R^{μν}), which we study in detail. In addition, when realistic Gauss-Bonnet gravities of the form R+F(G) are considered, the gravitational shock wave solutions are identical to the general relativistic solution. Finally, the singularity structure of the gravitational shock waves solutions is studied, and it is shown that the effect of higher order gravities makes the singularities milder in comparison to the general relativistic solutions, and in some particular cases the singularities seem to be absent.

  15. Ultra-Low Noise Quad Photoreceiver for Space Based Laser Interferometric Gravity Wave Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gravity wave detection using space-based long-baseline laser interferometric sensors imposes stringent noise requirements on the system components, including the...

  16. Thermospheric Gravity Wave Activity near Summer Solstice 2014 Based on Analysis of Tromsø Dynasonde Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabotin, Nikolay; Negrea, Catalin; Godin, Oleg A.; Rietveld, Michael; Bullett, Terence; Zabotina, Liudmila

    2015-04-01

    Propagation conditions for thermospheric gravity waves in the Polar Regions are characterized by combination of several unique factors including interactions with the Auroral activity and the polar vortex. Tropospheric sources of the acoustic gravity waves (AGWs), such as wind disturbances caused by mountain relief, are likely to be complemented by energy and momentum depositions associated with fluxes of energetic particles from above. We apply recently developed Dynasonde techniques to study peculiarities of the gravity wave characteristics over Northern Scandinavia. A week-long (adjacent to the summer 2014 Solstice) data series for this study has been obtained with the Dynasonde system at the EISCAT's Tromsø Observatory operating continuously with sounding session periodicity equal to 2 min. A component of Dynasonde data analysis software, the inversion procedure NeXtYZ, has been used to attribute plasma density, plasma contour tilts, and line-of-sight Doppler values to the altitudes in real space with 1 km resolution. The temporal and spatial resolution allows visualization of the phase fronts of the traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) and measuring the full set of parameters (both vertical and horizontal) of TID activity in the upper atmosphere between the base of the E layer and the maximum of F layer, where the ionospheric plasma can reflect the radar's signal. We verify the nature of the activity for selected spectral peaks by substituting the TID parameters into the dispersion relation describing acoustic-gravity waves. Application of the Lomb-Scargle periodogram technique to the tilt data provides useful insight into the dynamics of spectral composition of the TIDs, which we compare to results of a similar analysis obtained for mid-latitude (Wallops Island, VA) Dynasonde location. Interference of wave packets and multi-path propagation are more frequent in polar thermosphere compared to mid-latitude situation. Backtracking of selected waves to

  17. Fundamental problems of modeling the dynamics of internal gravity waves with applications to the Arctic Basin

    CERN Document Server

    Bulatov, Vitaly V

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we consider fundamental problems of the dynamics of internal gravity waves. We present analytical and numerical algorithms for calculating the wave fields for a set of values of the parameters, as observed in the ocean. We show that our mathematical models can describe the wave dynamics of the Arctic Basin, taking into account the actual physical characteristics of sea water, topography of its floor, etc. The numerical and analytical results show that the internal gravity waves have a significant effect on underwater sea objects in the Arctic Basin.

  18. Identification of Gravity wave Sources over Tropical Latitudes Using Reverse Ray Tracing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Pramitha, M.

    2016-07-01

    Sources and propagation characteristics of high-frequency gravity waves (GWs) observed in the mesosphere using airglow emissions from Gadanki (13.5oN, 79.2oE) and Hyderabad (17.5oN, 78.5oE) are investigated using reverse ray tracing. Wave amplitudes are also traced back, including both radiative and diffusive damping. For this a climatological model of the background atmosphere for the Gadanki region has been developed using nearly 30 years of observations available from a variety of ground based (MST radar, radiosondes, MF radar) and rocket- and satellite-borne measurements. With the reverse ray-tracing method, the source locations for wave events could be identified to be in the upper troposphere. Uncertainty in locating the terminal points of wave events in the horizontal direction is estimated to be within 50-100 km and 150-300 km for Gadanki and Hyderabad wave events, respectively. This uncertainty arises mainly due to non-consideration of the day-to-day variability in the tidal amplitudes. Interestingly, large (~9ms-1 km-1) vertical shears in the horizontal wind are noticed near the ray terminal points (at 10-12 km altitude) and are thus identified to be the source for generating the observed high phase- speed, high-frequency GWs. We also tried to identify the sources for the GWs which are observed during Indo-French campaign conducted during May 2014. Uniqueness of the present study lies in using near-real time background atmosphere data from simultaneous radiosonde and meteor radar covering both source and propagation/dissipation regions of GWs. When we searched for the sources near the terminal points, deep convection is found to be a source for these events. We also tried to identify the sources of inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) that are observed in the troposphere and lower stratosphere during different seasons using long-term (2006-2014) high resolution radiosonde observations. In general, 50% of the waves observed over this location have convection as

  19. On asymmetric generalized solitary gravity-capillary waves in finite depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, T; Wang, Z; Vanden-Broeck, J-M

    2016-10-01

    Generalized solitary waves propagating at the surface of a fluid of finite depth are considered. The fluid is assumed to be inviscid and incompressible and the flow to be irrotational. Both the effects of gravity and surface tension are included. It is shown that in addition to the classical symmetric waves, there are new asymmetric solutions. These new branches of solutions bifurcate from the branches of symmetric waves. The detailed bifurcation diagrams as well as typical wave profiles are presented.

  20. Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar: Initial assessment of gravity wave momentum fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Hocking, W. K.

    2010-10-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) was installed on Tierra del Fuego (53.8°S) in May 2008 and has been operational since that time. This paper describes tests of the SAAMER ability to measure gravity wave momentum fluxes and applications of this capability during different seasons. Test results for specified mean, tidal, and gravity wavefields, including tidal amplitudes and gravity wave momentum fluxes varying strongly with altitude and/or time, suggest that the distribution of meteors throughout the diurnal cycle and averaged over a month allows characterization of both monthly mean profiles and diurnal variations of the gravity wave momentum fluxes. Applications of the same methods for real data suggest confidence in the monthly mean profiles and the composite day diurnal variations of gravity wave momentum fluxes at altitudes where meteor counts are sufficient to yield good statistical fits to the data. Monthly mean zonal winds and gravity wave momentum fluxes exhibit anticorrelations consistent with those seen at other midlatitude and high-latitude radars during austral spring and summer, when no strong local gravity wave sources are apparent. When stratospheric variances are significantly enhanced over the Drake Passage “hot spot” during austral winter, however, MLT winds and momentum fluxes over SAAMER exhibit very different correlations that suggest that MLT dynamics are strongly influenced by strong local gravity wave sources within this “hot spot.” SAAMER measurements of mean zonal and meridional winds at these times and their differences from measurements at a conjugate site provide further support for the unusual momentum flux measurements.

  1. Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lichuan; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik;

    2016-01-01

    Over the ocean, the atmospheric turbulence can be significantly affected by swell waves. Change in the atmospheric turbulence affects the wind stress and atmospheric mixing over swell waves. In this study, the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress is introduced into an atmosphere......-wave-coupled regional climate model, separately and combined. The swell influence on atmospheric mixing is introduced into the atmospheric mixing length formula by adding a swell-induced contribution to the mixing. The swell influence on the wind stress under wind-following swell, moderate-range wind, and near......-neutral and unstable stratification conditions is introduced by changing the roughness length. Five year simulation results indicate that adding the swell influence on atmospheric mixing has limited influence, only slightly increasing the near-surface wind speed; in contrast, adding the swell influence on wind stress...

  2. Some experimental constraints for spectral parameters used in the Warner and McIntyre gravity wave parameterization scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ern

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to incorporate the effect of gravity waves (GWs on the atmospheric circulation most global circulation models (GCMs employ gravity wave parameterization schemes. To date, GW parameterization schemes in GCMs are used without experimental validation of the set of global parameters assumed for the GW launch spectrum. This paper focuses on the Warner and McIntyre GW parameterization scheme. Ranges of parameters compatible with absolute values of gravity wave momentum flux (GW-MF derived from CRISTA-1 and CRISTA-2 satellite measurements are deduced for several of the parameters and the limitations of both model and measurements are discussed. The findings presented in this paper show that the initial guess of spectral parameters provided by Warner and McIntyre (2001 are some kind of compromise with respect to agreement of absolute values and agreement of the horizontal structures found in both measurements and model results. Better agreement can be achieved by using a vertical wavenumber launch spectrum with a wider saturated spectral range and reduced spectral power in the unsaturated part. Still, even global features of the measurements remain unmatched, and it is inevitable to provide a globally varying source distribution in future.

  3. Some experimental constraints for spectral parameters used in the Warner and McIntyre gravity wave parameterization scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ern

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to incorporate the effect of gravity waves (GWs on the atmospheric circulation most global circulation models (GCMs employ gravity wave parameterization schemes. To date, GW parameterization schemes in GCMs are used without experimental validation of the set of global parameters assumed for the GW launch spectrum. This paper focuses on the Warner and McIntyre GW parameterization scheme. Ranges of parameters compatible with absolute values of gravity wave momentum flux (GW-MF derived from CRISTA-1 and CRISTA-2 satellite measurements are deduced for several of the parameters and the limitations of both model and measurements are discussed. The findings presented in this paper show that the initial guess of spectral parameters provided by by Warner and McIntyre (2001 are some kind of compromise with respect to agreement of absolute values and agreement of the horizontal structures found in both measurements and model results. Better agreement can be achieved by using a vertical wavenumber launch spectrum with a wider saturated spectral range and reduced spectral power in the unsaturated part. However, even with this optimized set of global launch parameters not all features of the measurements are matched. This indicates that for further improvement spatial and seasonal variations of the launch parameters should be included in GW parameterization schemes.

  4. Wavemaker theories for acoustic-gravity waves over a finite depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Miao; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (hereafter AGWs) in ocean have received much interest recently, mainly with respect to early detection of tsunamis as they travel at near the speed of sound in water which makes them ideal candidates for early detection of tsunamis. While the generation mechanisms of AGWs have been studied from the perspective of vertical oscillations of seafloor (Yamamoto, 1982; Stiassnie, 2010) and triad wave-wave interaction (Longuet-Higgins 1950; Kadri and Stiassnie 2013; Kadri and Akylas 2016), in the current study we are interested in their generation by wave-structure interaction with possible application to the energy sector. Here, we develop two wavemaker theories to analyze different wave modes generated by impermeable (the classic Havelock's theory) and porous (porous wavemaker theory) plates in weakly compressible fluids. Slight modification has been made to the porous theory so that, unlike the previous theory (Chwang, 1983), the new solution depends on the geometry of the plate. The expressions for three different types of plates (piston, flap, delta-function) are introduced. Analytical solutions are also derived for the potential amplitude of the gravity, evanescent, and acoustic-gravity waves, as well as the surface elevation, velocity distribution, and pressure for AGWs. Both theories reduce to previous results for incompressible flow when the compressibility is negligible. We also show numerical examples for AGW generated in a wave flume as well as in deep ocean. Our current study sets the theoretical background towards remote sensing by AGWs, for optimized deep ocean wave-power harnessing, among others. References Chwang, A.T. 1983 A porous-wavemaker theory. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 132, 395- 406. Kadri, U., Stiassnie, M. 2013 Generation of an acoustic-gravity wave by two gravity waves, and their subsequent mutual interaction. J. Fluid Mech. 735, R6. Kadri U., Akylas T.R. 2016 On resonant triad interactions of acoustic-gravity waves. J

  5. Linear surface capillary-gravity short-crested waves on a current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hu

    2008-01-01

    One of the forward situations in the study of water waves is the basic three-dimensional surface wave motion of short-crested waves. Capillary waves result in rich effects concerned closely with remote sensing in the open ocean. Ocean currents experience a complete process in surface wave motion. Based on the above ideas, a linear dynamical system of surface capillary-gravity short-crested waves is developed by considering the current effects, thus leading to the following analytical expressions of the kinematic and dynamic variables: the wave height, the wave steepness, the phase velocity, the wave-particle velocities, accelerations and trajectories and the wave pressure. A number of the classi-cal, typical and latest special wave cases can arise from these expressions.

  6. Gravitational Wave Spectrums from Pole-like Inflations based on Generalized Gravity Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, J

    1998-01-01

    We present a general and unified formulation which can handle the classical evolution and quantum generation processes of the cosmological gravitational wave in a broad class of generalized gravity theories. Applications are made in several inflation models based on the scalar-tensor theory, the induced gravity, and the low energy effective action of string theory. The gravitational wave power spectrums based on the vacuum expectation value of the quantized fluctuating metric during the pole-like inflation stages are derived in analytic forms. Assuming that the gravity theory transits to Einstein one while the relevant scales remain in the superhorizon scale, we derive the consequent power spectrums and the directional fluctuations of the relic radiation produced by the gravitational wave. The spectrums seeded by the vacuum fluctuations in the pole-like inflation models based on the generalized gravity show a distinguished common feature which differs from the scale invariant spectrum generated in an exponent...

  7. Tunable Superconducting Gravity Gradiometer for Mars Climate, Atmosphere, and Gravity Field Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, C. E.; Paik, H. J.; Moody, M. V.; Han, S.-C.; Rowlands, D. D.; Lemoine, F. G.; Shirron, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing a compact tensor superconducting gravity gradiometer (SGG) for obtaining gravimetric measurements from planetary orbits. A new and innovative design gives a potential sensitivity of approximately 10(sup -4) E Hz(sup - 1/2)( 1 E = 10(sup -9 S(sup -2) in the measurement band up to 0.1 Hz (suitale for short wavelength static gravity) and of approximately 10(sup -4) E Hz(sup - 1/2) in the frequency band less than 1 mHz (for long wavelength time-variable gravity) from the same device with a baseline just over 10 cm. The measurement band and sensitiy can be optimally tuned in-flight during the mission by changing resonance frequencies, which allows meaurements of both static and time-variable gravity fields from the same mission. Significant advances in the technologies needed for space-based cryogenic instruments have been made in the last decade. In particular, the use of cryocoolers will alleviate the previously severe constraint on mission lifetime imposed by the use of liquid helium, enabling mission durations in the 5 - 10 year range.

  8. ANALYTICAL SOLUTION FOR WAVES IN PLANETS WITH ATMOSPHERIC SUPERROTATION. II. LAMB, SURFACE, AND CENTRIFUGAL WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peralta, J.; López-Valverde, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomía, 18008 Granada (Spain); Imamura, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency 3-1-1, Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Read, P. L. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Luz, D. [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofísica da Universidade de Lisboa (CAAUL), Observatório Astronómico de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisboa (Portugal); Piccialli, A., E-mail: peralta@iaa.es [LATMOS, UVSQ, 11 bd dAlembert, 78280 Guyancourt (France)

    2014-07-01

    This paper is the second in a two-part study devoted to developing tools for a systematic classification of the wide variety of atmospheric waves expected on slowly rotating planets with atmospheric superrotation. Starting with the primitive equations for a cyclostrophic regime, we have deduced the analytical solution for the possible waves, simultaneously including the effect of the metric terms for the centrifugal force and the meridional shear of the background wind. In those cases where the conditions for the method of the multiple scales in height are met, these wave solutions are also valid when vertical shear of the background wind is present. A total of six types of waves have been found and their properties were characterized in terms of the corresponding dispersion relations and wave structures. In this second part, we study the waves' solutions when several atmospheric approximations are applied: Lamb, surface, and centrifugal waves. Lamb and surface waves are found to be quite similar to those in a geostrophic regime. By contrast, centrifugal waves turn out to be a special case of Rossby waves that arise in atmospheres in cyclostrophic balance. Finally, we use our results to identify the nature of the waves behind atmospheric periodicities found in polar and lower latitudes of Venus's atmosphere.

  9. Gravity waves on water with non-uniform depth and current

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, N.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model for the combined refraction-diffraction of linear periodic gravity waves on water is developed, in which the influence of inhomogeneities of depth and current is taken into account. The model is used to compute partial reflection of waves a gully or an undersea slope, with influ

  10. A solution of nonlinear equation for the gravity wave spectra from Adomian decomposition method: a first approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gledson Goulart

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the equation for the gravity wave spectra in mean atmosphere is analytically solved without linearization by the Adomian decomposition method. As a consequence, the nonlinear nature of problem is preserved and the errors found in the results are only due to the parameterization. The results, with the parameterization applied in the simulations, indicate that the linear solution of the equation is a good approximation only for heights shorter than ten kilometers, because the linearization the equation leads to a solution that does not correctly describe the kinetic energy spectra.

  11. Sources of mesoscale variability of gravity waves. I - Topographic excitation. II - Frontal, convective, and jet stream excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastrom, Gregory D.; Fritts, David C.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of topography as a source of mesoscale variability was investigated using aircraft measurements of winds and temperature collected during the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program, with results showing marked increases in the variance of zonal and meridional wind speeds and of potential temperature over rough terrain. In addition, four cases of mesoscale variance enhancements of horizontal velocity and temperature due to frontal activity, nonfrontal convection, and wind shear were studied. The implications of these episodic enhancements of variances for the vertical transports of energy and momentum are considered in the framework of the gravity wave theory.

  12. ENERGY CONSERVATION AND GRAVITY WAVES IN SOUND-PROOF TREATMENTS OF STELLAR INTERIORS. PART I. ANELASTIC APPROXIMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Benjamin P.; Zweibel, Ellen G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Vasil, Geoffrey M., E-mail: bpbrown@astro.wisc.edu [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2012-09-10

    Typical flows in stellar interiors are much slower than the speed of sound. To follow the slow evolution of subsonic motions, various sound-proof equations are in wide use, particularly in stellar astrophysical fluid dynamics. These low-Mach number equations include the anelastic equations. Generally, these equations are valid in nearly adiabatically stratified regions like stellar convection zones, but may not be valid in the sub-adiabatic, stably stratified stellar radiative interiors. Understanding the coupling between the convection zone and the radiative interior is a problem of crucial interest and may have strong implications for solar and stellar dynamo theories as the interface between the two, called the tachocline in the Sun, plays a crucial role in many solar dynamo theories. Here, we study the properties of gravity waves in stably stratified atmospheres. In particular, we explore how gravity waves are handled in various sound-proof equations. We find that some anelastic treatments fail to conserve energy in stably stratified atmospheres, instead conserving pseudo-energies that depend on the stratification, and we demonstrate this numerically. One anelastic equation set does conserve energy in all atmospheres and we provide recommendations for converting low-Mach number anelastic codes to this set of equations.

  13. Wave analysis in the atmosphere of Venus below 100-km altitude, simulated by the LMD Venus GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebonnois, Sébastien; Sugimoto, Norihiko; Gilli, Gabriella

    2016-11-01

    A new simulation of Venus atmospheric circulation obtained with the LMD Venus GCM is described and the simulated wave activity is analyzed. Agreement with observed features of the temperature structure, static stability and zonal wind field is good, such as the presence of a cold polar collar, diurnal and semi-diurnal tides. At the resolution used (96 longitudes × 96 latitudes), a fully developed superrotation is obtained both when the simulation is initialized from rest and from an atmosphere already in superrotation, though winds are still weak below the clouds (roughly half the observed values). The atmospheric waves play a crucial role in the angular momentum budget of the Venus's atmospheric circulation. In the upper cloud, the vertical angular momentum is transported by the diurnal and semi-diurnal tides. Above the cloud base (approximately 1 bar), equatorward transport of angular momentum is done by polar barotropic and mid- to high-latitude baroclinic waves present in the cloud region, with frequencies between 5 and 20 cycles per Venus day (periods between 6 and 23 Earth days). In the middle cloud, just above the convective layer, a Kelvin type wave (period around 7.3 Ed) is present at the equator, as well as a low-latitude Rossby-gravity type wave (period around 16 Ed). Below the clouds, large-scale mid- to high-latitude gravity waves develop and play a significant role in the angular momentum balance.

  14. The MaCWAVE program to study gravity wave influences on the polar mesosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Goldberg

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available MaCWAVE (Mountain and Convective Waves Ascending VErtically was a highly coordinated rocket, ground-based, and satellite program designed to address gravity wave forcing of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT. The MaCWAVE program was conducted at the Norwegian Andøya Rocket Range (ARR, 69.3° N in July 2002, and continued at the Swedish Rocket Range (Esrange, 67.9° N during January 2003. Correlative instrumentation included the ALOMAR MF and MST radars and RMR and Na lidars, Esrange MST and meteor radars and RMR lidar, radiosondes, and TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite measurements of thermal structures. The data have been used to define both the mean fields and the wave field structures and turbulence generation leading to forcing of the large-scale flow. In summer, launch sequences coupled with ground-based measurements at ARR addressed the forcing of the summer mesopause environment by anticipated convective and shear generated gravity waves. These motions were measured with two 12-h rocket sequences, each involving one Terrier-Orion payload accompanied by a mix of MET rockets, all at ARR in Norway. The MET rockets were used to define the temperature and wind structure of the stratosphere and mesosphere. The Terrier-Orions were designed to measure small-scale plasma fluctuations and turbulence that might be induced by wave breaking in the mesosphere. For the summer series, three European MIDAS (Middle Atmosphere Dynamics and Structure rockets were also launched from ARR in coordination with the MaCWAVE payloads. These were designed to measure plasma and neutral turbulence within the MLT. The summer program exhibited a number of indications of significant departures of the mean wind and temperature structures from ``normal" polar summer conditions, including an unusually warm mesopause and

  15. Swell impact on wind stress and atmospheric mixing in a regional coupled atmosphere-wave model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lichuan; Rutgersson, Anna; Sahlée, Erik; Guo Larsén, Xiaoli

    2016-07-01

    Over the ocean, the atmospheric turbulence can be significantly affected by swell waves. Change in the atmospheric turbulence affects the wind stress and atmospheric mixing over swell waves. In this study, the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress is introduced into an atmosphere-wave-coupled regional climate model, separately and combined. The swell influence on atmospheric mixing is introduced into the atmospheric mixing length formula by adding a swell-induced contribution to the mixing. The swell influence on the wind stress under wind-following swell, moderate-range wind, and near-neutral and unstable stratification conditions is introduced by changing the roughness length. Five year simulation results indicate that adding the swell influence on atmospheric mixing has limited influence, only slightly increasing the near-surface wind speed; in contrast, adding the swell influence on wind stress reduces the near-surface wind speed. Introducing the wave influence roughness length has a larger influence than does adding the swell influence on mixing. Compared with measurements, adding the swell influence on both atmospheric mixing and wind stress gives the best model performance for the wind speed. The influence varies with wave characteristics for different sea basins. Swell occurs infrequently in the studied area, and one could expect more influence in high-swell-frequency areas (i.e., low-latitude ocean). We conclude that the influence of swell on atmospheric mixing and wind stress should be considered when developing climate models.

  16. Atom Interferometry for detection of Gravity Waves-a Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atom interferometers are more sensitive to inertial effects. This is because atoms in their inertial frame are ideal test masses for detection of gravity effects...

  17. The southern stratospheric gravity-wave hot spot: individual waves and their momentum fluxes measured by COSMIC GPS-RO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Hindley

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available During austral winter the mountains of the southern Andes and Antarctic Peninsula are a known hot spot of intense gravity wave momentum flux. There also exists a long leeward region of increased gravity wave energy that sweeps eastwards from the mountains out over the Southern Ocean, the source of which has historically proved difficult to determine. In this study we use Global Positioning System (GPS Radio Occultation (RO data from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC satellite constellation to investigate the distribution, variability and sources of waves in the hot spot region and over the Southern Ocean. We present evidence that suggests a southward focusing of waves into the stratospheric jet from sources to the north. We also describe a wavelet analysis technique for the quantitative identification of individual waves from COSMIC temperature profiles. This analysis reveals different geographical regimes of wave amplitude and short-timescale variability in the wave field over the Southern Ocean. Finally, we take advantage of the large numbers of closely spaced pairs of profiles from the deployment phase of the COSMIC constellation in 2006 to make estimates of gravity wave horizontal wavelengths. We show that, given sufficient numbers of these pairs, GPS-RO can then produce physically reasonable estimates of stratospheric gravity wave momentum flux in the hot spot region that are consistent with other studies. The results are discussed in the context of previous satellite and modelling studies to build up a better picture of the nature and origins of waves in the southern winter stratosphere.

  18. Observations of gravity wave forcing of themesopause region during the January 2013 major Sudden Stratospheric Warming

    CERN Document Server

    deWit, R J; Espy, P J; Orsolini, Y J; Limpasuvan, V; Kinnison, D E

    2016-01-01

    Studies of vertical and interhemispheric coupling during Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) suggest that gravity wave (GW) momentum flux divergence plays a key role in forcing the middle atmosphere, although observational validation of GW forcing is limited. We present a whole atmosphere view of zonal winds from the surface to 100 km during the January 2013 major SSW, together with observed GW momentum fluxes in the mesopause region derived from uninterrupted high-resolution meteor radar observations from an All-Sky Interferometric Meteor Radar system located at Trondheim, Norway (63.4 $^{\\circ}$N, 10.5 $^{\\circ}$E). Observations show GW momentum flux divergence 6 days prior to the SSW onset, producing an eastward forcing with peak values of $\\sim$+145 $\\pm$ 60m $s^{-1}$ $d^{-1}$. As the SSW evolves, GW forcing turns westward, reaching a minimum of $\\sim$-240 $\\pm$ 70 m $s^{-1}$ $d^{-1}$ $\\sim$+18 days after the SSW onset. These results are discussed in light of previous studies and simulations using the Wh...

  19. On weakly singular and fully nonlinear travelling shallow capillary-gravity waves in the critical regime

    CERN Document Server

    Mitsotakis, Dimitrios; Assylbekuly, Aydar; Zhakebaev, Dauren

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter we consider long capillary-gravity waves described by a fully nonlinear weakly dispersive model. First, using the phase space analysis methods we describe all possible types of localized travelling waves. Then, we especially focus on the critical regime, where the surface tension is exactly balanced by the gravity force. We show that our long wave model with a critical Bond number admits stable travelling wave solutions with a singular crest. These solutions are usually referred to in the literature as peakons or peaked solitary waves. They satisfy the usual speed-amplitude relation, which coincides with Scott-Russel's empirical formula for solitary waves, while their decay rate is the same regardless their amplitude. Moreover, they can be of depression or elevation type independent of their speed. The dynamics of these solutions are studied as well.

  20. Improving the realism of gravity waves generated by convection in numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Claudia Christine

    Small-scale gravity waves (GWs) with horizontal wavelengths of tens up to several hundred kilometers have demonstrated importance for driving the general circulation of the atmosphere, which affects many climate processes. GWs that propagate vertically from the troposphere into the middle atmosphere eventually dissipate and deposit momentum to the mean flow. Through this process they influence the timing of the transition in springtime from winter westerlies to summer easterlies in the stratosphere. They also play an important role in driving the mean-meridional transport circulation, the Brewer-Dobson circulation, and in the tropics help drive the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation and the Semi-Annual Oscillation. GWs with scales on the order of the size of a model grid box or smaller remain unresolved in Global Circulation Models (GCMs) and therefore need to be parameterized. GWs are generated by a variety of sources including orography, convection, and geostrophic adjustment in regions of baroclinic instability. We focus here in particular on convectively-generated GWs, which are prevalent in the tropics and summer mid-latitudes. Their parameterizations in climate models range in complexity from simple assumptions of uniform sources to more complex methods that relate the spectrum of GWs to properties of convection in the climate model. The parameter settings that must be chosen to apply these GW parameterizations are poorly constrained by observations, so they are instead based largely on cloud-resolving model results. Cloud-resolving model studies themselves use parameterized physics for the microphysics of precipitation particle formation. We first explore the sensitivity of the waves generated in cloud-resolving models to these physics parameterizations and show that knowledge of large-scale storm conditions is sufficient to predict the large-area and time-average spectrum of GW momentum flux above storms, irrespective of the convective details that coarse

  1. Analysis of a jet stream induced gravity wave associated with an observed ice cloud over Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Buss

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A polar stratospheric ice cloud (PSC type II was observed by airborne lidar above Greenland on 14 January 2000. It was the unique observation of an ice cloud over Greenland during the SOLVE/THESEO 2000 campaign. Mesoscale simulations with the hydrostatic HRM model are presented which, in contrast to global analyses, are capable to produce a vertically propagating gravity wave that induces the low temperatures at the level of the PSC afforded for the ice formation. The simulated minimum temperature is ~8 K below the driving analyses and ~4.5 K below the frost point, exactly coinciding with the location of the observed ice cloud. Despite the high elevations of the Greenland orography the simulated gravity wave is not a mountain wave. Analyses of the horizontal wind divergence, of the background wind profiles, of backward gravity wave ray-tracing trajectories, of HRM experiments with reduced Greenland topography and of several diagnostics near the tropopause level provide evidence that the wave is emitted from an intense, rapidly evolving, anticyclonically curved jet stream. The precise physical process responsible for the wave emission could not be identified definitely, but geostrophic adjustment and shear instability are likely candidates. In order to evaluate the potential frequency of such non-orographic polar stratospheric cloud events, the non-linear balance equation diagnostic is performed for the winter 1999/2000. It indicates that ice-PSCs are only occasionally generated by gravity waves emanating from spontaneous adjustment.

  2. Ionospheric acoustic and gravity wave activity above low-latitude thunderstorms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lay, Erin Hoffmann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-30

    In this report, we study the correlation between thunderstorm activity and ionospheric gravity and acoustic waves in the low-latitude ionosphere. We use ionospheric total electron content (TEC) measurements from the Low Latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) and lightning measurements from the World- Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). We find that ionospheric acoustic waves show a strong diurnal pattern in summer, peaking in the pre-midnight time period. However, the peak magnitude does not correspond to thunderstorm area, and the peak time is significantly after the peak in thunderstorm activity. Wintertime acoustic wave activity has no discernable pattern in these data. The coverage area of ionospheric gravity waves in the summer was found to increase with increasing thunderstorm activity. Wintertime gravity wave activity has an observable diurnal pattern unrelated to thunderstorm activity. These findings show that while thunderstorms are not the only, or dominant source of ionospheric perturbations at low-latitudes, they do have an observable effect on gravity wave activity and could be influential in acoustic wave activity.

  3. Hydrodynamic coefficients of a simplified floating system of gravity cage in waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-wen WU; Fu-kun GUI; Yu-cheng LI; Wei-huan FANG

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulation and experimental tests were carried out to examine the hydrodynamic behaviors of a double-column floating system of gravity cage under wave conditions. A floating system of gravity cage can be treated as a small-sized floating structure when compared with the wavelengths. The main problem in calculating the wave loads on the small-sized floating structure is to obtain the reasonable force coefficients, which may differ from a submerged structure. In this paper, the floating system of gravity cage is simplified to a 2D problem, where the floating system is set symmetrically under wave conditions. The motion equations were deduced under wave conditions and a specific method was proposed to resolve the problem of wave forces acting on a small-sized floating system of gravity cage at water surface. Results of the numerical method were compared with those from model tests and the hydrodynamic coefficients Cn and C?were studied. It is found that Cn ranges from 0.6 to 1.0 while C?is between 0.4 and 0.6 in this study. The results are useful for research on the hydrodynamic behavior of the deep-water gravity sea cages.

  4. Thermal effect on gravity waves in a compressible liquid layer over a solid half-space under initial hydrostatic stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushil Kumar Addy; Nil Ratan Chakraborty

    2005-02-01

    This paper deals with the effect of temperature on gravity waves in a compressible liquid layer over a solid half-space. It has been assumed that the liquid layer is under the action of gravity, while the solid half-space is under the influence of initial compressive hydrostatic stress. When the temperature of the half-space is altered, gravity waves propagate through the liquid layer along with sub-oceanic Rayleigh waves in the system. A new frequency equation has been derived here for gravity waves and sub-oceanic Rayleigh waves. It has been shown graphically that the phase velocity of gravity waves is influenced significantly by the initial compressive hydrostatic stress present in the solid half-space, for a particular value of the phase velocity of sub-oceanic Rayleigh waves and different coupling co-efficients of the temperature.

  5. Detectability of bi-gravity with graviton oscillations using gravitational wave observations

    CERN Document Server

    Narikawa, Tatsuya; Tagoshi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Takahiro; Kanda, Nobuyuki; Nakamura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The gravitational waveforms in the ghost-free bi-gravity theory exhibit deviations from those in general relativity. The main difference is caused by graviton oscillations in the bi-gravity theory. We investigate the prospects for the detection of the corrections to gravitational waveforms from coalescing compact binaries due to graviton oscillations and for constraining bi-gravity parameters with the gravitational wave observations. We consider the bi-gravity model discussed by the De Felice-Nakamura-Tanaka subset of the bi-gravity model, and the phenomenological model in which the bi-gravity parameters are treated as independent variables. In both models, the bi-gravity waveform shows strong amplitude modulation, and there can be a characteristic frequency of the largest peak of the amplitude, which depends on the bi-gravity parameters. We show that there is a detectable region of the bi-gravity parameters for the advanced ground-based laser interferometers, such as Advanced LIGO, Advanced Virgo, and KAGRA....

