WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmospheric chemistry project

  1. Integrated Global Observation Strategy - Ozone and Atmospheric Chemistry Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsenrath, Ernest; Readings, C. J.; Kaye, J.; Mohnen, V.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The "Long Term Continuity of Stratospheric Ozone Measurements and Atmospheric Chemistry" project was one of six established by the Committee on Earth Observing Satellites (CEOS) in response to the Integrated Global Observing Strategy (IGOS) initiative. IGOS links satellite and ground based systems for global environmental observations. The strategy of this project is to develop a consensus of user requirements including the scientific (SPARC, IGAC, WCRP) and the applications community (WMO, UNEP) and to develop a long-term international plan for ozone and atmospheric chemistry measurements. The major components of the observing system include operational and research (meeting certain criteria) satellite platforms planned by the space faring nations which are integrated with a well supported and sustained ground, aircraft, and balloon measurements program for directed observations as well satellite validation. Highly integrated and continuous measurements of ozone, validation, and reanalysis efforts are essential to meet the international scientific and applications goals. In order to understand ozone trends, climate change, and air quality, it is essential to conduct long term measurements of certain other atmospheric species. These species include key source, radical, and reservoir constituents.

  2. Compilation and analyses of emissions inventories for the NOAA atmospheric chemistry project. Progress report, August 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkovitz, C.M.

    1997-09-01

    Global inventories of anthropogenic emissions of oxides of nitrogen for circa 1985 and 1990 and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) for circa 1990 have been compiled by this project. Work on the inventories has been carried out under the umbrella of the Global Emissions Inventory Activity of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry program. Global emissions of NOx for 1985 are estimated to be 21 Tg N/yr, with approximately 84% originating in the Northern Hemisphere. The global emissions for 1990 are 31 Tg N/yr for NOx and 173 Gg NMVOC/yr. Ongoing research activities for this project continue to address emissions of both NOx and NMVOCs. Future tasks include: evaluation of more detailed regional emissions estimates and update of the default 1990 inventories with the appropriate estimates; derivation of quantitative uncertainty estimates for the emission values; and development of emissions estimates for 1995.

  3. Atmospheric Chemistry and Greenhouse Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehhalt, D.; Prather, M.; Dentener, F.; Derwent, R.; Dlugokencky, Edward J.; Holland, E.; Isaksen, I.; Katima, J.; Kirchhoff, V.; Matson, P.; Midgley, P.; Wang, M.; Berntsen, T.; Bey, I.; Brasseur, G.; Buja, L.; Collins, W. J.; Daniel, J. S.; DeMore, W. B.; Derek, N.; Dickerson, R.; Etheridge, D.; Feichter, J.; Fraser, P.; Friedl, R.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Gauss, M.; Grenfell, L.; Grubler, Arnulf; Harris, N.; Hauglustaine, D.; Horowitz, L.; Jackman, C.; Jacob, D.; Jaegle, L.; Jain, Atul K.; Kanakidou, M.; Karlsdottir, S.; Ko, M.; Kurylo, M.; Lawrence, M.; Logan, J. A.; Manning, M.; Mauzerall, D.; McConnell, J.; Mickley, L. J.; Montzka, S.; Muller, J. F.; Olivier, J.; Pickering, K.; Pitari, G.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rogers, H.; Rognerud, B.; Smith, Steven J.; Solomon, S.; Staehelin, J.; Steele, P.; Stevenson, D. S.; Sundet, J.; Thompson, A.; van Weele, M.; von Kuhlmann, R.; Wang, Y.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Wigley, T. M.; Wild, O.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Yantosca, R.; Joos, Fortunat; McFarland, M.

    2001-10-01

    Chapter 4 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 2414.1 Introduction 2434.2 Trace Gases: Current Observations, Trends and Budgets 2484.3 Projections of Future Emissions 2664.4 Projections of Atmospheric Composition for the 21st Century 2674.5 Open Questions 2774.6 Overall Impact of Global Atmospheric Chemistry Change 279

  4. COMPILATION AND ANALYSES OF EMISSIONS INVENTORIES FOR THE NOAA ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY PROJECT. PROGRESS REPORT, AUGUST 1997.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BENKOVITZ,C.M.

    1997-09-01

    Global inventories of anthropogenic emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for circa 1985 and 1990 and Non-Methane Volatile Organic Compounds (NMVOCs) for circa 1990 have been compiled by this project. Work on the inventories has been carried out under the umbrella of the Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program. The 1985 NO{sub x} inventory was compiled using default data sets of global emissions that were refined via the use of more detailed regional data sets; this inventory is being distributed to the scientific community at large as the GEIA Version 1A inventory. Global emissions of NO{sub x} for 1985 are estimated to be 21 Tg N y{sup -1}, with approximately 84% originating in the Northern Hemisphere. The 1990 inventories of NO{sub x} and NMVOCs were compiled using unified methodologies and data sets in collaboration with the Netherlands National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection (Rijksinstituut Voor Volksgezondheid en Milieuhygiene, RIVM) and the Division of Technology for Society of the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, (IMW-TNO); these emissions will be used as the default estimates to be updated with more accurate regional data. The NMVOC inventory was gridded and speciated into 23 chemical categories. The resulting global emissions for 1990 are 31 Tg N yr{sup -1} for NO{sub x} and 173 Gg NMVOC yr{sup -1}. Emissions of NO{sub x} are highest in the populated and industrialized areas of eastern North America and across Europe, and in biomass burning areas of South America, Africa, and Asia. Emissions of NMVOCs are highest in biomass burning areas of South America, Africa, and Asia. The 1990 NO{sub x} emissions were gridded to 1{sup o} resolution using surrogate data, and were given seasonal, two-vertical-level resolution and speciated into NO and NO{sub 2} based on proportions derived from the 1985 GEIA Version 1B inventory. Global NMVOC

  5. The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Overview and Description of Models, Simulations and Climate Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Shindell, D. T.; Naik, V.; Plummer, D.; Josse, B.; Righi, M.; Rumbold, S. T.; Schulz, M.; Skeie, R. B.; Strode, S.; Young, P. J.; Cionni, I.; Dalsoren, S.; Eyring, V.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Collins, W. J.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Folberth, G.; Ghan, S. J.; Horowitz, L. W.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Nagashima, T.

    2013-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) consists of a series of time slice experiments targeting the long-term changes in atmospheric composition between 1850 and 2100, with the goal of documenting composition changes and the associated radiative forcing. In this overview paper, we introduce the ACCMIP activity, the various simulations performed (with a requested set of 14) and the associated model output. The 16 ACCMIP models have a wide range of horizontal and vertical resolutions, vertical extent, chemistry schemes and interaction with radiation and clouds. While anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions were specified for all time slices in the ACCMIP protocol, it is found that the natural emissions are responsible for a significant range across models, mostly in the case of ozone precursors. The analysis of selected present-day climate diagnostics (precipitation, temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind) reveals biases consistent with state-of-the-art climate models. The model-to- model comparison of changes in temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind between 1850 and 2000 and between 2000 and 2100 indicates mostly consistent results. However, models that are clear outliers are different enough from the other models to significantly affect their simulation of atmospheric chemistry.

  6. Multi-model mean nitrogen and sulfur deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): evaluation historical and projected changes

    OpenAIRE

    J.-F. Lamarque; Dentener, F.; Mcconnell, J.; C.-U. Ro; M. Shaw; Vet, R.; D. Bergmann; Cameron-Smith, P.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, S. J.; B. Josse; Lee, Y. H.; I. A. MacKenzie; Plummer, D.

    2013-01-01

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000–2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice...

  7. Multi-model mean nitrogen and sulfur deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): evaluation of historical and projected future changes

    OpenAIRE

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Dentener, F.; Mcconnell, J.; Ro, C.-U.; M. Shaw; Vet, R.; D. Bergmann; Cameron-Smith, P.; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, S. J.; B. Josse; Lee, Y. H.; I. A. MacKenzie

    2013-01-01

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000–2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present day (year 2000...

  8. The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP: overview and description of models, simulations and climate diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Lamarque

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP consists of a series of timeslice experiments targeting the long-term changes in atmospheric composition between 1850 and 2100, with the goal of documenting radiative forcing and the associated composition changes. Here we introduce the various simulations performed under ACCMIP and the associated model output. The ACCMIP models have a wide range of horizontal and vertical resolutions, vertical extent, chemistry schemes and interaction with radiation and clouds. While anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions were specified for all time slices in the ACCMIP protocol, it is found that the natural emissions lead to a significant range in emissions, mostly for ozone precursors. The analysis of selected present-day climate diagnostics (precipitation, temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind reveals biases consistent with state-of-the-art climate models. The model-to-model comparison of changes in temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind between 1850 and 2000 and between 2000 and 2100 indicates mostly consistent results, but with outliers different enough to possibly affect their representation of climate impact on chemistry.

  9. Atmospheric and aerosol chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeill, V. Faye [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Ariya, Parisa A. (ed.) [McGill Univ. Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; McGill Univ. Montreal, QC (Canada). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

    2014-09-01

    This series presents critical reviews of the present position and future trends in modern chemical research. Short and concise reports on chemistry, each written by the world renowned experts. Still valid and useful after 5 or 10 years. More information as well as the electronic version of the whole content available at: springerlink.com. Christian George, Barbara D'Anna, Hartmut Herrmann, Christian Weller, Veronica Vaida, D. J. Donaldson, Thorsten Bartels-Rausch, Markus Ammann Emerging Areas in Atmospheric Photochemistry. Lisa Whalley, Daniel Stone, Dwayne Heard New Insights into the Tropospheric Oxidation of Isoprene: Combining Field Measurements, Laboratory Studies, Chemical Modelling and Quantum Theory. Neil M. Donahue, Allen L. Robinson, Erica R. Trump, Ilona Riipinen, Jesse H. Kroll Volatility and Aging of Atmospheric Organic Aerosol. P. A. Ariya, G. Kos, R. Mortazavi, E. D. Hudson, V. Kanthasamy, N. Eltouny, J. Sun, C. Wilde Bio-Organic Materials in the Atmosphere and Snow: Measurement and Characterization V. Faye McNeill, Neha Sareen, Allison N. Schwier Surface-Active Organics in Atmospheric Aerosols.

  10. Oxygen Chemistry in Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, E. H.; Atreya, S. K.

    2002-09-01

    Oxygen chemistry in the atmosphere of Titan is controlled by the presence of CO and a likely influx of extraplanetary oxygen. The presence of water vapor, corroborated by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) stratospheric detection [1], combined with CO induces the formation of CO2, which has also been observed [2]. However, the high CO/H2O ratio in Titan's atmosphere causes the propagation of oxygen chemistry to follow a different path than what is predicted for the Jovian planets. Specifically, the efficient CO recycling mechanisms serve to inhibit significant formation of larger oxygen compounds such as CH3OH (methanol) and CH2CO (ketene). The results of a 1-D photochemical model are presented in the context of identifying possible oxygen compounds that might be detected by the Cassini/Huygens mission which will arrive at Titan in 2004. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program and by the GCMS Project of the Cassini/Huygens mission. [1] A. Coustenis et al., Astron. Astrophys., 336, L85-L89, 1998. [2] A. Coustenis et al., Icarus, 80, 54-76, 1989.

  11. Evaluation of Present-day Aerosols over China Simulated from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, H.; Chang, W.

    2014-12-01

    High concentrations of aerosols over China lead to strong radiative forcing that is important for both regional and global climate. To understand the representation of aerosols in China in current global climate models, we evaluate extensively the simulated present-day aerosol concentrations and aerosol optical depth (AOD) over China from the 12 models that participated in Atmospheric Chemistry & Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), by using ground-based measurements and satellite remote sensing. Ground-based measurements of aerosol concentrations used in this work include those from the China Meteorological Administration (CMA) Atmosphere Watch Network (CAWNET) and the observed fine-mode aerosol concentrations collected from the literature. The ground-based measurements of AOD in China are taken from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET), the sites with CIMEL sun photometer operated by Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and from Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network (CSHNET). We find that the ACCMIP models generally underestimate concentrations of all major aerosol species in China. On an annual mean basis, the multi-model mean concentrations of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon are underestimated by 63%, 73%, 54%, 53%, and 59%, respectively. The multi-model mean AOD values show low biases of 20-40% at studied sites in China. The ACCMIP models can reproduce seasonal variation of nitrate but cannot capture well the seasonal variations of other aerosol species. Our analyses indicate that current global models generally underestimate the role of aerosols in China in climate simulations.

  12. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    This report completes Clarkson University`s study of the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. In order to pursue this general goal, two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. Thus, two sets of specific goals have been established for this project. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are (1) Determine the formation rates of {circ}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay; (2) Examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size; (3) Measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and (4) Measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations.

  13. Tropospheric Ozone Changes, Radiative Forcing and Attribution to Emissions in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D.S.; Young, P.J.; Naik, V.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Shindell, D. T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Skeie, R. B.; Dalsoren, S. B.; Myhre, G.; Berntsen, T. K.; Folberth, G. A.; Rumbold, S. T.; Collins, W. J.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Doherty, R. M.; Zeng, G.; vanNoije, T. P. C.; Strunk, A.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Plummer, D. A.; Strode, S. A.; Horowitz, L.; Lee, Y. H.; Szopa, S.; Sudo, K.; Nagashima, T.; Josse, B.; Cionni, I.; Righi, M.; Eyring, V.; Conley, A.; Bowman, K. W.; Wild, O.; Archibald, A.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone (O3) from 17 atmospheric chemistry models taking part in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) has been used to calculate tropospheric ozone radiative forcings (RFs). All models applied a common set of anthropogenic emissions, which are better constrained for the present-day than the past. Future anthropogenic emissions follow the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios, which define a relatively narrow range of possible air pollution emissions. We calculate a value for the pre-industrial (1750) to present-day (2010) tropospheric ozone RF of 410 mW m-2. The model range of pre-industrial to present-day changes in O3 produces a spread (+/-1 standard deviation) in RFs of +/-17%. Three different radiation schemes were used - we find differences in RFs between schemes (for the same ozone fields) of +/-10 percent. Applying two different tropopause definitions gives differences in RFs of +/-3 percent. Given additional (unquantified) uncertainties associated with emissions, climate-chemistry interactions and land-use change, we estimate an overall uncertainty of +/-30 percent for the tropospheric ozone RF. Experiments carried out by a subset of six models attribute tropospheric ozone RF to increased emissions of methane (44+/-12 percent), nitrogen oxides (31 +/- 9 percent), carbon monoxide (15 +/- 3 percent) and non-methane volatile organic compounds (9 +/- 2 percent); earlier studies attributed more of the tropospheric ozone RF to methane and less to nitrogen oxides. Normalising RFs to changes in tropospheric column ozone, we find a global mean normalised RF of 42 mW m(-2) DU(-1), a value similar to previous work. Using normalised RFs and future tropospheric column ozone projections we calculate future tropospheric ozone RFs (mW m(-2); relative to 1750) for the four future scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6.0 and RCP8.5) of 350, 420, 370 and 460 (in 2030), and 200, 300, 280 and 600 (in 2100). Models show some

  14. Tropospheric ozone changes, radiative forcing and attribution to emissions in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Stevenson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ozone (O3 from 17 atmospheric chemistry models taking part in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP has been used to calculate tropospheric ozone radiative forcings (RFs. All models applied a common set of anthropogenic emissions, which are better constrained for the present-day than the past. Future anthropogenic emissions follow the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP scenarios, which define a relatively narrow range of possible air pollution emissions. We calculate a value for the pre-industrial (1750 to present-day (2010 tropospheric ozone RF of 410 mW m−2. The model range of pre-industrial to present-day changes in O3 produces a spread (±1 standard deviation in RFs of ±17%. Three different radiation schemes were used – we find differences in RFs between schemes (for the same ozone fields of ±10%. Applying two different tropopause definitions gives differences in RFs of ±3%. Given additional (unquantified uncertainties associated with emissions, climate-chemistry interactions and land-use change, we estimate an overall uncertainty of ±30% for the tropospheric ozone RF. Experiments carried out by a subset of six models attribute tropospheric ozone RF to increased emissions of methane (44±12%, nitrogen oxides (31 ± 9%, carbon monoxide (15 ± 3% and non-methane volatile organic compounds (9 ± 2%; earlier studies attributed more of the tropospheric ozone RF to methane and less to nitrogen oxides. Normalising RFs to changes in tropospheric column ozone, we find a global mean normalised RF of 42 mW m−2 DU−1, a value similar to previous work. Using normalised RFs and future tropospheric column ozone projections we calculate future tropospheric ozone RFs (mW m−2; relative to 1750 for the four future scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6.0 and RCP8.5 of 350, 420, 370 and 460 (in 2030, and 200, 300, 280 and 600 (in 2100. Models show some coherent responses of ozone to climate change

  15. Organic chemistry in Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scattergood, T.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory photochemical simulations and other types of chemical simulations are discussed. The chemistry of methane, which is the major known constituent of Titan's atmosphere was examined with stress on what can be learned from photochemistry and particle irradiation. The composition of dust that comprises the haze layer was determined. Isotope fractionation in planetary atmospheres is also discussed.

