WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric co2 concentration

  1. Deep Sea Memory of High Atmospheric CO2 Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathesius, Sabine; Hofmann, Matthias; Caldeira, Ken; Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim

    2015-04-01

    Carbon dioxide removal (CDR) from the atmosphere has been proposed as a powerful measure to mitigate global warming and ocean acidification. Planetary-scale interventions of that kind are often portrayed as "last-resort strategies", which need to weigh in if humankind keeps on enhancing the climate-system stock of CO2. Yet even if CDR could restore atmospheric CO2 to substantially lower concentrations, would it really qualify to undo the critical impacts of past emissions? In the study presented here, we employed an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC) to investigate how CDR might erase the emissions legacy in the marine environment, focusing on pH, temperature and dissolved oxygen. Against a background of a world following the RCP8.5 emissions path ("business-as-usual") for centuries, we simulated the effects of two massive CDR interventions with CO2 extraction rates of 5 GtC yr-1 and 25 GtC yr-1, respectively, starting in 2250. We found that the 5 GtC yr-1 scheme would have only minor ameliorative influence on the oceans, even after several centuries of application. By way of contrast, the extreme 25 GtC yr-1 scheme eventually leads to tangible improvements. However, even with such an aggressive measure, past CO2 emissions leave a substantial legacy in the marine environment within the simulated period (i.e., until 2700). In summary, our study demonstrates that anthropogenic alterations of the oceans, caused by continued business-as-usual emissions, may not be reversed on a multi-centennial time scale by the most aspirational geoengineering measures. We also found that a transition from the RCP8.5 state to the state of a strong mitigation scenario (RCP2.6) is not possible, even under the assumption of extreme extraction rates (25 GtC yr-1). This is explicitly demonstrated by simulating additional scenarios, starting CDR already in 2150 and operating until the atmospheric CO2 concentration reaches 280 ppm and 180 ppm, respectively. The simulated

  2. Uncertainties of predictions of future atmosphere CO2 concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linear carbon cycle models, tuned to reproduce the CO2 increase observed at Mauna Loa, independently of their individual assumptions, predict almost identical CO2 concentration trends for fossil energy scenarios assuming a slightly increasing production in the next few decades. The basic information for such prognoses therefore is the airborne fraction observed over the last 20 years. Uncertainties in this quantity are due to possible errors in the estimate of fossil fuel consumption and the corresponding CO2 emission, possible natural fluctuations in the baseline CO2 level, and uncertainties regarding the biospheric CO2 input and uptake as a result of deforestation and reforestation and land management. Depending on different assumptions the effective airborne fraction, defined as the ratio of CO2 increase due to fossil fuel CO2 alone to the integrated CO2 production, might be as low as 0.38 or as high as 0.72, compared to the apparent airborne fraction of 0.55. The effective airborne fraction derived from carbon cycle models, considering only the CO2 uptake by the ocean, lies in the range 0.60--0.70. A value as low as 0.40 seems therefore highly improbable. A high biospheric anthropogenic CO2 input therefore must have been accompanied by a high CO2 fertilization effect. Model considerations, however, are not in contradiction with a high biospheric input with the maximum production before 1958, which also would imply low preindustrial CO2 concentrations in the range 270--280 ppm as reported recently

  3. CO2 background concentra-tion in the atmosphere over the Chinese mainland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the long-term monitoring data on CO2 concentration, variation trend and characteristics of CO2 background concentration in the atmosphere over the Chinese mainland are analyzed. Results show that the increasing trend of CO2 background concentration in the atmosphere over the Chinese mainland has appeared during the period of 1991-2000. The average annual CO2 growth increment is 1.59 μL/L, and the average annual CO2 growth rate is 0.44%. Distinct seasonal variations of CO2 background concentration are observed, and the averaged amplitude of CO2 seasonal variations is 10.35 μL/L. Regional variation characteristics of CO2 background concentration in the atmosphere and possible impact of human activities on these variations over the Chinese mainland are discussed as well.

  4. The optimal atmospheric CO2 concentration for the growth of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming

    2015-07-20

    This study examined the optimal atmospheric CO2 concentration of the CO2 fertilization effect on the growth of winter wheat with growth chambers where the CO2 concentration was controlled at 400, 600, 800, 1000, and 1200 ppm respectively. I found that initial increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration dramatically enhanced winter wheat growth through the CO2 fertilization effect. However, this CO2 fertilization effect was substantially compromised with further increase in CO2 concentration, demonstrating an optimal CO2 concentration of 889.6, 909.4, and 894.2 ppm for aboveground, belowground, and total biomass, respectively, and 967.8 ppm for leaf photosynthesis. Also, high CO2 concentrations exceeding the optima not only reduced leaf stomatal density, length and conductance, but also changed the spatial distribution pattern of stomata on leaves. In addition, high CO2 concentration also decreased the maximum carboxylation rate (Vc(max)) and the maximum electron transport rate (J(max)) of leaf photosynthesis. However, the high CO2 concentration had little effect on leaf length and plant height. The optimal CO2 fertilization effect found in this study can be used as an indicator in selecting and breeding new wheat strains in adapting to future high atmospheric CO2 concentrations and climate change. PMID:26253981

  5. Algae Technology for Reduction of Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a short overview about the climate situation with regard to CO2, the physiology of photosynthesis will be explained in nonprofessional's style using algae as an example. The photosynthesis products and their conversions into valuable materials for human nutrition or into base substances for diverse industries will be described. Furthermore, I will introduce the state of the art on current scientific projects aiming to improve algae productivity and for the synthesis of therapeutically medicinal proteins. A highly productive algae facility will be introduced including its integration in an energy concept.(author)

  6. A 2-Micron Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development For Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Reithmaier, Karl; Bai, Yingxin; Trieu, Bo C.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2012-01-01

    A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  7. Effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on soil CO2 and N2O effluxes in a loess grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cserhalmi, Dóra; Balogh, János; Papp, Marianna; Horváth, László; Pintér, Krisztina; Nagy, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration proved to be the primary factor causing global climate change. Exposition systems to study the response to increasing CO2 levels by the terrestrial vegetation include the open top chamber (OTC) exposition system, also used in this study. Response of biomass growth and ecophysiological variables (e.g. emission of greenhouse gases (CO2, N2O) from the soil) to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were investigated in the OTC station, located in the Botanical Garden of the Szent István University, Gödöllő , Hungary. Loess grassland (Salvio nemorosae - Festucetum rupicolae) monoliths were studied in OTCs with target air CO2 concentration of 600 mikromol.mol-1 in 3 chambers. The chamber-effect (shade effect of the side of the chambers) was measured in 3 control chambers under present CO2 level. This management was compared to 3 free air parcels under the natural conditions. Changes of soil temperature and soil water content were recorded in each treatment, while PAR, air temperature, precipitation, wind velocity and humidity were measured by a micrometeorological station. Plant biomass was cut down to 5 cm height once a year. Leaf area index (LAI) was estimated weekly from ceptometer measurements, soil CO2 and N2O effluxes were also measured weekly during the growing period and less frequently during the rest of the year. Soil water content in the upper 30 cm of the soil was lower in the chambers by 3 % (v/v) in average than in the field plots. Soil temperature in the chambers at 3 cm depth was 1.5oC lower than in the free air parcels probably due to the shading effect of the larger biomass in the chambers. In the chambers (both the high CO2 and control ones) biomass values (536.59 ±222.43 gm-2) were higher than in the free parcels (315.67 ±73.36 gm-2). Average LAI was also higher (3.07 ± 2.78) in the chambers than in the free air treatment (2.08 ± 1.95). Soil respiration values in the high CO2 treatment was higher in

  8. NEW CONSTRAINT ON ESTIMATION OF THE ANTHROPOGENIC CO_2 BUDGET : RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONCENTRATION AND δ^<13>C OF ATMOSPHERIC CO_2 DETERMINED FROM ICE CORE ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    カトウ, キクオ; コマキ, カオリ; Kikuo, Kato; Kaori, KOMAKI

    1997-01-01

    Studies on ice cores from Antarctica and Greenland revealed variations in the concentration and δ^C of ancient atmospheric CO_2. Since the Industrial Revolution, addition of anthropogenic CO_2 to the atmosphere has caused a significant increase in atmospheric CO_2,accompanied by a decrease in δ^C of atmospheric CO_2. The relationship between them shows that the δ^C value of CO_2 which remained in the atmosphere is significantly larger than -25‰ of that originated from coal burning and defores...

  9. Measurement of Concentration of CO2 in Atmosphere In Situ Based on TDLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Fengxin; Guo, Jinjia; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Zhishen

    2014-11-01

    As one of the main greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, CO2has a significant impact on global climate change and the ecological environment. Because of close relationship between human activities and the CO2 emissions, it is very meaningful of detecting atmospheric CO2accurately. Based on the technology of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, the wavelength of distributed feedback laser is modulated, Fresnel lens is used as the receiving optical system, which receives the laser-beam reflected by corner reflector, and focuses the receiving laser-beam to the photoelectric detector. The second harmonic signal is received through lock-in amplifier and collected by AD data acquisition card, after that the system is built up.By choosing the infrared absorption line of CO2at 1.57μm, the system is calibrated by 100% CO2 gas cell. The atmospheric CO2 in situ is measured with long open-path way. Furthermore, the results show that CO2 concentration decreases along time in the morning of day. It is proved that TDLAS technology has many advantages, including fast response, high sensitivity and resolution. This research provides a technique for monitoring secular change of CO2 in atmosphere.

  10. The characteristics of atmospheric CO2 concentration variation of four national background stations in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide is an important kind of greenhouse gas which influences global temperature. Its concentration variation could indicate the distribution of human and natural activities in various regions. Through the non-dispersive infrared method, flask sampling of atmospheric CO2 concen- tration was measured weekly at four national background stations including Waliguan, Shangdianzi, Lin’an, and Longfengshan. Based on the data collected from September 2006 to August 2007, along with the Waliguan station’s experience on in situ observational data processing, the selection methods for sampling data through the atmospheric background CO2 concentration analysis were preliminarily discussed. On the basis of this result, the variation features of the four typical regions’ atmospheric background CO2 concentration was analyzed for the first time. The results show that the atmospheric CO2 concentration at Waliguan, Shangdianzi, Lin’an, and Longfengshan is 383.5, 385.9, 387.8, and 384.3 ppm, respectively. During the research period, CO2 concentration at the Waliguan station changed slightly. However, the CO2 concentration changed sharply at the Shangdianzi and the Lin’an stations due to the great influence of human activities in the Jingjinji and the Changjiang Delta economic zones, and changed regularly with seasons at Longfengshan station under dual influences of human activities and plant photosynthesis. The results from this study can lay the foundation for more profound studies on atmospheric CO2 concentration level of different areas in China, and could be used to improve the understanding of carbon source and sink distribution.

  11. The space and time impacts on U.S. regional atmospheric CO2 concentrations from a high resolution fossil fuel CO2 emissions inventory

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine D. Corbin; Denning, A Scott; Gurney, Kevin R

    2011-01-01

    To improve fossil fuel CO2 emissions estimates, high spatial and temporal resolution inventories are replacing coarse resolution, annual-mean estimates distributed by population density. Because altering the emissions changes a key boundary condition to inverse-estimated CO2 fluxes, it is essential to analyse the atmospheric impacts of redistributing anthropogenic emissions. Using a coupled ecosystem–atmosphere model, we compare 2004 atmospheric CO2 concentrations resulting from coarse and hi...

  12. Intra-seasonal variability of atmospheric CO2 concentrations over India during summer monsoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi Kumar, K.; Valsala, Vinu; Tiwari, Yogesh K.; Revadekar, J. V.; Pillai, Prasanth; Chakraborty, Supriyo; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2016-10-01

    In a study based on a data assimilation product of the terrestrial biospheric fluxes of CO2 over India, the subcontinent was hypothesized to be an anomalous source (sink) of CO2 during the active (break) spells of rain in the summer monsoon from June to September (Valsala et al., 2013). We test this hypothesis here by investigating intraseasonal variability in the atmospheric CO2 concentrations over India by utilizing a combination of ground-based and satellite observations and model outputs. The results show that the atmospheric CO2 concentration also varies in synchrony with the active and break spells of rainfall with amplitude of ±2 ppm which is above the instrumental uncertainty of the present day techniques of atmospheric CO2 measurements. The result is also consistent with the signs of the Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) flux anomalies estimated in our earlier work. The study thus offers the first observational affirmation of the above hypothesis although the data gap in the satellite measurements during monsoon season and the limited ground-based stations over India still leaves some uncertainty in the robust assertion of the hypothesis. The study highlights the need to capture these subtle variabilities and their responses to climate variability and change since it has implications for inverse estimates of terrestrial CO2 fluxes.

  13. The effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration on carbon isotope fractionation in C3 land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Brian A.; Jahren, A. Hope

    2012-11-01

    Because atmospheric carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of all land-plant carbon, workers have suggested that pCO2 level may exert control over the amount of 13C incorporated into plant tissues. However, experiments growing plants under elevated pCO2 in both chamber and field settings, as well as meta-analyses of ecological and agricultural data, have yielded a wide range of estimates for the effect of pCO2 on the net isotopic discrimination (Δδ13Cp) between plant tissue (δ13Cp) and atmospheric CO2 (δ13CCO2). Because plant stomata respond sensitively to plant water status and simultaneously alter the concentration of pCO2 inside the plant (ci) relative to outside the plant (ca), any experiment that lacks environmental control over water availability across treatments could result in additional isotopic variation sufficient to mask or cancel the direct influence of pCO2 on Δδ13Cp. We present new data from plant growth chambers featuring enhanced dynamic stabilization of moisture availability and relative humidity, in addition to providing constant light, nutrient, δ13CCO2, and pCO2 level for up to four weeks of plant growth. Within these chambers, we grew a total of 191 C3 plants (128 Raphanus sativus plants and 63 Arabidopsis thaliana) across fifteen levels of pCO2 ranging from 370 to 4200 ppm. Three types of plant tissue were harvested and analyzed for carbon isotope value: above-ground tissues, below-ground tissues, and leaf-extracted nC31-alkanes. We observed strong hyperbolic correlations (R ⩾ 0.94) between the pCO2 level and Δδ13Cp for each type of plant tissue analyzed; furthermore the linear relationships previously suggested by experiments across small (10-350 ppm) changes in pCO2 (e.g., 300-310 ppm or 350-700 ppm) closely agree with the amount of fractionation per ppm increase in pCO2 calculated from our hyperbolic relationship. In this way, our work is consistent with, and provides a unifying relationship for, previous work on carbon isotopes

  14. Future atmospheric CO2 concentration and environmental consequences for the feed market: a consequential LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxe, Henrik; Hamelin, Lorie; Hinrichsen, Torben;

    2014-01-01

    that such altered chemical composition and crop yields would have for the production of pig feed. Results revealed, among others, that an extra European demand of pig feed under an atmospheric [CO2] of 550 μmole mole-1 would lead to ca. 6% less expansion of additional arable land worldwide, in comparison to feed......With the rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration [CO2], crops will assimilate more carbon. This will increase yields in terms of carbohydrates but dilute the content of protein and minerals in crops. This consequential life cycle assessment study modelled the environmental consequences...... produced under today’s conditions. However, this did not translate into lower greenhouse gas emissions, because the benefit of increased crop yield was counteracted by changes in the composition of the feed formulation. Among the important changes, feed produced under high [CO2] was shown to integrate 23...

  15. Response of biomass and nitrogen yield of white clover to radiation and atmospheric CO2 concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the present study were to test (i) whether the effect of season-long CO2 enrichment on plant dry matter production of white clover (Trifolium repens cv. Karina) depends on the temperature or can solely be explained by changes in radiation use efficiency, and (ii) whether the atmospheric CO2 concentration affects the relationship between tissue %N and plant biomass. Plants were grown in pots with adequate nutrient and water supply and were exposed to ambient and above ambient CO2 concentrations (approximately +80 ppm, +160 ppm, +280 ppm) in open-top chambers for two seasons. Nitrogen fertilizer was given only before the experiment started to promote N2 fixation. Plants were clipped to a height of 5 cm, when the canopy had reached a height of about 20 cm and when the CO2 effect had not been diminished due to self-shading of the leaves. Photon exposure (400–700 nm) measured above the canopy was linearly related to the above ground biomass, the leaf area index and the nitrogen yield (r2 > 0.94). The slopes of the curves depended on the CO2 concentration. Since most of the radiation (>90%) was absorbed by the foliage, the slopes were used to calculate the CO2 effect on the radiation use efficiency of biomass production, which is shown to increase curvilinearly between 380 and 660 ppm CO2 from 2.7 g MJ−1 to 3.9 g MJ−1. CO2 enrichment increased above ground biomass by increasing the leaf number, the individual leaf weight and the leaf area; specific leaf weight was not affected. The relative CO2 response varied between harvests; there was a slight but not significant positive relationship with mean daytime temperature. At the beginning of the season, plant nitrogen concentration in the above ground biomass was decreased by CO2 enrichment. However, at later growth stages, when the plants depended solely on N2 fixation, nitrogen concentration was found to be increased when the nitrogen concentration value was adjusted for the decrease due to the

  16. Spatial variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations during the ARCTAS-CARB 2008 Summer Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadrevu, K. P.; Choi, Y.; Vay, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) was a major NASA field campaign designed to understand the transport and transformation of trace gases and aerosols on transcontinental and intercontinental scales and their impact on the composition of the arctic atmosphere and climate. Preceding the summer ARCTAS deployment, measurements were conducted over the state of California in collaboration with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) utilizing the airborne chemistry payload already integrated on the NASA DC-8. In situ CO2 measurements were made using a modified infrared CO2 gas analyzer having a precision of 0.1 ppmv and accuracy of ±0.25 ppmv traceable to the WMO scale. This analysis focuses on the atmospheric CO2 variability and biospheric/atmospheric exchange over California. We used multi-satellite remote sensing datasets to relate airborne observations of CO2 to infer sources and sinks. Georeferencing the airborne CO2 transect data with the LANDSAT derived land cover datasets over California suggested significant spatial variations. The airborne CO2 concentrations were found to be 375-380ppm over the Pacific ocean, 385-391ppm in the highly vegetated agricultural areas, 400-420 in the near coastal areas and greater than 425ppmv in the urban areas. Analysis from MODIS fire products suggested significant fires in northern California. CO2 emissions exceeded 425ppmv in the fire affected regions, where mostly Douglas and White Fir conifers and mixed Chaparral vegetation was burnt. Analysis from GOES-East and GOES-West visible satellite imagery suggested significant smoke plumes moving from northern California towards Nevada and Idaho. To infer the biospheric uptake of CO2, we tested the potential correlations between airborne CO2 data and MODIS normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI). Results suggested significant anti-correlations between the airborne CO2 data and

  17. Analysis of influence of atmosphere extinction to Raman lidar monitoring CO2 concentration profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Pei-Tao; Zhang Yin-Chao; Wang Lian; Zhao Yue-Feng; Su Jia; Fang Xin; Cao Kai-Fa; Xie Jun; Du Xiao-Yong

    2007-01-01

    Lidar (Light detection and ranging) system monitoring of the atmosphere is a novel and powerful technique tool. The Raman lidar is well established today as a leading research tool in the study of numerous important areas in the atmospheric sciences. In this paper, the principle of Raman lidar technique measurement CO2 concentration profile is presented and the errors caused by molecular and aerosol extinction for CO2 concentration profile measurement with Raman lidar are also presented. The standard atmosphere extinction profile and 'real-time' Hefei area extinction profile are used to conduct correction and the corresponding results are yielded. Simulation results with standard atmosphere mode correction indicate that the errors caused by molecule and aerosol extinction should be counted for the reason that they could reach about 8 ppm and 5 ppm respectively. The relative error caused by Hefei area extinction correction could reach about 6%. The errors caused by the two components extinction influence could produce significant changes for CO2 concentration profile and need to be counted in data processing which could improve the measurement accuracies.

  18. Phytochemical changes in leaves of subtropical grasses and fynbos shrubs at elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattas, D.; Stock, W. D.; Mabusela, W. T.; Green, I. R.

    2005-07-01

    The effects of elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations on plant polyphenolic, tannin, nitrogen, phosphorus and total nonstructural carbohydrate concentrations were investigated in leaves of subtropical grass and fynbos shrub species. The hypothesis tested was that carbon-based secondary compounds would increase when carbon gain is in excess of growth requirements. This premise was tested in two ecosystems involving plants with different photosynthetic mechanisms and growth strategies. The first ecosystem comprised grasses from a C 4-dominated, subtropical grassland, where three plots were subjected to three different free air CO 2 enrichment treatments, i.e., elevated (600 to 800 μmol mol -1), intermediate (400 μmol mol -1) and ambient atmospheric CO 2. One of the seven grass species, Alloteropsis semialata, had a C 3 photosynthetic pathway while the other grasses were all C 4. The second ecosystem was simulated in a microcosm experiment where three fynbos species were grown in open-top chambers at ambient and 700 μmol mol -1 atmospheric CO 2 in low nutrient acid sands typical of south western coastal and mountain fynbos ecosystems. Results showed that polyphenolics and tannins did not increase in the grass species under elevated CO 2 and only in Leucadendron laureolum among the fynbos species. Similarly, foliar nitrogen content of grasses was largely unaffected by elevated CO 2, and among the fynbos species, only L. laureolum and Leucadendron xanthoconus showed changes in foliar nitrogen content under elevated CO 2, but these were of different magnitude. The overall decrease in nitrogen and phosphorus and consequent increase in C:N and C:P ratio in both ecosystems, along with the increase in polyphenolics and tannins in L. laureolum in the fynbos ecosystem, may negatively affect forage quality and decomposition rates. It is concluded that fast growing grasses do not experience sink limitation and invest extra carbon into growth rather than polyphenolics and

  19. Effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on Pinus ponderosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the results from an experiment of the effects of long-term elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.) saplings and seedlings. The study began in 1983 as a pilot study designed to explore the feasibility of using open-top chambers for continuous multi-year exposures on sapling-sized trees and to examine possible CO2 responses so that future research could be adequately designed. however, following the first year of exposure, preliminary results from the study indicated that measurements of CO2 responses should be intensified. Open-top chambers proved suitable for use in multiyear exposures of mature trees. With respect to the preliminary examination of CO2 responses, many interesting observations were made. The nature of the preliminary results suggests that future long-term field CO2 exposures on perennial species may be critical to the understanding and preparation for future environments. Other research reported here attempted to adapt an existing western coniferous forest growth and succession model for use in elevated CO2 scenarios using differential species responses, and assessed the usefulness of the model in that regard. Seven papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  20. Responses to iron limitation in Hordeum vulgare L. as affected by the atmospheric CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, S; Rothe, A; Kania, A; Wasaki, J; Römheld, V; Engels, C; Kandeler, E; Neumann, G

    2008-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 treatments stimulated biomass production in Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient barley plants, both in hydroponics and in soil culture. Root/shoot biomass ratio was increased in severely Fe-deficient plants grown in hydroponics but not under moderate Fe limitation in soil culture. Significantly increased biomass production in high CO2 treatments, even under severe Fe deficiency in hydroponic culture, indicates an improved internal Fe utilization. Iron deficiency-induced secretion of PS in 0.5 to 2.5 cm sub-apical root zones was increased by 74% in response to elevated CO2 treatments of barley plants in hydroponics but no PS were detectable in root exudates collected from soil-grown plants. This may be attributed to suppression of PS release by internal Fe concentrations above the critical level for Fe deficiency, determined at final harvest for soil-grown barley plants, even without additional Fe supply. However, extremely low concentrations of easily plant-available Fe in the investigated soil and low Fe seed reserves suggest a contribution of PS-mediated Fe mobilization from sparingly soluble Fe sources to Fe acquisition of the soil-grown barley plants during the preceding culture period. Higher Fe contents in shoots (+52%) of plants grown in soil culture without Fe supply under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations may indicate an increased efficiency for Fe acquisition. No significant influence on diversity and function of rhizosphere-bacterial communities was detectable in the outer rhizosphere soil (0-3 mm distance from the root surface) by DGGE of 16S rRNA gene fragments and analysis of marker enzyme activities for C-, N-, and P-cycles. PMID:18453445

  1. Changing atmospheric CO2 concentration was the primary driver of early Cenozoic climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Eleni; John, Eleanor H; Edgar, Kirsty M; Foster, Gavin L; Ridgwell, Andy; Inglis, Gordon N; Pancost, Richard D; Lunt, Daniel J; Pearson, Paul N

    2016-04-25

    The Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO, which occurred about 51 to 53 million years ago), was the warmest interval of the past 65 million years, with mean annual surface air temperature over ten degrees Celsius warmer than during the pre-industrial period. Subsequent global cooling in the middle and late Eocene epoch, especially at high latitudes, eventually led to continental ice sheet development in Antarctica in the early Oligocene epoch (about 33.6 million years ago). However, existing estimates place atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels during the Eocene at 500-3,000 parts per million, and in the absence of tighter constraints carbon-climate interactions over this interval remain uncertain. Here we use recent analytical and methodological developments to generate a new high-fidelity record of CO2 concentrations using the boron isotope (δ(11)B) composition of well preserved planktonic foraminifera from the Tanzania Drilling Project, revising previous estimates. Although species-level uncertainties make absolute values difficult to constrain, CO2 concentrations during the EECO were around 1,400 parts per million. The relative decline in CO2 concentration through the Eocene is more robustly constrained at about fifty per cent, with a further decline into the Oligocene. Provided the latitudinal dependency of sea surface temperature change for a given climate forcing in the Eocene was similar to that of the late Quaternary period, this CO2 decline was sufficient to drive the well documented high- and low-latitude cooling that occurred through the Eocene. Once the change in global temperature between the pre-industrial period and the Eocene caused by the action of all known slow feedbacks (apart from those associated with the carbon cycle) is removed, both the EECO and the late Eocene exhibit an equilibrium climate sensitivity relative to the pre-industrial period of 2.1 to 4.6 degrees Celsius per CO2 doubling (66 per cent confidence), which is similar to the

  2. Changing atmospheric CO2 concentration was the primary driver of early Cenozoic climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Eleni; John, Eleanor H.; Edgar, Kirsty M.; Foster, Gavin L.; Ridgwell, Andy; Inglis, Gordon N.; Pancost, Richard D.; Lunt, Daniel J.; Pearson, Paul N.

    2016-05-01

    The Early Eocene Climate Optimum (EECO, which occurred about 51 to 53 million years ago), was the warmest interval of the past 65 million years, with mean annual surface air temperature over ten degrees Celsius warmer than during the pre-industrial period. Subsequent global cooling in the middle and late Eocene epoch, especially at high latitudes, eventually led to continental ice sheet development in Antarctica in the early Oligocene epoch (about 33.6 million years ago). However, existing estimates place atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels during the Eocene at 500-3,000 parts per million, and in the absence of tighter constraints carbon-climate interactions over this interval remain uncertain. Here we use recent analytical and methodological developments to generate a new high-fidelity record of CO2 concentrations using the boron isotope (δ11B) composition of well preserved planktonic foraminifera from the Tanzania Drilling Project, revising previous estimates. Although species-level uncertainties make absolute values difficult to constrain, CO2 concentrations during the EECO were around 1,400 parts per million. The relative decline in CO2 concentration through the Eocene is more robustly constrained at about fifty per cent, with a further decline into the Oligocene. Provided the latitudinal dependency of sea surface temperature change for a given climate forcing in the Eocene was similar to that of the late Quaternary period, this CO2 decline was sufficient to drive the well documented high- and low-latitude cooling that occurred through the Eocene. Once the change in global temperature between the pre-industrial period and the Eocene caused by the action of all known slow feedbacks (apart from those associated with the carbon cycle) is removed, both the EECO and the late Eocene exhibit an equilibrium climate sensitivity relative to the pre-industrial period of 2.1 to 4.6 degrees Celsius per CO2 doubling (66 per cent confidence), which is similar to the

  3. Modelling representation errors of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at a regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Peters

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Inverse modelling of carbon sources and sinks requires an accurate estimate of the quality of the observations to obtain a realistic estimate of the inferred fluxes and their uncertainties. Representation errors, defined here as the mismatch between point observations and grid cell averages, may add substantial uncertainty to the interpretation of atmospheric CO2 concentration data. We used a high resolution (2 km mesoscale model (RAMS to simulate the variations in the CO2 concentration to estimate the representation errors for grid sizes of 10–100 km. Meteorology is the main driver of representation errors in our study causing spatial and temporal variations in the error estimate. Within the nocturnal boundary layer the representation errors are relatively large and mainly determined by unresolved topography at lower model resolutions. During the day, surface CO2 flux variability and mesoscale circulations were found to be the main sources of representation errors. Careful up-scaling of point observations can reduce the importance of the representation error substantially. The remaining representation error is in the order of 0.5–1.5 ppm at 20–100 km resolution.

  4. Impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration on photosynthesis and growth of micro-and macro-algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Marine photosynthesis drives the oceanic biological CO2 pump to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere, which sinks more than one third of the industry-originated CO2 into the ocean. The increasing atmos-pheric CO2 and subsequent rise of pCO2 in seawater, which alters the carbonate system and related chemical reactions and results in lower pH and higher HCO3- concentration, affect photosynthetic CO2 fixation processes of phytoplanktonic and macroalgal species in direct and/or indirect ways. Although many unicellular and multicellular species can operate CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to util-ize the large HCO3- pool in seawater, enriched CO2 up to several times the present atmospheric level has been shown to enhance photosynthesis and growth of both phytoplanktonic and macro-species that have less capacity of CCMs. Even for species that operate active CCMs and those whose photo-synthesis is not limited by CO2 in seawater, increased CO2 levels can down-regulate their CCMs and therefore enhance their growth under light-limiting conditions (at higher CO2 levels, less light energy is required to drive CCM). Altered physiological performances under high-CO2 conditions may cause genetic alteration in view of adaptation over long time scale. Marine algae may adapt to a high CO2 oceanic environment so that the evolved communities in future are likely to be genetically different from the contemporary communities. However, most of the previous studies have been carried out under indoor conditions without considering the acidifying effects on seawater by increased CO2 and other interacting environmental factors, and little has been documented so far to explain how physi-ology of marine primary producers performs in a high-CO2 and low-pH ocean.

  5. Impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration on photosynthesis and growth of micro- and macro-algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU HongYan; ZOU DingHui; GAO KunShan

    2008-01-01

    Marine photosynthesis drives the oceanic biological CO2 pump to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere, which sinks more than one third of the industry-originated CO2 into the ocean. The increasing atmospheric CO2 and subsequent rise of pCO2 in seawater, which alters the carbonate system and related chemical reactions and results in lower pH and higher HCO3- concentration, affect photosynthetic CO2 fixation processes of phytoplanktonic and macroalgal species in direct and/or indirect ways. Although many unicellular and multicellular species can operate CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to utilize the large HCO3- pool in seawater, enriched CO2 up to several times the present atmospheric level has been shown to enhance photosynthesis and growth of both phytoplanktonic and macro-species that have less capacity of CCMs. Even for species that operate active CCMs and those whose photosynthesis is not limited by CO2 in seawater, increased CO2 levels can down-regulate their CCMs and therefore enhance their growth under light-limiting conditions (at higher CO2 levels, less light energy is required to drive CCM). Altered physiological performances under high-CO2 conditions may cause genetic alteration in view of adaptation over long time scale. Marine algae may adapt to a high CO2 oceanic environment so that the evolved communities in future are likely to be genetically different from the contemporary communities. However, most of the previous studies have been carried out under indoor conditions without considering the acidifying effects on seawater by increased CO2 and other interacting environmental factors, and little has been documented so far to explain how physiology of marine primary producers performs in a high-CO2 and low-pH ocean.

  6. The Influence of Atmospheric CO2 Concentration and Climate Variability on Amazon Tropical Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanho, A. D. D. A.; Galbraith, D.; Zhang, K.; Coe, M. T.; Costa, M. H.; Moorcroft, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical forests are important regulators of atmospheric CO2 concentration and any change in tropical forest C balance will directly affect global climate. Long term studies from undisturbed old-growth forest monitoring sites distributed across Amazonia have presented an overall increase in aboveground biomass in the last decades, and the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations is considered the main driver for this observed carbon sink. The main goal of this work was to use simulations from dynamic global vegetation models (DGVM) to explore how much of the observed historical (1970-2008) increase in biomass in undisturbed tropical forest in Amazonia could be attributed to the CO2 fertilization effect or associated to climate change. We compared simulated biomass and productivity from three DGVMs (IBIS, ED2 and JULES) with observations from forest plots (RAINFOR). The analyses helped clarify the variability of historical and potential future simulations.The analyses showed that models shared similar results and deficiencies. The three models represented the two major model types: conventional dynamic global vegetation models that simulate community dynamics and competition between plant functional types (PFTs) using an aggregated 'big-leaf' representation (IBIS and Jules), and a size-and-age structured terrestrial ecosystem model that captures individual scale dynamics and competition (ED2). In general, the ED2 model results were more sensitive to climate, but all models greatly underestimate the impact of extreme climatic events (e.g. drought) compared to field data.All the DGVM's studied tend to simulate the average biomass well and to overestimate productivity of vegetation under current conditions. All the models presented very low spatial variability compared to field observation. The lack of spatial variability of biomass and productivity is attributed to the lack of nutrient and residence time spatial heterogeneity. All of the DGVMs results suggest that

  7. Measurement of Lower-Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Distribution Using a Compact 1.6 μm DIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao; Abo, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of present carbon sources and sinks including their spatial distribution and their variation in time is one of the essential information for predicting future CO2 atmospheric concentration levels. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is expected to measure atmospheric CO2 profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer and lower troposphere from a ground platform. We have succeeded to develop a compact 1.6 μm DIAL system for measuring CO2 concentration profiles in the lower atmosphere. This 1.6 μm DIAL system consists of the optical parametric generator (OPG) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd:YAG laser with high repetition rate and the receiving optics that included the near-infrared photomultiplier tube operating at the analog mode and a 25 cm telescope. CO2 concentration profiles were obtained up to 2.5 km altitude.

  8. Short-term carbon cycling responses of a mature eucalypt woodland to gradual stepwise enrichment of atmospheric CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, John E; Macdonald, Catriona A; Tjoelker, Mark G; Crous, Kristine Y; Gimeno, Teresa E; Singh, Brajesh K; Reich, Peter B; Anderson, Ian C; Ellsworth, David S

    2016-01-01

    Projections of future climate are highly sensitive to uncertainties regarding carbon (C) uptake and storage by terrestrial ecosystems. The Eucalyptus Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) experiment was established to study the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2 ) on a native mature eucalypt woodland with low fertility soils in southeast Australia. In contrast to other FACE experiments, the concentration of CO2 at EucFACE was increased gradually in steps above ambient (+0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 ppm CO2 above ambient of ~400 ppm), with each step lasting approximately 5 weeks. This provided a unique opportunity to study the short-term (weeks to months) response of C cycle flux components to eCO2 across a range of CO2 concentrations in an intact ecosystem. Soil CO2 efflux (i.e., soil respiration or Rsoil ) increased in response to initial enrichment (e.g., +30 and +60 ppm CO2 ) but did not continue to increase as the CO2 enrichment was stepped up to higher concentrations. Light-saturated photosynthesis of canopy leaves (Asat ) also showed similar stimulation by elevated CO2 at +60 ppm as at +150 ppm CO2 . The lack of significant effects of eCO2 on soil moisture, microbial biomass, or activity suggests that the increase in Rsoil likely reflected increased root and rhizosphere respiration rather than increased microbial decomposition of soil organic matter. This rapid increase in Rsoil suggests that under eCO2, additional photosynthate was produced, transported belowground, and respired. The consequences of this increased belowground activity and whether it is sustained through time in mature ecosystems under eCO2 are a priority for future research. PMID:26426394

  9. Variations of near-surface atmospheric CO2 and H2O concentrations during summer on Muztagata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Expeditions during the summers of 2002 and 2003 implemented continuous monitoring of near-surface (2 m height) atmospheric CO2 and H2O concentrations at the 4500 m elevation on Muztagata. The resultant data sets reveal a slight decrease of CO2 concentrations (of about 5μmol·mol-1) and changes in the diurnal variations from the end of June to the middle August. The daily maximum CO2 concentrations occur between 02:30―05:30 AM (local time) and the minimum levels occur between 12:00―15:30 PM. The atmospheric CO2 concentrations in the summer of 2002 were around 5μmol·mol-1 lower than those during the same period of 2003, whereas the diurnal amplitude was higher. In contrast, we found that the daily mean atmospheric H2O content in 2003 was much lower than that in 2002 and there exists a striking negative correlation between CO2 and H2O concentrations. We therefore suggest that the near-surface atmospheric CO2 concentration is affected not only by photosynthesis and respiration, but also by the air H2O content in the glaciated region around Muztagata.

  10. Using a Tree Ring δ13C Annual Series to Reconstruct Atmospheric CO2 Concentration over the Past 300 Years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xing-Yun; QIAN Jun-Long; WANG Jian; HE Qing-Yan; WANG Zu-Liang; CHEN Cheng-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    The annual series of δ13C were measured in tree rings of three Cryptomeria fortunei disks (CF-1, CF-2, and CF 3) collected from West Tianmu Mountain, Zhejiang Province, China, according to cross-dating tree ring ages. There was no obvious decreasing trend of the δ13C annual time series of CF-2 before 1835. However, from 1835 to 1982 the three tree ring δ13C annual series exhibited similar decreasing trends that were significantly (P ≤ 0.001) correlated. The distribution characteristics of a scatter diagram between estimated δ13C series of CF-2 from modeling and the atmospheric CO2 concentration extracted from the Law Dome ice core from 1840 to 1978 were analyzed and a curvilinear regression equation for reconstructing atmospheric CO2 concentration was established with R2 = 0.98.Also, a test of independent samples indicated that between 1685 and 1839 the reconstructed atmospheric CO2 concentration .using the δ13C series of CF-2 had a close relationship with the Law Dome and Siple ice cores, with a standard deviation of 1.98.The general increasing trend of the reconstructed atmospheric CO2 concentration closely reflected the long-term variation of atmospheric CO2 concentration recorded both before and after the Industrial Revolution. Between 1685 and 1840 the evaluated atmospheric CO2 concentration was stable, but after 1840 it exhibited a rapid increase. Given a longer δ13C annual time series of tree rings, it was feasible to rebuild a representative time series to describe the atmospheric CO2 concentration for an earlier period and for years that were not in the ice core record.

  11. Future Atmospheric CO2 Concentration and Environmental Consequences for the Feed Market: a Consequential LCA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxe, Henrik; Hamelin, Lorie; Hinrichsen, Torben;

    2014-01-01

    that such altered chemical composition and crop yields would have for the production of pig feed. Results revealed, among others, that an extra European demand of pig feed under an atmospheric [CO2] of 550 μmole mole-1 would lead to ca. 6% less expansion of additional arable land worldwide, in comparison to feed...

  12. Modeling atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles and fluxes above sloping terrain at a boreal site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Aalto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 fluxes and concentrations were simulated in the planetary boundary layer above subarctic hilly terrain using a three dimensional model. The model solves the transport equations in the local scale and includes a vegetation sub-model. A WMO/GAW background concentration measurement site and an ecosystem flux measurement site are located inside the modeled region at a hilltop and above a mixed boreal forest, respectively. According to model results, the concentration measurement at the hill site was representative for continental background. However, this was not the case for the whole model domain. Concentration at few meters above active vegetation represented mainly local variation. Local variation became inseparable from the regional signal at about 60-100 m above ground. Flow over hills changed profiles of environmental variables and height of inversion layer, however CO2 profiles were more affected by upwind land use than topography. The hill site was above boundary layer during night and inside boundary layer during daytime. The CO2 input from model lateral boundaries dominated in both cases. Daily variation in the CO2 assimilation rate was clearly seen in the CO2 profiles. Concentration difference between the hill site and the forest site was about 5ppm during afternoon according to both model and measurements. The average modeled flux to the whole model region was about 40% of measured and modeled local flux at the forest site.

  13. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on leaf dark respiration of Xanthium strumarium in light and in darkness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Lewis, J D; Tissue, D T; Seemann, J R; Griffin, K L

    2001-02-27

    Leaf dark respiration (R) is an important component of plant carbon balance, but the effects of rising atmospheric CO(2) on leaf R during illumination are largely unknown. We studied the effects of elevated CO(2) on leaf R in light (R(L)) and in darkness (R(D)) in Xanthium strumarium at different developmental stages. Leaf R(L) was estimated by using the Kok method, whereas leaf R(D) was measured as the rate of CO(2) efflux at zero light. Leaf R(L) and R(D) were significantly higher at elevated than at ambient CO(2) throughout the growing period. Elevated CO(2) increased the ratio of leaf R(L) to net photosynthesis at saturated light (A(max)) when plants were young and also after flowering, but the ratio of leaf R(D) to A(max) was unaffected by CO(2) levels. Leaf R(N) was significantly higher at the beginning but significantly lower at the end of the growing period in elevated CO(2)-grown plants. The ratio of leaf R(L) to R(D) was used to estimate the effect of light on leaf R during the day. We found that light inhibited leaf R at both CO(2) concentrations but to a lesser degree for elevated (17-24%) than for ambient (29-35%) CO(2)-grown plants, presumably because elevated CO(2)-grown plants had a higher demand for energy and carbon skeletons than ambient CO(2)-grown plants in light. Our results suggest that using the CO(2) efflux rate, determined by shading leaves during the day, as a measure for leaf R is likely to underestimate carbon loss from elevated CO(2)-grown plants. PMID:11226264

  14. Statistical Analysis of Long Term Trends in Atmospheric CO2 Concentration at Baseline Stations

    OpenAIRE

    Antonovsky, M.Y.; Buchstaber, V. M.; Zubenko, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of several greenhouse gases that can modify the earth's heat balance by absorbing outgoing radiation from the earth's surface, thereby increasing the amount of heat retained by the atmosphere (the so-called greenhouse effect). Changes in CO2 are therefore of considerable importance. In this paper, the long-term trends are assessed at four baseline stations -- Mauna Loa (Hawaii), Barrow (Alaska), American Samoa and South Pole. The authors conclude that a parabolic model ...

  15. The counteracting effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and drought episodes: Studies of enchytraeid communities in a dry heathland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Kristine; Krogh, Paul Henning; Linden, Leon;

    2010-01-01

    The potential impacts of interactions of multiple climate change factors in soil ecosystems have received little attention. Most studies have addressed effects of single factors such as increased temperature or atmospheric CO2 but little is known about how such environmental factors will interact....... In the present study we investigate the effects of in situ exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, increased temperatures and prolonged drought episodes on field communities of Enchytraeidae (Oligochaeta) in a dry heathland (Brandbjerg, Denmark). Increased CO2 had a positive effect on enchytraeid...... biomass, whereas drought significantly reduced it. Elevated temperature did not result in any detectable effects. No interactions between the three factors were observed. Interestingly, the positive effect of increased CO2 and the negative effect of drought were cancelled out when applied in combination...

  16. An inverse modeling approach for tree-ring-based climate reconstructions under changing atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, É.; Guiot, J.; Hatté, C.; Daux, V.; Danis, P.-A.; Dussouillez, P.

    2013-11-01

    Over the last decades, dendroclimatologists have relied upon linear transfer functions to reconstruct historical climate. Transfer functions need to be calibrated using recent data from periods where CO2 concentrations reached unprecedented levels (near 400 ppm). Based on these transfer functions, dendroclimatologists must then reconstruct a different past, a past where CO2 concentrations were much below 300 ppm. However, relying upon transfer functions calibrated in this way may introduce an unanticipated bias in the reconstruction of past climate, particularly if CO2 levels have had a noticeable fertilizing effect since the beginning of the industrial era. As an alternative to the transfer function approach, we run the MAIDENiso ecophysiological model in an inverse mode to link together climatic variables, atmospheric CO2 concentrations and tree growth parameters. Our approach endeavors to find the optimal combination of meteorological conditions that best simulate observed tree ring patterns. We test our approach in the Fontainebleau forest (France). By comparing two different CO2 scenarios, we present evidence that increasing CO2 concentrations have had a slight, yet significant, effect on reconstruction results. We demonstrate that higher CO2 concentrations augment the efficiency of water use by trees, therefore favoring the reconstruction of a warmer and drier climate. Under elevated CO2 concentrations, trees close their stomata and need less water to produce the same amount of wood. Inverse process-based modeling represents a powerful alternative to the transfer function technique, especially for the study of divergent tree-ring-to-climate relationships. The approach has several advantages, most notably its ability to distinguish between climatic effects and CO2 imprints on tree growth. Therefore our method produces reconstructions that are less biased by anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and that are based on sound ecophysiological knowledge.

  17. Ship-board report on atmospheric CO2 concentrations recorded on continuous from Mediterranean sea to Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the results obtained from continuous measurements performed during two cruises with hemispherical courses. In this way, it has been obtained the latitudinal trend of CO2 in continuity of space and time along two hemispheric courses in 1994-95 and 1996-97 from Europe to Antarctica. The results are compared with measurements from the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory (CMDL) cooperative air sampling network. The fitting of data recorded on board with the historical data sets recorded at Palmer Station is also presented, highlighting the current annual increase in atmospheric CO2 concentrations

  18. Changing Amazon biomass and the role of atmospheric CO2 concentration, climate, and land use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida Castanho, Andrea D.; Galbraith, David; Zhang, Ke; Coe, Michael T.; Costa, Marcos H.; Moorcroft, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The Amazon tropical evergreen forest is an important component of the global carbon budget. Its forest floristic composition, structure, and function are sensitive to changes in climate, atmospheric composition, and land use. In this study biomass and productivity simulated by three dynamic global vegetation models (Integrated Biosphere Simulator, Ecosystem Demography Biosphere Model, and Joint UK Land Environment Simulator) for the period 1970-2008 are compared with observations from forest plots (Rede Amazónica de Inventarios Forestales). The spatial variability in biomass and productivity simulated by the DGVMs is low in comparison to the field observations in part because of poor representation of the heterogeneity of vegetation traits within the models. We find that over the last four decades the CO2 fertilization effect dominates a long-term increase in simulated biomass in undisturbed Amazonian forests, while land use change in the south and southeastern Amazonia dominates a reduction in Amazon aboveground biomass, of similar magnitude to the CO2 biomass gain. Climate extremes exert a strong effect on the observed biomass on short time scales, but the models are incapable of reproducing the observed impacts of extreme drought on forest biomass. We find that future improvements in the accuracy of DGVM predictions will require improved representation of four key elements: (1) spatially variable plant traits, (2) soil and nutrients mediated processes, (3) extreme event mortality, and (4) sensitivity to climatic variability. Finally, continued long-term observations and ecosystem-scale experiments (e.g. Free-Air CO2 Enrichment experiments) are essential for a better understanding of the changing dynamics of tropical forests.

  19. Forecasting global atmospheric CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Agustí-Panareda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A new global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 real-time forecast is now available as part of the pre-operational Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate – Interim Implementation (MACC-II service using the infrastructure of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS. One of the strengths of the CO2 forecasting system is that the land surface, including vegetation CO2 fluxes, is modelled online within the IFS. Other CO2 fluxes are prescribed from inventories and from off-line statistical and physical models. The CO2 forecast also benefits from the transport modelling from a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP system initialized daily with a wealth of meteorological observations. This paper describes the capability of the forecast in modelling the variability of CO2 on different temporal and spatial scales compared to observations. The modulation of the amplitude of the CO2 diurnal cycle by near-surface winds and boundary layer height is generally well represented in the forecast. The CO2 forecast also has high skill in simulating day-to-day synoptic variability. In the atmospheric boundary layer, this skill is significantly enhanced by modelling the day-to-day variability of the CO2 fluxes from vegetation compared to using equivalent monthly mean fluxes with a diurnal cycle. However, biases in the modelled CO2 fluxes also lead to accumulating errors in the CO2 forecast. These biases vary with season with an underestimation of the amplitude of the seasonal cycle both for the CO2 fluxes compared to total optimized fluxes and the atmospheric CO2 compared to observations. The largest biases in the atmospheric CO2 forecast are found in spring, corresponding to the onset of the growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. In the future, the forecast will be re-initialized regularly with atmospheric CO2 analyses based on the assimilation of CO2 satellite retrievals, as they

  20. Coupling of surface temperatures and atmospheric CO_2 concentrations during the Palaeozoic era

    OpenAIRE

    Came, Rosemarie E.; Eiler, John M.; Veizer, Ján; Azmy, Karem; Brand, Uwe; Weidman, Christopher R.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations seem to have been several times modern levels during much of the Palaeozoic era (543–248 million years ago), but decreased during the Carboniferous period to concentrations similar to that of today. Given that carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas, it has been proposed that surface temperatures were significantly higher during the earlier portions of the Palaeozoic era. A reconstruction of tropical sea surface temperatures based on the δ^(18)O of carbona...

  1. [Remote sensing of seasonal variation in column concentration of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 in Hefei].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Si-Yang; Gao, Min-Guang; Xu, Liang; Jin, Ling; Li, Sheng; Tong, Jing-Jing; Wei, Xiu-Li; Liu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Wen-Qing

    2014-03-01

    In order to observe two kinds of greenhouse gases, CO2 and CH4, making the biggest contribution to global warming, a ground-based Fourier transform near-infrared spectral remote sensing system was developed to record the perpendicular incidence sun spectra from February 2012 to April 2013 in Hefei continuously. The measured total transmittances in the atmosphere were obtained from perpendicular incidence sun spectra. Methods of line-by-line and low-order polynomial approximation were used to model the total atmospheric transmittances in forward model. The measured transmittance spectra were fitted iteratively using the modeled transmittance spectra in the regions of CO2 6,150-6,270 and CH4 5,970-6,170 cm(-1) in order to obtain their column concentrations. The column-average dry-air mole fractions of CO2 and CH4 were obtained with the internal standard function of O2 column concentrations. CO2 and CH4 daily average values of column-average dry-air mole fractions changed with a larger fluctuation and obvious seasonal periodicity. Their monthly average values were consistent as a whole, although there were different characteristics. Compared with the results reported by Japanese greenhouse-gas satellite in the area of Waliguan, there was a time lag corresponding to peak and trough of CO2 content and the change from peak to trough costed a longtime. CHR content showed variation tendency of unique peak and trough, higher in summer and lower in winter, compared with average values of nationwide CH4 column concentrations based on SCIAMACHY data. The variation characteristics were related to complex factors such as the balance of source and sink, meteorological and climate conditions, and required long-term observation and further study.

  2. Technical Note: Long-term memory effect in the atmospheric CO2 concentration at Mauna Loa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Varotsos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The monthly mean values of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration derived from in-situ air samples collected at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, USA during 1958–2004 (the longest continuous record available in the world are analyzed by employing the detrended fluctuation analysis to detect scaling behavior in this time series. The main result is that the fluctuations of carbon dioxide concentrations exhibit long-range power-law correlations (long memory with lag times ranging from four months to eleven years, which correspond to 1/f noise. This result indicates that random perturbations in the carbon dioxide concentrations give rise to noise, characterized by a frequency spectrum following a power-law with exponent that approaches to one; the latter shows that the correlation times grow strongly. This feature is pointing out that a correctly rescaled subset of the original time series of the carbon dioxide concentrations resembles the original time series. Finally, the power-law relationship derived from the real measurements of the carbon dioxide concentrations could also serve as a tool to improve the confidence of the atmospheric chemistry-transport and global climate models.

  3. Technical Note: Long-term memory effect in the atmospheric CO2 concentration at Mauna Loa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Efstathiou

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The monthly mean values of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration derived from in-situ air samples collected at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, during 1958–2004 (the longest continuous record available in the world are analyzed by employing the detrended fluctuation analysis to detect scaling behavior in this time series. The main result is that the fluctuations of carbon dioxide concentrations exhibit long-range power-law correlations (long memory with lag times ranging from four months to eleven years, which correspond to 1/f noise. This result indicates that random perturbations in the carbon dioxide concentrations give rise to noise, characterized by a frequency spectrum following a power-law with exponent that approaches to one; the latter shows that the correlation times grow strongly. This feature is pointing out that a correctly rescaled subset of the original time series of the carbon dioxide concentrations resembles the original time series. Finally, the power-law relationship derived from the real measurements of the carbon dioxide concentrations could also serve as a tool to improve the confidence of the atmospheric chemistry-transport and global climate models.

  4. Carbon Dioxide Production Responsibility on the Basis of comparing in Situ and mean CO2 Atmosphere Concentration Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mavrodiev, S Cht; Vachev, B

    2008-01-01

    The method is proposed for estimation of regional CO2 and other greenhouses and pollutants production responcibility. The comparison of CO2 local emissions reduction data with world CO2 atmosphere data will permit easy to judge for overall effect in curbing not only global warming but also chemical polution.

  5. Passive CO2 concentration in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Rowan F; Khoshravesh, Roxana

    2016-06-01

    Photorespiratory limitations on C3 photosynthesis are substantial in warm, low CO2 conditions. To compensate, certain plants evolved mechanisms to actively concentrate CO2 around Rubisco using ATP-supported CO2 pumps such as C4 photosynthesis. Plants can also passively accumulate CO2 without additional ATP expenditure by localizing the release of photorespired and respired CO2 around Rubisco that is diffusively isolated from peripheral air spaces. Passive accumulation of photorespired CO2 occurs when glycine decarboxylase is localized to vascular sheath cells in what is termed C2 photosynthesis, and through forming sheaths of chloroplasts around the periphery of mesophyll cells. The peripheral sheaths require photorespired CO2 to re-enter chloroplasts where it can be refixed. Passive accumulation of respiratory CO2 is common in organs such as stems, fruits and flowers, due to abundant heterotrophic tissues and high diffusive resistance along the organ periphery. Chloroplasts within these organs are able to exploit this high CO2 to reduce photorespiration. CO2 concentration can also be enhanced passively by channeling respired CO2 from roots and rhizomes into photosynthetic cells of stems and leaves via lacunae, aerenchyma and the xylem stream. Through passive CO2 concentration, C3 species likely improved their carbon economy and maintained fitness during episodes of low atmospheric CO2. PMID:27058940

  6. The sensitivity of stand-scale photosynthesis and transpiration to changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kruijt

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3-dimensional forest model MAESTRO was used to simulate daily and annual photosynthesis and transpiration fluxes of forest stands and the sensitivity of these fluxes to potential changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2], temperature, water stress and phenology. The effects of possible feed-backs from increased leaf area and limitations to leaf nutrition were simulated by imposing changes in leaf area and nitrogen content. Two different tree species were considered: Picea sitchensis (Bong. Carr., a conifer with long needle longevity and large leaf area, and Betula pendula Roth., a broad-leaved deciduous species with an open canopy and small leaf area. Canopy photosynthetic production in trees was predicted to increase with atmospheric [CO2] and length of the growing season and to decrease with increased water stress. Associated increases in leaf area increased production further only in the B. pendula canopy, where the original leaf area was relatively small. Assumed limitations in N uptake affected B. pendula more than P. sitchensis. The effect of increased temperature was shown to depend on leaf area and nitrogen content. The different sensitivities of the two species were related to their very different canopy structure. Increased [CO2] reduced transpiration, but larger leaf area, early leaf growth, and higher temperature all led to increased water use. These effects were limited by feedbacks from soil water stress. The simulations suggest that, with the projected climate change, there is some increase in stand annual `water use efficiency', but the actual water losses to the atmosphere may not always decrease.

  7. Sensitivity of plants to changing atmospheric CO2 concentration: From the geological past to the next century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franks, Peter J [University of Sydney, Australia; Adams, Mark A [University of Sydney, Australia; Amthor, Jeffrey S. [U.S. Department of Energy; Barbour, Margaret M [University of Sydney, Australia; Berry, Joseph A [Carnegie Institution of Washington; Ellsworth, David [ORNL; Farquhar, Graham D [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Ghannoum, Oula [University of Western Sydney, Australia; Lloyd, Jon [James Cook University; McDowell, Nathan [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Tissue, David Thomas [ORNL; Von Caemmerer, Susanne [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

    2013-01-01

    The rate of CO2 assimilation by plants is directly influenced by the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere, ca. In response to a short-term change in ca, plants adjust stomatal conductance to CO2 and water vapour to maximise carbon gain in terms of the amount of water lost. This is one of several fundamental feedback processes between plants and their environment that govern the exchange of water for carbon. As an environmental variable, ca further has a unique global and historic significance. Although relatively stable and uniform in the short term, global ca has varied substantially on the timescale of thousands to millions of years, and currently is increasing at seemingly an unprecedented rate. This may exert profound impacts on both climate and plant function. Here we utilise extensive data sets and numerous models to develop an integrated, multi-scale assessment of the impact of changing ca on plant carbon dioxide uptake and water use. We find that, overall, the sensitivity of plants to rising or falling atmospheric CO2 concentration is qualitatively similar across all scales considered. It is characterised by an adaptive feedback response that moves towards maximising the rate of return, in the form of carbon, for the water and nitrogen resources invested in the process of carbon assimilation. This is achieved through predictable adjustments to stomatal anatomy and chloroplast biochemistry. Importantly, the long-term response to changing ca can be described by simple equations rooted in the formulation of more commonly studied short-term responses.

  8. Interactive effects of growth-limiting N supply and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on growth and carbon balance of Plantago major

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hertog, J; Stulen, G; Posthumus, F.S; Poorter, H

    1998-01-01

    To assess the interactions between concentration of atmospheric CO2 and N supply, the response of Plantago major ssp. pleiosperma Pilger to a doubling of the ambient CO2 concentration of 350 mu l l(-1) was investigated in a range of exponential rates of N addition. The relative growth rate (RGR) as

  9. Biomass production and carbohydrate content of Arabidopsis thaliana at atmospheric CO2 concentrations from 390 to 1680 mu l l(-1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Kooij, TAW; De Kok, LJ; Stulen, I.

    1999-01-01

    The concentration dependency of the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on Arabidopsis thaliana L. was studied. Plants were exposed to nearly ambient (390), 560, 810, 1240 and 1680 mu l l(-1) CO2 during the vegetative growth phase for 8 days. Shoot biomass production and dry matter con

  10. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on leaf dark respiration of Xanthium strumarium in light and in darkness

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xianzhong; Lewis, James D.; Tissue, David T.; Seemann, Jeffrey R.; Griffin, Kevin L.

    2001-01-01

    Leaf dark respiration (R) is an important component of plant carbon balance, but the effects of rising atmospheric CO2 on leaf R during illumination are largely unknown. We studied the effects of elevated CO2 on leaf R in light (RL) and in darkness (RD) in Xanthium strumarium at different developmental stages. Leaf RL was estimated by using the Kok method, whereas leaf RD was measured as the rate of CO2 efflux at zero light. Leaf RL and RD were sign...