  6. A Parabolic Equation Approach to Modeling Acousto-Gravity Waves for Local Helioseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bene, Kevin; Lingevitch, Joseph; Doschek, George

    2016-08-01

    A wide-angle parabolic-wave-equation algorithm is developed and validated for local-helioseismic wave propagation. The parabolic equation is derived from a factorization of the linearized acousto-gravity wave equation. We apply the parabolic-wave equation to modeling acoustic propagation in a plane-parallel waveguide with physical properties derived from helioseismic data. The wavenumber power spectrum and wave-packet arrival-time structure for receivers in the photosphere with separation up to 30° is computed, and good agreement is demonstrated with measured values and a reference spectral model.

  7. Proposed observations of gravity waves from the early Universe via "Millikan oil drops"

    CERN Document Server

    Chiao, R Y

    2006-01-01

    Pairs of Planck-mass drops of superfluid helium coated by electrons (i.e., ``Millikan oil drops''), when levitated in a superconducting magnetic trap, can be efficient quantum transducers between electromagnetic (EM) and gravitational (GR) radiation. This leads to the possibility of a Hertz-like experiment, in which EM waves are converted at the source into GR waves, and then back-converted at the receiver from GR waves back into EM waves. Detection of the gravity-wave analog of the cosmic microwave background using these drops can discriminate between various theories of the early Universe.

  8. The Role of Gravity Waves in the Formation and Organization of Clouds during TWPICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeder, Michael J. [Monash University; Lane, Todd P. [University of Melbourne; Hankinson, Mai Chi Nguyen [Monash University

    2013-09-27

    All convective clouds emit gravity waves. While it is certain that convectively-generated waves play important parts in determining the climate, their precise roles remain uncertain and their effects are not (generally) represented in climate models. The work described here focuses mostly on observations and modeling of convectively-generated gravity waves, using the intensive observations from the DoE-sponsored Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which took place in Darwin, from 17 January to 13 February 2006. Among other things, the research has implications the part played by convectively-generated gravity waves in the formation of cirrus, in the initiation and organization of further convection, and in the subgrid-scale momentum transport and associated large-scale stresses imposed on the troposphere and stratosphere. The analysis shows two groups of inertia-gravity waves are detected: group L in the middle stratosphere during the suppressed monsoon period, and group S in the lower stratosphere during the monsoon break period. Waves belonging to group L propagate to the south-east with a mean intrinsic period of 35 h, and have vertical and horizontal wavelengths of about 5-6 km and 3000-6000 km, respectively. Ray tracing calculations indicate that these waves originate from a deep convective region near Indonesia. Waves belonging to group S propagate to the south-south-east with an intrinsic period, vertical wavelength and horizontal wavelength of about 45 h, 2 km and 2000-4000 km, respectively. These waves are shown to be associated with shallow convection in the oceanic area within about 1000 km of Darwin. The intrinsic periods of high-frequency waves are estimated to be between 20-40 minutes. The high-frequency wave activity in the stratosphere, defined by mass-weighted variance of the vertical motion of the sonde, has a maximum following the afternoon local convection indicating that these waves are generated by local convection

  9. Slosh wave excitation in the gravity probe-B spacecraft propulsion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, Fred W.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of fluids in a Gravity Probe-B Spacecraft tank imposed by various frequencies of gravity jitters have been investigated. Fluid stress distribution also have been investigated. Results show that fluid stress distribution exerted on the outer and inner walls of rotating dewar are closely related to the characteristics of slosh waves excited on the liquid-vapor interface in the rotating dewar tank.

  10. Torsion Wave Solutions in Yang-Mielke Theory of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Pasic, Vedad

    2015-01-01

    The approach of metric-affine gravity initially distinguishes it from Einstein's general relativity. Using an independent affine connection produces a theory with 10+64 unknowns. We write down the Yang-Mills action for the affine connection and produce the Yang-Mills equation and the so called complementary Yang-Mills equation by independently varying with respect to the connection and the metric respectively. We call this theory the Yang-Mielke theory of gravity. We construct explicit spacetimes with pp-metric and purely axial torsion and show that they represent a solution of Yang-Mills theory. Finally we compare these spacetimes to existing solutions of metric-affine gravity and present future research possibilities.

  11. Experimental observation of gravity-capillary solitary waves generated by a moving air-suction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Beomchan; Cho, Yeunwoo

    2016-11-01

    Gravity-capillary solitary waves are generated by a moving "air-suction" forcing instead of a moving "air-blowing" forcing. The air-suction forcing moves horizontally over the surface of deep water with speeds close to the minimum linear phase speed cmin = 23 cm/s. Three different states are observed according to forcing speed below cmin. At relatively low speeds below cmin, small-amplitude linear circular depressions are observed, and they move steadily ahead of and along with the moving forcing. As the forcing speed increases close to cmin, however, nonlinear 3-D gravity-capillary solitary waves are observed, and they move steadily ahead of and along with the moving forcing. Finally, when the forcing speed is very close to cmin, oblique shedding phenomena of 3-D gravity-capillary solitary waves are observed ahead of the moving forcing. We found that all the linear and nonlinear wave patterns generated by the air-suction forcing correspond to those generated by the air-blowing forcing. The main difference is that 3-D gravity-capillary solitary waves are observed "ahead of" the air-suction forcing, whereas the same waves are observed "behind" the air-blowing forcing. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (NRF-2014R1A1A1002441).

  12. Simulation of breaking gravity waves during the south foehn of 7 - 13 January 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, H.; Doernbrack, A.

    1998-07-01

    A high-resolution mesoscale model with horizontal mesh size of 6 km is applied to simulate upper-level wave breaking above the Alps during a south foehn event in January 1996. The model reproduces the key synoptic and mesoscale features of cross-alpine airflow during foehn. High-resolution radiosonde ascents at Munich and Innsbruck are used to evaluate the quality of the model simulations. The simulations predict breaking gravity waves above the jet stream in a layer between 10 and 15 km altitude where the shear is maximum. In part of the foehn period a critical level is present at about 200 hPa that results in wave steepening below and no wave activity aloft. Regions where aircraft report clear-air turbulence encounters agree reasonably with the simulated locations of gravity wave breaking. (orig.)

  13. The interaction between gravity waves and solar tides in a linear tidal model with a 4-D ray-tracing gravity-wave parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribstein, B.; Achatz, U.

    2016-09-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) play an important role in atmospheric dynamics. Due to their short wavelengths, they must be parameterized in current weather and forecast models, which cannot resolve them explicitly. We are here the first to report the possibility and the implication of having an online GW parameterization in a linear but global model that incorporates their horizontal propagation, the effects of transients and of horizontal background gradients on GW dynamics. The GW parameterization is based on a ray-tracer model with a spectral formulation that is safe against numerical instabilities due to caustics. The global model integrates the linearized primitive equations to obtain solar tides (STs), with a seasonally dependent reference climatology, forced by a climatological daily cycle of the tropospheric and stratospheric heating, and the (instantaneous) GW momentum and buoyancy flux convergences resulting from the ray tracer. Under a more conventional "single-column" approximation, where GWs only propagate vertically and do not respond to horizontal gradients of the resolved flow, GW impacts are shown to be significantly changed in comparison with "full" experiments, leading to significant differences in ST amplitudes and phases, pointing at a sensitive issue of GW parameterizations in general. In the full experiment, significant semidiurnal STs arise even if the tidal model is only forced by diurnal heating rates. This indicates that an important part of the tidal signal is forced directly by GWs via their momentum and buoyancy deposition. In general, the effect of horizontal GW propagation and the GW response to horizontal large-scale flow gradients is rather observed in nonmigrating than in migrating tidal components.

  14. Quintessential Inflation on the Brane and the Relic Gravity Wave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Sami, M

    2004-01-01

    Quintessential inflation describes a scenario in which both inflation and dark energy (quintessence) are described by the same scalar field. In conventional braneworld models of quintessential inflation gravitational particle production is used to reheat the universe. This reheating mechanism is very inefficient and results in an excessive production of gravity waves which violate nucleosynthesis constraints and invalidate the model. We describe a new method of realizing quintessential inflation on the brane in which inflation is followed by `instant preheating' (Felder, Kofman & Linde 1999). The larger reheating temperature in this model results in a smaller amplitude of relic gravity waves which is consistent with nucleosynthesis bounds. The relic gravity wave background has a `blue' spectrum at high frequencies and is a generic byproduct of successful quintessential inflation on the brane.

  15. Wind-profiler observations of gravity waves produced by convection at mid-latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. G. Choi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a case study which includes regions of large rapidly varying vertical velocities observed by a VHF wind-profiler at Aberystwyth (52.4° N, 4.1° W. Analysis indicates that this region is associated with gravity waves above the tropopause level and simultaneous regions of convective activity below the tropopause level. This case study also suggests that convective activity can be identified effectively by finding periods of large uncertainties on the derived velocities. These regions are hypothesized to be related to regions of small-scale inhomogeneity in the wind field. Examination suggests that the large vertical velocity fluctuations above these convective regions are short period gravity wave packets as expected from theory. In addition the vertical flux of the horizontal momentum associated with the gravity waves also displays the pattern of reversal observed in previous studies.

  16. Scattering of coherent sound waves by atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, P. L.; Liu, C. H.; Maestrello, L.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical study of the propagation of coherent sound waves through an atmosphere containing both mean and fluctuating flow variables is presented. The general flow problem is formulated as a time-dependent wave propagation in a half-space containing the turbulent medium. The coherent acoustic waves are analyzed by a smoothing technique, assuming that mean flow variables vary with the height only. The general equations for the coherent waves are derived, and then applied to two special cases, corresponding to uniform and shear mean flow, respectively. The results show that mean shear and turbulence introduce pronounced effects on the propagation of coherent acoustic disturbances.

  17. Characteristics of cyclone generated gravity waves observed using assimilated WRF model simulations over Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hima Bindu, H.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Yesubabu, V.; Narayana Rao, T.; Kesarkar, Amit; Naidu, C. V.

    2016-11-01

    Characteristics of gravity waves (GWs) generated due to tropical cyclone (TC) Phailin (2013) that occurred over Bay of Bengal are investigated using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model simulations from its depression stage to weakening stage (10-14 October 2013). Two types of numerical experiments are conducted with and without assimilating conventional and satellite observations using the 3-Dimentional Variational (3DVAR) technique. The results show that the experiment without assimilating any observations (control) has produced a large difference in terms of track and intensity with observed best track estimates of IMD. Similar features are noticed also in winds, reflectivity and independent GPS Radio Occultation (temperature) and radiosonde (temperature and winds) profiles. The experiment with assimilation significantly reduced the observed differences in all the above mentioned parameters. A close match of the assimilated outputs with observations prompted us to use it to identify the TC generated GW characteristics. GW perturbation components are extracted from the three day mean (4-7 October 2013) calm background atmosphere prior to the formation of depression. When compared to the control run, assimilated outputs show a clear increase in all the gravity wave parameters except the amplitudes where control run wave amplitudes are found to be stronger than the assimilated outputs. Fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis in the time domain revealed dominance of GWs with periods of 2-4 h. Band pass filtered vertical velocity perturbations for these periods showed clear downward phase propagation (0.05-0.07 ms- 1) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) at different latitude/longitude positions away from the centre of the TC revealing an upward energy propagation of generated GWs. Interestingly, an increase in GW activity during the landfall of the TC is found. FFT in the vertical domain revealed vertical wavelengths ranging from 3 to 8 km

  18. Impact of mountain gravity waves on infrasound propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiens, Florentin; Lott, François; Millet, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Linear theory of acoustic propagation is used to analyze how mountain waves can change the characteristics of infrasound signals. The mountain wave model is based on the integration of the linear inviscid Taylor-Goldstein equation forced by a nonlinear surface boundary condition. For the acoustic propagation we solve the wave equation using the normal mode method together with the effective sound speed approximation. For large-amplitude mountain waves we use direct numerical simulations to compute the interactions between the mountain waves and the infrasound component. It is shown that the mountain waves perturb the low level waveguide, which leads to significant acoustic dispersion. The mountain waves also impact the arrival time and spread of the signals substantially and can produce a strong absorption of the wave signal. To interpret our results we follow each acoustic mode separately and show which mode is impacted and how. We also show that the phase shift between the acoustic modes over the horizontal length of the mountain wave field may yield to destructive interferences in the lee side of the mountain, resulting in a new form of infrasound absorption. The statistical relevance of those results is tested using a stochastic version of the mountain wave model and large enough sample sizes.

  19. Hamiltonian discontinuous Galerkin FEM for linear, stratified (in)compressible Euler equations: internal gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oers, Alexander M.; Maas, Leo R. M.; Bokhove, Onno

    2017-02-01

    The linear equations governing internal gravity waves in a stratified ideal fluid possess a Hamiltonian structure. A discontinuous Galerkin finite element method has been developed in which this Hamiltonian structure is discretized, resulting in conservation of discrete analogs of phase space and energy. This required (i) the discretization of the Hamiltonian structure using alternating flux functions and symplectic time integration, (ii) the discretization of a divergence-free velocity field using Dirac's theory of constraints and (iii) the handling of large-scale computational demands due to the 3-dimensional nature of internal gravity waves and, in confined, symmetry-breaking fluid domains, possibly its narrow zones of attraction.

  20. Freely decaying weak turbulence for sea surface gravity waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, M; Osborne, A R; Serio, M; Resio, D; Pushkarev, A; Zakharov, V E; Brandini, C

    2002-09-30

    We study the long-time evolution of deep-water ocean surface waves in order to better understand the behavior of the nonlinear interaction processes that need to be accurately predicted in numerical models of wind-generated ocean surface waves. Of particular interest are those nonlinear interactions which are predicted by weak turbulence theory to result in a wave energy spectrum of the form of [k](-2.5). We numerically implement the primitive Euler equations for surface waves and demonstrate agreement between weak turbulence theory and the numerical results.

  1. Angular momentum transport by internal gravity waves III - Wave excitation by core convection and the Coriolis effect

    CERN Document Server

    Pantillon, Florian P; Charbonnel, Corinne

    2007-01-01

    This is the third in a series of papers that deal with angular momentum transport by internal gravity waves. We concentrate on the waves excited by core convection in a 3Msun, Pop I main sequence star. Here, we want to examine the role of the Coriolis acceleration in the equations of motion that describe the behavior of waves and to evaluate its impact on angular momentum transport. We use the so-called traditional approximation of geophysics, which allows variable separation in radial and horizontal components. In the presence of rotation, the horizontal structure is described by Hough functions instead of spherical harmonics. The Coriolis acceleration has two main effects on waves. It transforms pure gravity waves into gravito-inertial waves that have a larger amplitude closer to the equator, and it introduces new waves whose restoring force is mainly the conservation of vorticity. Taking the Coriolis acceleration into account changes the subtle balance between prograde and retrograde waves in non-rotating ...

  2. Horizontal rays and vertical modes method for the computation of the vertical propagation of acoustic-gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaye, Noé; Smith, Stefan Llewellyn

    2016-04-01

    We consider the vertical propagation of acoustic-gravity waves generated by a finite-size perturbation at the bottom, through a moving inhomogeneous atmosphere. Under the hypothesis of weak inhomogeneities in the horizontal direction, an approximate solution is obtained in terms of normal modes and horizontal rays. The problem is thus reduced to a depth-separated equation very similar to the standard Taylor-Goldstein equation, with weak dependence of the parameters on the horizontal coordinates, and to ray equations along the horizontal -- thus decreasing the computational resources needed. One advantage of this method is to retain the signal that is partially transmitted across reflecting regions that may exist due to the background wind jet, contrary to standard ray tracing that would predict pure reflexion. In addition, the limitation to an homogeneous medium along the horizontal coordinates that applies to other standard methods based on spectral integral transforms is released with the current approach. An idealized configuration is investigated, where numerical results are shown. Finally, a more general formulation in terms of approximate adiabatic spectral integral transform is presented. Implications for the computation of the propagation of Tsunami-generated acoustic-gravity waves, and more generally waves generated at the bottom of an inhomogeneous moving fluid, are discussed.

  3. Influence of atmospheric waves on the formation and maintenance of

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yuhji

    2016-04-01

    The formation and maintenance of the subtropical jet during the Northern Hemisphere winter was examined using new analysis method that can isolate the responses to specific forcings within meteorological data. It is found that atmospheric waves play a crucial role in the climatological maintenance, the month-to-month, and the day-to-day variabilities of the jet. Climatologically, stationary waves, which reach up to 1.4 m/s/day, are the greatest accelerator of the jet core, whereas synoptic waves decelerate the jet core. For the month-to-month variability of the jet, stationary waves are the primary driver of the jet, followed by synoptic waves. On the other hand, Low-Frequency Transient (LFT) waves, whose frequency falls between stationary and synoptic waves, act to suppress the variability. However, synoptic waves play a key role in creating the variability on a monthly scale, whereas stationary waves work only for the maintenance of the jet. Regarding the day-to-day variability of the jet, the most important driver of eddies originates from the interference between synoptic waves and the mixing of stationary and LFT waves.

  4. Inter-hemispheric Comparison of Mesospheric Short-period Gravity Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, K.; Taylor, M. J.; Collins, R. L.; Irving, B. K.; Negale, M.; Siskind, D. E.; Eckermann, S. D.; Hoppel, K.; Harvey, V.; Russell, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Mesospheric short-period (≤1-hr) gravity waves are of great importance for dynamics in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) region, and are typically measured by instruments capable of high temporal and/or spatial resolutions such as lidars and airglow imagers. These waves have been studied extensively at low- and mid-latitudes where known wave sources are well established. The results show strong dependence on the background wind and temperature fields, which can act as a barrier prohibiting vertical propagation of the waves, as well as providing a ducted environment in which the waves can travel large horizontal distances. In fact, results show that up to 75% of these waves may exhibit ducted wave motion. Recent airglow imaging measurements over Antarctica have revealed a large number of short-period gravity waves in absence of the prominent wave sources present at lower latitudes. In contrast to results at lower latitudes, very few waves (˜5%) observed over Halley (76°S) exhibited Doppler ducted motion. In this work, we utilize airglow imagery, SABER temperature measurements, together with the Navy's high-altitude numerical weather prediction system, NOGAPS-ALPHA, to investigate propagation conditions (particularly, the role of thermal ducting) over Rothera (68°S). Data acquired from a newly installed airglow imager operating at Poker Flat, Alaska (65°N) and the co-located lidar provide an opportunity to perform an inter-hemispheric comparison of propagation conditions over two polar sites at similar latitudes.

  5. Observation of strongly non-Gaussian statistics for random sea surface gravity waves in wave flume experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, M; Osborne, A R; Serio, M; Cavaleri, L; Brandini, C; Stansberg, C T

    2004-12-01

    We study random surface gravity wave fields and address the formation of large-amplitude waves in a laboratory environment. Experiments are performed in one of the largest wave tank facilities in the world. We present experimental evidence that the tail of the probability density function for wave height strongly depends on the Benjamin-Feir index (BFI)-i.e., the ratio between wave steepness and spectral bandwidth. While for a small BFI the probability density functions obtained experimentally are consistent with the Rayleigh distribution, for a large BFI the Rayleigh distribution clearly underestimates the probability of large events. These results confirm experimentally the fact that large-amplitude waves in random spectra may result from the modulational instability.

  6. On the Dynamics of Two-Dimensional Capillary-Gravity Solitary Waves with a Linear Shear Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dali Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical study of the dynamics of two-dimensional capillary-gravity solitary waves on a linear shear current is presented in this paper. The numerical method is based on the time-dependent conformal mapping. The stability of different kinds of solitary waves is considered. Both depression wave and large amplitude elevation wave are found to be stable, while small amplitude elevation wave is unstable to the small perturbation, and it finally evolves to be a depression wave with tails, which is similar to the irrotational capillary-gravity waves.

  7. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Harms

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10^–23 Hz^–1/2 above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our

  8. Terrestrial Gravity Fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Different forms of fluctuations of the terrestrial gravity field are observed by gravity experiments. For example, atmospheric pressure fluctuations generate a gravity-noise foreground in measurements with super-conducting gravimeters. Gravity changes caused by high-magnitude earthquakes have been detected with the satellite gravity experiment GRACE, and we expect high-frequency terrestrial gravity fluctuations produced by ambient seismic fields to limit the sensitivity of ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors. Accordingly, terrestrial gravity fluctuations are considered noise and signal depending on the experiment. Here, we will focus on ground-based gravimetry. This field is rapidly progressing through the development of GW detectors. The technology is pushed to its current limits in the advanced generation of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, targeting gravity strain sensitivities better than 10(-23) Hz(-1/2) above a few tens of a Hz. Alternative designs for GW detectors evolving from traditional gravity gradiometers such as torsion bars, atom interferometers, and superconducting gradiometers are currently being developed to extend the detection band to frequencies below 1 Hz. The goal of this article is to provide the analytical framework to describe terrestrial gravity perturbations in these experiments. Models of terrestrial gravity perturbations related to seismic fields, atmospheric disturbances, and vibrating, rotating or moving objects, are derived and analyzed. The models are then used to evaluate passive and active gravity noise mitigation strategies in GW detectors, or alternatively, to describe their potential use in geophysics. The article reviews the current state of the field, and also presents new analyses especially with respect to the impact of seismic scattering on gravity perturbations, active gravity noise cancellation, and time-domain models of gravity perturbations from atmospheric and seismic point sources. Our understanding of

  9. Surface Gravity Waves: Resonance in a Fish Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinick, Scott J.; Lynch, John J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, an inexpensive 10-gallon glass aquarium was used to study wave motion in water. The waves travel at speeds comparable to a person walking ([approximately]1 m/s). The scale of the motion allows for distances to be measured with a meterstick and for times to be measured with a stopwatch. For a wide range of water depths, standing waves…

  10. A formulation of three-dimensional residual mean flow and wave activity flux applicable to both to Rossby waves and gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, T.; Sato, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Transformed Eulerian-Mean (TEM) equations formulated by Andrews and McIntyre (1976, 1978) has been widely used to examine wave-mean flow interaction in the meridional cross section. Although a lot of efforts have been made to generalize the TEM equations to three dimensions so far, formulae derived by previous studies are applicable to particular waves, mainly Rossby waves on the quasi-geostrophic (QG) equations or inertia-gravity waves on the primitive equations. This study has newly formulated three-dimensional (3D) TEM equations which are applicable to both Rossby waves and gravity waves. The formulae can be used to examine the 3D material transport driven by these waves. Moreover, two kinds of 3D wave activity flux have been derived respectively for describing the wave force to the mean flow and for the wave propagation. The residual mean flow is expressed with the sum of the Eulerian-mean flow and the Stokes drift in the 2D TEM equations. Thus, a formulation is made for the 3D Stokes drift on the primitive equation (PRSD) from its original definition using a small amplitude theory for a slowly-varying mean flow. The PRSD is equivalent to the 3D Stokes drift derived by Kinoshita et al. (2010) for gravity waves for the constant Coriolis parameter and to the 3D QG Stokes drift which is also derived in this study for the small Rossby number limit. The 3D wave activity flux (3D-flux-M), whose divergence corresponds to the wave force, is derived by using PRSD. The 3D residual mean flow associated with synoptic-scale wave disturbances in the upper troposphere in April is investigated by applying the new formulae to ERA-Interim data. It is found that the sum of time-mean unbalanced flow and PRSD is southward in the east end of the storm track although it is northward in the west as is consistent with the 2D residual flow. A case study is also made for dominant gravity waves around the Southern Andes by applying the PRSD and 3D-flux-M to the simulation data of a

  11. A Coupled Atmospheric and Wave Modeling System for Storm Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Bolanos, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at improving the simulation of wind and waves during storms in connection with wind turbine design and operations in coastal areas. For this particular purpose, we investigated the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System which couples the Weather...... Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model with the thirdgeneration ocean wave modelSWAN. This study investigates mainly two issues: spatial resolution and the wind-wave interface parameter roughness length(z0). To study the impact of resolution, the nesting function for both WRF and SWAN is used, with spatial...... resolution ranging from 25km to 2km. Meanwhile, the atmospheric forcing data of dierent spatial resolution, with one about 100km (FNL) and the other about 38km (CFSR) are both used. In addition, bathymatry data of diferent resolutions (1arc-minute and 30arc-seconds) are used. We used three approaches...

  12. Climatology of extratropical atmospheric wave packets in the northern hemisphere

    CERN Document Server

    Grazzini, Federico

    2010-01-01

    Planetary and synoptic scale wave-packets represents one important component of the atmospheric large-scale circulation. These dissipative structures are able to rapidly transport eddy kinetic energy, generated locally (e.g. by baroclinic conversion), downstream along the upper tropospheric flow. The transported energy, moving faster than individual weather systems, will affect the development of the next meteorological system on the leading edge of the wave packet, creating a chain of connections between systems that can be far apart in time and space, with important implications on predictability. In this work we present a different and novel approach to investigate atmospheric variability, based on the objective recognition of planetary and synoptic wave packets. We have developed an objective tracking algorithm which allows to extract relevant statistical properties of the wave trains as a function of their dominant wavelength. We have applied the algorithm to the daily analysis (every 12h) from 1958-2009...

  13. Characteristics of Small-scale Gravity Wave Propagation in the Mesopause Region over Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Kawamura, S.; Murayama, Y.; Kita, K.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated characteristics of the atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) propagation using sodium airglow images obtained by an all-sky imager installed at Poker Flat Research Range (65.1N, 147.4W, MLAT 65.6) in Alaska. In this study, we developed data analysis programs which automatically derive the unambiguous 2-D power spectrum from the sodium airglow images, using a method by Coble et al. (1998). The power spectrums of the AGWs which have horizontal wavelengths between 2 - 400 km and periods up to 8 hours were obtained by these programs. Statistical study of the AGW data and mesospheric wind data by an MF radar during two winter seasons from October 2000 to April 2002 indicates the following characteristics. - During these periods, the AGW dominantly propagated westward in the zonal direction. - The meridional propagation direction frequently changed. This change seems to be explained by filtering effect by the mesospheric wind. - Total power of the AGW increased in December and January. In this paper, we discuss the relationship between these characteristics of the AGW propagation and unique phenomena in high-latitude region such as auroral precipitation. Acknowledgements This work is conducted as a part of "Alaska Project", the cooperative research project between NICT and Geophysical Institute of University of Alaska. Reference Coble, M. R., G. C. Papen, and C. S. Gardner, Computing two-dimensional unambiguous horizontal wavenumber spectra from OH airglow images, IEEE Trans. Geosci. and Remote Sens., 36, 368--382, 1998.

  14. Intercomparisons of HIRDLS, COSMIC and SABER for the detection of stratospheric gravity waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Wright

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Colocated temperature profiles from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC, High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS and the Sounding of the Atmosphere by Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER mission are compared over the years 2006–2007 to assess their relative performances for the detection of stratospheric gravity waves. Two methods are used, one based on a simple comparison of the standard deviations and correlation coefficients of high-pass filtered profiles from each instrument, and the other based on Stockwell transform analyses of the profiles for vertical wavelength and temperature perturbation scales. It is concluded, when allowing for their different vertical resolution capabilites, that the three instruments reproduce each other's results for magnitude and vertical scale of perturbations to within their resolution limits in approximately 50% of cases, but with a positive frequency and temperature bias in the case of COSMIC. This is possibly indicative of a slightly higher vertical resolution being available to the constellation than estimated.

  15. Evidence for Gravity Wave Seeding of Convective Ionosphere Storms Initiated by Deep Troposphere Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, M. C.; Pfaff, R. F., Jr.; Dao, E. V.; Holzworth, R. H., II

    2014-12-01

    With the increase in solar activity, the Communications/Outage Forecast System satellite (C/NOFS) now goes below the F peak. As such, we now can study the development of Convective Ionospheric Storms (CIS) and, most importantly, large-scale seeding of the low growth-rate Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability. Two mechanisms have been suggested for such seeding: the Collisional Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability (CKHI) and internal atmospheric gravity waves. A number of observations have shown that the spectrum of fully developed topside structures peaks at 600 km and extends to over 1000 km. These structures are exceedingly difficult to explain by CKHI. Here we show that sinusoidal plasma oscillations on the bottomside during daytime develop classical R-T structures on the nightside with the background 600 km structure still apparent. In two case studies, thunderstorm activity was observed east of the sinusoidal features in the two hours preceding the C/NOFS passes. Thus, we argue that convective tropospheric storms are a likely source of these sinusoidal features.

  16. The instability of counter-propagating kernel gravity waves in a constant shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Umurhan, O M; Harnik, N; Lott, F

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism describing the recently developed notion of kernel gravity waves (KGWs) is reviewed and such structures are employed to interpret the unstable dynamics of an example stratified plane parallel shear flow. This flow has constant vertical shear, is infinite in the vertical extent, and characterized by two density jumps of equal magnitude each decreasing successively with height, in which the jumps are located symmetrically away from the midplane of the system. We find that for a suitably defined bulk-Richardson number there exists a band of horizontal wavenumbers which exhibits normal-mode instability. The instability mechanism closely parallels the mechanism responsible for the instability seen in the problem of counter-propagating Rossby waves. In this problem the instability arises out of the interaction of counter-propagating gravity waves. We argue that the instability meets the Hayashi-Young criterion for wave instability. We also argue that the instability is the simplest one that can arise ...

  17. Numerical simulation of the capillary-gravity waves excited by an obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanazaki, Hideshi; Inomata, Ryosuke

    2016-11-01

    Capillary gravity waves excited by an obstacle are investigated by the unsteady numerical solution of the Euler equations. It is well known that the large-amplitude upstream advancing solitary waves are generated periodically under the resonant condition of Fr =1 (Fr: Froude number), i.e., when the phase velocity of the long surface waves agrees with the mean flow speed. With capillary effects (Bo>0), short waves are newly generated by the upstream solitary waves of large amplitude. In this study it is investigated how the characteristics of the solitary waves and the short waves, especially their amplitudes, change due to the variation of the obstacle height and the Froude number. The results will be compared also with the solutions of the forced KdV-type equations.

  18. Numerical modeling study of the momentum deposition of small amplitude gravity waves in the thermosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the momentum deposition in the thermosphere from the dissipation of small amplitude gravity waves (GWs within a wave packet using a fully nonlinear two-dimensional compressible numerical model. The model solves the nonlinear propagation and dissipation of a GW packet from the stratosphere into the thermosphere with realistic molecular viscosity and thermal diffusivity for various Prandtl numbers. The numerical simulations are performed for GW packets with initial vertical wavelengths (λz ranging from 5 to 50 km. We show that λz decreases in time as a GW packet dissipates in the thermosphere, in agreement with the ray trace results of Vadas and Fritts (2005 (VF05. We also find good agreement for the peak height of the momentum flux (zdiss between our simulations and VF05 for GWs with initial λz ≤ 2π H in an isothermal, windless background, where H is the density scale height. We also confirm that zdiss increases with increasing Prandtl number. We include eddy diffusion in the model, and find that the momentum deposition occurs at lower altitudes and has two separate peaks for GW packets with small initial λz. We also simulate GW packets in a non-isothermal atmosphere. The net λz profile is a competition between its decrease from viscosity and its increase from the increasing background temperature. We find that the wave packet disperses more in the non-isothermal atmosphere, and causes changes to the momentum flux and λz spectra at both early and late times for GW packets with initial λz ≥ 10 km. These effects are caused by the increase in T in the thermosphere, and the decrease in T near the mesopause.

  19. Imaging gravity waves in lower stratospheric AMSU-A radiances, Part 1: Simple forward model

    OpenAIRE

    S. D. Eckermann; Wu, D. L.

    2006-01-01

    Using a simplified model of in-orbit radiance acquisition by the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A), we derive three-dimensional temperature weighting functions for Channel 9 measurements (peaking at ~60–90 hPa) at all 30 cross-track beam positions and use them to investigate the sensitivity of these radiances to gravity waves. The vertical widths of the weighting functions limit detection to waves with vertical wavelengths of ≳10 km, with slightly better vertical waveleng...

  20. Gravitational waves during inflation from a 5D large-scale repulsive gravity model

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes, Luz Marina; Aguilar, José Edgar Madriz; Bellini, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    We investigate, in the transverse traceless (TT) gauge, the generation of the relic background of gravitational waves, generated during an early inflationary stage, on the framework of a large-scale repulsive gravity model. We calculate the spectrum of the tensor metric fluctuations of an effective 4D Schwarzschild-de-Sitter metric, which is obtained after implementing a planar coordinate transformation on a 5D Ricci-flat metric solution, in the context of a non-compact Kaluza-Klein theory of gravity. We found that the spectrum is nearly scale invariant under certain conditions. One interesting aspect of this model is that is possible to derive dynamical field equations for the tensor metric fluctuations, valid not just at cosmological scales, but also at astrophysical scales, from the same theoretical model. The astrophysical and cosmological scales are determined by the gravity- antigravity radius, which is a natural length scale of the model, that indicates when gravity becomes repulsive in nature.