  16. Land cover change impacts on atmospheric chemistry: simulating projected large-scale tree mortality in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, Jeffrey A.; Heald, Colette L.; Silva, Sam J.; Martin, Randall V.

    2016-02-01

    Land use and land cover changes impact climate and air quality by altering the exchange of trace gases between the Earth's surface and atmosphere. Large-scale tree mortality that is projected to occur across the United States as a result of insect and disease may therefore have unexplored consequences for tropospheric chemistry. We develop a land use module for the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model to facilitate simulations involving changes to the land surface, and to improve consistency across land-atmosphere exchange processes. The model is used to test the impact of projected national-scale tree mortality risk through 2027 estimated by the 2012 USDA Forest Service National Insect and Disease Risk Assessment. Changes in biogenic emissions alone decrease monthly mean O3 by up to 0.4 ppb, but reductions in deposition velocity compensate or exceed the effects of emissions yielding a net increase in O3 of more than 1 ppb in some areas. The O3 response to the projected change in emissions is affected by the ratio of baseline NOx : VOC concentrations, suggesting that in addition to the degree of land cover change, tree mortality impacts depend on whether a region is NOx-limited or NOx-saturated. Consequently, air quality (as diagnosed by the number of days that 8 h average O3 exceeds 70 ppb) improves in polluted environments where changes in emissions are more important than changes to dry deposition, but worsens in clean environments where changes to dry deposition are the more important term. The influence of changes in dry deposition demonstrated here underscores the need to evaluate treatments of this physical process in models. Biogenic secondary organic aerosol loadings are significantly affected across the US, decreasing by 5-10 % across many regions, and by more than 25 % locally. Tree mortality could therefore impact background aerosol loadings by between 0.5 and 2 µg m-3. Changes to reactive nitrogen oxide abundance and partitioning are also locally

  17. Compilation and analyses of emissions inventories for NOAA`s atmospheric chemistry project. Progress report, August 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkovitz, C.M.; Mubaraki, M.A.

    1997-09-01

    Global inventories of anthropogenic emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for circa 1985 and 1990 and Non-Methane Volatile Organic Compounds (NMVOCs) for circa 1990 have been compiled by this project. Work on the inventories has been carried out under the umbrella of the Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) Program. The 1985 NO{sub x} inventory was compiled using default data sets of global emissions that were refined via the use of more detailed regional data sets; this inventory is being distributed to the scientific community at large as the GEIA Version 1A inventory. Global emissions of NO{sub x} for 1985 are estimated to be 21 Tg N y{sup -1}, with approximately 84% originating in the Northern Hemisphere. The 1990 inventories of NO{sub x} and NMVOCs were compiled using unified methodologies and data sets in collaboration with the Netherlands National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection (Rijksinstituut Voor Volksgezondheid en Milieuhygiene, RIVM) and the Division of Technology for Society of the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, (IMW-TNO); these emissions will be used as the default estimates to be updated with more accurate regional data. The NMVOC inventory was gridded and speciated into 23 chemical categories.

  18. Chemistry Of Atmospheric Brown Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2015-05-27

    Organic carbon (OC) accounts for a large fraction of atmospheric aerosol and has profound effects on air quality, atmospheric chemistry and climate forcing. Molecular composition of the OC and its evolution during common processes of atmospheric aging have been a subject of extensive research over the last decade (see reviews of Ervens et al.,1 Hallquist et al.,2 Herckes et al.,3 Carlton et al.,4 Kroll and Seinfeld,5 Rudich et al.,6 and Kanakidou et al.7). Even though many fundamental advances have been reported in these studies, our understanding of the climate-related properties of atmospheric OC is still incomplete and the specific ways in which OC impacts atmospheric environment and climate forcing are just beginning to be understood. This review covers one topic of particular interest in this area –environmental chemistry of light-absorbing aerosol OC and its impact on radiative forcing.

  19. Computational solution of atmospheric chemistry problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafri, J.; Ake, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive studies were performed on problems of interest in atmospheric chemistry. In addition to several minor projects, four major projects were performed and described (theoretical studies of ground and low-lying excited states of ClO2; ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of the methyl peroxy radical; electronic states ot the FO radical; and theoretical studies S02 (H2O) (sub n)).

  20. Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation Historical and Projected Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Dentener, F.; McConnell, J.; Ro, C.-U.; Shaw, M.; Vet, R.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, S. J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, D.; Shindell, D. T.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.

    2013-01-01

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. For this time slice, we find a multi-model mean deposition of 50 Tg(N) yr1 from nitrogen oxide emissions, 60 Tg(N) yr1 from ammonia emissions, and 83 Tg(S) yr1 from sulfur emissions. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching 1300 mg(N) m2 yr1 averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, 3050 larger than the values in any region currently (2000). The new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

  1. Multi-model Mean Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Evaluation of Historical and Projected Future Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Dentener, Frank; McConnell, J.R.; Ro, C-U; Shaw, Mark; Vet, Robert; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, Philip; Dalsoren, S.; Doherty, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, Steven J.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Plummer, David; Shindell, Drew; Skeie, R. B.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Zeng, G.; Curran, M.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Das, S.; Fritzsche, D.; Nolan, M.

    2013-08-20

    We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000-2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice), the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States, but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching >1300 mgN/m2/yr averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30-50% larger than the values in any region currently (2000). Despite known issues, the new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of climate and ecological studies.

  2. Atmospheric chemistry over southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; Levy, Robert C.; Thompson, Anne M.

    2012-03-01

    Changing Chemistry in a Changing Climate: Human and Natural Impacts Over Southern Africa (C4-SAR); Midrand, South Africa, 31 May to 3 June 2011 During the southern African dry season, regional haze from mixed industrial pollution, biomass burning aerosol and gases from domestic and grassland fires, and biogenic sources from plants and soils is worsened by a semipermanent atmospheric gyre over the subcontinent. These factors were a driver of several major international field campaigns in the 1990s and early 2000s and attracted many scientists to the region. Some researchers were interested in understanding fundamental processes governing chemistry of the atmosphere and interaction with climate change. Others found favorable conditions for evaluating satellite- derived measurements of atmospheric properties and a changing land surface. With that background in mind a workshop on atmospheric chemistry was held in South Africa. Sponsored by the International Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Pollution (ICACGP; http://www.icacgp.org/), the workshop received generous support from Eskom, the South African power utility; and the Climatology Research Group of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

  3. Atmospheric Chemistry Over Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatebe, Charles K.; Levy, Robert C.; Thompson, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    During the southern African dry season, regional haze from mixed industrial pollution, biomass burning aerosol and gases from domestic and grassland fires, and biogenic sources from plants and soils is worsened by a semi-permanent atmosphere gyre over the subcontinent. These factors were a driver of several major international field campaigns in the 1990s and early 2000s, and attracted many scientists to the region. Some researchers were interested in understanding fundamental processes governing chemistry of the atmosphere and interaction with climate change. Others found favorable conditions for evaluating satellite-derived measurements of atmospheric properties and a changing land surface. With that background in mind a workshop on atmospheric chemistry was held in South Africa. Sponsored by the International Commission for Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Pollution (ICACGP; http://www.icacgp.org/), the workshop received generous support from the South African power utility, Eskom, and the Climatology Research Group of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. The purpose of the workshop was to review some earlier findings as well as more recent findings on southern African climate vulnerability, chemical changes due to urbanization, land-use modification, and how these factors interact. Originally proposed by John Burrows, president of ICACGP, the workshop was the first ICACGP regional workshop to study the interaction of air pollution with global chemical and climate change. Organized locally by the University of the Witwatersrand, the workshop attracted more than 60 delegates from South Africa, Mozambique, Botswana, Zimbabwe, France, Germany, Canada, and the United States. More than 30 presentations were given, exploring both retrospective and prospective aspects of the science. In several talks, attention was focused on southern African chemistry, atmospheric pollution monitoring, and climate processes as they were studied in the field

  4. Some advances in atmospheric chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In the recent decade, researches have been carried out by our group on some aspects of atmospheric chemistry through field observation, mechanism analysis and model simulation. Here some main results on greenhouse gas (CH4, N2O) emission from Chinese agricultural fields, aerosol, global carbon cycle and ozone variation in surface laver over China are briefly reported.

  5. Atmospheric Chemistry and Air Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey S. Gaffney

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric chemistry is an important discipline for understanding air pollution and its impacts. This mini-review gives a brief history of air pollution and presents an overview of some of the basic photochemistry involved in the production of ozone and other oxidants in the atmosphere. Urban air quality issues are reviewed with a specific focus on ozone and other oxidants, primary and secondary aerosols, alternative fuels, and the potential for chlorine releases to amplify oxidant chemistry in industrial areas. Regional air pollution issues such as acid rain, long-range transport of aerosols and visibility loss, and the connections of aerosols to ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate chemistry are examined. Finally, the potential impacts of air pollutants on the global-scale radiative balances of gases and aerosols are discussed briefly.

  6. Atmospheric chemistry in volcanic plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Glasow, Roland

    2010-04-13

    Recent field observations have shown that the atmospheric plumes of quiescently degassing volcanoes are chemically very active, pointing to the role of chemical cycles involving halogen species and heterogeneous reactions on aerosol particles that have previously been unexplored for this type of volcanic plumes. Key features of these measurements can be reproduced by numerical models such as the one employed in this study. The model shows sustained high levels of reactive bromine in the plume, leading to extensive ozone destruction, that, depending on plume dispersal, can be maintained for several days. The very high concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the volcanic plume reduces the lifetime of the OH radical drastically, so that it is virtually absent in the volcanic plume. This would imply an increased lifetime of methane in volcanic plumes, unless reactive chlorine chemistry in the plume is strong enough to offset the lack of OH chemistry. A further effect of bromine chemistry in addition to ozone destruction shown by the model studies presented here, is the oxidation of mercury. This relates to mercury that has been coemitted with bromine from the volcano but also to background atmospheric mercury. The rapid oxidation of mercury implies a drastically reduced atmospheric lifetime of mercury so that the contribution of volcanic mercury to the atmospheric background might be less than previously thought. However, the implications, especially health and environmental effects due to deposition, might be substantial and warrant further studies, especially field measurements to test this hypothesis.

  7. Multi-model mean nitrogen and sulfur deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP: evaluation of historical and projected future changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Lamarque

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP. The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000–2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present day (year 2000 ACCMIP time slice, the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. For this time slice, we find a multi-model mean deposition of approximately 50 Tg(N yr−1 from nitrogen oxide emissions, 60 Tg(N yr−1 from ammonia emissions, and 83 Tg(S yr−1 from sulfur emissions. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States but less so over Europe. This difference points towards a potential misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores, but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double their 2000 counterpart in some scenarios and reaching > 1300 mg(N m−2 yr−1 averaged over regional to continental-scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~ 30–50% larger than the values in any region currently (circa 2000. However, sulfur deposition rates in 2100 are in all regions lower than in 2000 in

  8. Multi-model mean nitrogen and sulfur deposition from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP: evaluation historical and projected changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-F. Lamarque

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present multi-model global datasets of nitrogen and sulfate deposition covering time periods from 1850 to 2100, calculated within the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP. The computed deposition fluxes are compared to surface wet deposition and ice-core measurements. We use a new dataset of wet deposition for 2000–2002 based on critical assessment of the quality of existing regional network data. We show that for present-day (year 2000 ACCMIP time-slice, the ACCMIP results perform similarly to previously published multi-model assessments. For this time slice, we find a multi-model mean deposition of 50 Tg(N yr−1 from nitrogen oxide emissions, 60 Tg(N yr−1 from ammonia emissions, and 83 Tg(S yr−1 from sulfur emissions. The analysis of changes between 1980 and 2000 indicates significant differences between model and measurements over the United States but less so over Europe. This difference points towards misrepresentation of 1980 NH3 emissions over North America. Based on ice-core records, the 1850 deposition fluxes agree well with Greenland ice cores but the change between 1850 and 2000 seems to be overestimated in the Northern Hemisphere for both nitrogen and sulfur species. Using the Representative Concentration Pathways to define the projected climate and atmospheric chemistry related emissions and concentrations, we find large regional nitrogen deposition increases in 2100 in Latin America, Africa and parts of Asia under some of the scenarios considered. Increases in South Asia are especially large, and are seen in all scenarios, with 2100 values more than double 2000 in some scenarios and reaching > 1300 mg(N m−2 yr−1 averaged over regional to continental scale regions in RCP 2.6 and 8.5, ~30–50 % larger than the values in any region currently (2000. The new ACCMIP deposition dataset provides novel, consistent and evaluated global gridded deposition fields for use in a wide range of

  9. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernath, P. F.