  11. Control of atmospheric CO_2 concentrations by 2050: A calculation on the emission rights of different countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING ZhongLi; DUAN XiaoNan; GE QuanSheng; ZHANG ZhiQiang

    2009-01-01

    This paper is to provide quantitative data on some critical issues in anticipation of the forthcoming international negotiations in Denmark on the control of atmospheric CO_2 concentrations. Instead of letting only a small number of countries dominate a few controversial dialogues about emissions re-ductions, a comprehensive global system must be established based on emissions allowances for different countries, to realize the long-term goal of controlling global atmospheric CO_2 concentrations.That a system rooted in "cumulative emissions per capita," the best conception of the "common but differentiated responsibilities" principle affirmed by the Kyoto Protocol according to fundamental standards of fairness and justice, was demonstrated. Based on calculations of various countries' cu-mulative emissions per capita, estimates of their cumulative emissions from 1900 to 2005, and their annual emissions allowances into the future (2006-2050), a 470 ppmv atmospheric CO_2 concentration target was set. According to the following four objective indicators-total emissions allowance from 1900 to 2050, actual emissions from 1900 to 2005, emissions levels in 2005, and the average growth rate of emissions from 1996 to 2005-all countries and regions whose population was more than 300000 in 2005 were divided into four main groups: countries with emissions deficits, countries and regions needing to reduce their gross emissions, countries and regions needing to reduce their emissions growth rates, and countries that can maintain the current emissions growth rates. Based on this pro-posal, most G8 countries by 2005 had already expended their 2050 emissions allowances. The accu-mulated financial value based on emissions has reached more than 5.5 trillion US dollars (20 dollars per ton of CO_2). Even if these countries could achieve their ambitious emissions reduction targets in the future, their per capita emissions from 2006 to 2050 would still be much higher than those of de

  12. Control of atmospheric CO2 concentrations by 2050: A calculation on the emission rights of different countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper is to provide quantitative data on some critical issues in anticipation of the forthcoming international negotiations in Denmark on the control of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Instead of letting only a small number of countries dominate a few controversial dialogues about emissions reductions, a comprehensive global system must be established based on emissions allowances for different countries, to realize the long-term goal of controlling global atmospheric CO2 concentrations. That a system rooted in "cumulative emissions per capita," the best conception of the "common but differentiated responsibilities" principle affirmed by the Kyoto Protocol according to fundamental standards of fairness and justice, was demonstrated. Based on calculations of various countries’ cumulative emissions per capita, estimates of their cumulative emissions from 1900 to 2005, and their annual emissions allowances into the future (2006―2050), a 470 ppmv atmospheric CO2 concentration target was set. According to the following four objective indicators―total emissions allowance from 1900 to 2050, actual emissions from 1900 to 2005, emissions levels in 2005, and the average growth rate of emissions from 1996 to 2005―all countries and regions whose population was more than 300000 in 2005 were divided into four main groups: countries with emissions deficits, countries and regions needing to reduce their gross emissions, countries and regions needing to reduce their emissions growth rates, and countries that can maintain the current emissions growth rates. Based on this proposal, most G8 countries by 2005 had already expended their 2050 emissions allowances. The accu-mulated financial value based on emissions has reached more than 5.5 trillion US dollars (20 dollars per ton of CO2). Even if these countries could achieve their ambitious emissions reduction targets in the future, their per capita emissions from 2006 to 2050 would still be much higher than those of

  13. Increase of uncertainty in transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions after stabilization of atmospheric CO2 concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed a dataset from an experiment of an earth system model of intermediate complexity, focusing on the change in transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions (TCRE) after atmospheric CO2 concentration was stabilized in the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5. We estimated the TCRE in 2005 at 0.3–2.4 K/TtC for an unconstrained case and 1.1–1.7 K/TtC when constrained with historical and present-day observational data, the latter result being consistent with other studies. The range of TCRE increased when the increase of CO2 concentration was moderated and then stabilized. This is because the larger (smaller) TCRE members yield even greater (less) TCRE. An additional experiment to assess the equilibrium state revealed significant changes in temperature and cumulative carbon emissions after 2300. We also found that variation of land carbon uptake is significant to the total allowable carbon emissions and subsequent change of the TCRE. Additionally, in our experiment, we revealed that equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS), one of the 12 parameters perturbed in the ensemble experiment, has a strong positive relationship with the TCRE at the beginning of the stabilization and its subsequent change. We confirmed that for participant models in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5, ECS has a strong positive relationship with TCRE. For models using similar experimental settings, there is a positive relationship with TCRE for the start of the period of stabilization in CO2 concentration, and rate of change after stabilization. The results of this study are influential regarding the total allowable carbon emissions calculated from the TCRE and the temperature increase set as the mitigation target. (letter)

  14. Emission of CO2 by the transport sector and the impact on the atmospheric concentration in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, M. D. F.; Kitazato, C.; Perez-Martinez, P.; Nogueira, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Metropolitan Area of São Paulo (MASP) is impacted by the emission of 7 million vehicles, being 85% light-duty vehicles (LDV), 3% heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDV)s, and 12% motorcycles. About 55% of LDVs burn a mixture of 78% gasoline and 22% ethanol (gasohol), 4% use hydrous ethanol (95% ethanol and 5% water), 38% are flex-fuel vehicles that are capable of burning both gasohol and hydrous ethanol and 3% use diesel (diesel + 5% bio-diesel). The owners of the flex-fuel vehicles decide to use ethanol or gasohol depending on the market price of the fuel. Many environmental programs were implemented to reduce the emissions by the LDV and HDV traffic; the contribution from the industrial sector has been decreasing as the industries have moved away from MASP, due to the high taxes applied to the productive sector. Due to the large contribution of the transport sector to CO2, its contribution is important in a regional scale. The total emission is estimated in 15327 million tons per year of CO2eq (60% by LDV, 38% HDV and 2% motorcycles). Measurements of CO2 performed with a Picarro monitor based on WS-CRDS (wavelength-scanned cavity ringdown spectroscopy) for the years 2012-2013 were performed. The sampling site was on the University of Sao Paulo campus (22o34´S, 46o44´W), situated in the west area of the city, surrounded by important traffic roads. The average data showed two peaks, one in the morning and the other in the afternoon, both associated with the traffic. Correlation analysis was performed between the concentrations and the number of vehicles, as a proxy for the temporal variation of the CO2 emission. The highest concentration was 430 ppm at 8:00am, associated to the morning peak hour of vehicles and the stable condition of the atmosphere. The average concentration was 406 ±12 ppm, considering all measured data. According to official inventories from the Environmental Agency (CETESB), the emission of CO2 has increased 39% from 1990 to 2008, associated

  15. Estimation of background CO2 concentrations at the high alpine station Schneefernerhaus by atmospheric observations and inverse modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giemsa, Esther; Jacobeit, Jucundus; Ries, Ludwig; Frank, Gabriele; Hachinger, Stephan; Meyer-Arnek, Julian

    2016-04-01

    In order to estimate the influence of Central European CO2 emissions, a new method to retrieve background concentrations based on statistics of radon-222 and backward trajectories is developed and applied to the CO2 observations at the alpine high-altitude research station Schneefernerhaus (2670 m a.s.l.). The reliable identification of baseline conditions is important for perceiving changes in time as well as in the sources and sinks of greenhouse gases and thereby assessing the efficiency of existing mitigation strategies. In the particular case of Central Europe, the analysis of background concentrations could add further insights on the question why background CO2 concentrations increased in the last few decades, despite a significant decrease in the reported emissions. Ongoing effort to define the baseline conditions has led to a variety of data selection techniques. In this diversity of data filtering concepts, a relatively recent data selection method effectively appropriates observations of radon-222 to reliably and unambiguously identify baseline air masses. Owing to its relatively constant emission rate from the ice-free land surface and its half-life of 3.8 days that is solely achieved through radioactive decay, the tropospheric background concentration of the inert radioactive gas is low and temporal variations caused by changes in atmospheric transport are precisely detectable. For defining the baseline air masses reaching the high alpine research station Schneefernerhaus, an objective analysis approach is applied to the two-hourly radon records. The CO2 values of days by the radon method associated with prevailing atmospheric background conditions result in the CO2 concentrations representing the least land influenced air masses. Additionally, three-dimensional back-trajectories were retrieved using the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) FLEXPART driven by analysis fields of the Global Forecast System (GFS) produced by the National Centers

  16. Concentrations and (delta)13C values of atmospheric CO2 from oceanic atmosphere through time: polluted and non-polluted areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CO2 is one of the primary agents of global climate changes. The increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration is essentially related to human-induced emissions and, particularly, to the burning of fossil fuel whose (delta)13C values are quite negative. Consequently, an increase of the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere should be paralleled by a decrease of its (delta)13C. Continuous and/or spot measurements of CO2 concentrations were repeatedly carried out during the last decade and in the same period of the year along hemispheric courses from Italy to Antarctica on a vessel of the Italian National Research Program in Antarctica. During these expeditions, discrete air samples were also collected in 4-l Pyrex flasks in order to carry out precise carbon isotope analyses on atmospheric CO2 from different areas, including theoretically 'clean' open ocean areas, with the main purpose of comparing these open ocean results with the results obtained by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/World Meteorological Organization (NOAA/WMO) at land-based stations. According to the data obtained for these two variables, a relatively large atmospheric pollution is apparent in the Mediterranean area where the CO2 concentration has reached the value of 384 ppmv while quite negative (delta)13C values have been measured only occasionally. In this area, southerly winds probably help to reduce the effect of atmospheric pollution even though, despite a large variability of CO2 concentrations, these values are consistently higher than those measured in open ocean areas by a few ppmv to about 10 ppmv. A marked, though non-continuous, pollution is apparent in the area of the Bab-el-Mandeb strait where (delta)13C values considerably more negative than in the Central and Southern Red Sea were measured. The concentration of atmospheric CO2 over the Central Indian Ocean increased from about 361 ppmv at the end of 1996 to about 373 ppmv at the end of 2003 (mean growth rate of about 1

  17. Concentrations and δ13C values of atmospheric CO2 from oceanic atmosphere through time: polluted and non-polluted areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longinelli, Antonio; Lenaz, Renzo; Ori, Carlo; Selmo, Enrico

    2005-11-01

    CO2 is one of the primary agents of global climate changes. The increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration is essentially related to human-induced emissions and, particularly, to the burning of fossil fuel whose δ13C values are quite negative. Consequently, an increase of the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere should be paralleled by a decrease of its δ13C. Continuous and/or spot measurements of CO2 concentrations were repeatedly carried out during the last decade and in the same period of the year along hemispheric courses from Italy to Antarctica on a vessel of the Italian National Research Program in Antarctica. During these expeditions, discrete air samples were also collected in 4-l Pyrex flasks in order to carry out precise carbon isotope analyses on atmospheric CO2 from different areas, including theoretically 'clean' open ocean areas, with the main purpose of comparing these open ocean results with the results obtained by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/World Meteorological Organization (NOAA/WMO) at land-based stations. According to the data obtained for these two variables, a relatively large atmospheric pollution is apparent in the Mediterranean area where the CO2 concentration has reached the value of 384 ppmv while quite negative δ13C values have been measured only occasionally. In this area, southerly winds probably help to reduce the effect of atmospheric pollution even though, despite a large variability of CO2 concentrations, these values are consistently higher than those measured in open ocean areas by a few ppmv to about 10 ppmv. A marked, though non-continuous, pollution is apparent in the area of the Bab-el-Mandeb strait where δ13C values considerably more negative than in the Central and Southern Red Sea were measured. The concentration of atmospheric CO2 over the Central Indian Ocean increased from about 361 ppmv at the end of 1996 to about 373 ppmv at the end of 2003 (mean growth rate of about 1.7 ppmv yr1 in

  18. Spatial and Temporal Variability of CO2 and CH4 Concentrations in the Atmospheric Surface Layer over West Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belan, Boris D.; Machida, Toshinobu; Sasakawa, Motoki; Davydov, Denis K.; Fofonov, Alexander V.; Krasnov, Oleg A.; Maksyutov, Shamil; Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.

    2015-04-01

    The investigation of greenhouse gas behavior in the atmosphere plays a key role in predicting the global changes of Earth's climate. In this connection, of particular importance is the study of the distribution of sources/sinks of trace gases in the atmospheric surface layer over the different regions of the globe. In order to fill a gap in the data on greenhouse gas concentrations in Russia, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES, Japan) and Institute of Atmospheric Optics (IAO SB RAS, Russia) established a network for GHG monitoring (JR-STATION, Japan-Russia Siberian Tall Tower Inland Observation Network). Gas analyzers and meteorological sensors were mounted at radio relay towers located in different regions of West Siberia. The checking equipment was placed in containers at the tower base. In the containers, the climatic parameters optimal for gas analyzer operation were maintained. The work on the network development started in 2001. Since at each of the sites the measurement duration could be different, in this paper we present the data of the greenhouse gas monitoring for eight sites which give the primary idea on the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of CO2 and CH4 in the atmospheric surface layer over West Siberia. The analysis of the data showed that the average increase in concentration of carbon dioxide by results of our measurements in this territory increases within 1.95 - 2.53 ppm/year, depending on the area. The analysis of long-term data testifies about existence of growth of concentration of methane within 3.2 - 7.2 ppb / year. The presence of a distributed network of the sites operating in the monitoring regime makes it possible not only to investigate the temporal dynamics of CO2 and CH4 at each site and to determine the spatial differences between the concentrations by comparing the data, but also to plot the distribution charts for different moments of time. This work was supported by the Global Environment Research

  19. Energyless CO2 Absorption, Generation, and Fixation Using Atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Okada, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Chiaki; Yamada, Masayuki; Nakazawa, Kenta; Mukai, Chisato

    2016-01-01

    From an economic and ecological perspective, the efficient utilization of atmospheric CO2 as a carbon resource should be a much more important goal than reducing CO2 emissions. However, no strategy to harvest CO2 using atmospheric CO2 at room temperature currently exists, which is presumably due to the extremely low concentration of CO2 in ambient air (approximately 400 ppm=0.04 vol%). We discovered that monoethanolamine (MEA) and its derivatives efficiently absorbed atmospheric CO2 without requiring an energy source. We also found that the absorbed CO2 could be easily liberated with acid. Furthermore, a novel CO2 generator enabled us to synthesize a high value-added material (i.e., 2-oxazolidinone derivatives based on the metal catalyzed CO2-fixation at room temperature) from atmospheric CO2.

  20. Improving ecophysiological simulation models to predict the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on crop productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.

    2013-01-01

    Background - Process-based ecophysiological crop models are pivotal in assessing responses of crop productivity and designing strategies of adaptation to climate change. Most existing crop models generally over-estimate the effect of elevated atmospheric [CO2], despite decades of experimental resear

  1. 大气CO2浓度非均匀动态分布条件下的气候模拟%Climate simulation for dynamic heterogeneous distribution of atmospheric CO2 concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨成荫; 王汉杰; 韩士杰; 赵苏璇

    2012-01-01

    利用现有大气本底站的大气CO2浓度观测信息,综合考虑不同经济区划与土地覆盖类型对应的CO2浓度差异及其季节变化规律,构建模式区域内以月为单位的网格化大气CO2浓度非均匀动态分布数据模型.由此数据模型驱动RegCM4-CLM3.5区域气候模式运行,对东亚区2000年3月-2009年2月之间的气候变化特征进行了模拟,进而对大气CO2浓度非均匀动态分布可能引起的区域气候效应进行了初步研究.结果表明:目前气候模式中CO2浓度的常态均匀分布假设可能将温室效应夸大了10%左右.对大气CO2浓度非均匀动态分布影响气温变化的可能机制进行研究表明:CO2的自身效应(改变大气透射率)并不是导致Exp2试验温度降低的主要原因.大气CO2浓度的变化影响了大气与植物胞间CO2分压差,陆地植被通过改变气孔阻力适应这种变化,气孔阻力的变化直接影响到植物与大气间水分的交换,这种作用一方面通过蒸发冷却改变环境温度,另一方面,蒸发水分改变了近地面层湿度,进而水汽扩散到空中影响低云的分布.冬季,植物处于非生长季,对大气CO2浓度变化响应微弱,湿度和低云变化不明显;夏季,植物生长旺盛,由CO2生理学强迫激发的云反馈效应强烈,其效果是使中低云趋于增加,进而减弱了到达对流层低层的太阳短波辐射,造成温室效应减弱.%Based on the baseline concentration data of atmospheric CO2 observed from the GAW stations, considering the heterogeneous distributional characteristics of CO2 concentration among different economic regions and land use types, this paper constitutes a dynamical heterogeneous atmospheric CO2 concentration data set that varies monthly within a regional climate model domain around China. By running the RegCM4-CLM3. 5 regional climate model with the dynamic heterogeneous CO2 concentration data set, the climate change characteristics of the East Asia

  2. CO2气调储藏对大米食用品质调控效应的研究%Effects of Controlled Atmospheres with High CO2 Concentrations on Eating Quality of Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨维巧; 雷桂明; 刘霞; 李喜宏

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigated the effects of high CO2 atmosphere control condition on the insoluble amylase content and the quality of cooked rice. The sample named W45 from Tianjin was storaged at 10℃ and 30℃ separately for 6 months in gas-controlled chambers, which could quantitatively regulate the content of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The results showed that, under the condition of 10 ℃ and 8% O2, high-concentration CO2 could inhibit the increasing of insoluble amylase of rice, the effect of CO2 concentration was 20% > 10% > 2%, and the insoluble amylase content of rice, which storaged at 20% CO2 atmosphere control condition, increased by 9.39% compared to the initial value, the control (uninflated treatment) increased by 15.01% compared to the initial value. Under the storage condition of 30 X and 8% O2, there was no remarkable influence when high CO2 atmosphere charging at storage on insoluble amylase content At 10 X and 30 ℃ temperature storage conditions, the high CO2 treatment could effectively improve the cooking quality of rice, inhibit the heat water absorption rate of rice, increase the soluble solids content of rice water, the higher CO2 concentration the more obvious effects, and under the storage condition of 20% CO2 and 10 ℃, the heat water absorption rate of rice decreased by 12.71% compared to control, the soluble solids content of rice water increased by 24.56% compared to control.%以W45号大米为试材,定量控制储藏环境中的O2和CO2浓度,研究10℃和30℃条件下,高浓度CO2储藏6个月对大米不溶性直链淀粉含量及蒸煮品质的影响.结果表明:在低温10℃、O2浓度8%条件下,高浓度CO2可有效抑制大米不溶性直链淀粉含量的增加,CO2浓度作用效果20%>10%>2%,其中20%CO2气调储藏大米的不溶性直链淀粉含量与初始值相比仅增加了9.39%,显著低于对照(不充气处理);在高温30℃、O2浓度8%条件下,高浓度CO2调控大米不溶性直链

  3. Dynamics of CO2 fluxes and concentrations during a shallow subsurface CO2 release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2009-09-01

    A field facility located in Bozeman, Montana provides the opportunity to test methods to detect, locate, and quantify potential CO2 leakage from geologic storage sites. From 9 July to 7 August 2008, 0.3 t CO2 d{sup -1} were injected from a 100-m long, {approx}2.5 m deep horizontal well. Repeated measurements of soil CO2 fluxes on a grid characterized the spatio-temporal evolution of the surface leakage signal and quantified the surface leakage rate. Infrared CO2 concentration sensors installed in the soil at 30 cm depth at 0 to 10 m from the well and at 4 cm above the ground at 0 and 5 m from the well recorded surface breakthrough of CO2 leakage and migration of CO2 leakage through the soil. Temporal variations in CO2 concentrations were correlated with atmospheric and soil temperature, wind speed, atmospheric pressure, rainfall, and CO2 injection rate.

  4. Temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration estimates through the PETM using triple oxygen isotope analysis of mammalian bioapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehler, Alexander; Gingerich, Philip D.; Pack, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    The Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is a remarkable climatic and environmental event that occurred 56 Ma ago and has importance for understanding possible future climate change. The Paleocene–Eocene transition is marked by a rapid temperature rise contemporaneous with a large negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). Both the temperature and the isotopic excursion are well-documented by terrestrial and marine proxies. The CIE was the result of a massive release of carbon into the atmosphere. However, the carbon source and quantities of CO2 and CH4 greenhouse gases that contributed to global warming are poorly constrained and highly debated. Here we combine an established oxygen isotope paleothermometer with a newly developed triple oxygen isotope paleo-CO2 barometer. We attempt to quantify the source of greenhouse gases released during the Paleocene–Eocene transition by analyzing bioapatite of terrestrial mammals. Our results are consistent with previous estimates of PETM temperature change and suggest that not only CO2 but also massive release of seabed methane was the driver for CIE and PETM.

  5. Temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration estimates through the PETM using triple oxygen isotope analysis of mammalian bioapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehler, Alexander; Gingerich, Philip D; Pack, Andreas

    2016-07-12

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is a remarkable climatic and environmental event that occurred 56 Ma ago and has importance for understanding possible future climate change. The Paleocene-Eocene transition is marked by a rapid temperature rise contemporaneous with a large negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE). Both the temperature and the isotopic excursion are well-documented by terrestrial and marine proxies. The CIE was the result of a massive release of carbon into the atmosphere. However, the carbon source and quantities of CO2 and CH4 greenhouse gases that contributed to global warming are poorly constrained and highly debated. Here we combine an established oxygen isotope paleothermometer with a newly developed triple oxygen isotope paleo-CO2 barometer. We attempt to quantify the source of greenhouse gases released during the Paleocene-Eocene transition by analyzing bioapatite of terrestrial mammals. Our results are consistent with previous estimates of PETM temperature change and suggest that not only CO2 but also massive release of seabed methane was the driver for CIE and PETM. PMID:27354522

  6. Leaf cavity CO2 concentrations and CO2 exchange in onion, Allium cepa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, G T; Loboda, T; Black, C C; Brown, R H

    1995-06-01

    Onion (Allium cepa L.) plants were examined to determine the photosynthetic role of CO2 that accumulates within their leaf cavities. Leaf cavity CO2 concentrations ranged from 2250 μL L(-1) near the leaf base to below atmospheric (CO2 concentrations with minimum values near midday and maximum values at night. Conductance to CO2 from the leaf cavity ranged from 24 to 202 μmol m(-2) s(-1) and was even lower for membranes of bulb scales. The capacity for onion leaves to recycle leaf cavity CO2 was poor, only 0.2 to 2.2% of leaf photosynthesis based either on measured CO2 concentrations and conductance values or as measured directly by (14)CO2 labeling experiments. The photosynthetic responses to CO2 and O2 were measured to determine whether onion leaves exhibited a typical C3-type response. A linear increase in CO2 uptake was observed in intact leaves up to 315 μL L(-1) of external CO2 and, at this external CO2 concentration, uptake was inhibited 35.4±0.9% by 210 mL L(-1) O2 compared to 20 mL L(-1) O2. Scanning electron micrographs of the leaf cavity wall revealed degenerated tissue covered by a membrane. Onion leaf cavity membranes apparently are highly impermeable to CO2 and greatly restrict the refixation of leaf cavity CO2 by photosynthetic tissue. PMID:24307095

  7. Searching for a Relationship Between Forest Water Use and Increasing Atmospheric CO2 Concentration with Long-Term Hydrologic Data from the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amthor, J.S.

    1998-11-01

    Increases in atmospheric C02 concentration from mid-1956 through mid-1997 were compared with hydrologic records from five forested, gaged watersheds in the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in New Hampshire, U.S.A. The purpose of the comparison was to assess whether a relationship between increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and whole-ecosystem evapotranspiration (ET) could be determined. The HBEF is particularly well suited to this type of study because of the length of the hydrologic record and the physical properties of the watersheds. This analysis is based on HBEF water years (which begin 1 June and end the following 31 May) rather than calendar years. Hydrologic records from individual watersheds used in this analysis ranged from 28 to 41 water years. During the full 41-water-year period, it is estimated that water-year mean atmospheric CO2 concentration increased more than 15% (from about 314 to 363 ppm). In one south-facing watershed (i.e., HBEF watershed 3), there was a statistically significant negative relationship between atmospheric C02 concentration and ET. This translated into a nearly 77 rnndyear reduction in ET as a result of a 50 ppm increase in atmospheric C02 concentration, a result of practical significance. Evapotranspiration from the other watersheds was also negatively related to atmospheric CO2 concentration, but with smaller (and statistically insignificant) magnitudes. Evapotranspiration from the three south-facing (but not the two north-facing) watersheds included in the analysis was "abnormally" low during the most recent 2 years (i.e., water years beginning in 1995 and 1996), and this affected the trends in ET. This recent and abrupt, reduction in ET deserves further analysis, most importantly by an extension of the hydrologic record through continued long-term monitoring in the HBEF (which is ongoing). If ET remains relatively low during the coming years in south-facing watersheds, studies of the physical and/or biological

  8. Understanding urban atmospheric CO2: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataki, D. E.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Forster, C. B.; Klewicki, J. C.; Pardyjak, E. R.; Peterson, R. E.; Steenburgh, W. J.; Tyler, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    Many studies have shown that atmospheric CO2 concentrations are elevated far above ambient levels in cities due to strong local sources. Measurements of urban atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio, its isotopic composition, and its sources and sinks provide opportunities to understand the local carbon cycle and biogeochemistry of cities, which is increasingly important in studies of regional and global change as well as urban sustainability and planning. In an ongoing project in the Salt Lake Valley, Utah, measurements of CO2 mixing ratio and the isotopic composition of CO2 have shown that vehicle exhaust significantly elevates CO2 mixing ratios above ambient, particularly in the wintertime when temperature inversions create stable conditions. Natural gas combustion also makes a large contribution to CO2 mixing ratio in the winter, but becomes negligible in the summer. However, the urban "forest" in the Salt Lake Valley plays an active role in influencing CO2 mixing ratio during the spring, summer, and fall through photosynthesis and respiration. Atmospheric CO2 measurements in the Salt Lake Valley are also useful in that they correlate with air pollutants such as aerosols, particularly in the wintertime when CO2 sources are dominated by combustion. The relationship between CO2 mixing ratio and other pollutants varies as a function of fuel source (natural gas versus gasoline) and meteorological variables that affect atmospheric chemistry of reactive compounds; therefore, these relationships provide additional information about sources and sinks for atmospheric constituents. Finally, CO2 is a stable atmospheric tracer in that it does not undergo chemical transformations in the atmosphere. Measurements in the Salt Lake Valley showed that the temporal and spatial distribution of CO2 in the wintertime may provide information about atmospheric transport during complex cold pools events if mixing ratios are monitored at multiple locations. These results suggest that studies of

  9. Sensitivity of simulated CO2 concentration to regridding of global fossil fuel CO2 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Errors in the specification or utilization of fossil fuel CO2 emissions within carbon budget or atmospheric CO2 inverse studies can alias the estimation of biospheric and oceanic carbon exchange. A key component in the simulation of CO2 concentrations arising from fossil fuel emissions is the spatial distribution of the emission near coastlines. Finite grid resolution can give rise to mismatches between the emissions and simulated atmospheric dynamics which differ over land or water. We test these mismatches by examining simulated global atmospheric CO2 concentration driven by two different approaches to regridding fossil fuel CO2 emissions. The two approaches are: (1 a commonly-used method that allocates emissions to gridcells with no attempt to ensure dynamical consistency with atmospheric transport; (2 an improved method that reallocates emissions to gridcells to ensure dynamically consistent results. Results show large spatial and temporal differences in the simulated CO2 concentration when comparing these two approaches. The emissions difference ranges from −30.3 Tg C gridcell−1 yr−1 (−3.39 kg C m−2 yr−1 to +30.0 Tg C gridcell−1 yr−1 (+2.6 kg C m−2 yr−1 along coastal margins. Maximum simulated annual mean CO2 concentration differences at the surface exceed ±6 ppm at various locations and times. Examination of the current CO2 monitoring locations during the local afternoon, consistent with inversion modeling system sampling and measurement protocols, finds maximum hourly differences at 38 stations exceed ±0.10 ppm with individual station differences exceeding −32 ppm. The differences implied by not accounting for this dynamical consistency problem are largest at monitoring sites proximal to large coastal urban areas and point sources. These results suggest that studies comparing simulated to observed atmospheric CO2 concentration, such as atmospheric CO2 inversions, must take measures to correct for this potential

  10. Recent and projected increases in atmospheric CO2 concentration can enhance gene flow between wild and genetically altered rice (Oryza sativa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis H Ziska

    Full Text Available Although recent and projected increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide can alter plant phenological development, these changes have not been quantified in terms of floral outcrossing rates or gene transfer. Could differential phenological development in response to rising CO(2 between genetically modified crops and wild, weedy relatives increase the spread of novel genes, potentially altering evolutionary fitness? Here we show that increasing CO(2 from an early 20(th century concentration (300 µmol mol(-1 to current (400 µmol mol(-1 and projected, mid-21(st century (600 µmol mol(-1 values, enhanced the flow of genes from wild, weedy rice to the genetically altered, herbicide resistant, cultivated population, with outcrossing increasing from 0.22% to 0.71% from 300 to 600 µmol mol(-1. The increase in outcrossing and gene transfer was associated with differential increases in plant height, as well as greater tiller and panicle production in the wild, relative to the cultivated population. In addition, increasing CO(2 also resulted in a greater synchronicity in flowering times between the two populations. The observed changes reported here resulted in a subsequent increase in rice dedomestication and a greater number of weedy, herbicide-resistant hybrid progeny. Overall, these data suggest that differential phenological responses to rising atmospheric CO(2 could result in enhanced flow of novel genes and greater success of feral plant species in agroecosystems.

  11. [Research on On-Line Calibration Based Photoacoustic Spectrometry System for Monitoring the Concentration of CO2 in Atmosphere].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-feng; Pan, Sun-qiang; Lin, Xiao-lu; Hu, Peng-bing; Chen, Zhe-min

    2016-01-01

    Resonate frequency and cell constant of photoacoustic spectrum system are usually calibrated by using standard gas in laboratory, whereas the resonate frequency and cell constant will be changed in-situ, leading to measurement accuracy errors, caused by uncertainties of standard gas, differences between standard and measured gas components and changes in environmental condition, such as temperature and humidity. As to overcome the above problems, we have proposed an on-line atmospheric oxygen-based calibration technology for photoacoustic spectrum system and used in measurement of concentration of carbon dioxide in atmosphere. As the concentration of atmospheric oxygen is kept as constant as 20.96%, the on-line calibration for the photoacoustic spectrum system can be realized by detecting the swept-frequency and peak signal at 763.73 nm. The cell of the PAS has a cavity with length of 100 mm and an inner diameter of 6 mm, and worked in a first longitudinal resonant mode. The influence of environmental temperature and humidity, gas components on the photoacoustic cell's performance has been theoretically analyzed, and meanwhile the resonant frequencies and cell constants were calibrated and acquired respectively using standard gas, indoor air and outdoor air. Compared with calibrated gas analyzer, concentration of carbon dioxide is more accurate by using the resonant frequency and cell constant calculated by oxygen in tested air, of which the relative error is less than 1%, much smaller than that calculated by the standard gas in laboratory. The innovation of this paper is that using atmospheric oxygen as photoacoustic spectrum system's calibration gas effectively reduces the error caused by using standard gas and environmental condition changes, and thus improves the on-line measuring accuracy and reliability of the photoacoustic spectrum system.

  12. A role for atmospheric CO2 in preindustrial climate forcing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, T.B. van; Wagner-Cremer, F.; Kürschner, W.M.; Visscher, H.

    2008-01-01

    Complementary to measurements in Antarctic ice cores, stomatal frequency analysis of leaves of land plants preserved in peat and lake deposits can provide a proxy record of preindustrial atmospheric CO2 concentration. CO2 trends based on leaf remains of Quercus robur (English oak) from the Netherlan

  13. A role for atmospheric CO2 in preindustrial climate forcing

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas B. Van Hoof; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Kürschner, Wolfram M.; Visscher, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Complementary to measurements in Antarctic ice cores, stomatal frequency analysis of leaves of land plants preserved in peat and lake deposits can provide a proxy record of preindustrial atmospheric CO2 concentration. CO2 trends based on leaf remains of Quercus robur (English oak) from the Netherlands support the presence of significant CO2 variability during the first half of the last millennium. The amplitude of the reconstructed multidecadal fluctuations, up to 34 parts per million by volu...

  14. Regional Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange Via Atmospheric Budgets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, K J; Richardson, S J; Miles, N L

    2007-03-07

    are captured. Influence functions, derived using a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion model driven by the CSU Regional Atmospheric Modeling System and nudged to NCEP reanalysis meteorological fields, are used to determine source regions for the towers. The influence functions are combined with satellite vegetation observations to interpret the observed trends in CO2 concentration. Full inversions will combine these elements in a more formal analytic framework.

  15. Rising atmospheric CO2 is reducing the protein concentration of a floral pollen source essential for North American bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziska, Lewis H; Pettis, Jeffery S; Edwards, Joan; Hancock, Jillian E; Tomecek, Martha B; Clark, Andrew; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Loladze, Irakli; Polley, H Wayne

    2016-04-13

    At present, there is substantive evidence that the nutritional content of agriculturally important food crops will decrease in response to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, Ca However, whether Ca-induced declines in nutritional quality are also occurring for pollinator food sources is unknown. Flowering late in the season, goldenrod (Solidago spp.) pollen is a widely available autumnal food source commonly acknowledged by apiarists to be essential to native bee (e.g. Bombus spp.) and honeybee (Apis mellifera) health and winter survival. Using floral collections obtained from the Smithsonian Natural History Museum, we quantified Ca-induced temporal changes in pollen protein concentration of Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), the most wide spread Solidago taxon, from hundreds of samples collected throughout the USA and southern Canada over the period 1842-2014 (i.e. a Ca from approx. 280 to 398 ppm). In addition, we conducted a 2 year in situtrial of S. Canadensis populations grown along a continuous Ca gradient from approximately 280 to 500 ppm. The historical data indicated a strong significant correlation between recent increases in Ca and reductions in pollen protein concentration (r(2)= 0.81). Experimental data confirmed this decrease in pollen protein concentration, and indicated that it would be ongoing as Ca continues to rise in the near term, i.e. to 500 ppm (r(2)= 0.88). While additional data are needed to quantify the subsequent effects of reduced protein concentration for Canada goldenrod on bee health and population stability, these results are the first to indicate that increasing Ca can reduce protein content of a floral pollen source widely used by North American bees. PMID:27075256

  16. Rising atmospheric CO2 is reducing the protein concentration of a floral pollen source essential for North American bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziska, Lewis H; Pettis, Jeffery S; Edwards, Joan; Hancock, Jillian E; Tomecek, Martha B; Clark, Andrew; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Loladze, Irakli; Polley, H Wayne

    2016-04-13

    At present, there is substantive evidence that the nutritional content of agriculturally important food crops will decrease in response to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, Ca However, whether Ca-induced declines in nutritional quality are also occurring for pollinator food sources is unknown. Flowering late in the season, goldenrod (Solidago spp.) pollen is a widely available autumnal food source commonly acknowledged by apiarists to be essential to native bee (e.g. Bombus spp.) and honeybee (Apis mellifera) health and winter survival. Using floral collections obtained from the Smithsonian Natural History Museum, we quantified Ca-induced temporal changes in pollen protein concentration of Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), the most wide spread Solidago taxon, from hundreds of samples collected throughout the USA and southern Canada over the period 1842-2014 (i.e. a Ca from approx. 280 to 398 ppm). In addition, we conducted a 2 year in situtrial of S. Canadensis populations grown along a continuous Ca gradient from approximately 280 to 500 ppm. The historical data indicated a strong significant correlation between recent increases in Ca and reductions in pollen protein concentration (r(2)= 0.81). Experimental data confirmed this decrease in pollen protein concentration, and indicated that it would be ongoing as Ca continues to rise in the near term, i.e. to 500 ppm (r(2)= 0.88). While additional data are needed to quantify the subsequent effects of reduced protein concentration for Canada goldenrod on bee health and population stability, these results are the first to indicate that increasing Ca can reduce protein content of a floral pollen source widely used by North American bees.

  17. Trapping atmospheric CO2 with gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Alba; Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Webb, Paul B; Kruger, Hedi; Bühl, Michael; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Nolan, Steven P

    2014-10-01

    The ability of gold-hydroxides to fix CO2 is reported. [Au(IPr)(OH)] and [{Au(IPr)}2(μ-OH)][BF4] react with atmospheric CO2 to form the trigold carbonate complex [{Au(IPr)}3(μ(3)-CO3)][BF4]. Reactivity studies revealed that this complex behaves as two basic and one cationic Au centres, and that it is catalytically active. DFT calculations and kinetic experiments have been carried out.

  18. 从树轮纤维素δ13C序列看树木生长对大气 CO2浓度变化的响应%Response of CO2 Concentration Parameters and Water-Use Efficiency Derived from Tree-Ring δ13C Series to Atmospheric CO2 Increase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈拓; 秦大河; 任贾文; 孙维贞; 李江风

    2001-01-01

    The well-documented increase in CO2 content of atmosphere since the beginning of industrialization has been variously attributed to the anthropogenic activities, such as agricultural explosion, global deforestation and enhanced fossil fuel combustion and so on. It was estimated that about one third of anthropogenic CO2 released to atmosphere was taken up by terrestrial plants. To evaluate how the land carbon reservoir has been acting as a sink to the anthropogenic CO2 input to atmosphere, it is important to study how plants in forests physiologically adjust to the changing atmospheric conditions. This has been studied intensively using controlled experiments, but it has been difficuh to scale short-term observations to long term ecosystem-level response. However, models of carbon discrimination during carbon fixation show that Cs plants are not passive recorders: carbon isotopic variations are subjected to strong physiological control through leaf gas exchange regulation. Therefore, records of carbon discrimination in tree-ring cellulose could be used to study past variations of the ecophysiology of trees in reaction to environmental variations, in addition to the reconstruction of past environments. In this paper, based on the tree-ring series from Zhaosu County of Xinjiang, the changes of the ratio of CO2 concentration in the intercellular space of leaves to that-on the atmosphere (Ci/Ca), CO2 concentration in the intercellular space of leaves (Ci) and plant water-use efficiency (A/g) derivec[ from carbon isotope chronology were analyzed for the past 240 a. The results show a relatively constant Ci/Ca value of 0. 52 during the whole period, suggesting a strategy of response of plants to increased atmospheric CO2 concentration. Significant increasing trends of Ci and A/g are also found, implying more carbon being fixed; Further analysis shows that their changes are related to atmospheric CO2 concentration, thus it is demonstrated that trees maybe take up the

  19. Effects of high atmospheric CO2 concentration on root hydraulic conductivity of conifers depend on species identity and inorganic nitrogen source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Tobias; Bassirirad, Hormoz

    2011-12-01

    We examined root hydraulic conductivity (L(p)) responses of one-year-old seedlings of four conifers to the combined effects of elevated CO2 and inorganic nitrogen (N) sources. We found marked interspecific differences in L(p) responses to high CO2 ranging from a 37% increase in P. abies to a 27% decrease in P. menziesii, but these effects depended on N source. The results indicate that CO2 effects on root water transport may be coupled to leaf area responses under nitrate (NO(3)(-)), but not ammonium (NH(4)(+)) dominated soils. To our knowledge, this is the first study that highlights the role of inorganic N source and species identity as critical factors that determine plant hydraulic responses to rising atmospheric CO2 levels. The results have important implications for understanding root biology in a changing climate and for models designed to predict feedbacks between rising atmospheric CO2, N deposition, and ecohydrology.

  20. Detection of CO2 leaks from carbon capture and storage sites with combined atmospheric CO2 and O-2 measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Charlotte; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a transportable instrument that simultaneously measures the CO2 and (relative) O-2 concentration of the atmosphere with the purpose to aid in the detection of CO2 leaks from CCS sites. CO2 and O-2 are coupled in most processes on earth (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration and fossi

  1. CO2 Impacts on the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michael; Bauer, James; Bodewits, Dennis; Farnham, Tony; Stevenson, Rachel; Yelle, Roger

    2014-09-01

    The dynamically new comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will pass Mars at the extremely close distance of 140,000 km on 2014 Oct 19. This encounter is unique---a record close approach to a planet with spacecraft that can observe its passage---and currently, all 5 Mars orbiters have plans to observe the comet and/or its effects on the planet. Gas from the comet's coma is expected to collide with the Martian atmosphere, altering the abundances of some species and producing significant heating, inflating the upper atmosphere. We propose DDT observations with Spitzer/IRAC to measure the comet's CO2+CO coma (observing window Oct 30 - Nov 20), to use these measurements to derive the coma's CO2 density at Mars during the closest approach, and to aid the interpretation of any observed effects or changes in the Martian atmosphere.

  2. Real time and in situ determination of ammonia concentration in the atmosphere by intermodulated Stark resonant CO2 laser spectroscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauren, H.; Gerkema, E.; Bicanic, D.; Jalink, H.

    1993-01-01

    A concept of Intermodulated Photoacoustic Stark Spectroscopy (IMPASS) was used in an attempt to perform the interference-free field measurement of trace ammonia (3-40 ppbv) concentration levels in the air with a time resolution of 40 s.

  3. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on insects and pathogens of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Triso) and oilseed rape(Brassica napus cv. Campino)

    OpenAIRE

    Oehme, Viktoriya

    2012-01-01

    It is suggested that plants, herbivore insects and pathogens will be affected by rising atmospheric CO2. The working hypothesis of this study was that elevated CO2 will affect plant composition and will thus exert influence on plant-insect interactions by changing the nutritive value for insects feeding on phloem sap. To test this hypothesis, experiments were carried out on wheat and oilseed rape in two different systems: controlled environment chambers (climate chamber system) and an open...

  4. A 40-million-year history of atmospheric CO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi Ge; Pagani, Mark; Liu, Zhonghui; Bohaty, Steven M; Deconto, Robert

    2013-10-28

    The alkenone-pCO2 methodology has been used to reconstruct the partial pressure of ancient atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2) for the past 45 million years of Earth's history (Middle Eocene to Pleistocene epochs). The present long-term CO2 record is a composite of data from multiple ocean localities that express a wide range of oceanographic and algal growth conditions that potentially bias CO2 results. In this study, we present a pCO2 record spanning the past 40 million years from a single marine locality, Ocean Drilling Program Site 925 located in the western equatorial Atlantic Ocean. The trends and absolute values of our new CO2 record site are broadly consistent with previously published multi-site alkenone-CO2 results. However, new pCO2 estimates for the Middle Miocene are notably higher than published records, with average pCO2 concentrations in the range of 400-500 ppm. Our results are generally consistent with recent pCO2 estimates based on boron isotope-pH data and stomatal index records, and suggest that CO2 levels were highest during a period of global warmth associated with the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (17-14 million years ago, Ma), followed by a decline in CO2 during the Middle Miocene Climate Transition (approx. 14 Ma). Several relationships remain contrary to expectations. For example, benthic foraminiferal δ(18)O records suggest a period of deglaciation and/or high-latitude warming during the latest Oligocene (27-23 Ma) that, based on our results, occurred concurrently with a long-term decrease in CO2 levels. Additionally, a large positive δ(18)O excursion near the Oligocene-Miocene boundary (the Mi-1 event, approx. 23 Ma), assumed to represent a period of glacial advance and retreat on Antarctica, is difficult to explain by our CO2 record alone given what is known of Antarctic ice sheet history and the strong hysteresis of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet once it has grown to continental dimensions. We also demonstrate that in the

  5. [CO2-Concentrating Mechanism and Its Traits in Haloalkaliphilic Cyanobacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriyanova, E V; Samylina, O S

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are a group of oxygenic phototrophs existing for at least 3.5 Ga. Photosynthetic CO2 assimilation by cyanobacteria occurs via the Calvin cycle, with RuBisCO, its key enzyme, having very low affinity to CO2. This is due to the fact that atmospheric CO2 concentration in Archaean, when the photosynthetic apparatus evolved, was several orders higher than now. Later, in the epoch of Precambrian microbial communities, CO2 content in the atmosphere decreased drastically. Thus, present-day phototrophs, including cyanobacteria, require adaptive mechanisms for efficient photosynthesis. In cyanobacterial cells, this function is performed by the CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), which creates elevated CO2 concentrations in the vicinity of RuBisCO active centers, thus significantly increasing the rate of CO2 fixation in the Calvin cycle. CCM has been previously studied only for freshwater and marine cyanobacteria. We were the first to investigate CCM in haloalkaliphilic cyanobacteria from soda lakes. Extremophilic haloalkaliphilic cyanobacteria were shown to possess a well-developed CCM with the structure and functional principles similar to those of freshwater and marine strains. Analysis of available data suggests that regulation of the amount of inorganic carbon transported into the cell is probably the general CCM function under these conditions.

  6. 1982–2010 Trends of Light Use Efficiency and Inherent Water Use Efficiency in African vegetation: Sensitivity to Climate and Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoul Khadre Traore

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Light and water use by vegetation at the ecosystem level, are key components for understanding the carbon and water cycles particularly in regions with high climate variability and dry climates such as Africa. The objective of this study is to examine recent trends over the last 30 years in Light Use Efficiency (LUE and inherent Water Use Efficiency (iWUE* for the major biomes of Africa, including their sensitivities to climate and CO2. LUE and iWUE* trends are analyzed using a combination of NOAA-AVHRR NDVI3g and fAPAR3g, and a data-driven model of monthly evapotranspiration and Gross Primary Productivity (based on flux tower measurements and remote sensing fAPAR, yet with no flux tower data in Africa and the ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms process-based land surface model driven by variable CO2 and two different gridded climate fields. The iWUE* data product increases by 10%–20% per decade during the 1982–2010 period over the northern savannas (due to positive trend of vegetation productivity and the central African forest (due to positive trend of vapor pressure deficit. In contrast to the iWUE*, the LUE trends are not statistically significant. The process-based model simulations only show a positive linear trend in iWUE* and LUE over the central African forest. Additionally, factorial model simulations were conducted to attribute trends in iWUE and LUE to climate change and rising CO2 concentrations. We found that the increase of atmospheric CO2 by 52.8 ppm during the period of study explains 30%–50% of the increase in iWUE* and >90% of the LUE trend over the central African forest. The modeled iWUE* trend exhibits a high sensitivity to the climate forcing and environmental conditions, whereas the LUE trend has a smaller sensitivity to the selected climate forcing.

  7. Upconversion-based lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgstedt, Lasse; Fix, Andreas; Wirth, Martin;

    2016-01-01

    For the first time an upconversion based detection scheme is demonstrated for lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2-concentrations, with a hard target at a range of 3 km and atmospheric backscatter from a range of similar to 450 m. The pulsed signals at 1572 nm are upconverted to 635 nm, and dete......For the first time an upconversion based detection scheme is demonstrated for lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2-concentrations, with a hard target at a range of 3 km and atmospheric backscatter from a range of similar to 450 m. The pulsed signals at 1572 nm are upconverted to 635 nm......, and detected by a photomultiplier tube, to test how the upconversion technology performs in a long range detection system. The upconversion approach is compared to an existing direct detection scheme using a near-IR detector with respect to signal-to-noise ratio and quantum efficiency. It is for the first time...

  8. Trend, seasonal and diurnal variations of atmospheric CO2 in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The concentration of atmospheric CO2 in Beijing increased rapidly at a mean growth rate of 3.7%@a?1 from 1993 to 1995. After displaying a peak of (409.7±25.9) ?mol@mol?1 in 1995, it decreased slowly. Both the almost stable anthropogenic CO2 source and increasing biotic CO2 sink contribute to the drop of CO2 concentration from 1995 to 2000. The seasonal variation of CO2 concentration exhibits a clear cycle with a maximum in winter, averaging (426.8±20.6) ?mol@mol?1, and a minimum in summer, averaging (369.1±6.1) ?mol@mol?1. The seasonal variation of CO2 concentration is mainly controlled by phenology. The mean diurnal variation of atmospheric CO2 concentration for a year in Beijing is highly clear: daily maximum CO2 concentration usually occurs at night, but daily minimum CO2 concentration does in the daytime, with a mean diurnal difference more than 34.7 ?mol@mol?1. It has been revealed that the interannual variations of atmospheric CO2 concentration in winter and autumn regulated the interannual trend of atmospheric CO2, whereas the interannual variation of CO2 concentration in summer affected the general tendency of atmospheric CO2 in a less degree.

  9. A role for atmospheric CO2 in preindustrial climate forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, Thomas B; Wagner-Cremer, Friederike; Kürschner, Wolfram M; Visscher, Henk

    2008-10-14

    Complementary to measurements in Antarctic ice cores, stomatal frequency analysis of leaves of land plants preserved in peat and lake deposits can provide a proxy record of preindustrial atmospheric CO(2) concentration. CO(2) trends based on leaf remains of Quercus robur (English oak) from the Netherlands support the presence of significant CO(2) variability during the first half of the last millennium. The amplitude of the reconstructed multidecadal fluctuations, up to 34 parts per million by volume, considerably exceeds maximum shifts measured in Antarctic ice. Inferred changes in CO(2) radiative forcing are of a magnitude similar to variations ascribed to other mechanisms, particularly solar irradiance and volcanic activity, and may therefore call into question the concept of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which assumes an insignificant role of CO(2) as a preindustrial climate-forcing factor. The stomata-based CO(2) trends correlate with coeval sea-surface temperature trends in the North Atlantic Ocean, suggesting the possibility of an oceanic source/sink mechanism for the recorded CO(2) changes.

  10. The effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on gross nitrogen and carbon dynamics in a permanent grassland: A field pulse-labeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Gerald; Gorenflo, André; Keidel, Lisa; Brenzinger, Kristof; Elias, Dafydd; McNamara, Niall; Maček, Irena; Vodnik, Dominik; Braker, Gesche; Schimmelpfennig, Sonja; Gerstner, Judith; Müller, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    To predict ecosystem reactions to elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) it is essential to understand the interactions between plant carbon input, microbial community composition and activity and associated nutrient dynamics. Long-term observations (> 14 years) within the Giessen Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (Giessen FACE) study on permanent grassland showed next to an enhanced biomass production an unexpected strong positive feedback effect on ecosystem respiration and nitrous oxide (N2O) production. The overall goal of this study is to understand the long-term effects of eCO2 and carbon input on microbial community composition and activity as well as the associated nitrogen dynamics, N2O production and plant N uptake in the Giessen FACE study on permanent grassland. A combination of 13CO2 pulse labelling with 15N tracing of 15NH4+ and 15NO3- was carried out in situ. Different fractions of soil organic matter (recalcitrant, labile SOM) and the various mineral N pools in the soil (NH4+, NO3-), gross N transformation rates, pool size dependent N2O and N2 emissions as well as N species dependent plant N uptake rates and the origin of the CO2 respiration have been quantified. Microbial analyses include exploring changes in the composition of microbial communities involved in the turnover of NH4+, NO3-, N2O and N2, i.e. ammonia oxidizing, denitrifying, and microbial communities involved in dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA). mRNA based analyses will be employed to comparably evaluate the long-term effects of eCO2 on the structure and abundance of these communities, while transcripts of these genes will be used to target the fractions of the communities which actively contribute to N transformations. We quantified the contribution of mycorrhizae on N2O emissions and observed the phenological development of the mycorrhizae after the labeling.

  11. C4 Photosynthesis (The CO2-Concentrating Mechanism and Photorespiration).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Z.; Ku, MSB.; Edwards, G. E.

    1993-09-01

    Despite previous reports of no apparent photorespiration in C4 plants based on measurements of gas exchange under 2 versus 21% O2 at varying [CO2], photosynthesis in maize (Zea mays) shows a dual response to varying [O2]. The maximum rate of photosynthesis in maize is dependent on O2 (approximately 10%). This O2 dependence is not related to stomatal conductance, because measurements were made at constant intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci); it may be linked to respiration or pseudocyclic electron flow. At a given Ci, increasing [O2] above 10% inhibits both the rate of photosynthesis, measured under high light, and the maximum quantum yield, measured under limiting light ([phi]CO2). The dual effect of O2 is masked if measurements are made under only 2 versus 21% O2. The inhibition of both photosynthesis and [phi]CO2 by O2 (measured above 10% O2) with decreasing Ci increases in a very similar manner, characteristically of O2 inhibition due to photorespiration. There is a sharp increase in O2 inhibition when the Ci decreases below 50 [mu]bar of CO2. Also, increasing temperature, which favors photorespiration, causes a decrease in [phi]CO2 under limiting CO2 and 40% O2. By comparing the degree of inhibition of photosynthesis in maize with that in the C3 species wheat (Triticum aestivum) at varying Ci, the effectiveness of C4 photosynthesis in concentrating CO2 in the leaf was evaluated. Under high light, 30[deg]C, and atmospheric levels of CO2 (340 [mu]bar), where there is little inhibition of photosynthesis in maize by O2, the estimated level of CO2 around ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) in the bundle sheath compartment was 900 [mu]bar, which is about 3 times higher than the value around Rubisco in mesophyll cells of wheat. A high [CO2] is maintained in the bundle sheath compartment in maize until Ci decreases below approximately 100 [mu]bar. The results from these gas exchange measurements indicate that photorespiration occurs in maize but

  12. Use of high-scale traffic modeling to estimate road vehicle emissions of CO2 and impact on the atmospheric concentration in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, R. M.; Perez-Martinez, P.; Andrade, M. D. F.

    2015-12-01

    Adequate estimations of motor vehicle CO2 emission inventories at high spatial and temporal urban scales are needed to establish transport policy measures aim to reduce climate change impacts from global cities. The Metropolitan Region of São Paulo (MRSP) is impacted by the emission of 7 million vehicles (97% light-duty gasoline vehicles LDVs and 3% heavy-duty diesel vehicles HDVs) and several environmental programs were implemented to reduce the emissions. Inventories match site measurements and remote sensing and help to assess the real impact of road vehicle emissions on city's air quality. In this paper we presented a high-resolution vehicle-based inventory of motor CO2 emissions mapped at a scale of 100 m and 1 hour. We used origin and destination (O/D) transport area zone trips from the mobility survey of the São Paulo Transport Metropolitan Company (Metro), a road network of the region and traffic datasets from the São Paulo Transport Engineering Company (CET). The inventory was done individually for LDVs and HDVs for the years 2008 and 2013 and was complemented with air quality datasets from the State Environmental Company (CETESB), together with census data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE). Our inventory showed partial disagreement with the São Paulo State's GHG inventory, caused by the different approach used - bottom vs. top down - and characteristic spatial and temporal biases of the population inputs used (different emission factors). Higher concentrations became apparent near the road-network at the spatial scale used. The total emissions were estimated in 20,781 million tons per year of CO2eq (83.7% by LDVs and 16.3% HDVs). Temporal profiles - diurnal, weekly and monthly - in vehicle emission distributions were calculated using CET's traffic counts and surrogates of congestion. These profiles were compared with average road-site measurements of CO2 for the year 2013. Measurements showed two peaks associated to the

  13. Tomato–Pseudomonas syringae interactions under elevated CO2 concentration: the role of stomata

    OpenAIRE

    Xin LI; Sun, Zenghui; Shao, Shujun; Zhang, Shuai; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Zhang, Guanqun; Jiang, Yuping; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Yanhong; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) in agricultural and natural ecosystems is known to reduce plant stomatal opening, but it is unclear whether these CO2-induced stomatal alterations are associated with foliar pathogen infections. In this study, tomato plants were grown under ambient and elevated [CO2] and inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000, a strain that is virulent on tomato plants. We found that elevated [CO2] enhanced tomato defence against P. syri...

  14. Analysis of Source and Concentration Variations of Atmospheric CO2 in East Asia in 1 994-201 0%1994-2010年东亚地区CO2浓度变化特征及成因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解淑艳; 王胜杰; 王瑞斌

    2014-01-01

    Based on observed atmospheric CO2 concentrations at 5 background stations in East Asia since 1 994,temporal and spatial variation characteristics and changesand impacts of the anthropogenic sourcesof atmospheric CO2 are analyzed.Results reveal that the annual average CO2 concentrations showed a clear upward trend,the concentration increased by 8.4% ~9.0% in 201 0 compared with 1 994.Monthly average CO2 concentrations exhibit strong seasonal variations.The higher values prefer to present in cold seasons such as winter and spring,while the lower values appear mostly in summer seasons in northern hemisphere.Reducing the fossil fuel consumption,increasing the forest coverage and improving the agricultural coverage will help reduce the mean CO2 concentration in the atmosphere.%在东亚地区选取5个大气本底观测站1994年以来观测的 CO2监测资料,分析了各站大气 CO2的时空变化特征,以及 CO2主要人为源的变化及其影响。结果表明,5个本底站大气 CO2年均值均呈明显升高趋势,2010年较1994年增长幅度为8.4%~9.0%;在北半球国家,CO2月均值有明显的季节变化,高值多出现在冬春等寒冷季节,低值多出现在夏季。减少化石燃料消耗量、增加森林覆盖率及农业覆盖率将对大气中 CO2有削减作用。

  15. Atmospheric verification of anthropogenic CO2 emission trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francey, Roger J.; Trudinger, Cathy M.; van der Schoot, Marcel; Law, Rachel M.; Krummel, Paul B.; Langenfelds, Ray L.; Paul Steele, L.; Allison, Colin E.; Stavert, Ann R.; Andres, Robert J.; Rödenbeck, Christian

    2013-05-01

    International efforts to limit global warming and ocean acidification aim to slow the growth of atmospheric CO2, guided primarily by national and industry estimates of production and consumption of fossil fuels. Atmospheric verification of emissions is vital but present global inversion methods are inadequate for this purpose. We demonstrate a clear response in atmospheric CO2 coinciding with a sharp 2010 increase in Asian emissions but show persisting slowing mean CO2 growth from 2002/03. Growth and inter-hemispheric concentration difference during the onset and recovery of the Global Financial Crisis support a previous speculation that the reported 2000-2008 emissions surge is an artefact, most simply explained by a cumulative underestimation (~ 9PgC) of 1994-2007 emissions; in this case, post-2000 emissions would track mid-range of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change emission scenarios. An alternative explanation requires changes in the northern terrestrial land sink that offset anthropogenic emission changes. We suggest atmospheric methods to help resolve this ambiguity.

  16. Energy implications of future stabilization of atmospheric CO2 content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change calls for ''stabilization of greenhouse-gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system...''. A standard baseline scenario that assumes no policy intervention to limit greenhouse-gas emissions has 10 TW (10 x 1012 watts) of carbon-emission-free power being produced by the year 2050, equivalent to the power provided by all today's energy sources combined. Here we employ a carbon-cycle/energy model to estimate the carbon-emission-free power needed for various atmospheric CO2 stabilization scenarios. We find that CO2 stabilization with continued economic growth will require innovative, cost-effective and carbon-emission-free technologies that can provide additional tens of terawatts of primary power in the coming decades, and certainly by the middle of the twenty-first century, even with sustained improvement in the economic productivity of primary energy. (author)

  17. The Abundance of Atmospheric CO2 in Ocean Exoplanets: A Novel CO2 Deposition Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Levi, Amit; Podolak, Morris

    2016-01-01

    We consider super-Earth sized planets which have a water mass fraction that is large enough to form an external mantle composed of high pressure water ice polymorphs and that lack a substantial H/He atmosphere. We consider such planets in their habitable zone so that their outermost condensed mantle is a global deep liquid ocean. For these ocean planets we investigate potential internal reservoirs of CO2; the amount of CO2 dissolved in the ocean for the various saturation conditions encountered, and the ocean-atmosphere exchange flux of CO2. We find that in steady state the abundance of CO2 in the atmosphere has two possible states. When the wind-driven circulation is the dominant CO2 exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of tens of bars of CO2 results, where the exact value depends on the subtropical ocean surface temperature and the deep ocean temperature. When sea-ice formation, acting on these planets as a CO2 deposition mechanism, is the dominant exchange mechanism, an atmosphere of a few bars of CO2 is esta...

  18. Biomass burial and storage to reduce atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, N.

    2012-04-01

    To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a theoretical carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC/y, but probably 1-3 GtC/y can be realized in practice. Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other environmental concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from forest industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be 14/tCO2 (50/tC), lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The low cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is possible because the technique uses the natural process of photosynthesis to remove carbon from the atmosphere. The technique is low tech, distributed, safe, and can be stopped at any time, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

  19. Constraints on the atmospheric CO2 deglacial rise based on its δ13CO2 evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Lourantou, A.; Lavric, J. V.; Köhler, Peter; Barnola, J.-M.; Michel, E.; Paillard, D.; D. Raynaud; Chappellaz, J.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of air bubbles trapped in polar ice permits the reconstruction of atmospheric evolution of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2 ), on various timescales. Within this study, the simultaneous analysis of the CO2 mixing ratio and its stable carbon isotope composition (δ 13 CO2 ) over the last two deglaciations allows us to better constrain the global carbon cycle. Based on the different isotopic signatures of the ocean and the terrestrial biosphere (major reservoirs re...

  20. Effects of Hight Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations on Activities of Sucrose Metabolism-related Enzymes in Lycium barbarum Fruit%增施CO2对宁夏枸杞夏果秋果蔗糖代谢酶活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘毓璟; 张雁南; 曹兵

    2016-01-01

    以宁杞1号苗木为材料,采用OTC气室控制CO2浓度,设置自然环境CO2浓度(350±20μmol·mol-1,CK)和倍增CO2浓度(700±20 μmol·mol-1,TR)2个处理,测定宁夏枸杞果实中蔗糖代谢相关酶活性的变化,研究大气CO2浓度倍增对宁夏枸杞果实糖代谢的影响.结果表明:在高浓度CO2下,夏果中(CO2处理90 d),合成酶类和分解酶类酶活性均为处理组>对照组,其中转化酶(AI、NI)活性差异极显著;秋果中(CO2处理120 d)合成酶类与分解酶类较夏果活性均有降低,分解酶类活性为处理组>对照组,合成酶类活性为处理组<对照组,且其中SS合成方向差异极显著.据此,AI、NI及SS(合成方向)可能是高浓度CO2下蔗糖代谢响应的关键酶,且长期高浓度CO2处理会降低宁夏枸杞果实中蔗糖代谢相关酶的活性.%Taking Lycium barbarum seedlings of cultivar "Ningqi No.1" as research materials,effects of high atmospheric CO2 concentration on the activities of the enzymes related to sucrose metabolism were investigated by measuring the activities of sucrose metabolism-related enzymes in L.barbarum fruit.Two CO2 concentrations were set up:natural environment with a CO2 concentration of (350±20)μmol · mol-1 (control) and doubled CO2 concentration (700±20)μmol · mol 1 generated by open top chamber.The results showed that under high CO2 concentration,the activities of the enzymes on sucrose synthesis and decomposition in summer fruit 90 d after treatment were higher than those in the control,in which differences in invertase (AI,NI) activity was significant.While in autumn fruit 120 d after treatment,the activities of the enzymes on sucrose synthesis and decomposition were lower than those in summer fruit,the activities of the enzymes on sucrose decomposition were higher than those in the control,the activities of the enzymes on sucrose synthesis were lower than those in the control,and the differences in SS (synthetic direction) were

  1. 西安城区大气CO2浓度的变化特征及趋势研究%Study of Variation Characteristics and Trend of Atmospheric CO2 Concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王帆; 王照; 李文韬

    2015-01-01

    为了解西安市大气中CO2的特征,于东仪路烈士陵园对CO2进行了2011年~2013年的连续观测.结果表明,西安大气中CO2浓度的日变化大致呈现双峰趋势;同时,CO2浓度随季节变化明显,12月最高6~8月最低;2011~2013年间,CO2浓度和每年增幅均呈上升趋势.研究表明,西安大气中CO2主要来源于化石燃料燃烧等人为源,采暖季浓度明显高于非采暖季且日变化规律存在差异,机动车尾气的排放对CO2浓度每日的第二个峰值形成有重要影响.并采用SPSS软件对西安市2020年的CO2浓度做预测分析,其中私家车保有量和绿化面积对CO2浓度有直接影响.

  2. Simulated effect of calcification feedback on atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Cao, Long

    2016-01-01

    Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 reduces pH and saturation state of calcium carbonate materials of seawater, which could reduce the calcification rate of some marine organisms, triggering a negative feedback on the growth of atmospheric CO2. We quantify the effect of this CO2-calcification feedback by conducting a series of Earth system model simulations that incorporate different parameterization schemes describing the dependence of calcification rate on saturation state of CaCO3. In a scenario with SRES A2 CO2 emission until 2100 and zero emission afterwards, by year 3500, in the simulation without CO2-calcification feedback, model projects an accumulated ocean CO2 uptake of 1462 PgC, atmospheric CO2 of 612 ppm, and surface pH of 7.9. Inclusion of CO2-calcification feedback increases ocean CO2 uptake by 9 to 285 PgC, reduces atmospheric CO2 by 4 to 70 ppm, and mitigates the reduction in surface pH by 0.003 to 0.06, depending on the form of parameterization scheme used. It is also found that the effect of CO2-calcification feedback on ocean carbon uptake is comparable and could be much larger than the effect from CO2-induced warming. Our results highlight the potentially important role CO2-calcification feedback plays in ocean carbon cycle and projections of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  3. Simulated effect of calcification feedback on atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Cao, Long

    2016-02-01

    Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 reduces pH and saturation state of calcium carbonate materials of seawater, which could reduce the calcification rate of some marine organisms, triggering a negative feedback on the growth of atmospheric CO2. We quantify the effect of this CO2-calcification feedback by conducting a series of Earth system model simulations that incorporate different parameterization schemes describing the dependence of calcification rate on saturation state of CaCO3. In a scenario with SRES A2 CO2 emission until 2100 and zero emission afterwards, by year 3500, in the simulation without CO2-calcification feedback, model projects an accumulated ocean CO2 uptake of 1462 PgC, atmospheric CO2 of 612 ppm, and surface pH of 7.9. Inclusion of CO2-calcification feedback increases ocean CO2 uptake by 9 to 285 PgC, reduces atmospheric CO2 by 4 to 70 ppm, and mitigates the reduction in surface pH by 0.003 to 0.06, depending on the form of parameterization scheme used. It is also found that the effect of CO2-calcification feedback on ocean carbon uptake is comparable and could be much larger than the effect from CO2-induced warming. Our results highlight the potentially important role CO2-calcification feedback plays in ocean carbon cycle and projections of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  4. Impacting factors and relationship between stomatal parameters and atmospheric CO2 concentration%气孔参数与大气CO2浓度的相关性及其影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马清温; 李凤兰; 李承森

    2004-01-01

    通常认为气孔参数(气孔密度和气孔指数)和大气CO2浓度有负相关关系,但不是每种植物的气孔参数都与CO2浓度的变化有负相关关系,气孔参数对大气CO2浓度的显著反应也只在一定的CO2浓度范围内发生.大气CO2浓度是影响气孔参数变化的主要因素,同时温度、水分的供应和光照条件等其它环境因素也影响气孔参数.CO2浓度和光照条件主要影响气孔发生,而其它环境因素主要影响叶片表皮细胞的大小.气孔指数部分消除了表皮细胞大小带来的影响,用气孔指数指示大气CO2浓度比用气孔密度指示更为可靠.