  1. New approach of gravity wave detection in mesopause temperatures operating an array of airglow spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Paul; Schmidt, Carsten; Wüst, Sabine; Bittner, Michael

    2014-05-01

    GRIPS (Ground based Infrared P-branch Spectrometer) airglow measurements allow the derivation of kinetic temperature in the mesopause region averaged over a field of view of some 10km x 10km. In 2011, three identical GRIPS instruments were setup at Oberpfaffenhofen (11.28°E, 48.09°N), Germany, in a way that their fields of view form an equilateral triangle shape in the mesopause with a horizontal dimension of approximately 70km. Using this setup, GRIPS time series cannot only be analyzed with respect to gravity wave periods, but also spatial wave parameters can be derived. Based on the results of the harmonic analysis the horizontal wavelength, phase speed and the direction of propagation were determined for gravity wave events from February to July 2011. We present distinct relationships between periods, amplitudes, phase speeds and wavelengths, which were identified in this dataset. Further data analysis of the derived wave parameters show preferred directions of propagation and suggest seasonal variations of the wave characteristics. The presentation will be concluded by the introduction of a measurement setup relying on one GRIPS instrument which is equipped with a variably adjustable mirror optic. The capability to scan multiple fields of view during nightly measurements will offer longer-term investigations of mesopause gravity waves.

  2. Characterizing the propagation of gravity waves in 3D nonlinear simulations of solar-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Alvan, L; Brun, A S; Mathis, S; Garcia, R A

    2015-01-01

    The revolution of helio- and asteroseismology provides access to the detailed properties of stellar interiors by studying the star's oscillation modes. Among them, gravity (g) modes are formed by constructive interferences between progressive internal gravity waves (IGWs), propagating in stellar radiative zones. Our new 3D nonlinear simulations of the interior of a solar-like star allows us to study the excitation, propagation, and dissipation of these waves. The aim of this article is to clarify our understanding of the behavior of IGWs in a 3D radiative zone and to provide a clear overview of their properties. We use a method of frequency filtering that reveals the path of {individual} gravity waves of different frequencies in the radiative zone. We are able to identify the region of propagation of different waves in 2D and 3D, to compare them to the linear raytracing theory and to distinguish between propagative and standing waves (g modes). We also show that the energy carried by waves is distributed in d...

  3. Cosmic Tsunamis in Modified Gravity: Disruption of Screening Mechanisms from Scalar Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagala, R.; Llinares, C.; Mota, D. F.

    2017-03-01

    Extending general relativity by adding extra degrees of freedom is a popular approach for explaining the accelerated expansion of the Universe and to build high energy completions of the theory of gravity. The presence of such new degrees of freedom is, however, tightly constrained from several observations and experiments that aim to test general relativity in a wide range of scales. The viability of a given modified theory of gravity, therefore, strongly depends on the existence of a screening mechanism that suppresses the extra degrees of freedom. We perform simulations, and find that waves propagating in the new degrees of freedom can significantly impact the efficiency of some screening mechanisms, thereby threatening the viability of these modified gravity theories. Specifically, we show that the waves produced in the symmetron model can increase the amplitude of the fifth force and the parametrized post Newtonian parameters by several orders of magnitude.

  4. Scalar Gravitational Waves in the Effective Theory of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Mottola, Emil

    2016-01-01

    As a low energy effective field theory, classical General Relativity receives an infrared relevant modification from the conformal trace anomaly of the energy-momentum tensor of massless, or nearly massless, quantum fields. The local form of the effective action associated with the trace anomaly is expressed in terms of a dynamical scalar field that couples to the conformal factor of the spacetime metric, allowing it to propagate over macroscopic distances. Linearized around flat spacetime, this semi-classical EFT admits scalar gravitational wave solutions in addition to the transversely polarized tensor waves of the classical Einstein theory. The amplitude, Hamiltonian, energy flux, and quantization of the scalar wave modes are discussed. Astrophysical sources for scalar gravitational waves are considered, with the excited gluonic condensates in the interiors of neutron stars in merger events with other compact objects likely to provide the strongest burst signals.

  5. Improvement of stratospheric balloon positioning and the impact on Antarctic gravity wave parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Haase, J. S.; Hertzog, A.; Lou, Y.; Vincent, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) play an important role in transferring energy and momentum from the troposphere to the middle atmosphere. However, shorter period GWs are generally not explicitly resolved in general circulation models but need to be parameterized instead. Super pressure balloons, which float on the isopycnal surfaces, provide a direct access to measure GW characteristics as a function of wave intrinsic frequency that are needed for these parameterizations. The 30 s sampling rate of the GPS receivers carried on the balloons deployed in 2010 Concordiasi campaign in the Antarctic region is much higher compared to the previous campaigns and can cover the full range of the GW spectrum. Two among 19 balloons in the Concordiasi campaign are also equipped with the high-accuracy dual-frequency GPS receivers initially developed for GPS radio occultation research in addition to the regular single-frequency receivers, which enables us to expect a better accuracy of balloon positions for the purpose of GW momentum flux estimates. The positions are estimated using the Precise Point Positioning with Ambiguity Resolution (PPPAR) method based on the GPS data. Improvements of the positions are significant, from ~3-10 m to ~0.1-0.2 m in 3-D positions, which makes it possible to resolve the Eulerian pressure independently of height for the estimation of the intrinsic phase speed. The impacts of the position improvements on the final GW parameters (momentum flux and intrinsic phase speed) retrievals are highlighted, with ~0.54 mPa difference of the mean absolute momentum flux in Antarctic region and considerable difference in the distribution of the intrinsic phase speed.

  6. A case study of gravity waves-convective storms interaction 9 May 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stobie, J. G.; Einaudi, F.; Uccellini, L. W.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis is presented of a series of severe storms which occurred in the north central United States on 9 May 1979 and whose spatial distribution and movement correlate well with observed gravity waves. Two gravity wave trains of 2.1-3 mb amplitude, 2.5-3.3 h period and 240-265 km horizontal wavelength were isolated through power spectra analysis and cross-correlation techniques applied to National Weather Service barograph traces. The wave trains propagated in the 200 deg direction, which coincided with the jet axis, with a phase velocity of 20-30 m/s and within a 300 km wide band. The storms were identified on enhanced infrared GOES satellite pictures with the help of radar summaries. These convective systems initially developed in Nebraska and propagated north-northeast at 25 m/s, revealing wave-like characteristics with a separation of 300-400 km. The convective systems were closely linked to the observed wave trains with cell intensity, height and associated rainfall maximized at the wave ridge. One of the two wave trains developed in regions of weak or no convection and appeared to initiate more intense convective clusters downstream from the point of origin. It is shown that the characteristics of the wave trains are consistent with those of gravity waves generated in a region of strong vertical shear associated with the jet. It is suggested that the wave trains continue to extract energy from the basic state all along their track through critical level interaction.

  7. A statistical study of variations of internal gravity wave energy characteristics in meteor zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, N. M.; Kalov, E. D.

    1987-01-01

    Internal gravity wave (IGW) parameters obtained by the radiometer method have been considered by many other researchers. The results of the processing of regular radiometeor measurements taken during 1979 to 1980 in Obninsk (55.1 deg N, 36.6 deg E) are presented.

  8. On the time varying horizontal water velocity of single, multiple, and random gravity wave trains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, D.R.

    1964-01-01

    In this dissertation some characteristics of the horizontal water velocity for single, multiple, and random gravity wave trains are studied. This work consists of two parts, an analogue study and hydraulic measurements. An important aspect in this work is to suggest the horizontal water velocity asy

  9. A null coframe formulation of quadratic curvature gravity and gravitational wave solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Baykal, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Quadratic curvature gravity equations are projected to a complex null coframe by using the algebra of exterior forms and expressed in terms of the spinor quantities defined originally by Newman and Penrose. As an application, a new family of impulsive gravitational wave solutions propagating in various type D backgrounds are introduced.

  10. Capillary Gravity Waves over an Obstruction - Forced Generalized KdV equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeongwhan; Whang, S. I.; Sun, Shu-Ming

    2013-11-01

    Capillary gravity surface waves of an ideal fluid flow over an obstruction is considered. When the Bond number is near the critical value 1/3, a forced generalized KdV equation of fifth order is derived. We study the equation analytically and numerically. Existence and stability of solutions are studied and new types of numerical solutions are found.

  11. Computation of 3D steady Navier-Stokes flow with free-surface gravity waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, M.R.; Koren, B.; Raven, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper an iterative method for the computation of stationary gravity-wave solutions is investigated, using a novel formulation of the free-surface (FS) boundary-value problem. This method requires the solution of a sequence of stationary Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes subproblems employing t

  12. Computation of 3D Steady Navier-Stokes Flow with Free-Surface Gravity Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, M.R.; Koren, B.; Raven, H.C.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper an iterative method for the computation of stationary gravity-wave solutions is investigated, using a novel formulation of the free-surface (FS) boundary-value problem. This method requires the solution of a sequence of stationary Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes subproblems employing t

  13. Propagation of High Frequency Waves in the Quiet Solar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Andić, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20mHz) have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analysed here. Image sequences are taken using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analyzed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis is performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observe the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10mHz to 13mHz. We also observe propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in regions where magnetic structures are present.

  14. Propagation of High Frequency Waves in the Quiet Solar Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andić, A.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20 mHz have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting for partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analysed here. Image sequences were taken by using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT, Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analysed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis was performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observed the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10 mHz to 13 mHz. We also observed propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in the regions where magnetic structures are present.

  15. Coupling Atmosphere and Waves for Coastal Wind Turbine Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolanos, Rodolfo; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Petersen, Ole S.;

    2014-01-01

    model (MIKE 21 SW) are implemented for the North Sea in order to consider wave effects on roughness. The objective is to see the reaction of an atmospheric model to the water surface description through offline coupling. A comparison with three simplified roughness formulations embedded in WRF showed...

  16. Nonlinear Aspects of Internal Waves in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-20

    ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER University of New Hampshire Kingsbury Hall Durham, NH 03824 9. SPONSORING...of internal waves in the atmosphere John P. McHugh Department of Mechanical Engineering University of New Hampshire Durham, NH 03824 (603) 862-1899...Sciences, 44, pp. 1404- 1410 , 1987. [27] Solomonoff, A. and Turkel, E.: Global collocation methods for approx- imation and the solution of partial

  17. Near-Inertial Internal Gravity Waves in the Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Matthew H; MacKinnon, Jennifer A; Simmons, Harper L; Nash, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    We review the physics of near-inertial waves (NIWs) in the ocean and the observations, theory, and models that have provided our present knowledge. NIWs appear nearly everywhere in the ocean as a spectral peak at and just above the local inertial period f, and the longest vertical wavelengths can propagate at least hundreds of kilometers toward the equator from their source regions; shorter vertical wavelengths do not travel as far and do not contain as much energy, but lead to turbulent mixing owing to their high shear. NIWs are generated by a variety of mechanisms, including the wind, nonlinear interactions with waves of other frequencies, lee waves over bottom topography, and geostrophic adjustment; the partition among these is not known, although the wind is likely the most important. NIWs likely interact strongly with mesoscale and submesoscale motions, in ways that are just beginning to be understood.

  18. Statistical characteristics of gravity wave activities observed by an OH airglow imager at Xinglong, in northern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Li

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available An all-sky airglow imager (ASAI was installed at Xinglong, in northern China (40.2° N, 117.4° E in November 2009 to study the morphology of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT region. Using one year of OH airglow imager data from December 2009 to November 2010, the characteristics of short-period AGWs are investigated and a yearlong AGW climatology in northern China is first ever reported. AGW occurrence frequency in summer and winter is higher than that in equinoctial months. Observed bands mainly have horizontal wavelengths from 10 to 35 km, observed periods from 4 to 14 min and observed horizontal phase speeds in the range of 30 to 60 m s−1. Most of the bands propagate in the meridional direction. The propagation directions of the bands show a strong southwestward preference in winter, while almost all bands propagate northeastward in summer. Although the wind filtering in the middle atmosphere may control AGW propagations in the zonal direction, the non-uniform distribution of wave sources in the lower atmosphere may contribute to the anisotropy in the meridional direction in different seasons. Additionally, as an indication of local instability, the characteristics of ripples are also analyzed. It also shows seasonal variations, occurring more often in summer and winter and mainly moving westward in summer and eastward in winter.

  19. Cosmological Gravitational Wave in a Gravity with Quadratic Order Curvature Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Noh, H

    1996-01-01

    We present a set of equations describing the cosmological gravitational wave in a gravity theory with quadratic order gravitational coupling terms which naturally arise in quantum correction procedures. It is known that the gravitational wave equation in the gravity theories with a general $f(R)$ term in the action leads to a second order differential equation with the only correction factor appearing in the damping term. The case for a $R^{ab} R_{ab}$ term is completely different. The gravitational wave is described by a fourth order differential equation both in time and space. However, curiously, we find that the contributions to the background evolution are qualitatively the same for both terms.

  20. Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gamow, George

    2003-01-01

    A distinguished physicist and teacher, George Gamow also possessed a special gift for making the intricacies of science accessible to a wide audience. In Gravity, he takes an enlightening look at three of the towering figures of science who unlocked many of the mysteries behind the laws of physics: Galileo, the first to take a close look at the process of free and restricted fall; Newton, originator of the concept of gravity as a universal force; and Einstein, who proposed that gravity is no more than the curvature of the four-dimensional space-time continuum.Graced with the author's own draw

  1. Local Dynamics of Baroclinic Waves in the Martian Atmosphere

    KAUST Repository

    Kavulich, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    The paper investigates the processes that drive the spatiotemporal evolution of baroclinic transient waves in the Martian atmosphere by a simulation experiment with the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Mars general circulation model (GCM). The main diagnostic tool of the study is the (local) eddy kinetic energy equation. Results are shown for a prewinter season of the Northern Hemisphere, in which a deep baroclinic wave of zonal wavenumber 2 circles the planet at an eastward phase speed of about 70° Sol-1 (Sol is a Martian day). The regular structure of the wave gives the impression that the classical models of baroclinic instability, which describe the underlying process by a temporally unstable global wave (e.g., Eady model and Charney model), may have a direct relevance for the description of the Martian baroclinic waves. The results of the diagnostic calculations show, however, that while the Martian waves remain zonally global features at all times, there are large spatiotemporal changes in their amplitude. The most intense episodes of baroclinic energy conversion, which take place in the two great plain regions (Acidalia Planitia and Utopia Planitia), are strongly localized in both space and time. In addition, similar to the situation for terrestrial baroclinic waves, geopotential flux convergence plays an important role in the dynamics of the downstream-propagating unstable waves. © 2013 American Meteorological Society.

  2. Statistical analysis of thermospheric gravity waves from Fabry-Perot Interferometer measurements of atomic oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. K. Ford

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Data from the Fabry-Perot Interferometers at KEOPS (Sweden, Sodankylä (Finland, and Svalbard (Norway, have been analysed for gravity wave activity on all the clear nights from 2000 to 2006. A total of 249 nights were available from KEOPS, 133 from Sodankylä and 185 from the Svalbard FPI. A Lomb-Scargle analysis was performed on each of these nights to identify the periods of any wave activity during the night. Comparisons between many nights of data allow the general characteristics of the waves that are present in the high latitude upper thermosphere to be determined. Comparisons were made between the different parameters: the atomic oxygen intensities, the thermospheric winds and temperatures, and for each parameter the distribution of frequencies of the waves was determined. No dependence on the number of waves on geomagnetic activity levels, or position in the solar cycle, was found. All the FPIs have had different detectors at various times, producing different time resolutions of the data, so comparisons between the different years, and between data from different sites, showed how the time resolution determines which waves are observed. In addition to the cutoff due to the Nyquist frequency, poor resolution observations significantly reduce the number of short-period waves (<1 h period that may be detected with confidence. The length of the dataset, which is usually determined by the length of the night, was the main factor influencing the number of long period waves (>5 h detected. Comparisons between the number of gravity waves detected at KEOPS and Sodankylä over all the seasons showed a similar proportion of waves to the number of nights used for both sites, as expected since the two sites are at similar latitudes and therefore locations with respect to the auroral oval, confirming this as a likely source region. Svalbard showed fewer waves with short periods than KEOPS data for a season when both had the same time resolution data

  3. Propagation and Breaking at High Altitudes of Gravity Waves Excited by Tropospheric Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.; Garcia, Rolando R.

    1996-01-01

    An anelastic approximation is used with a time-variable coordinate transformation to formulate a two-dimensional numerical model that describes the evolution of gravity waves. The model is solved using a semi-Lagrangian method with monotone (nonoscillatory) interpolation of all advected fields. The time-variable transformation is used to generate disturbances at the lower boundary that approximate the effect of a traveling line of thunderstorms (a squall line) or of flow over a broad topographic obstacle. The vertical propagation and breaking of the gravity wave field (under conditions typical of summer solstice) is illustrated for each of these cases. It is shown that the wave field at high altitudes is dominated by a single horizontal wavelength; which is not always related simply to the horizontal dimension of the source. The morphology of wave breaking depends on the horizontal wavelength; for sufficiently short waves, breaking involves roughly one half of the wavelength. In common with other studies, it is found that the breaking waves undergo "self-acceleration," such that the zonal-mean intrinsic frequency remains approximately constant in spite of large changes in the background wind. It is also shown that many of the features obtained in the calculations can be understood in terms of linear wave theory. In particular, linear theory provides insights into the wavelength of the waves that break at high altitudes, the onset and evolution of breaking. the horizontal extent of the breaking region and its position relative to the forcing, and the minimum and maximum altitudes where breaking occurs. Wave breaking ceases at the altitude where the background dissipation rate (which in our model is a proxy for molecular diffusion) becomes greater than the rate of dissipation due to wave breaking, This altitude, in effect, the model turbopause, is shown to depend on a relatively small number of parameters that characterize the waves and the background state.

  4. Investigating the Dominant Source for the Generation of Gravity Waves during Indian Summer Monsoon Using Ground-based Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debashis NATH; CHEN Wen

    2013-01-01

    Over the tropics,convection,wind shear (i.e.,vertical and horizontal shear of wind and/or geostrophic adjustment comprising spontaneous imbalance in jet streams) and topography are the major sources for the generation of gravity waves.During the summer monsoon season (June-August) over the Indian subcontinent,convection and wind shear coexist.To determine the dominant source of gravity waves during monsoon season,an experiment was conducted using mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar situated at Gadanki (13.5°N,79.2°E),a tropical observatory in the southern part of the Indian subcontinent.MST radar was operated continuously for 72 h to capture high-frequency gravity waves.During this time,a radiosonde was released every 6 h in addition to the regular launch (once daily to study low-frequency gravity waves) throughout the season.These two data sets were utilized effectively to characterize the jet stream and the associated gravity waves.Data available from collocated instruments along with satellite-based brightness temperature (TBB) data were utilized to characterize the convection in and around Gadanki,Despite the presence of two major sources of gravity wave generation (i.e.,convection and wind shear) during the monsoon season,wind shear (both vertical shear and geostrophic adjustment) contributed the most to the generation of gravity waves on various scales.

  5. Multi-instrument gravity-wave measurements over Tierra del Fuego and the Drake Passage - Part 1: Potential energies and vertical wavelengths from AIRS, COSMIC, HIRDLS, MLS-Aura, SAAMER, SABER and radiosondes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C. J.; Hindley, N. P.; Moss, A. C.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2015-07-01

    Gravity waves in the terrestrial atmosphere are a vital geophysical process, acting to transport energy and momentum on a wide range of scales and to couple the various atmospheric layers. Despite the importance of these waves, the many studies to date have often exhibited very dissimilar results, and it remains unclear whether these differences are primarily instrumental or methodological. Here, we address this problem by comparing observations made by a diverse range of the most widely-used gravity wave resolving instruments in a common geographic region around the southern Andes and Drake Passage, an area known to exhibit strong wave activity. Specifically, we use data from three limb-sounding radiometers (MLS-Aura, HIRDLS and SABER), the COSMIC GPS-RO constellation, a ground-based meteor radar, the AIRS infrared nadir sounder and radiosondes to examine the gravity wave potential energy (GWPE) and vertical wavelengths (λz) of individual gravity wave packets from the lower troposphere to the edge of the lower thermosphere. Our results show important similarities and differences. Limb sounder measurements show high intercorrelation, typically > 0.80 between any instrument pair. Meteor-radar observations agree in form with the limb sounders, despite vast technical differences. AIRS and radiosonde observations tend to be uncorrelated or anticorrelated with the other datasets, suggesting very different behaviour of the wave field in the different spectral regimes accessed by each instrument. Except in spring, we see little dissipation of GWPE throughout the stratosphere and lower mesosphere. Observed GWPE for individual wave packets exhibits a log-normal distribution, with short-timescale intermittency dominating over a well-repeated monthly-median seasonal cycle. GWPE and λz exhibit strong correlations with the stratospheric winds, but not with local surface winds. Our results provide guidance for interpretation and intercomparison of such datasets in their full

  6. Multi-instrument gravity-wave measurements over Tierra del Fuego and the Drake Passage – Part 1: Potential energies and vertical wavelengths from AIRS, COSMIC, HIRDLS, MLS-Aura, SAAMER, SABER and radiosondes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Wright

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves in the terrestrial atmosphere are a vital geophysical process, acting to transport energy and momentum on a wide range of scales and to couple the various atmospheric layers. Despite the importance of these waves, the many studies to date have often exhibited very dissimilar results, and it remains unclear whether these differences are primarily instrumental or methodological. Here, we address this problem by comparing observations made by a diverse range of the most widely-used gravity wave resolving instruments in a common geographic region around the southern Andes and Drake Passage, an area known to exhibit strong wave activity. Specifically, we use data from three limb-sounding radiometers (MLS-Aura, HIRDLS and SABER, the COSMIC GPS-RO constellation, a ground-based meteor radar, the AIRS infrared nadir sounder and radiosondes to examine the gravity wave potential energy (GWPE and vertical wavelengths (λz of individual gravity wave packets from the lower troposphere to the edge of the lower thermosphere. Our results show important similarities and differences. Limb sounder measurements show high intercorrelation, typically > 0.80 between any instrument pair. Meteor-radar observations agree in form with the limb sounders, despite vast technical differences. AIRS and radiosonde observations tend to be uncorrelated or anticorrelated with the other datasets, suggesting very different behaviour of the wave field in the different spectral regimes accessed by each instrument. Except in spring, we see little dissipation of GWPE throughout the stratosphere and lower mesosphere. Observed GWPE for individual wave packets exhibits a log-normal distribution, with short-timescale intermittency dominating over a well-repeated monthly-median seasonal cycle. GWPE and λz exhibit strong correlations with the stratospheric winds, but not with local surface winds. Our results provide guidance for interpretation and intercomparison of such

  7. Wavemaker theories for acoustic-gravity waves over a finite depth

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves (hereafter AGWs) in ocean have received much interest recently, mainly with respect to early detection of tsunamis as they travel at near the speed of sound in water which makes them ideal candidates for early detection of tsunamis. While the generation mechanisms of AGWs have been studied from the perspective of vertical oscillations of seafloor and triad wave-wave interaction, in the current study we are interested in their generation by wave-structure interaction with possible implication to the energy sector. Here, we develop two wavemaker theories to analyze different wave modes generated by impermeable (the classic Havelock's theory) and porous (porous wavemaker theory) plates in weakly compressible fluids. Slight modification has been made to the porous theory so that, unlike the previous theory, the new solution depends on the geometry of the plate. The expressions for three different types of plates (piston, flap, delta-function) are introduced. Analytical solutions are also de...

  8. Observation of mesospheric gravity waves at Comandante Ferraz Antarctica Station (62° S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Souza

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An airglow all-sky imager was operated at Comandante Ferraz Antarctica Station (62.1° S, 58.4° W, between April and October of 2007. Mesospheric gravity waves were observed using the OH airglow layer during 43 nights with good weather conditions. The waves presented horizontal wavelengths between 10 and 60 km and observed periods mainly distributed between 5 and 20 min. The observed phase speeds range between 5 m/s and 115 m/s; the majority of the wave velocities were between 10 and 60 m/s. The waves showed a preferential propagation direction towards the southwest in winter (May to July, while during spring (August to October there was an anisotropy with a preferential propagation direction towards the northwest. Unusual mesospheric fronts were also observed. The most probable wave source could be associated to orographic forcing, cold fronts or strong cyclonic activity in the Antarctica Peninsula.

  9. Effect of small floating disks on the propagation of gravity waves

    CERN Document Server

    De Santi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    A dispersion relation for gravity waves in water covered by disk-like impurities floating in a viscous matrix is derived. The macroscopic equations are obtained ensemble-averaging the fluid equations at the disk scale in the asymptotic limit of long waves and low disk surface fraction. Various regimes have been identified depending on the disk radii and the thickness and viscosity of the top layer. Semi-quantitative analysis in the close-packing regime suggests dramatic modification of the dynamics, with order of magnitude increase in wave damping and wave dispersion. Possible relevance of the results to wave propagation in ice-covered ocean is discussed, and comparison with field data is provided.

  10. Atmospheric Refractive Electromagnetic Wave Bending and Propagation Delay

    CERN Document Server

    Mangum, Jeffrey G

    2014-01-01

    In this tutorial we summarize the physics and mathematics behind refractive electromagnetic wave bending and delay. Refractive bending and delay through the Earth's atmosphere at both radio/millimetric and optical/IR wavelengths are discussed, but with most emphasis on the former, and with Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) applications in mind. As modern astronomical measurements often require sub-arcsecond position accuracy, care is required when selecting refractive bending and delay algorithms. For the spherically-uniform model atmospheres generally used for all refractive bending and delay algorithms, positional accuracies $\\lesssim 1^{\\prime\\prime}$ are achievable when observing at zenith angles $\\lesssim 75^\\circ$. A number of computationally economical approximate methods for atmospheric refractive bending and delay calculation are presented, appropriate for astronomical observations under these conditions. For observations under more realistic atmospheric conditions, for zenith angles $\\gtrsim 75^...

  11. Zero-Gravity Atmospheric Cloud Physics Experiment Laboratory engineering concepts/design tradeoffs. Volume 1: Study results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, R. V.; Eaton, L. R.; Wilkinson, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    The work is summarized which was accomplished from January 1974 to October 1974 for the Zero-Gravity Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory. The definition and development of an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory and the selection and delineation of candidate experiments that require the unique environment of zero gravity or near zero gravity are reported. The experiment program and the laboratory concept for a Spacelab payload to perform cloud microphysics research are defined. This multimission laboratory is planned to be available to the entire scientific community to utilize in furthering the basic understanding of cloud microphysical processes and phenomenon, thereby contributing to improved weather prediction and ultimately to provide beneficial weather control and modification.

  12. Frequencies of gravity-capillary waves on highly curved interfaces with edge constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, P. N.

    2007-06-01

    A recently developed technique to calculate the natural frequencies of gravity-capillary waves in a confined liquid mass with a possibly highly curved free surface is extended to the case where the contact line is pinned. The general technique is worked out in detail for the cases of rectangular and cylindrical containers of circular section, the cases for which experimental data are available. The results of the present method are in excellent agreement with all earlier experimental and theoretical data for the flat static interface case [Benjamin and Scott, 1979. Gravity-capillary waves with edge constraints. J. Fluid Mech. 92, 241-267; Graham-Eagle, 1983. A new method for calculating eigenvalues with applications to gravity-capillary waves with edge constraints. Math. Proc. Camb. Phil. Soc. 94, 553-564; Henderson and Miles, 1994. Surface-wave damping in a circular cylinder with a fixed contact line. J. Fluid Mech. 275, 285-299]. However, the present method is applicable even when the contact angle is not π/2 and the static interface is curved. As a consequence we are able to work out the effects of a curved meniscus on the results of Cocciaro et al. [1993. Experimental investigation of capillary effects on surface gravity waves: non-wetting boundary conditions. J. Fluid Mech. 246, 43-66] where the measured contact angle was 62∘. We find that the meniscus does indeed account, as suggested by Cocciaro et al., for the earlier discrepancy between theory and experiment of about 20 mHz and there is now excellent agreement between the two.

  13. Gravity Waves From Non-Minimal Quadratic Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Pallis, Constantinos

    2015-01-01

    We discuss non-minimal quadratic inflation in supersymmetric (SUSY) and non-SUSY models which entails a linear coupling of the inflaton to gravity. Imposing a lower bound on the parameter cR, involved in the coupling between the inflaton and the Ricci scalar curvature, inflation can be attained even for subplanckian values of the inflaton while the corresponding effective theory respects the perturbative unitarity up to the Planck scale. Working in the non-SUSY context we also consider radiative corrections to the inflationary potential due to a possible coupling of the inflaton to bosons or fermions. We find ranges of the parameters, depending mildly on the renormalization scale, with adjustable values of the spectral index ns, tensor-to-scalar ratio r=(2-4)x10^-3, and an inflaton mass close to 3x10^13 GeV. In the SUSY framework we employ two gauge singlet chiral superfields, a logarithmic Kahler potential including all the allowed terms up to fourth order in powers of the various fields, and determine uniqu...

  14. Scintillation index of optical wave propagating in turbulent atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rao Rui-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    A concise expression of the scintillation index is proposed for a plane optical wave and a spherical optical wave both propagating in a turbulent atmosphere with a zero inner scale and a finite inner scale under an arbitrary fluc- tuation condition. The expression is based on both the results in the Rytov approximation under a weak fluctuation condition and the numerical results in a strong fluctuation regime. The maximum value of the scintillation index and its corresponding Rytov index axe evaluated. These quantities are affected by the ratio of the turbulence inner scale to the Frcsnel size.

  15. Kludge modified gravity inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms: Testing gravitational-wave tests of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Samajdar, Anuradha; Ajith, Parameswaran; Del Pozzo, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We describe a variety of self-consistent modifications of the effective-one-body framework that yield kludge modified gravity inspiral-merger-ringdown (IMR) waveforms. These waveforms do not correspond to any particular modified theory of gravity, but offer parametrized deviations from general relativity in various regimes. They can thus be used to test the performance of various gravitational wave tests of general relativity (GR). As an example, we introduce the IMR consistency test, which tests for consistency between the estimations of the final mass and spin from the inspiral and merger-ringdown portions of a binary black hole waveform. We show that for reasonable source parameters and SNRs in Advanced LIGO, this test is able to detect a deviation from GR with high confidence for certain modifications of the GR energy flux that are not constrained by observations of the double pulsar. We also consider the performance of a parameterized test of GR on these kludge modified gravity waveforms.