    2017-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), also called SCISAT, is a Canadian-led small satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere. ACE was launched into a low Earth circular orbit by NASA on August 12, 2003 and it continues to function nominally. The ACE instruments are a high spectral resolution (0.02 cm-1) Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2.2 to 13.3 μm (750-4400 cm-1), a spectrophotometer known as Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation (MAESTRO) with wavelength coverage of 285-1020 nm and two filtered detector arrays to image the Sun at 0.525 and 1.02 μm. ACE operates in solar occultation mode to provide altitude profiles of temperature, pressure, atmospheric extinction and the volume mixing ratios (VMRs) for several dozen molecules and related isotopologues. This paper presents a mission overview and a summary of selected scientific results.

  10. Pre-industrial to End 21st Century Projections of Tropospheric Ozone from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, P. J.; Archibald, A. T.; Bowman, K. W.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Naik, V.; Stevenson, D. S.; Tilmes, S.; Voulgarakis, A.; Wild, O.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Cionni, I.; Collins, W. J.; Dalsoren, S. B.; Doherty, R. M.; Eyring, V.; Faluvegi, G.; Horowitz, L. W.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Nagashima, T.; Plummer, D. A.; Righi, M.; Strode, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Present day tropospheric ozone and its changes between 1850 and 2100 are considered, analysing 15 global models that participated in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). The ensemble mean compares well against present day observations. The seasonal cycle correlates well, except for some locations in the tropical upper troposphere. Most (75 %) of the models are encompassed with a range of global mean tropospheric ozone column estimates from satellite data, but there is a suggestion of a high bias in the Northern Hemisphere and a low bias in the Southern Hemisphere, which could indicate deficiencies with the ozone precursor emissions. Compared to the present day ensemble mean tropospheric ozone burden of 337+/-23 Tg, the ensemble mean burden for 1850 time slice is approx. 30% lower. Future changes were modelled using emissions and climate projections from four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). Compared to 2000, the relative changes in the ensemble mean tropospheric ozone burden in 2030 (2100) for the different RCPs are: -4% (-16 %) for RCP2.6, 2% (-7%) for RCP4.5, 1% (-9%) for RCP6.0, and 7% (18 %) for RCP8.5. Model agreement on the magnitude of the change is greatest for larger changes. Reductions in most precursor emissions are common across the RCPs and drive ozone decreases in all but RCP8.5, where doubled methane and a 40-150% greater stratospheric influx (estimated from a subset of models) increase ozone. While models with a high ozone burden for the present day also have high ozone burdens for the other time slices, no model consistently predicts large or small ozone changes; i.e. the magnitudes of the burdens and burden changes do not appear to be related simply, and the models are sensitive to emissions and climate changes in different ways. Spatial patterns of ozone changes are well correlated across most models, but are notably different for models without time evolving stratospheric ozone concentrations

  11. Atmospheric Composition Change: Climate-Chemistry Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, I.S.A.; Granier, C.; Myhre, G.; Bernsten, T. K.; Dalsoren, S. B.; Gauss, S.; Klimont, Z.; Benestad, R.; Bousquet, P.; Collins, W.; Cox, T.; Eyring, V.; Fowler, D.; Fuzzi, S.; Jockel, P.; Laj, P.; Lohmann, U.; Maione, M.; Monks, T.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Raes, F.; Richter, A.; Rognerud, B.; Schulz, M.; Shindell, D.; Stevenson, D. S.; Storelvmo, T.; Wang, W.-C.; vanWeele, M.; Wild, M.; Wuebbles, D.

    2011-01-01

    Chemically active climate compounds are either primary compounds such as methane (CH4), removed by oxidation in the atmosphere, or secondary compounds such as ozone (O3), sulfate and organic aerosols, formed and removed in the atmosphere. Man-induced climate-chemistry interaction is a two-way process: Emissions of pollutants change the atmospheric composition contributing to climate change through the aforementioned climate components, and climate change, through changes in temperature, dynamics, the hydrological cycle, atmospheric stability, and biosphere-atmosphere interactions, affects the atmospheric composition and oxidation processes in the troposphere. Here we present progress in our understanding of processes of importance for climate-chemistry interactions, and their contributions to changes in atmospheric composition and climate forcing. A key factor is the oxidation potential involving compounds such as O3 and the hydroxyl radical (OH). Reported studies represent both current and future changes. Reported results include new estimates of radiative forcing based on extensive model studies of chemically active climate compounds such as O3, and of particles inducing both direct and indirect effects. Through EU projects such as ACCENT, QUANTIFY, and the AEROCOM project, extensive studies on regional and sector-wise differences in the impact on atmospheric distribution are performed. Studies have shown that land-based emissions have a different effect on climate than ship and aircraft emissions, and different measures are needed to reduce the climate impact. Several areas where climate change can affect the tropospheric oxidation process and the chemical composition are identified. This can take place through enhanced stratospheric-tropospheric exchange of ozone, more frequent periods with stable conditions favouring pollution build up over industrial areas, enhanced temperature-induced biogenic emissions, methane releases from permafrost thawing, and enhanced

  12. Updated operational protocols for the U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation Chemistry Quality Assurance Project in support of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Martin, RoseAnn

    2017-02-06

    The U.S. Geological Survey Branch of Quality Systems operates the Precipitation Chemistry Quality Assurance Project (PCQA) for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) and National Atmospheric Deposition Program/Mercury Deposition Network (NADP/MDN). Since 1978, various programs have been implemented by the PCQA to estimate data variability and bias contributed by changing protocols, equipment, and sample submission schemes within NADP networks. These programs independently measure the field and laboratory components which contribute to the overall variability of NADP wet-deposition chemistry and precipitation depth measurements. The PCQA evaluates the quality of analyte-specific chemical analyses from the two, currently (2016) contracted NADP laboratories, Central Analytical Laboratory and Mercury Analytical Laboratory, by comparing laboratory performance among participating national and international laboratories. Sample contamination and stability are evaluated for NTN and MDN by using externally field-processed blank samples provided by the Branch of Quality Systems. A colocated sampler program evaluates the overall variability of NTN measurements and bias between dissimilar precipitation gages and sample collectors.This report documents historical PCQA operations and general procedures for each of the external quality-assurance programs from 2007 to 2016.

  13. 1997 Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul H. Wine

    1998-11-23

    DOE's Atmospheric Chemistry Program is providing partial funding for the Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS) and FY 1997 Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry

  14. Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer: Demonstration of feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mroz, E.J.; Olivares, J.; Kok, G.

    1996-04-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry Analyzer (AACA) that will provide a continuous, real-time analysis of the elemental (major, minor and trace) composition of atmospheric aerosols. The AACA concept is based on sampling the atmospheric aerosol through a wet cyclone scrubber that produces an aqueous suspension of the particles. This suspension can then be analyzed for elemental composition by ICP/MS or collected for subsequent analysis by other methods. The key technical challenge was to develop a wet cyclone aerosol sampler suitable for respirable particles found in ambient aerosols. We adapted an ultrasonic nebulizer to a conventional, commercially available, cyclone aerosol sampler and completed collection efficiency tests for the unit, which was shown to efficiently collect particles as small as 0.2 microns. We have completed the necessary basic research and have demonstrated the feasibility of the AACA concept.

  15. Tropospheric ozone changes, radiative forcing and attribution to emissions in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Inter-comparison Project (ACCMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Stevenson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Ozone (O3 from 17 atmospheric chemistry models taking part in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP has been used to calculate tropospheric ozone radiative forcings (RFs. We calculate a~value for the pre-industrial (1750 to present-day (2010 tropospheric ozone RF of 0.40 W m−2. The model range of pre-industrial to present-day changes in O3 produces a spread (±1 standard deviation in RFs of ±17%. Three different radiation schemes were used – we find differences in RFs between schemes (for the same ozone fields of ±10%. Applying two different tropopause definitions gives differences in RFs of ±3%. Given additional (unquantified uncertainties associated with emissions, climate-chemistry interactions and land-use change, we estimate an overall uncertainty of ±30% for the tropospheric ozone RF. Experiments carried out by a subset of six models attribute tropospheric ozone RF to increased emissions of methane (47%, nitrogen oxides (29%, carbon monoxide (15% and non-methane volatile organic compounds (9%; earlier studies attributed more of the tropospheric ozone RF to methane and less to nitrogen oxides. Normalising RFs to changes in tropospheric column ozone, we find a global mean normalised RF of 0.042 W m−2 DU−1, a value similar to previous work. Using normalised RFs and future tropospheric column ozone projections we calculate future tropospheric ozone RFs (W m−2; relative to 1850 – add 0.04 W m−2 to make relative to 1750 for the Representative Concentration Pathways in 2030 (2100 of: RCP2.6: 0.31 (0.16; RCP4.5: 0.38 (0.26; RCP6.0: 0.33 (0.24; and RCP8.5: 0.42 (0.56. Models show some coherent responses of ozone to climate change: decreases in the tropical lower troposphere, associated with increases in water vapour; and increases in the sub-tropical to mid-latitude upper troposphere, associated with increases in

  16. Modeling the atmospheric chemistry of TICs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Michael V.; Burns, Douglas S.; Chynwat, Veeradej; Moore, William; Plitz, Angela; Rottmann, Shawn; Hearn, John

    2009-05-01

    An atmospheric chemistry model that describes the behavior and disposition of environmentally hazardous compounds discharged into the atmosphere was coupled with the transport and diffusion model, SCIPUFF. The atmospheric chemistry model was developed by reducing a detailed atmospheric chemistry mechanism to a simple empirical effective degradation rate term (keff) that is a function of important meteorological parameters such as solar flux, temperature, and cloud cover. Empirically derived keff functions that describe the degradation of target toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) were derived by statistically analyzing data generated from the detailed chemistry mechanism run over a wide range of (typical) atmospheric conditions. To assess and identify areas to improve the developed atmospheric chemistry model, sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were performed to (1) quantify the sensitivity of the model output (TIC concentrations) with respect to changes in the input parameters and (2) improve, where necessary, the quality of the input data based on sensitivity results. The model predictions were evaluated against experimental data. Chamber data were used to remove the complexities of dispersion in the atmosphere.

  17. Energy, atmospheric chemistry, and global climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1991-01-01

    Global atmospheric changes due to ozone destruction and the greenhouse effect are discussed. The work of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is reviewed, including its judgements regarding global warming and its recommendations for improving predictive capability. The chemistry of ozone destruction and the global atmospheric budget of nitrous oxide are reviewed, and the global sources of nitrous oxide are described.

  18. Exoplanetary Atmospheres - Chemistry, Formation Conditions, and Habitability

    CERN Document Server

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Moses, Julianne I; Hu, Yongyun

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing the atmospheres of extrasolar planets is the new frontier in exoplanetary science. The last two decades of exoplanet discoveries have revealed that exoplanets are very common and extremely diverse in their orbital and bulk properties. We now enter a new era as we begin to investigate the chemical diversity of exoplanets, their atmospheric and interior processes, and their formation conditions. Recent developments in the field have led to unprecedented advancements in our understanding of atmospheric chemistry of exoplanets and the implications for their formation conditions. We review these developments in the present work. We review in detail the theory of atmospheric chemistry in all classes of exoplanets discovered to date, from highly irradiated gas giants, ice giants, and super-Earths, to directly imaged giant planets at large orbital separations. We then review the observational detections of chemical species in exoplanetary atmospheres of these various types using different methods, incl...

  19. Parallel computing in atmospheric chemistry models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Div.

    1996-02-01

    Studies of atmospheric chemistry are of high scientific interest, involve computations that are complex and intense, and require enormous amounts of I/O. Current supercomputer computational capabilities are limiting the studies of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry and will certainly not be able to handle the upcoming coupled chemistry/climate models. To enable such calculations, the authors have developed a computing framework that allows computations on a wide range of computational platforms, including massively parallel machines. Because of the fast paced changes in this field, the modeling framework and scientific modules have been developed to be highly portable and efficient. Here, the authors present the important features of the framework and focus on the atmospheric chemistry module, named IMPACT, and its capabilities. Applications of IMPACT to aircraft studies will be presented.

  20. Chemistry of Planetary Atmospheres: Insights and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Yuk

    2015-11-01

    Using observations from the Mariners, Pioneers, Vikings, Voyagers, Pioneer Venus, Galileo, Venus Express, Curiosity, Cassini, New Horizons, and numerous observatories both in orbit of Earth and on the ground, I will give a survey of the major chemical processes that control the composition of planetary atmospheres. For the first time since the beginning of the space age, we understand the chemistry of planetary atmospheres ranging from the primitive atmospheres of the giant planets to the highly evolved atmospheres of terrestrial planets and small bodies. Our understanding can be distilled into three important ideas: (1) The stability of planetary atmospheres against escape of their constituents to space, (2) the role of equilibrium chemistry in determining the partitioning of chemical species, and (3) the role of disequilibrium chemistry, which produces drastic departures from equilibrium chemistry. To these three ideas we must also add a fourth: the role of biochemistry at Earth's surface, which makes its atmospheric chemistry unique in the cosmochemical environment. Only in the Earth's atmosphere do strong reducing and oxidizing species coexist to such a degree. For example, nitrogen species in the Earth's atmosphere span eight oxidation states from ammonia to nitric acid. Much of the Earth's atmospheric chemistry consists of reactions initiated by the degradation of biologically produced molecules. Life uses solar energy to drive chemical reactions that would otherwise not occur; it represents a kind of photochemistry that is special to Earth, at least within the Solar System. It remains to be seen how many worlds like Earth there are beyond the Solar System, especially as we are now exploring the exoplanets using Kepler, TESS, HST, Spitzer, soon to be launched missions such as JWST and WFIRST, and ground-based telescopes. The atmospheres of the Solar System provide a benchmark for studying exoplanets, which in turn serve to test and extend our current

  1. Organic chemistry in the atmosphere. [laboratory modeling of Titan atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.

    1974-01-01

    The existence of an at least moderately complex organic chemistry on Titan is stipulated based on clear evidence of methane, and at least presumptive evidence of hydrogen in its atmosphere. The ratio of methane to hydrogen is the highest of any atmosphere in the solar system. Irradiation of hydrogen/methane mixtures produces aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. A very reasonable hypothesis assumes that the red cloud cover of Titan is made of organic chemicals. Two-carbon hydrocarbons experimentally produced from irradiated mixtures of methane, ammonia, water, and hydrogen bear out the possible organic chemistry of the Titanian environment.

  2. Atmospheric Chemistry of Venus-like Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Laura

    2010-01-01

    We use thermodynamic calculations to model atmospheric chemistry on terrestrial exoplanets that are hot enough for chemical equilibira between the atmosphere and lithosphere, as on Venus. The results of our calculations place constraints on abundances of spectroscopically observable gases, the surface temperature and pressure, and the mineralogy of the surface. These results will be useful in planning future observations of the atmospheres of terrestrial-sized exoplanets by current and proposed space observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Spitzer, James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Terrestrial Planet Finder, and Darwin.