  5. Atmospheric CO2 and climate: Importance of the transient response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary studies suggest that the thermal inertia of the upper layers of the oceans, combined with vertical mixing of deeper oceanic waters, could delay the response of the globally averaged surface temperature to an increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration by a decade or so relative to equilibrium calculations. This study extends the global analysis of the transient response to zonal averages, using a hierarchy of simple energy balance models and vertical mixing assumptions for water exchange between upper and deeper oceanic layers. It is found that because of the latitudinal dependence of both thermal inertia and radiative and dynamic energy exchange mechanisms, the approach toward equilibrium of the surface temperature of various regions of the earth will be significantly different from the global average approach. This suggests that the actual time evolution of the horizontal surface temperature gradients--and any associated regional climatic anomalies-may well be significantly different from that suggested by equilibrium climatic modeling simulations (or those computed with a highly unrealistic geographic distribution of ocean thermal capacity). Also, the transient response as a function of latitude is significantly different between globally equivalent CO2 and solar constant focusing runs. It is suggested that the nature of the transient response is a major uncertainty in characterizing the CO2 problem and that study of this topic should become a major priority for future research. An appendix puts this issue in the context of the overall CO2 problem

  6. The Global Land-Ocean Temperature Index in Relation to Sunspot Number, the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation Index, the Mauna Loa Atmospheric Concentration of CO2, and Anthropogenic Carbon Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Global warming/climate change has been a subject of scientific interest since the early 19th century. In particular, increases in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) have long been thought to account for Earth's increased warming, although the lack of a dependable set of observational data was apparent as late as the mid 1950s. However, beginning in the late 1950s, being associated with the International Geophysical Year, the opportunity arose to begin accurate continuous monitoring of the Earth's atmospheric concentration of CO2. Consequently, it is now well established that the atmospheric concentration of CO2, while varying seasonally within any particular year, has steadily increased over time. Associated with this rising trend in the atmospheric concentration of CO2 is a rising trend in the surface-air and sea-surface temperatures (SSTs). This Technical Publication (TP) examines the statistical relationships between 10-year moving averages (10-yma) of the Global Land-Ocean Temperature Index (GLOTI), sunspot number (SSN), the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) index, and the Mauna Loa CO2 (MLCO2) index for the common interval 1964-2006, where the 10-yma values are used to indicate trends in the data. Scatter plots using the 10-yma values between GLOTI and each of the other parameters are determined, both as single-variate and multivariate fits. Scatter plots are also determined for MLCO2 using single-variate and bivariate (BV) fits, based on the GLOTI alone and the GLOTI in combination with the AMO index. On the basis of the inferred preferential fits for MLCO2, estimates for MLCO2 are determined for the interval 1885-1964, thereby yielding an estimate of the preindustrial level of atmospheric concentration of CO2. Lastly, 10-yma values of MLCO2 are compared against 10-yma estimates of the total carbon emissions (TCE) to determine the likelihood that manmade sources of carbon emissions are indeed responsible for the recent warming now

  7. Relationship between Atmospheric CO_2 Concentration and Global Warming Based on Carbon Storage Dynamics of Terrestrial and Marine Ecosystems%从陆地和海洋生态系统角度辨析大气CO_2浓度与全球变暖关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范跃新; 徐玲琳; 刘秀铭; 陈光水; 杨智杰; 王健

    2012-01-01

    By the investigation of relationship between temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration of ancient climate record,and the responses of carbon pools in terrestrial and marine ecosystems to recent global warming,relationship of atmospheric CO2 concentration and global warming is re-examined.The result shows that the view of "global warming driven by increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration" can not be strongly supported by the facts,such as in the ancient climate record atmospheric CO2 concentration often lagged behind the change of temperature,etc.In contrast,it is found that during the past century,both terrestrial and marine ecosystems reduced carbon storage as a response to global warming,thus supporting the view of "global warming contributes to the increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration".For terrestrial ecosystems,the reduction of carbon storage may be due to the mechanism that global warming decreases total NPP of terrestrial ecosystems;for marine ecosystems,global warming may cause the decrease of the ocean′s carbon absorption,by which the mechanism is very complicated.%根据古气候记录的温度与大气CO2浓度变化的关系,结合近百年尺度陆地和海洋生态系统碳库对全球变暖的响应模式,探讨大气CO2浓度升高与全球变暖的关系.结果发现,不论是古气候记录的大气CO2浓度升高的时间滞后于升温的时间,还是古气候与近百年来大气CO2浓度升高幅度相近条件下,两者升温幅度存在约10倍差异的事实,均不支持"大气CO2浓度升高驱动了全球变暖"的观点.近百年尺度陆地和海洋生态系统碳汇功能随升温降低从而增大了大气CO2来源,这有可能是"温度升高促进了大气CO2浓度增加"的原因.陆地生态系统碳汇功能降低的驱动机制可能是由于升温降低了陆地生态系统的净初级生产力,增大了异氧呼吸和有机碳分解速率所致;而海洋CO2吸收能力的降低则可能与升温导致CO

  8. 太阳光谱对高分辨吸收光谱反演大气CO2浓度影响的研究%Study on the Effect of Solar Spectra on the Retrieval of Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Using High Resolution Absorption Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡振华; 黄腾; 王颖萍; 丁蕾; 郑海洋; 方黎

    2011-01-01

    以太阳光为辐射源的近红外波段高分辨率吸收光谱广泛应用于大气参数遥测.以CO2浓度反演为例,研究了太阳光谱分辨率的影响.利用美国AER公司编制的太阳光谱计算程序得到大气上界的理论计算太阳光谱作为辐射源,结合自行编制的高分辨率大气透过率模拟软件HRATS对大气中CO2平均浓度进行模拟反演.数值模拟计算结果表明,太阳光谱的准确度对浓度反演非常重要,特别是在超分辨光谱反演中异常重要,虽然反演浓度的偏差与观测分辨率没有明显的线性变化规律,但有趋势:观测分辨率的降低对太阳光谱分辨率的要求也降低,为了精确反演大气中CO2浓度,因此需要充分利用大气层顶的高分辨太阳辐射光谱数据.%Taking solar source as radiation in the near-infrared high-resolution absorption spectrum is widely used in remote sensing of atmospheric parameters. The present paper will take retrieval of the concentration of CO2 for example, and study the effect of solar spectra resolution. Retrieving concentrations of CO2 by using high resolution absorption spectra, a method which uses the program provided by AER to calculate the solar spectra at the top of atmosphere as radiation and combine with the HRATS (high resolution atmospheric transmission simulation) to simulate retrieving concentration of CO2. Numerical simulation shows that the accuracy of solar spectrum is important to retrieval, especially in the hyper-resolution spectral retrieavl, and the error of retrieval concentration has poor linear relation with the resolution of observation, but there is a tendency that the decrease in the resolution requires low resolution of solar spectrum. In order to retrieve the concentration of CO2 of atmosphere, the authors' should take full advantage of high-resolution solar spectrum at the top of atmosphere

  9. Long-term observations of atmospheric CO2 and carbon isotopes at continental sites in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    LEVIN Ingeborg; Graul, Rolf; Trivett, Neil

    1995-01-01

    A network for regional atmospheric CO2 observations had already been established in Germany by 1972, consisting of 5 stations with basically different characteristics: Westerland, a coastal station at the North Sea, 2 regional stations, Waldhof and Deuselbach, as well as 2 mountain stations, Brotjacklriegel at the eastern border of Germany and Schauinsland in the Black Forest. In addition to CO2 concentration observations, from 1977 onwards quasi-continuous 13CO2 and 14CO2 measurements were p...

  10. Long-term observations of atmospheric CO2 and carbon isotopes at continental sites in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    LEVIN Ingeborg; Graul, Rolf; TRIVETT, NEIL B. A.

    2011-01-01

    A network for regional atmospheric CO2 observations had already been established in Germany by 1972, consisting of 5 stations with basically different characteristics: Westerland, a coastal station at the North Sea, 2 regional stations, Waldhof and Deuselbach, as well as 2 mountain stations, Brotjacklriegel at the eastern boarder of Germany and Schauinsland in the Black Forest. In addition to CO2 concentration observations, from 1977 onwards quasi-continuous 13CO2 and 14CO2 measurements were ...

  11. Effects of Controlled Atmospheres with High-O2 or High-CO2 Concentrations on Postharvest Physiology and Storability of "Napoleon" Sweet Cherry%高O2或高CO2浓度气调贮藏对"那翁"甜樱桃采后生理和贮藏性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜爱丽; 田世平; 徐勇

    2002-01-01

    Sweet cherries ( Prunus avium L. cv. Napoleon) were stored in controlled atmospheres (CA) of high O2 (70% O2+0% CO2) or high CO2 (5% O2+10% CO2), in modified atmosphere package (MAP, (13%-18%) O2+(2%-4%) CO2) and in air (control) at 1 ℃ to investigate the effects of different O2 and CO2 concentrations on physiological properties, quality and storability of the fruits during storage. The results indicated that compared with other treatments, CA with high O2 concentration decreased fruit decay and ethanol content, but increased the accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA) and stimulated browning. CA with high CO2 concentration inhibited polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity, reduced MDA content, maintained vitamin C content and firmness, decreased fruit decay and browning. Soluble solids contents (SSC) were not significantly affected by different atmosphere treatments. "Napoleon" fruits stored in 5% O2+10% CO2 for as long as 80 d were of good quality, but only 40, 20 and 30 d stored in MAP, 70% O2+ 0% CO2 and air, respectively.%研究了甜樱桃品种"那翁" ( Prunus avium L. cv. Napoleon)在1 ℃的高O2 浓度气调(CA-I: 70% O2+0% CO2)、高CO2 浓度气调 (CA-II: 5% O2+10% CO2)、自发气调 (modified atmosphere package, MAP) 和普通冷藏条件下果实生理、品质、耐藏性的变化.结果表明:与其他处理相比,高O2 浓度的气调可以抑制果实腐烂、减少果肉中乙醇含量,但果实的丙二醛(MDA)含量迅速上升、褐变严重.高CO2浓度的气调能有效抑制MDA含量上升的速率和多酚氧化酶(PPO)活性,保持果实硬度和维生素C含量,减少果实腐烂和褐变,延长贮藏寿命.不同处理对果实可溶性固形物含量的影响不大."那翁" 甜樱桃在5% O2+10% CO2气调中贮藏80 d能保持果实固有的风味品质.在MAP下, 70% O2+0% CO2和普通冷藏中的适宜贮藏期分别为40 d、20 d和30 d.

  12. Differential absorption lidar for volcanic CO(2) sensing tested in an unstable atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Manuel; Burton, Mike; Fiorani, Luca

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by the need for an extremely durable and portable instrument to quantify volcanic CO(2) we have produced a corresponding differential absorption lidar (DIAL). It was tested on a volcano (Vulcano, Italy), sensing a non-uniform volcanic CO(2) signal under turbulent atmospheric conditions. The measured CO(2) mixing ratio trend agrees qualitatively well but quantitatively poorly with a reference CO(2) measurement. The disagreement is not in line with the precision of the DIAL determined under conditions that largely exclude atmospheric effects. We show evidence that the disagreement is mainly due to atmospheric turbulence. We conclude that excluding noise associated with atmospheric turbulence, as commonly done in precision analysis of DIAL instruments, may largely underestimate the error of measured CO(2) concentrations in turbulent atmospheric conditions. Implications for volcanic CO(2) sensing with DIAL are outlined. PMID:25836880

  13. CO2 Leakage Identification in Geosequestration Based on Real Time Correlation Analysis Between Atmospheric O2 and CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马登龙; 邓建强; 张早校

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a method for monitoring CO2 leakage in geological carbon dioxide sequestration. A real time monitoring parameter, apparent leakage flux (ALF), is presented to monitor abnormal CO2 leakage, which can be calculated by atmospheric CO2 and O2 data. The computation shows that all ALF values are close to zero-line without the leakage. With a step change or linear perturbation of concentration to the initial CO2 concen-tration data with no leakage, ALF will deviate from background line. Perturbation tests prove that ALF method is sensitive to linear perturbation but insensitive to step change of concentration. An improved method is proposed based on real time analysis of surplus CO2 concentration in least square regression process, called apparent leakage flux from surplus analysis (ALFs), which is sensitive to both step perturbation and linear perturbations of concen-tration. ALF is capable of detecting concentration increase when the leakage occurs while ALFs is useful in all pe-riods of leakage. Both ALF and ALFs are potential approaches to monitor CO2 leakage in geosequestration project.

  14. Characterization of YBCO superconductor sintered in CO2-containing atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stability of the YBCO superconductor toward reacting with CO2 in CO2/O2 gas mixtures during sintering was investigated as a function of the partial pressure of CO2 and temperature. Transport critical current density of the superconductor decreased drastically with increasing concentration of CO2 in the gas mixture. The microstructure and composition of the samples were investigated by transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

  15. Dependence of global temperatures on atmospheric CO2 and solar irradiance

    OpenAIRE

    David J. Thomson

    1997-01-01

    Changes in global average temperatures and of the seasonal cycle are strongly coupled to the concentration of atmospheric CO2. I estimate transfer functions from changes in atmospheric CO2 and from changes in solar irradiance to hemispheric temperatures that have been corrected for the effects of precession. They show that changes from CO2 over the last century are about three times larger than those from changes in solar irradiance. The increase in global average ...

  16. Atmospheric CO2 and soil extracellular enzyme activity: A meta-analysis and CO2 gradient experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations may alter carbon and nutrient cycling and microbial processes in terrestrial ecosystems. One of the primary ways that microbes interact with soil organic matter is through the production of extracellular enzymes, which break down large, complex organic molecules...

  17. Atmospheric CO2 Variability Observed during ASCENDS Flight Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, B.; Browell, E. V.; Campbell, J. F.; Choi, Y.; Dobler, J. T.; Fan, T. F.; Harrison, F. W.; Kooi, S. A.; Liu, Z.; Meadows, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; Plant, J.; Yang, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate observations of atmospheric CO2 with a space-based lidar system, such as for the NASA ASCENDS mission, will improve knowledge of global CO2 distribution and variability and increase the confidence in predictions of future climate changes. To prepare for the ASCENDS mission, the NASA Langley Research Center and Exelis Inc. (now part of Harris Corp.) have been collaborating in the development and evaluation of an Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar approach for measuring atmospheric CO2 from space. Two airborne IM-CW lidars operating in the 1.57-mm CO2 absorption band have been developed and flight tested to demonstrate precise atmospheric CO2 column measurements. A total of 14 flight campaigns have been conducted with the two lidar and in-situ CO2 measurement systems. Significant atmospheric CO2 variations on various spatiotemporal scales were observed during these campaigns. For example, around 10-ppm CO2 changes were found within free troposphere in a region of about 200×300 km2 over Iowa during a summer 2014 flight. Even over extended forests, about 2-ppm CO2 column variability was measured within about 500-km distance. For winter times, especially over snow covered ground, relatively less horizontal CO2 variability was observed, likely owing to minimal interactions between the atmosphere and land surface. Inter-annual variations of CO2 drawdown over cornfields in the Mid-West were found to be larger than 5 ppm due to slight differences in the corn growing phase and meteorological conditions even in the same time period of a year. Furthermore, considerable differences in atmospheric CO2 profiles were found during winter and summer campaigns. In the winter CO2 was found to decrease from about 400 ppm in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to about 392 ppm above 10 km, while in the summer CO2 increased from 386 ppm in the ABL to about 396 ppm in free troposphere. These and other CO2 observations are discussed in this presentation.

  18. Investigation into optimal CO2 concentration for CO2 capture from aluminium production

    OpenAIRE

    Mathisen, Anette; Sørensen, Henriette; Melaaen, Morten Christian; Müller, Gunn-Iren

    2013-01-01

    Capture of CO2 from aluminum production has been simulated using Aspen Plus and Aspen Hysys. The technology used for aluminum production is the Hall-Héroult and the current cell design necessitates that large amounts of false air is supplied to the cells. This results in a CO2 concentration in the process gas at around 1 vol%, which is considered uneconomical for CO2 capture. Therefore, the aim of this investigation is to evaluate the CO2 capture from aluminum production when the process g...

  19. How much has the increase in atmospheric CO2 directly affected past soybean production?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Gen; Iizumi, Toshichika; Nishimori, Motoki; Yokozawa, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of climate change is vital for food security. Among the most important environmental impacts of climate change is the direct effect of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) on crop yields, known as the CO2 fertilization effect. Although several statistical studies have estimated past impacts of temperature and precipitation on crop yield at regional scales, the impact of past CO2 fertilization is not well known. We evaluated how soybean yields have been enhanced by historical atmospheric [CO2] increases in three major soybean-producing countries. The estimated average yields during 2002-2006 in the USA, Brazil, and China were 4.34%, 7.57%, and 5.10% larger, respectively, than the average yields estimated using the atmospheric [CO2] of 1980. Our results demonstrate the importance of considering atmospheric [CO2] increases in evaluations of the past effects of climate change on crop yields. PMID:24827887

  20. Atmospheric CO2 Supersaturation Observed in the Martian Polar Nights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, K.; Kuroda, T.; Hayashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    The present study shows the spatio-temporal distribution of the occurrence of CO2 supersaturation in the martian atmosphere by using the Mars Global Surveyor radio occultation data. We also compare the results with numerical simulation results.

  1. Wave-Modulated CO2 Condensation in Mars' Polar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, D.; Neumann, G. A.

    2016-09-01

    We have identified regions where atmospheric waves would be expected to significantly modulate CO2 cloud formation in Mars' polar winters. We have correlated this with MOLA cloud identifications but, surprisingly, only poor correlations were found.

  2. Mesoscale modelling of atmospheric CO2 across Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lansø, Anne Sofie

    2016-01-01

    It is scientifically well-established that the increase of atmospheric CO2 affects the entire globe and will lead to higher surface temperatures. Although anthropogenic CO2is emitted straight into the atmosphere, it does not all contribute to the existing atmospheric CO2 reservoir. Approximately 29...... the processes controlling the sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2. This PhD dissertation attempts to increase our understanding of the importance of accounting for high spatiotemporal variability in estimates of CO2 exchanges between the atmosphere and the surface. For this purpose, a mesoscale...... modelling system is constructed, centred around Denmark, based on an atmospheric transport model. In this study, the main areas of focus have been on improving the spatial surface representation, for both land and sea, and investigating the influence of the temporal resolution on the air–sea CO2 exchange...

  3. [Monitoring Atmospheric CO2 and delta(13)C (CO2) Background Levels at Shangdianzi Station in Beijing, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ling-ju; Zhou, Ling-xi; Liu, Li-xin; Zhang, Gen

    2016-04-15

    The study presented time series of atmospheric CO2 concentrations from flask sampling at SDZ regional station in Beijing during 2007 and 2013, together with delta(13)CO2) values during 2009 and 2013. The "representative data" of CO2 and delta(13)C (CO2) were selected from the complete data for further analysis. Annual CO2 concentrations increased from 385.6 x 10(-6) in 2007 to 398.1 x 10(-6) in 2013, with an average growth rate of 2.0 x 10(-6) a(-1), while the delta(13)C values decreased from -8.38% per hundred in 2009 to -8.52% per hundred in 2013, with a mean growth rate of -0.03% per hundred x a(-1). The absolute increase of CO2 from 2007 to 2008 reached the lowest level during 2007 and 2013, possibly due to relatively less carbon emissions during the 2008 Olympic Games period. The peak-to-peak amplitudes of atmospheric CO2 and delta(13)C seasonal variations were 23. 9 x 10 -6 and 1. 03%o, respectively. The isotopic signatures of CO2 sources/sinks were also discussed in this study. The delta8 value for heating season I (Jan. 01-Mar. 14) was -21.30% per hundred, while -25.39% per hundred for heating season 11 (Nov. 15-Dec.31) , and for vegetative season (Mar. 15-Nov. 14) the delta(bio) value was estimated to be -21.28% per hundred, likely suggesting the significant impact of fossil fuel and corn straw combustions during winter heating season and biological activities during vegetative season. PMID:27548943

  4. [Monitoring Atmospheric CO2 and delta(13)C (CO2) Background Levels at Shangdianzi Station in Beijing, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ling-ju; Zhou, Ling-xi; Liu, Li-xin; Zhang, Gen

    2016-04-15

    The study presented time series of atmospheric CO2 concentrations from flask sampling at SDZ regional station in Beijing during 2007 and 2013, together with delta(13)CO2) values during 2009 and 2013. The "representative data" of CO2 and delta(13)C (CO2) were selected from the complete data for further analysis. Annual CO2 concentrations increased from 385.6 x 10(-6) in 2007 to 398.1 x 10(-6) in 2013, with an average growth rate of 2.0 x 10(-6) a(-1), while the delta(13)C values decreased from -8.38% per hundred in 2009 to -8.52% per hundred in 2013, with a mean growth rate of -0.03% per hundred x a(-1). The absolute increase of CO2 from 2007 to 2008 reached the lowest level during 2007 and 2013, possibly due to relatively less carbon emissions during the 2008 Olympic Games period. The peak-to-peak amplitudes of atmospheric CO2 and delta(13)C seasonal variations were 23. 9 x 10 -6 and 1. 03%o, respectively. The isotopic signatures of CO2 sources/sinks were also discussed in this study. The delta8 value for heating season I (Jan. 01-Mar. 14) was -21.30% per hundred, while -25.39% per hundred for heating season 11 (Nov. 15-Dec.31) , and for vegetative season (Mar. 15-Nov. 14) the delta(bio) value was estimated to be -21.28% per hundred, likely suggesting the significant impact of fossil fuel and corn straw combustions during winter heating season and biological activities during vegetative season.

  5. Biosequestration of atmospheric CO2 and flue gas-containing CO2 by microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Wai Yan; Show, Pau Loke; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ling, Tau Chuan; Juan, Joon Ching

    2015-05-01

    The unceasing rise of greenhouse gas emission has led to global warming and climate change. Global concern on this phenomenon has put forward the microalgal-based CO2 sequestration aiming to sequester carbon back to the biosphere, ultimately reducing greenhouse effects. Microalgae have recently gained enormous attention worldwide, to be the valuable feedstock for renewable energy production, due to their high growth rates, high lipid productivities and the ability to sequester carbon. The photosynthetic process of microalgae uses atmospheric CO2 and CO2 from flue gases, to synthesize nutrients for their growth. In this review article, we will primarily discuss the efficiency of CO2 biosequestration by microalgae species, factors influencing microalgal biomass productions, microalgal cultivation systems, the potential and limitations of using flue gas for microalgal cultivation as well as the bio-refinery approach of microalgal biomass.

  6. Implications of "peak oil" for atmospheric CO2 and climate

    CERN Document Server

    Kharecha, P A

    2007-01-01

    Peaking of global oil production may have a large effect on future atmospheric CO2 amount and climate change, depending upon choices made for subsequent energy sources. We suggest that, if estimates of oil and gas reserves by the Energy Information Administration are realistic, it is feasible to keep atmospheric CO2 from exceeding approximately 450 ppm, provided that future exploitation of the huge reservoirs of coal and unconventional fossil fuels incorporates carbon capture and sequestration. Existing coal-fired power plants, without sequestration, must be phased out before mid-century to achieve this limit on atmospheric CO2. We also suggest that it is important to "stretch" oil reserves via energy efficiency, thus avoiding the need to extract liquid fuels from coal or unconventional fossil fuels. We argue that a rising price on carbon emissions is probably needed to keep CO2 beneath the 450 ppm ceiling.

  7. Dynamics of Soil Organic Carbon Under Uncertain Climate Change and Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhong-Bing; ZHANG Ren-Duo

    2012-01-01

    Climate change and elevated atmospheric CO2 should affect the dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC).SOC dynamics under uncertain patterns of climate warming and elevated atmospheric CO2 as well as with different soil erosion extents at Nelson Farm during 1998-2100 were simulated using stochastic modelling.Results based on numerous simulations showed that SOC decreased with elevated atmospheric temperature but increased with atmospheric CO2 concentration.Therefore,there was a counteract effect on SOC dynamics between climate warming and elevated CO2.For different soil erosion extents,warming 1 ℃ and elevated atmospheric CO2 resulted in SOC increase at least 15%,while warming 5 ℃ and elevated CO2 resulted in SOC decrease more than 29%.SOCpredictions with uncertainty assessment were conducted for different scenarios of soil erosion,climate change,and elevated CO2.Statistically,SOC decreased linearly with the probability.SOC also decreased with time and the degree of soil erosion.For example,in 2100 with a probability of 50%,SOC was 1617,1 167,and 892 g m-2,respectively,for no,minimum,and maximum soil erosion.Under climate warming 5 ℃ and elevated CO2,the soil carbon pools became a carbon source to the atmosphere (P > 95%).The results suggested that stochastic modelling could be a useful tool to predict future SOC dynamics under uncertain climate change and elevated CO2.

  8. Salt concentrations during water production resulting from CO2 storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Lena; Class, Holger; Binning, Philip John

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Carbon capture and storage (CCS) in deep geological formations is one possible option to mitigate the greenhouse gas effect by reducing CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. The assessment of the risks related to CO2 storage is an important task. Events such as CO2 leakage and brine...... displacement and infiltration could result in hazards for human health and the environment and therefore have to be investigated in detail. In this work numerical simulations are performed to estimate the risk related to the displacement of brine. The injected CO2 will displace the brine that is initially...

  9. Characteristics of CO2 concentrations and its variations at Longfengshan regional atmospheric background station in Northeast China%龙凤山区域大气本底站大气二氧化碳(CO2)浓度变化特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴艳玲; 宁尚军; 于大江; 宋庆利; 代鑫; 赵金荣

    2015-01-01

    The background CO2 concentrations were continuously measured at Longfengshan regional atmospheric background station by Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy system from 2009 to 2011. The results showed that the diurnal cycle of hourly average CO2 concentration displayed with the lowest value occurred at about 13∶00—16∶00, when the intensity of the photosynthesis of vegetable and the vertical air dilution are the strongest. Because of the earliest time of sunrise in summer and the CO2 consumption by the photosynthesis of vegetable, the highest concentration of CO2 occurred at the 3∶00, which is much earlier than that (7∶00—9∶00) in other seasons. The daily amplitude was the highest ( 92 mg·L-1 ) in summer and the daily amplitudes in other seasons were less than 8 × 10-6 . The monthly mean of CO2 concentration reached a high value in December or January and the lowest one in summer. Due to the agricultural biomass burning, the second peak of the monthly mean CO2 occurred in May and October. The annual mean of CO2 is 711 ± 23 mg·L-1 in 2009 and 723 ± 25 mg·L-1 in 2011, with an increase rate of 0.89%/yr. In summer and winter, surface wind from the sector of E⁃ESE⁃SE⁃SSE apparently increased the CO2 concentrations and surface wind from the sector of W⁃WNW⁃NW greatly decreased the CO2 concentration. The absorption effect of CO2 by the forest surrounding the station can be estimated by a value of 61 mg·L-1 , which is up to 8.5% of the average level of CO2 in summer.%利用基于光腔衰荡光谱( CRDS)测量技术,于2009年1月至2011年12月在龙凤山区域大气本底站对大气中CO2进行了在线观测.龙凤山CO2浓度日最低值出现在13∶00—16∶00,此时植被光合作用对CO2的吸收作用以及大气垂直运动导致的稀释作用最强.春、秋和冬季CO2浓度日最高值出现在7∶00—9∶00,夏季日最高值出现在3∶00.夏季日高值出现的早,是由于夏季

  10. 陆生植物气孔参数与大气CO2浓度变化%Relationship between stomata parameters of plants and atmospheric CO2 concentration change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑淑霞; 上官周平

    2005-01-01

    陆生植物的起源与演化与全球气候和环境的变化密不可分,利用植物气孔参数(气孔密度和气孔指数)来指示或重建古大气CO2浓度变化是近年来全球变化研究的热点之一.就陆生植物气孔参数的研究进行了概述,对研究中存在的问题及其前景作了简要探讨,并对植物生物学方法在定量研究古气候和古环境变化的趋势进行了分析.

  11. Seasonal dynamics of soil CO2 efflux and soil profile CO2 concentrations in arboretum of Moscow botanical garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Olga; Udovenko, Maria; Matyshak, Georgy

    2016-04-01

    To analyse and predict recent and future climate change on a global scale exchange processes of greenhouse gases - primarily carbon dioxide - over various ecosystems are of rising interest. In order to upscale land-use dependent sources and sinks of CO2, knowledge of the local variability of carbon fluxes is needed. Among terrestrial ecosystems, urban areas play an important role because most of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide originate from these areas. On the other hand, urban soils have the potential to store large amounts of soil organic carbon and, thus, contribute to mitigating increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Research objectives: 1) estimate the seasonal dynamics of carbon dioxide production (emission - closed chamber technique and profile concentration - soil air sampling tubes method) by soils of Moscow State University Botanical Garden Arboretum planted with Picea obovata and Pinus sylvestris, 1) identification the factors that control CO2 production. The study was conducted with 1-2 weeks intervals between October 2013 and November 2015 at two sites. Carbon dioxide soil surface efflux during the year ranged from 0 to 800 mgCO2/(m2hr). Efflux values above 0 mgCO2/(m2hr) was observed during the all cold period except for only 3 weeks. Soil CO2 concentration ranged from 1600-3000 ppm in upper 10-cm layer to 10000-40000 ppm at a depth of 60 cm. The maximum concentrations of CO2 were recorded in late winter and late summer. We associate it with high biological activity (both heterotrophic and autotrophic) during the summer, and with physical gas jamming in the winter. The high value of annual CO2 production of the studied soils is caused by high organic matter content, slightly alkaline reaction, good structure and texture of urban soils. Differences in soil CO2 production by spruce and pine urban forest soils (in the pine forest 1.5-2.0 times higher) are caused by urban soil profiles construction, but not temperature regimes. Seasonal

  12. Decarbonization rate and the timing and magnitude of the CO2 concentration peak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Ashwin K.

    2016-11-01

    Carbon-dioxide (CO2) is the main contributor to anthropogenic global warming, and the timing of its peak concentration in the atmosphere is likely to be the major factor in the timing of maximum radiative forcing. Other forcers such as aerosols and non-CO2 greenhouse gases may also influence the timing of maximum radiative forcing. This paper approximates solutions to a linear model of atmospheric CO2 dynamics with four time-constants to identify factors governing the timing of its concentration peak. The most important emissions-related factor is the ratio between average rates at which emissions increase and decrease, which in turn is related to the rate at which the emissions intensity of CO2 is reduced. Rapid decarbonization of CO2 can not only limit global warming but also achieve an early CO2 concentration peak. The most important carbon cycle parameters are the long multi-century time-constant of atmospheric CO2, and the ratio of contributions to the impulse response function of atmospheric CO2 from the infinitely long lived and the multi-century contributions respectively. Reducing uncertainties in these parameters can reduce uncertainty in forecasts of the radiative forcing peak. A simple approximation for peak CO2 concentration, valid especially if decarbonization is slow, is developed. Peak concentration is approximated as a function of cumulative emissions and emissions at the time of the concentration peak. Furthermore peak concentration is directly proportional to cumulative CO2 emissions for a wide range of emissions scenarios. Therefore, limiting the peak CO2 concentration is equivalent to limiting cumulative emissions. These relationships need to be verified using more complex models of Earth system's carbon cycle.

  13. Nitrogen and carbon cycling in a grassland community ecosystem as affected by elevated atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing global atmospheric CO2 concentration has led to concerns regarding its potential effects on terrestrial ecosystem and the long-term storage of C and N in soil. This study examined responses to elevated CO2 in a grass ecosystem invaded with a leguminous shrub Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd (...

  14. Hazardous indoor CO2 concentrations in volcanic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveiros, Fátima; Gaspar, João L; Ferreira, Teresa; Silva, Catarina

    2016-07-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the main soil gases released silently and permanently in diffuse degassing areas, both in volcanic and non-volcanic zones. In the volcanic islands of the Azores (Portugal) several villages are located over diffuse degassing areas. Lethal indoor CO2 concentrations (higher than 10 vol %) were measured in a shelter located at Furnas village, inside the caldera of the quiescent Furnas Volcano (S. Miguel Island). Hazardous CO2 concentrations were detected not only underground, but also at the ground floor level. Multivariate regression analysis was applied to the CO2 and environmental time series recorded between April 2008 and March 2010 at Furnas village. The results show that about 30% of the indoor CO2 variation is explained by environmental variables, namely barometric pressure, soil water content and wind speed. The highest indoor CO2 concentrations were recorded during bad weather conditions, characterized by low barometric pressure together with rainfall periods and high wind speed. In addition to the spike-like changes observed on the CO2 time series, long-term oscillations were also identified and appeared to represent seasonal variations. In fact, indoor CO2 concentrations were higher during winter period when compared to the dry summer months. Considering the permanent emission of CO2 in various volcanic regions of the world, CO2 hazard maps are crucial and need to be accounted by the land-use planners and authorities.

  15. Atmospheric CO2 capture by algae: Negative carbon dioxide emission path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Diana; Pires, José C M

    2016-09-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the most important greenhouse gas, which concentration increase in the atmosphere is associated to climate change and global warming. Besides CO2 capture in large emission point sources, the capture of this pollutant from atmosphere may be required due to significant contribution of diffuse sources. The technologies that remove CO2 from atmosphere (creating a negative balance of CO2) are called negative emission technologies. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage may play an important role for CO2 mitigation. It represents the combination of bioenergy production and carbon capture and storage, keeping carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs. Algae have a high potential as the source of biomass, as they present high photosynthetic efficiencies and high biomass yields. Their biomass has a wide range of applications, which can improve the economic viability of the process. Thus, this paper aims to assess the atmospheric CO2 capture by algal cultures. PMID:27005790

  16. Atmospheric CO2 capture by algae: Negative carbon dioxide emission path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Diana; Pires, José C M

    2016-09-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the most important greenhouse gas, which concentration increase in the atmosphere is associated to climate change and global warming. Besides CO2 capture in large emission point sources, the capture of this pollutant from atmosphere may be required due to significant contribution of diffuse sources. The technologies that remove CO2 from atmosphere (creating a negative balance of CO2) are called negative emission technologies. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage may play an important role for CO2 mitigation. It represents the combination of bioenergy production and carbon capture and storage, keeping carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs. Algae have a high potential as the source of biomass, as they present high photosynthetic efficiencies and high biomass yields. Their biomass has a wide range of applications, which can improve the economic viability of the process. Thus, this paper aims to assess the atmospheric CO2 capture by algal cultures.

  17. Simulation of CO2 concentrations at Tsukuba tall tower using WRF-CO2 tracer transport model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srabanti Ballav; Prabir K Patra; Yousuke Sawa; Hidekazu Matsueda; Ahoro Adachi; Shigeru Onogi; Masayuki Takigawa; Utpal K De

    2016-02-01

    Simulation of carbon dioxide (CO2) at hourly/weekly intervals and fine vertical resolution at the continental or coastal sites is challenging because of coarse horizontal resolution of global transport models. Here the regional Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with atmospheric chemistry is adopted for simulating atmospheric CO2 (hereinafter WRF-CO2) in nonreactive chemical tracer mode. Model results at horizontal resolution of 27 × 27 km and 31 vertical levels are compared with hourly CO2 measurements from Tsukuba, Japan (36.05°N, 140.13°E) at tower heights of 25 and 200 m for the entire year 2002. Using the wind rose analysis, we find that the fossil fuel emission signal from the megacity Tokyo dominates the diurnal, synoptic and seasonal variations observed at Tsukuba. Contribution of terrestrial biosphere fluxes is of secondary importance for CO2 concentration variability. The phase of synoptic scale variability in CO2 at both heights are remarkably well simulated the observed data (correlation coefficient >0.70) for the entire year. The simulations of monthly mean diurnal cycles are in better agreement with the measurements at lower height compared to that at the upper height. The modelled vertical CO2 gradients are generally greater than the observed vertical gradient. Sensitivity studies show that the simulation of observed vertical gradient can be improved by increasing the number of vertical levels from 31 in the model WRF to 37 (4 below 200 m) and using the Mellor–Yamada–Janjic planetary boundary scheme. These results have large implications for improving transport model simulation of CO2 over the continental sites.

  18. Nitrogen and Carbon Cycling in a Grassland Community Ecosystem as Affected by Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Torbert, H.A.; Johnson, H. B.; H. W. Polley

    2012-01-01

    Increasing global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has led to concerns regarding its potential effects on terrestrial ecosystems and the long-term storage of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soil. This study examined responses to elevated CO2 in a grass ecosystem invaded with a leguminous shrub Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd (Huisache). Seedlings of Acacia along with grass species were grown for 13 months at CO2 concentrations of 385 (ambient), 690, and 980 μmol mol−1. Elevated CO2 ...

  19. A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganshin, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Oda, T [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Saito, M [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Maksyutov, S [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Valsala, V [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Fischer, R [University of London; Lowry, D [University of London; Lukyanov, A [Central Aerological Observatory; Matsueda, H [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Nisbet, E [University of London; Rigby, M [University of Bristol, UK; Sawa, Y [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Toumi, R [Imperial College, London; Tsuboi, K [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Varlagin, A [A.N. Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russia; Zhuravlev, R [Central Aerological Observatory

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model (GELCA), comprising a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e. a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution), which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a) using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b) using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and highresolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to sources of

  20. Stability of CO_2 Atmospheres on Desiccated M Dwarf Exoplanets

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Peter; Hu, Renyu; Robinson, Tyler D.; Li, Cheng; Yung, Yuk L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the chemical stability of CO2-dominated atmospheres of desiccated M dwarf terrestrial exoplanets using a 1-dimensional photochemical model. Around Sun-like stars, CO2 photolysis by Far-UV (FUV) radiation is balanced by recombination reactions that depend on water abundance. Planets orbiting M dwarf stars experience more FUV radiation, and could be depleted in water due to M dwarfs' prolonged, high-luminosity pre-main sequences (Luger & Barnes 2015). We show that, for water-depl...

  1. Halloysite Nanotubes Capturing Isotope Selective Atmospheric CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Subhra Jana; Sankar Das; Chiranjit Ghosh; Abhijit Maity; Manik Pradhan

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to capture and subsequent selective trapping of CO2, a nanocomposite has been developed through selective modification of the outer surface of the halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) with an organosilane to make the nanocomposite a novel solid-phase adsorbent to adsorb CO2 from the atmosphere at standard ambient temperature and pressure. The preferential adsorption of three major abundant isotopes of CO2 (12C16O2, 13C16O2, and 12C16O18O) from the ambient air by amine functionalized HNTs ...

  2. Rapid removal of atmospheric CO2 by urban soils

    OpenAIRE

    Washbourne, Carla-Leanne; Lopez-Capel, Elisa; Renforth, Phil; Ascough, Philippa L.; Manning, David A.C.

    2015-01-01

    The measured calcium carbonate content of soils to a depth of 100 mm at a large urban development site has increased over 18 months at a rate that corresponds to the sequestration of 85 t of CO2/ha (8.5 kg of CO2 m–2) annually. This is a consequence of rapid weathering of calcium silicate and hydroxide minerals derived from the demolition of concrete structures, which releases Ca that combines with CO2 ultimately derived from the atmosphere, precipitating as calcite. Stable isotope data confi...

  3. A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 × 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Sawa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 × 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e., a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution, which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and high-resolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to sources of large anthropogenic emissions. While this study focused on

  4. Atmospheric CO2: principal control knob governing Earth's temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacis, Andrew A; Schmidt, Gavin A; Rind, David; Ruedy, Reto A

    2010-10-15

    Ample physical evidence shows that carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is the single most important climate-relevant greenhouse gas in Earth's atmosphere. This is because CO(2), like ozone, N(2)O, CH(4), and chlorofluorocarbons, does not condense and precipitate from the atmosphere at current climate temperatures, whereas water vapor can and does. Noncondensing greenhouse gases, which account for 25% of the total terrestrial greenhouse effect, thus serve to provide the stable temperature structure that sustains the current levels of atmospheric water vapor and clouds via feedback processes that account for the remaining 75% of the greenhouse effect. Without the radiative forcing supplied by CO(2) and the other noncondensing greenhouse gases, the terrestrial greenhouse would collapse, plunging the global climate into an icebound Earth state. PMID:20947761

  5. Bioenergy from forestry and changes in atmospheric CO2: reconciling single stand and landscape level approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, Francesco; Guest, Geoffrey; Strømman, Anders H

    2013-11-15

    Analyses of global warming impacts from forest bioenergy systems are usually conducted either at a single stand level or at a landscape level, yielding findings that are sometimes interpreted as contrasting. In this paper, we investigate and reconcile the scales at which environmental impact analyses of forest bioenergy systems are undertaken. Focusing on the changes caused in atmospheric CO2 concentration of forest bioenergy systems characterized by different initial states of the forest, we show the features of the analyses at different scales and depict the connections between them. Impacts on atmospheric CO2 concentration at a single stand level are computed through impulse response functions (IRF). Results at a landscape level are elaborated through direct application of IRFs to the emission profile, so to account for the fluxes from all the stands across time and space. Impacts from fossil CO2 emissions are used as a benchmark. At a landscape level, forest bioenergy causes an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration for the first decades that is similar to the impact from fossil CO2, but then the dynamics clearly diverge because while the impact from fossil CO2 continues to rise that from bioenergy stabilizes at a certain level. These results perfectly align with those obtained at a single stand for which characterization factors have been developed. In the hypothetical case of a sudden cessation of emissions, the change caused in atmospheric CO2 concentration from biogenic CO2 emissions reverses within a couple of decades, while that caused by fossil CO2 emissions remains considerably higher for centuries. When counterfactual aspects like the additional sequestration that would have occurred in the forest if not harvested and the theoretical displacement of fossil CO2 are included in the analysis, results can widely differ, as the CO2 debt at a landscape level ranges from a few years to several centuries (depending on the underlying assumptions considered).

  6. Atmospheric Verification of Point Source Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Keller, E. D.; Norris, M. W.; Wiltshire, R.; Baisden, W. T.; Brailsford, G. W.; Bromley, T.

    2015-12-01

    Large point sources (electricity generation and large-scale industry) make up roughly one third of all fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions. Currently, these emissions are determined from self-reported inventory data, and sometimes from smokestack emissions monitoring, and the uncertainty in emissions from individual power plants is about 20%. We examine the utility of atmospheric 14C measurements combined with atmospheric transport modelling as a tool for independently quantifying point source CO2ff emissions, to both improve the accuracy of the reported emissions and for verification as we move towards a regulatory environment. We use the Kapuni Gas Treatment Facility as a test case. It is located in rural New Zealand with no other significant fossil fuel CO2 sources nearby, and emits CO2ff at ~0.1 Tg carbon per year. We use several different sampling methods to determine the 14C and hence the CO2ff content downwind of the emission source: grab flask samples of whole air; absorption of CO2 into sodium hydroxide integrated over many hours; and plant material which faithfully records the 14C content of assimilated CO2. We use a plume dispersion model to compare the reported emissions with our observed CO2ff mole fractions. We show that the short-term variability in plume dispersion makes it difficult to interpret the grab flask sample results, whereas the variability is averaged out in the integrated samples and we obtain excellent agreement between the reported and observed emissions, indicating that the 14C method can reliably be used to evaluated point source emissions.

  7. EFFECTS OF NITROGEN ON THE DRY MATTER ACCUMULATION,CARBON ANDNITROGEN METABOLISM OF WHEAT LEAVES UNDER ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 CONCENTRATION%高浓度CO2下氮素对小麦叶片干物质积累及碳氮关系的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于显枫; 张绪成; 王红丽

    2012-01-01

    高大气CO2浓度下植物叶片干物质积累、碳氮关系和糖含量的变化对光合作用的适应性下调有重要的反馈作用,通过研究不同施氮量对高大气CO2浓度下植物叶片干物质积累、叶氮浓度和糖含量的影响,可进一步明确氮素对植物光合作用适应性下调的调控机制。以不同大气CO2浓度和氮素水平为处理条件,测定盆栽小麦拔节期叶片鲜重、干重、含水量、还原糖、可溶性糖、全氮含量,研究了氮素对长期高大气CO2浓度(760μmol.mol-1)下小麦叶片的干物质积累、糖含量及碳氮含量的影响。结果表明,大气CO2浓度升高使小麦叶片的鲜重和干重增加,含水量下降。大气CO2浓度升高使N0处理的小麦叶片还原糖含量下降,而可溶性糖含量显著升高;施氮后小麦叶片还原糖含量无显著变化,但可溶性糖含量降低。高大气CO2浓度条件下小麦叶片全氮含量下降,C/N比增加,而增施氮素后C/N比显著下降。可溶性糖含量和C/N比的下降有利于减轻同化物质对光合作用的反馈抑制,提高大气CO2浓度增高条件下小麦叶片的Pn。%The photosynthetic down-regulation in plant leaves under elevated atmospheric CO2 may be related to the changes of the relationship between nitrogen and carbon,and soluble sugars content in plant leaves.It is helped to investigate the effect of nitrogen application on the dry matter accumulation,foliar N concentration and soluble sugar content and determine the regulatory mechanism of nitrogen application on photosynthetic down-regulation under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration.A pot experiment was conducted to wheat treated by different atmospheric CO2 concentrations and nitrogen application rates,the fresh weight,the dry weight,moisture content,foliar N concentration,reductive and soluble sugar content measured in this,to understand the effect of nitrogen application on the dry matter accumulation and nitrogen

  8. First direct observation of the atmospheric CO2 year-to-year increase from space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Reuter

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The reliable prediction of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations and associated global climate change requires an adequate understanding of the CO2 sources and sinks. The sparseness of the existing surface measurement network limits current knowledge about the global distribution of CO2 surface fluxes. The retrieval of CO2 total vertical columns from satellite observations is predicted to improve this situation. Such an application however requires very high accuracy and precision. We report on retrievals of the column-averaged CO2 dry air mole fraction, denoted XCO2, from the near-infrared nadir spectral radiance and solar irradiance measurements of the SCIAMACHY satellite instrument between 2003 and 2005. We focus on northern hemispheric large scale CO2 features such as the CO2 seasonal cycle and show - for the first time - that the atmospheric annual increase of CO2 can be directly observed using satellite measurements of the CO2 total column. The satellite retrievals are compared with global XCO2 obtained from NOAA's CO2 assimilation system CarbonTracker taking into account the spatio-temporal sampling and altitude sensitivity of the satellite data. We show that the measured CO2 year-to-year increase agrees within about 1 ppm/year with CarbonTracker. We also show that the latitude dependent amplitude of the northern hemispheric CO2 seasonal cycle agrees with CarbonTracker within about 2 ppm with the retrieved amplitude being systematically larger. The analysis demonstrates that it is possible using satellite measurements of the CO2 total column to retrieve information on the atmospheric CO2 on the level of a few parts per million.

  9. A regenerable solid amine CO2 concentrator for space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, A. M.; Cusick, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A regenerable solid amine CO2 control system, which employs water vapor for desorption, is being developed for potential use on long duration space missions. During cyclic operation, CO2 is first absorbed from the cabin atmosphere onto the granular amine. Steam is then used to heat the solid amine bed and desorb the CO2. This paper describes the solid amine system operation and application to the Shuttle Orbiter, Manned Space Platform (MSP) and Space Operations Center (SOC). The importance and interplay of system performance parameters are presented together with supporting data and design characteristics.

  10. CFD模拟气调库快速降氧过程O2和CO2浓度变化规律%Variation and distribution characteristics of O2, CO2 concentration in controlled atmosphere storage by CFD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周博; 南晓红; 文改黎

    2015-01-01

    O2和CO2浓度对果蔬的贮藏品质有着极大的影响,获得其在气调库内的变化和分布规律可以为气调库优化设计提供理论依据。该文以西安某苹果气调库为研究对象,采用k-ε紊流模型建立了气调库内气体流动、传热与传质的三维数学求解模型,并通过编写UDF程序获得苹果呼吸强度和冷风机送风口O2、CO2质量分数随库内气体组分浓度变化实时数据。经过对该气调库的快速降氧过程数值模拟获得库内O2和CO2浓度随时间变化的规律,并与试验数据呈现较好的一致性,相对偏差平均值为0.027。结果表明库内气体区O2浓度随时间呈指数衰减。该文的研究对象经过4.1 h,气体区O2浓度下降速度小于货物区,此时提高制氮机制氮体积分数会缩短降氧时间。气体区和货物区CO2浓度变化规律相似,升高速度逐渐变小。库内O2和CO2浓度分布在气体区比较均匀,在货物区则存在一定的梯度,货物区中心位置不利于果蔬的贮藏。该文研究对于获取实际气调库降氧时间及选择合理的制氮机,改进气调工艺具有重要参考价值。%Concentration of O2and CO2 has a great effect on storage quality of cold stored fruits or vegetables. Obtaining concentration variation and distribution characteristics of O2and CO2 concentration in a controlled atmosphere storage (CA storage) can provide theoretical basis for optimal design and operation of CA storages. Hence, a combination of CFD calculation and experimental study were carried out to study the complicated phenomenon of air flow, heat and mass transfer in CA storage. An unsteady, 3D (three-dimensional) global CFD model was established for a real CA storage for apples in Xian. The CFD model includes k-ε turbulent model and species transport model. The apple zone was regarded as porous medium zone. Air cooler was equipped in the storage. User-Defined-Function (UDF) programs were

  11. Atmospheric column CO2 measurement from a new automatic ground-based sun photometer in Beijing from 2010 to 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Z Q; Y. S. Xie; Gu, X. F.; D. H. Li; K. T. Li; Zhang, X. Y.; J. Wu; Xiong, W.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is generally regarded as the most important greenhouse gas affecting global warming. Many researches have been conducted to measure atmospheric CO2 concentration, analyze CO2 variation on both seasonal and interannual scales and predict future CO2 tendencies. Among them, ground-based remote sensing observation of CO2 is the essential approach to provide validation data for satellite observation owning to its much higher accuracy and column CO2 measurement capability. Unlike the...

  12. Latitudinal variation in oxygen-18 of atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francey, Roger J.; Tans, Pieter P.

    1987-06-01

    A potentially important new atmospheric tracer of large-scale behavior at the earth's surface, the oxygen isotope composition of CO2, is reported. Measurements on flask air collected from Alaska, Hawaii, Samoa, Tasmania, coastal Antarctica, and the South Pole are compared with recent measurements of delta O-18 in CO2 extracted in situ from marine air at Cape Grim, Tasmania. This comparison provides a measure of precision and demonstrates a marked improvement over previous measurements. While previous data suggested a north-south gradient, the flask data establish a strong, asymmetric meridional gradient. It is argued that this reflects the oxygen isotope ratio in ground water, via mechanisms involving gross catalyzed CO2 exchange with leaf (and possibly soil) water. Very large CO2 fluxes are involved, of the order of 200 Gt carbon/yr.

  13. The extraction of CO2 from the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having indicated some methods which are considered as ridiculous, hazardous or ethically questionable, the author first presents of method of extraction of CO2 from the atmosphere developed by a research team of the University of Calgary and applied by the Carbon Engineering Company. According to this concept, ambient air is circulated through an air-contactor in which air leaves its CO2 to a potassium hydroxide flow which transforms into potassium carbonate. This hydroxide is then re-generated by exchange with calcium hydroxide. The thus formed calcium carbonate is finally thermally decomposed to release CO2. He also presents the BECCS (Bio-energy with carbon capture and storage) which has been put forward by the IPCC, evokes the cost of the extracted ton of CO2 and the arguments of the opponents to this method

  14. Experimental and modeling study of NO emission under high CO2 concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    An experimental and numerical study of the NOx formation and reduction process in a designed coal combustion furnace under both traditional air atmosphere and O2/CO2 atmosphere was conducted, in an attempt to explore the chemistry mechanism of the experimentally observed NOx suppression under high CO2 concentration atmospheres. A simplified ‘chemically oriented’ approach, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-chemical kinetics modeling method, was validated and used to model the experimental process. The high CO2 concentration’s chemical effect on NO reduction has been studied, and the differences in NOx reaction behaviors between O2/CO2 atmosphere and air atmosphere were analyzed by detailed chemical kinetic model. On the basis of investigations through elementary chemical reactions, it can be concluded that high CO2 concentration plays an important role on NOx conversion process during oxy-fuel combustion. Moreover, the dominant reaction steps and the most important reactions for NO conversion under different atmospheres were discussed. Under O2/CO2 atmosphere, the main active sequence for NO reaction includes: NO→N→N2, and the main active path for NO reaction under air atmosphere is through N2→N→NO.

  15. Rapid Removal of Atmospheric CO2 by Urban Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washbourne, Carla-Leanne; Lopez-Capel, Elisa; Renforth, Phil; Ascough, Philippa L; Manning, David A C

    2015-05-01

    The measured calcium carbonate content of soils to a depth of 100 mm at a large urban development site has increased over 18 months at a rate that corresponds to the sequestration of 85 t of CO2/ha (8.5 kg of CO2 m(-2)) annually. This is a consequence of rapid weathering of calcium silicate and hydroxide minerals derived from the demolition of concrete structures, which releases Ca that combines with CO2 ultimately derived from the atmosphere, precipitating as calcite. Stable isotope data confirm an atmospheric origin for carbonate carbon, and 14C dating indicates the predominance of modern carbon in the pedogenic calcite. Trial pits show that carbonation extends to depths of ≥1 m. Work at other sites shows that the occurrence of pedogenic carbonates is widespread in artificially created urban soils containing Ca and Mg silicate minerals. Appropriate management of fewer than 12000 ha of urban land to maximize calcite precipitation has the potential to remove 1 million t of CO2 from the atmosphere annually. The maximal global potential is estimated to be approximately 700-1200 Mt of CO2 per year (representing 2.0-3.7% of total emissions from fossil fuel combustion) based on current rates of production of industry-derived Ca- and Mg-bearing materials. PMID:25837769

  16. Covariation of deep Southern Ocean oxygenation and atmospheric CO2 through the last ice age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, Samuel L; Galbraith, Eric D; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Anderson, Robert F

    2016-02-11

    No single mechanism can account for the full amplitude of past atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration variability over glacial-interglacial cycles. A build-up of carbon in the deep ocean has been shown to have occurred during the Last Glacial Maximum. However, the mechanisms responsible for the release of the deeply sequestered carbon to the atmosphere at deglaciation, and the relative importance of deep ocean sequestration in regulating millennial-timescale variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration before the Last Glacial Maximum, have remained unclear. Here we present sedimentary redox-sensitive trace-metal records from the Antarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean that provide a reconstruction of transient changes in deep ocean oxygenation and, by inference, respired carbon storage throughout the last glacial cycle. Our data suggest that respired carbon was removed from the abyssal Southern Ocean during the Northern Hemisphere cold phases of the deglaciation, when atmospheric CO2 concentration increased rapidly, reflecting--at least in part--a combination of dwindling iron fertilization by dust and enhanced deep ocean ventilation. Furthermore, our records show that the observed covariation between atmospheric CO2 concentration and abyssal Southern Ocean oxygenation was maintained throughout most of the past 80,000 years. This suggests that on millennial timescales deep ocean circulation and iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean played a consistent role in modifying atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  17. Covariation of deep Southern Ocean oxygenation and atmospheric CO2 through the last ice age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, Samuel L; Galbraith, Eric D; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Anderson, Robert F

    2016-02-11

    No single mechanism can account for the full amplitude of past atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration variability over glacial-interglacial cycles. A build-up of carbon in the deep ocean has been shown to have occurred during the Last Glacial Maximum. However, the mechanisms responsible for the release of the deeply sequestered carbon to the atmosphere at deglaciation, and the relative importance of deep ocean sequestration in regulating millennial-timescale variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration before the Last Glacial Maximum, have remained unclear. Here we present sedimentary redox-sensitive trace-metal records from the Antarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean that provide a reconstruction of transient changes in deep ocean oxygenation and, by inference, respired carbon storage throughout the last glacial cycle. Our data suggest that respired carbon was removed from the abyssal Southern Ocean during the Northern Hemisphere cold phases of the deglaciation, when atmospheric CO2 concentration increased rapidly, reflecting--at least in part--a combination of dwindling iron fertilization by dust and enhanced deep ocean ventilation. Furthermore, our records show that the observed covariation between atmospheric CO2 concentration and abyssal Southern Ocean oxygenation was maintained throughout most of the past 80,000 years. This suggests that on millennial timescales deep ocean circulation and iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean played a consistent role in modifying atmospheric CO2 concentration. PMID:26840491

  18. ROOT-GROWTH AND FUNCTIONING UNDER ATMOSPHERIC CO2 ENRICHMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STULEN, [No Value; DENHERTOG, J

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the extent to which atmospheric CO2 enrichment may influence growth of plant roots and function in terms of uptake of water and nutrients, and carbon allocation towards symbionts. It is concluded that changes in dry matter allocation greatly depend on the experimental conditions

  19. Climate change and CO2 removal from the atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, R.D.

    2014-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed in recent years to counteract climate change and ocean acidification by removing CO2 from the atmosphere (Carbon Dioxide Removal). The most versatile and widely applicable of these methods is enhanced weathering of olivine, which is capable of removing billions of

  20. Water loss from terrestrial planets with CO2-rich atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Wordsworth, Robin; Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Water photolysis and hydrogen loss from the upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets is of fundamental importance to climate evolution but remains poorly understood in general. Here we present a range of calculations we performed to study the dependence of water loss rates from terrestrial planets on a range of atmospheric and external parameters. We show that CO2 can only cause significant water loss by increasing surface temperatures over a narrow range of conditions, with cooling of the mi...

  1. Stomatal proxy record of CO2 concentrations during the Last Termination demonstrates dynamic climate behaviour and an important role for CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinthorsdottir, Margret; Wohlfarth, Barbara; Kylander, Malin E.; Blaauw, Maarten; Reimer, Paula J.

    2013-04-01

    We present a new stomatal proxy-based record of CO2 concentrations spanning Greenland Interstadial 1 (Allerød pollen zone, GI-1a to 1c), Greenland Stadial 1 (Younger Dryas pollen zone, GS-1) and the first part of the Holocene (Preboreal pollen zone). The calibrated atmospheric CO2 concentrations are based on Betula nana (dwarf birch) leaves from a fossil lake sedimentary sequence in south-eastern Sweden. The stomatal proxy method relies on the inverse relationship between stomatal density on plant leaves and atmospheric CO2 concentrations to reconstruct variations in past CO2 concentrations. The record presented here demonstrates that the overall pattern of CO2 evolution during this period was dynamic, with significant abrupt fluctuations in CO2 concentration when the climate moved from interstadial to stadial state and vice versa. The cooling at the GI-1/GS-1 transition was preceded by an abrupt warming, and the warming at the GS-1/Holocene transition was preceded by an abrupt cooling. This scenario is in contrast to CO2 records reconstructed from air bubbles trapped in ice, which indicate a gradual increase in concentrations, but largely in alignment with previously published stomatal proxy-based CO2 records. A new loss-on-ignition chemical record (used here as a proxy for temperature), from the same locality, lends independent support to the CO2 record.

  2. Algal constraints on the Cenozoic history of atmospheric CO2?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. M. Rickaby

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An urgent question for future climate, in light of increased burning of fossil fuels, is the temperature sensitivity of the climate system to atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2. To date, no direct proxy for past levels of pCO2 exists beyond the reach of the polar ice core records. We propose a new methodology for placing an upper constraint on pCO2 over the Cenozoic based on the living geological record. Specifically, our premise is that the contrasting calcification tolerance of various extant species of coccolithophore to raised pCO2 reflects an "evolutionary memory" of past atmospheric composition. The different times of first emergence of each morphospecies allows an upper constraint of past pCO2 to be placed on Cenozoic timeslices. Further, our hypothesis has implications for the response of marine calcifiers to ocean acidification. Geologically "ancient" species, which have survived large changes in ocean chemistry, are likely more resilient to predicted acidification.

  3. Effects of Atmospheric CO2 Enrichment on Soil CO2 Efflux in a Young Longleaf Pine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Brett Runion

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The southeastern landscape is composed of agricultural and forest systems that can store carbon (C in standing biomass and soil. Research is needed to quantify the effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 on terrestrial C dynamics including CO2 release back to the atmosphere and soil sequestration. Longleaf pine savannahs are an ecologically and economically important, yet understudied, component of the southeastern landscape. We investigated the effects of ambient and elevated CO2 on soil CO2 efflux in a young longleaf pine system using a continuous monitoring system. A significant increase (26.5% in soil CO2 efflux across 90 days was observed under elevated CO2; this occurred for all weekly and daily averages except for two days when soil temperature was the lowest. Soil CO2 efflux was positively correlated with soil temperature with a trend towards increased efflux response to temperature under elevated CO2. Efflux was negatively correlated with soil moisture and was best represented using a quadratic relationship. Soil CO2 efflux was not correlated with root biomass. Our data indicate that, while elevated CO2 will increase feedback of CO2 to the atmosphere via soil efflux, terrestrial ecosystems will remain potential sinks for atmospheric CO2 due to greater biomass production and increased soil C sequestration.

  4. Module for measurement of CO2 concentration in exhaled air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puton, Jaroslaw; Palko, Tadeusz; Knap, Andrzej; Jasek, Krzysztof; Siodlowski, Boguslaw

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this work consists in working out of a detection module for capnography (carbon dioxide concentration measurement in anaesthesiology and intensive care). The principle of operation of the module consists of the NDIR method. The basic assumption for construction of this model was using of directly modulated thermal IR source in it. A few models of IR sources were worked out. Their heaters were made from thick platinum layers and foil. Limits of modulation frequency for IR sources were greater than 30 Hz. The detection module consists of an optical part, analogue electronics and microprocessor system with a suitable program. The time dependent concentration of CO2, end tidal concentration of CO2, mean concentration of N2O and breath frequency are output values of the detection module. Measurements are executed 30 times per second. The accuracy of CO2 concentration measurement equals to 5%.