  16. Stratospheric gravity wave activities inferred through the GPS radio occultation technique; Ondas de gravidade na estratosfera terrestre inferida atraves da tecnica de radio ocultacao de GPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrasse, Cristiano Max [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IPeD), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Takahashi, Hisao; Fechine, Joaquim; Denardini, Clezio Marcos [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Wickert, Jens, E-mail: cmw@univap.br, E-mail: hisaotak@laser.inpe.br, E-mail: joaquim@laser.inpe.br, E-mail: denardin@dae.inpe.br, E-mail: jens.wickert@gfz-potsdam.de [GeoForschungsZentrum, Potsdam (GFZ), Department of Geodesy and Remote Sensing (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Stratospheric gravity wave activities were deduced from GPS radio occultation temperature profiles obtained by CHAMP satellite between 2001 and 2005. Potential energy profiles are used to analyze the gravity wave activity over South America. The results showed an inter-annual variation of the potential energy integrated between 24 and 34 km of altitude. The gravity wave activity is more concentrated around the equatorial region. In order to evaluate the seasonal variation of the gravity wave activity, a mean potential energy was determined over (10 deg N-10 deg S) and (100 deg W-20 deg W). The results showed a lower gravity wave activity during winter time, while during spring time the mean potential energy showed an increase in the wave activity. The results of the mean potential energy also showed that the gravity wave activity in the lower stratosphere exhibits a higher wave activity during 2002 and 2004 and a lower wave activity during 2003 and 2005. (author)

  17. Imaging gravity waves in lower stratospheric AMSU-A radiances, Part 1: Simple forward model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Eckermann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a simplified model of in-orbit radiance acquisition by the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A, we derive three-dimensional temperature weighting functions for Channel 9 measurements (peaking at ~60–90 hPa at all 30 cross-track beam positions and use them to investigate the sensitivity of these radiances to gravity waves. The vertical widths of the weighting functions limit detection to waves with vertical wavelengths of ≳10 km, with slightly better vertical wavelength sensitivity at the outermost scan angles due to the limb effect. Fourier Transforms of two-dimensional cross-track weighting functions reveal optimal sensitivity to cross-track wavelengths at the near-nadir scan angles, where horizontal measurement footprints are smallest. This sensitivity is greater for the AMSU-A on the Aqua satellite than for the identical instruments on the NOAA meteorological satellites, due to a lower orbit altitude and thus smaller horizontal footprints from antenna spreading. Small cross-track asymmetries in the radiance response to gravity waves are found that peak at the mid-range scan angles, with more symmetric responses at near-nadir and far off-nadir scan angles. Three-dimensional simulations show gravity wave oscillations imaged in horizontal AMSU-A radiance maps swept out by the scan pattern and satellite motion. A distorting curvature is added to imaged wave phase lines due to vertical variations in weighting function peaks with cross-track scan angle. This wave distortion is analogous to the well-known "limb darkening" and "limb brightening" of microwave radiances acquired from purely vertical background temperature profiles by cross-track scanners. Waves propagating along track are more visible in these images at the outermost scan angles than those propagating cross track, due to oversampling and narrower widths of the horizontal measurement footprints in the along track direction. Based on nominal noise floors and representative

  18. Impacts of climate changes on ocean surface gravity waves over the eastern Canadian shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lanli; Sheng, Jinyu

    2017-03-01

    A numerical study is conducted to investigate the impact of climate changes on ocean surface gravity waves over the eastern Canadian shelf (ECS). The "business-as-usual" climate scenario known as Representative Concentration Pathway RCP8.5 is considered in this study. Changes in the ocean surface gravity waves over the study region for the period 1979-2100 are examined based on 3 hourly ocean waves simulated by the third-generation ocean wave model known as WAVEWATCHIII. The wave model is driven by surface winds and ice conditions produced by the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CanRCM4). The whole study period is divided into the present (1979-2008), near future (2021-2050) and far future (2071-2100) periods to quantify possible future changes of ocean waves over the ECS. In comparison with the present ocean wave conditions, the time-mean significant wave heights (H s ) are expected to increase over most of the ECS in the near future and decrease over this region in the far future period. The time-means of the annual 5% largest H s are projected to increase over the ECS in both near and far future periods due mainly to the changes in surface winds. The future changes in the time-means of the annual 5% largest H s and 10-m wind speeds are projected to be twice as strong as the changes in annual means. An analysis of inverse wave ages suggests that the occurrence of wind seas is projected to increase over the southern Labrador and central Newfoundland Shelves in the near future period, and occurrence of swells is projected to increase over other areas of the ECS in both the near and far future periods.

  19. Long-Term Observation of Small and Medium-Scale Gravity Waves over the Brazilian Equatorial Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essien, Patrick; Buriti, Ricardo; Wrasse, Cristiano M.; Medeiros, Amauri; Paulino, Igo; Takahashi, Hisao; Campos, Jose Andre

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the long term observations of small and medium-scale gravity waves over Brazilian equatorial region. Coordinated optical and radio measurements were made from OLAP at Sao Joao do Cariri (7.400S, 36.500W) to investigate the occurrences and properties and to characterize the regional mesospheric gravity wave field. All-sky imager measurements were made from the site. for almost 11 consecutive years (September 2000 to November 2010). Most of the waves propagated were characterized as small-scale gravity. The characteristics of the two waves events agreed well with previous gravity wave studies from Brazil and other sites. However, significant differences in the wave propagation headings indicate dissimilar source regions. The observed medium-scale gravity wave events constitute an important new dataset to study their mesospheric properties at equatorial latitudes. These data exhibited similar propagation headings to the short period events, suggesting they originated from the same source regions. It was also observed that some of the medium-scale were capable of propagating into the lower thermosphere where they may have acted directly as seeds for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability development. The wave events were primarily generated by meteorological processes since there was no correlation between the evolution of the wave events and solar cycle F10.7.

  20. Rotating black holes in a draining bathtub: superradiant scattering of gravity waves

    CERN Document Server

    Richartz, Mauricio; Liberati, Stefano; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2014-01-01

    In a draining rotating fluid flow background, surface perturbations behave as a scalar field on a rotating effective black hole spacetime. We propose a new model for the background flow which takes into account the varying depth of the water. Numerical integration of the associated Klein-Gordon equation using accessible experimental parameters shows that gravity waves in an appropriate frequency range are amplified through the mechanism of superradiance. Our numerical results suggest that the observation of this phenomenon in a common fluid mechanical system is within experimental reach. Unlike the case of wave scattering around Kerr black holes, which depends only on one dimensionless background parameter (the ratio $a/M$ between the specific angular momentum and the mass of the black hole), our system depends on two dimensionless background parameters, namely the normalized angular velocity and surface gravity at the effective black hole horizon.

  1. Rotating black holes in a draining bathtub: Superradiant scattering of gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richartz, Maurício; Prain, Angus; Liberati, Stefano; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2015-06-01

    In a draining rotating fluid flow background, surface perturbations behave as a scalar field on a rotating effective black hole spacetime. We propose a new model for the background flow which takes into account the varying depth of the water. Numerical integration of the associated Klein-Gordon equation using accessible experimental parameters shows that gravity waves in an appropriate frequency range are amplified through the mechanism of superradiance. Our numerical results suggest that the observation of this phenomenon in a common fluid mechanical system is within experimental reach. Unlike the case of wave scattering around Kerr black holes, which depends only on one dimensionless background parameter (the ratio a /M between the specific angular momentum and the mass of the black hole), our system depends on two dimensionless background parameters, namely the normalized angular velocity and surface gravity at the effective black hole horizon.

  2. ASIRI: Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Waves and Instabilities (RAWI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    packets in the atmosphere and the seasonally reversing current systems and upwelling in the ocean, all of them are strongly coupled. It is...occurs over a continuum of scales, from regional-scale heat transport by the (occasionally reversing ) Walker circulation down to local heat fluxes...to Kelvin wave propagation in the equatorial IO, MJO and other subseasonal phenomena. Given the logistical 2 and financial constraints, the

  3. Spatial gravity wave characteristics obtained from multiple OH(3-1) airglow temperature time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Paul; Schmidt, Carsten; Wüst, Sabine; Bittner, Michael

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach for the detection of gravity waves in OH-airglow observations at the measurement site Oberpfaffenhofen (11.27°E, 48.08°N), Germany. The measurements were performed at the German Remote Sensing Data Center (DFD) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) during the period from February 4th, 2011 to July 6th, 2011. In this case study the observations were carried out by three identical Ground-based Infrared P-branch Spectrometers (GRIPS). These instruments provide OH(3-1) rotational temperature time series, which enable spatio-temporal investigations of gravity wave characteristics in the mesopause region. The instruments were aligned in such a way that their fields of view (FOV) formed an equilateral triangle in the OH-emission layer at a height of 87 km. The Harmonic Analysis is applied in order to identify joint temperature oscillations in the three individual datasets. Dependent on the specific gravity wave activity in a single night, it is possible to detect up to four different wave patterns with this method. The values obtained for the waves' periods and phases are then used to derive further parameters, such as horizontal wavelength, phase velocity and the direction of propagation. We identify systematic relationships between periods and amplitudes as well as between periods and horizontal wavelengths. A predominant propagation direction towards the East and North-North-East characterizes the waves during the observation period. There are also indications of seasonal effects in the temporal development of the horizontal wavelength and the phase velocity. During late winter and early spring the derived horizontal wavelengths and the phase velocities are smaller than in the subsequent period from early April to July 2011.

  4. Symmetries In Evolving Space-time and Their Connection To High-frequency Gravity Wave Production

    CERN Document Server

    Beckwith, A W

    2008-01-01

    We present how a worm hole bridge from a prior to the present universe allows us to use symmetry arguments which allow us to generate relic gravity waves, and also non massless gravitons. The relic gravitons are produced due to thermal / vacuum energy transferral from a prior universe using a pseudo time dependent version of the Wheeler De Witt equation as presented by Crowell (2005)

  5. Higher-Order Bragg Resonance in Gravity Surface Waves over Periodic Bottoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yu-Meng; TAO Zhi-Yong; WANG Xin-Long

    2006-01-01

    @@ A calculation method based on the Bloch theorem is developed for the gravity surface waves over the periodic bottoms of large undulations. The study shows the existence of comparable high-order bandgaps, which are demonstrated to result from the higher-order Bragg resonances, i.e. the resonant interactions between surface waves and the harmonic components of the fluctuating bottom. It is also shown that the band widths of the high-order gaps are quite sensitive to the amplitudes of high-order harmonics of the bottom.

  6. Second generation diffusion model of interacting gravity waves on the surface of deep fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pushkarev

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a second generation phenomenological model for nonlinear interaction of gravity waves on the surface of deep water. This model takes into account the effects of non-locality of the original Hasselmann diffusion equation still preserving important properties of the first generation model: physically consistent scaling, adherence to conservation laws and the existence of Kolmogorov-Zakharov solutions. Numerical comparison of both models with the original Hasselmann equation shows that the second generation models improves the angular distribution in the evolving wave energy spectrum.

  7. Lagrangian temperature and vertical velocity fluctuations due to gravity waves in the lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Plougonven, Riwal; Legras, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Wave-induced Lagrangian fluctuations of temperature and vertical velocity in the lower stratosphere are quantified using measurements from superpressure balloons (SPBs). Observations recorded every minute along SPB flights allow the whole gravity wave spectrum to be described and provide unprecedented information on both the intrinsic frequency spectrum and the probability distribution function of wave fluctuations. The data set has been collected during two campaigns coordinated by the French Space Agency in 2010, involving 19 balloons over Antarctica and 3 in the deep tropics. In both regions, the vertical velocity distributions depart significantly from a Gaussian behavior. Knowledge on such wave fluctuations is essential for modeling microphysical processes along Lagrangian trajectories. We propose a new simple parameterization that reproduces both the non-Gaussian distribution of vertical velocities (or heating/cooling rates) and their observed intrinsic frequency spectrum.

  8. Directional Filtering Due to Mesospheric Wind Shear on the Propagation of Acoustic-gravity Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Yonghui; CHEN Wei; WANG Yachong

    2013-01-01

    Gravity waves with periods close to the Brunt-V(a)is(a)l(a) period of the upper troposphere are often observed at mesopause altitudes as short period,quasi-monochromatic waves.The assumption that these short period waves originate in the troposphere may be problematic because their upward propagation to the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region could be significantly impeded due to an extended region of strong evanescence above the stratopause.To reconcile this apparent paradox,an alternative explanation is proposed in this paper.The inclusion of mean winds and their vertical shears is sufficient to allow certain short period waves to remain internal above the stratopause and to propagate efficiently to higher altitudes.A time-dependent numerical model is used to demonstrate the feasibility of this and to determine the circumstances under which the mesospheric wind shears play a role in the removal and directional filtering of short period gravity waves.Finally this paper concludes that the combination of the height-dependent mean winds and the mean temperature structure probably explains the existence of short period,quasi-monochromatic structures observed in airglow images of mesopause region.

  9. Gravitational waves from extreme mass-ratio inspirals in Dynamical Chern-Simons gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Pani, Paolo; Gualtieri, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    Dynamical Chern-Simons gravity is an interesting extension of General Relativity, which finds its way in many different contexts, including string theory, cosmological settings and loop quantum gravity. In this theory, the gravitational field is coupled to a scalar field by a parity-violating term, which gives rise to characteristic signatures. Here we investigate how Chern-Simons gravity would affect the quasi-circular inspiralling of a small, stellar-mass object into a large non-rotating supermassive black hole, and the accompanying emission of gravitational and scalar waves. We find the relevant equations describing the perturbation induced by the small object, and we solve them through the use of Green's function techniques. Our results show that for a wide range of coupling parameters, the Chern-Simons coupling gives rise to an increase in total energy flux, which translates into a fewer number of gravitational-wave cycles over a certain bandwidth. For space-based gravitational-wave detectors such as LIS...

  10. Gravitational waves from extreme mass-ratio inspirals in dynamical Chern-Simons gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Paolo; Cardoso, Vitor; Gualtieri, Leonardo

    2011-05-01

    Dynamical Chern-Simons gravity is an interesting extension of general relativity, which finds its way in many different contexts, including string theory, cosmological settings, and loop quantum gravity. In this theory, the gravitational field is coupled to a scalar field by a parity-violating term, which gives rise to characteristic signatures. Here we investigate how Chern-Simons gravity would affect the quasicircular inspiralling of a small, stellar-mass object into a large nonrotating supermassive black hole, and the accompanying emission of gravitational and scalar waves. We find the relevant equations describing the perturbation induced by the small object, and we solve them through the use of Green’s function techniques. Our results show that for a wide range of coupling parameters, the Chern-Simons coupling gives rise to an increase in total energy flux, which translates into a fewer number of gravitational-wave cycles over a certain bandwidth. For space-based gravitational-wave detectors such as LISA, this effect can be used to constrain the coupling parameter effectively.

  11. QBO modulation of the mesopause gravity wave momentum flux over Tierra del Fuego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wit, R. J.; Janches, D.; Fritts, D. C.; Hibbins, R. E.

    2016-04-01

    The interannual variability of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) gravity wave momentum flux over southern midlatitudes (53.7°S) has been studied using more than 7 years of meteor radar observations at Río Grande, Argentina. A modulation, with periods similar to that of the equatorial stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), is observed in the vertical flux of zonal as well as meridional momentum. The QBO signal is largest in the zonal component during summer and is in phase with the stratospheric QBO at 50 hPa (˜21 km). The relation between the stratospheric QBO and the QBO modulation in the MLT gravity wave forcing (derived from the divergence of the momentum flux) was found to be consistent with that expected from the Holton-Tan effect coupled to the interhemispheric coupling mechanism. These results provide the first observational support for the existence of the midlatitude gravity wave forcing anomalies as hypothesized in the interhemispheric coupling mechanism.

  12. Coordinated investigation of midlatitude upper mesospheric temperature inversion layers and the associated gravity wave forcing by Na lidar and Advanced Mesospheric Temperature Mapper in Logan, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tao; Pautet, P.-D.; Zhao, Y.; Cai, X.; Criddle, N. R.; Taylor, M. J.; Pendleton, W. R.

    2014-04-01

    Mesospheric inversion layers (MIL) are well studied in the literature but their relationship to the dynamic feature associated with the breaking of atmospheric waves in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) region are not well understood. Two strong MIL events (ΔT ~30 K) were observed above 90 km during a 6 day full diurnal cycle Na lidar campaign conducted from 6 August to 13 August Logan, Utah (42°N, 112°W). Colocated Advanced Mesospheric Temperature Mapper observations provided key information on concurrent gravity wave (GW) events and their characteristics during the nighttime observations. The study found both MILs were well correlated with the development and presence of an unstable region ~2 km above the MIL peak altitudes and a highly stable region below, implicating the strengthening of MIL is likely due to the increase of downward heat flux by the enhanced saturation of gravity wave, when it propagates through a highly stable layer. Each MIL event also exhibited distinct features: one showed a downward progression most likely due to tidal-GW interaction, while the peak height of the other event remained constant. During further investigation of atmospheric stability surrounding the MIL structure, lidar measurements indicate a sharp enhancement of the convective stability below the peak altitude of each MIL. We postulate that the sources of these stable layers were different; one was potentially triggered by concurrent large tidal wave activity and the other during the passage of a strong mesospheric bore.

  13. Ionospheric signatures of gravity waves produced by the 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Tohoku tsunamis: A modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yonghui; Wang, Wenqing; Hickey, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Ionospheric fluctuations inferred from observations of total electron content have previously been attributed to tsunamis and have confirmed the strong coupling between Earth's ocean and ionosphere via atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs). To further advance our understanding of this wave coupling process we employ a linear full-wave model and a nonlinear time-dependent model to examine the ionospheric response to the AGW perturbations induced by the 2004 Sumatra and the 2011 Tohoku tsunamis. In the 2004 case, our modeling analyses reveal that one component of the propagating AGWs becomes dynamically unstable in the E-region ionosphere at a range exceeding 2000 km in a direction 340° clockwise from north. Another component becomes convectively unstable in the E-region ionosphere at a range exceeding 700 km in a direction 250° clockwise from north. In the 2011 case, a significant enhancement in the ionospheric disturbance occurs in a direction northwest from the epicenter about 1 h following the tsunami onset, in general agreement with observations. Our simulations also indicate that the AGW propagating toward the southeast is responsible for a traveling ionospheric disturbance that remains of an observable amplitude for over 4 h during which time it propagates horizontally almost 4000 km.

  14. Effects of Steady Flow on Magnetoacoustic-Gravity Surface Waves: I. The Weak Field Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdélyi, R.; Mather, J. F.

    2017-02-01

    Magnetoacoustic gravity (MAG) waves have been studied for some time. In this article, we investigate the effect that a shear flow at a tangential discontinuity embedded in a gravitationally stratified and magnetised plasma has on MAG surface waves. The dispersion relation found is algebraically analogous to the relation of the non-flow cases obtained by Miles and Roberts ( Solar Phys. 141, 205, 1992), except for the introduction of a Doppler-shifted frequency for the eigenvalue. This feature, however, introduces rather interesting physics, including the asymmetric presence of forward- and backward-propagating surface waves. We find that increasing the equilibrium flow speed leads to a shift in the permitted regions of propagation for surface waves. For most wave number combinations this leads to the fast mode being completely removed, as well as more limited phase speed regimes for slow-mode propagation. We also find that upon increasing the flow, the phase speeds of the backward propagating waves are increased. Eventually, at high enough flow speeds, the wave's direction of propagation is reversed and is in the positive direction. However, the phase speed of the forward-propagating wave remains mainly the same. For strong enough flows we find that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can also occur when the forward- and backward-propagating modes couple.

  15. Waves and Magnetism in the Solar Atmosphere (WAMIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Y. K.; Auchere, F.; Casini, R.; Fineschi, S.; Gibson, S. E.; Knoelker, M.; Korendyke, C.; Laming, J. M.; Mcintosh, S. W.; Moses, J. D.; Romoli, M.; Rybak, J.; Socker, D. G.; Strachan, L.; Tomczyk, S.; Vourlidas, A.; Wu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere provide the energy for most varieties of solar activity, including high-energy electromagnetic radiation, solar energetic particles, flares, and coronal mass ejections, as well as powering the solar wind. Despite the fundamental role of magnetic fields in solar and heliospheric physics, there exists only very limited measurements of the field above the base of the corona. What is needed are direct measurements of not only the strength and orientation of the magnetic field but also the signatures of wave motions in order to better understand coronal structure, solar activity and the role of MHD waves in heating and accelerating the solar wind. Fortunately, the remote sensing instrumentation used to make magnetic field measurements is also well suited for measuring the Doppler signature of waves in the solar structures. With this in mind, we are proposing the WAMIS (Waves and Magnetism in the Solar Atmosphere) investigation. WAMIS will take advantage of greatly improved infrared (IR) detectors, forward models, advanced diagnostic tools and inversion codes to obtain a breakthrough in the measurement of coronal magnetic fields and in the understanding of the interaction of these fields with space plasmas. This will be achieved with a high altitude balloon borne payload consisting of a coronagraph with an IR spectro-polarimeter focal plane assembly. The balloon platform provides minimum atmospheric absorption and scattering at the IR wavelengths in which these observations are made. Additionally, a NASA long duration balloon flight mission from the Antarctic can achieve continuous observations over most of a solar rotation, covering all of the key time scales for the evolution of coronal magnetic fields. With these improvements in key technologies along with experience gained from current ground-based instrumentation, WAMIS will provide a low-cost mission with a high technology readiness leve.

  16. Small-scale topology of solar atmosphere dynamics I: wave sources and wave diffraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, N.M.; Rutten, R.J.; Brandt, P.N.; Shine, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    We study the small-scale topology of dynamical phenomena in the quiet-sun internet w ork atmosphere,using short-duration Fourier analysis of high-resolution filtergram sequences to obtain statistical estimates for the co-location probability of different fine-structure elements and wave modes. In th

  17. Joint Optimization of Vertical Component Gravity and Seismic P-wave First Arrivals by Simulated Annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, J. N.; Basler-Reeder, K.; Kent, G. M.; Pullammanappallil, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous joint seismic-gravity optimization improves P-wave velocity models in areas with sharp lateral velocity contrasts. Optimization is achieved using simulated annealing, a metaheuristic global optimization algorithm that does not require an accurate initial model. Balancing the seismic-gravity objective function is accomplished by a novel approach based on analysis of Pareto charts. Gravity modeling uses a newly developed convolution algorithm, while seismic modeling utilizes the highly efficient Vidale eikonal equation traveltime generation technique. Synthetic tests show that joint optimization improves velocity model accuracy and provides velocity control below the deepest headwave raypath. Detailed first arrival picking followed by trial velocity modeling remediates inconsistent data. We use a set of highly refined first arrival picks to compare results of a convergent joint seismic-gravity optimization to the Plotrefa™ and SeisOpt® Pro™ velocity modeling packages. Plotrefa™ uses a nonlinear least squares approach that is initial model dependent and produces shallow velocity artifacts. SeisOpt® Pro™ utilizes the simulated annealing algorithm and is limited to depths above the deepest raypath. Joint optimization increases the depth of constrained velocities, improving reflector coherency at depth. Kirchoff prestack depth migrations reveal that joint optimization ameliorates shallow velocity artifacts caused by limitations in refraction ray coverage. Seismic and gravity data from the San Emidio Geothermal field of the northwest Basin and Range province demonstrate that joint optimization changes interpretation outcomes. The prior shallow-valley interpretation gives way to a deep valley model, while shallow antiformal reflectors that could have been interpreted as antiformal folds are flattened. Furthermore, joint optimization provides a clearer image of the rangefront fault. This technique can readily be applied to existing datasets and could

  18. NUMERICAL STUDIES OF INTERNAL SOLITARY WAVE GENERATION AND EVOLUTION BY GRAVITY COLLAPSE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhen-hua; SONG Jin-bao

    2012-01-01

    In this study,an analysis on the internal wave generation via the gravity collapse mechanism is carried out based on the theoretical formulation and the numerical simulation.With the linear theoretical model,a rectangle shape wave is generated and propagates back and forth in the domain,while a two-dimensional non-hydrostatic numerical model could reproduce all the observed phenomena in the laboratory experiments conducted by Chen et al.(2007),and the related process realistically.The model results further provide more quantitative information in the whole domain,thus allowing an in depth understanding of the corresponding internal solitary wave generation and propagation.It is shown that the initial type of the internal wave is determined by the relative height between the perturbation and the environmental density interface,while the final wave type is related to the relative height of the upper and lower layers of the environmental fluid.The shape of the internal wave generated is consistent with that predicted by the KdV and EKdV theories if its amplitude is small,as the amplitude becomes larger,the performance of the EKdV becomes better after the wave adjusts itself to the ambient stratification and reaches an equilibrium state between the nonlinear and dispersion effects.The evolution of the mechanical energy is also analyzed.

  19. Alfv\\'en Wave Driven High Frequency Waves in the Solar Atmosphere: Implications for Ion Heating

    CERN Document Server

    Kaghashvili, Edisher Kh

    2014-01-01

    This work is an extension of Kaghashvili [1999] where ion-cyclotron wave dissipation channel for Alfv\\'en waves was discussed. While our earlier study dealt with the mode coupling in the commonly discussed sense, here we study changes in the initial waveform due to interaction of the initial driver Alfv\\'en wave and the plasma inhomogeneity, which are implicitly present in the equations, but were not elaborated in Kaghashvili [1999]. Using a cold plasma approximation, we show how high frequency waves (higher than the initial driver Alfv\\'en wave frequency) are generated in the inhomogeneous solar plasma flow. The generation of the high frequency forward and backward propagating modified fast magnetosonic/whistler waves as well as the generation of the driven Alfv\\'en waves is discussed in the solar atmosphere. The generated high frequency waves have a shorter dissipation timescale, and they can also resonant interact with particles using both the normal cyclotron and anomalous cyclotron interaction channels. ...

  20. Gravitational waves during inflation from a 5D large-scale repulsive gravity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Luz M.; Moreno, Claudia; Madriz Aguilar, José Edgar; Bellini, Mauricio

    2012-10-01

    We investigate, in the transverse traceless (TT) gauge, the generation of the relic background of gravitational waves, generated during the early inflationary stage, on the framework of a large-scale repulsive gravity model. We calculate the spectrum of the tensor metric fluctuations of an effective 4D Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric on cosmological scales. This metric is obtained after implementing a planar coordinate transformation on a 5D Ricci-flat metric solution, in the context of a non-compact Kaluza-Klein theory of gravity. We found that the spectrum is nearly scale invariant under certain conditions. One interesting aspect of this model is that it is possible to derive the dynamical field equations for the tensor metric fluctuations, valid not just at cosmological scales, but also at astrophysical scales, from the same theoretical model. The astrophysical and cosmological scales are determined by the gravity-antigravity radius, which is a natural length scale of the model, that indicates when gravity becomes repulsive in nature.

  1. Gravitational waves during inflation from a 5D large-scale repulsive gravity model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Luz M., E-mail: luzmarinareyes@gmail.com [Departamento de Matematicas, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e ingenierias (CUCEI), Universidad de Guadalajara (UdG), Av. Revolucion 1500, S.R. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Moreno, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.moreno@cucei.udg.mx [Departamento de Matematicas, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e ingenierias (CUCEI), Universidad de Guadalajara (UdG), Av. Revolucion 1500, S.R. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Madriz Aguilar, Jose Edgar, E-mail: edgar.madriz@red.cucei.udg.mx [Departamento de Matematicas, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e ingenierias (CUCEI), Universidad de Guadalajara (UdG), Av. Revolucion 1500, S.R. 44430, Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Bellini, Mauricio, E-mail: mbellini@mdp.edu.ar [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (UNMdP), Funes 3350, C.P. 7600, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR) - Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2012-10-22

    We investigate, in the transverse traceless (TT) gauge, the generation of the relic background of gravitational waves, generated during the early inflationary stage, on the framework of a large-scale repulsive gravity model. We calculate the spectrum of the tensor metric fluctuations of an effective 4D Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric on cosmological scales. This metric is obtained after implementing a planar coordinate transformation on a 5D Ricci-flat metric solution, in the context of a non-compact Kaluza-Klein theory of gravity. We found that the spectrum is nearly scale invariant under certain conditions. One interesting aspect of this model is that it is possible to derive the dynamical field equations for the tensor metric fluctuations, valid not just at cosmological scales, but also at astrophysical scales, from the same theoretical model. The astrophysical and cosmological scales are determined by the gravity-antigravity radius, which is a natural length scale of the model, that indicates when gravity becomes repulsive in nature.

  2. Tests of General Relativity and Alternative Theories of Gravity Using Gravitational Wave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, K. G.; Pai, Archana

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational wave (GW) observations of coalescing compact binaries will be unique probes of strong-field, dynamical aspects of relativistic gravity. We present a short review of various schemes proposed in the literature to test general relativity (GR) and alternative theories of gravity using inspiral waveforms. Broadly these schemes may be classified into two types: model dependent and model independent. In the model dependent category, GW observations are compared against a specific waveform model representative of a particular theory or a class of theories such as scalar-tensor theories, dynamical Chern-Simons theory and massive graviton theories. Model independent tests are attempts to write down a parametrized gravitational waveform where the free parameters take different values for different theories and (at least some of) which can be constrained by GW observations. We revisit some of the proposed bounds in the case of downscaled LISA configuration (eLISA) and compare them with the original LISA configuration. We also compare the expected bounds on alternative theories of gravity from ground-based and space-based detectors and find that space-based GW detectors can test GR and other theories of gravity with unprecedented accuracies. We then focus on a recent proposal to use singular value decomposition of the Fisher information matrix to improve the accuracies with which post-Newtonian theory can be tested. We extend those results to the case of space-based detector eLISA and discuss its implications.

  3. Challenges to self-acceleration in modified gravity from gravitational waves and large-scale structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Lombriser

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of gravitational-wave astronomy marked by the aLIGO GW150914 and GW151226 observations, a measurement of the cosmological speed of gravity will likely soon be realised. We show that a confirmation of equality to the speed of light as indicated by indirect Galactic observations will have important consequences for a very large class of alternative explanations of the late-time accelerated expansion of our Universe. It will break the dark degeneracy of self-accelerated Horndeski scalar–tensor theories in the large-scale structure that currently limits a rigorous discrimination between acceleration from modified gravity and from a cosmological constant or dark energy. Signatures of a self-acceleration must then manifest in the linear, unscreened cosmological structure. We describe the minimal modification required for self-acceleration with standard gravitational-wave speed and show that its maximum likelihood yields a 3σ poorer fit to cosmological observations compared to a cosmological constant. Hence, equality between the speeds challenges the concept of cosmic acceleration from a genuine scalar–tensor modification of gravity.

  4. Challenges to self-acceleration in modified gravity from gravitational waves and large-scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombriser, Lucas; Lima, Nelson A.

    2017-02-01

    With the advent of gravitational-wave astronomy marked by the aLIGO GW150914 and GW151226 observations, a measurement of the cosmological speed of gravity will likely soon be realised. We show that a confirmation of equality to the speed of light as indicated by indirect Galactic observations will have important consequences for a very large class of alternative explanations of the late-time accelerated expansion of our Universe. It will break the dark degeneracy of self-accelerated Horndeski scalar-tensor theories in the large-scale structure that currently limits a rigorous discrimination between acceleration from modified gravity and from a cosmological constant or dark energy. Signatures of a self-acceleration must then manifest in the linear, unscreened cosmological structure. We describe the minimal modification required for self-acceleration with standard gravitational-wave speed and show that its maximum likelihood yields a 3σ poorer fit to cosmological observations compared to a cosmological constant. Hence, equality between the speeds challenges the concept of cosmic acceleration from a genuine scalar-tensor modification of gravity.

  5. Regional variations of mesospheric gravity-wave momentum flux over Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Espy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Images of mesospheric airglow and radar-wind measurements have been combined to estimate the difference in the vertical flux of horizontal momentum carried by high-frequency gravity waves over two dissimilar Antarctic stations. Rothera (67° S, 68° W is situated in the mountains of the Peninsula near the edge of the wintertime polar vortex. In contrast, Halley (76° S, 27° W, some 1658 km to the southeast, is located on an ice sheet at the edge of the Antarctic Plateau and deep within the polar vortex during winter. The cross-correlation coefficients between the vertical and horizontal wind perturbations were calculated from sodium (Na airglow imager data collected during the austral winter seasons of 2002 and 2003 at Rothera for comparison with the 2000 and 2001 results from Halley reported previously (Espy et al., 2004. These cross-correlation coefficients were combined with wind-velocity variances from coincident radar measurements to estimate the daily averaged upper-limit of the vertical flux of horizontal momentum due to gravity waves near the peak emission altitude of the Na nightglow layer, 90km. The resulting momentum flux at both stations displayed a large day-to-day variability and showed a marked seasonal rotation from the northwest to the southwest throughout the winter. However, the magnitude of the flux at Rothera was about 4 times larger than that at Halley, suggesting that the differences in the gravity-wave source functions and filtering by the underlying winds at the two stations create significant regional differences in wave forcing on the scale of the station separation.

  6. Experimental study of tsunami-type waves impact on soil at foundations of offshore gravity platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.D. Belyaev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Scouring, caused by waves, currents and races of ship propellers, has been a subject of theoretical investigations, physical modeling in hydraulic laboratories and full-scale experiments in several countries. The results reported on these tests usually recommend formulas and diagrams to determine water velocities that can be used to estimate the risk of scouring and design the required protection measures. The results of the physical modeling of interaction of long tsunami-type waves with an offshore gravity platform are presented in this article. The reaction of seabed soil to wave impact at the platform foundation has been studied and the obtained results have been analyzed. Conclusions about changes in the seabed profile, density of the top layers of the seabed soil and their influence on the platform stability have been made.

  7. Rayleigh and acoustic gravity waves detection on magnetograms during the Japanese Tsunami, 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Klausner, Virginia; Muella, Marcio T A H; Mendes, Odim; Domingues, Margarete O; Papa, Andres R R

    2015-01-01

    The continuous geomagnetic field survey holds an important potential in future prevention of tsunami damages, and also, it could be used in tsunami forecast. In this work, we were able to detected for the first time Rayleigh and ionospheric acoustic gravity wave propagation in the Z-component of the geomagnetic field due to the Japanese tsunami, 2011 prior to the tsunami arrival. The geomagnetic measurements were obtained in the epicentral near and far-field. Also, these waves were detected within minutes to few hours of the tsunami arrival. For these reasons, these results are very encouraging, and confirmed that the geomagnetic field monitoring could play an important role in the tsunami warning systems, and also, it could provide additional information in the induced ionospheric wave propagation models due to tsunamis.