  3. Preindustrial to present day changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical and methane lifetime from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Naik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We have analysed results from 17 global models, participating in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP, to explore trends in hydroxyl radical concentration (OH and methane (CH4 lifetime since preindustrial times (1850 and gain a better understanding of their key drivers. For the present day (2000, the models tend to simulate higher OH abundances in the Northern Hemisphere versus Southern Hemisphere. Evaluation of simulated carbon monoxide concentrations, the primary sink for OH, against observations suggests low biases in the Northern Hemisphere that may contribute to the high north-south OH asymmetry in the models. A comparison of modelled and observed methyl chloroform lifetime suggests that the present day global multi-model mean OH concentration is slightly overestimated. Despite large regional changes, the modelled global mean OH concentration is roughly constant over the past 150 yr, due to concurrent increases in OH sources (humidity, tropospheric ozone, and NOx emissions, together with decreases in stratospheric ozone and increase in tropospheric temperature, compensated by increases in OH sinks (methane abundance, carbon monoxide and non-methane volatile organic carbon (NMVOC emissions. The large intermodel diversity in the sign and magnitude of OH and methane lifetime changes over this period reflects differences in the relative importance of chemical and physical drivers of OH within each model. For the 1980 to 2000 period, we find that climate warming and a slight increase in mean OH leads to a 4.3 ± 1.9% decrease in the methane lifetime. Analysing sensitivity simulations performed by 10 models, we find that preindustrial to present day climate change decreased the methane lifetime by about 4 months, representing a negative feedback on the climate system. Further, using a subset of the models, we find that global mean OH increased by 46.4 ± 12.2% in response to

  4. Preindustrial to present-day changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical and methane lifetime from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Naik

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We have analysed time-slice simulations from 17 global models, participating in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP, to explore changes in present-day (2000 hydroxyl radical (OH concentration and methane (CH4 lifetime relative to preindustrial times (1850 and to 1980. A comparison of modeled and observation-derived methane and methyl chloroform lifetimes suggests that the present-day global multi-model mean OH concentration is overestimated by 5 to 10% but is within the range of uncertainties. The models consistently simulate higher OH concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere (NH compared with the Southern Hemisphere (SH for the present-day (2000; inter-hemispheric ratios of 1.13 to 1.42, in contrast to observation-based approaches which generally indicate higher OH in the SH although uncertainties are large. Evaluation of simulated carbon monoxide (CO concentrations, the primary sink for OH, against ground-based and satellite observations suggests low biases in the NH that may contribute to the high north–south OH asymmetry in the models. The models vary widely in their regional distribution of present-day OH concentrations (up to 34%. Despite large regional changes, the multi-model global mean (mass-weighted OH concentration changes little over the past 150 yr, due to concurrent increases in factors that enhance OH (humidity, tropospheric ozone, nitrogen oxide (NOx emissions, and UV radiation due to decreases in stratospheric ozone, compensated by increases in OH sinks (methane abundance, carbon monoxide and non-methane volatile organic carbon (NMVOC emissions. The large inter-model diversity in the sign and magnitude of preindustrial to present-day OH changes (ranging from a decrease of 12.7% to an increase of 14.6% indicate that uncertainty remains in our understanding of the long-term trends in OH and methane lifetime. We show that this diversity is largely explained by the different ratio of the

  5. Preindustrial to Present-Day Changes in Tropospheric Hydroxyl Radical and Methane Lifetime from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, V.; Voulgarakis, A.; Fiore, A. M.; Horowitz, L. W.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Lin, M.; Prather, M. J.; Young, P. J.; Bergmann, D.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Cionni, I.; Collins, W. J.; Dalsoren, S. B.; Doherty, R.; Eyring, V.; Faluvegi, G.; Folberth, G. A.; Josse, B.; Lee, Y. H.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Nagashima, T.; vanNoije, T. P. C.; Plummer, D. A.; Righi, M.; Rumbold, S. T.; Skeie, R.; Shindell, D. T.; Stevenson, D. S.; Strode, S.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Zeng, G.

    2013-01-01

    We have analysed time-slice simulations from 17 global models, participating in the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), to explore changes in present-day (2000) hydroxyl radical (OH) concentration and methane (CH4) lifetime relative to preindustrial times (1850) and to 1980. A comparison of modeled and observation-derived methane and methyl chloroform lifetimes suggests that the present-day global multi-model mean OH concentration is overestimated by 5 to 10% but is within the range of uncertainties. The models consistently simulate higher OH concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) compared with the Southern Hemisphere (SH) for the present-day (2000; inter-hemispheric ratios of 1.13 to 1.42), in contrast to observation-based approaches which generally indicate higher OH in the SH although uncertainties are large. Evaluation of simulated carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations, the primary sink for OH, against ground-based and satellite observations suggests low biases in the NH that may contribute to the high north–south OH asymmetry in the models. The models vary widely in their regional distribution of present-day OH concentrations (up to 34%). Despite large regional changes, the multi-model global mean (mass-weighted) OH concentration changes little over the past 150 yr, due to concurrent increases in factors that enhance OH (humidity, tropospheric ozone, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions, and UV radiation due to decreases in stratospheric ozone), compensated by increases in OH sinks (methane abundance, carbon monoxide and non-methane volatile organic carbon (NMVOC) emissions). The large inter-model diversity in the sign and magnitude of preindustrial to present-day OH changes (ranging from a decrease of 12.7% to an increase of 14.6%) indicate that uncertainty remains in our understanding of the long-term trends in OH and methane lifetime. We show that this diversity is largely explained by the different ratio of the

  6. Atmospheric Prebiotic Chemistry and Organic Hazes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Melissa G.

    2012-01-01

    Earth's atmospheric composition at the time of the origin of life is not known, but it has often been suggested that chemical transformation of reactive species in the atmosphere was a significant source of pre biotic organic molecules. Experimental and theoretical studies over the past half century have shown that atmospheric synthesis can yield molecules such as amino acids and nucleobases, but these processes are very sensitive to gas composition and energy source. Abiotic synthesis of organic molecules is more productive in reduced atmospheres, yet the primitive Earth may not have been as reducing as earlier workers assumed, and recent research has reflected this shift in thinking. This work provides a survey of the range of chemical products that can be produced given a set of atmospheric conditions, with a particular focus on recent reports. Intertwined with the discussion of atmospheric synthesis is the consideration of an organic haze layer, which has been suggested as a possible ultraviolet shield on the anoxic early Earth. Since such a haze layer - if formed - would serve as a reservoir for organic molecules, the chemical composition of the aerosol should be closely examined. The results highlighted here show that a variety of products can be formed in mildly reducing or even neutral atmospheres, demonstrating that contributions of atmospheric synthesis to the organic inventory on early Earth should not be discounted. This review intends to bridge current knowledge of the range of possible atmospheric conditions in the prebiotic environment and pathways for synthesis under such conditions by examining the possible products of organic chemistry in the early atmosphere.

  7. Submillimeter Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry Exploration Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlecht, Erich T.; Allen, Mark A.; Gill, John J.; Choonsup, Lee; Lin, Robert H.; Sin, Seth; Mehdi, Imran; Siegel, Peter H.; Maestrini, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry Exploration Sounder (SPACES), a high-sensitivity laboratory breadboard for a spectrometer targeted at orbital planetary atmospheric analysis. The frequency range is 520 to 590 GHz, with a target noise temperature sensitivity of 2,500 K for detecting water, sulfur compounds, carbon compounds, and other atmospheric constituents. SPACES is a prototype for a powerful tool for the exploration of the chemistry and dynamics of any planetary atmosphere. It is fundamentally a single-pixel receiver for spectral signals emitted by the relevant constituents, intended to be fed by a fixed or movable telescope/antenna. Its front-end sensor translates the received signal down to the 100-MHz range where it can be digitized and the data transferred to a spectrum analyzer for processing, spectrum generation, and accumulation. The individual microwave and submillimeter wave components (mixers, LO high-powered amplifiers, and multipliers) of SPACES were developed in cooperation with other programs, although with this type of instrument in mind. Compared to previous planetary and Earth science instruments, its broad bandwidth (approx. =.13%) and rapid tunability (approx. =.10 ms) are new developments only made possible recently by the advancement in submillimeter circuit design and processing at JPL.

  8. Carbon Monoxide Affecting Planetary Atmospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Horst, Sarah

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric hazes are present in a range of solar system and extrasolar planetary atmospheres, and organic hazes, such as that in Titan's atmosphere, could be a source of prebiotic molecules.1 However, the chemistry occurring in planetary atmospheres and the resulting chemical structures are still not clear. Numerous experimental simulations2 have been carried out in the laboratory to understand the chemistry in N2/CH4 atmospheres, but very few simulations4 have included CO in their initial gas mixtures, which is an important component in many N2/CH4 atmospheres including Titan, Triton, and Pluto.3 Here we have conducted a series of atmosphere simulation experiments using AC glow discharge (cold plasma) as energy source to irradiate reactions in gas mixtures of CO, CH4, and N2 with a range of CO mixing ratios (from 0, 0.05%, 0.2%, 0.5%, 1%, 2.5%, to 5%) at low temperature (~100 K). Gas phase products are monitored during the reaction by quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS), and solid phase products are analyzed by solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). MS results show that with the increase of CO in the initial gases, the production of nitrogenous organic molecules increases while the production of hydrogen molecules decreases in the gas phase. NMR measurements of the solid phase products show that with the increase of CO, hydrogen atoms bonded to nitrogen or oxygen in unsaturated structures increase while those bonded to saturated carbon decrease, which means more unsaturated species and less saturated species formed with the addition of CO. MS and NMR results demonstrate that the inclusion of CO affects the compositions of both gas and solid phase products, indicating that CO has an important impact on the chemistry occurring in our experiments and probably in planetary atmospheres.1. Hörst, S. M., et al. 2012, AsBio, 12, 8092. Cable, M. L., et al. 2012, Chem. Rev., 112, 18823. Lutz, B. L., et al. 1983, Sci, 220, 1374; Greaves, J. S., et al

  9. Atmospheric Chemistry of Micrometeoritic Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, M. E.; Belle, C. L.; Pevyhouse, A. R.; Iraci, L. T.

    2011-01-01

    Micrometeorites approx.100 m in diameter deliver most of the Earth s annual accumulation of extraterrestrial material. These small particles are so strongly heated upon atmospheric entry that most of their volatile content is vaporized. Here we present preliminary results from two sets of experiments to investigate the fate of the organic fraction of micrometeorites. In the first set of experiments, 300 m particles of a CM carbonaceous chondrite were subject to flash pyrolysis, simulating atmospheric entry. In addition to CO and CO2, many organic compounds were released, including functionalized benzenes, hydrocarbons, and small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In the second set of experiments, we subjected two of these compounds to conditions that simulate the heterogeneous chemistry of Earth s upper atmosphere. We find evidence that meteor-derived compounds can follow reaction pathways leading to the formation of more complex organic compounds.

  10. THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

    2004-04-05

    In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical

  11. Evaluation of preindustrial to present-day black carbon and its albedo forcing from Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP, we evaluate the historical black carbon (BC aerosols simulated by 8 ACCMIP models against observations including 12 ice core records, long-term surface mass concentrations, and recent Arctic BC snowpack measurements. We also estimate BC albedo forcing by performing additional simulations using offline models with prescribed meteorology from 1996–2000. We evaluate the vertical profile of BC snow concentrations from these offline simulations using the recent BC snowpack measurements. Despite using the same BC emissions, the global BC burden differs by approximately a factor of 3 among models due to differences in aerosol removal parameterizations and simulated meteorology: 34 Gg to 103 Gg in 1850 and 82 Gg to 315 Gg in 2000. However, the global BC burden from preindustrial to present-day increases by 2.5–3 times with little variation among models, roughly matching the 2.5-fold increase in total BC emissions during the same period. We find a large divergence among models at both Northern Hemisphere (NH and Southern Hemisphere (SH high latitude regions for BC burden and at SH high latitude regions for deposition fluxes. The ACCMIP simulations match the observed BC surface mass concentrations well in Europe and North America except at Ispra. However, the models fail to predict the Arctic BC seasonality due to severe underestimations during winter and spring. The simulated vertically resolved BC snow concentrations are, on average, within a factor of 2–3 of the BC snowpack measurements except for Greenland and the Arctic Ocean. For the ice core evaluation, models tend to adequately capture both the observed temporal trends and the magnitudes at Greenland sites. However, models fail to predict the decreasing trend of BC depositions/ice core concentrations from the 1950s to the 1970s in most Tibetan Plateau ice cores. The distinct temporal trend at the Tibetan

  12. Evaluation of preindustrial to present-day black carbon and its albedo forcing from ACCMIP (Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP, we evaluate the historical black carbon (BC aerosols simulated by 8 ACCMIP models against observations including 12 ice core records, long-term surface mass concentrations and recent Arctic BC snowpack measurements. We also estimate BC albedo forcing by performing additional simulations using offline models with prescribed meteorology from 1996–2000. We evaluated the vertical profile of BC snow concentrations from these offline simulations using the recent BC snowpack measurements.

    Despite using the same BC emissions, the global BC burden differs by approximately a factor of 3 among models due to differences in aerosol removal parameterizations and simulated meteorology: 34 Gg to 103 Gg in 1850 and 82 Gg to 315 Gg in 2000. However, the global BC burden from preindustrial to present-day increases by 2.5–3 times with little variation among models, roughly matching the 2.5-fold increase in total BC emissions during the same period. We find a large divergence among models at both Northern Hemisphere (NH and Southern Hemisphere (SH high latitude regions for BC burden and at SH high latitude regions for deposition fluxes. The ACCMIP simulations match the observed BC surface mass concentrations well in Europe and North America except at Jungfraujoch and Ispra. However, the models fail to predict the Arctic BC seasonality due to severe underestimations during winter and spring. The simulated vertically resolved BC snow concentrations are, on average, within a factor of 2–3 of the BC snowpack measurements except for Greenland and the Arctic Ocean.