  5. Climate Sensitivity, Sea Level, and Atmospheric CO2

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, James; Russell, Gary; Kharecha, Pushker

    2012-01-01

    Cenozoic temperature, sea level and CO2 co-variations provide insights into climate sensitivity to external forcings and sea level sensitivity to climate change. Pleistocene climate oscillations imply a fast-feedback climate sensitivity 3 {\\pm} 1 {\\deg}C for 4 W/m2 CO2 forcing for the average of climate states between the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the error estimate being large and partly subjective because of continuing uncertainty about LGM global surface climate. Slow feedbacks, especially change of ice sheet size and atmospheric CO2, amplify total Earth system sensitivity. Ice sheet response time is poorly defined, but we suggest that hysteresis and slow response in current ice sheet models are exaggerated. We use a global model, simplified to essential processes, to investigate state-dependence of climate sensitivity, finding a strong increase in sensitivity when global temperature reaches early Cenozoic and higher levels, as increased water vapor eliminates the tropopause. It follows that...

  6. A review of elevated atmospheric CO2 effects on plant growth and water relations: implications for horticulture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Empirical records provide incontestable evidence for the global rise in CO2 concentration in the earth's atmosphere. Plant growth can be stimulated by elevation of CO2; photosynthesis increases and economic yield is often enhanced. The application of more CO2 can increase plant water use efficiency ...

  7. Operational constraints and strategies for systems to effect the sustainable, solar-driven reduction of atmospheric CO_2

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yikai; Lewis, Nathan S.; Xiang, Chengxiang

    2015-01-01

    The operational constraints for a 6-electron/6-proton CO_2 reduction system that operates at the concentration of CO_2 in the current atmosphere (p_(CO_2) = 400 ppm) have been evaluated on a variety of scale lengths that span from laboratory scale to global scale. Due to the low concentration of CO_2 in the atmosphere, limitations due to mass transport of CO_2 from the tropopause have been evaluated through five different regions, each with different characteristic length scales: the troposph...

  8. Climate change and agroecosystems: the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 and temperature on crop growth, development, and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streck Nereu Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2 of the Earths atmosphere is increasing, which has the potential of increasing greenhouse effect and air temperature in the future. Plants respond to environment CO2 and temperature. Therefore, climate change may affect agriculture. The purpose of this paper was to review the literature about the impact of a possible increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature on crop growth, development, and yield. Increasing CO2 concentration increases crop yield once the substrate for photosynthesis and the gradient of CO2 concentration between atmosphere and leaf increase. C3 plants will benefit more than C4 plants at elevated CO2. However, if global warming will take place, an increase in temperature may offset the benefits of increasing CO2 on crop yield.

  9. Water loss from terrestrial planets with CO2-rich atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Wordsworth, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Water photolysis and hydrogen loss from the upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets is of fundamental importance to climate evolution but remains poorly understood in general. Here we present a range of calculations we performed to study the dependence of water loss rates from terrestrial planets on atmospheric composition (CO2 and N2 levels), planetary mass, and external parameters (stellar spectrum, orbital distance and impacts). From coupled 1D climate and escape modeling, we show that CO2 can only cause significant water loss by increasing surface temperatures over a narrow range of conditions, with cooling of the middle and upper atmosphere acting as a bottleneck on escape in other circumstances. Around G-stars, efficient loss only occurs on planets with intermediate CO2 atmospheric partial pressures (0.1 to 1 bar) that receive a net flux close to the critical runaway greenhouse limit. Because G-star total luminosity increases with time but XUV/UV luminosity decreases, this places strong limits on moist...

  10. Enhanced priming of old, not new soil carbon at elevated atmospheric CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergard, Mette; Reinsch, Sabine; Bengtson, Per;

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations accompanied by global warming and altered precipitation patterns calls for assessment of long-term effects of these global changes on carbon (C) dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems, as changes in net C exchange between soil and atmosphere will impact...... the atmospheric CO2 concentration profoundly. In many ecosystems, including the heath/grassland system studied here, increased plant production at elevated CO2 increase fresh C input from litter and root exudates to the soil and concurrently decrease soil N availability. Supply of labile C to the soil may...... accelerate the decomposition of soil organic C (SOC), a phenomenon termed ‘the priming effect’, and the priming effect is most pronounced at low soil N availability. Hence, we hypothesized that priming of SOC decomposition in response to labile C addition would increase in soil exposed to long-term elevated...

  11. Overlapping effect of atmospheric H2O, CO2 and 03 on the CO2 radiative effect

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei-Chyung; Ryan, P. Barry

    2011-01-01

    The effect of overlapping of atmospheric HThe effect of overlapping of atmospheric H2O, CO2 and 03 absorption bands on the radiation budget perturbation caused by CO2 doubling is investigated. Since the effect depends on the amount of gases in the atmosphere as well as on the strength of the absorption bands, we examine the effect associated with the variation of gas abundance using a narrow band representation for the absorption bands. This band representation allows for the absorption band ...

  12. Elevated atmospheric CO2 increases microbial growth rates and enzymes activity in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Blagodatsky, Sergey; Dorodnikov, Maxim; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2010-05-01

    Increasing the belowground translocation of assimilated carbon by plants grown under elevated CO2 can cause a shift in the structure and activity of the microbial community responsible for the turnover of organic matter in soil. We investigated the long-term effect of elevated CO2 in the atmosphere on microbial biomass and specific growth rates in root-free and rhizosphere soil. The experiments were conducted under two free air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) systems: in Hohenheim and Braunschweig, as well as in the intensively managed forest mesocosm of the Biosphere 2 Laboratory (B2L) in Oracle, AZ. Specific microbial growth rates (μ) were determined using the substrate-induced respiration response after glucose and/or yeast extract addition to the soil. We evaluated the effect of elevated CO2 on b-glucosidase, chitinase, phosphatase, and sulfatase to estimate the potential enzyme activity after soil amendment with glucose and nutrients. For B2L and both FACE systems, up to 58% higher μ were observed under elevated vs. ambient CO2, depending on site, plant species and N fertilization. The μ-values increased linearly with atmospheric CO2 concentration at all three sites. The effect of elevated CO2 on rhizosphere microorganisms was plant dependent and increased for: Brassica napus=Triticum aestivumyeast extract then for those growing on glucose, i.e. the effect of elevated CO2 was smoothed on rich vs. simple substrate. So, the r/K strategies ratio can be better revealed by studying growth on simple (glucose) than on rich substrate mixtures (yeast extract). After adding glucose, enzyme activities under elevated CO2 were 1.2-1.9-fold higher than under ambient CO2. This indicates the increased activity of microorganisms, which leads to accelerated C turnover in soil under elevated CO2. Our results clearly showed that the functional characteristics of the soil microbial community (i.e. specific growth rates and enzymes activity) rather than total microbial biomass

  13. Advances on the Responses of Root Dynamics to Increased Atmospheric CO2 and Global Climate Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Plant roots dynamics responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, increased temperature and changed precipitation can be a key link between plant growth and long-term changes in soil organic matter and ecosystem carbon balance. This paper reviews some experiments and hypotheses developed in this area, which mainly include plant fine roots growth, root turnover, root respiration and other root dynamics responses to elevated CO2 and global climate change. Some recent new methods of studying root systems were also discussed and summarized. It holds herein that the assemblage of information about root turnover patterns, root respiration and other dynamic responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 and global climatic change can help to better understand and explore some new research areas. In this paper, some research challenges in the plant root responses to the elevated CO2 and other environmental factors during global climate change were also demonstrated.

  14. A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 × 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Toumi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model (GELCA, comprising a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 × 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e. a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution, which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and high-resolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to

  15. 晚白垩世(80Ma)CO_2浓度对东亚气候影响的数值模拟%MODELING IMPACTS OF ATMOSPHERIC CO_2 CONCENTRATION ON EAST ASIAN CLIMATE DURING THE LATE CRETACEOUS(80Ma)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈军明; 赵平; 王成善; 黄永建

    2009-01-01

    利用美国国家大气研究中心(NCAR)的CCSM2.0全球气候系统模式,并结合重建的古地理资料,研究了晚白垩世(80Ma)东亚气候特征以及CO_2浓度变化对东亚气候的影响.模拟结果表明:与现代气候比较,晚白垩纪时期的东亚大陆冬季风和夏季风都偏强,具有同步变化的特点,并且中高纬度年平均地表气温明显增加,而低纬度地区有所下降,年降水变化的区域性特征明显;就年平均而言,在30°~40°N的内陆地区地面净失去水分、变干燥,而在低纬度、大陆东岸以及高纬度地区,地表获得水分、变湿润.晚白垩纪CO_2浓度变化对大气辐射和大气热状况的影响是复杂的;降低CO_2浓度可以导致东亚地区气候显著变化,冬季东亚中纬度地区大陆降温比其附近的海洋大,太平洋中高纬度的低压系统加强,因而造成东亚冬季风偏强;而在夏季,中纬度大陆地区降温幅度大于海洋,西太平洋副热带高压减弱,因而夏季风减弱.对应于较低的CO_2浓度,年降水量在东亚及其沿岸的中、低纬度大部分地区显著减少,在东亚高纬度的大陆和海洋上降水的减少幅度不大,而在30°N附近亚洲大陆中部和东部的一些地区降水有所增加;总体上,地表水分收支在东亚大陆的东部都是以负值为主,地面净失去水分、变干燥,其中30°N以南的大陆沿岸最显著;而在东亚大陆的内陆地区,水分收支差异以0~0.5mm/天的正值为主,东亚大陆的东部是以地面净得到水分、变潮湿为主.%In this paper,the characteristics of the East Asian climate and the impacts of atmospheric CO_2 concentration variation on the East Asian climate were examined by using the Community Climate System Model version 2 (CCSM 2.0)developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)as well as the reconstructed paleogeographic data of the Late Cretaceous (80Ma). The simulation results show that the winter and

  16. [CO2 Budget and Atmospheric Rectification (COBRA) Over North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the CO2 Budget and Rectification Airborne (COBRA) study was to assess terrestrial sources and sinks of carbon dioxide using an air-borne study. The study was designed to address the measurement gap between plot-scale direct flux measurements and background hemispheric-scale constraints and to refine techniques for measuring terrestrial fluxes at regional to continental scales. The initial funded effort (reported on here) was to involve two air-borne campaigns over North America, one in summer and one in winter. Measurements for COBRA (given the acronym C02BAR in the initial proposal) were conducted from the University of North Dakota Citation 11, a twin-engine jet aircraft capable of profiling from the surface to 12 km and cruising for up to 4 hours and 175m/s. Onboard instrumentation measured concentrations of CO2, CO, and H2O, and meteorological parameters at high rates. In addition, two separate flask sampling systems collected discrete samples for laboratory analysis of CO2,CO, CH4, N2O, SF6, H2, 13CO2, C18O16O,O2/N2, and Ar/N2. The project involved a collaboration between a number of institutions, including (but not limited to) Harvard, NOAA-CMDL, the University of North Dakota, and Scripps.

  17. Improving the Ginkgo CO2 barometer: Implications for the early Cenozoic atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Richard S.; Wing, Scott L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomatal properties of fossil Ginkgo have been used widely to infer the atmospheric concentration of CO2 in the geological past (paleo-pCO2). Many of these estimates of paleo-pCO2 have relied on the inverse correlation between pCO2 and stomatal index (SI - the proportion of epidermal cells that are stomata) observed in recent Ginkgo biloba, and therefore depend on the accuracy of this relationship. The SI - pCO2 relationship in G. biloba has not been well documented, however. Here we present new measurements of SI for leaves of G. biloba that grew under pCO2 from 290 to 430 ppm. We prepared and imaged all specimens using a consistent procedure and photo-documented each count. As in prior studies, we found a significant inverse relationship between SI and pCO2, however, the relationship is more linear, has a shallower slope, and a lower correlation coefficient than previously reported. We examined leaves of G. biloba grown under pCO2 of 1500 ppm, but found they had highly variable SI and a large proportion of malformed stomata. We also measured stomatal dimensions, stomatal density, and the carbon isotope composition of G. biloba leaves in order to test a mechanistic model for inferring pCO2. This model overestimated observed pCO2, performing less well than the SI method between 290 and 430 ppm. We used our revised SI-pCO2 response curve, and new observations of selected fossils, to estimate late Cretaceous and Cenozoic pCO2 from fossil Ginkgo adiantoides. All but one of the new estimates is below 800 ppm, and together they show little long-term change in pCO2 or relation to global temperature. The low Paleogene pCO2 levels indicated by the Ginkgo SI proxy are not consistent with the high pCO2 inferred by some climate and carbon cycle models. We cannot currently resolve the discrepancy, but greater agreement between proxy data and models may come from a better understanding of the stomatal response of G. biloba to elevated pCO2, better counts and measurements of

  18. Root damage by insects reverses the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on Eucalypt seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott N Johnson

    Full Text Available Predicted increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 are widely anticipated to increase biomass accumulation by accelerating rates of photosynthesis in many plant taxa. Little, however, is known about how soil-borne plant antagonists might modify the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2, with root-feeding insects being particularly understudied. Root damage by insects often reduces rates of photosynthesis by disrupting root function and imposing water deficits. These insects therefore have considerable potential for modifying plant responses to eCO2. We investigated how root damage by a soil-dwelling insect (Xylotrupes gideon australicus modified the responses of Eucalyptus globulus to eCO2. eCO2 increased plant height when E. globulus were 14 weeks old and continued to do so at an accelerated rate compared to those grown at ambient CO2 (aCO2. Plants exposed to root-damaging insects showed a rapid decline in growth rates thereafter. In eCO2, shoot and root biomass increased by 46 and 35%, respectively, in insect-free plants but these effects were arrested when soil-dwelling insects were present so that plants were the same size as those grown at aCO2. Specific leaf mass increased by 29% under eCO2, but at eCO2 root damage caused it to decline by 16%, similar to values seen in plants at aCO2 without root damage. Leaf C:N ratio increased by >30% at eCO2 as a consequence of declining leaf N concentrations, but this change was also moderated by soil insects. Soil insects also reduced leaf water content by 9% at eCO2, which potentially arose through impaired water uptake by the roots. We hypothesise that this may have impaired photosynthetic activity to the extent that observed plant responses to eCO2 no longer occurred. In conclusion, soil-dwelling insects could modify plant responses to eCO2 predicted by climate change plant growth models.

  19. Remote Sensing of Seasonal Variation in Column Concentration of Atmospheric CO2 and CH4 in Hefei%合肥地区大气中CO2和CH4柱浓度季节变化遥测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程巳阳; 高闽光; 徐亮; 金岭; 李胜; 童晶晶; 魏秀丽; 刘建国; 刘文清

    2014-01-01

    In order to observe two kinds of greenhouse gases ,CO2 and CH4 ,making the biggest contribution to global warming , a ground-based Fourier transform near-infrared spectral remote sensing system was developed to record the perpendicular inci-dence sun spectra from February 2012 to April 2013 in Hefei continuously .The measured total transmittances in the atmosphere were obtained from perpendicular incidence sun spectra .Methods of line-by-line and low-order polynomial approximation were used to model the total atmospheric transmittances in forward model .The measured transmittance spectra were fitted iteratively using the modeled transmittance spectra in the regions of CO2 6 150~6 270 and CH4 5 970~6 170 cm -1 in order to obtain their column concentrations .The column-average dry-air mole fractions of CO2 and CH4 were obtained with the internal standard function of O2 column concentrations .CO2 and CH4 daily average values of column-average dry-air mole fractions changed with a larger fluctuation and obvious seasonal periodicity .Their monthly average values were consistent as a whole ,although there were different characteristics .Compared with the results reported by Japanese greenhouse-gas satellite in the area of Waliguan , there was a time lag corresponding to peak and trough of CO 2 content and the change from peak to trough costed a long time . CH4 content showed variation tendency of unique peak and trough ,higher in summer and lower in winter ,compared with aver-age values of nationwide CH4 column concentrations based on SCIAMACHY data .The variation characteristics were related to complex factors such as the balance of source and sink ,meteorological and climate conditions ,and required long-term observa-tion and further study .%针对全球变暖贡献最大的两种温室气体CO2和CH4,采用自行研制的地基傅里叶变换近红外光谱遥测系统连续观测了合肥地区2012年2月到2013年4月的直射太阳光光谱,进而获得

  20. Atmospheric CO2 fertilization effects on biomass yields of 10 crops in northern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan F. Degener

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The quality and quantity of the influence that atmospheric CO2 has on cropgrowth is still a matter of debate. This study's aim is to estimate if CO2 will have an effect on biomass yields at all, to quantify and spatially locate the effects and to explore if an elevated photosynthesis rate or water-use-efficiency is predominantly responsible. This study uses a numerical carbon based crop model (BioSTAR to estimate biomass yields within theadministrative boundaries of Niedersachsen in Northern Germany. 10 crops are included (winter grains: wheat, barley,rye, triticale - early, medium, late maize variety - sunflower, sorghum, spring wheat, modeled annuallyfor the entire 21st century on 91,014 separate sites. Modeling was conducted twice, once with an annually adaptedCO2 concentration according to the SRES-A1B scenario and once with a fixed concentration of 390 ppm to separate the influence of CO2 from that of the other input variables.Rising CO2 concentrations will play a central role in keeping future yields of all crops above or aroundtoday's level. Differences in yields between modeling with fixed or adapted CO2 can be as high as60 % towards the century's end. Generally yields will increase when CO2 rises and decline whenit is kept constant. As C4-crops are equivalently affected it is presumed that anelevated efficiency in water use is the main responsible factor for all plants.

  1. Potential impact of rising atmospheric CO2 on quality of grains in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Saurav; Chakraborty, Debashis; Sehgal, Vinay K; Pal, Madan

    2015-11-15

    Experiments were conducted in open-top chambers to assess the effect of atmospheric CO2 enrichment (E-CO2) on the quality of grains in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) crop. Physical attributes of the grains was not affected, but the hydration and swelling capacities of the flour increased. Increase in carbohydrates and reduction in protein made the grains more carbonaceous (higher C:N) under E-CO2. Among other mineral nutrients, K, Ca and Zn concentrations decreased, while P, Mg, Cu, Fe, Mn and B concentrations did not change. The pH, bulk density and cooking time of chickpea flour remained unaffected, although the water absorption capacity of flour increased and oil absorption reduced. Results suggest that E-CO2 could affect the grain quality adversely and nutritional imbalance in grains of chickpea might occur.

  2. Effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 and vegetation type on microbiota associated with decomposing straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Helle B.; Ronn, R.; Christensen, S.

    2001-01-01

    concentration in the recovered straw samples. After five months of decomposition, hyphal biomass was significantly lower in straw from plants grown at elevated CO2 (-30% and -13% in the fallow and wheat field, respectively). Bacterial biomass was not significantly affected by the CO2 induced changes...... in the litter quality, but the lower decomposition rate and fewer bacterial grazers in the straw from plants grown at elevated CO2 together indicate reduced microbial activity and turnover. Notwithstanding this, these data show that growth at elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration results in slower...... decomposition of wheat straw, but the effect is probably of minor importance compared to the effect of varying crops, agricultural practise or changing land use....

  3. Changes in calcification of coccoliths under stable atmospheric CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, C.; Meier, K. J. S.; Kinkel, H.;

    2014-01-01

    The response of coccolithophore calcification to ocean acidification has been studied in culture experiments as well as in present and past oceans. The response, however, is different between species and strains, and for the relatively small carbonate chemistry changes observed in natural...... North Atlantic Ocean. The pre-industrial Holocene, with its predominantly stable atmospheric CO2, provides the conditions for such a comprehensive analysis. For an analysis on changes in major components of Holocene coccolithophores under natural conditions, the family Noelaerhabdaceae was selected...

  4. Atmospheric CO2 enrichment alters energy assimilation, investment and allocation in Xanthium strumarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Jennifer M; Wang, Xianzhong; Lewis, James D; Fung, Howard A; Tissue, David T; Griffin, Kevin L

    2005-05-01

    Energy-use efficiency and energy assimilation, investment and allocation patterns are likely to influence plant growth responses to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]). Here, we describe the influence of elevated [CO2] on energetic properties as a mechanism of growth responses in Xanthium strumarium. Individuals of X. strumarium were grown at ambient or elevated [CO2] and harvested. Total biomass and energetic construction costs (CC) of leaves, stems, roots and fruits and percentage of total biomass and energy allocated to these components were determined. Photosynthetic energy-use efficiency (PEUE) was calculated as the ratio of total energy gained via photosynthetic activity (Atotal) to leaf CC. Elevated [CO2] increased leaf Atotal, but decreased CC per unit mass of leaves and roots. Consequently, X. strumarium individuals produced more leaf and root biomass at elevated [CO2] without increasing total energy investment in these structures (CCtotal). Whole-plant biomass was associated positively with PEUE. Whole-plant construction required 16.1% less energy than modeled whole-plant energy investment had CC not responded to increased [CO2]. As a physiological mechanism affecting growth, altered energetic properties could positively influence productivity of X. strumarium, and potentially other species, at elevated [CO2]. PMID:15819914

  5. CO2−3 concentration and pCO2 thresholds for calcification and dissolution on the Molokai reef flat, Hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Halley

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The severity of the impact of elevated atmospheric pCO2 to coral reef ecosystems depends, in part, on how seawater pCO2 affects the balance between calcification and dissolution of carbonate sediments. Presently, there are insufficient published data that relate concentrations of pCO2 and CO32− to in situ rates of reef calcification in natural settings to accurately predict the impact of elevated atmospheric pCO2 on calcification and dissolution processes. Rates of net calcification and dissolution, CO32− concentrations, and pCO2 were measured, in situ, on patch reefs, bare sand, and coral rubble on the Molokai reef flat in Hawaii. Rates of calcification ranged from 0.003 to 0.23 g CaCO3 m−2 h−1 and dissolution ranged from −0.005 to −0.33 g CaCO3 m−2 h−1. Calcification and dissolution varied diurnally with net calcification primarily occurring during the day and net dissolution occurring at night. These data were used to calculate threshold values for pCO2 and CO32− at which rates of calcification and dissolution are equivalent. Results indicate that calcification and dissolution are linearly correlated with both CO32− and pCO2. Threshold pCO2 and CO32− values for individual substrate types showed considerable variation. The average pCO2 threshold value for all substrate types was 654±195 µatm and ranged from 467 to 1003 µatm. The average CO3−- threshold value was 152±24 µmol kg-1, ranging from 113 to 184 µmol kg−1. Ambient seawater measurements of pCO2 and CO32− indicate that CO32− and pCO2 threshold values for all substrate types were both exceeded, simultaneously, 13% of the time at present day atmospheric pCO2 concentrations. It is predicted that atmospheric pCO2 will exceed the average pCO2 threshold value for calcification and dissolution on the Molokai reef flat by the year 2100.

  6. Effects of Atmospheric CO2 Enrichment on Soil CO2 Efflux in a Young Longleaf Pine System

    OpenAIRE

    G. Brett Runion; J. R. Butnor; Prior, S. A.; Mitchell, R. J.; Rogers, H. H.

    2012-01-01

    The southeastern landscape is composed of agricultural and forest systems that can store carbon (C) in standing biomass and soil. Research is needed to quantify the effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on terrestrial C dynamics including CO2 release back to the atmosphere and soil sequestration. Longleaf pine savannahs are an ecologically and economically important, yet understudied, component of the southeastern landscape. We investigated the effects of ambient and elevated C...

  7. Stomatal proxy record of CO2 concentrations from the last termination suggests an important role for CO2 at climate change transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinthorsdottir, Margret; Wohlfarth, Barbara; Kylander, Malin E.; Blaauw, Maarten; Reimer, Paula J.

    2013-05-01

    A new stomatal proxy-based record of CO2 concentrations ([CO2]), based on Betula nana (dwarf birch) leaves from the Hässeldala Port sedimentary sequence in south-eastern Sweden, is presented. The record is of high chronological resolution and spans most of Greenland Interstadial 1 (GI-1a to 1c, Allerød pollen zone), Greenland Stadial 1 (GS-1, Younger Dryas pollen zone) and the very beginning of the Holocene (Preboreal pollen zone). The record clearly demonstrates that i) [CO2] were significantly higher than usually reported for the Last Termination and ii) the overall pattern of CO2 evolution through the studied time period is fairly dynamic, with significant abrupt fluctuations in [CO2] when the climate moved from interstadial to stadial state and vice versa. A new loss-on-ignition chemical record (used here as a proxy for temperature) lends independent support to the Hässeldala Port [CO2] record. The large-amplitude fluctuations around the climate change transitions may indicate unstable climates and that “tipping-point” situations were involved in Last Termination climate evolution. The scenario presented here is in contrast to [CO2] records reconstructed from air bubbles trapped in ice, which indicate lower concentrations and a gradual, linear increase of [CO2] through time. The prevalent explanation for the main climate forcer during the Last Termination being ocean circulation patterns needs to re-examined, and a larger role for atmospheric [CO2] considered.

  8. Quantifying the drivers of ocean-atmosphere CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Williams, Richard G.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    A mechanistic framework for quantitatively mapping the regional drivers of air-sea CO2 fluxes at a global scale is developed. The framework evaluates the interplay between (1) surface heat and freshwater fluxes that influence the potential saturated carbon concentration, which depends on changes in sea surface temperature, salinity and alkalinity, (2) a residual, disequilibrium flux influenced by upwelling and entrainment of remineralized carbon- and nutrient-rich waters from the ocean interior, as well as rapid subduction of surface waters, (3) carbon uptake and export by biological activity as both soft tissue and carbonate, and (4) the effect on surface carbon concentrations due to freshwater precipitation or evaporation. In a steady state simulation of a coarse-resolution ocean circulation and biogeochemistry model, the sum of the individually determined components is close to the known total flux of the simulation. The leading order balance, identified in different dynamical regimes, is between the CO2 fluxes driven by surface heat fluxes and a combination of biologically driven carbon uptake and disequilibrium-driven carbon outgassing. The framework is still able to reconstruct simulated fluxes when evaluated using monthly averaged data and takes a form that can be applied consistently in models of different complexity and observations of the ocean. In this way, the framework may reveal differences in the balance of drivers acting across an ensemble of climate model simulations or be applied to an analysis and interpretation of the observed, real-world air-sea flux of CO2.

  9. Rapid coupling of Antarctic temperature and atmospheric CO2 during deglaciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. van Ommen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic ice cores provide clear evidence of a close coupling between variations in Antarctic temperature and the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during the glacial/interglacial cycles of the past 800 thousand years. Precise information on the relative timing of the temperature and CO2 changes can assist in refining our understanding of the physical processes involved in this coupling. Here, we focus on the last deglaciation, 19 000 to 11 000 years before present, during which CO2 concentrations increased by ~80 parts per million by volume and Antarctic temperature increased by ~10 °C. Utilising a recently developed proxy for regional Antarctic temperature, derived from five near-coastal ice cores, and two ice core CO2 records with high dating precision, we show that the increase in CO2 lagged the increase in regional Antarctic temperature by only 0–400 years. This new value for the lag, consistent for both CO2 records, implies a faster feedback between temperature and CO2 than the centennial to millennial-scale lags suggested by previous studies.

  10. Recent widespread tree growth decline despite increasing atmospheric CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas C R Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The synergetic effects of recent rising atmospheric CO(2 and temperature are expected to favor tree growth in boreal and temperate forests. However, recent dendrochronological studies have shown site-specific unprecedented growth enhancements or declines. The question of whether either of these trends is caused by changes in the atmosphere remains unanswered because dendrochronology alone has not been able to clarify the physiological basis of such trends. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we combined standard dendrochronological methods with carbon isotopic analysis to investigate whether atmospheric changes enhanced water use efficiency (WUE and growth of two deciduous and two coniferous tree species along a 9 degrees latitudinal gradient across temperate and boreal forests in Ontario, Canada. Our results show that although trees have had around 53% increases in WUE over the past century, growth decline (measured as a decrease in basal area increment--BAI has been the prevalent response in recent decades irrespective of species identity and latitude. Since the 1950s, tree BAI was predominantly negatively correlated with warmer climates and/or positively correlated with precipitation, suggesting warming induced water stress. However, where growth declines were not explained by climate, WUE and BAI were linearly and positively correlated, showing that declines are not always attributable to warming induced stress and additional stressors may exist. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show an unexpected widespread tree growth decline in temperate and boreal forests due to warming induced stress but are also suggestive of additional stressors. Rising atmospheric CO2 levels during the past century resulted in consistent increases in water use efficiency, but this did not prevent growth decline. These findings challenge current predictions of increasing terrestrial carbon stocks under climate change scenarios.

  11. Radiative transfer in CO2-rich atmospheres: 1. Collisional line mixing implies a colder early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozak, N.; Aharonson, O.; Halevy, I.

    2016-06-01

    Fast and accurate radiative transfer methods are essential for modeling CO2-rich atmospheres, relevant to the climate of early Earth and Mars, present-day Venus, and some exoplanets. Although such models already exist, their accuracy may be improved as better theoretical and experimental constraints become available. Here we develop a unidimensional radiative transfer code for CO2-rich atmospheres, using the correlated k approach and with a focus on modeling early Mars. Our model differs from existing models in that it includes the effects of CO2 collisional line mixing in the calculation of the line-by-line absorption coefficients. Inclusion of these effects results in model atmospheres that are more transparent to infrared radiation and, therefore, in colder surface temperatures at radiative-convective equilibrium, compared with results of previous studies. Inclusion of water vapor in the model atmosphere results in negligible warming due to the low atmospheric temperatures under a weaker early Sun, which translate into climatically unimportant concentrations of water vapor. Overall, the results imply that sustained warmth on early Mars would not have been possible with an atmosphere containing only CO2 and water vapor, suggesting that other components of the early Martian climate system are missing from current models or that warm conditions were not long lived.

  12. Variability of Atmospheric CO2 Over India and Surrounding Oceans and Control by Surface Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, R. K.; Dadhwal, V. K.; Majumdar, A.; Patel, N. R.; Dutt, C. B. S.

    2011-08-01

    In the present study, seasonal and inter-annual variability of atmospheric CO2 concentration over India and surrounding oceans during 2002-2010 derived from Atmospheric InfrarRed Sounder observation and their relation with the natural flux exchanges over terrestrial Indian and surrounding oceans were analyzed. The natural fluxes over the terrestrial Indian in the form of net primary productivity (NPP) were simulated based on a terrestrial biosphere model governed by time varying climate parameters (solar radiation, air temperature, precipitation etc) and satellite greenness index together with the land use land cover and soil attribute maps. The flux exchanges over the oceans around India (Tropical Indian Ocean: TIO) were calculated based on a empirical model of CO2 gas dissolution in the oceanic water governed by time varying upper ocean parameters such as gradient of partial pressure of CO2 between ocean and atmosphere, winds, sea surface temperature and salinity. Comparison between the variability of atmospheric CO2 anomaly with the anomaly of surface fluxes over India and surrounding oceans suggests that biosphere uptake over India and oceanic uptake over the south Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of seasonal variability of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate. On inter-annual scale, flux exchanges over the tropical north Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate.

  13. VARIABILITY OF ATMOSPHERIC CO2 OVER INDIA AND SURROUNDING OCEANS AND CONTROL BY SURFACE FLUXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Nayak

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, seasonal and inter-annual variability of atmospheric CO2 concentration over India and surrounding oceans during 2002–2010 derived from Atmospheric InfrarRed Sounder observation and their relation with the natural flux exchanges over terrestrial Indian and surrounding oceans were analyzed. The natural fluxes over the terrestrial Indian in the form of net primary productivity (NPP were simulated based on a terrestrial biosphere model governed by time varying climate parameters (solar radiation, air temperature, precipitation etc and satellite greenness index together with the land use land cover and soil attribute maps. The flux exchanges over the oceans around India (Tropical Indian Ocean: TIO were calculated based on a empirical model of CO2 gas dissolution in the oceanic water governed by time varying upper ocean parameters such as gradient of partial pressure of CO2 between ocean and atmosphere, winds, sea surface temperature and salinity. Comparison between the variability of atmospheric CO2 anomaly with the anomaly of surface fluxes over India and surrounding oceans suggests that biosphere uptake over India and oceanic uptake over the south Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of seasonal variability of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate. On inter-annual scale, flux exchanges over the tropical north Indian Ocean could play positive role on the control of atmospheric carbon dioxide growth rate.

  14. Effects of Temperature Rise and Increase in CO2 Concentration on Simulated Wheat Yields in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nonhebel, Sanderine

    1996-01-01

    A crop-growth-simulation model based on SUCROS87 was used to study effects of temperature rise and increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration on wheat yields in several regions in Europe. The model simulated potential and water-limited crop production (growth with ample supply of nutrients and in the

  15. Development of a mobile and high-precision atmospheric CO2 monitoring station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, M.; Haszpra, L.; Major, I.; Svingor, É.; Veres, M.

    2009-04-01

    Nowadays one of the most burning questions for the science is the rate and the reasons of the recent climate change. Greenhouse gases (GHG), mainly CO2 and CH4 in the atmosphere could affect the climate of our planet. However, the relation between the amount of atmospheric GHG and the climate is complex, full with interactions and feedbacks partly poorly known even by now. The only way to understand the processes, to trace the changes, to develop and validate mathematical models for forecasts is the extensive, high precision, continuous monitoring of the atmosphere. Fossil fuel CO2 emissions are a major component of the European carbon budget. Separation of the fossil fuel signal from the natural biogenic one in the atmosphere is, therefore, a crucial task for quantifying exchange flux of the continental biosphere through atmospheric observations and inverse modelling. An independent method to estimate trace gas emissions is the top-down approach, using atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements combined with simultaneous radiocarbon (14C) observations. As adding fossil fuel CO2 to the atmosphere, therefore, leads not only to an increase in the CO2 content of the atmosphere but also to a decrease in the 14C/12C ratio in atmospheric CO2. The ATOMKI has more than two decade long experience in atmospheric 14CO2 monitoring. As a part of an ongoing research project being carried out in Hungary to investigate the amount and temporal and spatial variations of fossil fuel CO2 in the near surface atmosphere we developed a mobile and high-precision atmospheric CO2 monitoring station. We describe the layout and the operation of the measuring system which is designed for the continuous, unattended monitoring of CO2 mixing ratio in the near surface atmosphere based on an Ultramat 6F (Siemens) infrared gas analyser. In the station one atmospheric 14CO2 sampling unit is also installed which is developed and widely used since more than one decade by ATOMKI. Mixing ratio of CO2 is

  16. Recent advances in developing COS as a tracer of Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaf, D.; Stimler, K.; Yakir, D.

    2012-04-01

    Potential use of COS as tracer of CO2 flux into vegetation, based on its co-diffusion with CO2 into leaves without outflux, stimulated research on COS-CO2 interactions. Atmospheric measurements by NOAA in recent years, across a global latitudinal transect, indicated a ratio of the seasonal drawdowns in COS and CO2 (normalized to their respective ambient concentrations) of about 6. We carried out leaf-scale gas exchange measurements of COS and CO2 in 22 plant species of deciduous, evergreen trees, grasses, and shrubs, under a range of light intensities and ambient COS concentrations (using mid IR laser spectroscopy). A narrow range in the normalized ratio of the net uptake rates of COS and CO2 (termed leaf relative uptake; LRU) was observed with a mean value of 1.61±0.26. These results reflect the dominance of stomatal conductance over both COS and CO2 uptake, imposing a relatively constant ratio between the two fluxes, except under low light conditions when CO2, but not COS, metabolism is light limited. A relatively constant ratio under common ambient conditions will facilitate the application of COS as a tracer of gross photosynthesis from leaf to global scales. We also report first eddy flux measurements of COS/CO2 at the ecosystem scales. Preliminarily results indicate a ratio of the COS flux, Fcos, to net ecosystem CO2 exchange, NEE, of 3-5 (termed ecosystem relative uptake; ERU). Combining measurements of COS and CO2 and the new information on their ratios at different scales should permit the direct estimation of gross CO2 uptake, GPP, by land ecosystems according to: GPP=NEE*ERU/LRU. In addition, we show that COS effect on stomatal conductance may require a special attention. Increasing COS concentrations between 250 and 2800 pmol mol-1 (enveloping atmospheric levels) stimulate stomatal conductance. It seems likely that the stomata are responding to H2S produced in the leaves from COS.

  17. Does Size Matter? Atmospheric CO2 May Be a Stronger Driver of Stomatal Closing Rate Than Stomatal Size in Taxa That Diversified under Low CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott-Kingston, Caroline; Haworth, Matthew; Yearsley, Jon M; Batke, Sven P; Lawson, Tracy; McElwain, Jennifer C

    2016-01-01

    One strategy for plants to optimize stomatal function is to open and close their stomata quickly in response to environmental signals. It is generally assumed that small stomata can alter aperture faster than large stomata. We tested the hypothesis that species with small stomata close faster than species with larger stomata in response to darkness by comparing rate of stomatal closure across an evolutionary range of species including ferns, cycads, conifers, and angiosperms under controlled ambient conditions (380 ppm CO2; 20.9% O2). The two species with fastest half-closure time and the two species with slowest half-closure time had large stomata while the remaining three species had small stomata, implying that closing rate was not correlated with stomatal size in these species. Neither was response time correlated with stomatal density, phylogeny, functional group, or life strategy. Our results suggest that past atmospheric CO2 concentration during time of taxa diversification may influence stomatal response time. We show that species which last diversified under low or declining atmospheric CO2 concentration close stomata faster than species that last diversified in a high CO2 world. Low atmospheric [CO2] during taxa diversification may have placed a selection pressure on plants to accelerate stomatal closing to maintain adequate internal CO2 and optimize water use efficiency.

  18. Does Size Matter? Atmospheric CO2 May Be a Stronger Driver of Stomatal Closing Rate Than Stomatal Size in Taxa That Diversified under Low CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott-Kingston, Caroline; Haworth, Matthew; Yearsley, Jon M.; Batke, Sven P.; Lawson, Tracy; McElwain, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    One strategy for plants to optimize stomatal function is to open and close their stomata quickly in response to environmental signals. It is generally assumed that small stomata can alter aperture faster than large stomata. We tested the hypothesis that species with small stomata close faster than species with larger stomata in response to darkness by comparing rate of stomatal closure across an evolutionary range of species including ferns, cycads, conifers, and angiosperms under controlled ambient conditions (380 ppm CO2; 20.9% O2). The two species with fastest half-closure time and the two species with slowest half-closure time had large stomata while the remaining three species had small stomata, implying that closing rate was not correlated with stomatal size in these species. Neither was response time correlated with stomatal density, phylogeny, functional group, or life strategy. Our results suggest that past atmospheric CO2 concentration during time of taxa diversification may influence stomatal response time. We show that species which last diversified under low or declining atmospheric CO2 concentration close stomata faster than species that last diversified in a high CO2 world. Low atmospheric [CO2] during taxa diversification may have placed a selection pressure on plants to accelerate stomatal closing to maintain adequate internal CO2 and optimize water use efficiency. PMID:27605929

  19. Does Size Matter? Atmospheric CO2 May Be a Stronger Driver of Stomatal Closing Rate Than Stomatal Size in Taxa That Diversified under Low CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott-Kingston, Caroline; Haworth, Matthew; Yearsley, Jon M; Batke, Sven P; Lawson, Tracy; McElwain, Jennifer C

    2016-01-01

    One strategy for plants to optimize stomatal function is to open and close their stomata quickly in response to environmental signals. It is generally assumed that small stomata can alter aperture faster than large stomata. We tested the hypothesis that species with small stomata close faster than species with larger stomata in response to darkness by comparing rate of stomatal closure across an evolutionary range of species including ferns, cycads, conifers, and angiosperms under controlled ambient conditions (380 ppm CO2; 20.9% O2). The two species with fastest half-closure time and the two species with slowest half-closure time had large stomata while the remaining three species had small stomata, implying that closing rate was not correlated with stomatal size in these species. Neither was response time correlated with stomatal density, phylogeny, functional group, or life strategy. Our results suggest that past atmospheric CO2 concentration during time of taxa diversification may influence stomatal response time. We show that species which last diversified under low or declining atmospheric CO2 concentration close stomata faster than species that last diversified in a high CO2 world. Low atmospheric [CO2] during taxa diversification may have placed a selection pressure on plants to accelerate stomatal closing to maintain adequate internal CO2 and optimize water use efficiency. PMID:27605929

  20. Effect of elevated CO2 concentration on photosynthetic characteristics of hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii under cadmium stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tingqiang Li; Qi Tao; Zhenzhen Di; Fan Lu; Xiaoe Yang

    2015-01-01

    The combined effects of elevated CO2 and cadmi-um (Cd) on photosynthetic rate, chlorophyl fluorescence and Cd accumulation in hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredi Hance were investigated to predict plant growth under Cd stress with rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. Both pot and hydroponic experiments were conducted and the plants were grown under ambient (350 mL L?1) or elevated (800 mL L?1) CO2. Elevated CO2 significantly (P<0.05) increased Pn (105%–149%), Pnmax (38.8%–63.0%) and AQY (20.0%–34.8%) of S. alfredii in al the Cd treatments, but reduced chlorophyl concentra-tion, dark respiration and photorespiration. After 10 days growth in medium with 50 mM Cd under elevated CO2, PSII activities were significantly enhanced (P<0.05) with Pm, Fv/Fm, F(II) and qP increased by 66.1%, 7.5%, 19.5% and 16.4%, respectively, as compared with ambient-grown plants. Total Cd uptake in shoot of S. alfredi grown under elevated CO2 was increased by 44.1%–48.5%, which was positively correlated with the increase in Pn. These results indicate that elevated CO2 promoted the growth of S. alfredi due to increased photosynthetic carbon uptake rate and photosynthetic light-use efficiency, and showed great potential to improve the phytoextraction of Cd by S. alfredi .

  1. Effect of elevated CO2 concentration on photosynthetic characteristics of hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii under cadmium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingqiang; Tao, Qi; Di, Zhenzhen; Lu, Fan; Yang, Xiaoe

    2015-07-01

    The combined effects of elevated CO2 and cadmium (Cd) on photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence and Cd accumulation in hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii Hance were investigated to predict plant growth under Cd stress with rising atmospheric CO2 concentration. Both pot and hydroponic experiments were conducted and the plants were grown under ambient (350 µL L(-1)) or elevated (800 µL L(-1)) CO2 . Elevated CO2 significantly (P < 0.05) increased Pn (105%-149%), Pnmax (38.8%-63.0%) and AQY (20.0%-34.8%) of S. alfredii in all the Cd treatments, but reduced chlorophyll concentration, dark respiration and photorespiration. After 10 days growth in medium with 50 µM Cd under elevated CO2 , PSII activities were significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) with Pm, Fv/Fm, Φ(II) and qP increased by 66.1%, 7.5%, 19.5% and 16.4%, respectively, as compared with ambient-grown plants. Total Cd uptake in shoot of S. alfredii grown under elevated CO2 was increased by 44.1%-48.5%, which was positively correlated with the increase in Pn. These results indicate that elevated CO2 promoted the growth of S. alfredii due to increased photosynthetic carbon uptake rate and photosynthetic light-use efficiency, and showed great potential to improve the phytoextraction of Cd by S. alfredii. PMID:25370532

  2. Potential effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on coastal wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the atmosphere has steadily increased from 280 parts per million (ppm) in preindustrial times to 381 ppm today and is predicted by some models to double within the next century. Some of the important pathways whereby changes in atmospheric CO2 may impact coastal wetlands include changes in temperature, rainfall, and hurricane intensity (fig. 1). Increases in CO2 can contribute to global warming, which may (1) accelerate sea-level rise through melting of polar ice fields and steric expansion of oceans, (2) alter rainfall patterns and salinity regimes, and (3) change the intensity and frequency of tropical storms and hurricanes. Sea-level rise combined with changes in storm activity may affect erosion and sedimentation rates and patterns in coastal wetlands and maintenance of soil elevations.Feedback loops between plant growth and hydroedaphic conditions also contribute to maintenance of marsh elevations through accumulation of organic matter. Although increasing CO2 concentration may contribute to global warming and climate changes, it may also have a direct impact on plant growth and development by stimulating photosynthesis or improving water use efficiency. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey are examining responses of wetland plants to elevated CO2 concentration and other factors. This research will lead to a better understanding of future changes in marsh species composition, successional rates and patterns, ecological functioning, and vulnerability to sea-level rise and other global change factors.

  3. Exchanges of Atmospheric CO2 and 13CO2 with the Terrestrial Biosphere and Oceans from 1978 to 2000. II. A Three-Dimensional Tracer Inversion Model to Deduce Regional Fluxes

    OpenAIRE

    Piper, Stephen C; Keeling, Charles D.; HEIMANN Martin; Stewart, Elisabeth F

    2001-01-01

    A three-dimensional tracer inversion model is described that couples atmospheric CO2 transport with prescribed and adjustable source/sink components of the global car- bon cycle to predict atmospheric CO2 concentration and 13C/12C isotopic ratio taking account of exchange fluxes of atmospheric CO2 with the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans. Industrial CO2 emissions are prescribed from fuel production data. Transport of CO2 is prescribed by a model, TM2, that employs 9 vertical levels from ...

  4. Response of free-living soil protozoa and microorganisms to elevated atmospheric CO2 and presence of mycorrhiza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, R.; Gavito, M.; Larsen, J.;

    2002-01-01

    Possible interactions between mycorrhiza, atmospheric CO2, free-living soil microorganisms and protozoa were investigated in pot experimental systems. Pea plants (Pisum sativum L. cv. Solara) were grown under ambient (360 mul l(-1)) or elevated (700 mul l(-1)) atmospheric CO2 concentration...... with or without the presence of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus caledonium. It was hypothesised that (1) the populations of free-living soil protozoa would increase as a response to elevated CO2, (2) the effect of elevated CO2 on protozoa would be moderated by the presence of mycorrhiza and (3......) the presence of arbuscular mycorrhiza would affect soil protozoan numbers regardless of atmospheric CO2. After 3 weeks growth there was no difference in bacterial numbers (direct counts) in soil, but the number of free-living bacterial-feeding protozoa was significantly higher under elevated CO2...

  5. A recent build-up of atmospheric CO2 over Europe. Part 1: observed signals and possible explanations

    OpenAIRE

    Ramonet, Michael; Ciais, Philippe; Aalto, Tuula; Aulagnier, Céline; Chevallier, Frédéric; Cipriano, Domenico; Conway, Thomas J.; Haszpra, Laszlo; Kazan, Victor; Meinhardt, Frank; Paris, Jean-Daniel; Schmidt, Martina; Simmonds, Peter; Xueref-Rémy, Irène; Necki, Jaroslaw N.

    2011-01-01

    We analysed interannual and decadal changes in the atmospheric CO2 concentration gradient (ΔCO2) between Europe and the Atlantic Ocean over the period 1995–2007. Fourteen measurement stations are used, with Mace-Head being used to define background conditions. The variability of ΔCO2 reflects fossil fuel emissions and natural sinks activity over Europe, as well as atmospheric transport variability. The mean ΔCO2 increased by 1–2 ppm at Eastern European stations (∼30% growth), between 1990–199...

  6. On the development of a methodology for extensive in-situ and continuous atmospheric CO2 monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Chang, S.; Jhang, T.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is recognized as the dominating greenhouse gas contributing to anthropogenic global warming. Stringent controls on carbon dioxide emissions are viewed as necessary steps in controlling atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. From the view point of policy making, regulation of carbon dioxide emissions and its monitoring are keys to the success of stringent controls on carbon dioxide emissions. Especially, extensive atmospheric CO2 monitoring is a crucial step to ensure that CO2 emission control strategies are closely followed. In this work we develop a methodology that enables reliable and accurate in-situ and continuous atmospheric CO2 monitoring for policy making. The methodology comprises the use of gas filter correlation (GFC) instrument for in-situ CO2 monitoring, the use of CO2 working standards accompanying the continuous measurements, and the use of NOAA WMO CO2 standard gases for calibrating the working standards. The use of GFC instruments enables 1-second data sampling frequency with the interference of water vapor removed from added dryer. The CO2 measurements are conducted in the following timed and cycled manner: zero CO2 measurement, two standard CO2 gases measurements, and ambient air measurements. The standard CO2 gases are calibrated again NOAA WMO CO2 standards. The methodology is used in indoor CO2 measurements in a commercial office (about 120 people working inside), ambient CO2 measurements, and installed in a fleet of in-service commercial cargo ships for monitoring CO2 over global marine boundary layer. These measurements demonstrate our method is reliable, accurate, and traceable to NOAA WMO CO2 standards. The portability of the instrument and the working standards make the method readily applied for large-scale and extensive CO2 measurements.

  7. Atmospheric CO2 Inversions of the Mid-Continental Intensive (MCI) Region (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, A. E.; Denning, A.; Ogle, S. M.; Corbin, K.; Uliasz, M.; Davis, K. J.; Lauvaux, T.; Miles, N.; Andrews, A. E.; Petron, G.; Huntzinger, D. N.

    2009-12-01

    We combine the SiB3 biosphere model with the RAMS mesoscale meteorology model and associated Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) and use CO2 observations from an extensive tower network in 2007 to correct a priori ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross primary productivity (GPP) fluxes for a domain consisting of most of North America. In particular, eight of these towers are located in a concentrated ring around the Mid-Continent Intensive (MCI) region of the United States providing one of the densest tower networks (CO2) in the world, in the midst of one of the strongest areas of seasonal carbon flux in the world. The unique area combined with dense observations and relatively simple atmospheric transport provides an incredible test-bed to investigate atmospheric CO2 inversions. Multiple inversion approaches are compared and contrasted. The results are then investigated for sensitivity to a priori inversion designs, boundary inflow contributions, and network density.

  8. The paper trail of the 13C of atmospheric CO2 since the industrial revolution period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 13C concentration in atmospheric CO2 has been declining over the past 150 years as large quantities of 13C-depleted CO2 from fossil fuel burning are added to the atmosphere. Deforestation and other land use changes have also contributed to the trend. Looking at the 13C variations in the atmosphere and in annual growth rings of trees allows us to estimate CO2 uptake by land plants and the ocean, and assess the response of plants to climate. Here I show that the effects of the declining 13C trend in atmospheric CO2 are recorded in the isotopic composition of paper used in the printing industry, which provides a well-organized archive and integrated material derived from trees' cellulose. 13C analyses of paper from two European and two American publications showed, on average, a - 1.65 ± 1.00 per mille trend between 1880 and 2000, compared with - 1.45 and - 1.57 per mille for air and tree-ring analyses, respectively. The greater decrease in plant-derived 13C in the paper we tested than in the air is consistent with predicted global-scale increases in plant intrinsic water-use efficiency over the 20th century. Distinct deviations from the atmospheric trend were observed in both European and American publications immediately following the World War II period.

  9. CO2 and HCO3- uptake in marine diatoms acclimated to different CO2 concentrations.

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhardt, S.; Amoroso, G.; Riebesell, Ulf

    2001-01-01

    Rates of cellular uptake of CO2 and HCO3- during steady-state photosynthesis were measured in the marine diatoms Thalassiosira weissflogii and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, acclimated to CO2 partial pressures of 36, 180, 360, and 1,800 ppmv. In addition, in vivo activity of extracellular (eCA) and intracellular (iCA) carbonic anhydrase was determined in relation to CO2 availability. Both species responded to diminishing CO2 supply with an increase in eCA and iCA activity. In P. tricornutum, eCA ...

  10. Effect of CO2 on Atmospheric Corrosion of UNS G10190 Steel under Thin Electrolyte Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of UNS G10190 steel under a thin electrolyte film in the atmosphere polluted by CO2 has been studied in the lab using an atmospheric corrosion monitor(ACM) in combination with XRD and SEM observations of the surface of steel. The ACM study indicated that the corrosion rate of the steel increased with increasing carbon dioxide concentration. The XRD and SEM observations showed that no carbonate was found in the corrosion product on the steel surface. The corrosion product consisted of two layers, i. e., inner and outer layer. From the experimental results, it was concluded that CO2 played an enhancing role in the atmospheric corrosion of UNS G10190 steel. The film of the corrosion product showed slight protection.

  11. Characteristics of coupled atmosphere-ocean CO2 sensitivity experiments with different ocean formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Community Climate Model at the National Center for Atmospheric Research has been coupled to a simple mixed-layer ocean model and to a coarse-grid ocean general circulation model (OGCM). This paper compares the responses of simulated climate to increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in these two coupled models. Three types of simulations were run: (1) control runs with both ocean models, with CO2 held constant at present-day concentrations, (2) instantaneous doubling of atmospheric CO2 (from 330 to 660 ppm) with both ocean models, and (3) a gradually increasing (transient) CO2 concentration starting at 330 ppm and increasing linearly at 1% per year, with the OGCM. The mixed-layer and OGCM cases exhibit increases of 3.5 C and 1.6 C, respectively, in globally averaged surface air temperature for the instantaneous doubling cases. The transient-forcing case warms 0.7 C by the end of 30 years. The mixed-layer ocean yields warmer-than-observed tropical temperatures and colder-than-observed temperatures in the higher latitudes. The coarse-grid OGCM simulates lower-than-observed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the tropics and higher-than-observed SSTs and reduced sea-ice extent at higher latitudes. Sensitivity in the OGCM after 30 years is much lower than in simulations with the same atmosphere coupled to a 50-m slab-ocean mixed layer. The OGCM simulates a weaker thermohaline circulation with doubled CO2 as the high-latitude ocean-surface layer warms and freshens and the westerly wind stress decreases. Convective overturning in the OGCM decreases substantially with CO2 warming

  12. Characteristics of coupled atmosphere-ocean CO2 sensitivity experiments with different ocean formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Community Climate Model at the National Center for Atmospheric Research has been coupled to a simple mixed-layer ocean model and to a coarse-grid ocean general circulation model (OGCM). This paper compares the responses of simulated climate to increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in these two coupled models. Three types of simulations were run: (1) control runs with both ocean models, with CO2 held constant at present-day concentrations, (2) instantaneous doubling of atmospheric CO2 (from 330 to 660 ppm) with both ocean models, and (3) a gradually increasing (transient) CO2 concentration starting at 330 ppm and increasing linearly at 1% per year, with the OGCM. The mixed-layer and OGCM cases exhibit increases of 3.5 C and 1.6 C, respectively, in globally averaged surface air temperature for the instantaneous doubling cases. The transient-forcing case warms 0.7 C by the end of 30 years. The mixed-layer ocean yields warmer-than-observed tropical temperatures and colder-than-observed temperatures in the higher latitudes. The coarse-grid OGCM simulates lower-than-observed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the tropics and higher-than-observed SSTs and reduced sea-ice extent at higher latitudes. Sensitivity in the OGCM after 30 years is much lower than in simulations with the same atmosphere coupled to a 50-m slab-ocean mixed layer. The OGCM simulates a weaker thermohaline circulation with doubled CO2 as the high-latitude ocean-surface layer warms and freshens and the westerly wind stress decreases. Convective overturning in the OGCM decreases substantially with CO2 warming. 46 refs.; 20 figs.; 1 tab

  13. Development and consequences of atmospheric CO2 pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consequences of the use of fossil fuels and a number of trace gases have changed the composition of the atmosphere and, in this way, the radiation balance within the atmosphere. The influence on the climate of the rising atmospheric content of carbon dioxide (CO2) has become an important problem, which constitutes the background to energy policy. This problem has become more and more topical and multi-faceted over the past decade. Extreme climatic anomalies occur in various regions of the earth, which had not previously been experienced in this intensity in our century. Even more extreme weather and climatic events must be expected to occur in the future. From the most recent data climatologists conclude that the development will be different than had initially been assumed. For instance, the role of water vapor seems to have been underestimated. A change in climate, starting from the tropics, seems to be under way. The modeling results, which must be used as a starting point for specific predictions in any field, are still highly contradictory and do not at present permit a forecast to be made for a region such as Central Europe. It can only be said with some reliability that the process of warming up will continue, perhaps even at an increasing pace. (orig.)

  14. Plant growth and leaf-spot severity on eucalypt at different CO2 concentrations in the air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Oliveira da Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of increased air-CO2 concentration on plant growth and on leaf-spot caused by Cylindrocladium candelabrum in Eucalyptus urophylla. Seedlings were cultivated for 30 days at 451, 645, 904, and 1,147 µmol mol-1 CO2 ; then, they were inoculated with the pathogen and kept under the same conditions for seven days. Increased CO2 concentration increased plant height and shoot dry matter mass, and decreased disease incidence and severity. Stem diameter was not affected by the treatments. Increased concentrations of atmospheric CO2 favorably affect eucalypt growth and reduce leaf-spot severity.

  15. A natural experiment on plant acclimation: lifetime stomatal frequency response of an individual tree to annual atmospheric CO2increase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, F.; Below, R.; Klerk, P. de; Dilcher, D.L.; Joosten, H.; Kürschner, W.M.; Visscher, H.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been increasing in atmospheric concentration since the Industrial Revolution. A decreasing number of stomata on leaves of land plants still provides the only morphological evidence that this man-made increase has already affected the biosphere. The current rate of CO2 respon

  16. Rapid atmospheric CO2 changes associated with the 8,200-years-B.P. cooling event

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, F.; Aaby, B.; Visscher, H.

    2002-01-01

    By applying the inverse relation between numbers of leaf stomata and atmospheric CO2 concentration, stomatal frequency analysis of fossil birch leaves from lake deposits in Denmark reveals a century-scale CO2 change during the prominent Holocene cooling event that occurred in the North Atlantic regi

  17. Glyphosate Resistance of C3 and C4 Weeds under Rising Atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Nimesha; Manalil, Sudheesh; Florentine, Singarayer K.; Chauhan, Bhagirath S.; Seneweera, Saman

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reviews current knowledge on how changes of plant metabolism under elevated CO2 concentrations (e[CO2]) can affect the development of the glyphosate resistance of C3 and C4 weeds. Among the chemical herbicides, glyphosate, which is a non-selective and post-emergence herbicide, is currently the most widely used herbicide in global agriculture. As a consequence, glyphosate resistant weeds, particularly in major field crops, are a widespread problem and are becoming a significant challenge to future global food production. Of particular interest here it is known that the biochemical processes involved in photosynthetic pathways of C3 and C4 plants are different, which may have relevance to their competitive development under changing environmental conditions. It has already been shown that plant anatomical, morphological, and physiological changes under e[CO2] can be different, based on (i) the plant’s functional group, (ii) the available soil nutrients, and (iii) the governing water status. In this respect, C3 species are likely to have a major developmental advantage under a CO2 rich atmosphere, by being able to capitalize on the overall stimulatory effect of e[CO2]. For example, many tropical weed grass species fix CO2 from the atmosphere via the C4 photosynthetic pathway, which is a complex anatomical and biochemical variant of the C3 pathway. Thus, based on our current knowledge of CO2 fixing, it would appear obvious that the development of a glyphosate-resistant mechanism would be easier under an e[CO2] in C3 weeds which have a simpler photosynthetic pathway, than for C4 weeds. However, notwithstanding this logical argument, a better understanding of the biochemical, genetic, and molecular measures by which plants develop glyphosate resistance and how e[CO2] affects these measures will be important before attempting to innovate sustainable technology to manage the glyphosate-resistant evolution of weeds under e[CO2]. Such information will be

  18. Agricultural Green Revolution as a driver of increasing atmospheric CO2 seasonal amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Collatz, George J.; Kalnay, Eugenia; Salawitch, Ross J.; West, Tristram O.; Guanter, Luis

    2014-11-01

    The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) record displays a prominent seasonal cycle that arises mainly from changes in vegetation growth and the corresponding CO2 uptake during the boreal spring and summer growing seasons and CO2 release during the autumn and winter seasons. The CO2 seasonal amplitude has increased over the past five decades, suggesting an increase in Northern Hemisphere biospheric activity. It has been proposed that vegetation growth may have been stimulated by higher concentrations of CO2 as well as by warming in recent decades, but such mechanisms have been unable to explain the full range and magnitude of the observed increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude. Here we suggest that the intensification of agriculture (the Green Revolution, in which much greater crop yield per unit area was achieved by hybridization, irrigation and fertilization) during the past five decades is a driver of changes in the seasonal characteristics of the global carbon cycle. Our analysis of CO2 data and atmospheric inversions shows a robust 15 per cent long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude from 1961 to 2010, punctuated by large decadal and interannual variations. Using a terrestrial carbon cycle model that takes into account high-yield cultivars, fertilizer use and irrigation, we find that the long-term increase in CO2 seasonal amplitude arises from two major regions: the mid-latitude cropland between 25° N and 60° N and the high-latitude natural vegetation between 50° N and 70° N. The long-term trend of seasonal amplitude increase is 0.311 +/- 0.027 per cent per year, of which sensitivity experiments attribute 45, 29 and 26 per cent to land-use change, climate variability and change, and increased productivity due to CO2 fertilization, respectively. Vegetation growth was earlier by one to two weeks, as measured by the mid-point of vegetation carbon uptake, and took up 0.5 petagrams more carbon in July, the height of the growing season, during 2001-2010 than in 1961

  19. Glyphosate Resistance of C3 and C4 Weeds under Rising Atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Nimesha; Manalil, Sudheesh; Florentine, Singarayer K; Chauhan, Bhagirath S; Seneweera, Saman

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reviews current knowledge on how changes of plant metabolism under elevated CO2 concentrations (e[CO2]) can affect the development of the glyphosate resistance of C3 and C4 weeds. Among the chemical herbicides, glyphosate, which is a non-selective and post-emergence herbicide, is currently the most widely used herbicide in global agriculture. As a consequence, glyphosate resistant weeds, particularly in major field crops, are a widespread problem and are becoming a significant challenge to future global food production. Of particular interest here it is known that the biochemical processes involved in photosynthetic pathways of C3 and C4 plants are different, which may have relevance to their competitive development under changing environmental conditions. It has already been shown that plant anatomical, morphological, and physiological changes under e[CO2] can be different, based on (i) the plant's functional group, (ii) the available soil nutrients, and (iii) the governing water status. In this respect, C3 species are likely to have a major developmental advantage under a CO2 rich atmosphere, by being able to capitalize on the overall stimulatory effect of e[CO2]. For example, many tropical weed grass species fix CO2 from the atmosphere via the C4 photosynthetic pathway, which is a complex anatomical and biochemical variant of the C3 pathway. Thus, based on our current knowledge of CO2 fixing, it would appear obvious that the development of a glyphosate-resistant mechanism would be easier under an e[CO2] in C3 weeds which have a simpler photosynthetic pathway, than for C4 weeds. However, notwithstanding this logical argument, a better understanding of the biochemical, genetic, and molecular measures by which plants develop glyphosate resistance and how e[CO2] affects these measures will be important before attempting to innovate sustainable technology to manage the glyphosate-resistant evolution of weeds under e[CO2]. Such information will be of

  20. Glyphosate Resistance of C3 and C4 Weeds under Rising Atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Nimesha; Manalil, Sudheesh; Florentine, Singarayer K; Chauhan, Bhagirath S; Seneweera, Saman

    2016-01-01

    The present paper reviews current knowledge on how changes of plant metabolism under elevated CO2 concentrations (e[CO2]) can affect the development of the glyphosate resistance of C3 and C4 weeds. Among the chemical herbicides, glyphosate, which is a non-selective and post-emergence herbicide, is currently the most widely used herbicide in global agriculture. As a consequence, glyphosate resistant weeds, particularly in major field crops, are a widespread problem and are becoming a significant challenge to future global food production. Of particular interest here it is known that the biochemical processes involved in photosynthetic pathways of C3 and C4 plants are different, which may have relevance to their competitive development under changing environmental conditions. It has already been shown that plant anatomical, morphological, and physiological changes under e[CO2] can be different, based on (i) the plant's functional group, (ii) the available soil nutrients, and (iii) the governing water status. In this respect, C3 species are likely to have a major developmental advantage under a CO2 rich atmosphere, by being able to capitalize on the overall stimulatory effect of e[CO2]. For example, many tropical weed grass species fix CO2 from the atmosphere via the C4 photosynthetic pathway, which is a complex anatomical and biochemical variant of the C3 pathway. Thus, based on our current knowledge of CO2 fixing, it would appear obvious that the development of a glyphosate-resistant mechanism would be easier under an e[CO2] in C3 weeds which have a simpler photosynthetic pathway, than for C4 weeds. However, notwithstanding this logical argument, a better understanding of the biochemical, genetic, and molecular measures by which plants develop glyphosate resistance and how e[CO2] affects these measures will be important before attempting to innovate sustainable technology to manage the glyphosate-resistant evolution of weeds under e[CO2]. Such information will be of

  1. Impact of oceanic circulation changes on the CO2 concentration during past interglacials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouttes, Nathaelle; Swingedouw, Didier; Crosta, Xavier; Fernanda Sanchez Goñi, Maria; Roche, Didier

    2016-04-01

    Interglacials before the Mid-Bruhnes Event (around 430 kyrs BP) were characterized by colder temperature in Antarctica, lower sea level and lower atmospheric CO2 compared to the more recent interglacials. Recent climate simulations have shown that the climate of the interglacials before and after the MBE can only be reproduced when taking into account changes in orbital parameters and atmospheric CO2 concentrations (Yin and Berger, 2010; Yin and Berger, 2012). Indeed, interglacial atmospheric CO2 concentrations were ~250 ppm and ~280 ppm prior and after the MBE, respectively. Yet, the cause for this change in atmospheric CO2 remains mainly unknown. climate simulations suggest that oceanic circulation was different during the interglacials due to the different climate states (Yin, 2013). The changes of oceanic circulation could have modified the carbon cycle: a more sluggish circulation would lead to greater carbon sequestration in the deep ocean and, subsequently, a decrease of atmospheric CO2. However, the impact of oceanic circulation changes on the carbon cycle during the interglacials of the last 800 kyrs has never been tested in coupled carbon-climate models. Here, we evaluate the role of ocean circulation changes on the carbon cycle during interglacials by using the intermediate complexity model iLOVECLIM (Goosse et al., 2010 ; Bouttes et al., 2015). This model includes a carbon cycle module on land and in the ocean and simulates carbon isotopes. The interglacial simulations are forced with orbital parameters, ice sheets and CO2 concentrations from data reconstructions. The model computes carbon fluxes between the reservoirs and an atmospheric CO2 that is distinct from the one used as a forcing. We will present simulations from this climate model for different interglacial periods of the last 800 000 years and use model-data comparison to analyse and evaluate the changes in the carbon cycle, including CO2. References Bouttes, N. et al. (2015), Geosci. Model

  2. Why CO2 cools the middle atmosphere - a consolidating model perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessling, Helge F.; Bathiany, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    Complex models of the atmosphere show that increased carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations, while warming the surface and troposphere, lead to lower temperatures in the stratosphere and mesosphere. This cooling, which is often referred to as "stratospheric cooling", is evident also in observations and considered to be one of the fingerprints of anthropogenic global warming. Although the responsible mechanisms have been identified, they have mostly been discussed heuristically, incompletely, or in combination with other effects such as ozone depletion, leaving the subject prone to misconceptions. Here we use a one-dimensional window-grey radiation model of the atmosphere to illustrate the physical essence of the mechanisms by which CO2 cools the stratosphere and mesosphere: (i) the blocking effect, associated with a cooling due to the fact that CO2 absorbs radiation at wavelengths where the atmosphere is already relatively opaque, and (ii) the indirect solar effect, associated with a cooling in places where an additional (solar) heating term is present (which on Earth is particularly the case in the upper parts of the ozone layer). By contrast, in the grey model without solar heating within the atmosphere, the cooling aloft is only a transient blocking phenomenon that is completely compensated as the surface attains its warmer equilibrium. Moreover, we quantify the relative contribution of these effects by simulating the response to an abrupt increase in CO2 (and chlorofluorocarbon) concentrations with an atmospheric general circulation model. We find that the two permanent effects contribute roughly equally to the CO2-induced cooling, with the indirect solar effect dominating around the stratopause and the blocking effect dominating otherwise.