  8. Direct numerical experiment on measuring of dispersion relation for gravity waves in the presence of condensate

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    During previous numerical experiments on isotropic turbulence of surface gravity waves we observed formation of the long wave background (condensate). It was shown (Korotkevich, Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 101 (7), 074504 (2008)), that presence of the condensate changes a spectrum of direct cascade, corresponding to the flux of energy to the small scales from pumping region (large scales). Recent experiments show that the inverse cascade spectrum is also affected by the condensate. In this case mechanism proposed as a cause for the change of direct cascade spectrum cannot work. But inverse cascade is directly influenced by the linear dispersion relation for waves, as a result direct measurement of the dispersion relation in the presence of condensate is necessary. We performed the measurement of this dispersion relation from the direct numerical experiment. The results demonstrate that in the region of inverse cascade influence of the condensate cannot be neglected.

  9. Framework of Distributed Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean-Wave Modeling System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Yuanqiao; HUANG Liwen; DENG Jian; ZHANG Jinfeng; WANG Sisi; WANG Lijun

    2006-01-01

    In order to research the interactions between the atmosphere and ocean as well as their important role in the intensive weather systems of coastal areas, and to improve the forecasting ability of the hazardous weather processes of coastal areas, a coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave modeling system has been developed.The agent-based environment framework for linking models allows flexible and dynamic information exchange between models. For the purpose of flexibility, portability and scalability, the framework of the whole system takes a multi-layer architecture that includes a user interface layer, computational layer and service-enabling layer. The numerical experiment presented in this paper demonstrates the performance of the distributed coupled modeling system.

  10. Tsunami mitigation by resonant triad interaction with acoustic–gravity waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Kadri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tsunamis have been responsible for the loss of almost a half million lives, widespread long lasting destruction, profound environmental effects, and global financial crisis, within the last two decades. The main tsunami properties that determine the size of impact at the shoreline are its wavelength and amplitude in the ocean. Here, we show that it is in principle possible to reduce the amplitude of a tsunami, and redistribute its energy over a larger space, through forcing it to interact with resonating acoustic–gravity waves. In practice, generating the appropriate acoustic–gravity modes introduces serious challenges due to the high energy required for an effective interaction. However, if the findings are extended to realistic tsunami properties and geometries, we might be able to mitigate tsunamis and so save lives and properties. Moreover, such a mitigation technique would allow for the harnessing of the tsunami's energy.

  11. Tsunami mitigation by resonant triad interaction with acoustic-gravity waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadri, Usama

    2017-01-01

    Tsunamis have been responsible for the loss of almost a half million lives, widespread long lasting destruction, profound environmental effects, and global financial crisis, within the last two decades. The main tsunami properties that determine the size of impact at the shoreline are its wavelength and amplitude in the ocean. Here, we show that it is in principle possible to reduce the amplitude of a tsunami, and redistribute its energy over a larger space, through forcing it to interact with resonating acoustic-gravity waves. In practice, generating the appropriate acoustic-gravity modes introduces serious challenges due to the high energy required for an effective interaction. However, if the findings are extended to realistic tsunami properties and geometries, we might be able to mitigate tsunamis and so save lives and properties. Moreover, such a mitigation technique would allow for the harnessing of the tsunami's energy.

  12. Tests of General Relativity and Alternative theories of gravity using Gravitational Wave observations

    CERN Document Server

    Arun, K G

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational Wave (GW) observations of coalescing compact binaries will be unique probes of strong-field, dynamical aspects of relativistic gravity. We present a short review of various schemes proposed in the literature to test General Relativity (GR) and alternative theories of gravity using inspiral waveforms. Broadly these schemes may be classified into two types: model dependent and model independent. In the model dependent category, GW observations are compared against a specific waveform model representative of a particular theory or a class of theories like Scalar-Tensor theories, Dynamical Chern-Simons theory and Massive graviton theories. Model independent tests are attempts to write down a parametrised gravitational waveform where the free parameters take different values for different theories and (at least some of) which can be constrained by GW observations. We revisit some of the proposed bounds in the case of downscaled LISA configuration (eLISA) and compare them with the original LISA config...

  13. Impact of the gravity of a Schwarzschild black hole upon the Rossby wave instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casse, F.; Varniere, P.; Meliani, Z.

    2017-01-01

    In an early work, the Rossby wave instability was proposed to explain the variability thought to originate in the close vicinity of black holes but this was done in the pseudo-Newtonian approach. Here we present the first general relativistic (GR) hydrodynamics simulations of this instability not only proving its theorized existence in a full GR environment but also studying the effect of the strong gravity on the instability. To that end, we performed a set of simulations increasingly closer to the black hole with our new GR version of the MPI-AMRVAC code. This allows us to study the minute changes in the behaviour of the instability. We found that a pseudo-Newtonian approach gives adequate results provided that the time-shifting induced by the black hole gravity is taken into account. Hence, to view the disc as a distant observer would, a full GR ray-tracing post-treatment of the simulations is a must.

  14. Existence of a directional Stokes drift in asymmetrical three-dimensional travelling gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iooss, Gérard; Plotnikov, Pavel

    2009-09-01

    We consider periodic travelling gravity waves at the surface of an infinitely deep perfect fluid. The pattern is non-symmetric with respect to the propagation direction of the waves and we consider a general non-resonant situation. Defining a couple of amplitudes ɛ,ɛ along the basis of wave vectors which satisfy the dispersion relation, following Iooss and Plotnikov (2009), travelling waves exist with an asymptotic expansion in powers of ɛ,ɛ, for nearly all pair of angles made by the basic wave vectors with the critical propagation direction, and for values of the couple (ɛ12,ɛ22) in a subset of the plane, with asymptotic full measure at the origin. We prove the remarkable property that on the free surface, observed in the moving frame, the propagation direction of the waves differs from the asymptotic direction taken by fluid particles, by a small angle which is computed. To cite this article: G. Iooss, P. Plotnikov, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  15. Horizontal ducting of sound by curved nonlinear internal gravity waves in the continental shelf areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying-Tsong; McMahon, Kara G; Lynch, James F; Siegmann, William L

    2013-01-01

    The acoustic ducting effect by curved nonlinear gravity waves in shallow water is studied through idealized models in this paper. The internal wave ducts are three-dimensional, bounded vertically by the sea surface and bottom, and horizontally by aligned wavefronts. Both normal mode and parabolic equation methods are taken to analyze the ducted sound field. Two types of horizontal acoustic modes can be found in the curved internal wave duct. One is a whispering-gallery type formed by the sound energy trapped along the outer and concave boundary of the duct, and the other is a fully bouncing type due to continual reflections from boundaries in the duct. The ducting condition depends on both internal-wave and acoustic-source parameters, and a parametric study is conducted to derive a general pattern. The parabolic equation method provides full-field modeling of the sound field, so it includes other acoustic effects caused by internal waves, such as mode coupling/scattering and horizontal Lloyd's mirror interference. Two examples are provided to present internal wave ducts with constant curvature and meandering wavefronts.

  16. Impact of Low-Level Southerly Surges on Mixed Rossby Gravity Waves over the Central Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutomi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    This study examines dynamical impacts of lower-tropospheric southerly wind surges originating in midlatitudes of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) on the development of mixed Rossby gravity (MRG) waves over the central Pacific during June-August 1979-2012, through the statistical analysis of the JRA-55 products and NOAA outgoing long wave radiation data. The central Pacific MRG waves are identified by an extended EOF (EEOF) analysis on 2-8-day filtered daily 850-hPa meridional wind anomalies during June-August 1979-2012. Composite analysis based on the leading EEOF time coefficients is able to capture the development of the MRG waves associated with a southerly surge originating in the SH extratropics. As a weak clockwise gyre as a part of an off-equatorial easterly wavetrain moves eastward and southeastward from the off-equatorial eastern Pacific into the equatorial central Pacific, the southerly surge penetrates into the equatorial tropics at around 150W. Then, the clockwise gyre develops into a MRG-type gyre over the central Pacific. A transition from an easterly wave-type gyre into a MRG-type gyre occurs associated with the southerly surge. The southerly surge forms a cross-equatorial flow on the western flank of the MRG-type gyre. The gyre is amplified when the southerly surge reaches the equatorial tropics. At the same time, convection coupled with the MRG-type gyre is enhanced. The southerly surges are originated in the midlatitude South Pacific, and they are induced by synoptic-scale baroclinic disturbances propagating along the SH midlatitude westerly jet. An eddy vorticity budget analysis indicates that the southerly surge plays an important role in spinning up the MRG-type gyre through transient advection of absolute vorticiy. A case study of a MRG-wave event in mid-July 2006 also illustrates development of a MRG wave associated with the southerly surge and an easterly wave-to-MRG wave transition.

  17. A coordinated study of 1 h mesoscale gravity waves propagating from Logan to Boulder with CRRL Na Doppler lidars and temperature mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xian; Chen, Cao; Huang, Wentao; Smith, John A.; Chu, Xinzhao; Yuan, Tao; Pautet, Pierre-Dominique; Taylor, Mike J.; Gong, Jie; Cullens, Chihoko Y.

    2015-10-01

    We present the first coordinated study using two lidars at two separate locations to characterize a 1 h mesoscale gravity wave event in the mesopause region. The simultaneous observations were made with the Student Training and Atmospheric Research (STAR) Na Doppler lidar at Boulder, CO, and the Utah State University Na Doppler lidar and temperature mapper at Logan, UT, on 27 November 2013. The high precision possessed by the STAR lidar enabled these waves to be detected in vertical wind. The mean wave amplitudes are ~0.44 m/s in vertical wind and ~1% in relative temperature at altitudes of 82-107 km. Those in the zonal and meridional winds are 6.1 and 5.2 m/s averaged from 84 to 99 km. The horizontal and vertical wavelengths inferred from the mapper and lidars are ~219 ± 4 and 16.0 ± 0.3 km, respectively. The intrinsic period is ~1.3 h for the airglow layer, Doppler shifted by a mean wind of ~17 m/s. The wave packet propagates from Logan to Boulder with an azimuth angle of ~135° clockwise from north and an elevation angle of ~ 3° from the horizon. The observed phase difference between the two locations can be explained by the traveling time of the 1 h wave from Logan to Boulder, which is about ~2.4 h. The wave polarization relations are examined through the simultaneous quantifications of the three wind components and temperature. This study has developed a systematic methodology for fully characterizing mesoscale gravity waves, inspecting their intrinsic properties and validating the derivation of horizontal wave structures by applying multiple instruments from coordinated stations.

  18. New gravity-capillary waves at low speeds. Part 2: Nonlinear geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Trinh, Philippe H

    2015-01-01

    When traditional linearised theory is used to study gravity-capillary waves produced by flow past an obstruction, the geometry of the object is assumed to be small in one or several of its dimensions. In order to preserve the nonlinear nature of the obstruction, asymptotic expansions in the low-Froude or low-Bond number limits can be derived, but here, the solutions are waveless to every order. This is because the waves are in fact, exponentially small, and thus beyond-all-orders of regular asymptotics; their formation is a consequence of the divergence of the asymptotic series and the associated Stokes Phenomenon. In Part 1, we showed how exponential asymptotics could be used to study the problem when the size of the obstruction is first linearised. In this paper, we extend the analysis to the nonlinear problem, thus allowing the full geometry to be considered at leading order. When applied to the classic problem of flow over a step, our analysis reveals the existence of six classes of gravity-capillary wave...

  19. Influence of gravity waves and tides on mesospheric temperature inversion layers: simultaneous Rayleigh lidar and MF radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, S.; Sathishkumar, S.; Gurubaran, S.

    2008-11-01

    Three nights of simultaneous Rayleigh lidar temperature measurements over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E) and medium frequency (MF) radar wind measurements over Tirunelveli (8.7° N, 77.8° E) have been analyzed to illustrate the possible effects due to tidal-gravity wave interactions on upper mesospheric inversion layers. The occurrence of tidal gravity wave interaction is investigated using MF radar wind measurements in the altitude region 86 90 km. Of the three nights, it is found that tidal gravity wave interaction occurred in two nights. In the third night, diurnal tidal amplitude is found to be significantly larger. As suggested in Sica et al. (2007), mesospheric temperature inversion seems to be a signature of wave saturation in the mesosphere, since the temperature inversion occurs at heights, when the lapse rate is less than half the dry adiabatic lapse rate.

  20. Influence of gravity waves and tides on mesospheric temperature inversion layers: simultaneous Rayleigh lidar and MF radar observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, S. [National Atmospheric Research Lab., Chittoor (India); Sathishkumar, S.; Gurubaran, S. [Indian Inst. of Geomagnetism, Tirunelveli (India). Equatorial Geophysical Research Lab.

    2008-07-01

    Three nights of simultaneous Rayleigh lidar temperature measurements over Gadanki (13.5 N,79.2 E) and medium frequency (MF) radar wind measurements over Tirunelveli (8.7 N,77.8 E) have been analyzed to illustrate the possible effects due to tidal-gravity wave interactions on upper mesospheric inversion layers. The occurrence of tidal gravity wave interaction is investigated using MF radar wind measurements in the altitude region 86-90 km. Of the three nights, it is found that tidal gravity wave interaction occurred in two nights. In the third night, diurnal tidal amplitude is found to be significantly larger. As suggested in Sica et al. (2007), mesospheric temperature inversion seems to be a signature of wave saturation in the mesosphere, since the temperature inversion occurs at heights, when the lapse rate is less than half the dry adiabatic lapse rate. (orig.)

  1. Formation and mechanics of granular waves in gravity and shallow overland flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römkens, Mathias J. M.; Suryadevara, Madhu R.; Prasad, Shyam N.

    2010-05-01

    Sediment transport in overland flow is a highly complex process involving many properties relative to the flow regime characteristics, soil surface conditions, and type of sediment. From a practical standpoint, most sediment transport studies are concerned with developing relationships of rates of sediment movement under different hydraulic regimes in channel flow for use in soil erosion and sediment transport prediction models. Relatively few studies have focused on the more basic aspects of sediment movement in which particle-to-particle, particle-to-boundary, and particle-to-fluid interactions determine in an important way the nature of the movement. Our experimental work under highly controlled experimental conditions with both gravity flow of granular material (glass beads) in air and sediment transport (sand particles and glass beads) in shallow overland flow have shown that sediment movement is not a simple phenomenon solely determined by flow rates on a proportional basis, but that it is represented by a highly structured and organized regime determined by sedimentary fluid mechanical principles which yield very characteristic waves during transport. In the gravity flow case involving granular chute flow, two-dimensional grain waves developed into the rolling and saltating moving grain mass at certain grain concentrations. This phenomenon appeared to be related to an energy exchange process as a result of collisions between moving grain particles that led to reduced kinetic velocities. As a result, particle concentration differences in the direction of flow developed that were noted as denser zones. In these zones, particles dropped out at the upstream part of these denser zones to resume their accelerating motion once they reached the downstream part of the zone until, during the next collision event, the process is repeated. Thus a periodic granular wave structure evolved. Depending on the addition rate, the granular flow regime may be a fluidized

  2. Imaging gravity waves in lower stratospheric AMSU-A radiances, Part 2: Validation case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Eckermann

    2006-01-01

    , horizontal structure and time evolution that closely match those observed in the AMSU-A data. These comparisons not only verify gravity wave detection and horizontal imaging capabilities for AMSU-A Channel 9, but provide an absolute validation of the anticipated radiance signals for a given three-dimensional gravity wave, based on the modeling of Eckermann and Wu (2006.

  3. Gravitational waves induced by massless vector fields with non-minimal coupling to gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Kaixi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we calculate the contribution of the late time mode of a massless vector field to the power spectrum of the primordial gravitational wave using retarded Green's propagator. We consider a non-trivial coupling between gravity and the vector field. We find that the correction is scale-invariant and of order $\\frac{H^4}{M_P^4}$. The non-minimal coupling leads to a dependence of $\\frac{H^2}{M^2}$, which can amplify the correlation function up to the level of $\\frac{H^2}{M^2_P}$.

  4. Multi-symplectic structure of fully nonlinear weakly dispersive internal gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clamond, Didier; Dutykh, Denys

    2016-08-01

    In this short communication, we present the multi-symplectic structure for the two-layer Serre-Green-Naghdi equations describing the evolution of large amplitude internal gravity water waves when both layers are shallow. We consider only a two-layer stratification with rigid bottom and lid for simplicity, generalisations to several layers being conceivable. This multi-symplectic formulation allows the application of various multi-symplectic integrators (such as Euler or Preissman box schemes) that preserve exactly the multi-symplecticity at the discrete level.

  5. Multi-symplectic structure of fully-nonlinear weakly-dispersive internal gravity waves

    CERN Document Server

    Clamond, Didier

    2016-01-01

    In this short communication we present the multi-symplectic structure for the two-layer Serre-Green-Naghdi equations describing the evolution of large amplitude internal gravity long waves. We consider only a two-layer stratification with rigid bottom and lid for simplicity, generalisations to several layers being straightforward. This multi-symplectic formulation allows the application of various multi-symplectic integrators (such as Euler or Preissman box schemes) that preserve exactly the multi-symplecticity at the discrete level.

  6. Solar winds surfs waves in the Sun's atmosphere!

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The fact that this electrified plasma speeds up to almost 3 million kilometres per hour as it leaves the Sun - twice as fast as originally predicted - has been known for years. The interpretation of how it happens is the real and surprising novelty: "The waves in the Sun's atmosphere are produced by vibrating solar magnetic field lines, which give solar wind particles a push just like an ocean wave gives a surfer a ride" said Dr John Kohl, principal investigator for the Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer (UVCS) - the instrument among the 12 aboard SOHO which gathered the data - and for the Spartan 201 mission. The outermost solar atmosphere, or corona, is only seen from Earth during a total eclipse of the Sun, when it appears as a shimmering, white veil surrounding the black lunar disc. The corona is an extremely tenuous, electrically charged gas, known as plasma, that flows throughout the solar system as the solar wind. The waves are formed by rapidly vibrating magnetic fields in the coronal plasma. They are called magneto - hydro - dynamic (MHD) waves and are believed to accelerate the solar wind. The solar wind is made up of electrons and ions, electrically charged atoms that have lost electrons. The electric charge of the solar wind particles forces them to travel along invisible lines of magnetic force in the corona. The particles spiral around the magnetic field lines as they rush into space. "The magnetic field acts like a violin string: when it's touched, it vibrates. When the Sun's magnetic field vibrates with a frequency equal to that of the particle spiraling around the magnetic field, it heats it up, producing a force that accelerates the particle upward and away from the Sun," says Dr. Ester Antonucci, an astronomer at the observatory of Turin, Italy, and co-investigator for SOHO's UVCS an instrument developed with considerable financial support by the Italian Space Agency, ASI. In a way this is similar to what happens if two people hold a string at

  7. Waves and Magnetism in the Solar Atmosphere (WAMIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Kuen eKo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive measurements of magnetic fields in the solar corona have a long history as an important scientific goal. Besides being crucial to understanding coronal structures and the Sun’s generation of space weather, direct measurements of their strength and direction are also crucial steps in understanding observed wave motions. In this regard, the remote sensing instrumentation used to make coronal magnetic field measurements is well suited to measuring the Doppler signature of waves in the solar structures. In this paper, we describe the design and scientific values of the Waves and Magnetism in the Solar Atmosphere (WAMIS investigation. WAMIS, taking advantage of greatly improved infrared filters and detectors, forward models, advanced diagnostic tools and inversion codes, is a long-duration high-altitude balloon payload designed to obtain a breakthrough in the measurement of coronal magnetic fields and in advancing the understanding of the interaction of these fields with space plasmas. It consists of a 20 cm aperture coronagraph with a visible-IR spectro-polarimeter focal plane assembly. The balloon altitude would provide minimum sky background and atmospheric scattering at the wavelengths in which these observations are made. It would also enable continuous measurements of the strength and direction of coronal magnetic fields without interruptions from the day-night cycle and weather. These measurements will be made over a large field-of-view allowing one to distinguish the magnetic signatures of different coronal structures, and at the spatial and temporal resolutions required to address outstanding problems in coronal physics. Additionally, WAMIS could obtain near simultaneous observations of the electron scattered K-corona for context and to obtain the electron density. These comprehensive observations are not provided by any current single ground-based or space observatory. The fundamental advancements achieved by the near

  8. Seismic gravity-gradient noise in interferometric gravitational-wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, S A; Hughes, Scott A.; Thorne, Kip S.

    1998-01-01

    When ambient seismic waves pass near an interferometric gravitational-wave detector, they induce density perturbations in the earth which produce fluctuating gravitational forces on the interferometer's test masses. These forces mimic a stochastic background of gravitational waves and thus constitute noise. We compute this noise using the theory of multimode Rayleigh and Love waves propagating in a layered medium that approximates the geological strata at the LIGO sites. We characterize the noise by a transfer function $T(f) motion $\\tilde W(f)$ to the spectrum of test mass motion $\\tilde x(f) = L\\tilde h(f)$ (where $L$ is the length of the interferometer's arms, and $\\tilde h(f)$ is the spectrum of gravitational-wave noise). This paper's primary foci are (i) a study of how $T(f)$ depends on the various seismic modes; (ii) an attempt to estimate which modes are excited at the LIGO sites at quiet and noisy times; and (iii) a corresponding estimate of the seismic gravity-gradient noise level. At quiet times the...

  9. Magnetoacoustic Waves in Stratified Atmospheres with a Magnetic Null Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarr, Lucas A.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James E.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic fields strongly modify the propagation of MHD waves from the photosphere to the low corona, as can be shown exactly for the most simple case of a uniform magnetic field and isothermally stratrified atmosphere. For slightly more realistic scenarios, where both the atmospheric parameters and the magnetic field vary spatially, the linear MHD equations typically cannot be solved analytically. We use the Lagrangian Remap code--a nonlinear, shock-capturing MHD code--to study the propagation of initially acoustic wavepackets through a model 2D atmosphere that includes a gravitationally stratified chromosphere, transition region, and low corona. The magnetic field is formed by three photospheric concentrations and includes a single magnetic null point, resulting in an inhomogeneous system with a magnetic dome topology. A portion of an introduced wavepacket will refract toward the null due to the varying Alfven speed. Waves incident on the equipartition contour surrounding the null, where the sound and Alfven speeds coincide, partially transmit, reflect, and mode convert between branches of the local dispersion relation. Outward propagating slow modes generated during conversion become strongly concentrated along the set of field lines passing near the null. Acoustic energy is beamed back downwards towards each photospheric foot point, and upwards along one separatrix that exits the top of the numerical domain. Changes in the dominant restoring force for the wavepacket, between the Lorentz and pressure gradient forces, lead to a buildup of current density along topologically important features of the system (the null point and its four separatrices) and can drive reconnection at the null point itself. Ohmic dissipation of the currents locally heats the plasma. We find that the amount of current accumulation depends on where the centroid of a wavepacket initial crosses the photosphere, but does not simply coincide with regions of open versus closed magnetic field or

  10. Modeling of atmospheric-coupled Rayleigh waves on planets with atmosphere: From Earth observation to Mars and Venus perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lognonné, Philippe; Karakostas, Foivos; Rolland, Lucie; Nishikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Acoustic coupling between solid Earth and atmosphere has been observed since the 1960s, first from ground-based seismic, pressure, and ionospheric sensors and since 20 years with various satellite measurements, including with global positioning system (GPS) satellites. This coupling leads to the excitation of the Rayleigh surface waves by local atmospheric sources such as large natural explosions from volcanoes, meteor atmospheric air-bursts, or artificial explosions. It contributes also in the continuous excitation of Rayleigh waves and associated normal modes by atmospheric winds and pressure fluctuations. The same coupling allows the observation of Rayleigh waves in the thermosphere most of the time through ionospheric monitoring with Doppler sounders or GPS. The authors review briefly in this paper observations made on Earth and describe the general frame of the theory enabling the computation of Rayleigh waves for models of telluric planets with atmosphere. The authors then focus on Mars and Venus and give in both cases the atmospheric properties of the Rayleigh normal modes and associated surface waves compared to Earth. The authors then conclude on the observation perspectives especially for Rayleigh waves excited by atmospheric sources on Mars and for remote ionospheric observations of Rayleigh waves excited by quakes on Venus.

  11. Constraining Modified Theories of Gravity with Gravitational-Wave Stochastic Backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maselli, Andrea; Marassi, Stefania; Ferrari, Valeria; Kokkotas, Kostas; Schneider, Raffaella

    2016-08-26

    The direct discovery of gravitational waves has finally opened a new observational window on our Universe, suggesting that the population of coalescing binary black holes is larger than previously expected. These sources produce an unresolved background of gravitational waves, potentially observable by ground-based interferometers. In this Letter we investigate how modified theories of gravity, modeled using the parametrized post-Einsteinian formalism, affect the expected signal, and analyze the detectability of the resulting stochastic background by current and future ground-based interferometers. We find the constraints that Advanced LIGO would be able to set on modified theories, showing that they may significantly improve the current bounds obtained from astrophysical observations of binary pulsars.

  12. Human Gravity-Gradient Noise in Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Thorne, K S; Thorne, Kip S.; Winstein, Carolee J.

    1999-01-01

    Among all forms of routine human activity, the one which produces the strongest gravity-gradient noise in interferometric gravitational-wave detectors (e.g. LIGO) is the beginning and end of weight transfer from one foot to the other during walking. The beginning and end of weight transfer entail sharp changes (timescale tau ~ 20msec) in the horizontal jerk (first time derivative of acceleration) of a person's center of mass. These jerk pairs, occuring about twice per second, will produce gravity-gradient noise in LIGO in the frequency band 2.5 Hz <~ f <~ 1/(2 tau) ~= 25 Hz with the form sqrt{S_h(f)} sum is over all the walking people, r_i is the distance of the i'th person from the nearest interferometer test mass, and we estimate this formula to be accurate to within a factor 3. To ensure that this noise is neglible in advanced LIGO interferometers, people should be prevented from coming nearer to the test masses than r ~= 10m. A r ~= 10m exclusion zone will also reduce to an acceptable level gravity ...

  13. The Effect of Polar Vortex Disturbances on Mesopause Gravity Wave Drag in Relation to Mesopause Pole-to-Pole Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, R.; Hibbins, R. E.; Espy, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) play an important role in the dynamics of the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) region, linking the lower to the upper atmosphere. GW filtering by the background zonal wind is furthermore believed to be the fundamental mechanism coupling the winter stratosphere to the summer polar mesopause, in which increased planetary wave (PW) activity in the former is related to enhanced temperatures in the latter through a chain of global MLT temperature anomalies. During major Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) the interaction between PWs and the background flow leads to increased polar stratospheric temperatures and a reversal of the climatological winds from eastward to westward. As a result, large changes in GW filtering conditions occur, making SSWs an excellent tool to empirically test the inter-hemispheric coupling mechanism. In this study, mesopause GW forcing derived from meteor radar observations over Trondheim, Norway (63°N, 10°E) during the January 2013 major SSW is discussed in light of the polar vortex strength and selective filtering conditions over the same location to show the coupling between the polar winter stratosphere and MLT. Global temperature observations obtained with the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are subsequently used to study the temperature signature of the SSW in the MLT region over the winter pole in relation to the observed GW forcing. Furthermore, the temperature effect of the SSW throughout the middle atmosphere is tracked, away from the winter pole toward the summer pole, and compared to the temperature structure expected from the inter-hemispheric coupling mechanism.

  14. Numerical modeling of lower stratospheric Doppler ducted gravity waves over Jicamarca, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Li

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Persistent jet structures along zonal and meridional fields, believed to be caused by stationary gravity waves, were detected in February 1999 in MST wind measurements of the troposphere and lower stratosphere over Jicamarca, Peru. Over a seven day span, two days of observations showed signatures of a Doppler ducted gravity wave in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. Herein we present the observations, their characteristics, and results of numerical simulations used to mimic these observed features. Though a fair replication of the observed ducted structure in the numerical model is found, the observed period of ~90 min is nonetheless longer than anticipated and raises concern as to the specific physical nature of the observed structures. However, given the high quality of the observations, we demonstrate that continued analysis of this data set and concurrent modeling will allow for a better understanding of Doppler ducts at high spatial and temporal resolution which can ultimately be applied to studies of mesospheric ducts and bores.

  15. Directional asymmetry of the nonlinear wave phenomena in a three-dimensional granular phononic crystal under gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, A; Tournat, V; Gusev, V

    2014-08-01

    We report the experimental observation of the gravity-induced asymmetry for the nonlinear transformation of acoustic waves in a noncohesive granular phononic crystal. Because of the gravity, the contact precompression increases with depth inducing space variations of not only the linear and nonlinear elastic moduli but also of the acoustic wave dissipation. We show experimentally and explain theoretically that, in contrast to symmetric propagation of linear waves, the amplitude of the nonlinearly self-demodulated wave depends on whether the propagation of the waves is in the direction of the gravity or in the opposite direction. Among the observed nonlinear processes, we report frequency mixing of the two transverse-rotational modes belonging to the optical band of vibrations and propagating with negative phase velocities, which results in the excitation of a longitudinal wave belonging to the acoustic band of vibrations and propagating with positive phase velocity. We show that the measurements of the gravity-induced asymmetry in the nonlinear acoustic phenomena can be used to compare the in-depth distributions of the contact nonlinearity and of acoustic absorption.

  16. Research on Correlation Between Gravity Waves Energy and Jet%急流与低层大气重力波能量的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟; 易帆

    2011-01-01

    通过分析武汉(30.5°N,114°E)上空2000至2004年的Radiosonde常规观测数据,对当地对流层(1~10 km)与低平流层(18~25 km)的某些惯性重力波特征进行了研究,发现重力波能量与急流强度变化之间存在显著的相关.同时分析了海口(20°N,114°E)(2000至2004年)、北京(40°N,116°E)(2001年12月至2003年2月)的Radiosonde观测数据并进行了比较,发现较高纬度地区的相关性明显大于低纬度地区.通过对武汉地区2006年1月5天Radiosonde加密观测数据的分析,讨论了重力波动能与势能的高度变化,进一步发现纬向风的垂直剪切与急流中心的分布分别与重力波势能和动能的强弱分布相对应.%By analyzing the routine Radiosonde data obtained at Wuhan (30.5°N, l14°E) from 2000 to 2004, some characteristics of inertial gravity wave in Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere (TLS) were studied, and a strong correlation between the variation of gravity wave energy and jet intensity was found.Similar result of Wuhan was obtained by analyzing the routine Radiosonde data obtained at Haikou (20°N, 114°E) and Beijing (40°N, 116°E), and stronger correlation was found in higher latitude area.An intensive Radiosonde observation at Wuhan, which lasted 5 days in Jan 2006, was conducted to examine the variation with altitude of gravity wave kinetic energy and potential energy, and it was demonstrated that the excitation of gravity wave in TLS is attributed to jet (zonal wind shear), which suggests that it's a main excitation source of gravity wave in lower atmosphere.

  17. Spectral distribution of gravity wave momentum fluxes over the Antarctic Peninsula from Concordiasi superpressure balloon data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterscheid, R. L.; Gelinas, L. J.; Mechoso, C. R.; Schubert, G.

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves generated by flow over the steep topography of the Antarctic Peninsula transport significant amounts of zonal and meridional momentum into the stratosphere. Quantitative determination of this transport has been carried out for wave periods of 1 h or greater using data from a previous Antarctic superpressure balloon campaign in austral spring 2005 (VORCORE). The present study uses data from the later Concordiasi campaign (2010) to extend the momentum flux determination to shorter periods. Maps of the vertical fluxes of meridional and zonal momentum are presented for periods down to 12 min. We find that the momentum fluxes for periods below 1 h are comparable to those at longer periods, despite larger variances at longer periods. The momentum fluxes in the vicinity of the peninsula provide a significant zonal acceleration of the lower stratosphere, confirming a conclusion from the VORCORE data. The geographical distribution of fluxes around the peninsula has peaks both leeward and windward of the main terrain features. Numerical simulations suggest that the separate peaks may be related to wave transience caused by unsteady winds over the peninsula. Momentum fluxes comprise a main distribution maximizing at moderate flux values and a secondary distribution maximizing at high values exhibiting a high degree of intermittency. The high flux events account for the largest part of the average flux and suggest that drag parameterizations should take them into account. It is found that waves generated by the jet stream are also a significant source of momentum flux.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL AND TOPOGRAPHIC INFLUENCES ON ATMOSPHERIC INTERNAL SHIP WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZANG Zeng-liang; PAN Xiao-bin; ZHANG Ming

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model was used to investigate the influences of environmental and topographic parameters on the atmospheric three-layer internal ship waves. The results show that both the wavelength and the wedge angle decrease with an increase in the Scorer parameter, and the rate of changes in the wavelength and wedge angle are also alike. The results also show that the wedge angle decreases with an increase in the width of mountain, but the wavelength varies little with it. It is suggested that the wedge angle is determined by the ratio of the wavelength to the scale of the mountain. Besides, numerical sensitivity experiments were performed to test the former numerical experiments. The simulated results are consistent with the analytical results.