    For the ice core evaluation, models tend to capture both the observed temporal trends and the magnitudes well at Greenland sites. However, models fail to predict the decreasing trend of BC depositions/ice-core concentrations from the 1950s to the 1970s in most Tibetan Plateau ice cores. The distinct

  13. Evaluation of preindustrial to present-day black carbon and its albedo forcing from Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. H.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Flanner, M. G.; Jiao, C.; Shindell, D. T.; Bernsten, T.; Bisiaux, M. M.; Cao, J.; Collins, W. J.; Curran, M.; Edwards, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, S.; Horowitz, L. W.; McConnell, J. R.; Ming, J.; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, V.; Rumbold, S. T.; Skeie, R. B.; Sudo, K.; Takemura, T.; Thevenon, F.; Xu, B.; Yoon, J.-H.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), we evaluate the historical black carbon (BC) aerosols simulated by 8 ACCMIP models against observations including 12 ice core records, long-term surface mass concentrations, and recent Arctic BC snowpack measurements. We also estimate BC albedo forcing by performing additional simulations using offline models with prescribed meteorology from 1996-2000. We evaluate the vertical profile of BC snow concentrations from these offline simulations using the recent BC snowpack measurements. Despite using the same BC emissions, the global BC burden differs by approximately a factor of 3 among models due to differences in aerosol removal parameterizations and simulated meteorology: 34 Gg to 103 Gg in 1850 and 82 Gg to 315 Gg in 2000. However, the global BC burden from preindustrial to present-day increases by 2.5-3 times with little variation among models, roughly matching the 2.5-fold increase in total BC emissions during the same period.We find a large divergence among models at both Northern Hemisphere (NH) and Southern Hemisphere (SH) high latitude regions for BC burden and at SH high latitude regions for deposition fluxes. The ACCMIP simulations match the observed BC surface mass concentrations well in Europe and North America except at Ispra. However, the models fail to predict the Arctic BC seasonality due to severe underestimations during winter and spring. The simulated vertically resolved BC snow concentrations are, on average, within a factor of 2-3 of the BC snowpack measurements except for Greenland and the Arctic Ocean. For the ice core evaluation, models tend to adequately capture both the observed temporal trends and the magnitudes at Greenland sites. However, models fail to predict the decreasing trend of BC depositions/ice core concentrations from the 1950s to the 1970s in most Tibetan Plateau ice cores. The distinct temporal trend at the Tibetan Plateau ice cores

  14. Atmospheric chemistry and physics from air pollution to climate change

    CERN Document Server

    Seinfeld, John H

    2016-01-01

    Expanded and updated with new findings and new features Since the second edition of Seinfeld and Pandis’ classic textbook, significant progress has taken place in the field of atmospheric chemistry and physics, particularly in the areas of tropospheric chemistry, aerosols, and the science of climate change. A new edition of this comprehensive work has been developed by the renowned author team. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 3rd Edition, as the previous two editions have done, provides a rigorous and comprehensive treatment of the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere – including the chemistry of the stratosphere and troposphere, aerosol physics and chemistry, atmospheric new particle formation, physical meteorology, cloud physics, global climate, statistical analysis of data, and mathematical chemical/transport models of the atmosphere. Each of these topics is covered in detail and in each area the central results are developed from first principles. In this way the reader gains a significant un...

  15. The Atmospheric Chemistry of Methyl Chavicol (Estragole)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, W. J.; Alam, M. S.; Rickard, A. R.; Hamilton, J. F.; Pereira, K. F.; Camredon, M.; Munoz, A.; Vazquez, M.; Alacreu, P.; Rodenas, M.; Vera, T.

    2012-12-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leads to formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosols (SOA), with consequences for health, air quality, crop yields, atmospheric chemistry and radiative transfer. It is estimated that ca. 90 % of VOC emissions to the atmosphere originate from biogenic sources (BVOC); such emissions may increase under future climates. Recent field observations have identified Methyl Chavicol ("MC" hereafter, also known as Estragole; 1-allyl-4-methoxybenzene, C10H12O) as a major BVOC above pine forests in the USA [Bouvier-Brown et al., 2009], and within an oil palm plantation in Malaysian Borneo, where it was found that MC could represent the highest single floral contribution of reactive carbon to the atmosphere [Misztal et al., 2010]. Palm oil cultivation, and hence emissions of MC, may be expected to increase with societal food and biofuel demand. We present the results of a series of simulation chamber experiments to assess the atmospheric fate of MC. Experiments were performed in the EUPHORE (European Photoreactor) facility in Valencia, Spain (200 m3 outdoor smog chamber), investigating the degradation of MC by reaction with OH, O3 and NO3. An extensive range of measurement instrumentation was used to monitor precursor and product formation, including stable species (FTIR, PTR-MS, GC-FID and GC-MS), radical intermediates (LIF), inorganic components (NOx, O3, HONO (LOPAP and aerosol production (SMPS) and composition (PILS and filters; analysed offline by LC-MS and FTICR-MS). Experiments were conducted at a range of NOx:VOC ratios, and in the presence and absence of radical (OH) scavenger compounds. This chamber dataset is used to determine the rate constants for reaction of MC with OH, O3 and NO3, the ozonolysis radical yields, and identify the primary degradation products for each initiation route, alongside the aerosol mass yields. Aerosol composition measurements are analysed to identify markers for MC contributions to

  16. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE): Mission Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernath, P.

    2003-04-01

    The ACE mission goals are: (1) to measure and to understand the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the upper troposphere and stratosphere, with a particular emphasis on the Arctic region; (2) to explore the relationship between atmospheric chemistry and climate change; (3) to study the effects of biomass burning in the free troposphere; (4) to measure aerosol number density, size distribution and composition in order to reduce the uncertainties in their effects on the global energy balance. ACE will make a comprehensive set of simultaneous measurements of trace gases, thin clouds, aerosols, and temperature by solar occultation from a satellite in low earth orbit. A high inclination (74 degrees) low earth orbit (650 km) will give ACE coverage of tropical, mid-latitudes and polar regions. The solar occultation advantages are high sensitivity and self-calibration. A high-resolution (0.02 cm-1) infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4100 cm-1) will measure the vertical distribution of trace gases, and the meteorological variables of temperature and pressure. The ACE concept is derived from the now-retired ATMOS FTS instrument, which flew on the Space Shuttle in 1985, 1992, 1993, 1994. Climate-chemistry coupling may lead to the formation of an Arctic ozone hole. ACE will provide high quality data to confront these model predictions and will monitor polar chemistry as chlorine levels decline. The ACE-FTS can measure water vapor and HDO in the tropical tropopause region to study dehydration and strat-trop exchange. The molecular signatures of massive forest fires will evident in the ACE infrared spectra. The CO_2 in our spectra can be used to either retrieve atmospheric pressure or (if the instrument pointing knowledge proves to be satisfactory) for an independent retrieval of a CO_2 profile for carbon cycle science. Aerosols and clouds will be monitored using the extinction of solar

  17. Water physics and chemistry data from bottle casts from the GERDA as part of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) project from 20 July 1955 to 29 May 1957 (NODC Accession 7000057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected from bottle casts from the GERDA from 20 July 1955 to 29 May 1957. Data were collected as part of the Rosenstiel...

  18. Impact of aircraft emissions on the atmospheric chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dameris, M.; Sausen, R.; Grewe, V.; Koehler, I.; Ponater, M. [Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Steil, B. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Bruehl, Ch. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Chemie (Otto-Hahn-Institut), Mainz (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A hierarchy of models of different complexity has been applied to estimate the impact of aircraft NO{sub x} emissions on atmospheric chemistry. The global circulation model ECHAM3 has been coupled with two types of chemistry modules. The first of these describes only a simplified (linear) NO{sub x} and HNO{sub 3} chemistry while the second one is a comprehensive chemistry module (CHEM), describing tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry including photochemical reactions and heterogeneous reactions on sulphate aerosols and PSCs. The module CHEM has been coupled either off-line or with feedback via the ozone concentration. First results of multilayer integrations (over decades) are discussed. (author) 27 refs.

  19. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Sofen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent dataset for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total dataset of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971–2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regional background locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This dataset is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily eight-hour average (MDA8, SOMO35, AOT40, and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded datasets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi:10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452. We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  20. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.; Apadula, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Cupeiro, M.; Ellul, R.; Galbally, I. E.; Girgzdiene, R.; Luppo, S.; Mimouni, M.; Nahas, A. C.; Saliba, M.; Tørseth, K.

    2016-02-01

    The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent data set for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System) models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total data set of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971-2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regionally representative locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This data set is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily 8-hour average (MDA8), sum of means over 35 ppb (daily maximum 8-h; SOMO35), accumulated ozone exposure above a threshold of 40 ppbv (AOT40), and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded data sets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi: 10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452). We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  1. Collaborative Research. Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma Chemistry-Photon Synergies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung-Jin [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Eden, James Gary [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Combining the effects of low temperature, atmospheric pressure microplasmas and microplasma photon sources offers the promise of greatly expanding the range of applications for each of them. The plasma sources create active chemical species and these can be activated further by the addition of photons and the associated photochemistry. There are many ways to combine the effects of plasma chemistry and photochemistry, especially if there are multiple phases present. This project combined the construction of appropriate test experimental systems, various spectroscopic diagnostics and mathematical modeling. Through a continuous discussion and co-design process with the UC-Berkeley Team, we have successfully completed the fabrication and testing of all components for a microplasma array-assisted system designed for photon-activated plasma chemistry research. Microcavity plasma lamps capable of generating more than 20 mW/cm2 at 172 nm (Xe dimer) were fabricated with a custom form factor to mate to the plasma chemistry setup, and a lamp was current being installed by the Berkeley team so as to investigate plasma chemistry-photon synergies at a higher photon energy (~7.2 eV) as compared to the UVA treatment that is afforded by UV LEDs operating at 365 nm. In particular, motivated by the promising results from the Berkeley team with UVA treatment, we also produced the first generation of lamps that can generate photons in the 300-370 nm wavelength range. Another set of experiments, conducted under the auspices of this grant, involved the use of plasma microjet arrays. The combination of the photons and excited radicals produced by the plasma column resulted in broad area deactivation of bacteria.

  2. Atmospheric Boundary Layer, Integrating Air Chemistry and Land Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilà-Guerau De Arellano, J.; Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Stratum, van B.J.H.; Dries, van den C.L.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to the interactions between the atmosphere and the land for advanced undergraduate and graduate students and a reference text for researchers in atmospheric physics and chemistry, hydrology, and plant physiology. The combination of the book, which provides the

  3. Concluding remarks: Faraday Discussion on chemistry in the urban atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Jose L

    2016-07-18

    This article summarises the Concluding remarks from the Faraday Discussion on Chemistry in the Urban Atmosphere. The following themes are addressed: (a) new results that inform our understanding of the evolving sources and composition of the urban atmosphere ("News"); (b) results that identify gaps in our understanding that necessitate further work ("Gaps");

  4. Joint analysis of deposition fluxes and atmospheric concentrations of inorganic nitrogen and sulphur compounds predicted by six chemistry transport models in the frame of the EURODELTAIII project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanco, M. G.; Bessagnet, B.; Cuvelier, C.; Theobald, M. R.; Tsyro, S.; Pirovano, G.; Aulinger, A.; Bieser, J.; Calori, G.; Ciarelli, G.; Manders, A.; Mircea, M.; Aksoyoglu, S.; Briganti, G.; Cappelletti, A.; Colette, A.; Couvidat, F.; D'Isidoro, M.; Kranenburg, R.; Meleux, F.; Menut, L.; Pay, M. T.; Rouïl, L.; Silibello, C.; Thunis, P.; Ung, A.

    2017-02-01

    In the framework of the UNECE Task Force on Measurement and Modelling (TFMM) under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP), the EURODELTAIII project is evaluating how well air quality models are able to reproduce observed pollutant air concentrations and deposition fluxes in Europe. In this paper the sulphur and nitrogen deposition estimates of six state-of-the-art regional models (CAMx, CHIMERE, EMEP MSC-W, LOTOS-EUROS, MINNI and CMAQ) are evaluated and compared for four intensive EMEP measurement periods (25 Feb-26 Mar 2009; 17 Sep-15 Oct 2008; 8 Jan-4 Feb 2007 and 1-30 Jun 2006). For sulphur, this study shows the importance of including sea salt sulphate emissions for obtaining better model results; CMAQ, the only model considering these emissions in its formulation, was the only model able to reproduce the high measured values of wet deposition of sulphur at coastal sites. MINNI and LOTOS-EUROS underestimate sulphate wet deposition for all periods and have low wet deposition efficiency for sulphur. For reduced nitrogen, all the models underestimate both wet deposition and total air concentrations (ammonia plus ammonium) in the summer campaign, highlighting a potential lack of emissions (or incoming fluxes) in this period. In the rest of campaigns there is a general underestimation of wet deposition by all models (MINNI and CMAQ with the highest negative bias), with the exception of EMEP, which underestimates the least and even overestimates deposition in two campaigns. This model has higher scavenging deposition efficiency for the aerosol component, which seems to partly explain the different behaviour of the models. For oxidized nitrogen, CMAQ, CAMx and MINNI predict the lowest wet deposition and the highest total air concentrations (nitric acid plus nitrates). Comparison with observations indicates a general underestimation of wet oxidized nitrogen deposition by these models, as well as an overestimation of total air concentration for

  5. Atmospheric Chemistry in a Changing World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, William H.

    The world is changing,and the atmosphere's composition is changing with it. Human activity is responsible for much of this. Global population growth and migration to urban centers, extensive biomass burning, the spread of fertilizer-intensive agribusiness, globalization of business and industry, rising standards of living in the developing world, and increased energy use fuels atmospheric change. If current practices continue, atmospheric increases are likely for the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide; and for the chemically active gases nitric oxide, sulfur dioxide,and ammonia. Increases in global tropospheric ozone and aerosols are a distinct possibility.

  6. Atmospheric chemistry: The return of ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakola, Hannele; Hellén, Heidi

    2016-07-01

    Ethane emissions can lead to ozone pollution. Measurements at 49 sites show that long-declining atmospheric ethane concentrations started rising in 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere, largely due to greater oil and gas production in the USA.

  7. Response of lightning NOx emissions and ozone production to climate change: Insights from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, D. L.; Doherty, R. M.; Wild, O.; Young, P. J.; Butler, A.

    2016-05-01

    Results from an ensemble of models are used to investigate the response of lightning nitrogen oxide emissions to climate change and the consequent impacts on ozone production. Most models generate lightning using a parameterization based on cloud top height. With this approach and a present-day global emission of 5 TgN, we estimate a linear response with respect to changes in global surface temperature of +0.44 ± 0.05 TgN K-1. However, two models using alternative approaches give +0.14 and -0.55 TgN K-1 suggesting that the simulated response is highly dependent on lightning parameterization. Lightning NOx is found to have an ozone production efficiency of 6.5 ± 4.7 times that of surface NOx sources. This wide range of efficiencies across models is partly due to the assumed vertical distribution of the lightning source and partly to the treatment of nonmethane volatile organic compound (NMVOC) chemistry. Careful consideration of the vertical distribution of emissions is needed, given its large influence on ozone production.

  8. Quantifying atmospheric transport, chemistry, and mixing using a new trajectory-box model and a global atmospheric-chemistry GCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Riede

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for the quantification of transport, chemistry, and mixing along atmospheric trajectories based on a consistent model hierarchy. The hierarchy consists of the new atmospheric-chemistry trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the three-dimensional (3-D global ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric-chemistry (EMAC general circulation model. CAABA/MJT employs the atmospheric box model CAABA in a configuration using the atmospheric-chemistry submodel MECCA (M, the photochemistry submodel JVAL (J, and the new trajectory submodel TRAJECT (T, to simulate chemistry along atmospheric trajectories, which are provided offline. With the same chemistry submodels coupled to the 3-D EMAC model and consistent initial conditions and physical parameters, a unique consistency between the two models is achieved. Since only mixing processes within the 3-D model are excluded from the model consistency, comparisons of results from the two models allow to separate and quantify contributions of transport, chemistry, and mixing along the trajectory pathways. Consistency of transport between the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the 3-D EMAC model is achieved via calculation of kinematic trajectories based on 3-D wind fields from EMAC using the trajectory model LAGRANTO. The combination of the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT and the trajectory model LAGRANTO can be considered as a Lagrangian chemistry-transport model (CTM moving isolated air parcels. The procedure for obtaining the necessary statistical basis for the quantification method is described as well as the comprehensive diagnostics with respect to chemistry.