  3. Diurnal variation of CO2 concentration, Δ14C and δ13C in an urban forest: estimate of the anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 contributions

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Hiroshi A.; Konohira, Eiichi; HIYAMA, TETSUYA; MINAMI, Masayo; Nakamura, Toshio; YOSHIDA, Naohiro

    2002-01-01

    Diurnal variation in the atmospheric CO2 concentration and the carbon isotopic composition (Δ14C and δ13C) was measured in a forest in an urban area on 9 February 1999. The carbon isotope approach used in the present study differentiated between the quantitative contributions from anthropogenic and biogenic CO2 sources in the urban atmosphere. The anthropogenic (fossil fuel) and biogenic (soil respiration) contributions was estimated, and they ranged from 1 to 16% and from 2 to 8% of the tota...

  4. Abiotic formation of O2 and O3 in high-CO2 terrestrial atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Segura, A; Kasting, J F; Crisp, D; Cohen, M

    2007-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that high amounts of ozone (O3) and oxygen (O2) may be produced abiotically in atmospheres with high concentrations of CO2. The abiotic production of these two gases, which are also characteristic of photosynthetic life processes, could pose a potential "false-positive" for remote-sensing detection of life on planets around other stars.We show here that such false positives are unlikely on any planet that possesses abundant liquid water, as rainout of oxidized species onto a reduced planetary surface should ensure that atmospheric H2 concentrations remain relatively high, and that O2 and O3 remain low. Our aim is to determine the amount of O3 and O2 formed in a high CO2 atmosphere for a habitable planet without life. We use a photochemical model that considers hydrogen (H2) escape and a detailed hydrogen balance to calculate the O2 and O3 formed on planets with 0.2 of CO2 around the Sun, and 0.02, 0.2 and 2 bars of CO2 around a young Sun-like star with higher UV radiation. The ...

  5. Increased soil emissions of potent greenhouse gases under increased atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Groenigen, Kees Jan; Osenberg, Craig W; Hungate, Bruce A

    2011-07-13

    Increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) can affect biotic and abiotic conditions in soil, such as microbial activity and water content. In turn, these changes might be expected to alter the production and consumption of the important greenhouse gases nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and methane (CH(4)) (refs 2, 3). However, studies on fluxes of N(2)O and CH(4) from soil under increased atmospheric CO(2) have not been quantitatively synthesized. Here we show, using meta-analysis, that increased CO(2) (ranging from 463 to 780 parts per million by volume) stimulates both N(2)O emissions from upland soils and CH(4) emissions from rice paddies and natural wetlands. Because enhanced greenhouse-gas emissions add to the radiative forcing of terrestrial ecosystems, these emissions are expected to negate at least 16.6 per cent of the climate change mitigation potential previously predicted from an increase in the terrestrial carbon sink under increased atmospheric CO(2) concentrations. Our results therefore suggest that the capacity of land ecosystems to slow climate warming has been overestimated.

  6. Temporal variations of atmospheric CO2 and CO at Ahmedabad in western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Naveen; Lal, Shyam; Venkataramani, S.; Patra, Prabir K.; Sheel, Varun

    2016-05-01

    About 70 % of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is emitted from the megacities and urban areas of the world. In order to draw effective emission mitigation policies for combating future climate change as well as independently validating the emission inventories for constraining their large range of uncertainties, especially over major metropolitan areas of developing countries, there is an urgent need for greenhouse gas measurements over representative urban regions. India is a fast developing country, where fossil fuel emissions have increased dramatically in the last three decades and are predicted to continue to grow further by at least 6 % per year through to 2025. The CO2 measurements over urban regions in India are lacking. To overcome this limitation, simultaneous measurements of CO2 and carbon monoxide (CO) have been made at Ahmedabad, a major urban site in western India, using a state-of-the-art laser-based cavity ring down spectroscopy technique from November 2013 to May 2015. These measurements enable us to understand the diurnal and seasonal variations in atmospheric CO2 with respect to its sources (both anthropogenic and biospheric) and biospheric sinks. The observed annual average concentrations of CO2 and CO are 413.0 ± 13.7 and 0.50 ± 0.37 ppm respectively. Both CO2 and CO show strong seasonality with lower concentrations (400.3 ± 6.8 and 0.19 ± 0.13 ppm) during the south-west monsoon and higher concentrations (419.6 ± 22.8 and 0.72 ± 0.68 ppm) during the autumn (SON) season. Strong diurnal variations are also observed for both the species. The common factors for the diurnal cycles of CO2 and CO are vertical mixing and rush hour traffic, while the influence of biospheric fluxes is also seen in the CO2 diurnal cycle. Using CO and CO2 covariation, we differentiate the anthropogenic and biospheric components of CO2 and found significant contributions of biospheric respiration and anthropogenic emissions in the late night (00:00-05:00 h, IST

  7. Decarbonization and the time-delay between peak CO2 emissions and concentrations

    CERN Document Server

    Seshadri, Ashwin K

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-dioxide (CO2) is the main contributor to anthropogenic global warming, and the timing of its peak concentration in the atmosphere is likely to govern the timing of maximum radiative forcing. While dynamics of atmospheric CO2 is governed by multiple time-constants, we idealize this by a single time-constant to consider some of the factors describing the time-delay between peaks in CO2 emissions and concentrations. This time-delay can be understood as the time required to bring CO2 emissions down from its peak to a small value, and is governed by the rate of decarbonizaton of economic activity. This decarbonization rate affects how rapidly emissions decline after having achieved their peak, and a rapid decline in emissions is essential for limiting peak radiative forcing. Long-term mitigation goals for CO2 should therefore consider not only the timing of peak emissions, but also the rate of decarbonization. We discuss implications for mitigation of the fact that the emissions peak corresponds to small bu...

  8. Development of concepts to assess, monitor and evaluate increased CO2 concentrations arising from potential leakages of CCS sites

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Increasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere make it necessary to reduce the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission. One option is the capture and storage of CO2 in the deep underground. If leakages from these storage reservoirs occur, monitoring methods need to be available for early detection. Stable carbon isotopes were used to test an early warning monitoring approach during a field experiment, where 800 kg of CO2 were injected in the underground. Additionally, the influence of increase...

  9. Atmospheric Variability of CO2 impact on space observation Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, A. L.; Sen, B.; Newhart, L.; Segal, G.

    2009-12-01

    If International governments are to reduce GHG levels by 80% by 2050, as recommended by most scientific bodies concerned with avoiding the most hazardous changes in climate, then massive investments in infrastructure and new technology will be required over the coming decades. Such an investment will be a huge commitment by governments and corporations, and while it will offer long-term dividends in lower energy costs, a healthier environment and averted additional global warming, the shear magnitude of upfront costs will drive a call for a monitoring and verification system. Such a system will be required to offer accountability to signatories of governing bodies, as well as, for the global public. Measuring the average global distribution of CO2 is straight forward, as exemplified by the long running station measurements managed by NOAA’s Global Monitoring Division that includes the longterm Keeling record. However, quantifying anthropogenic and natural source/sink distributions and atmospheric mixing have been much more difficult to constrain. And, yet, an accurate accounting of all anthropogenic source strengths is required for Global Treaty verification. The only way to accurately assess Global GHG emissions is to construct an integrated system of ground, air and space based observations with extensive chemical modeling capabilities. We look at the measurement requirements for the space based component of the solutions. To determine what space sensor performance requirements for ground resolution, coverage, and revisit, we have analyzed regional CO2 distributions and variability using NASA and NOAA aircraft flight campaigns. The results of our analysis are presented as variograms showing average spatial variability over several Northern Hemispheric regions. There are distinct regional differences with the starkest contrast between urban versus rural and Coastal Asia versus Coastal US. The results suggest specific consequences on what spatial and temporal

  10. Analysis of atmospheric CO2 growth rates at Mauna Loa using CO2 fluxes derived from an inverse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) growth rates are estimated for a period 1959-2004 from atmospheric CO2 measurements at Mauna Loa by the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. Only during a few short periods, 1965-1966, 1972-1973, 1987-1988 and 1997-1998, in the last 45 yr have growth rates of atmospheric CO2 been of a similar magnitude or higher than that due to the total emission from burning of fossil fuels. Using results from a time-dependent inverse (TDI) model, based on observations of atmospheric CO2 at 87 stations, we establish that El Nino-induced climate variations in the tropics and large-scale forest fires in the boreal regions are the main causes of anomalous growth rates of atmospheric CO2. The high growth rate of 2.8 ppm/yr in 2002 can be predicted fairly successfully by using the correlations between (1) the peak-to-trough amplitudes in the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index and tropical flux anomaly, and (2) anomalies in CO2 flux and area burned by fire from the boreal regions. We suggest that the large interannual changes in CO2 growth rates can mostly be explained by natural climate variability. Our analysis also shows that the decadal average growth rate, linked primarily to human activity, has fluctuated around an all-time high value of 1.5 ppm/yr over the past 20 yr. A statistical model analysis is performed to identify the regions which have the maximum influence on the observed growth rate anomaly at Mauna Loa

  11. Persistent stimulation of photosynthesis in short rotation coppice mulberry under elevated CO2 atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhana Sekhar, Kalva; Rachapudi, Venkata Sreeharsha; Mudalkar, Shalini; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2014-08-01

    Current study was undertaken to elucidate the responses of short rotation coppice (SRC) mulberry under elevated CO2 atmosphere (550μmolmol(-1)). Throughout the experimental period, elevated CO2 grown mulberry plants showed significant increase in light saturated photosynthetic rates (A') by increasing intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci) despite reduced stomatal conductance (gs). Reduced gs was linked to decrease in transpiration (E) resulting in improved water use efficiency (WUE). There was a significant increase in carboxylation efficiency (CE) of Rubisco, apparent quantum efficiency (AQE), light and CO2 saturated photosynthetic rates (AMAX), photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE), chlorophyll a fluorescence characteristics (FV/FM and PIABS), starch and other carbohydrates in high CO2 grown plants which clearly demonstrate no photosynthetic acclimation in turn resulted marked increase in above and below ground biomass. Our results strongly suggest that short rotation forestry (<1year) with mulberry plantations should be effective to mitigate raising CO2 levels as well as for the production of renewable bio-energy.

  12. Stable isotope ratios of atmospheric CO_{2} and CH_{4} over Siberia measured at ZOTTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timokhina, Anastasiya; Prokushkin, Anatily; Lavric, Jost; Heimann, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The boreal and arctic zones of Siberia housing the large amounts of carbon stored in the living biomass of forests and wetlands, as well as in soils and specifically permafrost, play a crucial role in earth's global carbon cycle. The long-term studies of greenhouse gases (GHG) concentrations are important instruments to analyze the response of these systems to climate warming. In parallel to GHG observations, the measurements of their stable isotopic composition can provide useful information for distinguishing contribution of individual GHG source to their atmospheric variations, since each source has its own isotopic signature. In this study we report first results of laboratory analyses of the CO2 and CH4 concentrations, the stable isotope ratio of δ13C-CO2, δ18O-CO2, δ13C-CH4, δD-CH4 measured in one-liter glass flasks which were obtained from 301 height of ZOTTO (Zotino Tall Tower Observatory, near 60° N, 90° E, about 20 km west of the Yenisei River) during 2008 - 2013 and 2010 - 2013 for stable isotope composition of CO2 and CH4. The magnitudes of δ13C-CO2 and δ18O-CO2 in a seasonal cycle are -1.4±0.1‰ (-7.6 - -9.0‰) and -2.2±0.2‰ (-0.1 - -2.3‰), respectively. The δ13C-CO2 seasonal pattern opposes the CO2 concentrations, with a gradual enrichment in heavy isotope occurring during May - July, reflecting its discrimination in photosynthesis, and further depletion in August - September as photosynthetic activity decreases comparatively to ecosystem respiration. Relationship between the CO2 concentrations and respective δ13C-CO2 (Keeling plot) reveals isotopic source signature for growing season (May - September) -27.3±1.4‰ and -30.4±2.5‰ for winter (January - March). The behavior of δ18O-CO2 associated with both high photosynthetic rate in the June (enrichment of atmospheric CO2 by 18O as consequence of CO2 equilibrium with "heavy" leaf water) and respiratory activity of forest floor in June - October (depletion of respired CO2 by 18O

  13. A statistical analysis of three ensembles of crop model responses totemperature and CO2concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makowski, D; Asseng, S; Ewert, F.;

    2015-01-01

    Ensembles of process-based crop models are increasingly used to simulate crop growth for scenarios of temperature and/or precipitation changes corresponding to different projections of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This approach generates large datasets with thousands of simulated crop yield data...... in the simulation protocols. Here we demonstrate that statistical models based on random-coefficient regressions are able to emulate ensembles of process-based crop models. An important advantage of the proposed statistical models is that they can interpolate between temperature levels and between CO2 concentration...... levels, and can thus be used to calculate temperature and [CO2] thresholds leading to yield loss or yield gain, without re-running the original complex crop models. Our approach is illustrated with three yield datasets simulated by 19 maize models, 26 wheat models, and 13 rice models. Several statistical...

  14. A field and laboratory method for monitoring the concentration and isotopic composition of soil CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breecker, Dan; Sharp, Zachary D

    2008-01-01

    The stable isotope composition of nmol size gas samples can be determined accurately and precisely using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We have developed a technique that exploits this capability in order to measure delta13C and delta18O values and, simultaneously, the concentration of CO2 in sub-mL volume soil air samples. A sampling strategy designed for monitoring CO2 profiles at particular locations of interest is also described. This combined field and laboratory technique provides several advantages over those previously reported: (1) the small sample size required allows soil air to be sampled at a high spatial resolution, (2) the field setup minimizes sampling times and does not require powered equipment, (3) the analytical method avoids the introduction of air (including O2) into the mass spectrometer thereby extending filament life, and (4) pCO2, delta13C and delta18O are determined simultaneously. The reproducibility of measurements of CO2 in synthetic tank air using this technique is: +/-0.08 per thousand (delta13C), +/-0.10 per thousand (delta18O), and +/-0.7% (pCO2) at 5550 ppm. The reproducibility for CO2 in soil air is estimated as: +/-0.06 per thousand (delta13C), +/-0.06 per thousand (delta18O), and +/-1.6% (pCO2). Monitoring soil CO2 using this technique is applicable to studies concerning soil respiration and ecosystem gas exchange, the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 (e.g. free air carbon dioxide enrichment) on soil processes, soil water budgets including partitioning evaporation from transpiration, pedogenesis and weathering, diffuse solid-earth degassing, and the calibration of speleothem and pedogenic carbonate delta13C values as paleoenvironmental proxies. PMID:18186546

  15. Elevated CO2 significantly delays reproductive development of soybean under Free-Air Concentration Enrichment (FACE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Joseph C; Dohleman, Frank G; Bernacchi, Carl J; Long, Stephen P

    2009-01-01

    The effect of rising atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide [CO(2)] on the reproductive development of soybean (Glycine max. Merr) has not been evaluated under open-air field conditions. Soybeans grown under Free-Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE) exhibit warmer canopies due to decreased latent heat loss because of decreased stomatal conductance. According to development models based on accumulated thermal time, or growing degree days ( degrees Cd), increased canopy temperature should accelerate development. The SoyFACE research facility (Champaign, Illinois, USA) was used to test the hypothesis that development is accelerated in soybean when grown in [CO(2)] elevated to 548 micromol mol(-1). Canopy temperature was measured continuously with infrared thermometry, and used in turn to calculate GDD. Opposite to expectation, elevated [CO(2)], while increasing canopy temperature, delayed reproductive development by up to 3 days (P <0.05). Soybean grown in elevated [CO(2)] required approximately 49 degrees Cd more GDD (P <0.05) to complete full bloom stage (R2) and approximately 52 degrees Cd more GDD (P <0.05) to complete the beginning seed (R5) stage, but needed approximately 46 degrees Cd fewer GDD (P <0.05) to complete seed filling (R6). Soybeans grown in elevated [CO(2)] produced significantly more nodes (P <0.01) on the main stem than those grown under current [CO(2)]. This may explain the delay in completion of reproductive development and final maturation of the crop under elevated [CO(2)]. These results show a direct effect of rising [CO(2)] on plant development that will affect both projections of grain supply and may be significant to other species including those in natural communities. PMID:19561049

  16. A field and laboratory method for monitoring the concentration and isotopic composition of soil CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breecker, Dan; Sharp, Zachary D

    2008-01-01

    The stable isotope composition of nmol size gas samples can be determined accurately and precisely using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We have developed a technique that exploits this capability in order to measure delta13C and delta18O values and, simultaneously, the concentration of CO2 in sub-mL volume soil air samples. A sampling strategy designed for monitoring CO2 profiles at particular locations of interest is also described. This combined field and laboratory technique provides several advantages over those previously reported: (1) the small sample size required allows soil air to be sampled at a high spatial resolution, (2) the field setup minimizes sampling times and does not require powered equipment, (3) the analytical method avoids the introduction of air (including O2) into the mass spectrometer thereby extending filament life, and (4) pCO2, delta13C and delta18O are determined simultaneously. The reproducibility of measurements of CO2 in synthetic tank air using this technique is: +/-0.08 per thousand (delta13C), +/-0.10 per thousand (delta18O), and +/-0.7% (pCO2) at 5550 ppm. The reproducibility for CO2 in soil air is estimated as: +/-0.06 per thousand (delta13C), +/-0.06 per thousand (delta18O), and +/-1.6% (pCO2). Monitoring soil CO2 using this technique is applicable to studies concerning soil respiration and ecosystem gas exchange, the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 (e.g. free air carbon dioxide enrichment) on soil processes, soil water budgets including partitioning evaporation from transpiration, pedogenesis and weathering, diffuse solid-earth degassing, and the calibration of speleothem and pedogenic carbonate delta13C values as paleoenvironmental proxies.

  17. Separation of biospheric and fossil fuel fluxes of CO2 by atmospheric inversion of CO2 and 14CO2 measurements: Observation System Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sourish; Bharat Miller, John; Lehman, Scott

    2016-05-01

    National annual total CO2 emissions from combustion of fossil fuels are likely known to within 5-10 % for most developed countries. However, uncertainties are inevitably larger (by unknown amounts) for emission estimates at regional and monthly scales, or for developing countries. Given recent international efforts to establish emission reduction targets, independent determination and verification of regional and national scale fossil fuel CO2 emissions are likely to become increasingly important. Here, we take advantage of the fact that precise measurements of 14C in CO2 provide a largely unbiased tracer for recently added fossil-fuel-derived CO2 in the atmosphere and present an atmospheric inversion technique to jointly assimilate observations of CO2 and 14CO2 in order to simultaneously estimate fossil fuel emissions and biospheric exchange fluxes of CO2. Using this method in a set of Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), we show that given the coverage of 14CO2 measurements available in 2010 (969 over North America, 1063 globally), we can recover the US national total fossil fuel emission to better than 1 % for the year and to within 5 % for most months. Increasing the number of 14CO2 observations to ˜ 5000 per year over North America, as recently recommended by the National Academy of Science (NAS) (Pacala et al., 2010), we recover monthly emissions to within 5 % for all months for the US as a whole and also for smaller, highly emissive regions over which the specified data coverage is relatively dense, such as for the New England states or the NY-NJ-PA tri-state area. This result suggests that, given continued improvement in state-of-the art transport models, a measurement program similar in scale to that recommended by the NAS can provide for independent verification of bottom-up inventories of fossil fuel CO2 at the regional and national scale. In addition, we show that the dual tracer inversion framework can detect and minimize biases in

  18. Low atmospheric CO2 levels during the Little Ice Age due to cooling-induced terrestrial uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, M.; Etheridge, D. M.; Trudinger, C. M.; Allison, C. E.; Rayner, P. J.; Enting, I.; Mulvaney, R.; Steele, L. P.; Langenfelds, R. L.; Sturges, W. T.; Curran, M. A. J.; Smith, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Low atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration during the Little Ice Age has been used to derive the global carbon cycle sensitivity to temperature. Recent evidence confirms earlier indications that the low CO2 was caused by increased terrestrial carbon storage. It remains unknown whether the terrestrial biosphere responded to temperature variations, or there was vegetation re-growth on abandoned farmland. Here we present a global numerical simulation of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide concentrations in the pre-industrial period. Carbonyl sulfide concentration is linked to changes in gross primary production and shows a positive anomaly during the Little Ice Age. We show that a decrease in gross primary production and a larger decrease in ecosystem respiration is the most likely explanation for the decrease in atmospheric CO2 and increase in atmospheric carbonyl sulfide concentrations. Therefore, temperature change, not vegetation re-growth, was the main cause of the increased terrestrial carbon storage. We address the inconsistency between ice-core CO2 records from different sites measuring CO2 and δ13CO2 in ice from Dronning Maud Land (Antarctica). Our interpretation allows us to derive the temperature sensitivity of pre-industrial CO2 fluxes for the terrestrial biosphere (γL = -10 to -90 Pg C K-1), implying a positive climate feedback and providing a benchmark to reduce model uncertainties.

  19. Impacts of Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and O3 on Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera: Reproductive Fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph N. T. Darbah

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3 are rising in many regions of the world. Little is known about how these two commonly co-occurring gases will affect reproductive fitness of important forest tree species. Here, we report on the long-term effects of CO3 and O3 for paper birch seedlings exposed for nearly their entire life history at the Aspen FACE (Free Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment site in Rhinelander, WI. Elevated CO2 increased both male and female flower production, while elevated O3 increased female flower production compared to trees in control rings. Interestingly, very little flowering has yet occurred in combined treatment. Elevated CO2 had significant positive effect on birch catkin size, weight, and germination success rate (elevated CO2 increased germination rate of birch by 110% compared to ambient CO2 concentrations, decreased seedling mortality by 73%, increased seed weight by 17%, increased root length by 59%, and root-to-shoot ratio was significantly decreased, all at 3 weeks after germination, while the opposite was true of elevated O3 (elevated O3 decreased the germination rate of birch by 62%, decreased seed weight by 25%, and increased root length by 15%. Under elevated CO2, plant dry mass increased by 9 and 78% at the end of 3 and 14 weeks, respectively. Also, the root and shoot lengths, as well as the biomass of the seedlings, were increased for seeds produced under elevated CO2, while the reverse was true for seedlings from seeds produced under the elevated O3. Similar trends in treatment differences were observed in seed characteristics, germination, and seedling development for seeds collected in both 2004 and 2005. Our results suggest that elevated CO2 and O3 can dramatically affect flowering, seed production, and seed quality of paper birch, affecting reproductive fitness of this species.

  20. Atmospheric Mixing of CO2 above Carbon Storage Sites: Coupling Physics Based Models within a CO2 Sequestration System Modeling Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, P. H.; Olsen, S. C.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Dubey, M. K.; Guthrie, G. D.; Pawar, R. J.

    2006-12-01

    The Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is studying the injection of CO2 into geologic repositories. We are formulating the problem as science based decision framework that can address issues of risk, cost, and technical requirements at all stages of the sequestration process. The framework, called CO2-PENS , is implemented in a system model that is capable of performing stochastic simulations to address uncertainty in different geologic sequestration scenarios. In this talk we examine the changes atmospheric concentrations directly above a potential repository caused by diffuse CO2 leakage that migrates to the atmosphere from the repository. We present an atmospheric mixing model that accounts for local surface effects, local climate data, and daily variations in the mixing layer thickness. We compare model results to field data collected at a controlled flux tower experiment. We next show how the atmospheric mixing model can provide estimates of uncertainty when used from within the CO2- PENS framework. Finally, we discuss data needs and future work needed to make the atmospheric component more flexible so that it can quickly be applied to any potential repository.

  1. Changes in coccolith calcification under stable atmospheric CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bauke

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coccolith calcification is known to respond to ocean acidification in culture experiments as well as in present and past oceans. Previous studies basically focus on changes in coccolith weight due to increasing CO2 and the resulting changes in the carbonate system but pay little attention to the influence of other environmental factors. In order to untangle changes in coccolithophore calcification due to environmental factors such as temperature and/or productivity from changes caused by increasing pCO2 and carbonate ion concentration we here present a study on coccolith calcification from the Holocene North Atlantic Ocean. The pre-industrial Holocene with its predominantly stable carbonate system provides the conditions for such a comprehensive analysis. For a realistic analysis on changes in major components of Holocene coccolithophores, the family Noelaerhabdaceae was selected, which constitutes the main part of the assemblage in the North Atlantic. Records of average coccolith weights from three Holocene sediment cores along a North–South transect in the North Atlantic were analysed. During the Holocene mean weight (and therefore calcification of Noelaerhabdaceae (E. huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa coccoliths decreases at the Azores (Geofar KF 16 from around 7 to 5.5 pg, but increases at the Rockall Plateau (ODP Site 980 from around 6 to 8 pg and at the Vøring Plateau (MD08-3192 from 7 to 10.5 pg. This amplitude of average weight variability is within the range of glacial/interglacial changes that were interpreted to be an effect of decreasing carbonate ion concentration. By comparison with SEM assemblage counts, we show that weight changes are partly due to variations in the coccolithophore assemblage, but also an effect of a change in calcification and/or morphotype variability within single species. Our results indicate that there is no single key factor responsible for the observed changes in coccolith weight. A major increase in coccolith

  2. Regional disparities in the beneficial effects of rising CO2 concentrations on crop water productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; Folberth, Christian; Müller, Christoph; Pugh, Thomas A. M.; Boote, Kenneth J.; Conway, Declan; Ruane, Alex C.; Gerten, Dieter; Jones, James W.; Khabarov, Nikolay; Olin, Stefan; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Schmid, Erwin; Yang, Hong; Rosenzweig, Cynthia

    2016-08-01

    Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) are expected to enhance photosynthesis and reduce crop water use. However, there is high uncertainty about the global implications of these effects for future crop production and agricultural water requirements under climate change. Here we combine results from networks of field experiments and global crop models to present a spatially explicit global perspective on crop water productivity (CWP, the ratio of crop yield to evapotranspiration) for wheat, maize, rice and soybean under elevated [CO2] and associated climate change projected for a high-end greenhouse gas emissions scenario. We find CO2 effects increase global CWP by 10[047]%-27[737]% (median[interquartile range] across the model ensemble) by the 2080s depending on crop types, with particularly large increases in arid regions (by up to 48[25;56]% for rainfed wheat). If realized in the fields, the effects of elevated [CO2] could considerably mitigate global yield losses whilst reducing agricultural consumptive water use (4-17%). We identify regional disparities driven by differences in growing conditions across agro-ecosystems that could have implications for increasing food production without compromising water security. Finally, our results demonstrate the need to expand field experiments and encourage greater consistency in modelling the effects of rising [CO2] across crop and hydrological modelling communities.

  3. Atmospheric inversion for cost effective quantification of city CO2 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cities, currently covering only a very small portion (2, and are associated with 71–76 % of CO2 emissions from global final energy use. Although many cities have set voluntary climate plans, their CO2 emissions are not evaluated by Monitoring, Reporting and Verification (MRV procedures that play a key role for market- or policy-based mitigation actions. Here we propose a monitoring tool that could support the development of such procedures at the city scale. It is based on an atmospheric inversion method that exploits inventory data and continuous atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements from a network of stations within and around cities to estimate city CO2 emissions. We examine the cost-effectiveness and the performance of such a tool. The instruments presently used to measure CO2 concentrations at research stations are expensive. However, cheaper sensors are currently developed and should be useable for the monitoring of CO2 emissions from a megacity in the near-term. Our assessment of the inversion method is thus based on the use of several types of hypothetical networks, with a range of numbers of sensors sampling at 25 m a.g.l. The study case for this assessment is the monitoring of the emissions of the Paris metropolitan area (~ 12 million inhabitants and 11.4 Tg C emitted in 2010 during the month of January 2011. The performance of the inversion is evaluated in terms of uncertainties in the estimates of total and sectoral CO2 emissions. These uncertainties are compared to a notional ambitious target to diagnose annual total city emissions with an uncertainty of 5 % (2-sigma. We find that, with 10 stations only, which is the typical size of current pilot networks that are deployed in some cities, the uncertainty for the 1-month total city CO2 emissions is significantly reduced by the inversion by ~ 42 % but still corresponds to an annual uncertainty that is two times larger than the target of 5 %. By extending the network from 10 to

  4. Carbon allocation changes: an adaptive response to variations in atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Sandy; Li, Guangqi; Prentice, Iain Colin

    2016-04-01

    Given the ubiquity of nutrient constraints on primary production, an optimal carbon allocation strategy is expected to increase total below-ground allocation (fine root production and turnover, allocation to mycorrhizae and carbon exudation to the rhizophere) as atmospheric CO2 concentration increases. Conversely, below-ground allocation should be reduced when atmospheric CO2 concentrations were low, as occurred during glacial times. Using a coupled generic primary production and tree-growth model, we quantify the changes in carbon allocation that are required to explain the apparent homoeostasis of tree radial growth during recent decades and between glacial and interglacial conditions. These results suggest a resolution of the apparent paradox of continuing terrestrial CO2 uptake (a consequence of CO2 fertilization) and the widespread lack of observed enhancement of stem growth in trees. Adaptive shifts in carbon allocation are thus a key feature that should to be accounted for in models to predict tree growth and future timber harvests, as well as in large-scale ecosystem and carbon cycle models.

  5. 3D modelling of the early Martian Climate under a denser CO2 atmosphere: Temperatures and CO2 ice clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Forget, Francois; Millour, Ehouarn; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Kerber, Laura; Leconte, Jeremy; Marcq, Emmanuel; Haberle, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of geological evidence, it is often stated that the early martian climate was warm enough for liquid water to flow on the surface thanks to the greenhouse effect of a thick atmosphere. We present 3D global climate simulations of the early martian climate performed assuming a faint young sun and a CO2 atmosphere with pressure between 0.1 and 7 bars. The model includes a detailed radiative transfer model using revised CO2 gas collision induced absorption properties, and a parameterisation of the CO2 ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties. A wide range of possible climates is explored by using various values of obliquities, orbital parameters, cloud microphysic parameters, atmospheric dust loading, and surface properties. Unlike on present day Mars, for pressures higher than a fraction of a bar, surface temperatures vary with altitude because of the adiabatic cooling and warming of the atmosphere when it moves vertically. In most simulations, CO2 ice clouds cover a major part of the planet...

  6. Elevated atmospheric CO2 alters the arthropod community in a forest understory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jason; Zangerl, Arthur R.; Berenbaum, May R.; Sparks, Jed P.; Elich, Lauren; Eisenstein, Alissa; DeLucia, Evan H.

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which overall population sizes and community composition of arthropods in a naturally occurring forest understory are altered by elevated CO2. The Free Air Concentration Enrichment (FACE) method was used to fumigate large, replicated plots in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, USA to achieve the CO2 concentration predicted for 2050 (˜580 μl l-1). In addition, the extent to which unrestricted herbivorous arthropods were spatially delimited in their resource acquisition was determined. Stable isotope data for spiders (δ13C and δ15N) were collected in ambient and elevated CO2 plots and analyzed to determine whether their prey species moved among plots. Elevated CO2 had no effect on total arthropod numbers but had a large effect on the composition of the arthropod community. Insects collected in our samples were identified to a level that allowed for an assignment of trophic classification (generally to family). For the groups of insects sensitive to atmospheric gas composition, there was an increase in the numbers of individuals collected in primarily predaceous orders (Araneae and Hymenoptera; from 60% to more than 150%) under elevated CO2 and a decrease in the numbers in primarily herbivorous orders (Lepidoptera and Coleoptera; from -30 to -45%). Isotopic data gave no indication that the treatment plots represented a "boundary" to the movement of insects or that there were distinct and independent insect populations inside and outside the treatment plots. A simple two-ended mixing model estimates 55% of the carbon and nitrogen in spider biomass originated external to the elevated CO2 plots. In addition to changes in insect performance, decreases in herbivorous arthropods and increases in predaceous arthropods may also be factors involved in reduced herbivory under elevated CO2 in this forest.

  7. Response of leaf litter decomposition to rises in atmospheric CO2 and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammrich, A.; Flury, S.; Gessner, M. O.

    2007-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of CO2 have considerably increased in the last century and are expected to rise further. Elevated CO2 concentrations not only increase global temperature but also have potential to change plant litter quality, for example by increasing lignin content, changing C:N ratios and altering tannin contents. These chemical changes may interact with increased temperature to alter litter decomposition. To test whether changes in litter quality and warming affect decomposition, we conducted a field experiment with leaf litter collected from six species of mature deciduous trees exposed to either ambient or elevated CO2 levels. We used a set of 16 enclosures installed in four blocks in a freshwater marsh in a prealpine lake to test for the effects of CO2-mediated litter quality and temperature and the interaction of both factors. We measured leaf mass loss of the twelve litter types in control and heated enclosures (4 °C above ambient) and also in the open marsh. In contrast to expectations, species decomposing at low (oak and beech) and medium (hornbeam and maple) rates showed faster mass loss when leaves were grown under elevated CO2 conditions, whereas fast-decomposing species (cherry and basswood) showed no clear response. The accelerated decomposition of CO2-enriched litter could be due to higher amounts of nonstructural carbohydrates, which may have been either leached or readily degraded. Warming had a surprisingly small influence on mass loss of the tested litter species, and interactive effects were weak. These results suggest that direct and indirect effects of elevated CO2 levels on litter decomposition may not be readily predictable from first principles.

  8. Impact of elevated CO2 on carbohydrate and ureide concentrations in soybean inoculated with different strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, Annick; Prevost, Danielle; Juge, Christine; Chalifour, Francois-P.

    2011-07-15

    Over the past years, the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere has constantly increased and it is expected to continue; this climate change will lead to important impacts on the crops' productivity. The authors undertook a study to determine soybean's response to higher CO2 concentration and different strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum. They observed that, under elevated CO2, additional photosynthates are produced and used for nodular growth and that ureides increased significantly in leaves but not much in nodules. The different strains resulted in different nodular yield and ureides concentration resulting in diverse responses to elevated CO2 concentration: the commercial strain showed a feedback inhibition of nodule activity while the indigenous strain 12NS14 with a better nodule activity had a positive feedback reaction with soybean growth. This study demonstrated that, under higher CO2 concentration, a better soybean production could be achieve with the strain 12NS14.

  9. Carbon-13 isotope composition of the mean CO2 source in the urban atmosphere of Krakow, southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Jasek, Alina; Rozanski, Kazimierz

    2014-05-01

    Quantification of carbon emissions in urbanized areas constitutes an important part of the current research on the global carbon cycle. As the carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide can serve as a fingerprint of its origin, systematic observations of δ13CO2 and/or Δ14CO2, combined with atmospheric CO2mixing ratio measurements can be used to better constrain the urban sources of this gas. Nowadays, high precision optical analysers based on absorption of laser radiation in the cavity allow a real-time monitoring of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its 13CO2/12CO2 ratio, thus enabling better quantification of the contribution of different anthropogenic and natural sources of this gas to the local atmospheric CO2load. Here we present results of a 2-year study aimed at quantifying carbon isotopic signature of the mean CO2 source and its seasonal variability in the urban atmosphere of Krakow, southern Poland. The Picarro G2101-i CRDS isotopic analyser system for CO2and 13CO2/12CO2 mixing ratio measurements has been installed at the AGH University of Science and Technology campus in July 2011. Air inlet was located at the top of a 20m tower mounted on the roof of the faculty building (ca. 42m a.g.l.), close to the city centre. While temporal resolution of the analyser is equal 1s, a 2-minute moving average was used for calculations of δ13CO2 and CO2 mixing ratio to reduce measurement uncertainty. The measurements were calibrated against 2 NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) primary standard tanks for CO2 mixing ratio and 1 JRAC (Jena Reference Air Cylinder) isotope primary standard for δ13C. A Keeling approach based on two-component mass and isotope balance was used to derive daily mean isotopic signatures of local CO2 from individual measurements of δ13CO2 and CO2 mixing ratios. The record covers a 2-year period, from July 2011 to July 2013. It shows a clear seasonal pattern, with less negative and less variable δ13CO2 values

  10. Effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on carbon allocation patterns in Eriphorum vaginatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, L.

    2013-12-01

    Greenhouse gases of particular importance to the human induced greenhouse effect are, e.g., CO2 and CH4. Natural and agricultural wetlands together contribute with over 40 % of the annual atmospheric emissions of CH4 and are, therefore, considered to be the largest single contributor of this gas to the troposphere. There is a growing concern that increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO2 will stimulate CH4 production and emission from wetland ecosystems, resulting in feedback mechanisms that in future will increase the radiative forcing of these ecosystems. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of elevated atmospheric CO2 on fluxes of CO2 and CH4, biomass allocation patterns and amount of labile substrates (i.e. low molecular weight organic acids, OAs) for CH4 production in the root vicinity of Eriophorum vaginatum. Eriophorum cores and plants were collected at Fäjemyr, a temperate ombrotrophic bog situated in the south of Sweden. These were cultivated under controlled environmental conditions in an atmosphere of 390 or 800 ppm of CO2 (n=5 per treatment). After a one month development period gas fluxes were measured twice per week over one month using a Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (Gasmet Dx-4030) and OAs using a liquid chromatography-ionspray tandem mass spectrometry system (Dionex ICS-2500 and Applied Biosystems 2000 Q-Trap triple quadrupole MS). The results clearly show that elevated CO2 significantly affects all measured parts of the carbon cycle. Greenhouse gas fluxes were significantly (repeated measures test) higher under elevated CO2 conditions, NEE p Reco p = 0.005, GPP p = 0.012 and CH4 p = 0.022. As were biomass of leaves, roots and concentration of OAs around the roots of plants, p = 0.045, p = 0 = 0.045 and p = 0.045 respectively (Kruskal wallis 1-way anova). The study shows higher CH4 emissions under elevated CO2 and that this may be due to a priming effect, due to input of fresh labile-C via living roots and possibly

  11. Measurement of Ecosystem-Atmosphere Exchange of Isotopic CO2 Using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambaliza, M. O.; Mount, G.; Lamb, B.; Westberg, H.; Gibson, R.

    2005-12-01

    Analysis of the isotopic content of atmospheric carbon dioxide provides a wealth of information about the complex interaction between the biosphere and the atmosphere. Traditionally, the isotopic content of atmospheric CO2 has been determined by taking grab samples from field sites followed by laboratory mass spectrometry analysis. This procedure severely limits the duration and frequency of measurements. In this work, we investigate the performance of a measurement method that is based on Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The FTIR separately measures the concentrations of the 12CO2 and 13CO2 isotopomers of carbon dioxide at approximately one minute intervals with very high signal-to-noise ratio using molecular absorption in a 1-meter cell in the 2100 to 2600 cm-1 region of the isotopic vibration-rotation bands. δ13C values are determined with a precision of approximately 0.7‰ every minute, with higher precision obtained by averaging the short integrations. The FTIR system also measures CO2 flux using the disjunct eddy covariance technique, so the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and isoflux can also be measured, potentially allowing for the partitioning of the NEE into its photosynthetic and respiratory components. First scientific results from this new instrument are presented from two field campaigns conducted in summer 2005 in a poplar forest near Boardman, Oregon. A 25-m tower was used with air inlets at 0.3, 4.1, 7.5, 10.8, 14.0, and 20.6 meters above the ground. These were switched sequentially into the instrument to achieve height resolution in the canopy, or were kept at constant height. Canopy height was 13 meters. Carbon dioxide concentrations are measured to a precision of about 0.7 ppmv from a one-minute integration with higher precisions obtained from time averaging. CO2 isotopic concentrations were measured with a precision of about 2 ppmv/minute. In this work, we present results of temporal and vertical variations of CO2 concentrations

  12. Target atmospheric CO2: Where should humanity aim?

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, J; Kharecha, P; Beerling, D; Masson-Delmotte, V; Pagani, M; Raymo, M; Royer, D L; Zachos, J C

    2008-01-01

    Paleoclimate data show that climate sensitivity is ~3 deg-C for doubled CO2, including only fast feedback processes. Equilibrium sensitivity, including slower surface albedo feedbacks, is ~6 deg-C for doubled CO2 for the range of climate states between glacial conditions and ice-free Antarctica. Decreasing CO2 was the main cause of a cooling trend that began 50 million years ago, large scale glaciation occurring when CO2 fell to 425 +/- 75 ppm, a level that will be exceeded within decades, barring prompt policy changes. If humanity wishes to preserve a planet similar to that on which civilization developed and to which life on Earth is adapted, paleoclimate evidence and ongoing climate change suggest that CO2 will need to be reduced from its current 385 ppm to at most 350 ppm. The largest uncertainty in the target arises from possible changes of non-CO2 forcings. An initial 350 ppm CO2 target may be achievable by phasing out coal use except where CO2 is captured and adopting agricultural and forestry practice...

  13. A proposed potential role for increasing atmospheric CO2 as a promoter of weight gain and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersoug, Lars-Georg; Sjödin, Anders Mikael; Astrup, A

    2012-01-01

    Human obesity has evolved into a global epidemic. Interestingly, a similar trend has been observed in many animal species, although diet composition, food availability and physical activity have essentially remained unchanged. This suggests a common factor-potentially an environmental factor...... affecting all species. Coinciding with the increase in obesity, atmospheric CO2 concentration has increased more than 40%. Furthermore, in modern societies, we spend more time indoors, where CO2 often reaches even higher concentrations. Increased CO2 concentration in inhaled air decreases the pH of blood...

  14. Seasonally varying contributions to urban CO2 in the Chicago, Illinois, USA region: Insights from a high-resolution CO2 concentration and δ13C record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Moore

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Understanding urban carbon cycling is essential given that cities sustain 54% of the global population and contribute 70% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. When combined with CO2 concentration measurements ([CO2], stable carbon isotope analyses (δ13C can differentiate sources of CO2, including ecosystem respiration and combustion of fossil fuels, such as petroleum and natural gas. In this study, we used a wavelength scanned-cavity ringdown spectrometer to collect ∼2x106 paired measurements for [CO2] and δ13C values in Evanston, IL for August 2011 through February 2012. Evanston is located immediately north of Chicago, IL, the third largest city in the United States. The measurements represent one of the longest records of urban [CO2] and δ13C values thus far reported. We also compiled local meteorological information, as well as complementary [CO2] and δ13C data for background sites in Park Falls, WI and Mauna Loa, HI. We use the dataset to examine how ecosystem processes, fossil fuel usage, wind speed, and wind direction control local atmospheric [CO2] and δ13C in a midcontinent urban setting on a seasonal to daily basis. On average, [CO2] and δ13C values in Evanston were 16–23 ppm higher and 0.97–1.13‰ lower than the background sites. While seasonal [CO2] and δ13C values generally followed broader northern hemisphere trends, the difference between Evanston and the background sites was larger in winter versus summer. Mixing calculations suggest that ecosystem respiration and petroleum combustion equally contributed CO2 in excess of background during the summer and that natural gas combustion contributed 80%–94% of the excess CO2 in winter. Wind speed and direction strongly influenced [CO2] and δ13C values on an hourly time scale. The highest [CO2] and lowest δ13C values occurred at wind speeds <3 m s−1 and when winds blew from the northwest, west, and south over densely populated neighborhoods.

  15. A high precision mass spectrometry method for measuring O2/N2 ratios and CO2 concentrations in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A full, detailed understanding of the global carbon budget is needed for robust modelling of global climate and environmental change. Since the industrial revolution the carbon cycle has been shifted from a steady state in which removal of CO2 from the atmosphere through photosynthesis is balanced by its addition through respiration. Currently increased respiration due to deforestation, modern agricultural practises and the burning of fossil fuels dominates photosynthesis resulting in modern atmospheric CO2 concentrations some 32% higher than the year 1800 levels. However, the CO2 concentration rises are lower than expected from known fossil fuel combustion inventories. A significant proportion of the excess CO2 is taken up by the oceans, however a missing carbon sink must still be invoked to account for the difference between measured and expected CO2 rises. A global greening as a result of increased photosynthesis is required to close the circle

  16. Evidence for CO2 Ice Formation and CO2 Gas Depletion in the South Polar Winter Atmosphere of Mars from Mars Climate Sounder Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinboehl, A.; Patel, P.; Schofield, J. T.; Kass, D. M.; Hayne, P. O.; McCleese, D. J.

    2016-09-01

    New 2D retrievals from MCS data show south polar winter atmospheric temperatures below the CO2 frost point, consistent with CO2 gas removal through condensation. Limb emission features suggest CO2 ice occurrence correlated with CO2 gas depletion.

  17. Potentialities of the atmospheric CO2 remote sensing thanks to static Fourier transform spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A global measurement of atmospheric CO2 concentration is required to improve the prediction of the range of global warming. A satellite mission could provide such a measurement. CNES developed a new generation instrument dedicated to atmospheric sounding. It is a static Fourier transform spectrometer whose mass and size are smaller than those of classical spectrometers. The application of the concept for CO2 sounding is studied thanks to an on ground experimental bread board representative of a satellite borne spectrometer. The CO2 concentration is deduced from atmospheric spectra at 1.6 μm thanks to differential spectroscopy technique. The instrumental concept is presented. Then the conception of the spectrometer and the working procedure are described. A study of information content is done. Retrieval simulations show that an error of ±0.6 ppm can be expected, lower than the ±1 ppm goal. Finally the results of a measurement campaign are given. The retrieval precision is compatible with the objectives. Yet the instrument is also sensitive to disruptive parameters. For example deformations of the instrument could engender significant measurement errors. Instrument improvements are proposed to increase the retrieval precision. (author)

  18. Phosphorus feedbacks constraining tropical ecosystem responses to changes in atmospheric CO2 and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojuan; Thornton, Peter E.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of phosphorus (P) availability on carbon (C) cycling in the Amazon region are investigated using CLM-CNP. We demonstrate that the coupling of P dynamics reduces the simulated historical terrestrial C sink due to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) by about 26%. Our exploratory simulations show that the response of tropical forest C cycling to increasing [CO2] depends on how elevated CO2 affects phosphatase enzyme production. The effects of warming are more complex, depending on the interactions between humidity, C, and nutrient dynamics. While a simulation with low humidity generally shows the reduction of net primary productivity (NPP), a second simulation with higher humidity suggests overall increases in NPP due to the dominant effects of reduced water stress and more nutrient availability. Our simulations point to the need for (1) new observations on how elevated [CO2] affects phosphatase enzyme production and (2) more tropical leaf-scale measurements under different temperature/humidity conditions with different soil P availability.

  19. CO2 Flux Estimation Errors Associated with Moist Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazoo, N. C.; Denning, A. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Pawson, S.; Lokupitiya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Vertical transport by moist sub-grid scale processes such as deep convection is a well-known source of uncertainty in CO2 source/sink inversion. However, a dynamical link between vertical transport, satellite based retrievals of column mole fractions of CO2, and source/sink inversion has not yet been established. By using the same offline transport model with meteorological fields from slightly different data assimilation systems, we examine sensitivity of frontal CO2 transport and retrieved fluxes to different parameterizations of sub-grid vertical transport. We find that frontal transport feeds off background vertical CO2 gradients, which are modulated by sub-grid vertical transport. The implication for source/sink estimation is two-fold. First, CO2 variations contained in moist poleward moving air masses are systematically different from variations in dry equatorward moving air. Moist poleward transport is hidden from orbital sensors on satellites, causing a sampling bias, which leads directly to small but systematic flux retrieval errors in northern mid-latitudes. Second, differences in the representation of moist sub-grid vertical transport in GEOS-4 and GEOS-5 meteorological fields cause differences in vertical gradients of CO2, which leads to systematic differences in moist poleward and dry equatorward CO2 transport and therefore the fraction of CO2 variations hidden in moist air from satellites. As a result, sampling biases are amplified and regional scale flux errors enhanced, most notably in Europe (0.43+/-0.35 PgC /yr). These results, cast from the perspective of moist frontal transport processes, support previous arguments that the vertical gradient of CO2 is a major source of uncertainty in source/sink inversion.

  20. Antarctic ice sheet sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 variations in the early to mid-Miocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; Florindo, Fabio; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Tripati, Robert; von Eynatten, Hilmar; Gasson, Edward; Kuhn, Gerhard; Tripati, Aradhna; DeConto, Robert; Fielding, Christopher; Field, Brad; Golledge, Nicholas; McKay, Robert; Naish, Timothy; Olney, Matthew; Pollard, David; Schouten, Stefan; Talarico, Franco; Warny, Sophie; Willmott, Veronica; Acton, Gary; Panter, Kurt; Paulsen, Timothy; Taviani, Marco

    2016-03-29

    Geological records from the Antarctic margin offer direct evidence of environmental variability at high southern latitudes and provide insight regarding ice sheet sensitivity to past climate change. The early to mid-Miocene (23-14 Mya) is a compelling interval to study as global temperatures and atmospheric CO2 concentrations were similar to those projected for coming centuries. Importantly, this time interval includes the Miocene Climatic Optimum, a period of global warmth during which average surface temperatures were 3-4 °C higher than today. Miocene sediments in the ANDRILL-2A drill core from the Western Ross Sea, Antarctica, indicate that the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) was highly variable through this key time interval. A multiproxy dataset derived from the core identifies four distinct environmental motifs based on changes in sedimentary facies, fossil assemblages, geochemistry, and paleotemperature. Four major disconformities in the drill core coincide with regional seismic discontinuities and reflect transient expansion of grounded ice across the Ross Sea. They correlate with major positive shifts in benthic oxygen isotope records and generally coincide with intervals when atmospheric CO2 concentrations were at or below preindustrial levels (∼280 ppm). Five intervals reflect ice sheet minima and air temperatures warm enough for substantial ice mass loss during episodes of high (∼500 ppm) atmospheric CO2 These new drill core data and associated ice sheet modeling experiments indicate that polar climate and the AIS were highly sensitive to relatively small changes in atmospheric CO2 during the early to mid-Miocene. PMID:26903644

  1. Changes in the salinity tolerance of sweet pepper plants as affected by nitrogen form and high CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, María C; Pérez-Jiménez, Margarita; López-Marín, Josefa; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2016-08-01

    The assimilation and availability of nitrogen in its different forms can significantly affect the response of primary productivity under the current atmospheric alteration and soil degradation. An elevated CO2 concentration (e[CO2]) triggers changes in the efficiency and efficacy of photosynthetic processes, water use and product yield, the plant response to stress being altered with respect to ambient CO2 conditions (a[CO2]). Additionally, NH4(+) has been related to improved plant responses to stress, considering both energy efficiency in N-assimilation and the overcoming of the inhibition of photorespiration at e[CO2]. Therefore, the aim of this work was to determine the response of sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) receiving an additional supply of NH4(+) (90/10 NO3(-)/NH4(+)) to salinity stress (60mM NaCl) under a[CO2] (400μmolmol(-1)) or e[CO2] (800μmolmol(-1)). Salt-stressed plants grown at e[CO2] showed DW accumulation similar to that of the non-stressed plants at a[CO2]. The supply of NH4(+) reduced growth at e[CO2] when salinity was imposed. Moreover, NH4(+) differentially affected the stomatal conductance and water use efficiency and the leaf Cl(-), K(+), and Na(+) concentrations, but the extent of the effects was influenced by the [CO2]. An antioxidant-related response was prompted by salinity, the total phenolics and proline concentrations being reduced by NH4(+) at e[CO2]. Our results show that the effect of NH4(+) on plant salinity tolerance should be globally re-evaluated as e[CO2] can significantly alter the response, when compared with previous studies at a[CO2]. PMID:27317970

  2. Elevated atmospheric CO2 triggers compensatory feeding by root herbivores on a C3 but not a C4 grass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott N Johnson

    Full Text Available Predicted increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations often reduce nutritional quality for herbivores by increasing the C:N ratio of plant tissue. This frequently triggers compensatory feeding by aboveground herbivores, whereby they consume more shoot material in an attempt to meet their nutritional needs. Little, however, is known about how root herbivores respond to such changes. Grasslands are particularly vulnerable to root herbivores, which can collectively exceed the mass of mammals grazing aboveground. Here we provide novel evidence for compensatory feeding by a grass root herbivore, Sericesthis nigrolineata, under elevated atmospheric CO2 (600 µmol mol(-1 on a C3 (Microlaena stipoides but not a C4 (Cymbopogon refractus grass species. At ambient CO2 (400 µmol mol(-1 M. stipoides roots were 44% higher in nitrogen (N and 7% lower in carbon (C concentrations than C. refractus, with insects performing better on M. stipoides. Elevated CO2 decreased N and increased C:N in M. stipoides roots, but had no impact on C. refractus roots. Root-feeders displayed compensatory feeding on M. stipoides at elevated CO2, consuming 118% more tissue than at ambient atmospheric CO2. Despite this, root feeder biomass remained depressed by 24%. These results suggest that compensatory feeding under elevated atmospheric CO2 may make some grass species particularly vulnerable to attack, potentially leading to future shifts in the community composition of grasslands.

  3. Atmospheric CO2 Amplification of Orbitally Forced Changes in the Hydrological Cycle in the Early Mesozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, P. E.; Schaller, M. F.; Kent, D. V.

    2015-12-01

    Models of increasing atmospheric CO2 predict an intensification of the hydrological cycle coupled with warming, possibly amplifying effects of orbitally-forced fluctuations. While there is some Pleistocene evidence of this, CO2 concentrations were much lower than projected for the future. For the potentially more relevant Early Mesozoic, with CO2 >1000 ppm, we observe that both the soil carbonate and stomatal proxies for CO2 strongly and positively correlate with climatic-precession variance in correlative continental and marine strata of both eastern North America and Europe with temporal correlation robustly supported by magneto-, astro-, and U-Pb zircon geochronology. Eastern North American lacustrine and paleosol strata are generally characterized by >3000 ppm CO2 over most of the Norian (228-207 Ma) dropping to ~1000-3000 ppm during the succeeding latest Norian to late Rhaetian (207 to 201.6 Ma) correlative with a dramatic drop in the amplitude of the response to orbital forcing. This is followed by an extraordinary doubling to nearly tripling of CO2 (~2000-5000 ppm) in the latest Rhaetian to Early Jurassic (201.6 to 200.6 Ma) and a concurrent profound increase in the amplitude of the apparent climatic-precession variance during the eruption of the massive Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. Decreasing CO2 (~1000-2000 ppm) afterward is tracked by decreasing amplitude in the orbitally-paced cyclicity. Likewise, in the UK, high amplitude cyclicity in the lacustrine to paralic Twyning Md. Fm. gives way upward into the paralic Blue Anchor and marine Rhaetian Westbury fms in which lithological cyclicity is muted. Again, the amplitude of the orbitially-paced lithological cyclicity dramatically increases into the paralic to marine late Rhaetian Lilstock Fm. and marine latest Rhaetian to Early Jurassic Blue Lias. Parallel and correlative transitions are seen in at least western Germany. The agreement between the continental eastern US and paralic to marine European

  4. Impact of atmospheric CO2 on growth, photosynthesis and nitrogen metabolism in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, Eloísa; Ruano, David; Cabello, Purificación; de la Haba, Purificación

    2006-07-01

    Expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR; EC 1.6.6.1) and glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) were analysed in relation to the rate of CO(2) assimilation in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) leaves. Intact plants were exposed to different atmospheric CO(2) concentrations (100, 400 and 1200microLL(-1)) for 14 days. A correlation between the in vivo rates of net CO(2) assimilation and the atmospheric CO(2) concentrations was observed. Transpiration rate and stomatal conductance remained unaffected by CO(2) levels. The exposure of the cucumber plants to rising CO(2) concentrations led to a concomitant increase in the contents of starch and soluble sugars, and a decrease in the nitrate content in leaves. At very low CO(2), NR and GS expression decreased, in spite of high nitrate contents, whereas at normal and elevated CO(2) expression and activity were high although the nitrate content was very low. Thus, in cucumber, NR and GS expression appear to be dominated by sugar levels, rather than by nitrate contents.

  5. Impact of oceanic circulation changes on atmospheric δ13CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menviel, L.; Mouchet, A.; Meissner, K. J.; Joos, F.; England, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    δ13CO2 measured in Antarctic ice cores provides constraints on oceanic and terrestrial carbon cycle processes linked with millennial-scale and glacial/interglacial changes in atmospheric CO2. However, the interpretation of δ13CO2 is not straightforward. Using two Earth system models of intermediate complexity we perform a set of sensitivity experiments in which the formation rates of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), North Pacific Deep Water (NPDW), Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) are varied. We study the impact of these circulation changes on atmospheric δ13CO2 as well as on the oceanic δ13C distribution. In general, we find that the formation rates of AABW, NADW, NPDW and AAIW are negatively correlated with changes in δ13CO2: namely strong oceanic ventilation decreases atmospheric δ13CO2. However, since large scale ocean circulation reorganizations also impact nutrient utilization and the Earth's climate the relationship between atmospheric δ13CO2 levels and ocean ventilation rate is not unequivocal. In both models atmospheric δ13CO2 is very sensitive to changes in AABW formation rates: increased AABW formation enhances the upwelling of low δ13C waters to the surface and decreases atmospheric δ13CO2. By contrast, the impact of NADW changes on atmospheric δ13CO2 is less robust and might be model dependent.

  6. Atmospheric CO2 retrieved from ground-based solar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Toon, G. C.; Margolis, J. S.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2002-01-01

    The column-averaged volume mixing ration of CO2 over Kitt Peak, Arizona, has been retrieved from high-resolution solar absorption spectra obtained with the fourier transform spectrometer on the McMath telescope.