  19. Interdecadal change of atmospheric stationary waves and North China drought

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Xin-Gang; Fu Cong-Bin; Wang Ping

    2005-01-01

    The inderdecadal change of atmospheric stationary waves (ATW) has been investigated for the two periods 1956-77 and 1978-99. The trough of ATW in the middle and low layer of the troposphere over the Asian continent has experienced a significant weakening during the past two decades, which exerts a great influence on the North China climate. The ATW in 200 hPa has also exhibited some changes since 1977, as a stationary ridge appeared over the northwestern China while a stationary trough appeared above North China. This leads to an increasing of the upward motion above northwestern China and a decreasing above North China. A west-east section of the stationary waves at 40°N shows that the ATW above North China tilted westward for the period 1956-77, but was almost upright during 1978-99. The composite analysis confirms that the climate mean ATW pattern after 1977 is similar to the dry pattern for North China, while the rainy pattern is similar to that before 1977. In consequence, the North China drought is partly due to the interdecadal change of the ATW over boreal Asia in the recent two decades.

  20. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Small surface wave discharge at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss'ovski, Zh; Kolev, M.; Ivanov, A.; Lishev, St.; Koleva, I.

    2009-09-01

    A small surface wave driven source produces plasma at atmospheric pressure. Microwave power at frequency 2.45 GHz is coupled with the source and a discharge is ignited at power levels below 10 W. The coaxial exciter of the surface waves has a length of 10 mm because its dielectric is a high permittivity discharge tube. The plasma source operates as a plasma jet in the case of plasma columns longer than the tube length. The source maintains stable plasma columns over a wide range of neutral gas flow and applied power in continuous and pulse regimes. An additional advantage of this source is the discharge self-ignition. An electron temperature of Te ~ 1.9 eV and a density of ne ~ 3.9 × 1014 cm-3 are estimated by the probe diagnostics method. The emission spectra in the wavelength range 200-1000 nm under different experimental conditions are analysed and they prove the applicability of the source for analytical spectroscopy. The dependences of column length, reflected power and plasma parameters on the gas flow and the input power are discussed.

  1. Geodetic refraction effects of electromagnetic wave propagation through the atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    1984-01-01

    With very few exceptions, geodetic measurements use electro­ magnetic radiation in order to measure directions, distances, time delays, and Doppler frequency shifts, to name the main ter­ restrial and space observables. Depending on the wavelength of the radiation and the purpose of the measurements, the follow­ ing parameters of the electromagnetic wave are measured: ampli­ tude, phase, angle-of-arrival, polarisation and frequency. Ac­ curate corrections have to be applied to the measurements in order to take into account the effects of the intervening medium between transmitter and receiver. The known solutions use at­ mospheric models, special observation programs, remote sensing techniques and instrumental methods. It has been shown that the effects of the earth's atmospheric envelope present a fundamental limitation to the accuracy and precision of geodetic measurements. This applies equally to ter­ restrial and space applications. Instrumental accuracies are al­ ready below the atmospherically i...

  2. Frozen-wave instability in near-critical hydrogen subjected to horizontal vibration under various gravity fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandikota, G; Chatain, D; Amiroudine, S; Lyubimova, T; Beysens, D

    2014-01-01

    The frozen-wave instability which appears at a liquid-vapor interface when a harmonic vibration is applied in a direction tangential to it has been less studied until now. The present paper reports experiments on hydrogen (H2) in order to study this instability when the temperature is varied near its critical point for various gravity levels. Close to the critical point, a liquid-vapor density difference and surface tension can be continuously varied with temperature in a scaled, universal way. The effect of gravity on the height of the frozen waves at the interface is studied by performing the experiments in a magnetic facility where effective gravity that results from the coupling of the Earth's gravity and magnetic forces can be varied. The stability diagram of the instability is obtained. The experiments show a good agreement with an inviscid model [Fluid Dyn. 21 849 (1987)], irrespective of the gravity level. It is observed in the experiments that the height of the frozen waves varies weakly with temperature and increases with a decrease in the gravity level, according to a power law with an exponent of 0.7. It is concluded that the wave height becomes of the order of the cell size as the gravity level is asymptotically decreased to zero. The interface pattern thus appears as a bandlike pattern of alternate liquid and vapor phases, a puzzling phenomenon that was observed with CO2 and H2 near their critical point in weightlessness [Acta Astron. 61 1002 (2007); Europhys. Lett. 86 16003 (2009)].

  3. Properties of internal planetary-scale inertio gravity waves in the mesosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. G. Mayr

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available At high latitudes in the upper mesosphere, horizontal wind oscillations have been observed with periods around 10h. Waves with such a period are generated in our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM, and they are identified as planetary-scale inertio gravity waves (IGW. These IGWs have periods between 9 and 11h and appear above 60km in the zonal mean (m=0, as well as in m=1 to 4, propagating eastward and westward. Under the influence of the Coriolis force, the amplitudes of the waves propagating westward are larger at high latitudes than those propagating eastward. The waves grow in magnitude at least up to about 100km and have vertical wavelengths around 25km. Applying a running window of 15 days for spectral analysis, the amplitudes in the wind field are typically between 10 and 20m/s and can reach 30m/s in the westward propagating component for m=1 at the poles. In the temperature perturbations, the wave amplitudes above 100km are typically 5K and as large as 10K for m=0 at the poles. The IGWs are intermittent but reveal systematic seasonal variations, with the largest amplitudes occurring generally in late winter and spring. Numerical experiments show that such waves are also generated without excitation of the migrating tides. The amplitudes and periods then are similar, indicating that the tides are not essential to generate the waves. However, the seasonal variations without tides are significantly different, which leads to the conclusion that non linear interactions between the semidiurnal tide and planetary waves must contribute to the excitation of the IGWs. Directly or indirectly through the planetary waves, the IGWs are apparently excited by the instabilities that arise in the zonal mean circulation. When the solar heating is turned off for m=0, both the PWs and IGWs essentially disappear. That the IGWs and PWs have common roots in their excitation mechanism is also indicated by the striking similarity of their seasonal variations in the

  4. Simulating influence of QBO phase on planetary waves during a stratospheric warming in a general circulation model of the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, Andrey; Gavrilov, Nikolai; Pogoreltsev, Alexander; Savenkova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    One of the important factors of dynamical interactions between the lower and upper atmosphere is energy and momentum transfer by atmospheric internal gravity waves. For numerical modeling of the general circulation and thermal regime of the middle and upper atmosphere, it is important to take into account accelerations of the mean flow and heating rates produced by dissipating internal waves. The quasi-biennial oscillations (QBOs) of the zonal mean flow at lower latitudes at stratospheric heights can affect the propagation conditions of planetary waves. We perform numerical simulation of global atmospheric circulation for the initial conditions corresponding to the years with westerly and easterly QBO phases. We focus on the changes in amplitudes of stationary planetary waves (SPWs) and traveling normal atmospheric modes (NAMs) in the atmosphere during SSW events for the different QBO phases. For these experiments, we use the global circulation of the middle and upper atmosphere model (MUAM). There is theory of PW waveguide describing atmospheric regions where the background wind and temperature allow the wave propagation. There were introduced the refractive index for PWs and found that strongest planetary wave propagation is in areas of large positive values of this index. Another important PW characteristic is the Eliassen-Palm flux (EP-flux). These characteristics are considered as useful tools for visualizing the PW propagation conditions. Sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event has significant influence on the formation of the weather anomalous and climate changes in the troposphere. Also, SSW event may affect the dynamical and energy processes in the upper atmosphere. The major SSW events imply significant temperature rises (up to 30 - 40 K) at altitudes 30 - 50 km accompanying with corresponding decreases, or reversals, of climatological eastward zonal winds in the stratosphere.

  5. A theoretical comparison of internal gravity wave propagation and dissipation in high and low temperature thermospheres Implications for orbiting spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, M. P.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the propagation and dissipation characteristics of a number of individual internal gravity waves are discussed and compared by using a multilayer, time-averaged model in which the waves lose energy due to viscous, thermal conduction and ion-drag dissipation. From this both the height and horizontal distance (from an assumed 'source') at which the waves achieve a maximum density amplitude may be determined. Such calculations are performed for both a very hot and a very cold thermosphere, and the subsequent differences in the wave characteristics and their relation to the control of orbiting spacecraft for each of these is discussed.

  6. Rayleigh-Taylor Gravity Waves and Quasiperiodic Oscillation Phenomenon in X-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev

    2002-01-01

    Accretion onto compact objects in X-ray binaries (black hole, neutron star (NS), white dwarf) is characterized by non-uniform flow density profiles. Such an effect of heterogeneity in presence of gravitational forces and pressure gradients exhibits Rayleigh-Taylor gravity waves (RTGW). They should be seen as quasiperiodic wave oscillations (QPO) of the accretion flow in the transition (boundary) layer between the Keplerian disk and the central object. In this paper the author shows that the main QPO frequency, which is very close to the Keplerian frequency, is split into separate frequencies (hybrid and low branch) under the influence of the gravitational forces in the rotational frame of reference. The RTGWs must be present and the related QPOs should be detected in any system where the gravity, buoyancy and Coriolis force effects cannot be excluded (even in the Earth and solar environments). The observed low and high QPO frequencies are an intrinsic signature of the RTGW. The author elaborates the conditions for the density profile when the RTGW oscillations are stable. A comparison of the inferred QPO frequencies with QPO observations is presented. The author finds that hectohertz frequencies detected from NS binaries can be identified as the RTGW low branch frequencies. The author also predicts that an observer can see the double NS spin frequency during the NS long (super) burst events when the pressure gradients and buoyant forces are suppressed. The Coriolis force is the only force which acts in the rotational frame of reference and its presence causes perfect coherent pulsations with a frequency twice of the NS spin. The QPO observations of neutron binaries have established that the high QPO frequencies do not go beyond of the certain upper limit. The author explains this observational effect as a result of the density profile inversions. Also the author demonstrates that a particular problem of the gravity waves in the rotational frame of reference in the

  7. Convection and waves on Small Earth and Deep Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddine Semane

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A scaled version of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF spectral hydrostatic forecast model (IFS has been developed with full physics using an Aqua planet configuration. This includes Kuang et al.'s Small Earth Diabatic Acceleration and REscaling (DARE/SE approach bringing the synoptic scale a factor γ closer to the convective scale by reducing the Earth radius by γ, and increasing the rotation rate and all diabatic processes by the same factor. Furthermore, the scaled version also provides an alternative system to DARE/SE, dubbed ‘Deep Atmosphere Diabatic Acceleration and REscaling’ (DARE/DA, which reduces gravity by a factor γ and thereby increases the horizontal scale of convection by γ, while only weakly affecting the large-scale flow. The two approaches have been evaluated using a T159 spectral truncation and γ = 8 with the deep convection scheme switched off. The evaluation is against the baseline unscaled model at T1279 spectral resolution without deep convection parametrisation, as well as the unscaled T159 model using the deep convection parametrisation. It is shown that the DARE/SE and DARE/DA systems provide fairly equivalent results, while the DARE/DA system seems to be the preferred choice as it damps divergent modes, providing a better climatology, and is technically easier to implement. However, neither of the systems could reproduce the motion range and modes of the high-resolution spectral model. Higher equivalent horizontal resolution in the 1–10 km range and the full non-hydrostatic system might be necessary to successfully simulate the convective and large-scale explicitly at reduced cost.

  8. Very-Low-Frequency Subionospheric Remote Sensing of Thunderstorm-driven Acoustic and Gravity Waves in the D-region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R. A.; Snively, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    We present observations of thunderstorm-driven perturbations to the D-region ionosphere measured by VLF subionospheric remote sensing (VLF-SRS). VLF-SRS is sensitive to electron density and collision frequency disturbances in a narrow altitude range near 85 km along the great-circle-path (GCP) between a VLF transmitter and a receiver some thousands of km away. These disturbances are measured as amplitude and/or phase perturbations to the continuous VLF transmitter signal. On March 20, 2001, a prominent event was observed by VLF receivers in Colorado monitoring the VLF transmitter in Puerto Rico, exhibiting unusually strong amplitude perturbations of up to 0.6 dB, with periods of 1-3 minutes, but no detectable phase perturbations. As these periods are well below the minimum Brunt-Vaisala period of about 5 minutes, we hypothesize that they may be associated with thunderstorm-generated acoustic waves (AWs). The GCPs from this transmitter to the receivers passed through two thunderstorms at the time of the AW event, one near the southern tip of Florida and the other over the Florida panhandle. The apparent AW event lasted for about one hour and was observed on four near-parallel GCPs separated by a few tens of km at the thunderstorm location. This data shows that VLF-SRS may provide a new, high-time-resolution (better than 1 Hz) monitoring system for acoustic and gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. To investigate the hypothesized AW source for this event, we use a two-step simulation process. A nonlinear, compressible, atmospheric dynamics model is used to simulate acoustic wave propagation from a defined source near the ground to 200 km altitude. Case studies are constructed to investigate different source configurations and perturbations to ionospheric density profiles. The modified electron and neutral density are then input to a finite-difference electromagnetic code that simulates the VLF transmitter signal propagation to the receiver over a distance of ~5000

  9. Impact of Schwarzschild black hole's gravity upon the Rossby wave instability

    CERN Document Server

    Casse, F; Meliani, Z

    2016-01-01

    In an early work the Rossby Wave Instability (RWI) has been proposed to explain variability thought to originate in the close vicinity of black-holes but this was done in the pseudo-Newtonian approach. Here we present the first general relativistic hydrodynamics simulations of this instability not only proving its theorized existence in a full general relativistic (GR) environment but also studying the effect of the strong gravity on the instability. To that end we performed a set of simulations increasingly closer to the black hole with our new GR version of the MPI-AMRVAC code.This allows us to study the minute changes in the behaviour of the instability.We found that the pseudo-Newtonian approach gives adequate results provided that time shifting induced by the black hole gravity is taken into account. Hence, to view the disc as a distant observer would a full GR ray-tracing post treatment of the simulations is a must.

  10. Nonhydrostatic granular flow over 3-D terrain: New Boussinesq-type gravity waves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Orgaz, Oscar; Hutter, Kolumban; Giraldez, Juan V.; Hager, Willi H.

    2015-01-01

    granular mass flow is a basic step in the prediction and control of natural or man-made disasters related to avalanches on the Earth. Savage and Hutter (1989) pioneered the mathematical modeling of these geophysical flows introducing Saint-Venant-type mass and momentum depth-averaged hydrostatic equations using the continuum mechanics approach. However, Denlinger and Iverson (2004) found that vertical accelerations in granular mass flows are of the same order as the gravity acceleration, requiring the consideration of nonhydrostatic modeling of granular mass flows. Although free surface water flow simulations based on nonhydrostatic depth-averaged models are commonly used since the works of Boussinesq (1872, 1877), they have not yet been applied to the modeling of debris flow. Can granular mass flow be described by Boussinesq-type gravity waves? This is a fundamental question to which an answer is required, given the potential to expand the successful Boussinesq-type water theory to granular flow over 3-D terrain. This issue is explored in this work by generalizing the basic Boussinesq-type theory used in civil and coastal engineering for more than a century to an arbitrary granular mass flow using the continuum mechanics approach. Using simple test cases, it is demonstrated that the above question can be answered in the affirmative way, thereby opening a new framework for the physical and mathematical modeling of granular mass flow in geophysics, whereby the effect of vertical motion is mathematically included without the need of ad hoc assumptions.

  11. Gravitational Waves and Inspiraling Compact Binaries in Alternative Theories of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Mirshekari, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation consists of four parts. In Part I, we briefly review fundamental theories of gravity, performed experimental tests, and gravitational waves. The framework and the methods that we use in our calculations are discussed in Part II. This part includes reviewing the methods of the Parametrized Post-Newtonian (PPN) framework, Direct Integration of Relaxed Einstein Equations (DIRE), and Matched Filtering. In Part III, we calculate the explicit equations of motion for non-spinning compact objects (neutron stars or black holes) to 2.5 post-Newtonian order, or $O(v/c)^5$ beyond Newtonian gravity, in a general class of alternative theories to general relativity known as scalar-tensor theories. For the conservative part of the motion, we obtain the two-body Lagrangian and conserved energy and momentum through second post-Newtonian order. We find the contributions to gravitational radiation reaction to 1.5 post-Newtonian and 2.5 post-Newtonian orders, the former corresponding to the effects of dipole gra...

  12. Unseeded Large Scale PIV measurements accounting for capillary-gravity waves phase speed

    CERN Document Server

    Benetazzo,; Gamba,; M.,; Barbariol,; F,

    2016-01-01

    Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV) is widely recognized as a reliable method to measure water surface velocity field in open channels and rivers. LSPIV technique is based on a camera view that frames the water surface in a sequence, and image-processing methods to compute water surface displacements between consecutive frames. Using LSPIV, high flow velocities, as for example flood conditions, were accurately measured, whereas determinations of low flow velocities is more challenging, especially in absence of floating seeding transported by the flow velocity. In fact, in unseeded conditions, typical surface features dynamics must be taken into account: besides surface structures convected by the current, capillary-gravity waves travel in all directions, with their own dynamics. Discrimination between all these phenomena is here discussed, providing a new method to distinguish and to correct unseeded LSPIV measurements associated with wavy structures, accounting for their phase speed magnitude and ...

  13. Matter-wave soliton bouncing on a reflecting surface under the effect of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseghir, A.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Baizakov, B. B.; Abdullaev, F. Kh.

    2014-08-01

    The dynamics of a matter-wave soliton bouncing on the reflecting surface (atomic mirror) under the effect of gravity has been studied by analytical and numerical means. The analytical description is based on the variational approach. Resonant oscillations of the soliton's center of mass and width, induced by appropriate modulation of the atomic scattering length and the slope of the linear potential, are analyzed. In numerical experiments we observe the Fermi-type acceleration of the soliton when the vertical position of the reflecting surface is periodically varied in time. Analytical predictions are compared to the results of numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and qualitative agreement between them is found.

  14. Primordial massive gravitational waves from Einstein-Chern-Simons-Weyl gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon, E-mail: ysmyung@inje.ac.kr, E-mail: tymoon@inje.ac.kr [Institute of Basic Sciences and Department of Computer Simulation, Inje University, Gimhae 621-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations during de Sitter inflation in the Einstein-Chern-Simons-Weyl gravity. Primordial massive gravitational waves are composed of one scalar, two vector and four tensor circularly polarized modes. We show that the vector power spectrum decays quickly like a transversely massive vector in the superhorizon limit z → 0. In this limit, the power spectrum coming from massive tensor modes decays quickly, leading to the conventional tensor power spectrum. Also, we find that in the limit of m{sup 2} → 0 (keeping the Weyl-squared term only), the vector and tensor power spectra disappear. It implies that their power spectra are not gravitationally produced because they (vector and tensor) are decoupled from the expanding de Sitter background, as a result of conformal invariance.

  15. Fast accurate computation of the fully nonlinear solitary surface gravity waves

    CERN Document Server

    Clamond, Didier

    2013-01-01

    In this short note, we present an easy to implement and fast algorithm for the computation of the steady solitary gravity wave solution of the free surface Euler equations in irrotational motion. First, the problem is reformulated in a fixed domain using the conformal mapping technique. Second, the problem is reduced to a single equation for the free surface. Third, this equation is solved using Petviashvili's iterations together with pseudo-spectral discretisation. This method has a super-linear complexity, since the most demanding operations can be performed using a FFT algorithm. Moreover, when this algorithm is combined with the multi-precision arithmetics, the results can be obtained to any arbitrary accuracy.

  16. Satellite traces, range spread-F occurrence, and gravity wave propagation at the southern anomaly crest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrera, M.A. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Tucuman (Argentina). CIASUR, Facultad Regional Tucuman; Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (Argentina). Lab. de Ionosfera; Pezzopane, M.; Zuccheretti, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy); Ezquer, R.G. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Tucuman (Argentina). CIASUR, Facultad Regional Tucuman; Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (Argentina). Lab. de Ionosfera; Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-07-01

    Range spread-F (RSF) and occurrence of ''satellite'' traces prior to RSF onset were studied at the southern peak of the ionospheric equatorial anomaly (EA). Ionograms recorded in September 2007 at the new ionospheric station of Tucuman, Argentina (26.9 S, 294.6 E, dip latitude 15.5 S), by the Advanced Ionospheric Sounder (AIS) developed at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), were considered. Satellite traces (STs) are confirmed to be a necessary precursor to the appearance of an RSF trace on the ionograms. Moreover, an analysis of isoheight contours of electron density seems to suggest a relationship between RSF occurrence and gravity wave (GW) propagation. (orig.)

  17. Gravitational waves in the $f(R,T)$ theory of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, M E S; de Araujo, J C N; Malheiro, M

    2016-01-01

    There is a host of alternative theories of gravitation in the literature, among them the $f(R,T)$ recently elaborated by Harko and collaborators. In these theories the $R$ and $T$ are respectively the Ricci scalar and the trace of the energy momentum tensor. There is already in literature a series of studies of different forms of the $f(R,T)$ functions as well as their cosmological consequences. However, there is not so far in the literature studies related to the gravitational waves in $f(R,T)$ gravity. Here we consider such an issue, in particular studying the putative extra polarization models that can well appear in such theories. To do that, we consider different functional forms for $f(R,T)$.

  18. Some Expressions for Gravity without the Big G and their Possible Wave-Theoretical-Explanation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tank H. K.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This letter presents some new expressions for gravity without the big G and proposes their possible wave-theoretical-explanation. This attempt leads to some insight that: (i We need the proportionality-constant G because we measure masses and distances in our arbitrarily-chosen units of kg and meters; but if we measure “mass” as a fraction of “total-mass of the universe” M 0 and measure distances as a fraction of “radius-of-the- universe” R 0 then there is no need for the proportionality-constant G . However, large uncertainties in the M 0 and R 0 limit the general application of this relation presently. (ii The strength of gravity would be different if the total-mass of the universe were different. Then this possibility is supported with the help of wave-theory. (iii This understanding of G leads to an insight that Plancks-length, Planck-mass and Planck’s unit of time are geometric-mean-values of astrophysical quantities like: total-mass of the universe and the smallest-possible-mass hH 0 = c 2 . (iv There appears a law followed by various systems-of-matter, like: the electron, the proton, the nucleus-of-atom, the globular-clusters, the spiral-galaxies, the galactic-clusters and the whole universe; that their ratio Mass / Radius 2 remains constant. This law seems to be more fundamental than the fundamental-forces because it is obeyed irrespective of the case, whether the system is bound by strong-force, electric-force, or gravitational-force.

  19. Low-noise dc superconducting quantum interference devices for gravity wave detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Insik

    I have designed, built and tested a low noise dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) system which is intended primarily for use in a 50 mK omnidirectional gravity wave antenna. The SQUID system has three SQUIDs on a single chip: one SQUID is the sensor, another SQUID is the main readout, and the last is a spare readout. For good impedance matching between the sensor SQUID and the input circuit, I use a thin-film transformer. This thin-film transformer gives an input inductance of about 1 muH, which is good for many applications. A SQUID system in a gravity wave antenna must operate continuously for at least 6 months with high reliability. To meet these requirements, I fabricated dc SQUID chips from Nb-Al/AlOsbx-Nb trilayers. I tested the SQUID chips in a liquid helium bath and a dilution refrigerator in the temperature range of 4.2 K to 90 mK. I have designed and tested an eddy-current damping filter as a distributed microwave filter to damp out microwave resonances in strip-line input coils coupled to SQUIDs. The filter chip consists of a Au/Cu-dot array. The filter chip was coupled to the SQUID using a flip-chip arrangement on the SQUID chip. I found that the filter reduced noise bumps and removed distortion from the current-voltage curves. To flux-lock the SQUID system, I developed 2-stage SQUID feedback loops. I investigated two cascade SQUID systems in which I feed the feedback signal into the sensor SQUID and couple the ac modulation signal to the readout SQUID. I found that the noise spectrum with 2-SQUID feedback operation recovers the noise spectrum of the sensor SQUID with about 9% higher noise.

  20. Impact of upper-level jet-generated inertia-gravity waves on surface wind and precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zülicke

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A meteorological case study for the impact of inertia-gravity waves on surface meteorology is presented. The large-scale environment from 17 to 19 December 1999 was dominated by a poleward breaking Rossby wave transporting subtropical air over the North Atlantic Ocean upward and north-eastward. The synoptic situation was characterized with an upper tropospheric jet streak passing Northern Europe. The unbalanced jet spontaneously radiated inertia-gravity waves from its exit region. Near-inertial waves appeared with a horizontal wavelength of about 200 km and an apparent period of about 12 h. These waves transported energy downwards and interacted with large-scale convection.

    This configuration is simulated with the nonhydrostatic Fifth-Generation Mesoscale Model. Together with simplified runs without orography and moisture it is demonstrated that the imbalance of the jet (detected with the cross-stream ageostrophic wind and the deep convection (quantified with the latent heat release are forcing inertia-gravity waves. This interaction is especially pronounced when the upper tropospheric jet is located above a cold front at the surface and supports deep frontal convection. Weak indication was found for triggering post-frontal convection by inertia-gravity waves.

    The realism of model simulations was studied in an extended validation study for the Baltic Sea region. It included observations from radar (DWDPI, BALTRAD, satellite (GFZGPS, weather stations (DWDMI and assimilated products (ELDAS, MESAN. The detected spatio-temporal patterns show wind pulsations and precipitation events at scales corresponding to those of inertia-gravity waves. In particular, the robust features of strong wind and enhanced precipitation near the front appeared with nearly the same amplitudes as in the model. In some datasets we found indication for periodic variations in the post-frontal region.

    These findings demonstrate the impact of upper

  1. Effects of Rotation and Gravity Field on Surface Waves in Fibre-Reinforced Thermoelastic Media under Four Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Abd-Alla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation is done to investigate the gravitational and rotational parameters effects on surface waves in fibre-reinforced thermoelastic media. The theory of generalized surface waves has been firstly developed and then it has been employed to investigate particular cases of waves, namely, Stoneley waves, Rayleigh waves, and Love waves. The analytical expressions for surface waves velocity and attenuation coefficient are obtained in the physical domain by using the harmonic vibrations and four thermoelastic theories. The wave velocity equations have been obtained in different cases. The numerical results are given for equation of coupled thermoelastic theory (C-T, Lord-Shulman theory (L-S, Green-Lindsay theory (G-L, and the linearized (G-N theory of type II. Comparison was made with the results obtained in the presence and absence of gravity, rotation, and parameters for fibre-reinforced of the material media. The results obtained are displayed by graphs to clear the phenomena physical meaning. The results indicate that the effect of gravity, rotation, relaxation times, and parameters of fibre-reinforced of the material medium is very pronounced.

  2. Advanced Sine Wave Modulation of Continuous Wave Laser System for Atmospheric CO2 Differential Absorption Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with ITT Exelis have been experimenting with Continuous Wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a means of performing atmospheric CO2 column measurements from space to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission.Because range resolving Intensity Modulated (IM) CW lidar techniques presented here rely on matched filter correlations, autocorrelation properties without side lobes or other artifacts are highly desirable since the autocorrelation function is critical for the measurements of lidar return powers, laser path lengths, and CO2 column amounts. In this paper modulation techniques are investigated that improve autocorrelation properties. The modulation techniques investigated in this paper include sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) sequences in various hardware configurations. A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit perfect autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a Gaussian filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not seriously degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  3. Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction in the Lifecycle of ENSO: The Coupled Wave Oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jialin LIN

    2009-01-01

    To explain the oscillatory nature of E1 Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), many ENSO theories emphasize the free oceanic equatorial waves propagating/reflecting within the Pacific Ocean, or the discharge/recharge of Pacific-basin-averaged ocean heat content. ENSO signals in the Indian and Atlantic oceans are often considered as remote response to the Pacific SST anomaly through atmospheric teleconnections. This study investigates the ENSO life cycle near the equator using long-term observational datasets. Space-time spectral analysis is used to identify and isolate the dominant interannual oceanic and atmospheric wave modes associated with ENSO. Nino3 SST anomaly is utilized as the ENSO index, and lag-correlation/regression are used to construct the composite ENSO life cycle. The propagation, structure and feedback mechanisms of the dominant wave modes are studied in detail. The results show that the dominant oceanic equatorial wave modes associated with ENSO are not free waves, but are two ocean-atmosphere coupled waves including a coupled Kelvin wave and a coupled equatorial Rossby (ER) wave. These waves are not confined only to the Pacific Ocean, but are of planetary scale with zonal wavenumbers 1-2, and propagate all the way around the equator in more than three years, leading to the longer than 3-year period of ENSO. When passing the continents, they become uncoupled atmospheric waves. The coupled Kelvin wave has larger variance than the coupled ER wave, making the total signals dominated by eastward propagation. Surface zonal wind stress (x) acts to slow down the waves. The two coupled waves interact with each other through boundary reflection and superposition, and they also interact with an off-equatorial Rossby wave in north Pacific along 15N through boundary reflection and wind stress forcing. The precipitation anomalies of the two coupled waves meet in the eastern Pacific shortly after the SST maximum of ENSO and excite a dry atmospheric Kelvin wave which

  4. Stability analysis of a tidally excited internal gravity wave near the centre of a solar-type star

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    We perform a stability analysis of a tidally excited nonlinear internal gravity wave near the centre of a solar-type star in two-dimensions. The motivation is to understand the tidal interaction between short-period planets and their solar-type host stars, which involves the launching of gravity waves at the top of the radiation zone that propagate towards the stellar centre. Studying the instabilities of these waves near the centre, where nonlinearities are most important, is essential, since it may have implications for the survival of these planets. When the waves have sufficient amplitude to overturn the stratification, they break and form a critical layer, which efficiently absorbs subsequent ingoing wave angular momentum, and can result in the planet spiralling into the star. However, previous simulations do not find the waves to undergo instability for smaller amplitudes. This work has two aims: to determine any instabilities that set in for small-amplitude waves, and to further understand the breaking...

  5. Multi-instrument gravity-wave measurements over Tierra del Fuego and the Drake Passage - Part 1: Potential energies and vertical wavelengths from AIRS, COSMIC, HIRDLS, MLS-Aura, SAAMER, SABER and radiosondes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Corwin J.; Hindley, Neil P.; Moss, Andrew C.; Mitchell, Nicholas J.

    2016-03-01

    Gravity waves in the terrestrial atmosphere are a vital geophysical process, acting to transport energy and momentum on a wide range of scales and to couple the various atmospheric layers. Despite the importance of these waves, the many studies to date have often exhibited very dissimilar results, and it remains unclear whether these differences are primarily instrumental or methodological. Here, we address this problem by comparing observations made by a diverse range of the most widely used gravity-wave-resolving instruments in a common geographic region around the southern Andes and Drake Passage, an area known to exhibit strong wave activity. Specifically, we use data from three limb-sounding radiometers (Microwave Limb Sounder, MLS-Aura; HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder, HIRDLS; Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry, SABER), the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) GPS-RO constellation, a ground-based meteor radar, the Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS) infrared nadir sounder and radiosondes to examine the gravity wave potential energy (GWPE) and vertical wavelengths (λz) of individual gravity-wave packets from the lower troposphere to the edge of the lower thermosphere ( ˜ 100 km). Our results show important similarities and differences. Limb sounder measurements show high intercorrelation, typically > 0.80 between any instrument pair. Meteor radar observations agree in form with the limb sounders, despite vast technical differences. AIRS and radiosonde observations tend to be uncorrelated or anticorrelated with the other data sets, suggesting very different behaviour of the wave field in the different spectral regimes accessed by each instrument. Evidence of wave dissipation is seen, and varies strongly with season. Observed GWPE for individual wave packets exhibits a log-normal distribution, with short-timescale intermittency dominating over a well-repeated monthly-median seasonal

  6. Effects of the planetary-scale waves on the temporal variations of the O2-1.27μm nightglow in the Venusian upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, N.; Fujiwara, H.; Takagi, M.; Kasaba, Y.; Takahashi, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The O2-1.27 μm nightglow distribution, which has the peak intensity in the depression region of the day-to-night flow, gives us information of the wind field at about 95 km in Venus. The past nightglow observations [Crisp et al., 1996] showed that the intensity of the nightglow in the brightness region changed by 20 % in about one hour, and the brightness region disappeared in less than one day. The observation results obtained by Venus Express (VEX) also showed the temporal variations of the nightglow emission. Some simulation studies suggested contributions of gravity waves generated in the cloud deck (50-70 km) to the temporal variations. However, the causes of the temporal variations are still unknown. In recent years, the importance of planetary-scale waves for the dynamics of the Venusian atmosphere has been recognized. For example, Takagi and Matsuda [2006] suggested that the atmospheric superrotation was driven by the momentum transport due to the vertical propagation of the thermal tides generated in the Venus cloud deck. In order to estimate effects of the planetary-scale waves on the temporal variations of the nightglow, we have performed numerical simulations with a general circulation model (GCM), which includes the altitude region of 80 - about 200 km. The planetary-scale waves (thermal tides, Kelvin wave and Rosbby wave) are imposed at the lower boundary. The amplitudes and phase velocities of the waves are assumed from the study by Del Genio and Rossow [1990]. The nightglow intensity and its global distribution are calculated from the GCM results assuming the chemical equilibration. In this study, we investigate contributions of the planetary-scale waves on the temporal variations of the nightglow shown by past observations. In addition, we show the characteristics of the wave propagation and the interactions between the waves in the Venusian upper atmosphere. Venus Climate Orbiter (VCO), which will be launched in 2010 as the second Japanese

  7. Medium-scale gravity wave activity in the thermosphere inferred from GOCE data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Raphael F.; Bruinsma, Sean; Massarweh, Lotfi; Doornbos, Eelco

    2016-08-01

    This study is focused on the effect of solar flux conditions on the dynamics of gravity waves (GWs) in the thermosphere. Air density and crosswind in situ estimates from the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometers are analyzed for the whole mission duration. The analysis is performed in the Fourier spectral domain averaging spectral results over periods of 2 months close to solstices. A new GW marker (called Cf3) is introduced here to characterize GWs activity under low, medium, and high solar flux conditions, showing a clear solar damping effect on GW activity. Most GW signal is found in a spectral range above 8 mHz in GOCE data, meaning a maximum horizontal wavelength of around 1000 km. The level of GW activity at GOCE altitude is strongly decreasing with increasing solar flux. Furthermore, a shift in the dominant frequency with solar flux conditions has been noted, leading to larger horizontal wavelengths (from 200 to 500 km) during high solar flux conditions. The correlation between air density variability and GW marker allows to identify most of the large-amplitude perturbations below 67° latitudes as due to GWs. The influence of correlated error sources, between air density and crosswinds, is discussed. Consistency of the spectral domain results is verified in the time domain with a global mapping of high-frequency air density perturbations along the GOCE orbit. This analysis shows a clear dependence with geomagnetic latitude with strong perturbations at magnetic poles and an extension to lower latitudes favored by low solar activity conditions. These results are consistent with previous Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) data analysis and with general circulation models.