    The quantification method presented here allows to investigate the characteristics of transport, chemistry, and mixing in a grid-based 3-D model. The analysis of chemical processes within the trajectory-box model CAABA/MJT is easily extendable to include, for example, the impact of different transport pathways or of mixing processes onto

  9. Lookup tables to compute high energy cosmic ray induced atmospheric ionization and changes in atmospheric chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Atri, Dimitra; Melott, Adrian L.; Thomas, Brian C

    2008-01-01

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts and supernovae may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. Existing atmospheric chemistry software does not have the capability of incorporating the effects of substantial cosmic ray flux above 10 GeV . An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), is used to study atmospheric chem...

  10. NOAA's Tropical Atmosphere Ocean Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Realtime El Nino and La Nina data from the tropical Pacific Ocean is provided by the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean / Triangle Trans-Ocean buoy network (TAO/TRITON) of...

  11. Atmospheric Chemistry Research in New EU Countries. A survey on atmospheric chemistry research and monitoring of air pollution in some new EU Member States and Candidate Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchvarova, E.; Spassova, T.; Valkov, N.; Iordanova, L. [Department of Composition of the Atmosphere and Hydrosphere, National IInstitute of Meteorology and Hydrology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria); Hjorth, J. (ed.) [Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Joint Research Centre JRC, Ispra (Italy)

    2005-07-01

    Historically some of the new EU Member States and the Candidate countries experienced high levels of pollution in the past. Enhanced management measures were and are needed to improve the air quality. The present survey on the ongoing air chemistry research is in support to such measures and the incorporation of the EU environmental legislation in the air quality management of these countries. The aim of the survey is to list the current research activities on atmospheric chemistry in these countries, as well as groups and institutions involved in it. The air chemistry plays essential part of air quality and climate change modelling, energy industry planning and health risk assessments. In addition, the air quality monitoring networks and management are briefly discussed, as well as some information on the air pollution modelling research. The ongoing research (field, laboratory and modelling) in the field of chemical transformation of trace compounds in the atmosphere is discussed here and parallels are drown among 10 of the new EU Member States and Candidate Countries, namely Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, the Slovak Republic and Slovenia. Laboratory studies traditionally emphasize on rate and equilibrium processes. Field studies are based on aircraft and surface measurements of reaction chemistry, advective influences on the chemical composition of the atmosphere, and air-surface exchange processes. Both types experimental studies on atmospheric chemistry are demanding concerning equipment and resources. Therefore, most of the studies in the field are coming from international projects, EU, ESF or NATO funded. Modelling efforts address both chemistry and dynamics on regional and global scales. The analysis of research activities in those fields is made with regards of the current EU practice in the field and the historical frames in the ten countries of interest. The unique traditions and achievements in

  12. The Atmospheric Chemistry of GJ 1214b: Photochemistry and Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kempton, Eliza Miller-Ricci; Fortney, Jonathan J

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations of the transiting super-Earth GJ 1214b reveal that its atmosphere may be hydrogen-rich or water-rich in nature, with clouds or hazes potentially affecting its transmission spectrum in the optical and very-near-IR. Here we further examine the possibility that GJ 1214b does indeed possess a hydrogen-dominated atmosphere, which is the hypothesis that is favored by models of the bulk composition of the planet. We study the effects of non-equilibrium chemistry (photochemistry, thermal chemistry, and mixing) on the planet's transmission spectrum. We furthermore examine the possibility that clouds could play a significant role in attenuating GJ 1214b's transmission spectrum at short wave- lengths. We find that non-equilibrium chemistry can have a large effect on the overall chemical composition of GJ 1214b's atmosphere, however these changes mostly take place above the height in the atmosphere that is probed by transmission spectroscopy. The effects of non-equilibrium chemistry on GJ 1214b's tran...

  13. Chemistry in the near-surface atmosphere at Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shematovich, V. I.

    2013-09-01

    Theoretical predictions of the composition and chemical evolution of near-surface atmospheres of the icy satellites in the Jovian and Kronian systems are of great importance for assessing the biological potential of these satellites. Depending on the satellite mass the formation of the rarefied exosphere with the relatively dense near-surface layer is possible as, for example, in the case of the relatively heavy Galilean satellites Europa and Ganymede in the Jovian system [1-3]. Ganymede is of special interest, because observations indicate that Ganymede has a significant O2 near - surface atmosphere, probably subsurface ocean, and is the only satellite with its own magnetosphere. Processes of formation of the rarefied gaseous envelope of Ganymede and chemical exchange between atmosphere and icy surface will be considered. The water vapour is usually the domin ant parent species in such gaseous envelope because of the ejection from the satellite icy surface due to the thermal outgassing, non-thermal photolysis and radiolysis and other active processes at work on the surface. The photochemis try of water vapour in the near - surface atmospheric layer [4] and the radiolysis of icy regolith [5] result in the supplement of the atmosphere by an admixture of H2, O2, OH and O. Returning molecules have species-dependent behaviour on contact with icy surface of the satellite and non-thermal energy distributions for the chemical radicals. The H2 and O2 molecules stick with very low efficiency and are immediately desorbed thermally, but returning H2O, OH, H and O stick to the grains in the icy regolith with unit efficiency. The suprathermal radicals OH, H, and O entering the regolith can drive the surface chemistry. The numerical kinetic model to investigate on the molecular level the chemistry of the atmosphere - surface interface of the rarefied Н2О-dominant gaseous envelope at Ganymede was developed. Such numerical model simulates the gas-phase and diffusive surface

  14. Atmospheric chemistry of isoflurane, desflurane, and sevoflurane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads P. Sulbæk; Nielsen, Ole John; Karpichev, Boris

    2012-01-01

    The smog chamber/Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique was used to measure the rate coefficients k(Cl + CF(3)CHClOCHF(2), isoflurane) = (4.5 ± 0.8) × 10(-15), k(Cl + CF(3)CHFOCHF(2), desflurane) = (1.0 ± 0.3) × 10(-15), k(Cl + (CF(3))(2)CHOCH(2)F, sevoflurane) = (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10...... (sevoflurane) are estimated at 3.2, 14, and 1.1 years, respectively. The 100 year time horizon global warming potentials of isoflurane, desflurane, and sevoflurane are 510, 2540, and 130, respectively. The atmospheric degradation products of these anesthetics are not of environmental concern....

  15. Ozone Depletion, UVB and Atmospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    The primary constituents of the Earth's atmosphere are molecular nitrogen and molecular oxygen. Ozone is created when ultraviolet light from the sun photodissociates molecular oxygen into two oxygen atoms. The oxygen atoms undergo many collisions but eventually combine with a molecular oxygen to form ozone (O3). The ozone molecules absorb ultraviolet solar radiation, primarily in the wavelength region between 200 and 300 nanometers, resulting in the dissociation of ozone back into atomic oxygen and molecular oxygen. The oxygen atom reattaches to an O2 molecule, reforming ozone which can then absorb another ultraviolet photon. This sequence goes back and forth between atomic oxygen and ozone, each time absorbing a uv photon, until the oxygen atom collides with and ozone molecule to reform two oxygen molecules.

  16. Atmospheric chemistry of hydrofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehested, J.

    1995-03-01

    Pulse radiolysis coupled with a time resolved UV absorption detection system and a FTIR spectrometer coupled to a 140 l reaction chamber was used to study the degradation of HCFCs and HFCs in the atmosphere. Reaction rates for a series of reactions of HFCs and HCFCs were investigated: F + RH, R + O{sub 2} + RO{sub 2} + NO, and RO{sub 2} + NO{sub 2} + M, together with UV absorption spectra of the halogenated alkyl (R) and halogenated alkyl peroxy radicals (RO{sub 2}). The products following the self reactions for RO{sub 2} radicals for RO{sub 2} = CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}O{sub 2}, CF{sub 2}HCF{sub 2}O{sub 2}, CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}, CFH{sub 2}CFHO{sub 2}, CF{sub 3}O{sub 2}, and CF{sub 3}C(O)O{sub 2} were investigated by the FTIR setup. The results show that the self reaction of halogenated peroxy radicals give the alkoxy radical, RO, as product. The atmospheric fate of these radicals were C-C bond cleavage for CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}O, CHF{sub 2}CF{sub 2}O, CFH{sub 2}CHFO, and CF{sub 3}C(O)O; while CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O radicals rect with O{sub 2} to give CF{sub 3}CHO and HO{sub 2}. the reaction between CFH{sub 2}O{sub 2} and HO{sub 2} was shown to give 29{+-}7 % CH{sub 2}FCOOH and 72{+-}11 % HCOF as the carbon containing products. (Abstract Truncated)

  17. Atmospheric chemistry of i-butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, V F; Wallington, T J; Nielsen, O J

    2010-12-02

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to determine rate constants of k(Cl + i-butanol) = (2.06 ± 0.40) × 10(-10), k(Cl + i-butyraldehyde) = (1.37 ± 0.08) × 10(-10), and k(OH + i-butanol) = (1.14 ± 0.17) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) in 700 Torr of N(2)/O(2) diluent at 296 ± 2K. The UV irradiation of i-butanol/Cl(2)/N(2) mixtures gave i-butyraldehyde in a molar yield of 53 ± 3%. The chlorine atom initiated oxidation of i-butanol in the absence of NO gave i-butyraldehyde in a molar yield of 48 ± 3%. The chlorine atom initiated oxidation of i-butanol in the presence of NO gave (molar yields): i-butyraldehyde (46 ± 3%), acetone (35 ± 3%), and formaldehyde (49 ± 3%). The OH radical initiated oxidation of i-butanol in the presence of NO gave acetone in a yield of 61 ± 4%. The reaction of chlorine atoms with i-butanol proceeds 51 ± 5% via attack on the α-position to give an α-hydroxy alkyl radical that reacts with O(2) to give i-butyraldehyde. The atmospheric fate of (CH(3))(2)C(O)CH(2)OH alkoxy radicals is decomposition to acetone and CH(2)OH radicals. The atmospheric fate of OCH(2)(CH(3))CHCH(2)OH alkoxy radicals is decomposition to formaldehyde and CH(3)CHCH(2)OH radicals. The results are consistent with, and serve to validate, the mechanism that has been assumed in the estimation of the photochemical ozone creation potential of i-butanol.

  18. Chemistry of Atmospheres: An Introduction to the Chemistry of the Atmospheres of Earth, the Planets and Their Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Reta; Barnet, Chris

    The author of this book states that he has attempted to produce a text that will be “intelligible to readers approaching atmospheric chemistry from any scientific discipline.” He proposes to provide the links between atmospheric chemistry and the traditional approaches to physics, chemistry, and biology. Within this context, he has presented a very readable general discussion at a level slightly higher than the popular level.Wayne has chosen not to interrupt the text with direct references but rather to group them at the back of each chapter. Although this sometimes raises a question concerning the basis of a specific statement, the references are in general adequate and extend through 1984. The manner in which the material is presented is not intimidating, and the book would be a good vehicle for introducing students to the subject and providing a starting point for individual research papers.

  19. Understanding atmospheric peroxyformic acid chemistry: observation, modeling and implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence and importance of peroxyformic acid (PFA in the atmosphere has been under controversy. We present here, for the first time, the observation data for PFA from four field measurements carried out in China. These data provided powerful evidence that PFA can stay in the atmosphere, typically in dozens of pptv level. The relationship between PFA and other detected peroxides was examined. The results showed that PFA had a strong positive correlation with its homolog, peroxyacetic acid, due to their similar sources and sinks. Through an evaluation of PFA production and removal rates, we proposed that the reactions between peroxyformyl radical (HC(OO2 and formaldehyde or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2 were likely to be the major source and degradation into formic acid (FA was likely to be the major sink for PFA. Based on a box model evaluation, we proposed that the HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry was a major source for FA under low NOx conditions. Furthermore, it is found that the impact of the HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry on radical cycling was dependent on the yield of HC(OO2 radical from HC(O + O2 reaction. When this yield exceeded 50%, the HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry should not be neglected for calculating the radical budget. To make clear the exact importance of HC(OO2 and PFA chemistry in the atmosphere, further kinetic, field and modeling studies are required.

  20. NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP): Research Summaries 1997-1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylo, M. J.; DeCola, P. L.; Kaye, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    Under the mandate contained in the FY 1976 NASA Authorization Act, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed and is implementing a comprehensive program of research, technology development, and monitoring of the Earth's upper atmosphere, with emphasis on the upper troposphere and stratosphere. This program aims at expanding our chemical and physical understanding to permit both the quantitative analysis of current perturbations as well as the assessment of possible future changes in this important region of our environment. It is carried out jointly by the Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP), both managed within the Research Division in the Office of Earth Science at NASA. Significant contributions to this effort have also been provided by the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) of NASA's Office of Aero-Space Technology. The long-term objectives of the present program are to perform research to: understand the physics, chemistry, and transport processes of the upper troposphere and the stratosphere and their control on the distribution of atmospheric chemical species such as ozone; assess possible perturbations to the composition of the atmosphere caused by human activities and natural phenomena (with a specific emphasis on trace gas geographical distributions, sources, and sinks and the role of trace gases in defining the chemical composition of the upper atmosphere); understand the processes affecting the distributions of radiatively active species in the atmosphere, and the importance of chemical-radiative-dynamical feedbacks on the meteorology and climatology of the stratosphere and troposphere; and understand ozone production, loss, and recovery in an atmosphere with increasing abundances of greenhouse gases. The current report is composed of two parts. Part 1 summarizes the objectives, status, and accomplishments of the research tasks supported

  1. The THS experiment: probing Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen; Beauchamp, Jack L; Salama, Farid

    2014-06-01

    In Titan’s atmosphere, a complex chemistry between N2 and CH4 occurs at temperatures lower than 200K and leads to the production of heavy molecules and subsequently solid aerosols that form the haze surrounding Titan. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment has been developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC facility to study Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature in order to help interpret Cassini’s observational data. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is jet-cooled to Titan-like temperature 150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma discharge 200K). Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of heavier precursors present as trace elements on Titan. Both the gas phase and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed using a combination of complementary in situ and ex situ diagnostics.Here we present the complementary results of two studies of the gas and solid phase. A Mass spectrometry analysis of the gas phase has demonstrated that the THS experiment is a unique tool to probe the first and intermediate steps as well as specific chemical pathways of Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at Titan-like temperature. The more complex chemistry, observed in the gas phase when adding trace elements to the initial N2-CH4 mixture, has also been confirmed by an extensive study of the solid phase products: Scanning Electron Microscopy images have shown that aggregates produced in N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 mixtures (up to 5 μm in diameter) are much larger than those produced in N2-CH4 mixtures (0.1-0.5 μm), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance results support a growth evolution of the chemistry when adding acetylene to the N2-CH4 mixture, resulting in the production of more complex hydrogen bonds than with a simple N2-CH4 mixture

  2. National Status and Trends, Benthic Surveillance Project Chemistry Data, 1984-1992, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Status and Trends (NSandT) Benthic Surveillance Project Chemistry data file reports the trace concentrations of a suite of chemical contaminants in...