  7. CO2 Spectroscopy Evaluation Using Atmospheric Solar Absorption Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Bhaswar; Brown, Linda R.; Miller, Charles E.; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Toth, Robert A.; Washenfelder, Rebecca A.; Wennberg, Paul O

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the improvements in successive versions (1996 - 2004) of HITRAN (1) and other molecular line parameter data set (2) to correctly simulate infrared (IR) and near-infrared (NIR) CO 2 transmittance spectra. Understanding the global sources and sinks of CO 2 requires highly accurate measurements (ó 0.3%) and makes extreme de- mands on the spectroscopy. We evaluated the line parameter data sets by fitting solar absorption spectra measured by the JPL MkIV FTIR spectrometer (3) and the ...

  8. Stomatal response of Pinus sylvestriformis to elevated CO2 concentrations during the four years of exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yu-mei; HAN Shi-jie; LIU Ying; JIA Xia

    2005-01-01

    Four-year-old Pinus sylvestriformis were exposed for four growing seasons in open top chambers to ambient CO2 concentration (approx. 350 μmol·mol-1) and high CO2 concentrations (500 and 700 μmol·mol-1) at Research Station of Changbai Mountain Forest Ecosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences at Antu Town, Jilin Province, China (42oN, 128oE). Stomatal response to elevated CO2 concentrations was examined by stomatal conductance (gs), ratio of intercellular to ambient CO2 concentration (ci/ca) and stomatal number. Reciprocal transfer experiments of stomatal conductance showed that stomatal conductance in high-[CO2]-grown plants increased in comparison with ambient-[CO2]-grown plants when measured at their respective growth CO2 concentration and at the same measurement CO2 concentration (except a reduction in 700 μmol·mol-1 CO2 grown plants compared with plants on unchambered field when measured at growth CO2 concentration and 350 μmol·mol-1CO2). High-[CO2]-grown plants exhibited lower ci/ca ratios than ambient-[CO2]-grown plants when measured at their respective growth CO2 concentration. However, ci/ca ratios increased for plants grown in high CO2 concentrations compared with control plants when measured at the same CO2 concentration. There was no significant difference in stomatal number per unit long needle between elevated and ambient CO2. However, elevated CO2 concentrations reduced the total stomatal number of whole needle by the decline of stomatal line and changed the allocation pattern of stomata between upper and lower surface of needle.

  9. Comparison of CO2 and O2 concentrations in soil air: A lesson learned about CO2 diffusivity in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angert, A.; Davidson, E. A.; Savage, K.; Yakir, D.; Luz, B.

    2002-12-01

    Soil respiration is a major component of the global carbon and oxygen cycles and accounts for about one quarter of global respiration. Since respiration consumes O2 and emits CO2, a simple relationship may be expected between the concentration of these gases in soil-air. However, because the [O2] signal in well-drained soils is small, deriving this relationship from field observations is not trivial. In this study, we present high accuracy measurements of O2 concentrations in soil air, that for the first time, enable precise comparison of these concentrations with CO2 concentrations. Soil air was sampled in two sites: an orchard in Israel, and a temperate forest (Harvard forest). The expected ratio of the decrease in [O2] in soil air to the increase in [CO2] can be calculated from the ratio of O2 consumption to CO2 emission in respiration, and the ratio between the diffusivities of these two gases in air as 0.79-0.07. The measured ratio of the decrease in [O2] to the increase in [CO2] in soil air was 0.56-2.48 in the orchard site and 1.06-1.20 in Harvard Forest. These ratios deviate strongly from the expected relationship. In the orchard site, these deviations were probably caused by reactions in the carbonate system due to the calcareous soil of this site. At Harvard Forest, such reactions cannot be quantitatively important because of the low pH of the soil. In this site, we propose that the relationship between CO2 and O2 in the soil air indicates that the ratio of diffusivity of O2 and CO2 in soils is higher than the diffusivity ratio in air. Our results demonstrate that a combination of high accuracy measurements of the O2 and CO2 in soil air is important for better understanding of the soil CO2 dynamics. Such observations will improve estimates of soil respiration that are based only on CO2 concentration and diffusivity.

  10. Atmospheric inversion for cost effective quantification of city CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Broquet, G.; Ciais, P.; Bellassen, V.; Vogel, F.; Chevallier, F.; Xueref-Remy, I.; Wang, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Cities, currently covering only a very small portion (market- or policy-based mitigation actions. Here we propose a monitoring tool that could support the development of such procedures at the city scale. It is based on an atmospheric inversion method that exploits inventory data and continuous atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements from a network of stations within and around cities to estimate city CO2 emissions. We examine the cost-effectiveness and the performance of such a tool. The instruments presently used to measure CO2 concentrations at research stations are expensive. However, cheaper sensors are currently developed and should be useable for the monitoring of CO2 emissions from a megacity in the near-term. Our assessment of the inversion method is thus based on the use of several types of hypothetical networks, with a range of numbers of sensors sampling at 25 m a.g.l. The study case for this assessment is the monitoring of the emissions of the Paris metropolitan area (~ 12 million inhabitants and 11.4 Tg C emitted in 2010) during the month of January 2011. The performance of the inversion is evaluated in terms of uncertainties in the estimates of total and sectoral CO2 emissions. These uncertainties are compared to a notional ambitious target to diagnose annual total city emissions with an uncertainty of 5 % (2-sigma). We find that, with 10 stations only, which is the typical size of current pilot networks that are deployed in some cities, the uncertainty for the 1-month total city CO2 emissions is significantly reduced by the inversion by ~ 42 % but still corresponds to an annual uncertainty that is two times larger than the target of 5 %. By extending the network from 10 to 70 stations, the inversion can meet this requirement. As for major sectoral CO2 emissions, the uncertainties in the inverted emissions using 70 stations are reduced significantly over that obtained using 10 stations by 32 % for commercial and residential buildings, by 33 % for

  11. Speculations on Cold, Dense Atmospheres, Faint Suns, and CO2 Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, M. H.

    2016-09-01

    If the early Mars atmosphere was sufficiently dense (>5 bar), liquid CO2 would have been a stable state. The result would be a mixed-phased system, with CO2 rain, lakes, rivers, and maybe oceans, with CO2 frost and snow in colder spots.

  12. Prolonged elevated atmospheric CO(2)does not affect decomposition of plant material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de M.A.; Six, J.; Blum, H.; Kessel, van C.

    2006-01-01

    Prolonged elevated atmospheric CO2 might alter decomposition. In a 90-day incubation study, we determined the long-term (9 years) impact of elevated CO2 on N mineralization of Lolium perenne and Trifolium repens plant material grown at ambient and elevated CO2 and low- and high-N-15 fertilizer addit

  13. Physiological characteristics of the primitive CO2 concentrating mechanism in PEPC transgenic rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO; Demao; (焦德茂); KUANG; Tingyun; (匡廷云); LI; Xia; (李; 霞); GE; Qiaoying; (戈巧英); HUANG; Xueqing; (黄雪清); HAO; Naibin; (郝乃斌); BAI; Kezhi; (白克智)

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between carbon assimilation and high-level expression of the maize PEPC in PEPC transgenic rice was studied by comparison to that in the untransformed rice, japonica kitaake. Stomatal conductance and photosynthetic rates in PEPC transgenic rice were higher than those of untransformed rice, but the increase of stomatal conductance had no statistical correlation with that of photosynthetic rate. Under high levels of light intensity, the protein contents of PEPC and CA were increased significantly. Therefore the photosynthetic capacity was increased greatly (50%) with atmospheric CO2 supply. While CO2 release in leaf was reduced and the compensation point was lowered correspondingly under CO2 free conditions. Treatment of the rice with the PEPC-specific inhibitor DCDP showed that overexpression of PEPC and enhancement of carbon assimilation were related to the stability of Fv/Fm. Labeling with 14CO2 for 20 s showed more 14C was distributed to C4 primary photosynthate asperate in PEPC transgenic rice, suggesting that there exists a limiting C4 photosynthetic mechanism in leaves. These results suggest that the primitive CO2 concentrating mechanism found in rice could be reproduced through metabolic engineering, and shed light on the physiological basis for transgenic breeding with high photosynthetic efficiency.

  14. Nitrogen and Carbon Cycling in a Grassland Community Ecosystem as Affected by Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Torbert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 concentration has led to concerns regarding its potential effects on terrestrial ecosystems and the long-term storage of carbon (C and nitrogen (N in soil. This study examined responses to elevated CO2 in a grass ecosystem invaded with a leguminous shrub Acacia farnesiana (L. Willd (Huisache. Seedlings of Acacia along with grass species were grown for 13 months at CO2 concentrations of 385 (ambient, 690, and 980 μmol mol−1. Elevated CO2 increased both C and N inputs from plant growth which would result in higher soil C from litter fall, root turnover, and excretions. Results from the incubation indicated an initial (20 days decrease in N mineralization which resulted in no change in C mineralization. However, after 40 and 60 days, an increase in both C and N mineralization was observed. These increases would indicate that increases in soil C storage may not occur in grass ecosystems that are invaded with Acacia over the long term.

  15. Two micron Heterodyne Doppler DIAL Lidar remote sensing of atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the development of a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument and its use for absolute CO2 measurements with a 1-2% precision. The first chapter describes the scientific framework of the thesis: atmospheric branch of the carbon cycle, climatic change and Kyoto protocol, present day monitoring network and main space missions. The modeling, experimental and theoretical aspects of the study are presented in the more general framework of the recovery of surface fluxes and atmospheric CO2 measurements. Chapter 2 treats of the evolution of atmospheric CO2 at the meso-scale. The time, horizontal and vertical representativeness of a CO2 measurement is evaluated. The processes at the origin of the variability of a mixing ratio in the different parts of the atmosphere is presented in order to develop an efficient measurement method. Chapter 3 discusses the DIAL measurement and its optimization for a maximum preciseness of the concentration measurement. A particular attention is given to the spectroscopy and to the optimization of parameters like the optical thickness of the air column, the energy of laser pulses in the atmosphere, and the analysis of statistical and systematic errors. Chapter 4 describes the experimental setup 'LIDIA', the existing Lidar used, its transformations and added parts. A particular attention is given to the signal processing. Then follows the presentation and discussion of the measurements performed night and day during the end of 2004 and during 2005: integrated measurements at the ground level and validation using in-situ measurements, vertical measurements inside the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), use of cloudy targets, measurements inside the free troposphere and resolved measurements inside the ABL. The contribution of simultaneous wind and vertical velocity measurements with concentration measurements is used to explain the natural and anthropic processes at the origin of the variations with time of the CO2

  16. Regulation of CO2 Concentrating Mechanism in Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Burnap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this chapter, we mainly focus on the acclimation of cyanobacteria to the changing ambient CO2 and discuss mechanisms of inorganic carbon (Ci uptake, photorespiration, and the regulation among the metabolic fluxes involved in photoautotrophic, photomixotrophic and heterotrophic growth. The structural components for several of the transport and uptake mechanisms are described and the progress towards elucidating their regulation is discussed in the context of studies, which have documented metabolomic changes in response to changes in Ci availability. Genes for several of the transport and uptake mechanisms are regulated by transcriptional regulators that are in the LysR-transcriptional regulator family and are known to act in concert with small molecule effectors, which appear to be well-known metabolites. Signals that trigger changes in gene expression and enzyme activity correspond to specific “regulatory metabolites” whose concentrations depend on the ambient Ci availability. Finally, emerging evidence for an additional layer of regulatory complexity involving small non-coding RNAs is discussed.

  17. Comparing surface and mid-troposphere CO2 concentration and fluxes from central U.S. grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, F. V.; Brunsell, N. A.; Quick, A. T.

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem dynamics influence the Earth’s climate system, which is affected by variations in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Assessments of CO2 concentration and net fluxes at regional scales are needed to diminish uncertainties related to the effects of land-use change on ecosystem processes, to identify land management practices that have the potential to mitigate CO2 emissions, and to discern sources and sinks within geopolitical boundaries for reasons of carbon accountability. Understanding how surface CO2 concentration and flux dynamics within heterogeneous landscapes scale to mid-troposphere concentrations is the focus of this study. CO2 flux data from three eddy covariance (EC) towers in northeastern Kansas are compared to mid-tropospheric data collected by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). EC tower data from two watershed sites on the Konza Prairie Biological Station (KPBS) for the period 2006-2010 and one study site at the Nelson Environmental Study Area (NESA) for the period 2007-2010 are examined. KPBS site 1D is primarily C4 grasses, burned annually; KPBS site 4B is a mix of C3 forbs and C4 grasses, burned every four years; and the NESA site is a mix of C3/C4 grasses, burned approximately every five years, and experiencing woody encroachment. Results show higher concentration of CO2 in the mid-troposphere. Furthermore, mid-troposphere CO2 exhibited daily and seasonal lags and decreased amplitude in flux dynamics compared to surface CO2. Long-term, combined observations of surface and atmospheric CO2 offer the potential for a better understanding of the natural processes and anthropogenic activities related to CO2 source-sink dynamics, seasonal and interannual variability, and climate forcings, including temperature and precipitation changes.

  18. The Influence of CO2 Admixtures on the Product Composition in a Nitrogen-Methane Atmospheric Glow Discharge Used as a Prebiotic Atmosphere Mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazankova, V.; Torokova, L.; Krcma, F.; Mason, N. J.; Matejcik, S.

    2016-11-01

    This work extends our previous experimental studies of the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere by atmospheric glow discharge. The Titan's atmosphere seems to be similarly to early Earth atmospheric composition. The exploration of Titan atmosphere was initiated by the exciting results of the Cassini-Huygens mission and obtained results increased the interest about prebiotic atmospheres. Present work is devoted to the role of CO2 in the prebiotic atmosphere chemistry. Most of the laboratory studies of such atmosphere were focused on the chemistry of N2 + CH4 mixtures. The present work is devoted to the study of the oxygenated volatile species in prebiotic atmosphere, specifically CO2 reactivity. CO2 was introduced to the standard N2 + CH4 mixture at different mixing ratio up to 5 % CH4 and 3 % CO2. The reaction products were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. This work shows that CO2 modifies the composition of the gas phase with the detection of oxygenated compounds: CO and others oxides. There is a strong influence of CO2 on increasing concentration other products as cyanide (HCN) and ammonia (NH3).

  19. The Influence of CO2 Admixtures on the Product Composition in a Nitrogen-Methane Atmospheric Glow Discharge Used as a Prebiotic Atmosphere Mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazankova, V.; Torokova, L.; Krcma, F.; Mason, N. J.; Matejcik, S.

    2016-04-01

    This work extends our previous experimental studies of the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere by atmospheric glow discharge. The Titan's atmosphere seems to be similarly to early Earth atmospheric composition. The exploration of Titan atmosphere was initiated by the exciting results of the Cassini-Huygens mission and obtained results increased the interest about prebiotic atmospheres. Present work is devoted to the role of CO2 in the prebiotic atmosphere chemistry. Most of the laboratory studies of such atmosphere were focused on the chemistry of N2 + CH4 mixtures. The present work is devoted to the study of the oxygenated volatile species in prebiotic atmosphere, specifically CO2 reactivity. CO2 was introduced to the standard N2 + CH4 mixture at different mixing ratio up to 5 % CH4 and 3 % CO2. The reaction products were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy. This work shows that CO2 modifies the composition of the gas phase with the detection of oxygenated compounds: CO and others oxides. There is a strong influence of CO2 on increasing concentration other products as cyanide (HCN) and ammonia (NH3).

  20. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Concentration and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection IPDA Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Ramanathan, Anand; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Weaver, Clark J.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated a pulsed direct detection IPDA lidar to measure range and the column concentration of atmospheric CO2. The lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and samples the shape of the 1,572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. We participated in the ASCENDS science flights on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during August 2011 and report here lidar measurements made on four flights over a variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US. These included over a stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, to a dry lake bed surrounded by mountains in Nevada, to a desert area with a coal-fired power plant, and from the Rocky Mountains to Iowa, with segments with both cumulus and cirrus clouds. Most flights were to altitudes >12 km and had 5-6 altitude steps. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range, CO2 column absorption, and CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds, between cumulus clouds, and to stratus cloud tops. The retrievals shows the decrease in column CO2 due to growing vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as a sudden increase in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption lineshape (averaged for 50 s) matched the predicted shapes to better than 1% RMS error. For 10 s averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by the received signal photon count. Retrievals were made using atmospheric parameters from both an atmospheric model and from in situ temperature and pressure from the aircraft. The retrievals had no free parameters and did not use empirical adjustments, and >70% of the measurements passed screening and were used in analysis. The differences between the lidar-measured retrievals and in situ measured average CO2 column concentrations were 6 km.

  1. Pollutants transport and atmospheric variability of CO2 over Siberia: contribution of airborne measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presented here intends to characterize the variations of atmospheric concentrations of CO2, CO, O3 and ultrafine particles, over a large scale aircraft transect above Siberia, during three intensive YAK-AEROSIB campaigns in April 2006, September 2006 and August 2007, respectively. Pollutant and greenhouse gases distribution in this poorly studied region is needed to model atmospheric long range transport. I show here that CO concentrations at the time of the campaigns is broadly affected by (1) advection of Chinese pollutants through baro-clinic perturbations, (2) advection (diffuse or not) of European pollutants at various altitudes, (3) and of biomass burning from Central Asia. This set of factors is analyzed through a novel statistical technique based on clustering of backward transport simulated by the FLEXPART Lagrangian model. Large observed CO2 gradients in summer are matched against vertical mixing in GCM simulated CO2. At last I present ultrafine particle measurements, and a possible nucleation summer maximum in the clean, continental mid-troposphere. (author)

  2. Los Angeles megacity: a high-resolution land-atmosphere modelling system for urban CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sha; Lauvaux, Thomas; Newman, Sally; Rao, Preeti; Ahmadov, Ravan; Deng, Aijun; Díaz-Isaac, Liza I.; Duren, Riley M.; Fischer, Marc L.; Gerbig, Christoph; Gurney, Kevin R.; Huang, Jianhua; Jeong, Seongeun; Li, Zhijin; Miller, Charles E.; O'Keeffe, Darragh; Patarasuk, Risa; Sander, Stanley P.; Song, Yang; Wong, Kam W.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2016-07-01

    Megacities are major sources of anthropogenic fossil fuel CO2 (FFCO2) emissions. The spatial extents of these large urban systems cover areas of 10 000 km2 or more with complex topography and changing landscapes. We present a high-resolution land-atmosphere modelling system for urban CO2 emissions over the Los Angeles (LA) megacity area. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-Chem model was coupled to a very high-resolution FFCO2 emission product, Hestia-LA, to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations across the LA megacity at spatial resolutions as fine as ˜ 1 km. We evaluated multiple WRF configurations, selecting one that minimized errors in wind speed, wind direction, and boundary layer height as evaluated by its performance against meteorological data collected during the CalNex-LA campaign (May-June 2010). Our results show no significant difference between moderate-resolution (4 km) and high-resolution (1.3 km) simulations when evaluated against surface meteorological data, but the high-resolution configurations better resolved planetary boundary layer heights and vertical gradients in the horizontal mean winds. We coupled our WRF configuration with the Vulcan 2.2 (10 km resolution) and Hestia-LA (1.3 km resolution) fossil fuel CO2 emission products to evaluate the impact of the spatial resolution of the CO2 emission products and the meteorological transport model on the representation of spatiotemporal variability in simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We find that high spatial resolution in the fossil fuel CO2 emissions is more important than in the atmospheric model to capture CO2 concentration variability across the LA megacity. Finally, we present a novel approach that employs simultaneous correlations of the simulated atmospheric CO2 fields to qualitatively evaluate the greenhouse gas measurement network over the LA megacity. Spatial correlations in the atmospheric CO2 fields reflect the coverage of individual measurement sites when a

  3. Side-line tunable laser transmitter for differential absorption lidar measurements of CO2: design and application to atmospheric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Gibert, Fabien; Barnes, Bruce W.; Ismail, Syed; Petros, Mulugeta; Petzar, Paul J.; Yu, Jirong; Modlin, Edward A.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2008-03-01

    A 2 μm wavelength, 90 mJ, 5 Hz pulsed Ho laser is described with wavelength control to precisely tune and lock the wavelength at a desired offset up to 2.9 GHz from the center of a CO2 absorption line. Once detuned from the line center the laser wavelength is actively locked to keep the wavelength within 1.9 MHz standard deviation about the setpoint. This wavelength control allows optimization of the optical depth for a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measuring atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The laser transmitter has been coupled with a coherent heterodyne receiver for measurements of CO2 concentration using aerosol backscatter; wind and aerosols are also measured with the same lidar and provide useful additional information on atmospheric structure. Range-resolved CO2 measurements were made with rolling average on the DIAL measurement.

  4. Weak Northern and Strong Tropical Land Carbon Uptake from Vertical Profiles of Atmospheric CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephens, Britton B.; Gurney, Kevin R.; Tans, Pieter P.; Sweeney, Colm; Peters, Wouter; Bruhwiler, Lori; Ciais, Philippe; Ramonet, Michel; Bousquet, Philippe; Nakazawa, Takakiyo; Aoki, Shuji; Machida, Toshinobu; Inoue, Gen; Vinnichenko, Nikolay; Lloyd, Jon; Jordan, Armin; Heimann, Martin; Shibistova, Olga; Langenfelds, Ray L.; Steele, L. Paul; Francey, Roger J.; Denning, A. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of midday vertical atmospheric CO2 distributions reveal annual-mean vertical CO2 gradients that are inconsistent with atmospheric models that estimate a large transfer of terrestrial carbon from tropical to northern latitudes. The three models that most closely reproduce the observed an

  5. Weak northern and strong tropical land carbon uptake from vertical profiles of atmospheric CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephens, B.B.; Gurney, K.R.; Tans, P.P.; Sweeney, C.; Peters, W.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of midday vertical atmospheric CO2 distributions reveal annual-mean vertical CO2 gradients that are inconsistent with atmospheric models that estimate a large transfer of terrestrial carbon from tropical to northern latitudes. The three models that most closely reproduce the observed an

  6. The importance of geomagnetic field changes versus rising CO2 levels for long-term change in the upper atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cnossen Ingrid

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Earth’s upper atmosphere has shown signs of cooling and contraction over the past decades. This is generally attributed to the increasing level of atmospheric CO2, a coolant in the upper atmosphere. However, especially the charged part of the upper atmosphere, the ionosphere, also responds to the Earth’s magnetic field, which has been weakening considerably over the past century, as well as changing in structure. The relative importance of the changing geomagnetic field compared to enhanced CO2 levels for long-term change in the upper atmosphere is still a matter of debate. Here we present a quantitative comparison of the effects of the increase in CO2 concentration and changes in the magnetic field from 1908 to 2008, based on simulations with the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM. This demonstrates that magnetic field changes contribute at least as much as the increase in CO2 concentration to changes in the height of the maximum electron density in the ionosphere, and much more to changes in the maximum electron density itself and to low-/mid-latitude ionospheric currents. Changes in the magnetic field even contribute to cooling of the thermosphere at ~300 km altitude, although the increase in CO2 concentration is still the dominant factor here. Both processes are roughly equally important for long-term changes in ion temperature.

  7. Isoprene leaf emission under CO2 free atmosphere: why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, S.

    2015-12-01

    Isoprene (C5H8) is a reactive hydrocarbon gas emitted at high rates by tropical vegetation, which affects atmospheric chemistry and climate and, in the leaf level, is a very important agent against environmental stress. Under optimal conditions for photosynthesis, the majority of carbon used for isoprene biosynthesis is a direct product from recently assimilated atmospheric CO2. However, the contribution of 'alternate' carbon sources, that increase with leaf temperature, have been demonstrated and emissions of isoprene from 'alternate' carbon sources under ambient CO2 below the compensation point for photosynthesis have been observed. In this study, we investigated the response of leaf isoprene emissions under 450 ppm CO2 and CO2 free atmosphere as a function of light and leaf temperature. At constant leaf temperature (30 °C) and CO2 free atmospheres, leaves of the tropical species Inga edulis showed net emissions of CO2 and light-dependent isoprene emissions which stagnated at low light levels (75 µmol m-2 s-1 PAR) and account for 25% of that observed with 450 ppm CO2. Under constant light (1000 µmol m-2 s-1 PAR) and CO2 free atmospheres, a increase of leaf temperatures from 25 to 40 °C resulted in net emissions of CO2 and temperature-dependent isoprene emissions which reached values up to 17% of those under 450 ppm CO2. Our observations suggest that, under environmental stress, as high light/temperature and drought (when the stomata close and the amount of internal CO2 decreases), the 'alternate' carbon can maintain photosynthesis rates resulting in the production of isoprene, independent of atmospheric CO2, through the re-assimilation of internal released CO2 as an 'alternate' carbon sources for isoprene.

  8. Impact of elevated CO2 concentration on dynamics of leaf photosynthesis in Fagus sylvatica is modulated by sky conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Otmar; Klem, Karel; Holišová, Petra; Šigut, Ladislav; Šprtová, Mirka; Teslová-Navrátilová, Petra; Zitová, Martina; Špunda, Vladimír; Marek, Michal V; Grace, John

    2014-02-01

    It has been suggested that atmospheric CO2 concentration and frequency of cloud cover will increase in future. It remains unclear, however, how elevated CO2 influences photosynthesis under complex clear versus cloudy sky conditions. Accordingly, diurnal changes in photosynthetic responses among beech trees grown at ambient (AC) and doubled (EC) CO2 concentrations were studied under contrasting sky conditions. EC stimulated the daily sum of fixed CO2 and light use efficiency under clear sky. Meanwhile, both these parameters were reduced under cloudy sky as compared with AC treatment. Reduction in photosynthesis rate under cloudy sky was particularly associated with EC-stimulated, xanthophyll-dependent thermal dissipation of absorbed light energy. Under clear sky, a pronounced afternoon depression of CO2 assimilation rate was found in sun-adapted leaves under EC compared with AC conditions. This was caused in particular by stomata closure mediated by vapour pressure deficit.

  9. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 Airborne Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Ramanathan, Anand; Hasselbrack, William E.; Mao, Jianping; Weaver, Clark; Browell, Edward V.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated an efficient pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Our team participated in the 2010 ASCENDS airborne campaigns we flew airborne version of the CO2 and O2 lidar on the NASA DC-8. The CO2 lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan and 300 scans per second. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to greater than 12 km, and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Our post-flight analysis estimated the Iidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak. We compared these to CO2 DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the conditions from airborne in-situ readings. Analysis of the 2010 measurements over the Pacific Ocean and Lamont OK shows the expected -linear change of the peak DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes greater than 6 km the random errors were approximately 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. After the 2010 flights we improved the airborne lidar's scan uniformity, calibration and receiver sensitivity. Our team participated in the seven ASCENDS science flights during late July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, snow patches on mountain tops, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as wen as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly

  10. Potential maternal effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on development and disease severity in a Mediterranean legume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Grünzweig

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Global change can greatly affect plant populations both directly by influencing growing conditions and indirectly by maternal effects on development of offspring. More information is needed on transgenerational effects of global change on plants and on their interactions with pathogens. The current study assessed potential maternal effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on performance and disease susceptibility of first-generation offspring of the Mediterranean legume Onobrychis crista-galli. Mother plants were grown at three CO2 concentrations, and the study focused on their offspring that were raised under common ambient climate and CO2. In addition, progeny were exposed to natural infection by the fungal pathogen powdery mildew. In one out of three years, offspring of high-CO2 treatments (440 and 600 ppm had lower shoot biomass and reproductive output than offspring of low-CO2 treatment (280 ppm. Disease severity in a heavy-infection year was higher in high-CO2 than in low-CO2 offspring. However, some of the findings on maternal effects changed when the population was divided into two functionally diverging plant types distinguishable by flower color (pink, Type P; white Type W. Disease severity in a heavy-infection year was higher in high-CO2 than in low-CO2 progeny in the more disease-resistant (Type P, but not in the more susceptible plant type (Type W. In a low-infection year, maternal CO2 treatments did not differ in disease severity. Mother plants of Type P exposed to low CO2 produced larger seeds than all other combinations of CO2 and plant type, which might contribute to higher offspring performance. This study showed that elevated CO2 potentially exerts environmental maternal effects on performance of progeny and, notably, also on their susceptibility to natural infection by a pathogen. Maternal effects of global change might differently affect functionally divergent plant types, which could impact population fitness and alter plant

  11. Mesozooplankton community development at elevated CO2 concentrations: results from a mesocosm experiment in an Arctic fjord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Czerny

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere caused by burning fossil fuels leads to increasing pCO2 and decreasing pH in the world oceans. These changes may have severe consequences for marine biota, especially in cold-water ecosystems due to higher solubility of CO2. However, studies on the response of mesozooplankton communities to elevated pCO2 are yet lacking. In order to test whether abundance and taxonomic composition change with pCO2, we have sampled nine mesocosms, which were deployed in Kongsfjorden, an Arctic fjord at Svalbard, and were adjusted to eight CO2 concentrations, initially ranging from 185 μatm to 1420 μatm. Samples were taken weekly over a six-week period with an Apstein net (55 μm mesh size in all mesocosms and the surrounding fjord. In addition, sediment trap samples, taken every second day in the mesocosms, were analyzed to account for losses due to vertical migration and mortality. The taxonomic analysis revealed that meroplanktonic larvae (cirripeds, polychaetes, bivalves, gastropod, and decapods dominated in the mesocosms while copepods (Calanus spp., Oithona similis, Acartia longiremis and Microsetella norvegica were found in lower abundances. In the fjord copepods prevailed for most of our study. With time, abundance and taxonomic composition developed similarly in all mesocosms; the pCO2 had no significant effect on the overall community structure. However, single taxa responded to elevated CO2 concentrations. The ratio of cirripedia nauplii to cypris larvae, the next developmental stage, in the sediment traps averaged over the entire experiment increased with pCO2 and this suggests that increased pCO2 may have delayed their development. Also, the number of bivalves, averaged over the experimental period, decreased significantly with increasing pCO2. The nature of the CO2 effect, either direct or indirect, remains open and needs to be addressed in future.

  12. Limited carbon storage in soil and litter of experimental forest plots under increased atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration is thought to be mitigated in part by carbon sequestration within forest ecosystems, where carbon can be stored in vegetation or soils. The storage of carbon in soils is determined by the fraction that is sequestered in persistent organic materials, such as humus. In experimental forest plots of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) exposed to high CO2 concentrations, nearly half of the carbon uptake is allocated to short-lived tissues, largely foliage. These tissues fall to the ground and decompose, normally contributing only a small portion of their carbon content to refractory soil humic materials. Such findings call into question the role of soils as long-term carbon sinks, and show the need for a better understanding of carbon cycling in forest soils. Here we report a significant accumulation of carbon in the litter layer of experimental forest plots after three years of growth at increased CO2 concentrations (565 μ l1). But fast turnover times of organic carbon in the litter layer (of about three years) appear to constrain the potential size of this carbon sink. Given the observation that carbon accumulation in the deeper mineral soil layers was absent, we suggest that significant, long-term net carbon sequestration in forest soils is unlikely. (author)

  13. A permafrost glacial hypothesis to explain atmospheric CO2 and the ice ages during the Pleistocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tarozo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past several 100 ka glacial-interglacial cycles, the concentration of atmospheric CO2 was closely coupled to global temperature, which indicates the importance of CO2 as a greenhouse gas. The reasons for changes in atmospheric CO2 have mainly been sought in the ocean, yet proxy evidence does not support the notion of increased oceanic carbon storage during glacials. Here we present results from the first permafrost loess sequence in Siberia spanning two glacial cycles (~240 ka, which reveal that permafrost soils repeatedly sequestered huge amounts of terrestrial carbon during glacial periods. This can be explained with permafrost favouring more intensive waterlogging conditions and better preservation of soil organic matter. Terrestrial carbon stored in permafrost soils was released upon warming and provided a powerful feedback mechanism for the glacial terminations. We outline a "permafrost glacial hypothesis" building on integrated annual insolation forcing, which readily explains the observed succession of the ice ages during the Pleistocene, including the mid-Pleistocene transition.

  14. Attribution of atmospheric CO2 and temperature increases to regions: importance of preindustrial land use change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The historical contribution of each country to today’s observed atmospheric CO2 excess and higher temperatures has become a basis for discussions around burden-sharing of greenhouse gas reduction commitments in political negotiations. However, the accounting methods have considered greenhouse gas emissions only during the industrial era, neglecting the fact that land use changes (LUC) have caused emissions long before the Industrial Revolution. Here, we hypothesize that considering preindustrial LUC affects the attribution because the geographic pattern of preindustrial LUC emissions differs significantly from that of industrial-era emissions and because preindustrial emissions have legacy effects on today’s atmospheric CO2 concentrations and temperatures. We test this hypothesis by estimating CO2 and temperature increases based on carbon cycle simulations of the last millennium. We find that accounting for preindustrial LUC emissions results in a shift of attribution of global temperature increase from the industrialized countries to less industrialized countries, in particular South Asia and China, by up to 2–3%, a level that may be relevant for political discussions. While further studies are needed to span the range of plausible quantifications, our study demonstrates the importance of including preindustrial emissions for the most scientifically defensible attribution. (letter)

  15. Estimation of 14CO2 flux at soil-atmosphere interface and distribution of 14C in forest ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To realize the dynamical behavior of 14C among exchangeable carbon reservoirs in terrestrial environment, a method for in situ determination of 14CO2 flux at soil-atmosphere interface and a high flow rate CO2 sampler were developed. This method allowed us to collect integrated quantity of CO2 for determining 14C activity over an extended time period under environmental conditions with minimal site disturbance. The 14CO2 flux from ground surface was estimated to be 1.59x10-5 Bq m-2 s-1 in a forest floor with the method. The specific activities of 14C in environmental materials such as some biological and air samples were also determined in the vicinity of the place, where the flux measurement was made, to discuss the behavior of 14C in the forest ecosystem. The results indicated that fresh pine needles had a similar 14C specific activity to the atmospheric CO2 at the same height due to its fairly rapid equilibrium, 14C specific activity in the atmospheric CO2 has a concentration gradient near the ground surface and, at least in this site, CO2 with high 14C specific activity was generated by decomposition of soil organic matter which may be accumulated in soil as a result of former nuclear weapons tests

  16. Rapid atmospheric CO2 changes associated with the 8,200-years-B.P. cooling event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Friederike; Aaby, Bent; Visscher, Henk

    2002-09-17

    By applying the inverse relation between numbers of leaf stomata and atmospheric CO2 concentration, stomatal frequency analysis of fossil birch leaves from lake deposits in Denmark reveals a century-scale CO2 change during the prominent Holocene cooling event that occurred in the North Atlantic region between 8,400 and 8,100 years B.P. In contrast to conventional CO2 reconstructions based on ice cores from Antarctica, quantification of the stomatal frequency signal corroborates a distinctive temperature-CO2 correlation. Results indicate a global CO2 decline of approximately 25 ppm by volume over approximately 300 years. This reduction is in harmony with observed and modeled lowering of North Atlantic sea-surface temperatures associated with a short-term weakening of thermohaline circulation. PMID:12202744

  17. CO2-dominated Atmosphere in Equilibrium with NH3-H2O Ocean: Application to Early Titan and Ocean Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marounina, N.; Grasset, O.; Tobie, G.; Carpy, S.

    2015-12-01

    During the accretion of Titan, impact heating may have been sufficient to allow the global melting of water ice (Monteux et al. 2014) and the release of volatile compounds, with CO2 and NH3 as main constituents (Tobie et al. 2012). Thus, on primitive Titan, it is thought that a massive atmosphere was in contact with a global water ocean. Similar configurations may occur on temperate water-rich planets called ocean planets (Léger et al. 2004, Kitzmann et al. 2015).Due to its rather low solubility in liquid water, carbon dioxide is expected to be one of the major components in the atmosphere. The atmospheric amount of CO2 is a key parameter for assessing the thermal evolution of the planetary surface because of its strong greenhouse effect. However, ammonia significantly affects the solubility of CO2 in water and hence the atmosphere-ocean thermo-chemical equilibrium. For primitive Titan, estimating the mass, temperature and composition of the primitive atmosphere is important to determine mechanisms that led to the present-day N2-CH4 dominated atmosphere. Similarly, for ocean planets, the influence of ammonia on the atmospheric abundance in CO2 has consequences for the definition of the habitable zone.To investigate the atmospheric composition of the water-rich worlds for a wide range of initial compositions, we have developed a vapor-liquid equilibrium model of the NH3-CO2-H2O system, where we account for the non-ideal comportment of both vapor and liquid phases and the ion speciation of volatiles dissolved in the aqueous phase. We show that adding NH3 to the CO2-H2O binary system induces an efficient absorption of the CO2 in the liquid phase and thus a lower CO2 partial pressure in the vapor phase. Indeed, the CO2 partial pressure remains low for the CO2/NH3 ratio of liquid concentrations lower than 0.5.Assuming various initial compositions of Titan's global water ocean, we explore the thermal and compositional evolution of a massive primitive atmosphere using

  18. Pressure sensing of the atmosphere by solar occultation using broadband CO2 absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. H.; Russell, J. M., III; Drayson, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for obtaining pressure at the tangent point in an IR solar occulation experiment is described. By measuring IR absorption in bands of atmospheric CO2 (e.g., 2.0, 2.7, or 4.3 microns), mean pressure values for each tangent point layer (vertical thickness 2 km or less) of the atmosphere can be obtained with rms errors of less than 3%. The simultaneous retrieval of pressure and gas concentration in a remote-sensing experiment will increase the accuracy of inverted gas concentrations and minimize the dependence of the experiment on pressure or mass path error resulting from use of climatological pressure data, satellite ephemeris, and instrument pointing accuracy.

  19. Laser Sounder for Global Measurement of CO2 Concentrations in the Troposphere from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Kawa, S. Randy; Sun, Xiaoli; Chen, Jeffrey; Stephen, Mark A.; Collatz, G. James; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of tropospheric CO2 abundance with global-coverage, a few hundred km spatial and monthly temporal resolution are needed to quantify processes that regulate CO2 storage by the land and oceans. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) is the first space mission focused on atmospheric CO2 for measuring total column CO, and O2 by detecting the spectral absorption in reflected sunlight. The OCO mission is an essential step, and will yield important new information about atmospheric CO2 distributions. However there are unavoidable limitations imposed by its measurement approach. These include best accuracy only during daytime at moderate to high sun angles, interference by cloud and aerosol scattering, and limited signal from CO2 variability in the lower tropospheric CO2 column. We have been developing a new laser-based technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations from orbit. Our initial goal is to demonstrate a lidar technique and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft. Our final goal is to develop a space instrument and mission approach for active measurements of the CO2 mixing ratio at the 1-2 ppmv level. Our technique is much less sensitive to cloud and atmospheric scattering conditions and would allow continuous measurements of CO2 mixing ratio in the lower troposphere from orbit over land and ocean surfaces during day and night. Our approach is to use the 1570nm CO2 band and a 3-channel laser absorption spectrometer (i.e. lidar used an altimeter mode), which continuously measures at nadir from a near polar circular orbit. The approach directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams from the instrument's lasers toward nadir, and measures the energy of the laser echoes reflected from land and water surfaces. It uses several tunable fiber laser transmitters which allowing measurement of the extinction from a single selected CO2 absorption line in the 1570

  20. Transcriptional and metabolic insights into the differential physiological responses of arabidopsis to optimal and supraoptimal atmospheric CO2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Kaplan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In tightly closed human habitats such as space stations, locations near volcano vents and closed culture vessels, atmospheric CO(2 concentration may be 10 to 20 times greater than Earth's current ambient levels. It is known that super-elevated (SE CO(2 (>1,200 µmol mol(-1 induces physiological responses different from that of moderately elevated CO(2 (up to 1,200 µmol mol(-1, but little is known about the molecular responses of plants to supra-optimal [CO(2]. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To understand the underlying molecular causes for differential physiological responses, metabolite and transcript profiles were analyzed in aerial tissue of Arabidopsis plants, which were grown under ambient atmospheric CO(2 (400 µmol mol(-1, elevated CO(2 (1,200 µmol mol(-1 and SE CO(2 (4,000 µmol mol(-1, at two developmental stages early and late vegetative stage. Transcript and metabolite profiling revealed very different responses to elevated versus SE [CO(2]. The transcript profiles of SE CO(2 treated plants were closer to that of the control. Development stage had a clear effect on plant molecular response to elevated and SE [CO(2]. Photosynthetic acclimation in terms of down-regulation of photosynthetic gene expression was observed in response to elevated [CO(2], but not that of SE [CO(2] providing the first molecular evidence that there appears to be a fundamental disparity in the way plants respond to elevated and SE [CO(2]. Although starch accumulation was induced by both elevated and SE [CO(2], the increase was less at the late vegetative stage and accompanied by higher soluble sugar content suggesting an increased starch breakdown to meet sink strength resulting from the rapid growth demand. Furthermore, many of the elevated and SE CO(2-responsive genes found in the present study are also regulated by plant hormone and stress. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides new insights into plant acclimation to elevated and SE [CO

  1. Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the abrupt4xCO2 scenario

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xiaoyong; Annette Rinke; JI Duoying; CUI Xuefeng; John C Moore

    2014-01-01

    We analyze sea ice changes from eight different earth system models that have conducted experiment abrupt4xCO2 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). In response to abrupt quadrupling of CO2 from preindustrial levels, Arctic temperatures dramatically rise by about 10°C—16°C in winter and the seasonal sea ice cycle and sea ice concentration are signiifcantly changed compared with the pre-industrial control simulations (piControl). Changes of Arctic sea ice concentration are spatially correlated with temperature patterns in all seasons and highest in autumn. Changes in sea ice are associated with changes in atmospheric circulation patterns at heights up to the jet stream. While the pattern of sea level pressure changes is generally similar to the surface air temperature change pattern, the wintertime 500 hPa circulation displays a positive Paciifc North America (PNA) anomaly under abrupt4xCO2-piControl. This large scale teleconnection may contribute to, or feedback on, the simulated sea ice cover change and is associated with an intensiifcation of the jet stream over East Asia and the north Paciifc in winter.

  2. Study of satellite retrieved CO2 and CH4 concentration over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Prabhunath; Rastogi, Shantanu; Singh, R. P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports a study of spatial and temporal variations of columnar averaged concentration of CO2 and CH4 over India using SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) and Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT) data. Comparison of these data with the global view National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) land data and also location specific flask data is made. The temporal variation in column averaged global CO2 is similar to that over India and it is also similar to the NOAA surface flask data and global view. The variation in NOAA surface CH4 is location dependent and its global view appears to vary seasonally in opposite phase with the column averaged CH4 values from satellites, reflecting the limited comparability of surface and column averaged data. Over India the CO2 maximum is in May and minimum in August/September while for CH4 the maximum is in September and minimum in February/March. The seasonal variation of CH4 over India is correlated with the eastern coastal rice cultivation.

  3. Responses of plant rhizosphere to atmospheric CO2 enrichment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Plant root growth is generally stimulated under elevated CO2. This will bring more carbon to the below-ground through root death and exudate. This potential increase in below-ground carbon sink may lead to changes in long-term soil sequestration and relationship between host plants and symbions. On the other hand, changes in litter components due to the changes in plant chemical composition may also affect soil processes, such as litter decomposition, soil organic matter sequestration and hetero-nutritional bacteria activities. These issues are discussed.

  4. Effect of CO2 concentrations on the activity of photosynthetic CO2 fixation and extracelluar carbonic anhydrase in the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiongwen; GAO Kunshan

    2003-01-01

    The growth and activity of photosynthetic CO2 uptake and extracellular carbonic anhydrase (Caext) of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum were investigated while cultured at different levels of CO2 in order to see its physiological response to different CO2 concentrations under either a low (30 μmol·m-2·s-1) or high (210 μmol·m-2·s-1) irradiance. The changes in CO2 concentrations (4-31 μmol/L) affected the growth and net photosynthesis to a greater extent under the low than under the high light regime. Caext was detected in the cells grown at 4 μmol/L CO2 but not at 31 and 12 μmol/L CO2, with its activity being about 2.5-fold higher at the high than at the low irradiance. Photo- synthetic CO2 affinity (1/ K1/2(CO2)) of the cells decreased with increased CO2 concentrations in culture. The cells cultured under the high-light show significantly higher photosynthetic CO2 affinity than those grown at the low-light level. It is concluded that the regulations of Caext activity and photosynthetic CO2 affinity are dependent not only on CO2 concentration but also on light availability, and that the development of higher Caext activity and CO2 affinity under higher light level could sufficiently support the photosynthetic demand for CO2 even at low level of CO2.

  5. Effect of photosynthesis on the abundance of 18O13C16O in atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Magdalena E. G.; Pons, Thijs L.; Ziegler, Martin; Lourens, Lucas J.; Röckmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The abundance of the isotopologue 18O13C16O (Δ47) in atmospheric air is a promising new tracer for the atmospheric carbon cycle (Eiler and Schauble, 2004; Affek and Eiler, 2006; Affek et al., 2007). The large gross fluxes in CO2 between the atmosphere and biosphere are supposed to play a major role in controlling its abundance. Eiler and Schauble (2004) set up a box model describing the effect of air-leaf interaction on the abundance of 18O13C16O in atmospheric air. The main assumption is that the exchange between CO2 and water within the mesophyll cells will imprint a Δ47 value on the back-diffusing CO2 that reflects the leaf temperature. Additionally, kinetic effects due to CO2 diffusion into and out of the stomata are thought to play a role. We investigated the effect of photosynthesis on the residual CO2 under controlled conditions using a leaf chamber set-up to quantitatively test the model assumptions suggested by Eiler and Schauble (2004). We studied the effect of photosynthesis on the residual CO2 using two C3 and one C4 plant species: (i) sunflower (Helianthus annuus), a C3 species with a high leaf conductance for CO2 diffusion, (ii) ivy (Hedera hibernica), a C3 species with a low conductance, and (iii), maize (Zea mays), a species with the C4 photosynthetic pathway. We also investigated the effect of different light intensities (photosynthetic photon flux density of 200, 700 and 1800 μmol m2s‑1), and thus, photosynthetic rate in sunflower and maize. A leaf was mounted in a cuvette with a transparent window and an adjustable light source. The air inside was thoroughly mixed, making the composition of the outgoing air equal to the air inside. A gas-mixing unit was attached at the entrance of the cuvette that mixed air with a high concentration of scrambled CO2 with a Δ47 value of 0 to 0.1‰ with CO2 free air to set the CO2 concentration of ingoing air at 500 ppm. The flow rate through the cuvette was adjusted to the photosynthetic activity of the

  6. Laser Sounder for Global Measurement of CO2 Concentrations in the Troposphere from Space: Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Kawa, S. R.; Sun, X.; Krainak, M. A.; Mao, J.; Jian, P.; Collatz, G. J.; Stephen, M.

    2006-12-01

    We report progress in developing a laser technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations from orbit. Our initial goal is to demonstrate a lidar technique and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft. Our final goal is to develop a practical space instrument and mission approach for active CO2 measurements at the 1 ppmv level. This would allow continuous measurements of CO2 mixing ratio, both day and night, over land and ocean surfaces, under realistic atmospheric scattering conditions. Measuring the CO2 mixing ratio in the troposphere from space is quite challenging. High signal-to-noise ratios and measurement stabilities are needed for accurate mixing ratio estimates. Our laser sounder approach has some fundamental advantages over passive sensors which use sunlight. It always uses a common nadir/zenith measurement path and the narrow laser divergence angles produce small laser footprints. The laser source allows it to measure in sunlight and darkness over different surfaces giving full global coverage. It can measure continuously over the ocean, to cloud tops and through broken clouds. The lasers are pulsed and potential measurement errors from aerosol scattering can be greatly reduced by using time gating in the receiver. Our approach uses a dual channel laser altimeter/spectrometer, which continuously measures at nadir from a near polar circular orbit. It uses several tunable fiber lasers for simultaneous measurement of the absorption from CO2 and O2, and aerosol backscatter in the same path. It directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams from the instrument's lasers toward nadir, and measures the energy of the laser echoes reflected from land and water surfaces During the measurement its lasers are tuned on- and off- a selected CO2 line near 1572 nm and a selected O2 line near 768 nm in the Oxygen A band at kHz rates. The receiver uses a 1-m diameter

  7. Impact of oceanic circulation changes on atmospheric δ13CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menviel, L.; Mouchet, A.; Meissner, K. J.; Joos, F.; England, M. H.

    2015-11-01

    δ13CO2 measured in Antarctic ice cores provides constraints on oceanic and terrestrial carbon cycle processes linked with millennial-scale changes in atmospheric CO2. However, the interpretation of δ13CO2 is not straightforward. Using carbon isotope-enabled versions of the LOVECLIM and Bern3D models, we perform a set of sensitivity experiments in which the formation rates of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW), North Pacific Deep Water (NPDW), Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) are varied. We study the impact of these circulation changes on atmospheric δ13CO2 as well as on the oceanic δ13C distribution. In general, we find that the formation rates of AABW, NADW, NPDW, and AAIW are negatively correlated with changes in δ13CO2: namely, strong oceanic ventilation decreases atmospheric δ13CO2. However, since large-scale oceanic circulation reorganizations also impact nutrient utilization and the Earth's climate, the relationship between atmospheric δ13CO2 levels and ocean ventilation rate is not unequivocal. In both models atmospheric δ13CO2 is very sensitive to changes in AABW formation rates: increased AABW formation enhances the transport of low δ13C waters to the surface and decreases atmospheric δ13CO2. By contrast, the impact of NADW changes on atmospheric δ13CO2 is less robust and might be model dependent. This results from complex interplay between global climate, carbon cycle, and the formation rate of NADW, a water body characterized by relatively high δ13C.

  8. Global and Regional Constraints on Exchanges of CO2 Between the Atmosphere and Terrestrial Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, S. C.

    2001-12-01

    The vigorous atmospheric circulation rapidly mixes CO2 that is exchanged with the terrestrial biosphere and oceans. Therefore, at time scales greater than 1 year, the approximate interhemispheric exchange time of the atmosphere, an average of CO2 measurements from a network of surface stations can be used to accurately determine the global net change in atmospheric CO2. By subtracting CO2 produced by fossil fuel combustion, which is well characterized by national statistics, the global the sum of terrestrial biospheric and oceanic net fluxes, here termed the "nonfossil" CO2 flux, can also be accurately determined. The nonfossil CO2 flux averaged -2.1+/-0.3 PgC/yr and -3.2+/-0.4 PgC/yr in the 1980s and 1990s respectively (negative denotes out of the atmosphere), and varied in annual average from about 0 to -4 PgC/yr over these two decades. Two primary methods have been used to further partition the nonfossil CO2 flux between land and oceans: the O2 and 13C/12C methods, which rely, respectively, on measurements of atmospheric O2 (actually O2/N2 for technical reasons) and of the 13C/12C ratio of CO2. Burning of fossil fuel consumes atmospheric O2 and releases CO2 with a 13C/12C ratio lower than that of atmospheric CO2 whereas uptake of CO2 by terrestrial plants releases O2, and increases the atmospheric 13C/12C ratio owing to the preferential assimilation of 12CO2 relative to 13CO2. In contrast, the uptake of CO2 by the oceans has little effect on either the atmospheric O2 or 13C/12C ratio. Therefore, the net CO2 uptake or release from the terrestrial biosphere can be calculated in either method by subtracting the change owing to fossil fuel emissions from the measured change in the atmosphere, utilizing known stoichiometric ratios of O2 and CO2 in the O2 method, and isotopic fractionation factors in the 13C/12C method. Currently, the O2 method gives a net global terrestrial biospheric CO2 flux of -0.2+/-0.7 PgC/yr and -1.4+/-0.7 PgC/yr for the 1980s and the 1990s

  9. Simulated effect of calcification feedback on atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification

    OpenAIRE

    Han Zhang; Long Cao

    2016-01-01

    Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 reduces pH and saturation state of calcium carbonate materials of seawater, which could reduce the calcification rate of some marine organisms, triggering a negative feedback on the growth of atmospheric CO2. We quantify the effect of this CO2-calcification feedback by conducting a series of Earth system model simulations that incorporate different parameterization schemes describing the dependence of calcification rate on saturation state of CaCO3. In a scen...

  10. Response of atmospheric CO2 to the abrupt cooling event 8200 years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jinho; Brook, Edward J.; Buizert, Christo

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 records for the centennial scale cooling event 8200 years ago (8.2 ka event) may help us understand climate-carbon cycle feedbacks under interglacial conditions, which are important for understanding future climate, but existing records do not provide enough detail. Here we present a new CO2 record from the Siple Dome ice core, Antarctica, that covers 7.4-9.0 ka with 8 to 16 year resolution. We observe a small, about 1-2 ppm, increase of atmospheric CO2 during the 8.2 ka event. The increase is not significant when compared to other centennial variations in the Holocene that are not linked to large temperature changes. Our results do not agree with leaf stomata records that suggest a CO2 decrease of up to ~25 ppm and imply that the sensitivity of atmospheric CO2 to the primarily Northern Hemisphere cooling of the 8.2 ka event was limited.

  11. The role of artificial atmospheric CO2 removal in stabilizing Earth's climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickfeld, K.; Tokarska, K.

    2014-12-01

    The current CO2 emission trend entails a risk that the 2°C target will be missed, potentially causing "dangerous" changes in Earth's climate system. This research explores the role of artificial atmospheric CO2 removal (also referred to as "negative emissions") in stabilizing Earth's climate after overshoot. We designed a range of plausible CO2 emission scenarios, which follow a gradual transition from a fossil fuel driven economy to a zero-emission energy system, followed by a period of negative emissions. The scenarios differ in peak emissions rate and, accordingly, the amount of negative emissions, to reach the same cumulative emissions compatible with the 2°C temperature stabilization target. The climate system components' responses are computed using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model of intermediate complexity. Results suggest that negative emissions are effective in reversing the global mean temperature and stabilizing it at a desired level (2°C above pre-industrial) after overshoot. Also, changes in the meridional overturning circulation and sea ice are reversible with the artificial removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. However, sea level continues to rise and is not reversible for several centuries, even under assumption of large amounts of negative emissions. For sea level to decline, atmospheric CO2 needs to be reduced to pre-industrial levels in our simulations. During the negative emission phase, outgassing of CO2 from terrestrial and marine carbon sinks offsets the artificial removal of atmospheric CO2, thereby reducing its effectiveness. On land, the largest CO2 outgassing occurs in the Tropics and is partially compensated by CO2 uptake at northern high latitudes. In the ocean, outgassing occurs mostly in the Southern Ocean, North Atlantic and tropical Pacific. The strongest outgassing occurs for pathways entailing greatest amounts of negative emissions, such that the efficiency of CO2 removal - here defined as the change in

  12. Radiocarbon isotopic evidence for assimilation of atmospheric CO2 by the seagrass Zostera marina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K.; Kuwae, T.

    2015-10-01

    Submerged aquatic vegetation takes up water-column dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) as a carbon source across its thin cuticle layer. It is expected that marine macrophytes also use atmospheric CO2 when exposed to air during low tide, although assimilation of atmospheric CO2 has never been quantitatively evaluated. Using the radiocarbon isotopic signatures (Δ14C) of the seagrass Zostera marina, DIC and particulate organic carbon (POC), we show quantitatively that Z. marina takes up and assimilates atmospheric modern CO2 in a shallow coastal ecosystem. The Δ14C values of the seagrass (-40 to -10 ‰) were significantly higher than those of aquatic DIC (-46 to -18 ‰), indicating that the seagrass uses a 14C-rich carbon source (atmospheric CO2, +17 ‰). A carbon-source mixing model indicated that the seagrass assimilated 0-40 % (mean, 17 %) of its inorganic carbon as atmospheric CO2. CO2 exchange between the air and the seagrass might be enhanced by the presence of a very thin film of water over the air-exposed leaves during low tide. Our radiocarbon isotope analysis, showing assimilation of atmospheric modern CO2 as an inorganic carbon source, improves our understanding of the role of seagrass meadows in coastal carbon dynamics.

  13. Radiocarbon isotopic evidence for assimilation of atmospheric CO2 by the seagrass Zostera marina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Watanabe

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Submerged aquatic vegetation assimilates dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in the water column as a carbon source across its thin cuticle layer. However, it is expected that marine macrophytes also use atmospheric CO2 when exposed to the air during low tide, although assimilation of atmospheric CO2 has never been quantitatively evaluated. Using the radiocarbon isotopic signatures (Δ14C of the seagrass Zostera marina and DIC, we show quantitatively that Z. marina takes up and assimilates atmospheric modern CO2 in a shallow coastal ecosystem. The Δ14C values of the seagrass (−36 to −8‰ were significantly higher than those of aquatic DIC (−45 to −18‰, indicating that the seagrass uses a 14C-rich carbon source (atmospheric CO2, +17‰. A carbon-source mixing model indicated that the seagrass assimilated ~ 46% (mean: 22% of its inorganic carbon as atmospheric CO2. CO2 exchange between the air and the seagrass may be enhanced by the presence of a very thin water film over the air-exposed leaves during low tide. Our radiocarbon isotope analysis, showing assimilation of atmospheric modern CO2 as an inorganic carbon source, offers better understanding of the role of seagrass meadows in coastal carbon dynamics.

  14. Laser Sounder for Global Measurement of CO2 Concentrations in the Troposphere from Space: Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, J. B.; Krainak, M.; Riris, H. J.; Sun, X.; Riris, H.; Andrews, A. E.; Collatz, J.

    2004-01-01

    We describe progress toward developing a laser-based technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations from orbit. Our goal is to demonstrate a lidar technique and instrument technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft at the few ppm level, with a capability of scaling to permit global CO2 measurements from orbit. Accurate measurements of the tropospheric CO2 mixing ratio from space are challenging due to the many potential error sources. These include possible interference from other trace gas species, the effects of temperature, clouds, aerosols & turbulence in the path, changes in surface reflectivity, and variability in dry air density caused by changes in atmospheric pressure, water vapor and topographic height. Some potential instrumental errors include frequency drifts in the transmitter, small transmission and sensitivity drifts in the instrument. High signal-to-noise ratios and measurement stability are needed for mixing ratio estimates at the few ppm level. We have been developing a laser sounder approach as a candidate for a future space mission. It utilizes multiple different laser transmitters to permit simultaneous measurement of CO2 and O2 extinction, and aerosol backscatter in the same measurement path. It directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams from the instrument's fiber lasers toward nadir, and measures the energy of the strong laser echoes reflected from the Earth's land and water surfaces. During the measurement its narrow linewidth lasers are rapidly tuned on- and off- selected CO2 line near 1572 nm and an O2 absorption line near 770 nm. The receiver measures the energies of the laser echoes from the surface and any clouds and aerosols in the path with photon counting detectors. Ratioing the on- to off-line echo pulse energies for each gas permits the column extinction and column densities of CO2 and O2 to be estimated simultaneously via the

  15. Interactive Effects of Drought Stresses and Elevated CO2 Concentration on Photochemistry Efficiency of Cucumber Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Ming Li; Bin-Bin Liu; Yang Wu; Zhi-Rong Zou

    2008-01-01

    To reveal and quantify the interactive effects of drought stresses and elevated CO2 concentration [CO2] on photochemistry efficiency of cucumber seedlings, the portable chlorophyll meter was used to measure the chlorophyll content, and the Imaging-PAM was used to image the chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and rapid light response curves (RLC) of leaves in two adjacent greenhouses. The results showed that chlorophyll content of leaves was reduced significantly with drought stress aggravated. Minimal fluorescence (Fo) was increased while maximal quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm) decreased significantly by severe drought stress. The significant decrease of effective quantum yield of PSll (Y(Ⅱ)) accompanied by the significant increase of quantum yield of regulated energy dissipation (Y(NPQ)) was observed under severe drought stress condition, but there was no change of quantum yield of nonregulated energy dissipation (Y(NO)). We detected that the coefficient of photochemical quenching (Qp) decreased, and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) increased significantly under severe drought stress. Furthermore, we found that maximum apparent electron transport rate (ETRmax) and saturating photosynthetically active radiation (PPFDsat) decreased significantly with drought stress aggravated. However, elevated [CO2] significantly increased FvlFm, Qp and PPFDsat, and decreased NPQ under all water conditions, although there were no significant effects on chlorophyll content, Fo, Y(Ⅱ), Y(NPQ), Y(NO) and ETRmax. Therefore, it is concluded that CO2-fertilized greenhouses or elevated atmospheric [CO2] in the future could be favorable for cucumber growth and development, and beneficial to alleviate the negative effects of drought stresses to a certain extent.

  16. Effects of elevated CO2 concentration on growth and water usage of tomato seedlings under different ammonium/nitrate ratios

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is generally expected to enhance photosynthesis and growth of agricultural C3 vegetable crops,and therefore results in an increase in crop yield.However,little is known about the combined effect of elevated CO2 and N species on plant growth and development.Two growth-chamber experiments were conducted to determine the effects of NH4+/NO3- ratio and elevated CO2 concentration on the physiological development and water use of tomato seedlings.Tomato was grown for 45 d in containers with nutrient solutions varying in NH4+/NO3- ratios and CO2 concentrations in growth chambers.Results showed that plant height,stem thickness,total dry weight,dry weight of the leaves,stems and roots,G value (total plant dry weight/seedling days),chlorophyll content,photosynthetic rate,leaf-level and whole plant-level water use efficiency and cumulative water consumption of tomato seedlings were increased with increasing proportion of NO3- in nutrient solutions in the elevated CO2 treatment.Plant biomass,plant height,stem thickness and photosynthetic rate were 67%,22%,24% and 55% higher at elevated CO2 concentration than at ambient CO2 concentration,depending on the values of NH4+/NO3- ratio.These results indicated that elevating CO2 concentration did not mitigate the adverse effects of 100% NH4+-N (in nutrient solution) on the tomato seedlings.At both CO2 levels,NH4+/NO3- ratios of nutrient solutions strongly influenced almost every measure of plant performance,and nitrate-fed plants attained a greater biomass production,as compared to ammonium-fed plants.These phenomena seem to be related to the coordinated regulation of photosynthetic rate and cumulative water consumption of tomato seedlings.