  8. Southern Africa Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data base (14,559 records) was received in January 1986. Principal gravity parameters include elevation and observed gravity. The observed gravity values are...

  9. NGS Absolute Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Absolute Gravity data (78 stations) was received in July 1993. Principal gravity parameters include Gravity Value, Uncertainty, and Vertical Gradient. The...

  10. Self-gravity density waves in Saturn's rings A, B, and C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griv, Evgeny

    The presence of fine-scale of the order of 100 m density structure in Saturn's brightest rings A and B with the appearance of record-grooves has been revealed by Voyager PPS stellar occultation, and Cassini scince images, UVIS and radio occultations. Both spacecraft missions have shown that these relatively large "irregular variations" in optical depth are not associated with any resonances with known or embedded satellites. This microstructure explains an azimuthal brightness assymetry in Saturn's A ring observed first by Camichel in 1958. We examine the problem of the linear stability of the Saturnian ring system of mutually gravitating particles with special emphasis on its fine-scale density wave structure (almost regularly spaced, aligned cylindric density enhancements and rarefications). In our theory, the density pattern is the manifestation of a compression (longitudinal) density wave propagating around the ring disk at a fixed angular phase velocity despite the general differential rotation of a system; the density enhancements consist of different material at different times. Jeans' gravitational instabilities of small-amolitude gravity perturbations (e.g., those produced by a spontaneous disturbance) are analysed through the use of hydrodynamic equations. An essential feature of this study is that the theory is not restricted by any assumptions regarding the thickness of the system. The ring disk is considered to be thin and its vertical structure is considered in a horizontally local approximation. In the dynamically equilibrium state, the density is regarded as nonuniform between two sharp surfaces, with a vacuum exterior. A plasma physics analytical method is given for the solution of the self-consistent system of the gasdynamical equations and the Poisson equation describing the stability of Saturn's rings when the system is perturbed in an arbitrary manner. That is, when a gravity perturbation does not distort the rings' plane (modes of even

  11. Transient flexural-and capillary-gravity waves due to disturbances in two-layer density-stratified fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Dong-qiang; SUN Cui-zhi

    2013-01-01

    Generation of the transient flexural-and capillary-gravity waves by impulsive disturbances in a two-layer fluid is investigated analytically.The upper fluid is covered by a thin elastic plate or by an inertial surface with the capillary effect.The density of each of the two immiscible layers is constant.The fluids are assumed to be inviscid and incompressible and the motion be irrotational.A point force on the surface and simple mass sources in the upper and lower fluid layers are considered.A linear system is established within the framework of potential theory.The integral solutions for the surface and interfacial waves are obtained by means of the Laplace-Fourier transform.A new representation for the dispersion relation of flexural-and capillary-gravity waves in a two-layer fluid is derived.The asymptotic representations of the wave motions are derived for large time with a fixed distance-to-time ratio with the Stokes and Scorer methods of stationary phase.It is shown that there are two different modes,namely the surface and interfacial wave modes.The wave systems observed depend on the relation between the observer's moving speed and the intrinsic minimal and maximal group velocities.

  12. PMP-2 Report: Equatorial Wave Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, I.

    1982-01-01

    The activities of the pre-MAP project 2 (PMP-2) from 1978 through 1981 are described. The following topics relating to the equatorial middle atmosphere are discussed briefly: (1) the semi-annual oscillation and Kelvin waves; (2) planetary Rossby waves; (3) upper mesospheric waves; and (4) gravity waves.

  13. The DYNAMO Orbiter Project: High Resolution Mapping of Gravity/Magnetic Fields and In Situ Investigation of Mars Atmospheric Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, S.; Chassefiere, E.; Forget, F.; Reme, H.; Mazelle, C.; Blelly, P. -L.; Acuna, M.; Connerney, J.; Purucker, M.; Lin, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamo is a small Mars orbiter planned to be launched in 2005 or 2007, in the frame of the NASA/CNES Mars exploration program. It is aimed at improving gravity and magnetic field resolution, in order to better understand the magnetic, geologic and thermal history of Mars, and at characterizing current atmospheric escape, which is still poorly constrained. These objectives are achieved by using a low periapsis orbit, similar to the one used by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft during its aerobraking phases. The proposed periapsis altitude for Dynamo of 120-130 km, coupled with the global distribution of periapses to be obtained during one Martian year of operation, through about 5000 low passes, will produce a magnetic/gravity field data set with approximately five times the spatial resolution of MGS. Low periapsis provides a unique opportunity to investigate the chemical and dynamical properties of the deep ionosphere, thermosphere, and the interaction between the atmosphere and the solar wind, therefore atmospheric escape, which may have played a crucial role in removing atmosphere, and water, from the planet. There is much room for debate on the importance of current atmosphere escape processes in the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, as early "exotic" processes including hydrodynamic escape and impact erosion are traditionally invoked to explain the apparent sparse inventory of present-day volatiles. Yet, the combination of low surface gravity and the absence of a substantial internally generated magnetic field have undeniable effects on what we observe today. In addition to the current losses in the forms of Jeans and photochemical escape of neutrals, there are solar wind interaction-related erosion mechanisms because the upper atmosphere is directly exposed to the solar wind. The solar wind related loss rates, while now comparable to those of a modest comet, nonetheless occur continuously, with the intriguing possibility of important cumulative and

  14. Effect of asymmetric gravity jitter excited slosh waves at liquid-vapor interface under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Pan, H. L.; Lee, C. C.; Leslie, F. W.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of fluids affected by the asymmetric gravity jitter oscillations, in particular the effect of surface tension on partially-filled rotating fluids (cryogenic liquid helium and helium vapor) in a sub-scale Gravity Probe-B Spacecraft propellant dewar tank imposed by time-dependent various directions of background gravity environment have been investigated. Results show that lower frequency gravity jitter imposed on the time-dependent variations of the direction of background gravity induced a greater amplitude of oscillations and a stronger degree of asymmetry in liquid-vapor interface geometry than that made by the higher frequency gravity jitter. Furthermore, the greater the components of background gravity in radial and circumferential directions will provide a greater contribution in driving more to the increasing amplitude and degrees of symmetry of liquid-vapor interface profiles which, in turn, modify the disturbance of moment of inertia and angular momentum of spacecraft.

  15. Gravitational lensing as a contaminant of the gravity wave signal in CMB

    CERN Document Server

    Seljak, U; Seljak, Uros; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2004-01-01

    Gravity waves (GW) in the early universe generate B-type polarization in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), which can be used as a direct way to measure the energy scale of inflation. Gravitational lensing contaminates the GW signal by converting the dominant E polarization into B polarization. By reconstructing the lensing potential from CMB itself one can decontaminate the B mode induced by lensing. We present results of numerical simulations of B mode delensing using quadratic and iterative maximum-likelihood lensing reconstruction methods as a function of detector noise and beam. In our simulations we find the quadratic method can reduce the lensing B noise power by up to a factor of 7, close to the no noise limit. In contrast, the iterative method shows significant improvements even at the lowest noise levels we tested. We demonstrate explicitly that with this method at least a factor of 40 noise power reduction in lensing induced B power is possible, suggesting that T/S=10^-6 may be achievable in th...

  16. Asymptotically flat black holes and gravitational waves in three-dimensional massive gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Troessaert, Cédric; Troncoso, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Different classes of exact solutions for the BHT massive gravity theory are constructed and analyzed. We focus in the special case of the purely quadratic Lagrangian, whose field equations are irreducibly of fourth order and are known to admit asymptotically locally flat black holes endowed with gravitational hair. The first class corresponds to a Kerr-Schild deformation of Minkowski spacetime along a covariantly constant null vector. As in the case of General Relativity, the field equations linearize so that the solution can be easily shown to be described by four arbitrary functions of a single null coordinate. These solutions can be regarded as a new sort of pp-waves. The second class is obtained from a deformation of the static asymptotically locally flat black hole, that goes along the spacelike (angular) Killing vector. Remarkably, although the deformation is not of Kerr-Schild type, the field equations also linearize, and hence the generic solution can be readily integrated. It is neither static nor sp...

  17. Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifier Second Harmonic as Millimeter-Wave Beacon Source for Atmospheric Propagation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design and test results of a CW millimeter-wave satellite beacon source, based on the second harmonic from a traveling-wave tube amplifier and utilizes a novel waveguide multimode directional coupler. A potential application of the beacon source is for investigating the atmospheric effects on Q-band (37-42 GHz) and V/W-band (71- 76 GHz) satellite-to-ground signals.

  18. Diffusion of Sound Waves in a Turbulent Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard H.

    1960-01-01

    The directional and frequency diffusion of a plane monochromatic 2 sound wave in statistically homogeneous, isotropic, and stationary turbulence is analyzed theoretically. The treatment is based on the diffusion equation for the energy density of sound waves, using the scattering cross section derived by Kraichnan for the type of turbulence assumed here. A form for the frequency-wave number spectrum of the turbulence is adopted which contains the pertinent parameters of the flow and is adapted to ease of calculation. A new approach to the evaluation of the characteristic period of the flow is suggested. This spectrum is then related to the scattering cross section. Finally, a diffusion equation is derived as a small-angle scattering approximation to the rigorous transport equation. The rate of spread of the incident wave in frequency and direction is calculated, as well as the power spectrum and autocorrelation for the wave.

  19. Cosmological Perturbation Theory to second order for curvature, density, and gravity waves on FRW background; and the WMAP results of inhomogeneity and clustering in the early universe

    CERN Document Server

    Patwardhan, Ajay; Kumar, M S R

    2008-01-01

    The second order perturbation calculations for gravity wave and Einstein equation for space time and matter are presented for the FRW metric cosmological model. While exact equations are found, suitable approximations are made to obtain definite results. In the gravity wave case the small wavelength case allows nearly locally flat background for obtaining a fit to the WMAP data. In the density and curvature case the FRW background is retained for the length scale of WMAP. Clustering and inhomogeneity are understood. The gravity wave ripples from Big Bang couple nonlinearly and redistribute the modes to higher values of 'l' giving consistency with the WMAP results. The order by order consistency of Einstein equations relate the second order perturbations in the curvature and density and the wrinkles in spacetime caused by the gravity wave modes reorganize these distributions. The radiation data of WMAP gives the picture of a FRW spacetime deformed and wrinkled consistent with matter distribution to one hundred...

  20. Resonant Alfven waves in partially ionized plasmas of the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Soler, R; Goossens, M

    2011-01-01

    Context. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. In magnetic waveguides resonant absorption due to plasma inhomogeneity naturally transfers wave energy from large-scale motions to small-scale motions. In the cooler parts of the solar atmosphere as, e.g., the chromosphere, effects due to partial ionization may be relevant for wave dynamics and heating. Aims. We study resonant Alfven waves in partially ionized plasmas. Methods. We use the multifluid equations in the cold plasma approximation. We investigate propagating resonant MHD waves in partially ionized flux tubes. We use approximate analytical theory based on normal modes in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations along with numerical eigenvalue computations. Results. We find that the jumps of the wave perturbations across the resonant layer are the same as in fully ionized plasmas. The damping length due to resonant absorption is inversely proportional to the frequency, while that due to ion-neutral collisions is in...

  1. Simultaneous Observations of Mesoscale Gravity Waves Over the Central US with CRRL Na Doppler Lidars and USU Temperature Mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xian; Chen, Cao; Huang, Wentao; Smith, John A.; Zhao, Jian; Chu, Xinzhao; Yuan, Tao; Pautet, Pierre-Dominique; Taylor, Mike J.

    2016-06-01

    We present the first coordinated study of a 1-h mesoscale gravity wave event detected simultaneously by a Na Doppler lidar at Boulder, CO (40.1°N, 105.2°W), and a Na Doppler lidar and an airglow temperature mapper (AMTM) at Logan, UT (41.7°N, 111.8°W) in the mesopause region on 27 Nov. 2013. The vertical and horizontal wavelengths are ~16.0±0.3 and 342.0±10.4 km, corresponding to vertical and horizontal phase speeds of ~4.4±0.1 and 95.0±3.0 m/s, respectively. The wave propagates from Logan to Boulder with an azimuth angle of ~138.1±1.7° clockwise from North. A uniqueness of this study is that the 1-h wave amplitudes on vertical winds have been quantified for the first time by the STAR Na lidar at Boulder. The GW polarization relation between vertical wind and temperature is evaluated. The intrinsic period of the wave is Doppler shifted to ~100 min by a background wind of 40 m/s, which is confirmed by USU lidar wind observations. This study illustrates a great potential of combining multiple instruments to fully characterize mesoscale gravity waves and inspect their intrinsic properties

  2. A case study of the energy dissipation of the gravity wave field based on satellite altimeter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, N. E.; Parsons, C. L.; Long, S. R.; Bliven, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    Wave breaking is proposed as the primary energy dissipation mechanism for the gravity wave field. The energy dissipation rate is calculated based on the statistical model proposed by Longuet-Higgins (1969) with a modification of the breaking criterion incorporating the surface stress according to Phillips and Banner (1974). From this modified model, an analytic expression is found for the wave attenuation rate and the half-life time of the wave field which depend only on the significant slope of the wave field and the ratio of friction velocity to initial wave phase velocity. These expressions explain why the freshly generated wave field does not last long, but why swells are capable of propagating long distances without substantial change in energy density. It is shown that breaking is many orders of magnitude more effective in dissipating wave energy than the molecular viscosity, if the significant slope is higher than 0.01. Limited observational data from satellite and laboratory are used to compare with the analytic results, and show good agreement.

  3. The 6.5-day wave and its seasonal variability in the middle and upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.-L.; Talaat, E. R.; Roble, R. G.; Lieberman, R. S.; Riggin, D. M.; Yee, J.-H.

    2004-11-01

    The zonal wave number 1 planetary wave of period near 6.5 days is a robust feature in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region with prominent seasonal variability as revealed by ground based and satellite observations. This wave and its seasonal variability are well reproduced in a recent one model year run of the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) with its lower boundary specified according to the National Centers for Environmental Prediction analysis (year 1993). Wavelet analysis of the model output shows that in the MLT region the wave maximizes before and after the equinoxes and minimizes at solstices. The wave amplitudes at the equinoxes are smaller than the peaks before and after but are still larger than the wave amplitudes at solstices. However, at the lower boundary near 30 km the wave peaks are predominantly between fall and the following spring. By examining the episodes of maximum and minimum wave amplitude and by conducting additional control experiments using the TIME-GCM, the structure of this planetary wave and the factors determining the wave characteristics and seasonal variability are studied in detail. It is found that the wave source, mean wind structure, instability, and the critical layers of the wave can all affect the wave response in the MLT region and can have a strong seasonal dependence. Before and after equinox, the wave follows the waveguide and propagates from the stratosphere to the summer mesosphere/mesopause, where it may amplify due to baroclinic/barotropic instability. Such instability is usually absent from the equinoctial atmosphere, so that there is no wave amplification at equinox. At solstice the wave decays significantly when propagating away from its winter source due to the strong eastward winter stratospheric jet. In the summer side the westward jet is also strong, and the meridional and vertical extension of the

  4. Asymmetric gravity jitter excited slosh waves at a liquid-vapor-solid interface in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Pan, H. L.; Leslie, F. W.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of fluids affected by the asymmetric gravity jitter oscillations is investigated focusing on the surface tension effect on partially filled rotating fluids in a sub-scale gravity probe-B spacecraft propellant dewar tank. Data obtained revealed that the lower frequency gravity jitter imposed on the time-dependent variations of the background gravity direction induced a greater amplitude of oscillations and a stronger degree of asymmetry in liquid-vapor interface geometry than that caused by the higher frequency gravity jitter. It is also found that the greater the components of background gravity in radial and circumferential directions the greater the contribution to driving more toward increasing amplitude and degrees of asymmetry of the liquid-vapor interface profiles, which in turn modify the disturbance of moment of inertia and angular momentum of spacecraft.

  5. MJO-related intraseasonal variation of gravity waves in the Southern Hemisphere tropical stratosphere revealed by high-resolution AIRS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Chikara; Sato, Kaoru; Alexander, M. Joan; Hoffmann, Lars

    2016-07-01

    The intraseasonal variability of gravity waves (GWs) in the austral summer middle stratosphere was examined using dedicated high-resolution temperature retrieval from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder data. Composite maps were made of stratospheric GW temperature variances, large-scale zonal winds around the tropopause, and precipitation based on the real-time multivariate Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) index. Regional distributions of these quantities are synchronized with the MJO: The GW variances are larger for stronger precipitation and for more strongly westward wind around the tropopause at a given precipitation. These results suggest that the GWs observed by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) in the stratosphere originate from convection. Moreover, it is shown that the zonal wind around the tropopause likely controls the GW propagation into the stratosphere by a critical level filtering mechanism and/or the GW generation by an obstacle source effect. This means that the MJO can modulate the middle atmospheric circulation by regulating the GWs in two ways, namely, generation and propagation.

  6. Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices in the f-plane shallow water system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko, E-mail: nori@phys-h.keio.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Research and Education Center for Natural Sciences, Keio University, 4-1-1 Hiyoshi, Kouhoku-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Inertia-gravity wave radiation from the merging of two co-rotating vortices is investigated numerically in a rotating shallow water system in order to focus on cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry at different values of the Rossby number (Ro). A numerical study is conducted on a model using a spectral method in an unbounded domain to estimate the gravity wave flux with high accuracy. Continuous gravity wave radiation is observed in three stages of vortical flows: co-rotating of the vortices, merging of the vortices, and unsteady motion of the merged vortex. A cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry appears at all stages at smaller Ro (≤20). Gravity waves from anticyclones are always larger than those from cyclones and have a local maximum at smaller Ro (∼2) compared with that for an idealized case of a co-rotating vortex pair with a constant rotation rate. The source originating in the Coriolis acceleration has a key role in cyclone–anticyclone asymmetry in gravity waves. An additional important factor is that at later stages, the merged axisymmetric anticyclone rotates faster than the elliptical cyclone due to the effect of the Rossby deformation radius, since a rotation rate higher than the inertial cutoff frequency is required to radiate gravity waves.

  7. ANALYSIS ON CHARACTERISTICS OF ATMOSPHERIC DUCT AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE PROPAGATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚展予; 赵柏林; 李万彪; 朱元竞; 杜金林; 戴福山

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of introducing the basic categories of atmospheric refraction and their existing conditions, the forming processes of three kinds of atmospheric duets are expounded. Several main characteristics of atmospheric duct are summarized and analyzed, and field sounding data from the WEstern North-Pacific cloud-radiation EXperiment (WENPEX) and meteorological data around the Xisha sea area are used to validate these characteristics. Meanwhile the sensitivities of the evaporation duct height to the variations of atmospheric humidity, the air-sea temperature difference, and horizontal wind speed are examined. With the analysis of the effect of atmospheric duct on the propagation of electromagnetic wave, the maximum trapped-wavelength and the critical emitting angle of elevation for electromagnetic wave which can form duct propagation are derived.At the same time the four kinds of necessary conditions for electromagnetic wave to form duct propagation are brought forward. The effects of atmospheric duct on ultrashort wave propagation,radar observation, short wave communication etc. are also discussed.

  8. influence of gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Mukherjee

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Based upon Biot's [1965] theory of initial stresses of hydrostatic nature produced by the effect of gravity, a study is made of surface waves in higher order visco-elastic media under the influence of gravity. The equation for the wave velocity of Stonely waves in the presence of viscous and gravitational effects is obtained. This is followed by particular cases of surface waves including Rayleigh waves and Love waves in the presence of viscous and gravity effects. In all cases the wave-velocity equations are found to be in perfect agreement with the corresponding classical results when the effects of gravity and viscosity are neglected.

  9. Stabilization of triadic resonance of a finite amplitude gravity wave in the ocean : when a daughter wave is engaged with two fiancés

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Ortiz, Sabine; Lerisson, Gaétan

    2016-11-01

    Triadic instability is a very generic mechanism by which a primary wave of finite amplitude is destabilized by two secondary (daugther) waves forming a resonant triad. For gravity wave in the ocean, as shown by Phillips, O.M. (CUP, 1967) the resonant triads form several continuous family that may be represented in twodimension (2D) as resonant lines in the 2D wave vector space of the secondary wave. We show here that the crossing of two od these branches may results in a double triadic instability where the instability is reduced. Building on McEwan, A.D. & Plumb, R.A. (Dyn. Atm. & Oceans, 1977) we show that this double triadic instability stabilization domain expends from a singular point to a finite significant region when the amplitude of the primary wave is increased. Comparison with direct computation of the instability branches shows that, from very small to order unity primary wave amplitude, the theoretical prediction stay valid and is able to explain the strong departure from the classical triadic instability theory. Support by DGA is acknowledged.

  10. Studies of Millimeter-Wave Atmospheric Noise Above Mauna Kea

    CERN Document Server

    Sayers, J; Ade, P A R; Aguirre, J E; Bock, J J; Edgington, S F; Glenn, J; Goldin, A; Haig, D; Lange, A E; Laurent, G T; Mauskopf, P D; Nguyen, H T; Rossinot, P; Schlaerth, J

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of the fluctuations in atmospheric emission (atmospheric noise) above Mauna Kea recorded with Bolocam at 143 and 268 GHz from the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). The 143 GHz data were collected during a 40 night observing run in late 2003, and the 268 GHz observations were made in early 2004 and early 2005 over a total of 60 nights. Below 0.5 Hz, the data time-streams are dominated by atmospheric noise in all observing conditions. The atmospheric noise data are consistent with a Kolmogorov-Taylor (K-T) turbulence model for a thin wind-driven screen, and the median amplitude of the fluctuations is 260 mK^2 rad^(-5/3) at 143 GHz and 5900 mK^2 rad^(-5/3) at 268 GHz. Comparing our results with previous ACBAR data, we find that the normalization of the power spectrum of the atmospheric noise fluctuations is a factor of 120 larger above Mauna Kea than above the South Pole at millimeter wavelengths. Most of this difference is due to the fact that the atmosphere above the South Pole is...

  11. Turbulence-resolving, two-phase flow simulations of wave-supported gravity flows: A conceptual study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Celalettin Emre

    2016-12-01

    Discoveries over the last three decades have shown that wave-supported gravity flows (WSGFs) are among the participating physical processes that carry substantial amount of fine sediments across low-gradient shelves. Therefore, understanding the full range of mechanisms responsible for such gravity flows is likely to shed light on the dynamics of subaqueous delta and clinoform development. As wave-induced boundary layer turbulence is the major agent to suspend sediments in WSGFs, the scale of WSGFs in the water column is also bounded by the wave-induced boundary layer thickness which is on the order of decimeters. Therefore, in order to explore the details of participating physical mechanisms, especially that due to turbulence-sediment interaction, highly resolved and accurate numerical models or measurements in the laboratory and the field are required. In this study, the dynamics of WSGFs is investigated by using turbulence-resolving, two-phase flow simulations that utilize Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). The effect of variable sediment loading, slope, and wave orbital velocity is investigated via 21 simulations.

  12. Wave-mean flow interaction and its relationship with the atmospheric energy cycle with diabatic heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Anmin; WU Guoxiong

    2005-01-01

    Based on the traditional theory of wave mean flow interaction, an improved quasi-geostrophic Eliassen-Palm flux with diabatic heating included is deduced. It is shown that there exists an intrinsic relation between the atmospheric energy cycle derived by Lorenz and the wave energy transfer derived by Eliassen and Palm. From this relation it becomes clear that the energy propagation process of large-scale stationary wave is indeed a part of Lorenz energy cycle, and the energy transform from mean flow to wave equals the global mass integral of the divergence of local wave energy flux or the global integral of local wave energy. The diagnostic results by using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data suggest that the classical adiabatic Eliassen-Palm flux relation can present only the wintertime wave energy transformation. For other seasons, however, the diabatic effect must be taken into account.

  13. The generation and damping of propagating MHD kink waves in the solar atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, R. J. [Mathematics and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Verth, G.; Erdélyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Hillier, A., E-mail: richard.morton@northumbria.ac.uk, E-mail: g.verth@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: robertus@sheffield.ac.uk [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, 17 Ohmine-cho Kita Kazan, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto City, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan)

    2014-03-20

    The source of the non-thermal energy required for the heating of the upper solar atmosphere to temperatures in excess of a million degrees and the acceleration of the solar wind to hundreds of kilometers per second is still unclear. One such mechanism for providing the required energy flux is incompressible torsional Alfvén and kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves, which are magnetically dominated waves supported by the Sun's pervasive and complex magnetic field. In particular, propagating MHD kink waves have recently been observed to be ubiquitous throughout the solar atmosphere, but, until now, critical details of the transport of the kink wave energy throughout the Sun's atmosphere were lacking. Here, the ubiquity of the waves is exploited for statistical studies in the highly dynamic solar chromosphere. This large-scale investigation allows for the determination of the chromospheric kink wave velocity power spectra, a missing link necessary for determining the energy transport between the photosphere and corona. Crucially, the power spectra contain evidence for horizontal photospheric motions being an important mechanism for kink wave generation in the quiescent Sun. In addition, a comparison with measured coronal power spectra is provided for the first time, revealing frequency-dependent transmission profiles, suggesting that there is enhanced damping of kink waves in the lower corona.

  14. The estimation of 550 km x 550 km mean gravity anomalies. [from free atmosphere gravimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, M. R.; Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    The calculation of 550 km X 550 km mean gravity anomalies from 1 degree X 1 degree mean free-air gravimetry data is discussed. The block estimate procedure developed by Kaula was used, and estimates for 1452 of the 1654 blocks were obtained.

  15. Unfolding the atmospheric and deep internal flows on Jupiter and Saturn using the Juno and Cassini gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanti, Eli; Kaspi, Yohai

    2016-10-01

    In light of the first orbits of Juno at Jupiter, we discuss the Juno gravity experiment and possible initial results. Relating the flow on Jupiter and Saturn to perturbations in their density field is key to the analysis of the gravity measurements expected from both the Juno (Jupiter) and Cassini (Saturn) spacecraft during 2016-17. Both missions will provide latitude-dependent gravity fields, which in principle could be inverted to calculate the vertical structure of the observed cloud-level zonal flow on these planets. Current observations for the flow on these planets exists only at the cloud-level (0.1-1 bar). The observed cloud-level wind might be confined to the upper layers, or be a manifestation of deep cylindrical flows. Moreover, it is possible that in the case where the observed wind is superficial, there exists deep interior flow that is completely decoupled from the observed atmospheric flow.In this talk, we present a new adjoint based inverse model for inversion of the gravity measurements into flow fields. The model is constructed to be as general as possible, allowing for both cloud-level wind extending inward, and a decoupled deep flow that is constructed to produce cylindrical structures with variable width and magnitude, or can even be set to be completely general. The deep flow is also set to decay when approaching the upper levels so it has no manifestation there. The two sources of flow are then combined to a total flow field that is related to the density anomalies and gravity moments via a dynamical model. Given the measured gravitational moments from Jupiter and Saturn, the dynamical model, together with the adjoint inverse model are used for optimizing the control parameters and by this unfolding the deep and surface flows. Several scenarios are examined, including cases in which the surface wind and the deep flow have comparable effects on the gravity field, cases in which the deep flow is dominating over the surface wind, and an extreme

  16. Probing the sky with radio waves from wireless technology to the development of atmospheric science

    CERN Document Server

    Yeang, Chen-Pang

    2013-01-01

    By the late nineteenth century, engineers and experimental scientists generally knew how radio waves behaved, and by 1901 scientists were able to manipulate them to transmit messages across long distances. What no one could understand, however, was why radio waves followed the curvature of the Earth. Theorists puzzled over this for nearly twenty years before physicists confirmed the zig-zag theory, a solution that led to the discovery of a layer in the Earth's upper atmosphere that bounces radio waves earthward-the ionosphere. In Probing the Sky with Radio Waves,

  17. Network Analysis of Atmospheric Rossby Wave Patterns in the Northern Midlatitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P.; Stolbova, V.; Kurths, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rossby waves, the primary contributors to weather and storms in the midlatitudes, are a major phenomenon in the upper atmosphere, and play a large role in poleward heat transport. Understanding the mechanism and features of Rossby waves are crucial for millions of people, especially due to the extreme events caused by Rossby Waves such as the Russian Heat Wave and the flood in Pakistan, both occurring in 2010. In this study, we use an idealized, regional, quasi-geostrophic, coupled ocean-atmosphere model (The Quasi-Geostrophic Coupled Model, or QGCM) to create Rossby waves in the northern hemisphere. We analyze these waves using the emerging technique of climate networks - a useful statistical tool for a range of complex systems, which has proven to be extremely useful in giving new insight into the climate system's behavior. Here, we create networks using different climatic variables, and investigate the properties of Rossby waves, including propagation speed and energy transport. We look at network measures, such as degree and link length, to determine the major features of Rossby waves. Finally, we compare our results to observed data, and show how our findings provide a better understanding of the different regimes of Rossby Waves, their features, and mechanisms of their propagation, which is crucial for forecasting on short and long-range time scales.

  18. A fully-coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave model of the Caspian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, Nicolas; Toumi, Ralf

    2016-11-01

    Located in the mid-latitudes, the Caspian Sea is the largest enclosed basin in the world. A fully-coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave model of the Caspian Sea at high resolution (8 km) for a period of three years is presented. After validating each component of the modelling platform, the wave state of the Caspian Sea is studied. Results show very different wave regimes between the three different basins, a strong seasonality and an almost swell-free state. It is shown here that waves modify the horizontal eddy viscosity and vertical heat diffusion. However, due to a reasonably weak annual wave state, these effects are restricted to the upper-ocean layer (cooling of the SST accompanied with a deepening of the MLD is modelled during autumn and winter. The results also show a significant improvement of the model skill in the representation of the dynamics when ROMS is coupled to WRF. Finally, as ocean surface waves imply feedback at the interface atmosphere-ocean through the transfer of momentum, mass and heat, we investigate their potential effects on the Caspian Sea dynamics. Results are mixed and show a reasonably weak impact of wave-induced processes. While waves have a negligible effect during the winter as wave-induced mixing is confined to the MLD, the summer global SST are less accurately modelled due to the enhancement of mixing in shallow MLDs. However the SST bias, temperature at a subsurface location are improved.

  19. Consistency between Fourier transform and small-volume few-wave decomposition for spectral and spatial variability of gravity waves above a typhoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. I. Lehmann

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Convective gravity wave (GW sources are spatially localized and emit at the same time waves with a wide spectrum of phase speeds. Any wave analysis therefore compromises between spectral and spatial resolution. Future satellite borne limb imagers will for a first time provide real 3-D volumes of observations. These volumes will be however limited which will impose further constraints on the analysis technique. In this study a three dimensional few-wave approach fitting sinusoidal waves to limited 3-D volumes is introduced. The method is applied to simulated GWs above typhoon Ewiniar and GW momentum flux is estimated from temperature fluctuations. Phase speed spectra as well as average profiles of positive, negative and net momentum fluxes are compared to momentum flux estimated by Fourier transform as well as spatial averaging of wind fluctuations. The results agree within 10–20%. The few-wave method can also reveal the spatial orientation of the GWs with respect to the source. The relevance of the results for different types of measurements as well as its applicability to model data is discussed.