  3. National Status and Trends, Benthic Surveillance Project Chemistry Data, 1984-1992, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Status and Trends (NS&T) Benthic Surveillance Project Chemistry data file reports the trace concentrations of a suite of chemical contaminants in...

  4. Studies of Arctic Middle Atmosphere Chemistry using Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmaier, Rodica

    The objective of this Ph.D. project is to investigate Arctic middle atmosphere chemistry using solar infrared absorption spectroscopy. These measurements were made at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL) at Eureka, Nunavut, which is operated by the Canadian Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Change (CANDAC). This research is part of the CANDAC/PEARL Arctic Middle Atmosphere Chemistry theme and aims to improve our understanding of the processes controlling the stratospheric ozone budget using measurements of the concentrations of stratospheric constituents. The instrument, a Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, has been specifically designed for high-resolution measurements over a broad spectral range and has been used to measure reactive species, source gases, reservoirs, and dynamical tracers at PEARL since August 2006. The first part of this research focuses on the optimization of ozone retrievals, for which 22 microwindows were studied and compared. The spectral region from 1000 to 1005 cm-1 was found to be the most sensitive in both the stratosphere and troposphere, giving the highest number of independent pieces of information and the smallest total error for retrievals at Eureka. Similar studies were performed in coordination with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change for nine other species, with the goal of improving and harmonizing the retrieval parameters among all Infrared Working Group sites. Previous satellite validation exercises have identified the highly variable polar conditions of the spring period to be a challenge. In this work, comparisons between the 125HR and ACE-FTS (Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier transform spectrometer) from 2007 to 2010 have been used to develop strict criteria that allow the ground and satellite-based instruments to be confidently compared. After applying these criteria, the differences between the two instruments were generally

  5. Research for the advancement of green chemistry practice: Studies in atmospheric and educational chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullipher, Steven Gene

    Green chemistry is a philosophy of chemistry that emphasizes a decreasing dependence on limited non-renewable resources and an increasing focus on preventing pollution byproducts of the chemical industry. In short, it is the discipline of chemistry practiced through the lens of environmental stewardship. In an effort to advance the practice of green chemistry, three studies will be described that have ramifications for the practice. The first study examines the atmospheric oxidation of a hydrofluorinated ether, a third-generation CFC replacement compound with primarily unknown atmospheric degradation products. Determination of these products has the potential to impact decisions on refrigerant usage in the future. The second study examines chemistry students' development of understanding benefits-costs-risks analysis when presented with two real-world scenarios: refrigerant choice and fuel choice. By studying how benefits-costs-risks thinking develops, curricular materials and instructional approaches can be designed to better foster the development of an ability that is both necessary for green chemists and important in daily decision-making for non-chemists. The final study uses eye tracking technology to examine students' abilities to interpret molecular properties from structural information in the context of global warming. Such abilities are fundamental if chemists are to appropriately assess risks and hazards of chemistry practice.

  6. Collaborative Research: Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma Chemistry-Photon Synergies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Combining the effects of low temperature, atmospheric pressure microplasmas and microplasma photon sources shows greatly expanded range of applications of each of them. The plasma sources create active chemical species and these can be activated further by addition of photons and associated photochemistry. There are many ways to combine the effects of plasma chemistry and photochemistry, especially if there are multiple phases present. The project combines construction of appropriate test experimental systems, various spectroscopic diagnostics and mathematical modeling.

  7. What makes urban atmospheric chemistry different and special?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Roy M.

    2016-04-01

    There has been a tendency in the atmospheric chemistry community to regard urban atmospheric chemistry as no different to global processes and to differentiate only in terms of the emissions density in models. Such an approach may be suitable for assessing the impact of urban emissions upon regional and global processes but is unsuited to generating a clear understanding of processes within the urban atmosphere itself. The urban atmosphere differentiates itself from the global atmosphere in terms of its density of emissions and relatively short timescales for chemical reaction processes, a consequence of which is that the key processes in the urban atmosphere are often different from those in the regional and remote atmosphere. This lecture will give relevant examples. One of the key aspects of both urban and rural/remote atmospheres is the oxidation of primary pollutants and the formation of secondary species. Such processes may differ markedly between urban and non-urban environments as there are major differences in the behaviour of key oxidants such as ozone, hydroxyl and NO3 radical. In the remote atmosphere the key production process for hydroxyl is through the photolysis of ozone to form excited state oxygen atoms which react with water vapour to form OH. In the urban atmosphere, concentrations of ozone are typically depressed relative to the rural atmosphere and hence this source of OH is less favourable. There are likely to be much higher concentrations of both nitrous acid and formaldehyde in the urban atmosphere whose photolysis is probably the major source of OH. Additionally, there is far more possibility for nocturnal formation of OH in the urban atmosphere from reactions of Criegee intermediates resulting from the oxidation of alkenes. As a consequence, it has been shown that winter to summer ratios of hydroxyl radical concentrations are much higher in the urban atmosphere than is typical of rural atmospheres in northern mid-latitudes. In rural

  8. The Role of Chemistry in Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, J. A.; Wolfe, G. M.; Bouvier-Brown, N. C.; Goldstein, A. H.; Park, J.; McKay, M.; Matross, D. M.; Mao, J.; Brune, W. H.; Lafranchi, B. W.; Browne, E. C.; Min, K.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Cohen, R. C.; Crounse, J.; Faloona, I. C.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Huisman, A. J.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2010-12-01

    Forest-atmosphere exchange of hydrocarbons, ozone, oxidized nitrogen and other reactive species impacts both atmospheric composition and ecosystem productivity, with broad implications for air quality and climate. Recent interpretations of measured ozone and acyl peroxy nitrate fluxes have inferred that intra-canopy chemistry plays an important role in governing both the sign and magnitude of the atmosphere-forest flux of these compounds. I review these observational insights and present results from a recently constructed 1-D vertically-resolved chemical transport model (CAFE) developed for analysis and interpretation of observations made during the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX). The model incorporates a fully resolved forest canopy; emissions from which are parameterized, in many cases, to match leaf-level and top-of-canopy fluxes measured at the ponderosa pine plantation. Model chemistry is based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM), with several additions to simulate the oxidation of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes not in the current MCM. The base model underestimates measured noontime OH concentrations by a factor of six. As a result we invoke enhanced OH-recycling from first generation isoprene and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol peroxy radicals to reconcile model and observed HOx components. Noting a few other aspects of model performance, I will focus on the model predictions of chemistry-induced fluxes. The model qualitatively reproduces the inferred sensitivity to intra-canopy chemistry for both ozone and acyl peroxy nitrates. In both cases, however, the model underestimates the observed exchange velocity suggesting non-stomatal losses (depositional or chemical) remain underestimated in the canopy. As an example of the potential importance of intra-canopy chemistry, the meteorological and structural characteristics of the forest are varied within the model. An intriguing result is that acyl peroxy nitrate (e.g., PAN) fluxes

  9. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulch, D. L.; Cox, R. A.; Hampson, R. F., Jr.; Kerr, J. A.; Troe, J.; Watson, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper contains a critical evaluation of the kinetics and photochemistry of gas phase chemical reactions of neutral species involved in middle atmosphere chemistry (10-55 km altitude). Data sheets have been prepared for 148 thermal and photochemical reactions, containing summaries of the available experimental data with notes giving details of the experimental procedures. For each reaction a preferred value of the rate coefficient at 298 K is given together with a temperature dependency where possible. The selection of the preferred value is discussed, and estimates of the accuracies of the rate coefficients and temperature coefficients have been made for each reaction. The data sheets are intended to provide the basic physical chemical data needed as input for calculations which model atmospheric chemistry. A table summarizing the preferred rate data is provided, together with an appendix listing the available data on enthalpies of formation of the reactant and product species.

  10. Recent Discoveries and Future Challenges in Atmospheric Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasius, Marianne; Goldstein, Allen H

    2016-03-15

    Earth's atmosphere contains a multitude of organic compounds, which differ by orders of magnitude regarding fundamental properties such as volatility, reactivity, and propensity to form cloud droplets, affecting their impact on global climate and human health. Despite recent major research efforts and advances, there are still substantial gaps in understanding of atmospheric organic chemistry, hampering efforts to understand, model, and mitigate environmental problems such as aerosol formation in both polluted urban and more pristine regions. The analytical toolbox available for chemists to study atmospheric organic components has expanded considerably during the past decade, opening new windows into speciation, time resolution and detection of reactive and semivolatile compounds at low concentrations. This has provided unprecedented opportunities, but also unveiled new scientific challenges. Specific groundbreaking examples include the role of epoxides in aerosol formation especially from isoprene, the importance of highly oxidized, reactive organics in air-surface processes (whether atmosphere-biosphere exchange or aerosols), as well as the extent of interactions of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions and the resulting impact on atmospheric organic chemistry.

  11. Particle precipitation: How the spectrum fit impacts atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissing, J. M.; Nieder, H.; Yakovchouk, O. S.; Sinnhuber, M.

    2016-11-01

    Particle precipitation causes atmospheric ionization. Modeled ionization rates are widely used in atmospheric chemistry/climate simulations of the upper atmosphere. As ionization rates are based on particle measurements some assumptions concerning the energy spectrum are required. While detectors measure particles binned into certain energy ranges only, the calculation of a ionization profile needs a fit for the whole energy spectrum. Therefore the following assumptions are needed: (a) fit function (e.g. power-law or Maxwellian), (b) energy range, (c) amount of segments in the spectral fit, (d) fixed or variable positions of intersections between these segments. The aim of this paper is to quantify the impact of different assumptions on ionization rates as well as their consequences for atmospheric chemistry modeling. As the assumptions about the particle spectrum are independent from the ionization model itself the results of this paper are not restricted to a single ionization model, even though the Atmospheric Ionization Module OSnabrück (AIMOS, Wissing and Kallenrode, 2009) is used here. We include protons only as this allows us to trace changes in the chemistry model directly back to the different assumptions without the need to interpret superposed ionization profiles. However, since every particle species requires a particle spectrum fit with the mentioned assumptions the results are generally applicable to all precipitating particles. The reader may argue that the selection of assumptions of the particle fit is of minor interest, but we would like to emphasize on this topic as it is a major, if not the main, source of discrepancies between different ionization models (and reality). Depending on the assumptions single ionization profiles may vary by a factor of 5, long-term calculations may show systematic over- or underestimation in specific altitudes and even for ideal setups the definition of the energy-range involves an intrinsic 25% uncertainty for the

  12. STREAMWATER ACID-BASED CHEMISTRY AND CRITICAL LOADS OF ATMOSPHERIC SULFUR DEPOSITION IN SHENANDOAH NATIONAL PARK, VIRGINIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A modeling study was conducted to evaluate the acid-base chemistry of streams within Shenandoah National Park, Virginia and to project future responses to sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) atmospheric emissions controls. Many of the major stream systems in the Park have acid neutraliz...

  13. Chemistry of Atmospheric Aerosols at Pacifichem 2015 Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nizkorodov, Sergey [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-12-28

    This grant was used to provide participant support for a symposium entitled “Chemistry of Atmospheric Aerosols” at the 2015 International Chemical Congress of Pacific Basin Societies (Pacifichem) that took place in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, on December 15-20, 2015. The objective was to help attract both distinguished scientists as well as more junior researchers, including graduate students, to this international symposium by reducing the financial barrier for its attendance. It was the second time a symposium devoted to Atmospheric Aerosols was part of the Pacifichem program. This symposium provided a unique opportunity for the scientists from different countries to gather in one place and discuss the cutting edge advances in the cross-disciplinary areas of aerosol research. To achieve the highest possible impact, the PI and the symposium co-organizers actively advertised the symposium by e-mail and by announcements at other conferences. A number of people responded, and the end result was a very busy program with about 100 oral and poster presentation described in the attached PDF file. Presentations by invited speakers occupied approximately 30% of time in each of the sessions. In addition to the invited speakers, each session also had contributed presentations, including those by graduate students and postdoctoral researchers. This symposium gathered established aerosol chemists from a number of countries including United States, Canada, China, Japan, Korea, Australia, Brazil, Hongkong, Switzerland, France, and Germany. There were plenty of time for the attendees to discuss new ideas and potential collaborations both during the oral sessions and at the poster sessions of the symposium. The symposium was very beneficial to graduate student researchers, postdoctoral fellows, and junior researchers whose prior exposure to international aerosol chemistry science had been limited. The symposium provided junior researchers with a much broader perspective of aerosol

  14. The 1-way on-line coupled atmospheric chemistry model system MECO(n – Part 1: The limited-area atmospheric chemistry model COSMO/MESSy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kerkweg

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The numerical weather prediction model of the Consortium for Small Scale Modelling (COSMO, maintained by the German weather service (DWD, is connected with the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy. This effort is undertaken in preparation of a~new, limited-area atmospheric chemistry model. This model is as consistent as possible, with respect to atmospheric chemistry and related processes, with a previously developed global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model: the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC model. The combined system constitutes a new research tool, bridging the global to the meso-γ scale for atmospheric chemistry research. MESSy provides the infrastructure and includes, among others, the process and diagnostic submodels for atmospheric chemistry simulations. Furthermore, MESSy is highly flexible allowing model setups with tailor made complexity, depending on the scientific question. Here, the connection of the MESSy infrastructure to the COSMO model is documented. Previously published prototype submodels for simplified tracer studies are generalised to be plugged-in and used in the global and the limited-area model. They are used to evaluate the tracer transport characteristics of the new COSMO/MESSy model system, an important prerequisite for future atmospheric chemistry applications. A supplementary document with further details on the technical implementation of the MESSy interface into COSMO with a complete list of modifications to the COSMO code is provided.

  15. Laboratory studies of nitrate radical chemistry - application to atmospheric processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noremsaune, Ingse

    1997-12-31

    This thesis studies atmospheric chemistry and tries in particular to fill gaps in the data base of atmospheric reactions. It studies the nitrate radical reactions with chloroethenes and with but-2-yne (2-butyne). The mechanisms and rate coefficients for the NO{sub 3}-initiated degradation of the chloroethenes and 2-butyne were investigated by means of the static reaction chamber and the fast flow-discharge technique. The reactions between the nitrate radical and the chloroethenes were studied at atmospheric pressure in a reaction chamber with synthetic air as bath gas. FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy) spectroscopy was used to follow the reactions and to identify the products. Products were observed for the reactions with (E)-1,2-dichloroethene and tetrachloroethene, although the absorption bands are weak. The alkyl peroxynitrate and nitrate compounds form very strong and characteristic absorption bands. The rate coefficients for the reactions between NO{sub 3} and the chloroethenes were investigated at room temperature by three different methods. The results are given in tables. 132 refs., 44 figs., 21 tabs.