  17. Climate change goes underground: effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on microbial community structure and activities in the rhizosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drigo, B.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    General concern about climate change has led to growing interest in the responses of terrestrial ecosystems to elevated concentrations of CO2 in the atmosphere. Experimentation during the last two to three decades using a large variety of approaches has provided sufficient information to conclude th

  18. ASSIMILATION, RESPIRATION AND ALLOCATION OF CARBON IN PLANTAGO MAJOR AS AFFECTED BY ATMOSPHERIC CO2 LEVELS - A CASE-STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENHERTOG, J; STULEN, [No Value; LAMBERS, H

    1993-01-01

    The response of Plantago major ssp. pleiosperma plants, grown on nutrient solution in a climate chamber, to a doubling of the ambient atmospheric CO2 concentration was investigated. Total dry matter production was increased by 30 % after 3 weeks of exposure, due to a transient stimulation of the rel

  19. Effects of increasing UV-B radiation and atmospheric CO2 on photosynthesis and growth: implications for terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increases in UV-B radiation reaching the earth as a result of stratospheric ozone depletion will most likely accompany increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Many studies have examined the effects of each factor independently, but few have evaluated the combined effects of both UV-B radiation and elevated CO2. In general the results of such studies have shown independent effects on growth or seed yield. Although interspecific variation is large, high levels of UV-B radiation tends to reduce plant growth in sensitive species, while CO2 enrichment tends to promote growth in most C3 species. However, most previous studies have not looked at temporal effects or at the relationship between photosynthetic acclimation to CO2 and possible photosynthetic limitations imposed by UV-B radiation. Elevated CO2 may provide some protection against UV-B for some species. In contrast, UV-B radiation may limit the ability to exploit elevated CO2 in other species. Interactions between the effects of CO2 enrichment and UV-B radiation exposure have also been shown for biomass allocation. Effects on both biomass allocation and photosynthetic acclimation may be important to ecosystem structure in terms of seedling establishment, competition and reproductive output. Few studies have evaluated ecosystem processes such as decomposition or nutrient cycling. Interactive effects may be subtle and species specific but should not be ignored in the assessment of the potential impacts of increases in CO2 and UV-B radiation on plants. (author)

  20. Effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on soil microbial respiration and root/rhizosphere respiration in-forest soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The two main components of soil respiration,i.e.,root/rhizosphere and microbial respiration,respond differently to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations both in mechanism and sensitivity because they have different substrates derived from plant and soil organic matter,respectively.To model the carbon cycle and predict the carbon source/sink of forest ecosystems,we must first understand the relative contributions of root/rhizosphere and microbial respiration to total soil respiration under elevated CO2 concentrations.Root/rhizosphere and soil microbial respiration have been shown to increase,decrease and remain unchanged under elevated CO2 concentrations.A significantly positive relationship between root biomass and root/rhizosphere respiration has been found.Fine roots respond more strongly to elevated CO2 concentrations than coarse roots.Evidence suggests that soil microbial respiration is highly variable and uncertain under elevated CO2 concentrations.Microbial biomass and activity are related or unrelated to rates of microbial respiration.Because substrate availability drives microbial metabolism in soils,it is likely that much of the variability in microbial respiration results from differences in the response of root growth to elevated CO2 concentrations and subsequent changes in substrate production.Biotic and abiotic factors affecting soil respiration were found to affect both root/rhizosphere and microbial respiration.

  1. An assessment procedure for chemical utilisation schemes intended to reduce CO2 emissions to atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Audus, H.; Oonk, H.

    1997-01-01

    The concept of reducing emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere by producing chemicals has been suggested by many people as a potential greenhouse gas mitigation option. The goal of such schemes is either: (i) fixation of CO2 in a chemical compound for a significant time, or, (ii) reduction of emissions

  2. Impacts of 3 years of elevated atmospheric CO2 on rhizosphere carbon flow and microbial community dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drigo, Barbara; Kowalchuk, George A; Knapp, Brigitte A; Pijl, Agata S; Boschker, Henricus T S; van Veen, Johannes A

    2013-02-01

    Carbon (C) uptake by terrestrial ecosystems represents an important option for partially mitigating anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Short-term atmospheric elevated CO2 exposure has been shown to create major shifts in C flow routes and diversity of the active soil-borne microbial community. Long-term increases in CO2 have been hypothesized to have subtle effects due to the potential adaptation of soil microorganism to the increased flow of organic C. Here, we studied the effects of prolonged elevated atmospheric CO2 exposure on microbial C flow and microbial communities in the rhizosphere. Carex arenaria (a nonmycorrhizal plant species) and Festuca rubra (a mycorrhizal plant species) were grown at defined atmospheric conditions differing in CO2 concentration (350 and 700 ppm) for 3 years. During this period, C flow was assessed repeatedly (after 6 months, 1, 2, and 3 years) by (13) C pulse-chase experiments, and label was tracked through the rhizosphere bacterial, general fungal, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) communities. Fatty acid biomarker analyses and RNA-stable isotope probing (RNA-SIP), in combination with real-time PCR and PCR-DGGE, were used to examine microbial community dynamics and abundance. Throughout the experiment the influence of elevated CO2 was highly plant dependent, with the mycorrhizal plant exerting a greater influence on both bacterial and fungal communities. Biomarker data confirmed that rhizodeposited C was first processed by AMF and subsequently transferred to bacterial and fungal communities in the rhizosphere soil. Over the course of 3 years, elevated CO2 caused a continuous increase in the (13) C enrichment retained in AMF and an increasing delay in the transfer of C to the bacterial community. These results show that, not only do elevated atmospheric CO2 conditions induce changes in rhizosphere C flow and dynamics but also continue to develop over multiple seasons, thereby affecting terrestrial ecosystems C utilization processes.

  3. Rapid, Long-term Monitoring of CO2 Concentration and δ13CO2 at CCUS Sites Allows Discrimination of Leakage Patterns from Natural Background Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galfond, B.; Riemer, D. D.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    In order for Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS) to gain wide acceptance as a method for mitigating atmospheric CO2 concentrations, schemes must be devised to ensure that potential leakage is detected. New regulations from the US Environmental Protection Agency require monitoring and accounting for Class VI injection wells, which will remain a barrier to wide scale CCUS deployment until effective and efficient monitoring techniques have been developed and proven. Monitoring near-surface CO2 at injection sites to ensure safety and operational success requires high temporal resolution CO2 concentration and carbon isotopic (δ13C) measurements. The only technologies currently capable of this rapid measurement of δ13C are optical techniques such as Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS). We have developed a comprehensive remote monitoring approach using CRDS and a custom manifold system to obtain accurate rapid measurements from a large sample area over an extended study period. Our modified Picarro G1101-i CRDS allows for automated rapid and continuous field measurement of δ13CO2 and concentrations of relevant gas species. At our field site, where preparations have been underway for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) operations, we have been able to measure biogenic effects on a diurnal scale, as well as variation due to precipitation and seasonality. Taking these background trends into account, our statistical treatment of real data has been used to improve signal-to-noise ratios by an order of magnitude over published models. Our system has proven field readiness for the monitoring of sites with even modest CO2 fluxes.

  4. How does atmospheric elevated CO2 affect crop pests and their natural enemies? Case histories from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Cheng Sun; Jin Yin; Fa-Jun Chen; Gang Wu; Feng Ge

    2011-01-01

    Global atmospheric CO2 concentrations have risen rapidly since the Industrial Revolution and are considered as a primary factor in climate change.The effects of elevated CO2 on herbivore insects were found to be primarily through the CO2-induced changes occurring in their host plants,which then possibly affect the intensity and frequency of pest outbreaks on crops.This paper reviews several ongoing research models using primary pests of crops (cotton bollworm,whitefly,aphids) and their natural enemies (ladybeetles,parasitoids) in China to examine insect responses to elevated CO2.It is generally indicated that elevated CO2 prolonged the development of cotton bollworm,Helicoverpa armigera,a chewing insect,by decreasing the foliar nitrogen of host plants.In contrast,the phloemsucking aphid and whitefly insects had species-specific responses to elevated CO2 because of complex interactions that occur in the phloem sieve elements of plants.Some aphid species,such as cotton aphid,Aphis gossypii and wheat aphid,Sitobion avenae,were considered to represent the only feeding guild to respond positively to elevated CO2 conditions.Although whitefly,Bemisia tabaci,a major vector of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus,had neutral response to elevated CO2,the plants became less vulnerable to the virus infection under elevated CO2.The predator and parasitoid response to elevated CO2 were frequently idiosyncratic.These documents from Chinese scientists suggested that elevated CO2 initially affects the crop plant and then cascades to a higher trophic level through the food chain to encompass herbivores (pests),their natural enemies,pathogens and underground nematodes,which disrupt the natural balance observed previously in agricultural ecosystems.

  5. CO2 greenhouse in the early martian atmosphere: SO2 inhibits condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Y L; Nair, H; Gerstell, M F

    1997-01-01

    Many investigators of the early martian climate have suggested that a dense carbon dioxide atmosphere was present and warmed the surface above the melting point of water (J.B. Pollack, J.F. Kasting, S.M. Richardson, and K. Poliakoff 1987. Icarus 71, 203-224). However, J.F. Kasting (1991. Icarus 94, 1-13) pointed out that previous thermal models of the primitive martian atmosphere had not considered the condensation of CO2. When this effect was incorporated, Kasting found that CO2 by itself is inadequate to warm the surface. SO2 absorbs strongly in the near UV region of the solar spectrum. While a small amount of SO2 may have a negligible effect by itself on the surface temperature, it may have significantly warmed the middle atmosphere of early Mars, much as ozone warms the terrestrial stratosphere today. If this region is kept warm enough to inhibit the condensation of CO2, then CO2 remains a viable greenhouse gas. Our preliminary radiative modeling shows that the addition of 0.1 ppmv of SO2 in a 2 bar CO2 atmosphere raises the temperature of the middle atmosphere by approximately 10 degrees, so that the upper atmosphere in a 1 D model remains above the condensation temperature of CO2. In addition, this amount of SO2 in the atmosphere provides an effective UV shield for a hypothetical biosphere on the martian surface.

  6. Electrochemical CO2 reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Kriescher, Stefanie M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The atmospheric concentration of CO2 has increased significantly during the last two centuries. Since CO2 is considered to be one of the largest contributors to the greenhouse effect and is postulated to cause global warming, it is important to stabilize and/or reduce its concentration. Apart from regulations for the amount of CO2 that may be emmitted, carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), biological and chemical conversions are potential ways to stabilize and/or reduce the atmospheric co...

  7. Phenol-Formaldehyde Resin-Based Carbons for CO2 Separation at Sub-Atmospheric Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Álvarez-Gutiérrez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The challenge of developing effective separation and purification technologies that leave much smaller energy footprints is greater for carbon dioxide (CO2 than for other gases. In addition to its involvement in climate change, CO2 is present as an impurity in biogas and bio-hydrogen (biological production by dark fermentation, in post-combustion processes (flue gas, CO2-N2 and many other gas streams. Selected phenol-formaldehyde resin-based activated carbons prepared in our laboratory have been evaluated under static conditions (adsorption isotherms as potential adsorbents for CO2 separation at sub-atmospheric pressures, i.e., in post-combustion processes or from biogas and bio-hydrogen streams. CO2, H2, N2, and CH4 adsorption isotherms at 25 °C and up to 100 kPa were obtained using a volumetric equipment and were correlated by applying the Sips model. Adsorption equilibrium was then predicted for multicomponent gas mixtures by extending the multicomponent Sips model and the Ideal Adsorbed Solution Theory (IAST in conjunction with the Sips model. The CO2 uptakes of the resin-derived carbons from CO2-CH4, CO2-H2, and CO2-N2 at atmospheric pressure were greater than those of the reference commercial carbon (Calgon BPL. The performance of the resin-derived carbons in terms of equilibrium of adsorption seems therefore relevant to CO2 separation in post-combustion (flue gas, CO2-N2 and in hydrogen fermentation (CO2-H2, CO2-CH4.

  8. The Effect of CO2 Ice Cap Sublimation on Mars Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterson, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Sublimation of the polar CO2 ice caps on Mars is an ongoing phenomenon that may be contributing to secular climate change on Mars. The transfer of CO2 between the surface and atmosphere via sublimation and deposition may alter atmospheric mass such that net atmospheric mass is increasing despite seasonal variations in CO2 transfer. My study builds on previous studies by Kahre and Haberle that analyze and compare data from the Phoenix and Viking Landers 1 and 2 to determine whether secular climate change is happening on Mars. In this project, I use two years worth of temperature, pressure, and elevation data from the MSL Curiosity rover to create a program that allows for successful comparison of Curiosity pressure data to Viking Lander pressure data so a conclusion can be drawn regarding whether CO2 ice cap sublimation is causing a net increase in atmospheric mass and is thus contributing to secular climate change on Mars.

  9. Root Herbivores Drive Changes to Plant Primary Chemistry, but Root Loss Is Mitigated under Elevated Atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Scott W.; Johnson, Scott N.; Jones, T. Hefin; Ostle, Nick J.; Hails, Rosemary S.; Vanbergen, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Above- and belowground herbivory represents a major challenge to crop productivity and sustainable agriculture worldwide. How this threat from multiple herbivore pests will change under anthropogenic climate change, via altered trophic interactions and plant response traits, is key to understanding future crop resistance to herbivory. In this study, we hypothesized that atmospheric carbon enrichment would increase the amount (biomass) and quality (C:N ratio) of crop plant resources for above- and belowground herbivore species. In a controlled environment facility, we conducted a microcosm experiment using the large raspberry aphid (Amphorophora idaei), the root feeding larvae of the vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus), and the raspberry (Rubus idaeus) host-plant. There were four herbivore treatments (control, aphid only, weevil only and a combination of both herbivores) and an ambient (aCO2) or elevated (eCO2) CO2 treatment (390 versus 650 ± 50 μmol/mol) assigned to two raspberry cultivars (cv Glen Ample or Glen Clova) varying in resistance to aphid herbivory. Contrary to our predictions, eCO2 did not increase crop biomass or the C:N ratio of the plant tissues, nor affect herbivore abundance either directly or via the host-plant. Root herbivory reduced belowground crop biomass under aCO2 but not eCO2, suggesting that crops could tolerate attack in a CO2 enriched environment. Root herbivory also increased the C:N ratio in leaf tissue at eCO2, potentially due to decreased N uptake indicated by lower N concentrations found in the roots. Root herbivory greatly increased root C concentrations under both CO2 treatments. Our findings confirm that responses of crop biomass and biochemistry to climate change need examining within the context of herbivory, as biotic interactions appear as important as direct effects of eCO2 on crop productivity. PMID:27379129

  10. Root Herbivores Drive Changes to Plant Primary Chemistry, but Root Loss Is Mitigated under Elevated Atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Scott W; Johnson, Scott N; Jones, T Hefin; Ostle, Nick J; Hails, Rosemary S; Vanbergen, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    Above- and belowground herbivory represents a major challenge to crop productivity and sustainable agriculture worldwide. How this threat from multiple herbivore pests will change under anthropogenic climate change, via altered trophic interactions and plant response traits, is key to understanding future crop resistance to herbivory. In this study, we hypothesized that atmospheric carbon enrichment would increase the amount (biomass) and quality (C:N ratio) of crop plant resources for above- and belowground herbivore species. In a controlled environment facility, we conducted a microcosm experiment using the large raspberry aphid (Amphorophora idaei), the root feeding larvae of the vine weevil (Otiorhynchus sulcatus), and the raspberry (Rubus idaeus) host-plant. There were four herbivore treatments (control, aphid only, weevil only and a combination of both herbivores) and an ambient (aCO2) or elevated (eCO2) CO2 treatment (390 versus 650 ± 50 μmol/mol) assigned to two raspberry cultivars (cv Glen Ample or Glen Clova) varying in resistance to aphid herbivory. Contrary to our predictions, eCO2 did not increase crop biomass or the C:N ratio of the plant tissues, nor affect herbivore abundance either directly or via the host-plant. Root herbivory reduced belowground crop biomass under aCO2 but not eCO2, suggesting that crops could tolerate attack in a CO2 enriched environment. Root herbivory also increased the C:N ratio in leaf tissue at eCO2, potentially due to decreased N uptake indicated by lower N concentrations found in the roots. Root herbivory greatly increased root C concentrations under both CO2 treatments. Our findings confirm that responses of crop biomass and biochemistry to climate change need examining within the context of herbivory, as biotic interactions appear as important as direct effects of eCO2 on crop productivity. PMID:27379129

  11. Controle de Rhyzopertha dominica pela atmosfera controlada com CO2, em trigo Control of Rhyzopertha dominica using a controlled atmosphere with CO2, in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Amaro Gonçalves

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de gases inertes como fumigantes no controle de pragas é uma alternativa ao uso de fosfina. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a eficiência de uma atmosfera com CO2 no controle de Rhyzoperta dominica (Fabr. (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae em grãos de trigo armazenado. O trabalho constou de cinco concentrações de CO2 (0, 30 , 40, 50 e 60%, completadas com N2, três períodos de exposição (5, 10, 15 dias, três populações de R. dominica (Fabr. (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae (Campo Mourão, PR, Sete Lagoas, MG e Santa Rosa, RS e sete fases de desenvolvimento do inseto (ovo, larva de 1º, 2º, 3º e 4º ínstar, pupa e adulto com três repetições. As diferentes fases da R. dominica foram acondicionadas em tecido organza e levadas para câmaras de expurgo de 200 litros com 75% deste volume repletos de grãos. As câmaras foram vedadas com borracha de silicone para garantir a hermeticidade. Após a vedação das câmaras injetavam-se os gases contendo diferentes teores de CO2. Os resultados mostraram que todos os teores de CO2 causaram 100% de mortalidade de adultos das três populações nos três períodos de exposição utilizados. Em pupas a mortalidade atingiu 100% no teor de 60% de CO2 para as três populações no período de 15 dias de exposição; porém, todos os teores de CO2 utilizados no período de 15 dias de exposição causaram 100% de mortalidade das pupas da população de Santa Rosa. Para o adequado controle de larvas de diferentes ínstares são necessários teores de CO2 iguais ou acima de 50%. Nos períodos de 10 e 15 dias de exposição, todos os teores de CO2 causaram 100% de mortalidade dos ovos das três populações avaliadas.Controlled atmosphere with inert gases offers an alternative to phosphine use to control stored grain pests. The objective of this research was to test a controlled atmosphere with CO2 to control Rhyzoperta dominica, (Fabr. (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae, an important pest of stored wheat

  12. Elevated atmospheric CO2 levels affect community structure of rice root-associated bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Okubo, Takashi; Liu, Dongyan; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ikeda, Seishi; Asakawa, Susumu; Tokida, Takeshi; Tago, Kanako; Hayatsu, Masahito; Aoki, Naohiro; Ishimaru, Ken; Ujiie, Kazuhiro; Usui, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Sakai, Hidemitsu; Hayashi, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that elevated atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) affects rice yields and grain quality. However, the responses of root-associated bacteria to [CO2] elevation have not been characterized in a large-scale field study. We conducted a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment (ambient + 200 μmol.mol−1) using three rice cultivars (Akita 63, Takanari, and Koshihikari) and two experimental lines of Koshihikari [chromosome segment substitution and near-isogenic lines (NILs)] to de...

  13. Elevated atmospheric CO2 levels affect community structure of rice root-associated bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Kiwamu eMinamisawa; Takashi eOkubo; Dongyan eLiu; Hirohito eTsurumaru; Seishi eIkeda; Susumu eAsakawa; Takeshi eTokida; Kanako eTago; Masahito eHayatsu; Naohiro eAoki; Ken eIshimaru; Kazuhiro eUjiie; Yasuhiro eUsui; Hirofumi eNakamura; Hidemitsu eSakai

    2015-01-01

    A number of studies have shown that elevated atmospheric CO2 ([CO2]) affects rice yields and grain quality. However, the responses of root-associated bacteria to [CO2] elevation have not been characterized in a large-scale field study. We conducted a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment (ambient + 200 μmol⋅mol−1) using three rice cultivars (Akita 63, Takanari, and Koshihikari) and two experimental lines of Koshihikari (chromosome segment substitution and near-isogenic lines) to determine...

  14. Sensitivity of Pliocene Arctic climate to orbital forcing, atmospheric CO2 and sea ice albedo parameterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Fergus W.; Haywood, Alan M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Pickering, Steven J.

    2016-05-01

    General circulation model (GCM) simulations of the mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP, 3.264 to 3.025 Myr ago) do not reproduce the magnitude of Northern Hemisphere high latitude surface air and sea surface temperature (SAT and SST) warming that proxy data indicate. There is also large uncertainty regarding the state of sea ice cover in the mPWP. Evidence for both perennial and seasonal mPWP Arctic sea ice is found through analyses of marine sediments, whilst in a multi-model ensemble of mPWP climate simulations, half of the ensemble simulated ice-free summer Arctic conditions. Given the strong influence that sea ice exerts on high latitude temperatures, an understanding of the nature of mPWP Arctic sea ice would be highly beneficial. Using the HadCM3 GCM, this paper explores the impact of various combinations of potential mPWP orbital forcing, atmospheric CO2 concentrations and minimum sea ice albedo on sea ice extent and high latitude warming. The focus is on the Northern Hemisphere, due to availability of proxy data, and the large data-model discrepancies in this region. Changes in orbital forcings are demonstrated to be sufficient to alter the Arctic sea ice simulated by HadCM3 from perennial to seasonal. However, this occurs only when atmospheric CO2 concentrations exceed 300 ppm. Reduction of the minimum sea ice albedo from 0.5 to 0.2 is also sufficient to simulate seasonal sea ice, with any of the combinations of atmospheric CO2 and orbital forcing. Compared to a mPWP control simulation, monthly mean increases north of 60°N of up to 4.2 °C (SST) and 9.8 °C (SAT) are simulated. With varying CO2, orbit and sea ice albedo values we are able to reproduce proxy temperature records that lean towards modest levels of high latitude warming, but other proxy data showing greater warming remain beyond the reach of our model. This highlights the importance of additional proxy records at high latitudes and ongoing efforts to compare proxy signals between sites.

  15. Concentration and stable carbon isotopic composition of CO2 in cave air of Postojnska jama, Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Mandic

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 and its isotopic composition (δ13CairCO2 were measured in Postojnska jama, Slovenia, at 10 locations inside the cave and outside the cave during a one-year period. At all interior locations the pCO2 was higher and δ13CairCO2 lower than in the outside atmosphere. Strong seasonal fluctuations in both parameters were observed at locations deeper in the cave, which are isolated from the cave air circulation. By using a binary mixing model of two sources of CO2, one of them being the atmospheric CO2, we show that the excess of CO2 in the cave air has a δ13C value of -23.3 ± 0.7 ‰, in reasonable agreement with the previously measured soil-CO2 δ13C values. The stable isotope data suggest that soil CO2 is brought to the cave by drip water.

  16. Simulation of atmospheric CO2 over Europe and western Siberia using the regional scale model REMO

    OpenAIRE

    Chevillard, Anne; Karstens, Ute; Ciais, Philippe; Lafont, Sébastien; Heimann, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The spatial distribution and the temporal variability of atmospheric CO2 over Europe and western Siberia are investigated using the regional atmospheric model, REMO. The model, of typical horizontal resolution 50 km, is part of a nested modelling framework that has been established as a concerted action during the EUROSIBERIAN CARBONFLUX project. In REMO, the transport of CO2 is simulated together with climate variables, which offers the possibility of calculating at each time step the land a...

  17. Interaction between Medicago truncatula and Pseudomonas fluorescens: evaluation of costs and benefits across an elevated atmospheric CO(2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Lepinay

    Full Text Available Soil microorganisms play a key role in both plants nutrition and health. Their relation with plant varies from mutualism to parasitism, according to the balance of costs and benefits for the two partners of the interaction. These interactions involved the liberation of plant organic compounds via rhizodeposition. Modification of atmospheric CO(2 concentration may affect rhizodeposition and as a consequence trophic interactions that bind plants and microorganisms. Positive effect of elevated CO(2 on plants are rather well known but consequences for micoorganisms and their interactions with plants are still poorly understood. A gnotobiotic system has been developed to study the interaction between Medicago truncatula Jemalong J5 and the mutualistic bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens strain C7R12 under two atmospheric CO(2 concentrations: ambient (365 ppm versus enriched (750 ppm. Costs and benefits for each partner have been determined over time by measuring plant development and growth, the C and N contents of the various plant parts and the density of the bacteria in rhizosphere compartments. Following the increase in CO(2, there was a beneficial effect of P. fluorescens C7R12 on development, vegetative growth, and C/N content of M. truncatula. Concerning plant reproduction, an early seed production was noticed in presence of the bacterial strain combined with increased atmospheric CO(2 conditions. Paradoxically, this transient increase in seed production was correlated with a decrease in bacterial density in the rhizosphere soil, revealing a cost of increased CO(2 for the bacterial strain. This shift of costs-benefits ratio disappeared later during the plant growth. In conclusion, the increase in CO(2 concentration modifies transiently the cost-benefit balance in favor of the plant. These results may be explained either by a competition between the two partners or a change in bacterial physiology. The ecosystem functioning depends on the

  18. 2-micron Pulsed Direct Detection IPDA Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J.; Singh, U.; Petros, M.

    2012-12-01

    A 2-micron high energy, pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar is being developed for atmospheric CO2 measurements. Development of this lidar heavily leverages the 2-micron laser technologies developed in LaRC over the last decade. The high pulse energy, direct detection lidar operating at CO2 2-micron absorption band provides an alternate approach to measure CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. It is expected to provide high-precision measurement capability by unambiguously eliminating contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Our objective is to integrate an existing high energy double-pulsed 2-micron laser transmitter with a direct detection receiver and telescope to enable an airborne capability to perform a first proof of principle demonstration of airborne direct detection CO2 measurements. The 2-micron transmitter provides 100mJ at 10Hz with double pulse format specifically designed for DIAL/IPDA instrument. The compact, rugged, highly reliable transceiver is based on unique Ho:Tm:YLF high-energy 2-micron pulsed laser technology. All the optical mounts are custom designed and have space heritage. A 16-inch diameter telescope has been designed and being manufactured for the direct detection lidar. The detector is an InGaAs Positive-Intrinsic-Negative (PIN) photodiode manufactured by Hamamatsu Corporation. The performance of the detector is characterized at various operating temperatures and bias voltages for spectral response, NEP, response time, dynamic range, and linearity. A collinear lidar structure is designed to be integrated to NASA UC12 or B200 research aircrafts. This paper will describe the design of the airborne 2-micron pulsed IPDA lidar system; the lidar operation parameters; the wavelength pair selection; laser transmitter energy, pulse rate, beam divergence, double pulse generation and accurate frequency control; detector characterization; telescope design; lidar structure design

  19. Acetylene fuel from atmospheric CO2 on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1992-01-01

    The Mars mission scenario proposed by Baker and Zubrin (1990) intended for an unmanned preliminary mission is extended to maximize the total impulse of fuel produced with a minimum mass of hydrogen from Earth. The hydrogen along with atmospheric carbon dioxide is processed into methane and oxygen by the exothermic reaction in an atmospheric processing module. Use of simple chemical reactions to produce acetylene/oxygen rocket fuel on Mars from hydrogen makes it possible to produce an amount of fuel that is nearly 100 times the mass of hydrogen brought from earth. If such a process produces the return propellant for a manned Mars mission, the required mission mass in LEO is significantly reduced over a system using all earth-derived propellants.

  20. Using Mauna Loa Atmospheric CO2 Data in Large General Education Geoscience Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.; Kapp, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    We have been using the Mauna Loa atmospheric CO2 dataset (http://scrippsco2.ucsd.edu/data/in_situ_co2/monthly_mlo.csv) in a large (up to 300) General Education Geoscience course, primarily in small breakout groups (30 students). The exercise is designed to address quantitative literacy including percentages, slopes and linear trends, issues of data completeness and bias, quality of extrapolations, as well as implications for climate change. We are significantly revising the course, which serves 600 students a semester, with help from a curriculum grant. A major goal is to improve student learning by incorporating inquiry based activities in the large lecture setting. Lectures now incorporate several activities throughout a given class period, in which students are asked to use critical thinking skills such as interpreting patterns in data and graphs, analyzing a scientific hypothesis for its coherence with the scientific method, and answering higher order synthesis questions in both verbal and written form. This differs from our past format where class periods were dominated by lecture, with a single short activity done individually about every other lecture. To test the effectiveness of the new course format we will give students the same atmospheric CO2 exercise in the lecture setting that they were given previously in breakout groups. Students will work in small groups in lecture after receiving a short introduction to the exercise by the instructor. They will plot CO2 concentrations, make extrapolations, and interpret patterns in the data. We will compare scores on the exercise with previous semesters. We expect that students will do better having had more experience with interpreting scientific data and practicing higher order thinking skills. We also expect working in small groups will foster better learning through peer teaching and discussion. We will incorporate responses from students who took part in the exercises from current and previous semesters. We

  1. Carbon and Oxygen Stable Isotope Measurements of Martian Atmospheric CO2 by the Phoenix Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Paul B.; Boynton, W. V.; Hoffman, J. H.; Ming, D. W.; Hamara, D.

    2010-01-01

    Precise stable isotope measurements of the CO2 in the martian atmosphere have the potential to provide important constraints for our understanding of the history of volatiles, the carbon cycle, current atmospheric processes, and the degree of water/rock interaction on Mars [1]. The isotopic composition of the martian atmosphere has been measured using a number of different methods (Table 1), however a precise value (carbonates in martian meteorites [2-4] it has been proposed that the martian atmosphere was enriched in 13C [8]. This was supported by measurements of trapped CO2 gas in EETA 79001[2] which showed elevated Delta(sup 13)C values (Table 1). More recently, Earth-based spectroscopic measurements of the martian atmosphere have measured the martian CO2 to be depleted in C-13 relative to CO2 in the terrestrial atmosphere[ 7, 9-11]. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument on the Mars Phoenix Lander [12] included a magnetic-sector mass spectrometer (EGA) [13] which had the goal of measuring the isotopic composition of martian atmospheric CO2 to within 0.5%. The mass spectrometer is a miniature instrument intended to measure both the martian atmosphere as well as gases evolved from heating martian soils.

  2. The declining uptake rate of atmospheric CO2 by land and ocean sinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Raupach

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Through 1959–2012, an airborne fraction (AF of 0.44 of total anthropogenic CO2 emissions remained in the atmosphere, with the rest being taken up by land and ocean CO2 sinks. Understanding of this uptake is critical because it greatly alleviates the emissions reductions required for climate mitigation, and also reduces the risks and damages that adaptation has to embrace. An observable quantity that reflects sink properties more directly than the AF is the CO2 sink rate (kS, the combined land–ocean CO2 sink flux per unit excess atmospheric CO2 above preindustrial levels. Here we show from observations that kS declined over 1959–2012 by a factor of about 1 / 3, implying that CO2 sinks increased more slowly than excess CO2. Using a carbon–climate model, we attribute the decline in kS to four mechanisms: slower-than-exponential CO2 emissions growth (~ 35% of the trend, volcanic eruptions (~ 25%, sink responses to climate change (~ 20%, and nonlinear responses to increasing CO2, mainly oceanic (~ 20%. The first of these mechanisms is associated purely with the trajectory of extrinsic forcing, and the last two with intrinsic, feedback responses of sink processes to changes in climate and atmospheric CO2. Our results suggest that the effects of these intrinsic, nonlinear responses are already detectable in the global carbon cycle. Although continuing future decreases in kS will occur under all plausible CO2 emission scenarios, the rate of decline varies between scenarios in non-intuitive ways because extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms respond in opposite ways to changes in emissions: extrinsic mechanisms cause kS to decline more strongly with increasing mitigation, while intrinsic mechanisms cause kS to decline more strongly under high-emission, low-mitigation scenarios as the carbon–climate system is perturbed further from a near-linear regime.

  3. Coal devolatilization and char conversion under suspension fired conditions in O2/N2 and O2/CO2 atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker Degn; Brix, Jacob; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2010-01-01

    was burned at 1573 K and 1673 K a faster conversion was found in N2 suggesting that the lower molecular diffusion coefficient of O2 in CO2 lowers the char conversion rate when external mass transfer influences combustion. The reaction of char with CO2 was not observed to have an influence on char conversion......The aim of the present investigation is to examine differences between O2/N2 and O2/CO2 atmospheres during devolatilization and char conversion of a bituminous coal at conditions covering temperatures between 1173 K and 1673 K and inlet oxygen concentrations between 5 and 28 vol.%. The experiments...... indicates that a shift from air to oxy-fuel combustion does not influence the devolatilization process significantly. Char combustion experiments yielded similar char conversion profiles when N2 was replaced with CO2 under conditions where combustion was primarily controlled by chemical kinetics. When char...

  4. Experimental study of concentration of tomato juice by CO2 hydrate formation

    OpenAIRE

    Li Shifeng; Shen Yanming; Liu Dongbing; Fan Lihui; Tan Zhe; Zhang Zhigang; Li Wenxiu; Li Wenpeng

    2015-01-01

    A new tomato juice concentration technology was presented by CO2 hydrate formation. The CO2 hydrate equilibrium conditions were measured by isochoric pressure search method and tomato juice concentration experiments were carried out in a high-pressure stirred reactor. Moreover, dehydration ratio was defined and CO2 hydrate formation rate constants were calculated with different feed pressure. The effects of feed pressure, temperature, and juice volume on de...

  5. Atmosphere-soil-vegetation model including CO2 exchange processes; SOLVEG2

    OpenAIRE

    永井 晴康

    2004-01-01

    A new atmosphere-soil-vegetation model named SOLVEG2 (SOLVEG version 2) was developed to study the heat, water, and CO2 exchanges between the atmosphere and land-surface. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer sub-models for the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation. It also includes sophisticated processes for solar and long-wave radiation transmission in vegetation canopy and CO2 exchanges among the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation. The model can be also used by coupling with a three-d...

  6. Phanerozoic atmospheric CO 2 change: evaluating geochemical and paleobiological approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Dana L.; Berner, Robert A.; Beerling, David J.

    2001-08-01

    . In addition, it assumes that there are no biological or temperature effects and that diagenetic alteration of the boron isotopic composition does not occur. A fifth CO 2 proxy, based on the redox chemistry of marine cerium, has several fundamental flaws and is not discussed in detail here.

  7. Microtopographic hydrologic variability change resulting from vegetation acclimation response to elevated atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, P. V.; Kumar, P.

    2015-12-01

    The elevated concentration of atmospheric CO2 increases the ratio of carbon fixation to water loss from plants or water use efficiency, which reduces transpiration. However, the magnitude of the effects of this vegetation acclimation on hydrologic dynamics, such as soil moisture content and surface runoff controlled by microtopographic variability on the land surface, remains unclear. Here we integrate a multi-layer canopy-root-soil model (MLCan) with a coupled surface-subsurface flow model (GCSFlow) to capture the acclimation responses of vegetation to climate change and predict how these changes affect hydrologic dynamics on landscapes at fine scales. The model is implemented on a hybrid CPU-GPU parallel computing environment to overcome challenges associated with the high density of computational grid and nonlinear solvers. The model is capable of simulating large-scale heterogeneities due to both microtopography and soils and lateral water fluxes at emerging lidar-scale resolutions (~1m). We demonstrate that hybrid computing is feasible for detailed, large-scale ecohydrologic modeling, which has been previously assumed to be an intractable computational problem. Simulations are performed for corn crop in the Goose Creek watershed in central Illinois, USA at present and projected higher concentrations of atmospheric CO2, 400 ppm and 550 ppm, respectively. The results show a net decrease of 11% for the average annual evapotranspiration of corn, which increases water content in the soil and at the land surface. These results highlight the critical role of a warming climate on atmospheric-soil-vegetation interactions and the need to understand other dynamics near the soil surface associated with water and vegetation.

  8. Direct impact of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on regional transpiration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, C.M.J.

    1994-01-01

    Plant physiological research has revealed that stomatal aperture of many plant species is reduced by CO 2 . Therefore, the question has been raised as to how transpiration will be affected if the ambient C0 2 concentration increases. This study focuses on the prediction of chan

  9. Impact of elevated CO2 concentration under three soil water levels on growth of Cinnamomum camphora

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Forest plays very important roles in global system with about 35% land area producing about 70% of total land net production. It is important to consider both elevated CO2 concentrations and different soil moisture when the possible effects of elevated CO2 concentration on trees are assessed. In this study, we grew Cinnamomum camphora seedlings under two CO2 concentrations (350 μmol/mol and 500 μmol/mol) and three soil moisture levels [80%, 60% and 40% FWC (field water capacity)] to focus on the effects of exposure of trees to elevated CO2 on underground and aboveground plant growth, and its dependence on soil moisture. The results indicated that high CO2 concentration has no significant effects on shoot height but significantly impacts shoot weight and ratio of shoot weight to height under three soil moisture levels. The response of root growth to CO2 enrichment is just reversed, there are obvious effects on root length growth, but no effects on root weight growth and ratio of root weight to length. The CO2 enrichment decreased 20.42%, 32.78%, 20.59% of weight ratio of root to shoot under 40%, 60% and 80% FWC soil water conditions, respectively. And elevated CO2 concentration significantly increased the water content in aboveground and underground parts. Then we concluded that high CO2 concentration favours more tree aboveground biomass growth than underground biomass growth under favorable soil water conditions. And CO2 enrichment enhanced lateral growth of shoot and vertical growth of root. The responses of plants to elevated CO2 depend on soil water availability, and plants may benefit more from CO2 enrichment with sufficient water supply.

  10. Evolution and challenges of dynamic global vegetation models for some aspects of plant physiology and elevated atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, L. F. C.; Arenque, B. C.; Aidar, S. T.; Moura, M. S. B.; Von Randow, C.; Tourigny, E.; Menezes, R. S. C.; Ometto, J. P. H. B.

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) simulate surface processes such as the transfer of energy, water, CO2, and momentum between the terrestrial surface and the atmosphere, biogeochemical cycles, carbon assimilation by vegetation, phenology, and land use change in scenarios of varying atmospheric CO2 concentrations. DGVMs increase the complexity and the Earth system representation when they are coupled with atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs) or climate models. However, plant physiological processes are still a major source of uncertainty in DGVMs. The maximum velocity of carboxylation (Vcmax), for example, has a direct impact over productivity in the models. This parameter is often underestimated or imprecisely defined for the various plant functional types (PFTs) and ecosystems. Vcmax is directly related to photosynthesis acclimation (loss of response to elevated CO2), a widely known phenomenon that usually occurs when plants are subjected to elevated atmospheric CO2 and might affect productivity estimation in DGVMs. Despite this, current models have improved substantially, compared to earlier models which had a rudimentary and very simple representation of vegetation-atmosphere interactions. In this paper, we describe this evolution through generations of models and the main events that contributed to their improvements until the current state-of-the-art class of models. Also, we describe some main challenges for further improvements to DGVMs.

  11. Seasonally varying contributions to urban CO2 in the Chicago, Illinois, USA region: Insights from a high-resolution CO2 concentration and δ13C record

    OpenAIRE

    Joel Moore; Jacobson, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Understanding urban carbon cycling is essential given that cities sustain 54% of the global population and contribute 70% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. When combined with CO2 concentration measurements ([CO2]), stable carbon isotope analyses (δ13C) can differentiate sources of CO2, including ecosystem respiration and combustion of fossil fuels, such as petroleum and natural gas. In this study, we used a wavelength scanned-cavity ringdown spectrometer to collect ∼2x106 paired measur...

  12. Laser detection of CO2 concentration in human breath at various diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageev, Boris G.; Nikiforova, Olga Y.

    2015-12-01

    Absorption spectra of human breath in 10 μm region were recorded by the use of intracavity laser photo-acoustic gas analyzer based on tunable waveguide CO2 laser. Healthy persons and patients with various diseases were studied. For determination of CO2 concentration in exhalation samples gas analyzer was calibrated by reference gaseous mixture CO2-N2. It was obtained that CO2 concentration values in human breath of healthy persons are greater than that of patients with various diseases.

  13. Effect of elevated ambient CO2 concentration on water use efficiency of Pinus sylvestriformis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Shijie; Zhang Junhui; Wang Chenrui; Zou Chunjing; Zhou Yumei; Wang Xiaochun

    1999-01-01

    Pinus sylvestriformis is an important species as an indicator of global climate changes in Changbai Mountain, China. The water use efficiency (WUE) of this species ( 11-year old ) was studied on response to elevated CO2 concentration at 500± 100 μL· L-1 by directly injecting CO2 into the canopy under natural condition in 1998-1999. The results showed that the elevated CO2 concentration reduced averagely stomatal opening, stomatal conductance and stomatal density to 78%, 80% and 87% respectively, as compared to normal ambient. The elevated CO2 reduced the transpiration and enhances the water use efficiency (WUE) of plant.

  14. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Concentration and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection IPDA Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James B. Abshire

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated a pulsed direct detection IPDA lidar to measure range and the column concentration of atmospheric CO2. The lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and samples the shape of the 1,572.33 nm CO2 absorption line. We participated in the ASCENDS science flights on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during August 2011 and report here lidar measurements made on four flights over a variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US. These included over a stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, to a dry lake bed surrounded by mountains in Nevada, to a desert area with a coal-fired power plant, and from the Rocky Mountains to Iowa, with segments with both cumulus and cirrus clouds. Most flights were to altitudes >12 km and had 5–6 altitude steps. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range, CO2 column absorption, and CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds, between cumulus clouds, and to stratus cloud tops. The retrievals shows the decrease in column CO2 due to growing vegetation when flying over Iowa cropland as well as a sudden increase in CO2 concentration near a coal-fired power plant. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption lineshape (averaged for 50 s matched the predicted shapes to better than 1% RMS error. For 10 s averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2–3 ppm and was limited by the received signal photon count. Retrievals were made using atmospheric parameters from both an atmospheric model and from in situ temperature and pressure from the aircraft. The retrievals had no free parameters and did not use empirical adjustments, and >70% of the measurements passed screening and were used in analysis. The differences between the lidar-measured retrievals and in situ measured average CO2 column concentrations were <1.4 ppm for flight measurement altitudes >6

  15. Atmospheric Fossil Fuel CO2 Traced by Δ(14)C in Beijing and Xiamen, China: Temporal Variations, Inland/Coastal Differences and Influencing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhenchuan; Zhou, Weijian; Wu, Shugang; Cheng, Peng; Lu, Xuefeng; Xiong, Xiaohu; Du, Hua; Fu, Yunchong; Wang, Gehui

    2016-06-01

    One year of atmospheric Δ(14)CO2 were observed in 2014 in the inland city of Beijing and coastal city of Xiamen, China, to trace temporal CO2ff variations and to determine the factors influencing them. The average CO2ff concentrations at the sampling sites in Beijing and Xiamen were 39.7 ± 36.1 ppm and 13.6 ± 12.3 ppm, respectively. These contributed 75.2 ± 14.6% and 59.1 ± 26.8% to their respective annual ΔCO2 offsets over background CO2 concentrations. Significantly (p < 0.05) high CO2ff values were observed in winter in Beijing. We did not find any significant differences in CO2ff values between weekdays and weekends. Diurnal CO2ff variations were plainly evident, with high values between midnight and 4:00, and during morning and afternoon rush hours. The sampling site in the inland city of Beijing displayed much higher CO2ff inputs and overall temporal variations than the site in the coastal city of Xiamen. The variations of CO2ff at both sites were controlled by a combination of emission sources, topography, and atmospheric dispersion. In particular, diurnal observations at the urban site in Beijing showed that CO2ff was easily accumulated under the southeast wind conditions. PMID:27171980

  16. Developing Model Constraints on Northern Extra-Tropical Carbon Cycling Based on measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeling, Ralph [UCSD-SIO

    2014-12-12

    The objective of this project was to perform CO2 data syntheses and modeling activities to address two central questions: 1) how much has the seasonal cycle in atmospheric CO2 at northern high latitudes changed since the 1960s, and 2) how well do prognostic biospheric models represent these changes. This project also supported the continuation of the Scripps time series of CO2 isotopes and concentration at ten baseline stations distributed globally.

  17. Atmosphere-soil-vegetation model including CO2 exchange processes: SOLVEG2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new atmosphere-soil-vegetation model named SOLVEG2 (SOLVEG version 2) was developed to study the heat, water, and CO2 exchanges between the atmosphere and land-surface. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer sub-models for the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation. It also includes sophisticated processes for solar and long-wave radiation transmission in vegetation canopy and CO2 exchanges among the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation. Although the model usually simulates only vertical variation of variables in the surface-layer atmosphere, soil, and vegetation canopy by using meteorological data as top boundary conditions, it can be used by coupling with a three-dimensional atmosphere model. In this paper, details of SOLVEG2, which includes the function of coupling with atmosphere model MM5, are described. (author)

  18. Interannual variability in the oxygen isotopes of atmospheric CO2 driven by El Nino

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welp, Lisa R.; Keeling, Ralph F.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Bollenbacher, Alane F.; Piper, Stephen C.; Yoshimura, Kei; Francey, Roger J.; Allison, Colin E.; Wahlen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The stable isotope ratios of atmospheric CO2 (O-18/O-16 and C-13/C-12) have been monitored since 1977 to improve our understanding of the global carbon cycle, because biosphere-atmosphere exchange fluxes affect the different atomic masses in a measurable way(1). Interpreting the O-18/O-16 variabilit

  19. Mesozooplankton community development at elevated CO2 concentrations: results from a mesocosm experiment in an Arctic fjord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Niehoff

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere caused by burning fossil fuels leads to increasing pCO2 and decreasing pH in the world ocean. These changes may have severe consequences for marine biota, especially in cold-water ecosystems due to higher solubility of CO2. However, studies on the response of mesozooplankton communities to elevated CO2 are still lacking. In order to test whether abundance and taxonomic composition change with pCO2, we have sampled nine mesocosms, which were deployed in Kongsfjorden, an Arctic fjord at Svalbard, and were adjusted to eight CO2 concentrations, initially ranging from 185 μatm to 1420 μatm. Vertical net hauls were taken weekly over about one month with an Apstein net (55 μm mesh size in all mesocosms and the surrounding fjord. In addition, sediment trap samples, taken every second day in the mesocosms, were analysed to account for losses due to vertical migration and mortality. The taxonomic analysis revealed that meroplanktonic larvae (Cirripedia, Polychaeta, Bivalvia, Gastropoda, and Decapoda dominated in the mesocosms while copepods (Calanus spp., Oithona similis, Acartia longiremis and Microsetella norvegica were found in lower abundances. In the fjord copepods prevailed for most of our study. With time, abundance and taxonomic composition developed similarly in all mesocosms and the pCO2 had no significant effect on the overall community structure. Also, we did not find significant relationships between the pCO2 level and the abundance of single taxa. Changes in heterogeneous communities are, however, difficult to detect, and the exposure to elevated pCO2 was relatively short. We therefore suggest that future mesocosm experiments should be run for longer periods.

  20. Temporal variability and spatial dynamics of CO2 and CH4 concentrations and fluxes in the Zambezi River system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoru, Cristian; Borges, Alberto; Bouillon, Steven; Nyoni, Frank; Nyambe, Imasiku

    2014-05-01

    Spanning over 2900 km in length and with a catchment of approximately 1.4 million km2, the Zambezi River is the fourth largest river in Africa and the largest flowing into the Indian Ocean from the African continent. Yet, there is surprisingly little or no information on carbon (C) cycling in this large river system. As part of a broader study on the riverine biogeochemistry in the Zambezi River basin, we present here mainstream dissolved CO2 and CH4 data collected during 2012 and 2013 over two climatic seasons (dry and wet) to constrain the interannual variability, seasonality and spatial heterogeneity of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and CH4 concentrations and fluxes along the aquatic continuum, in relation to physico-chemical parameters (temperature, conductivity, oxygen, and pH) and various carbon pools (dissolved and particulate, organic and inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, primary production, respiration and net aquatic metabolism). Both pCO2 and CH4 variability was high, ranging from minimal values of 150 ppm and 7 nM, respectively, mainly in the two large reservoirs (the Kariba and the Cabora Bassa characterized by high pH and oxygen and low DOC), up to maximum values of 12,500 ppm and 12,130 nM, CO2 and CH4, respectively, mostly below floodplains/wetlands (low pH and oxygen levels, high DOC and POC concentrations). The interannual variability was relatively large for both CO2 and CH4 (mean pCO2: 2350 ppm in 2013 vs. 3180 ppm in 2013; mean CH4: 600 nM in 2012 vs. 1000 nM in 2013) and significantly higher (up to two fold) during wet season compared to dry season closely linked to distinct seasonal hydrological characteristics. Overall, no clear pattern was observed along the longitudinal gradient as river CO2 and CH4 concentrations are largely influenced by the presence of floodplains/wetlands, anthropogenic reservoirs or natural barriers (waterfalls/ rapids). Following closely the concentration patterns, river CO2 and CH4 mean fluxes of 3440 mg C-CO2 m

  1. CORRELATION BETWEEN CORAL CALCIFICATION TREND AND RISE IN ATMOSPHERIC CO2 CONCENTRATION AND GLOBAL WARMING IN LAST SEVERAL DECADES IN THE SOUTHERN SOUTH CHINA SEA%南海南部最近几十年珊瑚钙化趋势与大气CO2浓度升高和全球变暖的联系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏瑞侠; 隋丹丹; 张叶春; 孙东怀; 郭峰; 徐玉芬; 张月宝; 李再军

    2012-01-01

    with lowest rainfall and cloud cover in April. Natural geographical conditions are suitable for reef coral living. Extension rate represents coral upward linear extension growth per year ( cm/a) , density represents coral skeletal quality per cm (g/cm) reflecting comprehensive environment quality; Calcification rate represents quality of calcium carbonate per cm and year ( g/cm2· a) excreted by coral, and calculated from the product of extension rate and density. In this study,the 3 growth parameters of the 11 Porites colonies were obtained along their main growth axes using digital X-radiography image of which the reative density is transferred to density with measured true density. The results show that their average extension rate is 0. 96±0. 05cm/a, increasing 10. 77% in the last 16 years with a rate of 0. 67%/a; The average density is 1. 17±0. 03g/cm3, decreasing 6. 92% with a rate of -0. 43%/a; The average calcification rate is 1. 13±0. 05g/cm2·a,,increasing 2. 69% with a rate of 0. 17%/a. Two coral species of P. lutea and P. lobata show slightly different variations in their 3 growth parameters. Standard diviation analysis indicate that density is less variable than extension and calcification rate for Porites, which reveal that increase in calcification rate is mainly induced by increase in extension rate. Our analysis summarize three vriational forms for the three growth parameters in 11 Porites colonies:1 ) A lot of corals assume increase in extension and calcification rate and decrease in density; 2) A few of corals assume increase in all of the 3 growth parameters; 3)A few of P. lobata colonies show decrease in all of the 3 growth parameters. Linear regression analysis indicates that increase or decrease in the 3 growth parameters correlates significantly with increase in both CO2 concentration and temperature. However, positive responses of extension and calcification rate and negative response of density are much stronger than their opposite

  2. Effect of elevated CO2 concentration on microalgal communities in Antarctic pack ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Thomas; McMinn, Andrew; Nomura, Daiki; Martin, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Increased anthropogenic CO2 emissions are causing changes to oceanic pH and CO2 concentrations that will impact many marine organisms, including microalgae. Phytoplankton taxa have shown mixed responses to these changes with some doing well while others have been adversely affected. Here, the photosynthetic response of sea-ice algal communities from Antarctic pack ice (brine and infiltration microbial communities) to a range of CO2 concentrations (400 ppm to 11,000 ppm in brine algae experiments, 400 ppm to 20,000 ppm in the infiltration ice algae experiment) was investigated. Incubations were conducted as part of the Sea-Ice Physics and Ecosystem Experiment II (SIPEX-2) voyage, in the austral spring (September-November), 2012. In the brine incubations, maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) and relative electron transfer rate (rETRmax) were highest at ambient and 0.049% (experiment 1) and 0.19% (experiment 2) CO2 concentrations, although, Fv/Fm was consistently between 0.53±0.10-0.68±0.01 across all treatments in both experiments. Highest rETRmax was exhibited by brine cultures exposed to ambient CO2 concentrations (60.15). In a third experiment infiltration ice algal communities were allowed to melt into seawater modified to simulate the changed pH and CO2 concentrations of future springtime ice-edge conditions. Ambient and 0.1% CO2 treatments had the highest growth rates and Fv/Fm values but only the highest CO2 concentration produced a significantly lower rETRmax. These experiments, conducted on natural Antarctic sea-ice algal communities, indicate a strong level of tolerance to elevated CO2 concentrations and suggest that these communities might not be adversely affected by predicted changes in CO2 concentration over the next century.

  3. Chemical Effects of CO2 Concentration on Soot Formation in Jet-stirred/Plug-flow Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张引弟; 娄春; 刘德华; 李勇; 阮龙飞

    2013-01-01

    Soot formation was investigated numerically with CO2 addition in a jet-stirred/plug-flow reactor (JSR/PFR) C2H4/O2/N2 reactor (C/O ratio of 2.2) at atmospheric pressure. An updated Kazakov mechanism empha-sizes the effect of the O2/CO2 atmosphere instead of an O2/N2 one in the premixed flame. The soot formation was taken into account in the JSR/PFR for C2H4/O2/N2. The effects of CO2 addition on soot formation in different C2H4/O2/CO2/N2 atmospheres were studied, with special emphasis on the chemical effect. The simulation shows that the endothermic reaction CO2+H CO+OH is responsible of the reduction of hydrocarbon intermediates in the CO2 added combustion through the supplementary formation of hydroxyl radicals. The competition of CO2 for H radical through the above forward reaction with the single most important chain branching reaction H+O2 O+OH reduces significantly the fuel burning rate. The chemical effects of CO2 cause a significant increase in residence time and mole fractions of CO and OH, significant decreases in some intermediates (H, C2H2), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, C6H6 and C16H10, etc.) and soot volume fraction. The CO2 addition will leads to a decrease by only about 5%to 20%of the maximum mole fractions of some C3 to C10 hydrocarbon intermediates. The sensitivity analysis and reaction-path analysis results show that C2H4 reaction path and products are altered due to the CO2 addition.

  4. Plant species, atmospheric CO2 and soil N interactively or additively control C allocation within plant-soil systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Shenglei; Howard Ferris

    2006-01-01

    Two plant species, Medicago truncatula (legume) and Avena sativa (non-legume), were grown in low- or high-N soils under two CO2 concentrations to test the hypothesis whether C allocation within plant-soil system is interactively or additively controlled by soil N and atmospheric CO2 is dependent upon plant species. The results showed the interaction between plant species and soil N had a significant impact on microbial activity and plant growth. The interaction between CO2 and soil N had a significant impact on soil soluble C and soil microbial biomass C under Madicago but not under Avena. Although both CO2 and soil N affected plant growth significantly, there was no interaction between CO2 and soil N on plant growth. In other words, the effects of CO2 and soil N on plant growth were additive. We considered that the interaction between N2 fixation trait of legume plant and elevated CO2 might have obscured the interaction between soil N and elevated CO2 on the growth of legume plant. In low-N soil, the shoot-to-root ratio of Avena dropped from 2.63±0.20 in the early growth stage to 1.47±0.03 in the late growth stage, indicating that Avena plant allocated more energy to roots to optimize nutrient uptake (i.e. N) when soil N was limiting. In high-N soil, the shoot-to-root ratio of Medicago increased significantly over time (from 2.45±0.30 to 5.43±0.10), suggesting that Medicago plants allocated more energy to shoots to optimize photosynthesis when N was not limiting.The shoot-to-root ratios were not significantly different between two CO2 levels.

  5. ENSO, Volcanic Activities and Interannual Variations of Atmospheric CO2%ENSO,火山活动与大气CO2的年际变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈中笑; 程军

    2011-01-01

    利用大气CO2及其δ13C的观测数据分析了不同区域大气CO2的季节和年际变化特征,并结合δ13C的变化趋势判断大气CO2变化的主要影响因素是来自陆地还是海洋.结果表明:大气CO2的年际变化主要受ENSO引起的陆地植被初级生产量而不是海洋吸收变化的影响,且La Ni(n)a对大气CO2的影响大于El Ni(n)o.火山活动后大气CO2的增加幅度减小,甚至掩盖了ENSO的影响,喷发后δ13C的增幅同步减小说明大气CO2增幅减小缘自温度持续降低引起的海洋吸收的增加或陆地呼吸作用的减弱.%Based on the observations of atmospheric CO2 and its δ13C, the characters of seasonal and interannual variations of atmospheric CO2 were analyzed in different regions.The trends of atmospheric δ13C were used to distinguish whether the dominative influential factor for the variations of atmospheric CO2 is from the terrestrial or the ocean.The results show that the interannual variations of atmospheric CO2 are mainly influenced by ENSOrelated change of terrestrial vegetation primary production, not by oceanic sink.And the intensity of La Ni(n)a has more effect on atmospheric CO2 than that of El Ni(n)o.The atmospheric CO2 increase would decrease after volcano events, which even conceal ENSO effects.The synchronized decrease in atmospheric δ13C increase after volcano eruptions indicates that it is likely due to the increase of oceanic uptake or the weakening of terrestrial respiration resulted from persistent decrease of surface temperature.

  6. Simulation of CO2 dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer using a mesoscale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granvold, P. W.; Chow, F. K.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    The consequences of unexpected releases of CO2 from underground carbon sequestration sites must be understood before large-scale carbon capture and storage projects are implemented. Carbon dioxide gas can migrate through faults, fractures, or abandoned wells that penetrate the subsurface storage site and provide a pathway to the ground surface. Though such leakage is typically slow and in small amounts, CO2 can accumulate at the ground surface because it is denser than the surrounding atmosphere. Such accumulation presents health risks for humans and animals in the vicinity, and can cause damage to crops, trees, and other vegetation. Because atmospheric dispersion of CO2 is driven by gravity and ambient wind conditions, the danger from CO2 is greatest in regions with topographic depressions where the dense gas can pool, or under stably- stratified background atmospheric conditions which further inhibit mixing and dilution of the gas. We are developing a simulation tool for predictions of CO2 releases from underground storage sites in a mesoscale atmospheric model. The model solves the compressible fluid flow equations, and has been modified to account for transport of dense gases. Example simulations from sources of different release strengths over various topography and background atmospheric conditions illustrate the behavior of the model and its utility for risk assessment and certification of carbon sequestration sites.

  7. The seasonal cycle of ocean-atmosphere CO2 Flux in Ryder Bay, West Antarctic Peninsula.

    OpenAIRE

    Legge, Oliver J.; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Johnson, Martin T.; Meredith, Michael P.; Venables, Hugh J.; Brown, Peter J.; Lee, Gareth A.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 15 million km2 of the Southern Ocean is seasonally ice covered, yet the processes affecting carbon cycling and gas exchange in this climatically important region remain inadequately understood. Here, 3 years of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) measurements and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes from Ryder Bay on the west Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) are presented. During spring and summer, primary production in the surface ocean promotes atmospheric CO2 uptake. In winter, higher DIC, caus...

  8. CO2 Dissociation using the Versatile Atmospheric Dielectric Barrier Discharge Experiment (VADER)

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Allen Lindon; Earl eScime

    2014-01-01

    Dissociation of CO2 is investigated in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with a simple, zero dimensional (0-D) chemical model and through experiment. The model predicts that the primary CO2 dissociation pathway within a DBD is electron impact dissociation and electron-vibrational excitation. The relaxation kinetics following dissociation are dominated by atomic oxygen chemistry. The experiments included investigating the energy efficiencies and dissociation rates of...

  9. CO2 dissociation using the Versatile atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge experiment (VADER)

    OpenAIRE

    Lindon, Michael A.; Scime, Earl E.

    2014-01-01

    Dissociation of CO2 is investigated in an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) with a simple, zero dimensional (0-D) chemical model and through experiment. The model predicts that the primary CO2 dissociation pathway within a DBD is electron impact dissociation and electron-vibrational excitation. The relaxation kinetics following dissociation are dominated by atomic oxygen chemistry. The experiments included investigating the energy efficiencies and dissociation rates of C...

  10. LA Megacity: An Integrated Land-Atmosphere System for Urban CO2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, S.; Lauvaux, T.; Newman, S.; Rao, P.; Patarasuk, R.; o'Keefe, D.; Huang, J.; Ahmadov, R.; Wong, C.; Song, Y.; Gurney, K. R.; Diaz Isaac, L. I.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.; Miller, C. E.; Duren, R. M.; Li, Z.; Yung, Y. L.; Sander, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    About 10% of the global population lives in the word's 20 megacities (cities with urban populations greater than 10 million people). Megacities account for approximately 20% of the global anthropogenic fossil fuel CO2 (FFCO2) emissions, and their proportion of emissions increases monotonically with the world population and urbanization. Megacities range in spatial extent from ~1000 - 10,000 km2 with complex topography and variable landscapes. We present here the first attempt at building an integrated land-atmosphere modeling system for megacity environments, developed and evaluated for urban CO2 emissions over the Los Angeles (LA) Megacity area. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) - Chem model was coupled to a ~1.3-km FFCO2 emission product, "Hestia-LA", to simulate the transport of CO2 across the LA magacity. We define the optimal model resolution to represent both the spatial variability of the atmospheric dynamics and the spatial patterns from the CO2 emission distribution. In parallel, we evaluate multiple configurations of WRF with various physical schemes, using meteorological observations from the CalNex-LA campaign of May-June 2010. Our results suggest that there is no remarkable difference between the medium- (4-km) and high- (1.3-km) resolution simulations in terms of atmospheric model performance. However, the high-resolution modeled CO2 mixing ratios clearly outperform the results at medium resolution for capturing both the spatial distribution and the temporal variability of the urban CO2 signals. We compare the impact of physical representation errors and emission aggregation errors on the modeled CO2 mixing ratios across the LA megacity. Finally, we present a novel approach to evaluate the design of the current surface network over the LA megacity using the modeled spatial correlations. These results reinforce the importance of using high-resolution emission products over megacities to represent correctly the large spatial gradients in

  11. Fast Atmosphere-Ocean Model Runs with Large Changes in CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Gary L.; Lacis, Andrew A.; Rind, David H.; Colose, Christopher; Opstbaum, Roger F.

    2013-01-01

    How does climate sensitivity vary with the magnitude of climate forcing? This question was investigated with the use of a modified coupled atmosphere-ocean model, whose stability was improved so that the model would accommodate large radiative forcings yet be fast enough to reach rapid equilibrium. Experiments were performed in which atmospheric CO2 was multiplied by powers of 2, from 1/64 to 256 times the 1950 value. From 8 to 32 times, the 1950 CO2, climate sensitivity for doubling CO2 reaches 8 C due to increases in water vapor absorption and cloud top height and to reductions in low level cloud cover. As CO2 amount increases further, sensitivity drops as cloud cover and planetary albedo stabilize. No water vapor-induced runaway greenhouse caused by increased CO2 was found for the range of CO2 examined. With CO2 at or below 1/8 of the 1950 value, runaway sea ice does occur as the planet cascades to a snowball Earth climate with fully ice covered oceans and global mean surface temperatures near 30 C.