  20. Surface gravity waves and their acoustic signatures, 1-30 Hz, on the mid-Pacific sea floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W E; Munk, Walter

    2013-10-01

    In 1999, Duennebier et al. deployed a hydrophone and geophone below the conjugate depth in the abyssal Pacific, midway between Hawaii and California. Real time data were transmitted for 3 yr over an abandoned ATT cable. These data have been analyzed in the frequency band 1 to 30 Hz. Between 1 and 6 Hz, the bottom data are interpreted as acoustic radiation from surface gravity waves, an extension to higher frequencies of a non-linear mechanism proposed by Longuet-Higgins in 1950 to explain microseisms. The inferred surface wave spectrum for wave lengths between 6 m and 17 cm is saturated (wind-independent) and roughly consistent with the traditional Phillips κ(-4) wave number spectrum. Shorter ocean waves have a strong wind dependence and a less steep wave number dependence. Similar features are found in the bottom record between 6 and 30 Hz. But this leads to an enigma: The derived surface spectrum inferred from the Longuet-Higgins mechanism with conventional assumptions for the dispersion relation is associated with mean square slopes that greatly exceed those derived from glitter. Regardless of the generation mechanism, the measured bottom intensities between 10 and 30 Hz are well below minimum noise standards reported in the literature.

  1. Observed longitude variations of zonal wind, UV albedo and H2O at Venus cloud top level: the role of stationary gravity waves generated by Venus topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Hauchecorne, Alain; khatuntsev, Igor; Markiewicz, Wojciech; Marcq, emmanuel; Lebonnois, Sebastien; Patsaeva, Marina; Turin, Alexander; Fedorova, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Based on the analysis of UV images (at 365 nm) of Venus cloud top (altitude 67±2 km) collected with VMC (Venus Monitoring Camera) on board Venus Express (VEX), it is found that the zonal wind speed south of the equator (from 5°S to 15°S) shows a conspicuous variation (from -101 to -83 m/s) with geographic longitude of Venus, correlated with the underlying relief of Aphrodite Terra. We interpret this pattern as the result of stationary gravity waves produced at ground level by the up lift of air when the horizontal wind encounters a mountain slope. These waves can propagate up to the cloud top level, break there and transfer their momentum to the zonal flow. Such upward propagation of gravity waves and influence on the wind speed vertical profile was shown to play an important role in the middle atmosphere of the Earth but is not reproduced in the current GCM of Venus atmosphere from LMD.In the equatorial regions, the UV albedo of clouds at 365 nm and the H2O mixing ratio at cloud top varies also with longitude, with an anti-correlation: the more H2O, the darker are the clouds. We argue that these variations may be simply explained by the divergence of the horizontal wind field. In the longitude region (from 60° to -10°) where the horizontal wind speed is increasing in magnitude (stretch), it triggers air upwelling which brings both the UV absorber and H2O at cloud top level and decreases the albedo, and vice-versa when the wind is decreasing in magnitude (compression). This picture is fully consistent with the classical view of Venus meridional circulation, with upwelling at equator revealed by horizontal air motions away from equator: the longitude effect is only an additional but important modulation of this effect. We argue that H2O enhancement is the sign of upwelling because the H2O mixing ratio decreases with altitude, comforting the view that the UV absorber is also brought to cloud top by upwelling.

  2. Influence of Venus topography on the zonal wind and UV albedo at cloud top level: The role of stationary gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Khatuntsev, I. V.; Hauchecorne, A.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Marcq, E.; Lebonnois, S.; Patsaeva, M.; Turin, A.; Fedorova, A.

    2016-06-01

    Based on the analysis of UV images (at 365 nm) of Venus cloud top (altitude 67 ± 2 km) collected with Venus Monitoring Camera on board Venus Express (VEX), it is found that the zonal wind speed south of the equator (from 5°S to 15°S) shows a conspicuous variation (from -101 to -83 m/s) with geographic longitude of Venus, correlated with the underlying relief of Aphrodite Terra. We interpret this pattern as the result of stationary gravity waves produced at ground level by the uplift of air when the horizontal wind encounters a mountain slope. These waves can propagate up to the cloud top level, break there, and transfer their momentum to the zonal flow. Such upward propagation of gravity waves and influence on the wind speed vertical profile was shown to play an important role in the middle atmosphere of the Earth by Lindzen (1981) but is not reproduced in the current GCM of Venus atmosphere from LMD. (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) In the equatorial regions, the UV albedo at 365 nm varies also with longitude. We argue that this variation may be simply explained by the divergence of the horizontal wind field. In the longitude region (from 60° to -10°) where the horizontal wind speed is increasing in magnitude (stretch), it triggers air upwelling which brings the UV absorber at cloud top level and decreases the albedo and vice versa when the wind is decreasing in magnitude (compression). This picture is fully consistent with the classical view of Venus meridional circulation, with upwelling at equator revealed by horizontal air motions away from equator: the longitude effect is only an additional but important modulation of this effect. This interpretation is comforted by a recent map of cloud top H2O, showing that near the equator the lower UV albedo longitude region is correlated with increased H2O. We argue that H2O enhancement is the sign of upwelling, suggesting that the UV absorber is also brought to cloud top by upwelling.

  3. The aurora as a source of planetary-scale waves in the middle atmosphere. [atmospheric turbulence caused by auroral energy absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Straus, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Photographs of global scale auroral forms taken by scanning radiometers onboard weather satellites in 1972 show that auroral bands exhibit well organized wave motion with typical zonal wave number of 5 or so. The scale size of these waves is in agreement with that of well organized neutral wind fields in the 150- to 200-km region during the geomagnetic storm of May 27, 1967. Further, the horizontal scale size revealed by these observations are in agreement with that of high altitude traveling ionospheric disturbances. It is conjectured that the geomagnetic storm is a source of planetary and synoptic scale neutral atmospheric waves in the middle atmosphere. Although there is, at present, no observation of substorm related waves of this scale size at mesospheric and stratospheric altitudes, the possible existence of a new source of waves of the proper scale size to trigger instabilities in middle atmospheric circulation systems may be significant in the study of lower atmospheric response to geomagnetic activity.

  4. Resonant energy conversion of 3-minute intensity oscillations into Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Kuridze, D

    2007-01-01

    Nonlinear coupling between 3-minute oscillations and Alfven waves in the solar lower atmosphere is studied. 3-minute oscillations are considered as acoustic waves trapped in a chromospheric cavity and oscillating along transversally inhomogeneous vertical magnetic field. It is shown that under the action of the oscillations the temporal dynamics of Alfven waves is governed by Mathieu equation. Consequently, the harmonics of Alfven waves with twice period and wavelength of 3-minute oscillations grow exponentially in time near the layer where the sound and Alfven speeds equal. Thus the 3-minute oscillations are resonantly absorbed by pure Alfven waves near this resonant layer. The resonant Alfven waves may penetrate into the solar corona taking energy from the chromosphere. Therefore the layer c_s=v_A may play a role of energy channel for otherwise trapped acoustic oscillations.

  5. Modeling of Present-Day Atmosphere and Ocean Non-Tidal De-Aliasing Errors for Future Gravity Mission Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann-Wolf, I.; Dobslaw, H.; Mayer-Gürr, T.

    2015-12-01

    A realistically perturbed synthetic de-aliasing model consistent with the updated Earth System Model of the European Space Agency (Dobslaw et al., 2015) is now available for the years 1995 -- 2006. The data-set contains realizations of (i) errors at large spatial scales assessed individually for periods between 10 -- 30, 3 -- 10, and 1 -- 3 days, the S1 atmospheric tide, and sub-diurnal periods; (ii) errors at small spatial scales typically not covered by global models of atmosphere and ocean variability; and (iii) errors due to physical processes not represented in currently available de-aliasing products. The error magnitudes for each of the different frequency bands are derived from a small ensemble of four atmospheric and oceanic models. In order to demonstrate the plausibility of the error magnitudes chosen, we perform a variance component estimation based on daily GRACE normal equations from the ITSG-Grace2014 global gravity field series recently published by the University of Graz. All 12 years of the error model are used to calculate empirical error variance-covariance matrices describing the systematic dependencies of the errors both in time and in space individually for five continental and four oceanic regions, and daily GRACE normal equations are subsequently employed to obtain pre-factors for each of those matrices. For the largest spatial scales up to d/o = 40 and periods longer than 24 h, errors prepared for the updated ESM are found to be largely consistent with noise of a similar stochastic character contained in present-day GRACE solutions. Differences and similarities identified for all of the nine regions considered will be discussed in detail during the presentation.Dobslaw, H., I. Bergmann-Wolf, R. Dill, E. Forootan, V. Klemann, J. Kusche, and I. Sasgen (2015), The updated ESA Earth System Model for future gravity mission simulation studies, J. Geod., doi:10.1007/s00190-014-0787-8.

  6. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru [Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, Aptdo 2759, Quito (Ecuador); Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2012-09-04

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  7. Relationship between propagation direction of gravity waves in OH and OI airglow images and VHF radar echo occurrence during the SEEK-2 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Onoma

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available We report simultaneous observations of atmospheric gravity waves (AGW in OI (557.7nm and OH airglow images and VHF radar backscatter from field-aligned irregularities (FAI in the E-region during the SEEK-2 (Sporadic-E Experiment over Kyushu 2 campaign period from 29 July to 9 August 2002. An all-sky imager was operated at Nishino-Omote (30.5 N, 130.1 E, Japan. On 14 nights, 17 AGW events were detected in OI and OH airglow images. AGW propagated mostly toward the northeast or southeast. From comparison with the E-region FAI occurrence, which is detected by a nearby VHF radar (31.57MHz, we found that AGW tended to propagate southeastward during FAI events. This result suggests that the interaction between AGW and E-region plasma plays an important role in generating FAI. Furthermore, polarization electric fields generated directly by AGW may contribute to the FAI generation.

    Keywords. Atmospheric composition and structure (Airglow and aurora, Ionosphere (Ionospheric irregularities, Mid-latitude ionosphere

  8. The 1998 November 14 Occultation of GSC 0622-00345 by Saturn. II. Stratospheric Thermal Profile, Power Spectrum, and Gravity Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Harrington, Joseph; Matcheva, Katia; 10.1088/0004-637X/716/1/404

    2010-01-01

    On 1998 November 14, Saturn and its rings occulted the star GSC 0622-00345. The occultation latitude was 55.5 degrees S. This paper analyzes the 2.3 {\\mu}m light curve derived by Harrington & French. A fixed-baseline isothermal fit to the light curve has a temperature of 140 +/- 3 K, assuming a mean molecular mass of 2.35 AMU. The thermal profile obtained by numerical inversion is valid between 1 and 60 {\\mu}bar. The vertical temperature gradient is >0.2 K/km more stable than the adiabatic lapse rate, but it still shows the alternating-rounded-spiked features seen in many temperature gradient profiles from other atmospheric occultations and usually attributed to breaking gravity (buoyancy) waves. We conduct a wavelet analysis of the thermal profile, and show that, even with our low level of noise, scintillation due to turbulence in Earth's atmosphere can produce large temperature swings in light-curve inversions. Spurious periodic features in the "reliable" region of a wavelet amplitude spectrum can excee...

  9. Power Absorption of High Frequency Electromagnetic Waves in a Partially Ionized Plasma Layer in Atmosphere Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭斌; 王晓钢

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the absorption, reflection, and transmission of electromagnetic waves in an unmagnetized uniform plasma layer covering a metal surface in atmosphere conditions.Instead of the absorption of the electromagnetic wave propagating only once in previous work on the plasma layer, a general formula of total power absorption by the plasma layer with an infinite time of reflections between the atmosphere-plasma interface and the metal surface has been derived for the first time. Effects of plasma parameters, especially the dependence of the fraction of positive ions, negative ions and electrons in plasmas on the power absorption processes are discussed. The results show that the existence of negative ions significantly reduces the power absorption of the electromagnetic wave. Absorptions of electromagnetic waves are calculated.

  10. Alfven waves in the solar atmosphere. III - Nonlinear waves on open flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollweg, J. V.; Jackson, S.; Galloway, D.

    1982-01-01

    Consideration is given the nonlinear propagation of Alfven waves on solar magnetic flux tubes, where the tubes are taken to be vertical, axisymmetric and initially untwisted and the Alfven waves are time-dependent axisymmetric twists. The propagation of the waves into the chromosphere and corona is investigated through the numerical solution of a set of nonlinear, time-dependent equations coupling the Alfven waves into motions that are parallel to the initial magnetic field. It is concluded that Alfven waves can steepen into fast shocks in the chromosphere, pass through the transition region to produce high-velocity pulses, and then enter the corona, which they heat. The transition region pulses have amplitudes of about 60 km/sec, and durations of a few tens of seconds. In addition, the Alfven waves exhibit a tendency to drive upward flows, with many of the properties of spicules.

  11. Inertia gravity waves in the upper troposphere during the MaCWAVE winter campaign – Part I: Observations with collocated radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Goldberg

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available During the {MaCWAVE} campaign, combined rocket, radiosonde and ground-based measurements have been performed at the Norwegian Andøya Rocket Range (ARR near Andenes and the Swedish Rocket Range (ESRANGE near Kiruna in January 2003 to study gravity waves in the vicinity of the Scandinavian mountain ridge. The investigations presented here are mainly based on the evaluation of continuous radar measurements with the ALWIN VHF radar in the upper troposphere/ lower stratosphere at Andenes (69.3° N, 16.0° E and the ESRAD VHF radar near Kiruna (67.9° N, 21.9° E. Both radars are separated by about 260 km. Based on wavelet transformations of both data sets, the strongest activity of inertia gravity waves in the upper troposphere has been detected during the first period from 24–26 January 2003 with dominant vertical wavelengths of about 4–5 km as well as with dominant observed periods of about 13–14 h for the altitude range between 5 and 8 km under the additional influence of mountain waves. The results show the appearance of dominating inertia gravity waves with characteristic horizontal wavelengths of ~200 km moving in the opposite direction than the mean background wind. The results show the appearance of dominating inertia gravity waves with intrinsic periods in the order of ~5 h and with horizontal wavelengths of 200 km, moving in the opposite direction than the mean background wind. From the derived downward energy propagation it is supposed, that these waves are likely generated by a jet streak in the upper troposphere. The parameters of the jet-induced gravity waves have been estimated at both sites separately. The identified gravity waves are coherent at both locations and show higher amplitudes on the east-side of the Scandinavian mountain ridge, as expected by the influence of mountains.

  12. Testing Chern-Simons modified gravity with gravitational-wave detections of extreme-mass-ratio binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canizares, Priscilla; Gair, Jonathan R.; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2012-08-01

    The detection of gravitational waves from extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (EMRI) binaries, comprising a stellar-mass compact object orbiting around a massive black hole, is one of the main targets for low-frequency gravitational-wave detectors in space, like the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) or evolved LISA/New Gravitational Observatory (eLISA/NGO). The long-duration gravitational-waveforms emitted by such systems encode the structure of the strong field region of the massive black hole, in which the inspiral occurs. The detection and analysis of EMRIs will therefore allow us to study the geometry of massive black holes and determine whether their nature is as predicted by general relativity and even to test whether general relativity is the correct theory to describe the dynamics of these systems. To achieve this, EMRI modeling in alternative theories of gravity is required to describe the generation of gravitational waves. However, up to now, only a restricted class of theories has been investigated. In this paper, we explore to what extent EMRI observations with a space-based gravitational-wave observatory like LISA or eLISA/NGO might be able to distinguish between general relativity and a particular modification of it, known as dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity. Our analysis is based on a parameter estimation study which uses approximate gravitational waveforms obtained via a radiative-adiabatic method. In this framework, the trajectory of the stellar object is modeled as a sequence of geodesics in the spacetime of the modified-gravity massive black hole. The evolution between geodesics is determined by flux formulae based on general relativistic post-Newtonian and black hole perturbation theory computations. Once the trajectory of the stellar compact object has been obtained, the waveforms are computed using the standard multipole formulae for gravitational radiation applied to this trajectory. Our analysis is restricted to a five

  13. Compensating laser wave-front aberration in atmosphere 1.27 km away with SBS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youlun Ju(鞠有伦); Qi Wang(王骐); Deying Chen(陈德应); Xin Yu(于欣); Yuezhu Wang(王月珠)

    2003-01-01

    It is reported that the wave-front aberration produced by atmosphere disturbance can be compensated with nonlinear optics phase conjugate technology. The distance of laser propagating in atmosphere is up to 1.27 km away. The result shows that SBS phase conjugating beam energy can be focus in a little area on target. And the biggest energy of phase conjugating beam on target is up to 142 mJ.

  14. Propagation of short-period gravity waves at high-latitudes during the MaCWAVE winter campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nielsen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available As part of the MaCWAVE (Mountain and Convective Waves Ascending Vertically winter campaign an all-sky monochromatic CCD imager has been used to investigate the properties of short-period mesospheric gravity waves at high northern latitudes. Sequential measurements of several nightglow emissions were made from Esrange, Sweden, during a limited period from 27–31 January 2003. Coincident wind measurements over the altitude range (~80–100 km using two meteor radar systems located at Esrange and Andenes have been used to perform a novel investigation of the intrinsic properties of five distinct wave events observed during this period. Additional lidar and MSIS model temperature data have been used to investigate their nature (i.e. freely propagating or ducted. Four of these extensive wave events were found to be freely propagating with potential source regions to the north of Scandinavia. No evidence was found for strong orographic forcing by short-period waves in the airglow emission layers. The fifth event was most unusual exhibiting an extensive, but much smaller and variable wavelength pattern that appeared to be embedded in the background wind field. Coincident wind measurements indicated the presence of a strong shear suggesting this event was probably due to a large-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.

  15. Experimental Study On The Mixing Induced By Inertia-gravity Wave Breaking On The Dynamical Barrier of A Vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, F.; Flor, J.

    We present the results of an experimental investigation on the material transport across the shear zone of a cyclonic vortex induced by the breaking of inertia-gravity waves. As has been suggested by McIntyre (1995) this could be a possible mechamism of ozone transport across the dynamical barrier of the polar vortex. The experiments were conducted in a 1 meter size tank containing a rotating stratified fluid. Barotropic vortices were generated by siphoning off fluid with a long perforated tube and per- turbed by planar internal waves generated by the vertical oscillation of a horizontal circular cylinder. As predicted by theorical results based on the WKB approximation, the waves opposing the vortex velocity field were trapped in the outer edge of the vor- tex. In some cases, the increase of wave energy in this region was strong enough to lead to 3-dimensional breaking of the wave pattern. Experimental visualization tech- niques were used to determine the class of instability responsible for this breaking and to measure the induced mixing. A simple model to predict the efficiency of the mixing process will be presented.

  16. Part of evanescent modes in the normally incident gravity surface wave's energy layout around a submerged obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charland, J.; Rey, V.; Touboul, J.

    2012-04-01

    Part of evanescent modes in the normally incident gravity surface wave's energy layout around a submerged obstacle Jenna Charland *1, Vincent Rey *2, Julien Touboul *2 *1 Mediterraneen Institute of Oceanography. Institut des Sciences de l'Ingénieur Toulon-Var. Avenue Georges Pompidou, BP 56, 83162 La Valette du Var Cedex, France. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Délégation Normandie. Projet soutenu financièrement par la Délégation Générale de l'Armement. *2 Mediterraneen Institute of Oceanography. Institut des Sciences de l'Ingénieur Toulon-Var. Avenue Georges Pompidou, BP 56, 83162 La Valette du Var Cedex, France. During the last decades various studies have been performed to understand the wave propagation over varying bathymetries. Few answers related to this non linear problem were given by the Patarapanich's studies which described the reflection coefficient of a submerged plate as a function of the wavelength. Later Le-Thi-Minh [2] demonstrated the necessity of taking into account the evanescent modes to better describe the propagation of waves over a varying bathymetry. However, all these studies stare at pseudo-stationary state that allows neither the comprehension of the transient behaviour of propagative modes nor the role of the evanescent modes in this unstationnary process. Our study deals with the wave establishment over a submerged plate or step and focuses on the evanescent modes establishment. Rey [3] described the propagation of a normally incident surface gravity wave over a varying topography on the behaviour of the fluid using a linearized potential theory solved by a numerical model using an integral method. This model has a large field of application and has been adapted to our case. This code still solves a stationary problem but allows us to calculate the contribution of the evanescent modes in the energy layout around a submerged plate or a submerged step. The results will show the importance of the trapped energy

  17. The oxygen red OI 630.0 nm line nightglow intensity as an indicator of atmospheric waves propagation in the mid-latitude ionosphere F2 region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javakhishvili, Giorgi; Didebulidze, Goderdzi; Gudadze, Nikoloz; Toriashvili, Lexo

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of the oxygen red OI 630.0 nm line nightglow intensity under influence of atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) is considered, taking into account nightly changes of the thermosphere meridional wind by observations from Abastumani (41.75 N; 42.82 E). The vortical type perturbations, which can be in situ excited, are also considered. On the basis of theoretical model, the 630.0 nm line integral intensity variations are estimated taking into account thermosphere wind field changes and atmospheric waves propagation influence on the nighttime ionosphere F2 layer. A possibility of identification of waves propagation from polar and equatorial regions during various helio-geophysical conditions is noted. The cases of detected large scale traveling ionosphere disturbances -TIDs (mostly generated in the polar regions) and traveling atmospheric disturbances -TADs (which can be generated both in polar and equatorial regions) are demonstrated. Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by Shota Rustaveli National Science Foundation Grant no. 31/56.

  18. Perturbed black holes in Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity: stability, ringdown, and gravitational-wave emission

    CERN Document Server

    Blázquez-Salcedo, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational waves emitted by distorted black holes---such as those arising from the coalescence of two neutron stars or black holes---carry not only information about the corresponding spacetime but also about the underlying theory of gravity. Although general relativity remains the simplest, most elegant and viable theory of gravitation, there are generic and robust arguments indicating that it is not the ultimate description of the gravitational universe. Here we focus on a particularly appealing extension of general relativity, which corrects Einstein's theory through the addition of terms which are second order in curvature: the topological Gauss-Bonnet invariant coupled to a dilaton. We study gravitational-wave emission from black holes in this theory, and (i) find strong evidence that black holes are linearly (mode) stable against both axial and polar perturbations; (ii) discuss how the quasinormal modes of black holes can be excited during collisions involving black holes, and finally (iii) show that...

  19. The Oblique Incident Effects of Electromagnetic Wave in Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Yong; JIANG Zhonghe; HU Xiwei; LIU Minghai

    2008-01-01

    The propagating behaviours, i.e. phase shift, transmissivity, reflectivity and absorptivity, of an electromagnetic (EM) wave in a two-dimensional atmospheric pressure plasma layer are described by the numerical solutions of integral-differential Maxwell's equations through a generalized finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) algorithm. These propagating behaviours are found to be strongly affected by five factors: two EM wave characteristics relevan.t to the oblique incident and three dimensionless factors. The two EM wave factors are the polarization mode (TM mode or TE mode) and its incident angle. The three dimensionless factors are: the ratio of the maximum electron density to the critical density n0/ncr, the ratio of the plasma layer width to the wave length d/λ, and the ratio of the collision frequency between electrons and neutrals to the incident wave frequency ve0/f.

  20. Advection of pollutants by internal solitary waves in oceanic and atmospheric stable stratifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Haarlemmer

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available When a pollutant is released into the ocean or atmosphere under turbulent conditions, even a steady release is captured by large eddies resulting in localized patches of high concentration of the pollutant. If such a cloud of pollutant subsequently enters a stable stratification-either a pycnocline or thermocline-then internal waves are excited. Since large solitary internal waves have a recirculating core, pollutants may be trapped in the sclitary wave, and advected large distances through the waveguide provided by the stratification. This paper addresses the mechanisms, through computer and physical simulation, by which a localized release of a dense pollutant results in solitary waves that trap the pollutant or disperse the pollutant faster than in the absence of the waves.

  1. On the practical applications of atmosphere-ocean and atmosphere-wave coupling in mesoscale numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanski, Adam

    The objectives of this work were to develop coupled atmosphere-ocean and atmosphere-wave models for the verification of the atmospheric simulations, model the small-scale ocean circulations, analyze the role of the atmospheric stability in the generation of coastal upwelling, improve the accuracy of numerical prediction over the coastal areas, and develop a parameterization of the swell-induced wind stress. The study confirmed the applicability of the high resolution Mesoscale Model 5 (MM5) wind field prediction to driving small scale ocean models applied to the U.S. West Coast, and showed that the small-scale circulation pattern of Bodega Bay can be well simulated even by the relatively simple 2D ocean model. Additional experiments performed with the complex 3D Princeton Ocean Model (POM) coupled with the MM5 showed the importance of the atmospheric stability in terms of the modification of the wind stress-curl pattern and the generation of coastal upwelling. The study revealed that the introduction of the stability effect to the wind stress computation may change the monthly mean wind stress curl by up to 0.15Pa/100km, and increase the simulated upwelling velocity by up to 25%, significantly improving the picture of the simulated upwelling and relaxation events. Further analysis performed with the MM5 model run at 9km resolution, showed that the introduction of the atmosphere-ocean coupling greatly improved the quality of the model results. The comparison with buoy data revealed that the atmosphere-ocean coupling led to a 95% increase in the correlation coefficients of the air temperature and heat fluxes, 23% for the wind direction, and up to 25% for the wind speed, and the reduction of the mean errors by up to 30%. The air-wave interaction model developed during this study showed the applicability of the innovative semi-analytical approach to the computation of the swell-induced stress. Its results also confirmed the importance of the swell-induced stress for

  2. Analysis and numerical modeling of the global free infra-gravity wave climate for the SWOT mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Aucan, Jérome; Rawat, Arshad

    2013-04-01

    All sea level variations of the order of 1 cm at scales under 30 km are of great interest for the future Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission. That satellite should provide high-resolution maps of the sea surface height for analysis of meso to sub-mesoscale currents, but that will require a filtering of all gravity wave motions in the data. Free infragravity waves (FIGWs) are generated and radiate offshore when swells and/or wind seas and their associated bound infragravity waves impact exposed coastlines. Free infragravity waves have dominant periods comprised between 1 and 10 minutes and horizontal wavelengths of up to tens of kilometers. Given the length scales of the infragravity waves wavelength and amplitude, the infragravity wave field will can a significant fraction the signal measured by the future SWOT mission. In this study, we analyze the data from recovered bottom pressure recorders of the Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunami (DART) program. This analysis includes data spanning several years between 2006 and 2010, from stations at different latitudes in the North and South Pacific, the North Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. We present and discuss the following conclusions: (1) The amplitude of free infragravity waves can reach several centimeters, higher than the precision sought for the SWOT mission. (2) The free infragravity signal is higher in the Eastern North Pacific than in the Western North Pacific, possibly due to smaller incident swell and seas impacting the nearby coastlines. (3) Free infragravity waves are higher in the North Pacific than in the North Atlantic, possibly owing to different average continental shelves configurations in the two basins. (4) There is a clear seasonal cycle at the high latitudes North Atlantic and Pacific stations that is much less pronounced or absent at the tropical stations, consistent with the generation mechanism of free infragravity waves. Our numerical model

  3. Analysis of the global free infra-gravity wave climate for the SWOT mission, and preliminary results of numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, A.; Aucan, J.; Ardhuin, F.

    2012-12-01

    All sea level variations of the order of 1 cm at scales under 30 km are of great interest for the future Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission. That satellite should provide high-resolution maps of the sea surface height for analysis of meso to sub-mesoscale currents, but that will require a filtering of all gravity wave motions in the data. Free infragravity waves (FIGWs) are generated and radiate offshore when swells and/or wind seas and their associated bound infragravity waves impact exposed coastlines. Free infragravity waves have dominant periods comprised between 1 and 10 minutes and horizontal wavelengths of up to tens of kilometers. Given the length scales of the infragravity waves wavelength and amplitude, the infragravity wave field will can a significant fraction the signal measured by the future SWOT mission. In this study, we analyze the data from recovered bottom pressure recorders of the Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunami (DART) program. This analysis includes data spanning several years between 2006 and 2010, from stations at different latitudes in the North and South Pacific, the North Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. We present and discuss the following conclusions: (1) The amplitude of free infragravity waves can reach several centimeters, higher than the precision sought for the SWOT mission. (2) The free infragravity signal is higher in the Eastern North Pacific than in the Western North Pacific, possibly due to smaller incident swell and seas impacting the nearby coastlines. (3) Free infragravity waves are higher in the North Pacific than in the North Atlantic, possibly owing to different average continental shelves configurations in the two basins. (4) There is a clear seasonal cycle at the high latitudes North Atlantic and Pacific stations that is much less pronounced or absent at the tropical stations, consistent with the generation mechanism of free infragravity waves. Our numerical model

  4. The acoustic-gravity wave effects of the solar eclipse%日食声重波效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何友文; 孙宏林

    2001-01-01

    By using the data of the rapid-run ionosonde the solar eclipseeffects were summarized at the Manzhouli、 Changchun and Beijing ionospheric observatory during the 9 March 1997 total solar eclipse. It must be pointed out that: (1) The Manzhouli ionospheric observatory was situated north of the position of the total solar eclipse path on 200 km above sea level, the Changchun and Beijing ionospheric observatory were south ; (2) The time for two successive observations was one minute for ten or twenty minutes around the middle of eclipse and five minute for the rest. It shows that: there are the traveling ionosphere disturbances (TID) caused by the acoustic gravity wave in the belt of solar eclipse during the solar eclipse. The TID was excited by the solar eclipse. The motional characteristics of the acoustic gravity wave offects of the solar eclipse were also discussed briefly.%介绍了1997年3月9日日食期间,首次利用地跨主食带区两侧的电离层台阵,食甚前后采用1min1次的同步加密观测的资料。观测证实:日食期间在主食带区日食确有可能诱发声重波所致的电离层行扰现象(TID)。并对其运动学特征作了粗浅的讨论。

  5. Small-scale topology of solar atmosphere dynamics : II : granulation, K2v grains and waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, N.M.; Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    We continue studying the small-scale topology of dynamical phenomena in the quiet-sun internetwork atmosphere throug statistical estimation of the co-location probability of different fine-structure elements and wave modes.In this paper we chart spatial alignments between the granular brig tness st

  6. Impact of a simple parameterization of convective gravity-wave drag in a stratosphere-troposphere general circulation model and its sensitivity to vertical resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bossuet

    Full Text Available Systematic westerly biases in the southern hemisphere wintertime flow and easterly equatorial biases are experienced in the Météo-France climate model. These biases are found to be much reduced when a simple parameterization is introduced to take into account the vertical momentum transfer through the gravity waves excited by deep convection. These waves are quasi-stationary in the frame of reference moving with convection and they propagate vertically to higher levels in the atmosphere, where they may exert a significant deceleration of the mean flow at levels where dissipation occurs. Sixty-day experiments have been performed from a multiyear simulation with the standard 31 levels for a summer and a winter month, and with a T42 horizontal resolution. The impact of this parameterization on the integration of the model is found to be generally positive, with a significant deceleration in the westerly stratospheric jet and with a reduction of the easterly equatorial bias. The sensitivity of the Météo-France climate model to vertical resolution is also investigated by increasing the number of vertical levels, without moving the top of the model. The vertical resolution is increased up to 41 levels, using two kinds of level distribution. For the first, the increase in vertical resolution concerns especially the troposphere (with 22 levels in the troposphere, and the second treats the whole atmosphere in a homogeneous way (with 15 levels in the troposphere; the standard version of 31 levels has 10 levels in the troposphere. A comparison is made between the dynamical aspects of the simulations. The zonal wind and precipitation are presented and compared for each resolution. A positive impact is found with the finer tropospheric resolution on the precipitation in the mid-latitudes and on the westerly stratospheric jet, but the general impact on the model climate is weak, the physical parameterizations used appear to be mostly independent to the

  7. Typhoon generated surface gravity waves measured by NOMAD-type buoys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Clarence O., III

    This study examines wind-generated ocean surface waves as measured by NOMAD-type buoys during the ONR-sponsored Impact of Typhoons on the Ocean in the Pacific (ITOP) field experiment in 2010. 1-D measurements from two new Extreme Air-Sea Interaction (EASI) NOMAD-type buoys were validated against measurements from established Air-Sea Interaction Spar (ASIS) buoys. Also, during ITOP, 3 drifting Miniature Wave Buoys, a wave measuring marine radar on the R/V Roger Revelle, and several overpasses of JASON-1 (C- and Ku-band) and -2 (Ku-band) satellite altimeters were within 100 km of either EASI buoy. These additional measurements were compared against both EASI buoys. Findings are in line with previous wave parameter inter-comparisons. A corroborated measurement of mean wave direction a