  12. CO2 Dissociation using the Versatile Atmospheric Dielectric Barrier Discharge Experiment (VADER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindon, Michael Allen

    As of 2013, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) estimates that the world emits approximately 36 trillion metric tons of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere every year. These large emissions have been correlated to global warming trends that have many consequences across the globe, including glacial retraction, ocean acidification and increased severity of weather events. With green technologies still in the infancy stage, it can be expected that CO2 emissions will stay this way for along time to come. Approximately 41% of the emissions are due to electricity production, which pump out condensed forms of CO2. This danger to our world is why research towards new and innovative ways of controlling CO2 emissions from these large sources is necessary. As of now, research is focused on two primary methods of CO2 reduction from condensed CO2 emission sources (like fossil fuel power plants): Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) and Carbon Capture and Utilization (CCU). CCS is the process of collecting CO2 using absorbers or chemicals, extracting the gas from those absorbers and finally pumping the gas into reservoirs. CCU on the other hand, is the process of reacting CO2 to form value added chemicals, which can then be recycled or stored chemically. A Dielectric Barrier discharge (DBD) is a pulsed, low temperature, non-thermal, atmospheric pressure plasma which creates high energy electrons suitable for dissociating CO2 into its components (CO and O) as one step in the CCU process. Here I discuss the viability of using a DBD for CO2 dissociation on an industrial scale as well as the fundamental physics and chemistry of a DBD for CO2 dissociation. This work involved modeling the DBD discharge and chemistry, which showed that there are specific chemical pathways and plasma parameters that can be adjusted to improve the CO2 reaction efficiencies and rates. Experimental studies using the Versatile Atmospheric dielectric barrier Discharge Expe

  13. An Assessment of Biases in Satellite CO2 Measurements Using Atmospheric Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. F.; O'Dell, C.

    2014-12-01

    Column-integrated CO2 mixing ratio measurements from satellite should provide a new view of the global carbon cycle, thanks to their ability to measure with great coverage in places that are poorly sampled by the in situ network (e.g. the tropics) using a new approach (full-column averages rather than point measurements). For this new insight to be useful, however, systematic errors in these data must first be identified and removed. Here we use atmospheric transport modeling to perform a global comparison of satellite CO2 measurements to higher-quality reference data (in situ data from flasks and aircraft, column CO2 data from the upward-looking spectrometers of the TCCON network) to assess systematic errors in the satellite data. This broad comparison is meant to complement the more direct validation done at specific TCCON sites. A suite of 3-D CO2 mixing ratio histories are generated across 2009-2014 using combinations of several different a priori fossil fuel, land biospheric, and oceanic CO2 fluxes run through the PCTM off-line atmospheric transport model driven by MERRA 1°x1.25° winds and vertical mixing parameters. Each member of the suite is forced to agree with in situ CO2 measurements (flask, tall tower, and routine light aircraft profiles) through use of a variational carbon data assimilation (4Dvar) system. The optimized 3-D CO2 fields are then compared to ACOS column CO2 retrievals of GOSAT data, with the differences being fit to different independent variables (aerosol optical depth, atmospheric path length, surface albedo, etc.) to derive a GOSAT bias correction. ACOS-GOSAT CO2 retrievals, corrected by this scheme, as well as with the "official" ACOS bias correction, will then be assimilated using the same 4Dvar approach. The benefit of the GOSAT data with and without the bias corrections will then be assessed by comparing the optimized CO2 fields to independent data (TCCON column data, as well as aircraft data left out of the in situ inversions

  14. Modern soil system constraints on reconstructing deep-time atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montañez, Isabel P.

    2013-01-01

    Paleosol carbonate-based estimates of paleo-atmospheric CO2 play a prominent role in constraining radiative-forcing and climate sensitivity in the deep-time. Large uncertainty in paleo-CO2 estimates made using the paleosol-carbonate CO2-barometer, however, arises primarily from their sensitivity to soil-respired CO2 (S(z)). This parameter is poorly constrained due to a paucity of soil CO2 measurements during carbonate formation in modern soils and a lack of widely applicable proxies of paleo-soil CO2. Here the δ13C values of carbonate and soil organic matter (SOM) pairs from 130 Holocene soils are applied to a two-component CO2-mixing equation to define soil order-specific ranges of soil CO2 applicable for constraining S(z) in their corresponding paleosol analogs. Equilibrium carbonate-SOM pairs, characterized by Δ13Ccarb-SOM values of 12.2-15.8‰, define a mean effective fractionation of 14.1‰ and overall inferred total soil CO2 contents during calcite formation of Calcisols and Argillisols), a best estimate of S(z) during calcite formation is 1500-2000 ppmv (range of 500-2500 ppmv). Overall higher values (2000-5000 ppmv) are indicated by the subset of these soils characterized by higher moisture content and productivity. Near atmospheric levels (400 ± 200 ppmv) of estimated S(z) are indicated by immature soils, recording their low soil productivity. Vertisols define the largest range in total soil CO2 (25,000 ppmv) reflecting their seasonally driven dynamic hydrochemistry. A S(z) range of 1000-10,000 ppmv is suggested for paleo-Vertisols for which calcite precipitation can be constrained to have occurred in an open system with two-component CO2 mixing, with a best estimate of 2000 ppmv ± 1000 ppmv appropriate for paleo-Vertisols for which evidence of protracted water saturation is lacking. Mollisol pairs define a best estimate of S(z) of 2500 ppmv (range of 600-4000 ppmv) for late Cretaceous and Cenozoic analogs. Non-equilibrium pairs with Δ13C values >16

  15. O2/CO2气氛下CO2和H2O气化反应对煤及煤焦燃烧特性的影响%Effect of CO2 and H2O gasification on the combustion characteristics of coal and char under O2/CO2 atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷鸣; 黄星智; 王春波

    2015-01-01

    The burning behaviors of Datong coal and char under O2/N2 , O2/CO2 and O2/H2 O/CO2 atmosphere were comparatively investigated by thermogravimetric analyzer. The influence of CO2 and H2 O gasification on the oxy-fuel combustion characteristics of coal and char were mainly studied. The results indicate that at 5%oxygen concentration the burning rate of pulverized coal in each atmosphere decreases in the order of O2/N2 , O2/CO2 and O2/H2 O/CO2 . When the oxygen concentration reduces to 2%, owing to the CO2 and H2 O gasification, the overall reaction rate of pulverized coal increases in the same order at high temperatures. The burning rate of char is slower in O2/CO2 than that in O2/N2 at 5% oxygen concentration, but as the burning process is delayed, the overall reaction rate of char in O2/H2 O/CO2 rises significantly due to the action of gasification. At 2% oxygen concentration, the overall reaction rate of char in O2/CO2 is higher than the burning rate of char in O2/N2 with the rise in temperature. The overall reaction rate of char in O2/H2 O/CO2 further increases because the H2 O gasification plays a major role in CO2 and H2 O co-gasification. The kinetic analysis shows that at 5% oxygen concentration the apparent activation energy in the atmosphere increases in the order of O2/N2 , O2/CO2 and O2/H2 O/CO2 . However, the apparent activation energy of different atmospheres declines with the decrease of oxygen concentration.%利用热天平对比研究了大同煤及煤焦在O2/N2、O2/CO2 和O2/H2O/CO2 中的燃烧行为,探讨CO2 和H2O气化反应对其富氧燃烧特性的影响. 结果表明,在5%氧气浓度下,煤粉在O2/N2、O2/CO2 和O2/H2 O/CO2 中的燃烧速率按顺序依次降低. 氧气浓度降低到2%,由于CO2 和H2 O气化反应的作用,煤粉在高温区的整体反应速率按顺序依次增大. 当氧气浓度为5%时,煤焦在O2/CO2 中的燃烧速率要低于 O2/N2 中的燃烧速率,但燃烧反应推迟后气化反

  16. Soil fertility limits carbon sequestration by forest ecosystems in a CO2-enriched atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northern mid-latitude forests are a larger terrestrial carbon sink. Ignoring nutrient limitations, large increases in carbon sequestration from carbon dioxide (CO2) fertilization are expected in these forests. Yet, forests are usually relegated to sites of moderate to poor fertility, where tree growth is often limited by nutrient supply, in particular nitrogen. Here we present evidence that estimates of increases in carbon sequestration of forests, which is expected to partially compensate for increasing CO2 in the atmosphere, are unduly optimistic. In two forest experiments on maturing pines exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2, the CO2-induced biomass carbon increment without added nutrients was undetectable at a nutritionally poor site, and the stimulation at a nutritionally moderate site was transient, stabilizing at a marginal gain after three years. However, a large synergistic gain from higher CO2 and nutrients was detected with nutrients added. This gain was even larger at the poor site (threefold higher than the expected additive effect) than at the moderate site (twofold higher). Thus, fertility can restrain the response of wood carbon sequestration to increased atmospheric CO2. Assessment of future carbon sequestration should consider the limitations imposed by soil fertility, as well as interactions with nitrogen deposition. (author)

  17. Changes in the activities of starch metabolism enzymes in rice grains in response to elevated CO2 concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li-Yong; Lin, Er-Da; Zhao, Hong-Liang; Feng, Yong-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is currently (2012) 393.1 μmol mol-1, an increase of approximately 42 % over pre-industrial levels. In order to understand the responses of metabolic enzymes to elevated CO2 concentrations, an experiment was conducted using the Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE )system. Two conventional japonica rice varieties ( Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica) grown in North China, Songjing 9 and Daohuaxiang 2, were used in this study. The activities of ADPG pyrophosphorylase, soluble and granule-bound starch synthases, and soluble and granule-bound starch branching enzymes were measured in rice grains, and the effects of elevated CO2 on the amylose and protein contents of the grains were analyzed. The results showed that elevated CO2 levels significantly increased the activity of ADPG pyrophosphorylase at day 8, 24, and 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 56.67 % for Songjing 9 and 21.31 % for Daohuaxiang 2. Similarly, the activities of starch synthesis enzymes increased significantly from the day 24 after flower to the day 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 36.81 % for Songjing 9 and 66.67 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in soluble starch synthase (SSS), and 25.00 % for Songjing 9 and 36.44 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS), respectively. The elevated CO2 concentration significantly increased the activity of soluble starch branching enzyme (SSBE) at day 16, 32, and 40 after flower, and also significantly increased the activity of granule-bound starch branching enzyme (GBSBE) at day 8, 32, and 40 after flower. The elevated CO2 concentration increased the peak values of enzyme activity, and the timing of the activity peaks for SSS and GBSBE were earlier in Songjing 9 than in Daohuaxiang 2. There were obvious differences in developmental stages between the two varieties of rice, which indicated that the elevated CO2 concentration increased enzyme activity expression and starch synthesis, affecting the final contents

  18. Quantifying Diurnal and Spatial Variations in CO2 Concentrations and Partial Columns using High-Resolution Global Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawson, S.; Nielsen, J.; Ott, L. E.; Darmenov, A.; Putman, W.

    2015-12-01

    Model-data fusion approaches, such as global inverse modeling for surface flux estimation, have traditionally been performed at spatial resolutions of several tens to a few hundreds of kilometers. Use of such coarse scales presents a fundamental limitation in reconciling the modeled field with both the atmospheric observations and the distribution of surface emissions and uptake. Emissions typically occur on small scales, including point sources (e.g. power plants, forest fires) or with inhomegeneous structure. Biological uptake can have spatial variations related to complex, diverse vegetation, etc. Atmospheric observations of CO2 are either surface based, providing information at a single point, or space based with a finite-sized footprint. For instance, GOSAT and OCO-2 have footprint sizes of around 10km and proposed active sensors (such as ASCENDS) will likely have even finer footprints. One important aspect of reconciling models to measurements is the representativeness of the observation for the model field, and this depends on the generally unknown spatio-temporal variations of the CO2 field around the measurement location and time. This work presents an assessment of the global spatio-temporal variations of the CO2 field using the "7km GEOS-5 Nature Run" (7km-G5NR), which includes CO2 emissions and uptake mapped to the finest possible resolution. Results are shown for surface CO2 concentrations, total-column CO2, and separate upper and lower tropospheric columns. Spatial variability is shown to be largest in regions with strong point sources and at night in regions with complex terrain, especially where biological processes dominate the local CO2 fluxes, where the day-night differences are also most marked. The spatio-temporal variations are strongest for surface concentrations and for lower tropospheric CO2. While these results are largely anticipated, these high resolution simulations provide quantitative estimates of the global nature of spatio

  19. Continental-scale enrichment of atmospheric 14CO2 from the nuclear power industry: potential impact on the estimation of fossil fuel-derived CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Graven, H. D.; Gruber, N.

    2011-01-01

    The 14C-free fossil carbon added to atmospheric CO2 by combustion dilutes the atmospheric 14C/C ratio (Δ14C), potentially providing a means to verify fossil CO2 emissions calculated using economic inventories. However, sources of 14C from nuclear power generation and spent fuel reprocessing can counteract this dilution and may bias 14C/C-based estimates of fossil fuel-derived CO2 if these nuclear influences are not correctly accounted for. Previous studies have examined nuclear influenc...

  20. Impacts of elevated atmospheric CO2 and O3 on forests: phytochemistry, trophic interactions, and ecosystem dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroth, Richard L

    2010-01-01

    Prominent among the many factors now affecting the sustainability of forest ecosystems are anthropogenically-generated carbon dioxide (CO2) and ozone (O3). CO2 is the substrate for photosynthesis and thus can accelerate tree growth, whereas O3 is a highly reactive oxygen species and interferes with basic physiological functions. This review summarizes the impacts of CO2 and O3 on tree chemical composition and highlights the consequences thereof for trophic interactions and ecosystem dynamics. CO2 and O3 influence phytochemical composition by altering substrate availability and biochemical/physiological processes such as photosynthesis and defense signaling pathways. Growth of trees under enriched CO2 generally leads to an increase in the C/N ratio, due to a decline in foliar nitrogen and concomitant increases in carbohydrates and phenolics. Terpenoid levels generally are not affected by atmospheric CO2 concentration. O3 triggers up-regulation of antioxidant defense pathways, leading to the production of simple phenolics and flavonoids (more so in angiosperms than gymnosperms). Tannins levels generally are unaffected, while terpenoids exhibit variable responses. In combination, CO2 and O3 exert both additive and interactive effects on tree chemical composition. CO2-and O3-mediated changes in plant chemistry influence host selection, individual performance (development, growth, reproduction), and population densities of herbivores (primarily phytophagous insects) and soil invertebrates. These changes can effect shifts in the amount and temporal pattern of forest canopy damage and organic substrate deposition. Decomposition rates of leaf litter produced under elevated CO2 and O3 may or may not be altered, and can respond to both the independent and interactive effects of the pollutants. Overall, however, CO2 and O3 effects on decomposition will be influenced more by their impacts on the quantity, rather than quality, of litter produced. A prominent theme to emerge

  1. Assessing the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY atmospheric CO2 retrieved using (FSI WFM-DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vinnichenko

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite observations of atmospheric CO2 offer the potential to identify regional carbon surface sources and sinks and to investigate carbon cycle processes. The extent to which satellite measurements are useful however, depends on the near surface sensitivity of the chosen sensor. In this paper, the capability of the SCIAMACHY instrument on board ENVISAT, to observe lower tropospheric and surface CO2 variability is examined. To achieve this, atmospheric CO2 retrieved from SCIAMACHY near infrared (NIR spectral measurements, using the Full Spectral Initiation (FSI WFM-DOAS algorithm, is compared to in situ aircraft observations over Siberia and additionally to tower and surface CO2 data over Mongolia, Europe and North America. Preliminary validation of daily averaged SCIAMACHY/FSI CO2 against ground based Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS column measurements made at Park Falls, reveal a negative bias of about −2.0% for collocated measurements within ±1.0degree of the site. However, at this spatial threshold SCIAMACHY can only capture the variability of the FTS observations at monthly timescales. To observe day to day variability of the FTS observations, the collocation limits must be increased. Furthermore, comparisons to in-situ CO2 observations demonstrate that SCIAMACHY is capable of observing lower tropospheric variability on (at least monthly timescales. Out of seventeen time series comparisons, eleven have correlation coefficients of 0.7 or more, and have similar seasonal cycle amplitudes. Additional evidence of the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY, is provided through the significant correlation of FSI derived CO2 with MODIS vegetation indices at over twenty selected locations in the United States. The SCIAMACHY/MODIS comparison reveals that at many of the sites, the amount of CO2 variability is coincident with the amount of vegetation activity. It is evident, from this analysis, that SCIAMACHY therefore has the potential to

  2. Assessing the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY atmospheric CO2 retrieved using (FSI WFM-DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vinnichenko

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Satellite observations of atmospheric CO2 offer the potential to identify regional carbon surface sources and sinks and to investigate carbon cycle processes. The extent to which satellite measurements are useful however, depends on the near surface sensitivity of the chosen sensor. In this paper, the capability of the SCIAMACHY instrument on board ENVISAT, to observe lower tropospheric and surface CO2 variability is examined. To achieve this, atmospheric CO2 retrieved from SCIAMACHY near infrared (NIR spectral measurements, using the Full Spectral Initiation (FSI WFM-DOAS algorithm, is compared to in-situ aircraft observations over Siberia and additionally to tower and surface CO2 data over Mongolia, Europe and North America. Preliminary validation of daily averaged SCIAMACHY/FSI CO2 against ground based Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS column measurements made at Park Falls, reveal a negative bias of about −2.0% for collocated measurements within ±1.0° of the site. However, at this spatial threshold SCIAMACHY can only capture the variability of the FTS observations at monthly timescales. To observe day to day variability of the FTS observations, the collocation limits must be increased. Furthermore, comparisons to in-situ CO2 observations demonstrate that SCIAMACHY is capable of observing a seasonal signal that is representative of lower tropospheric variability on (at least monthly timescales. Out of seventeen time series comparisons, eleven have correlation coefficients of 0.7 or more, and have similar seasonal cycle amplitudes. Additional evidence of the near surface sensitivity of SCIAMACHY, is provided through the significant correlation of FSI derived CO2 with MODIS vegetation indices at over twenty selected locations in the United States. The SCIAMACHY/MODIS comparison reveals that at many of the sites, the amount of CO2 variability is coincident with the amount of vegetation activity. The presented analysis suggests that

  3. 大气14CO2观测:2010~2011年广州城市大气中化石源CO2浓度变化特征%Fossil fuel-derived CO2 contribution to the urban atmosphere in Guangzhou, South China by 14CO2 observation, 2010-2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁平; 沈承德; 易惟熙; 王宁; 丁杏芳; 付东坡; 刘克新

    2013-01-01

    中国科学院广州地球化学研究所(GIGCAS)大气CO2观测点的数据显示:2010年10月至2011年11月,该站点大气CO2浓度变化范围为460~550 mL/m3,月平均浓度介于470~530 mL/m3之间,呈现夏、秋季浓度低,春、冬季浓度较高的特点。大气CO2的δ13C值变化介于–9.00‰~–13.10‰之间,月平均值介于–9.60‰~–11.80‰之间,与大气 CO2浓度之间关系不显著,反映了人类活动对城市大气 CO2的影响。GIGCAS 站点大气CO2的Δ14C值波动剧烈,介于29.1‰~–85.2‰之间,月平均值波动范围为4.9‰~–41.7‰,年平均大气CO2的Δ14C值为–16.4‰。较高的Δ14C值出现在夏、秋两季(7~9月),均值约为–5.2‰,较低的Δ14C值出现在冬、春两季(12月至次年4月)、均值约为–27.1‰,据此计算得出的化石源CO2浓度变化范围为1~58 mL/m3,年平均值约24 mL/m3,较低的大气化石源CO2浓度出现在夏、秋两季(7~9月),均值为17 mL/m3,较高大气化石源CO2量出现在冬、春两季(12月至次年4月),均值约为29 mL/m3。气象条件和人类活动对城市大气化石源CO2浓度影响巨大,调整人类活动是减少大气化石源CO2污染的途径之一。%During October 2010 to November 2011, the urban atmospheric CO2 concentration observed in Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Guangzhou ranges from 550 mL/m3 to 460 mL/m3, with the monthly mean concentration fluctuating between 530 mL/m3 and 470 mL/m3. It shows lower concentrations in summer and autumn, and higher concentrations in spring and winter. The CO2δ13C values vary between –9.00‰ and –13.10‰, with the monthly mean values fluctuating between –9.60‰ and –11.80‰. The relationship between CO2 concentration and δ13C values is not significant, reflecting the influence from human activities on the urban atmospheric CO2. The Δ14C values of urban atmospheric CO2 in Guangzhou fluctuate dramatically from 29.1‰to–85.2‰, with

  4. The impact on atmospheric CO2 of iron fertilization induced changes in the ocean's biological pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. McWilliams

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Using numerical simulations, we quantify the impact of changes in the ocean's biological pump on the air-sea balance of CO2 by fertilizing a small surface patch in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll region of the eastern tropical Pacific with iron. Decade-long fertilization experiments are conducted in a basin-scale, eddy-permitting coupled physical biogeochemical ecological model. In contrast to previous studies, we find that most of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC removed from the euphotic zone by the enhanced biological export is replaced by uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. Atmospheric uptake efficiencies, the ratio of the perturbation in air-sea CO2 flux to the perturbation in export flux across 100 m, are 0.75 to 0.93 in our patch size-scale experiments. The atmospheric uptake efficiency is insensitive to the duration of the experiment. The primary factor controlling the atmospheric uptake efficiency is the vertical distribution of the enhanced biological production. Iron fertilization at the surface tends to induce production anomalies primarily near the surface, leading to high efficiencies. In contrast, mechanisms that induce deep production anomalies (e.g. altered light availability tend to have a low uptake efficiency, since most of the removed DIC is replaced by lateral and vertical transport and mixing. Despite high atmospheric uptake efficiencies, patch-scale iron fertilization of the ocean's biological pump tends to remove little CO2 from the atmosphere over the decadal timescale considered here.

  5. O2/CO2气氛下火焰传播速度影响因素分析%Analysis of Influence Factors on Flame Speed Under O2/CO2 Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟孝蛟; 刘豪; 赵然; 王子剑; 胡翰; 闫志强; 邱建荣

    2011-01-01

    The flame propagation characteristic of hydrocarbons has a significant relationship with high CO2 concentrarion in an Oe/CO2 atmosphere. Laminar flame speed of C1-C7 n-alkanes were studied by detailed chemical kinetic models for O2/CO2 atmosphere, O2/N2 atmosphere and O2/ CO2/AR atmosphere respectively. The equivalence ratios were varied from 0.6 to 1.4 for initial pressure p=105 Pa, initial temperature T=298 K. The effects of equivalence ratio, O2 concentration, CO2 concentration and atmospheres on flame speed were explored. Results show that flame speed increases with equivalence ratio in fuel lean region, then decreases in the fuel rich region, and the maximum flame speed ap, pears at equivalence ratio 1.0 or 1.1. For the same O2 concentration, flame speed in an O2/CO2 atmosphere is markedly lower than that in O2/N2, which reveals that CO2 has a negative effect on flame propagation. Under O2/CO2/AR atmophere, flame speed decreases with increasing CO2 concentration, when O2 concentration remains unchanged. Besides, improving the O2 concentration in O2/CO2 atmosphere can increase flame speed, having a positive effect on n-alkanes combution process.%摘要:O2/CO2气 氛下高浓度CO2的存在对碳氢化合物的火焰传播特性有重要影响。基于化学动力学分析软件CHEMKIN对初始压力为10^5Pa,初始温度为298K,当量比为0.6~1.4的C1~C7直链烷烃在O2/CO2、O2/hi2、O2/CO2/AR气氛下的层流火焰传播速度进行模拟计算,探讨气氛、当量比、O2浓度、CO2浓度对火焰传播速度的影响规律。结果表明,火焰传播速度随当量比的增大而先增大后减小,火焰传播速度的最大值出现在当量比1.0或1.1处;在相同O2浓度下,O2/CO2气氛下火焰传播速度要比

  6. VUV-absorption cross section of CO2 at high temperatures and impact on exoplanet atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venot Olivia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV absorption cross sections are an essential ingredient of photochemical atmosphere models. Exoplanet searches have unveiled a large population of short-period objects with hot atmospheres, very different from what we find in our solar system. Transiting exoplanets whose atmospheres can now be studied by transit spectroscopy receive extremely strong UV fluxes and have typical temperatures ranging from 400 to 2500 K. At these temperatures, UV photolysis cross section data are severely lacking. Our goal is to provide high-temperature absorption cross sections and their temperature dependency for important atmospheric compounds. This study is dedicated to CO2, which is observed and photodissociated in exoplanet atmospheres. We performed these measurements for the 115 - 200 nm range at 300, 410, 480, and 550 K. In the 195 - 230 nm range, we worked at seven temperatures between 465 and 800 K. We found that the absorption cross section of CO2 is very sensitive to temperature, especially above 160 nm. Within the studied range of temperature, the CO2 cross section can vary by more than two orders of magnitude. This, in particular, makes the absorption of CO2 significant up to wavelengths as high as 230 nm, while it is negligible above 200 nm at 300 K. To investigate the influence of these new data on the photochemistry of exoplanets, we implemented the measured cross section into a 1D photochemical model. The model predicts that accounting for this temperature dependency of CO2 cross section can affect the computed abundances of NH3, CO2, and CO by one order of magnitude in the atmospheres of hot Jupiter and hot Neptune.

  7. Ocean-Atmosphere coupling and CO2 exchanges in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, R.; Pezzi, L. P.; Carmargo, R.; Acevedo, O. C.

    2013-05-01

    The establishment of the INTERCONF Program (Air-Sea Interactions at the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone) in 2004 and subsequent developing of projects such as the SIMTECO (Integrated System for Monitoring the Weather, the Climate and the Ocean in the South of Brazil) and ACEx (Atlantic Ocean Carbon Experiment) from 2010 in Brazil brought to light the importance of understanding the impact of the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean's mesoscale variability on the modulation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) at the synoptic scale. Recent results of all these projects showed that the ABL modulation, as well as the ocean-atmosphere turbulent (heat, momentum and CO2) fluxes are dependent on the behavior of the ocean's surface thermal gradients, especially those found in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone and at the southern coast off Brazil during the winter. As expected, when atmospheric large scale systems are not present over the study area, stronger heat fluxes are found over regions of higher sea surface temperature (SST) including over warm core eddies shed towards the subantarctic (cold) environment. In the coastal region off southern Brazil, the wintertime propagation of the Brazilian Costal Current (La Plata Plume) acts rising the chlorophyll concentration over the continental shelf as well as diminishing considerably the SST - hence producing prominent across-shore SST gradients towards the offshore region dominated by the Brazil Current waters. Owing to that, heat fluxes are directed towards the ocean in coastal waters that are also responsible for the carbon sinking off Brazil in wintertime. All this description is dependent on the synoptic atmospheric cycle and strongly perturbed when transient systems (cold fronts, subtropical cyclones) are present in the area. However, remote sensing data used here suggest that the average condition of the atmosphere directly responding to the ocean's mesoscale variability appears to imprint a signal that extends from the

  8. Impact of atmospheric and terrestrial CO2 feedbacks on fertilization-induced marine carbon uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Oschlies

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of oceanic CO2 uptake to alterations in the marine biological carbon pump, such as brought about by natural or purposeful ocean fertilization, has repeatedly been investigated by studies employing numerical biogeochemical ocean models. It is shown here that the results of such ocean-centered studies are very sensitive to the assumption made about the response of the carbon reservoirs on the atmospheric side of the sea surface. Assumptions made include prescribed atmospheric pCO2, an interactive atmospheric CO2 pool exchanging carbon with the ocean but not with the terrestrial biosphere, and an interactive atmosphere that exchanges carbon with both oceanic and terrestrial carbon pools. The impact of these assumptions on simulated annual to millennial oceanic carbon uptake is investigated for a hypothetical increase in the C:N ratio of the biological pump and for an idealized enhancement of phytoplankton growth. Compared to simulations with interactive atmosphere, using prescribed atmospheric pCO2 overestimates the sensitivity of the oceanic CO2 uptake to changes in the biological pump, by about 2%, 25%, 100%, and >500% on annual, decadal, centennial, and millennial timescales, respectively. Adding an interactive terrestrial carbon pool to the atmosphere-ocean model system has a small effect on annual timescales, but increases the simulated fertilization-induced oceanic carbon uptake by about 4%, 50%, and 100% on decadal, centennial, and millennial timescales, respectively. On longer than decadal timescales, a substantial fraction of oceanic carbon uptake induced by natural or purposeful ocean fertilization may not come from the atmosphere but from the terrestrial biosphere.

  9. Trace and low concentration co2 removal methods and apparatus utilizing metal organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2016-03-10

    In general, this disclosure describes techniques for removing trace and low concentration CO2 from fluids using SIFSIX-n-M MOFs, wherein n is at least two and M is a metal. In some embodiments, the metal is zinc or copper. Embodiments include devices comprising SIFSIX-n-M MOFs for removing CO2 from fluids. In particular, embodiments relate to devices and methods utilizing SIFSIX-n-M MOFs for removing CO2 from fluids, wherein CO2 concentration is trace. Methods utilizing SIFSIX-n-M MOFs for removing CO2 from fluids can occur in confined spaces. SIFSIX-n-M MOFs can comprise bidentate organic ligands. In a specific embodiment, SIFSIX-n-M MOFs comprise pyrazine or dipryidilacetylene ligands.

  10. Responses of Gmelina arborea, a tropical deciduous tree species, to elevated atmospheric CO2: growth, biomass productivity and carbon sequestration efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasineni, Girish K; Guha, Anirban; Reddy, Attipalli R

    2011-10-01

    The photosynthetic response of trees to rising CO(2) concentrations largely depends on source-sink relations, in addition to differences in responsiveness by species, genotype, and functional group. Previous studies on elevated CO(2) responses in trees have either doubled the gas concentration (>700 μmol mol(-1)) or used single large addition of CO(2) (500-600 μmol mol(-1)). In this study, Gmelina arborea, a fast growing tropical deciduous tree species, was selected to determine the photosynthetic efficiency, growth response and overall source-sink relations under near elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration (460 μmol mol(-1)). Net photosynthetic rate of Gmelina was ~30% higher in plants grown in elevated CO(2) compared with ambient CO(2)-grown plants. The elevated CO(2) concentration also had significant effect on photochemical and biochemical capacities evidenced by changes in F(V)/F(M), ABS/CSm, ET(0)/CSm and RuBPcase activity. The study also revealed that elevated CO(2) conditions significantly increased absolute growth rate, above ground biomass and carbon sequestration potential in Gmelina which sequestered ~2100 g tree(-1) carbon after 120 days of treatment when compared to ambient CO(2)-grown plants. Our data indicate that young Gmelina could accumulate significant biomass and escape acclimatory down-regulation of photosynthesis due to high source-sink capacity even with an increase of 100 μmo lmol(-1) CO(2). PMID:21889049

  11. VUV-absorption cross section of CO2 at high temperatures and impact on exoplanet atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Venot, Olivia; Bénilan, Yves; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Hébrard, Eric; Larcher, Gwenaelle; Schwell, Martin; Dobrijevic, Michel; Selsis, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) absorption cross sections are an essential ingredient of photochemical atmosphere models. Exoplanet searches have unveiled a large population of short-period objects with hot atmospheres, very different from what we find in our solar system. Transiting exoplanets whose atmospheres can now be studied by transit spectroscopy receive extremely strong UV fluxes and have typical temperatures ranging from 400 to 2500 K. At these temperatures, UV photolysis cross section data are severely lacking. Our goal is to provide high-temperature absorption cross sections and their temperature dependency for important atmospheric compounds. This study is dedicated to CO2, which is observed and photodissociated in exoplanet atmospheres. We performed these measurements for the 115 - 200 nm range at 300, 410, 480, and 550 K. In the 195 - 230 nm range, we worked at seven temperatures between 465 and 800 K. We found that the absorption cross section of CO2 is very sensitive to temperature, especially above 160 nm....

  12. Why are Nitrogen Concentrations in Plant Tissues Lower under Elevated CO2? A Critical Examination of the Hypotheses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel R. Taub; Xianzhong Wang

    2008-01-01

    Plants grown under elevated atmospheric [CO2] typically have decreased tissue concentrations of N compared with plants grown under current ambient [CO2]. The physiological mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon have not been definitely established, although a considerable number of hypotheses have been advanced to account for it. In this review we discuss and critically evaluate these hypotheses. One contributing factor to the decreases in tissue N concentrations clearly is dilution of N by increased photosynthetic assimilation of C. In addition, studies on intact plants show strong evidence for a general decrease in the specific uptake rates (uptake per unit mass or length of root) of N by roots under elevated CO2. This decreased root uptake appears likely to be the result both of decreased N demand by shoots and of decreased ability of the soil-root system to supply N. The best-supported mechanism for decreased N supply is a decrease in transpiration-driven mass flow of N in soils due to decreased stomatal conductance at elevated CO2, although some evidence suggests that altered root system architecture may also play a role. There is also limited evidence suggesting that under elevated CO2, plants may exhibit increased rates of N loss through volatilization and/or root exudation, further contributing to lowering tissue N concentrations.

  13. The effects of inorganic nitrogen form and CO2 concentration on wheat yield and nutrient accumulation and distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli eCarlisle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is the most limiting nutrient for plant growth and primary productivity. Inorganic N is available to plants from the soil as ammonium (NH4+ and nitrate (NO3–. We studied how wheat grown hydroponically to senescence in controlled environmental chambers is affected by N form (NH4+ vs. NO3– and CO2 concentration (‘subambient’, ‘ambient’, and ‘elevated’ in terms of biomass, yield, and nutrient accumulation and partitioning. NH4+-grown wheat had the strongest response to CO2 concentration. Plants exposed to subambient and ambient CO2 concentrations typically had the greatest biomass and nutrient accumulation under both N forms. In general NH4+ plants had higher concentrations of total N, P, K, S, Ca, Zn, Fe, and Cu, while NO3– plants had higher concentrations of Mg, B, Mn, and NO3–-N. NH4+ plants contained amounts of phytate similar to NO3– plants but had higher bioavailable Zn, which could have ramifications for human health. NH4+ plants allocated more nutrients and biomass to aboveground tissues whereas NO3– plants allocated more nutrients to the roots. The two inorganic nitrogen forms influenced plant growth and nutrient status so distinctly that they should be treated separately. Moreover, plant growth and nutrient status varied in a non-linear manner with atmospheric CO2 concentration.

  14. Impacts of CO2 concentration on growth, lipid accumulation, and carbon-concentrating-mechanism-related gene expression in oleaginous Chlorella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianhua; Xu, Hui; Luo, Yuanchan; Wan, Minxi; Huang, Jianke; Wang, Weiliang; Li, Yuanguang

    2015-03-01

    Biodiesel production by microalgae with photosynthetic CO2 biofixation is thought to be a feasible way in the field of bioenergy and carbon emission reduction. Knowledge of the carbon-concentrating mechanism plays an important role in improving microalgae carbon fixation efficiency. However, little information is available regarding the dramatic changes of cells suffered upon different environmental factors, such as CO2 concentration. The aim of this study was to investigate the growth, lipid accumulation, carbon fixation rate, and carbon metabolism gene expression under different CO2 concentrations in oleaginous Chlorella. It was found that Chlorella pyrenoidosa grew well under CO2 concentrations ranging from 1 to 20 %. The highest biomass and lipid productivity were 4.3 g/L and 107 mg/L/day under 5 % CO2 condition. Switch from high (5 %) to low (0.03 %, air) CO2 concentration showed significant inhibitory effect on growth and CO2 fixation rate. The amount of the saturated fatty acids was increased obviously along with the transition. Low CO2 concentration (0.03 %) was suitable for the accumulation of saturated fatty acids. Reducing the CO2 concentration could significantly decrease the polyunsaturated degree in fatty acids. Moreover, the carbon-concentrating mechanism-related gene expression revealed that most of them, especially CAH2, LCIB, and HLA3, had remarkable change after 1, 4, and 24 h of the transition, which suggests that Chlorella has similar carbon-concentrating mechanism with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The findings of the present study revealed that C. pyrenoidosa is an ideal candidate for mitigating CO2 and biodiesel production and is appropriate as a model for mechanism research of carbon sequestration.

  15. The effects of atmospheric [CO2] on carbon isotope fractionation and magnesium incorporation into biogenic marine calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Veronica

    1997-01-01

    The influences of atmospheric carbon dioxide on the fractionation of carbon isotopes and the magnesium incorporation into biogenic marine calcite were investigated using samples of the calcareous alga Amphiroa and benthic foraminifer Sorites grown in the Biosphere 2 Ocean system under variable atmospheric CO2 concentrations (approximately 500 to 1200 ppm). Carbon isotope fractionation was studied in both the organic matter and the skeletal carbonate. Magnesium analysis was to be performed on the carbonate removed during decalcification. These data have not been collected due to technical problems. Carbon isotope data from Amphiroa yields a linear relation between [CO2] and Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg)values suggesting that the fractionation of carbon isotopes during photosynthesis is positively correlated with atmospheric [CO2]. [CO2] and Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg) values for Sorites produce a relation that is best described by a hyperbolic function where Delta(sup 13)C(sub Corg) values increase between 300 and 700 ppm and decrease from 700 to 1200 ppm. Further investigation of this relation and Sorites physiology is needed.

  16. Effects of simulated spring thaw of permafrost from mineral cryosol on CO2 emissions and atmospheric CH4 uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, Brandon T.; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Layton, Alice; Chauhan, Archana; Pfiffner, Susan; Mykytczuk, Nadia C.; Sanders, Rebecca; Whyte, Lyle G.; Hedin, Lars; Saad, Nabil; Myneni, Satish; Onstott, Tullis C.

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies investigating organic-rich tundra have reported that increasing biodegradation of Arctic tundra soil organic carbon (SOC) under warming climate regimes will cause increasing CO2 and CH4 emissions. Organic-poor, mineral cryosols, which comprise 87% of Arctic tundra, are not as well characterized. This study examined biogeochemical processes of 1 m long intact mineral cryosol cores (1-6% SOC) collected in the Canadian high Arctic. Vertical profiles of gaseous and aqueous chemistry and microbial composition were related to surface CO2 and CH4 fluxes during a simulated spring/summer thaw under light versus dark and in situ versus water saturated treatments. CO2 fluxes attained 0.8 ± 0.4 mmol CO2 m-2 h-1 for in situ treatments, of which 85 ± 11% was produced by aerobic SOC oxidation, consistent with field observations and metagenomic analyses indicating aerobic heterotrophs were the dominant phylotypes. The Q10 values of CO2 emissions ranged from 2 to 4 over the course of thawing. CH4 degassing occurred during initial thaw; however, all cores were CH4 sinks at atmospheric concentration CH4. Atmospheric CH4 uptake rates ranged from -126 ± 77 to -207 ± 7 nmol CH4 m-2 h-1 with CH4 consumed between 0 and 35 cm depth. Metagenomic and gas chemistry analyses revealed that high-affinity Type II methanotrophic sequence abundance and activity were highest between 0 and 35 cm depth. Microbial sulfate reduction dominated the anaerobic processes, outcompeting methanogenesis for H2 and acetate. Fluxes, microbial community composition, and biogeochemical rates indicate that mineral cryosols of Axel Heiberg Island act as net CO2 sources and atmospheric CH4 sinks during summertime thaw under both in situ and water saturated states.

  17. Large-Scale Atmospheric Variability in AIRS CO2 and O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Jiang, X.; Chahine, M.; Yung, Y.; Olsen, E.; Chen, L.

    2006-12-01

    We present a modeling analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) and ozone (O3) from AIRS with results from two atmospheric chemistry and transport models (CTMs), in the context of the large-scale atmospheric transport. AIRS data, from selected periods in 2003 are retrieved applying the Vanishing Partial Derivative (VPD) method (Chahine et al. [GRL, 2005] and the presentation by Chahine et al., this meeting). Corresponding model results are simulated by 2-D and 3-D atmospheric CTMs. The AIRS retrieved and model simulated CO2 mixing ratios, averaged over 300-500 hPa, are compared with the Matsueda et al. observations in the tropics between 9 and 13 km (see the presentation by Jiang et al., this meeting). The latitudinal distributions of O3, both retrieved and simulated, are compared with ozonesonde data. Both comparisons show reasonable agreement. We then examine the spatiotemporal variabilities of CO2 and O3 and their correlation, both in the AIRS data and model results. Our objective is to better understand the AIRS observed atmospheric variability in CO2 that is associated with underlying large-scale atmospheric transport, particularly the stratosphere-troposphere- exchange (STE) at northern high latitudes in spring and the Asian monsoon summer circulation over South Asia.

  18. A possible mechanism of mineral responses to elevated atmospheric CO2 in rice grains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jia; ZHANG Ming-qian; WANG Xiao-wen; ZHANG Wei-jian

    2015-01-01

    Increasing attentions have been paid to mineral concentration decrease in miled rice grains caused by CO2 enrichment, but the mechanisms stil remain unclear. Therefore, mineral (Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn and Mn) translocation in plant-soil system with a FACE (Free-air CO2 enrichment) experiment were investigated in Eastern China after 4-yr operation. Results mainly showed that: (1) elevated CO2 signiifcantly increased the biomass of stem and panicle by 21.9 and 24.0%, respectively, but did not affect the leaf biomass. (2) Elevated CO2 signiifcantly increased the contents of Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, and Mn in panicle by 61.2, 28.9, 87.0, 36.7, and 66.0%, respectively, and in stem by 13.2, 21.3, 47.2, 91.8, and 25.2%, respectively, but did not affect them in leaf. (3) Elevated CO2 had positive effects on the weight ratio of mineral/biomass in stem and panicle. Our results suggest that elevated CO2 can favor the translocation of Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, and Mn from soil to stem and panicle. The CO2-led mineral decline in miled rice grains may mainly attribute to the CO2-led unbalanced stimulations on the translocations of minerals and carbohydrates from vegetative parts (e.g., leaf, stem, branch and husk) to the grains.

  19. A biogenic CO2 flux adjustment scheme for the mitigation of large-scale biases in global atmospheric CO2 analyses and forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustí-Panareda, Anna; Massart, Sébastien; Chevallier, Frédéric; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Boussetta, Souhail; Dutra, Emanuel; Beljaars, Anton

    2016-08-01

    Forecasting atmospheric CO2 daily at the global scale with a good accuracy like it is done for the weather is a challenging task. However, it is also one of the key areas of development to bridge the gaps between weather, air quality and climate models. The challenge stems from the fact that atmospheric CO2 is largely controlled by the CO2 fluxes at the surface, which are difficult to constrain with observations. In particular, the biogenic fluxes simulated by land surface models show skill in detecting synoptic and regional-scale disturbances up to sub-seasonal time-scales, but they are subject to large seasonal and annual budget errors at global scale, usually requiring a posteriori adjustment. This paper presents a scheme to diagnose and mitigate model errors associated with biogenic fluxes within an atmospheric CO2 forecasting system. The scheme is an adaptive scaling procedure referred to as a biogenic flux adjustment scheme (BFAS), and it can be applied automatically in real time throughout the forecast. The BFAS method generally improves the continental budget of CO2 fluxes in the model by combining information from three sources: (1) retrospective fluxes estimated by a global flux inversion system, (2) land-use information, (3) simulated fluxes from the model. The method is shown to produce enhanced skill in the daily CO2 10-day forecasts without requiring continuous manual intervention. Therefore, it is particularly suitable for near-real-time CO2 analysis and forecasting systems.

  20. 流动沙丘不同深度CO2浓度差异研究%The Difference of CO2 Concentration with Different Depth of the Moving Dune

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵天杰; 赵景波; 董治宝

    2011-01-01

    the diurnal changes of dune CO2 concentration under different depths were measured by using of the infrared monitoring instrument and combined with simultaneous temperature data in minqin county. The results showed that the CO2 concentration of 2 m and 4 m depths was always greater than 1 m. There was a significant positive correlation between the CO2 concentration of moving dune and atmospheric temperature in the depth from lm to 4m.The CO2 cumulative concentration was greater in daytime than in nighttime, which was basically the change of temperature, but the change of the former was later than that of the latter, and led to the asynchronous changes between the CO2 concentration of moving dune and atmospheric temperature. The atmospheric temperature was the main factor of determining the change law of the dune CO2 concentration. In addition, the diurnal concentration of CO2 could be changed by the content of organic carbon, soil conditions, moisture, etc. So it has important scientific significance to research the reason of global warming and the destruction of vegetation on the impact of atmospheric CO2.%利用红外CO2分析仪对民勤流动沙丘不同深度CO2浓度变化特征进行了昼夜连续观测,同时结合同步温度资料,分析了不同深度沙丘CO2浓度变化特征,得出了1 m、2m和4m深度处的CO2浓度累积值依次增大;在1~4m深度范围内,流动沙丘CO2浓度和大气温度之间呈显著的线性正相关;流动沙丘CO2浓度白天高于夜间,这种变化与昼夜温度变化规律相一致,但由于沙丘厚度大,深层温度的升降相对于大气温度的升降具有滞后性,导致了两者具有不同步变化的现象.大气温度是决定流动沙丘CO2昼夜浓度变化规律的主要因素.此外,沙丘中有机碳含量,沙丘疏松状况、沙丘含水量等都会对CO2昼夜浓度变化有一定的影响.查明沙丘CO2浓度昼夜变化规律对研究全球变暖的原因以及植被破坏对大气中CO2

  1. A critique of Phanerozoic climatic models involving changes in the CO 2 content of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucot, A. J.; Gray, Jane

    2001-12-01

    Critical consideration of varied Phanerozoic climatic models, and comparison of them against Phanerozoic global climatic gradients revealed by a compilation of Cambrian through Miocene climatically sensitive sediments (evaporites, coals, tillites, lateritic soils, bauxites, calcretes, etc.) suggests that the previously postulated climatic models do not satisfactorily account for the geological information. Nor do many climatic conclusions based on botanical data stand up very well when examined critically. Although this account does not deal directly with global biogeographic information, another powerful source of climatic information, we have tried to incorporate such data into our thinking wherever possible, particularly in the earlier Paleozoic. In view of the excellent correlation between CO 2 present in Antarctic ice cores, going back some hundreds of thousands of years, and global climatic gradient, one wonders whether or not the commonly postulated Phanerozoic connection between atmospheric CO 2 and global climatic gradient is more coincidence than cause and effect. Many models have been proposed that attempt to determine atmospheric composition and global temperature through geological time, particularly for the Phanerozoic or significant portions of it. Many models assume a positive correlation between atmospheric CO 2 and surface temperature, thus viewing changes in atmospheric CO 2 as playing the critical role in regulating climate/temperature, but none agree on the levels of atmospheric CO 2 through time. Prior to the relatively recent interval of time in which atmospheric CO 2 is directly measurable, a variety of biological and geological proxies have been proposed to correlate with atmospheric CO 2 level or with pCO 2/temperature. Atmospheric models may be constructed for the Pre-Cenozoic but the difficulties of assessing variables in their construction are many and complex. None of the modelers have gathered enough biological and geological data to

  2. [Variation of CO2 concentration in solar greenhouse in Northern China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Min; Xing, Yuxian; Wang, Xiufeng; Ma, Hong

    2003-03-01

    The variation of CO2 concentration in winter-spring cultivated solar greenhouse in northern China was studied. The diurnal change of CO2 concentration showed an irregular 'U' shape in most case, the maximum value appeared prior to unveiling straw mat in the morning, and the minimum between 12:00 and 14:00 PM. Sometimes, an irregular 'W' shape curve with two valleys was also observed, with the first one appeared prior to the ventilation at noon, and the second occurred between 15:00-16:30 PM. During the period of winter-spring cultivation, the daily maximum concentration of CO2 in solar greenhouse decreased gradually, while the daily minimum concentration and daytime average concentration dropped first, then went up. At the same time, the time of CO2 depletion lasted longer and longer. In December, CO2 depletion happened 2.1-3.1 hours after morning unveiling. In the next March, however, it moved up to 0.6-1.1 hours after unveiling in the morning. At daytime, both during and after ventilation, solar greenhouse often showed CO2 depletion. The period of CO2 depletion extended from 4-5.8 hours per day in December to 8-8.5 hours per day in March of next year. The spacial distribution of CO2 concentrations within the greenhouse showed that in the morning and in the evening, the order was the front > the middle > the back, and the ground > the canopy > the upper, and at midday, the order was the front the upper > the canopy. Photon flux density was the most important environmental factor affecting CO2 concentration in greenhouse. Ventilation did not avoided CO2 depletion. Canopy photosynthetic rate and soil respiratory rate were measured at different growth stages of tomato. At seedling stage, CO2 concentration in greenhouse was higher than that outside, due to the vigorous soil respiration and lower canopy photosynthetic rate. But at fruiting stage, severe CO2 depletion occurred because of stronger canopy photosynthesis and weak soil respiration. PMID:12836540

  3. Climate-vegetation modelling and fossil plant data suggest low atmospheric CO2 in the late Miocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, M.; Eronen, J. T.; Utescher, T.; Knorr, G.; Stepanek, C.; Lohmann, G.; Hickler, T.

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing need to understand the pre-Quaternary warm climates, how climate-vegetation interactions functioned in the past, and how we can use this information to understand the present. Here we report vegetation modelling results for the Late Miocene (11-7 Ma) to study the mechanisms of vegetation dynamics and the role of different forcing factors that influence the spatial patterns of vegetation coverage. One of the key uncertainties is the atmospheric concentration of CO2 during past climates. Estimates for the last 20 million years range from 280 to 500 ppm. We simulated Late Miocene vegetation using two plausible CO2 concentrations, 280 ppm CO2 and 450 ppm CO2, with a dynamic global vegetation model (LPJ-GUESS) driven by climate input from a coupled AOGCM (Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Model). The simulated vegetation was compared to existing plant fossil data for the whole Northern Hemisphere. For the comparison we developed a novel approach that uses information of the relative dominance of different plant functional types (PFTs) in the palaeobotanical data to provide a quantitative estimate of the agreement between the simulated and reconstructed vegetation. Based on this quantitative assessment we find that pre-industrial CO2 levels are largely consistent with the presence of seasonal temperate forests in Europe (suggested by fossil data) and open vegetation in North America (suggested by multiple lines of evidence). This suggests that during the Late Miocene the CO2 levels have been relatively low, or that other factors that are not included in the models maintained the seasonal temperate forests and open vegetation.

  4. Evaluating Satellite Observed CO2 Column by a 3-D Atmospheric Transport Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satellite remote sensing is the latest method of measuring atmospheric CO2, which covers a wide range and makes periodic observation. But due to lack of ground-based observation sites, global satellite observed CO2 column is not evaluated efficiently. This paper assess the applicability of using GEOS-Chem model to forward simulate atmospheric CO2 for verifying Greenhouse Gas Observation SATellite (GOSAT) observed CO2 column. It is shown that GEOS-Chem performs well in modelling atmospheric CO2 and there are generally no significant differences between ground-based observation and model results. According to the comparsion, the spatial and temporal distribution of XCO2 agrees well between GOSAT and GEOS-Chem. GOSAT XCO2 is turned out to be 2.6 ppm lower than the model results. The mean difference observed between GOSAT and GEOS-Chem varies from −1.8 to −3.1 ppm seasonally, with the standard deviation ranging from 1.4 to 2.1 ppm. And in general, the difference is larger in summer than that in winter, in land area than in sea area. It might have been caused by the different land-sea distribution and eco-system's changing with seasons

  5. 低浓度 CO2捕集的吸收率测算%Absorption rate measurement and calculation of low-concentration CO2 capture technical

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马超援

    2016-01-01

    The paper introduces low-concentration CO2 absorbinf methods,describes the measurement and calculation methods of low-concentra-tion CO2 capture technical and explores the elements of determininf absorbinf afent,which has certain meaninf for control indoor CO2 concentration.%介绍了常用的低浓度 CO2气体吸收方法,就低浓度 CO2捕集吸收率的测算方法进行了阐述,并探讨了确定吸收剂的要素,对室内 CO2浓度的控制有一定的意义。

  6. Influence of CO2 Concentration on Adsorption Behavior of 99Tc in Clay Under Hypoxic Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Zhi-xin; BAO; Liang-jin; JIANG; Tao; CHEN; Xi

    2013-01-01

    Under hypoxic conditions,using the Beishan groundwater the influence of the CO2 concentration on the adsorption behavior of 99Tc in the Longdong clay was studied by batch method.Meanwhile,the buffering effect of clay rocks on the pH value of aqueous solution at different CO2 concentrations was discussed.The adsorption behavior of 99Tc on clay at different initial pH values was also researched.

  7. Regulation of hormonal responses of sweet pepper as affected by salinity and elevated CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, María Carmen; Houdusse, Fabrice; Garcia-Mina, Jose M; Garnica, María; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2014-08-01

    This study examines the extent to which the predicted CO2 -protective effects on the inhibition of growth, impairment of photosynthesis and nutrient imbalance caused by saline stress are mediated by an effective adaptation of the endogenous plant hormonal balance. Therefore, sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuum, cv. Ciclón) were grown at ambient or elevated [CO2] (400 or 800 µmol mol(-1)) with a nutrient solution containing 0 or 80 mM NaCl. The results show that, under saline conditions, elevated [CO2] increased plant dry weight, leaf area, leaf relative water content and net photosynthesis compared with ambient [CO2], whilst the maximum potential quantum efficiency of photosystem II was not modified. In salt-stressed plants, elevated [CO2 ] increased leaf NO3(-) concentration and reduced Cl(-) concentration. Salinity stress induced ABA accumulation in the leaves but it was reduced in the roots at high [CO2], being correlated with the stomatal response. Under non-stressed conditions, IAA was dramatically reduced in the roots when high [CO2] was applied, which resulted in greater root DW and root respiration. Additionally, the observed high CK concentration in the roots (especially tZR) could prevent downregulation of photosynthesis at high [CO2], as the N level in the leaves was increased compared with the ambient [CO2], under salt-stress conditions. These results demonstrate that the hormonal balance was altered by the [CO2], which resulted in significant changes at the growth, gas exchange and nutritional levels. PMID:24152078

  8. Contrasting CO2 concentration discharge dynamics in headwater streams: A multi-catchment comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsmore, K. J.; Wallin, M. B.; Johnson, M. S.; Billett, M. F.; Bishop, K.; Pumpanen, J.; Ojala, A.

    2013-06-01

    CO2 concentrations are highly variable and strongly linked to discharge, but until recently, measurements have been largely restricted to low-frequency manual sampling. Using new in situ CO2 sensors, we present concurrent, high-frequency (data collected from five catchments across Canada, UK, and Fennoscandinavia to explore concentration-discharge dynamics; we also consider the relative importance of high flows to lateral aquatic CO2 export. The catchments encompassed a wide range of mean CO2 concentrations (0.73-3.05 mg C L-1) and hydrological flow regimes from flashy peatland streams to muted outflows within a Finnish lake system. In three of the catchments, CO2 concentrations displayed clear bimodal distributions indicating distinct CO2 sources. Concentration-discharge relationships were not consistent across sites with three of the catchments displaying a negative relationship and two catchments displaying a positive relationship. When individual high flow events were considered, we found a strong correlation between both the average magnitude of the hydrological and CO2 response peaks, and the average response lag times. An analysis of lateral CO2 export showed that in three of the catchments, the top 30% of flow (i.e., flow that was exceeded only 30% of the time) had the greatest influence on total annual load. This indicates that an increase in precipitation extremes (greater high-flow contributions) may have a greater influence on the flushing of CO2 from soils to surface waters than a long-term increase in mean annual precipitation, assuming source limitation does not occur.

  9. Response of Sphagnum mosses to increased CO2 concentration and nitrogen deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this work was to study the effects of different CO2 concentration and N deposition rates on Sphagna adapted to grow along a nutrient availability gradient (i.e. ombrotrophy-mesotrophy-eutrophy). The study investigated: (i) the effects of various longterm CO2 concentrations on the rate of net photosynthesis in Sphagna, (ii) the effects of the CO2 and N treatments on the moss density, shoot dry masses, length increment and dry mass production in Sphagna, (iii) the concentrations of the major nutrients in Sphagna after prolonged exposure to the CO2 and N treatments, and (iv) species dependent differences in potential NH4+ and NO3- uptake rates. The internal nutrient concentration of the capitulum and the production of biomass were effected less by the elevated CO2 concentrations because the availability of N was a controlling factor. In addition responses to the N treatments were related to ecological differences between the Sphagna species. Species with a high tolerance of N availability were able to acclimatise to the increased N deposition rates. The data suggests a high nutrient status is less significant than the adaptation of the Sphagna to their ecological niche (e.g. low tolerance of meso-eutrophic S. warnstorfii to high N deposition rate). At the highest N deposition rate the ombrotrophic S. fuscum had the highest increase in tissue N concentration among the Sphagna studied. S. fuscum almost died at the highest N deposition rate because of the damaging effects of N to the plant's metabolism. Ombrotrophic hummock species such as S. fuscum, were also found to have the highest potential N uptake rate (on density of dry mass basis) compared to lawn species. The rate of net photosynthesis was initially increased with elevated CO2 concentrations, but photosynthesis was down regulated with prolonged exposure to CO2. The water use efficiency in Sphagna appeared not to be coupled with exposure to the long-term CO2 concentration. The effects of CO

  10. Soil organic carbon dust emission: an omitted global source of atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Webb, Nicholas P; Butler, Harry J; Strong, Craig L; McTainsh, Grant H; Leys, John F; Viscarra Rossel, Raphael A

    2013-10-01

    Soil erosion redistributes soil organic carbon (SOC) within terrestrial ecosystems, to the atmosphere and oceans. Dust export is an essential component of the carbon (C) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) budget because wind erosion contributes to the C cycle by removing selectively SOC from vast areas and transporting C dust quickly offshore; augmenting the net loss of C from terrestrial systems. However, the contribution of wind erosion to rates of C release and sequestration is poorly understood. Here, we describe how SOC dust emission is omitted from national C accounting, is an underestimated source of CO(2) and may accelerate SOC decomposition. Similarly, long dust residence times in the unshielded atmospheric environment may considerably increase CO(2) emission. We developed a first approximation to SOC enrichment for a well-established dust emission model and quantified SOC dust emission for Australia (5.83 Tg CO(2)-e yr(-1)) and Australian agricultural soils (0.4 Tg CO(2)-e yr(-1)). These amount to underestimates for CO(2) emissions of ≈10% from combined C pools in Australia (year = 2000), ≈5% from Australian Rangelands and ≈3% of Australian Agricultural Soils by Kyoto Accounting. Northern hemisphere countries with greater dust emission than Australia are also likely to have much larger SOC dust emission. Therefore, omission of SOC dust emission likely represents a considerable underestimate from those nations' C accounts. We suggest that the omission of SOC dust emission from C cycling and C accounting is a significant global source of uncertainty. Tracing the fate of wind-eroded SOC in the dust cycle is therefore essential to quantify the release of CO(2) from SOC dust to the atmosphere and the contribution of SOC deposition to downwind C sinks.

  11. NO emission characteristics of superfine pulverized coal combustion in the O2/CO2 atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Superfine pulverized coal combustion in O2/CO2 atmosphere is a new promising technology. • NO emissions of superfine pulverized coal combustion in O2/CO2 mixture were focused. • Coal particle sizes have significant effects on NO emissions in O2/CO2 combustion. - Abstract: The combination of O2/CO2 combustion and superfine pulverized coal combustion technology can make full use of their respective merits, and solve certain inherent disadvantages of each technology. The technology of superfine pulverized coal combustion in the O2/CO2 atmosphere is easy and feasible to be retrofitted with few reconstructions on the existing devices. It will become a useful and promising method in the future. In this paper, a one-dimensional drop-tube furnace system was adopted to study the NO emission characteristics of superfine pulverized coal combustion in the O2/CO2 atmosphere. The effects of coal particle size, coal quality, furnace temperature, stoichiometric ratio, etc. were analyzed. It is important to note that coal particle sizes have significant influence on NO emissions in the O2/CO2 combustion. For the homogeneous NO reduction, smaller coal particles can inhibit the homogeneous NO formations under fuel-rich combustion conditions, while it becomes disadvantageous for fuel-lean combustion. However, under any conditions, heterogeneous reduction is always more significant for smaller coal particle sizes, which have smoother pore surfaces and simpler pore structures. The results from this fundamental research will provide technical support for better understanding and developing this new combustion process

  12. Atmospheric pCO2 Reconstructed across the Early Eocene Hyperthermals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Schubert, B.

    2015-12-01

    Negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) are commonly associated with extreme global warming. The Early Eocene is punctuated by five such CIEs, the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM, ca. 55.8 Ma), H1 (ca. 53.6 Ma), H2 (ca. 53.5 Ma), I1 (ca. 53.3 Ma), and I2 (ca. 53.2 Ma), each characterized by global warming. The negative CIEs are recognized in both marine and terrestrial substrates, but the terrestrial substrates exhibit a larger absolute magnitude CIE than the marine substrates. Here we reconcile the difference in CIE magnitude between the terrestrial and marine substrates for each of these events by accounting for the additional carbon isotope fractionation by C3 land plants in response to increased atmospheric pCO2. Our analysis yields background and peak pCO2 values for each of the events. Assuming a common mechanism for each event, we calculate that background pCO2 was not static across the Early Eocene, with the highest background pCO2 immediately prior to I2, the last of the five CIEs. Background pCO2 is dependent on the source used in our analysis with values ranging from 300 to 720 ppmv provided an injection of 13C-depleted carbon with δ13C value of -60‰ (e.g. biogenic methane). The peak pCO2 during each event scales according to the magnitude of CIE, and is therefore greatest during the PETM and smallest during H2. Both background and peak pCO2 are higher if we assume a mechanism of permafrost thawing (δ13C = -25‰). Our reconstruction of pCO2 across these events is consistent with trends in the δ18O value of deep-sea benthic foraminifera, suggesting a strong link between pCO2 and temperature during the Early Eocene.

  13. Glacial atmospheric CO2 decline in association with decrease of marine sedimentary phosphorus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENG; Huanxin; ZHANG; Xingmao; WU; Nengyou; WANG; Ying; CHEN; Lihong; ZHONG; Hexian; QIN; Yachao

    2006-01-01

    The environmental and biogeochemical information extracted from the sediments collected from the northern shelf of the South China Sea shows that terrigenous inputs of phosphorus into the sea remained relatively constant, and the variation of phosphorus contents at different depths was caused by climatic and environmental changes. The findings also suggest that the vertical variation of phosphorus content was opposite to those of calcium carbonate and cadmium, and the functional correlation between CO2 and PO43? in seawater was given by calculating the chemical equilibrium, indicating that the accumulation of marine sedimentary phosphorus may have something to do with the variation of atmospheric CO2. The decreased phosphorus accumulation as well as the correspondingly-increased calcium carbonate content might be one of key factors causing glacial atmospheric CO2 decline.