  16. Non-equilibrium CO chemistry in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, A A; Carlsson, M; Cernicharo, J

    2003-01-01

    Investigating the reliability of the assumption of instantaneous chemical equilibrium (ICE) for calculating the CO number density in the solar atmosphere is of crucial importance for the resolution of the long-standing controversy over the existence of `cool clouds' in the chromosphere, and for determining whether the cool gas owes its existence to CO radiative cooling or to a hydrodynamical process. Here we report the first results of such an investigation in which we have carried out time-dependent gas-phase chemistry calculations in radiation hydrodynamical simulations of solar chromospheric dynamics. We show that while the ICE approximation turns out to be suitable for modeling the observed infrared CO lines at the solar disk center, it may substantially overestimate the `heights of formation' of strong CO lines synthesized close to the edge of the solar disk, especially concerning vigorous dynamic cases resulting from relatively strong photospheric disturbances. This happens because during the cool phase...

  17. The effects of atmospheric chemistry on radiation budget in the Community Earth Systems Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y.; Czader, B.; Diao, L.; Rodriguez, J.; Jeong, G.

    2013-12-01

    The Community Earth Systems Model (CESM)-Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) simulations were performed to study the impact of atmospheric chemistry on the radiation budget over the surface within a weather prediction time scale. The secondary goal is to get a simplified and optimized chemistry module for the short time period. Three different chemistry modules were utilized to represent tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry, which differ in how their reactions and species are represented: (1) simplified tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry (approximately 30 species), (2) simplified tropospheric chemistry and comprehensive stratospheric chemistry from the Model of Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 3 (MOZART-3, approximately 60 species), and (3) comprehensive tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry (MOZART-4, approximately 120 species). Our results indicate the different details in chemistry treatment from these model components affect the surface temperature and impact the radiation budget.

  18. TROPOLITE, on the path of atmospheric chemistry made simple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresi, Luca; Van Der Meulen, Wencke; Vink, Rob

    2014-10-01

    Accurate, reliable and stable long term measurements of Earth's Atmospheric Chemistry from Space are currently done by complex instruments, whose mass is in excess of 100 Kg. TROPOMI is the more recent instrument being developed jointly by ESA and NSO and due for launch in 2015. TROPOMI, consisting of four spectrometers ranging from UV to SWIR, is paving the way to the development of high performance spectrometers that will compose the backbone of the European Copernicus system. The objective of TROPOMI is to measure trace gases with an accuracy one order of magnitude better of what is currently done from Space. While teams of engineers are still busy finalizing TROPOMI, ESA, NSO, and TNO have launched an initiative along a different development axis: to explore the possibility of a lighter version of TROPOMI, to address a market valuing a cost effective instrument for Atmospheric Chemistry. TROPOLITE, as it is dubbed, leverages on all the technology developments and the lessons learnt from TROPOMI, but with the clear objective of a design to cost solution. Furthermore, mass and power of the instrument shall be within the envelope of a payload of a small satellite, namely 20kg and 30W and possibly within a volume of 20 x 20 x 40 cm3. The scope of TROPOLITE is to address a larger user base that is interested in an affordable instrument to perform from a small satellite some specific tasks relevant to Air Quality and/or Climate. The paper, after a short overview of the TROPOMI design and current status, presents the design philosophy of TROPOLITE, and shows what are the technologies and processes stemming from the experience gained with TROPOMI that make possible a simplified, but still very performing, version of TROPOMI. A comparison in terms of performance and functionalities of the two instruments is discussed. Finally, the development plan from the current development status of TROPOLITE up to Qualification Model is presented.

  19. Simulation of a Forensic Chemistry Problem: A Multidisciplinary Project for Secondary School Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, G. A.

    1995-09-01

    A multidisciplinary chemistry project for high school students is presented based upon a forensic theme and team problem solving approach. The project involves data collection and interpretation using FTIR, HPLC, NMR, and TLC. Simulated evidence sample formulations and a sample assignment scheme are presented.

  20. Implementing a Student-Designed Green Chemistry Laboratory Project in Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Kate J.; Jones, T. Nicholas; Schaller, Chris P.; McIntee, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    A multiweek organic chemistry laboratory project is described that emphasizes sustainable practices in experimental design. An emphasis on student-driven development of the project is meant to mirror the independent nature of research. Students propose environmentally friendly modifications of several reactions. With instructor feedback, students…

  1. First Global Observations of Atmospheric COCIF from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dejian; Boone, Chris D.; Bernath, Peter F.; Weisenstein, Debra K.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Manney, Gloria L.; Walker, Kaley A.

    2010-01-01

    Carbonyl chlorofluoride (COCIF) is an important reservoir of chlorine and fluorine in the Earth's atmosphere. Satellite-based remote sensing measurements of COCIF, obtained by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) for a time period spanning February 2004 through April 2007, have been used in a global distribution study. There is a strong source region for COCIF in the tropical stratosphere near 27 km. A layer of enhanced COCIF spans the low- to mid-stratosphere over all latitudes, with volume mixing ratios of 40-100 parts per trillion by volume, largest in the tropics and decreasing toward the poles. The COCIF volume mixing ratio profiles are nearly zonally symmetric, but they exhibit a small hemispheric asymmetry that likely arises from a hemispheric asymmetry in the parent molecule CCl3 F. Comparisons are made with a set of in situ stratospheric measurements from the mid-1980s and with predictions from a 2-D model.

  2. Urban Climate Effects on Air Pollution and Atmospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoul, Tara; Bloss, William; Pope, Francis

    2016-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone, adversely affects the environment and human health. The presence of chlorine nitrate (ClNO2) in the troposphere can enhance ozone (O3) formation as it undergoes photolysis, releasing chlorine reactive atoms (Cl) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), both of which enhance tropospheric ozone formation. The importance of new sources of tropospheric ClNO2 via heterogeneous processes has recently been highlighted. This study employed a box model, using the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM version 3.2) to assess the effect of ClNO2 on air quality in urban areas within the UK. The model updated to include ClNO2 production, photolysis, a comprehensive parameterisation of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) uptake, and ClNO2 production calculated from bulk aerosol composition. The model simulation revealed the presence of ClNO2 enhances the formation of NO2, organic peroxy radical (CH3O2), O3, and hydroxyl radicals (OH) when compared with simulations excluding ClNO2. In addition, the study examined the effect of temperature variation upon ClNO2 formation. The response of ClNO2 to temperature was analysed to identify the underlying drivers, of particular importance when assessing the response of atmospheric chemistry processes under potential future climates.

  3. Alternative Solvents through Green Chemistry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of this project is to develop state-of-the-art, green precision cleaning technologies for NASA’s 21st Century Launch Complex thus eliminating...

  4. LCREP chemistry and lipids - Lower Columbia River Ecosystem Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 1) The purpose of this project is to document juvenile salmon habitat occurrence in the Lower Columbia River and estuary, and examine how habitat conditions...

  5. Stereoscopic Projection in the Chemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrew, LeRoy A.

    1972-01-01

    Describes the development of a three-dimensional projection system used to present structural principles by means of slides. Polarization of images from two planar projectors and viewing through polarized lenses gives stereo results. Techniques used in producing the slides and constructing the equipment are given. (TS)

  6. Manhattan Project Technical Series: The Chemistry of Uranium (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitch, E. I. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Katz, J. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1947-03-10

    This constitutes Chapters 11 through 16, inclusive, of the Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Uranium Oxides, Sulfides, Selenides, and Tellurides; The Non-Volatile Fluorides of Uranium; Uranium Hexafluoride; Uranium-Chlorine Compounds; Bromides, Iodides, and Pseudo-Halides of Uranium; and Oxyhalides of Uranium.

  7. Building Bridges between Science Courses Using Honors Organic Chemistry Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Timothy; Pontrello, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Introductory undergraduate science courses are traditionally offered as distinct units without formalized student interaction between classes. To bridge science courses, the authors used three Honors Organic Chemistry projects paired with other science courses. The honors students delivered presentations to mainstream organic course students and…

  8. A comparison of atmospheric composition using the Carbon Bond and Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sarwar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We incorporate the recently developed Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (version 2, RACM2 into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system for comparison with the existing 2005 Carbon Bond mechanism with updated toluene chemistry (CB05TU. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean hydroxyl radical concentrations by 46% and nitric acid by 26%. However, it reduces hydrogen peroxide by 2%, peroxyacetic acid by 94%, methyl hydrogen peroxide by 19%, peroxyacetyl nitrate by 40%, and organic nitrate by 41%. RACM2 predictions generally agree better with the observed data than the CB05TU predictions. RACM2 enhances ozone for all ambient levels leading to higher bias at low (70 ppbv concentrations. The RACM2 ozone predictions are also supported by increased ozone production efficiency that agrees better with observations. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean sulfate by 10%, nitrate by 6%, ammonium by 10%, anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols by 42%, biogenic secondary organic aerosols by 5%, and in-cloud secondary organic aerosols by 7%. Increased inorganic and organic aerosols with RACM2 agree better with observed data. While RACM2 enhances ozone and secondary aerosols by relatively large margins, control strategies developed for ozone or fine particles using the two mechanisms do not differ appreciably.

  9. A comparison of atmospheric composition using the Carbon Bond and Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sarwar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We incorporate the recently developed Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism (version 2, RACM2 into the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system for comparison with the existing 2005 Carbon Bond mechanism with updated toluene chemistry (CB05TU. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean hydroxyl radical concentrations by 46% and nitric acid by 26%. However, it reduces hydrogen peroxide by 2%, peroxyacetic acid by 94%, methyl hydrogen peroxide by 19%, peroxyacetyl nitrate by 40%, and organic nitrate by 41%. RACM2 enhances ozone compared to CB05TU at all ambient levels. Although it exhibited greater overestimates at lower observed concentrations, it displayed an improved performance at higher observed concentrations. The RACM2 ozone predictions are also supported by increased ozone production efficiency that agrees better with observations. Compared to CB05TU, RACM2 enhances the domain-wide monthly mean sulfate by 10%, nitrate by 6%, ammonium by 10%, anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols by 42%, biogenic secondary organic aerosols by 5%, and in-cloud secondary organic aerosols by 7%. Increased inorganic and organic aerosols with RACM2 agree better with observed data. Any air pollution control strategies developed using the two mechanisms do not differ appreciably.

  10. A fast stratospheric chemistry solver: the E4CHEM submodel for the atmospheric chemistry global circulation model EMAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. G. Baumgaertner

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy (EMAC and the atmospheric chemistry box model CAABA are extended by a computationally very efficient submodel for atmospheric chemistry, E4CHEM. It focuses on stratospheric chemistry but also includes background tropospheric chemistry. It is based on the chemistry of MAECHAM4-CHEM and is intended to serve as a simple and fast alternative to the flexible but also computationally more demanding submodel MECCA. In a model setup with E4CHEM, EMAC is now also suitable for simulations of longer time scales. The reaction mechanism contains basic O3, CH4, CO, HOx, NOx and ClOx gas phase chemistry. In addition, E4CHEM includes optional fast routines for heterogeneous reactions on sulphate aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds (substituting the existing submodels PSC and HETCHEM, and scavenging (substituting the existing submodel SCAV. We describe the implementation of E4CHEM into the MESSy structure of CAABA and EMAC. For some species the steady state in the box model differs by up to 100% when compared to results from CAABA/MECCA due to different reaction rates. After an update of the reaction rates in E4CHEM the mixing ratios in both boxmodel and 3-D model simulations are in satisfactory agreement with the results from a simulation where MECCA with a similar chemistry scheme was employed. Finally, a comparison against a simulation with a more complex and already evaluated chemical mechanism is presented in order to discuss shortcomings associated with the simplification of the chemical mechanism.

  11. he Impact of Primary Marine Aerosol on Atmospheric Chemistry, Radiation and Climate: A CCSM Model Development Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keene, William C. [University of Virginia; Long, Michael S. [University of Virginia

    2013-05-20

    This project examined the potential large-scale influence of marine aerosol cycling on atmospheric chemistry, physics and radiative transfer. Measurements indicate that the size-dependent generation of marine aerosols by wind waves at the ocean surface and the subsequent production and cycling of halogen-radicals are important but poorly constrained processes that influence climate regionally and globally. A reliable capacity to examine the role of marine aerosol in the global-scale atmospheric system requires that the important size-resolved chemical processes be treated explicitly. But the treatment of multiphase chemistry across the breadth of chemical scenarios encountered throughout the atmosphere is sensitive to the initial conditions and the precision of the solution method. This study examined this sensitivity, constrained it using high-resolution laboratory and field measurements, and deployed it in a coupled chemical-microphysical 3-D atmosphere model. First, laboratory measurements of fresh, unreacted marine aerosol were used to formulate a sea-state based marine aerosol source parameterization that captured the initial organic, inorganic, and physical conditions of the aerosol population. Second, a multiphase chemical mechanism, solved using the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry's MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere) system, was benchmarked across a broad set of observed chemical and physical conditions in the marine atmosphere. Using these results, the mechanism was systematically reduced to maximize computational speed. Finally, the mechanism was coupled to the 3-mode modal aerosol version of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM v3.6.33). Decadal-scale simulations with CAM v.3.6.33, were run both with and without reactive-halogen chemistry and with and without explicit treatment of particulate organic carbon in the marine aerosol source function. Simulated results were interpreted (1) to evaluate influences

  12. Simulating the impacts of large scale insect- and disease-driven tree mortality on atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, J.; Heald, C. L.; Silva, S. J.; Martin, R.

    2015-12-01

    Land-use and land-cover change (LUC) is an important driver of global change through the alteration of local energy, moisture, and carbon exchanges. LUC can also directly impact the emission and deposition of important reactive trace gases, altering the oxidative chemistry of the atmosphere and subsequently air quality and climate. Large-scale tree mortality as a result of insects and disease may therefore have unexplored feedbacks on atmospheric chemistry. Between 2013 and 2027, over 80 million acres of treed land in the United States is predicted to experience basal area mortality rates exceeding 25%. We harmonized the description of land cover across the relevant surface-atmosphere exchange processes in the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to facilitate LUC simulations, and used this adapted model to test the impact of projected tree mortality according to the 2012 USDA National Insect and Disease Risk Assessment. Nation-wide biogenic VOC emissions were reduced by 5%, with local impacts approaching 50% in some regions. By themselves, these emission reductions resulted in lower surface-level O3 mixing ratios, but this was counteracted by decreases in the O3 deposition velocity (by up to 10%) due to the reduction in vegetation density. Organic aerosol mass concentrations were also significantly affected across the United States, decreasing by 5-10% across the eastern U.S. and the northwest, with local impacts exceeding 25% in some regions. We discuss the general impacts on air quality in clean and polluted regions of the US, and point to developments needed for a more robust understanding of land cover change feedbacks.

  13. Alternative Solvents through Green Chemistry Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Quinn, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Components in the aerospace industry must perform with accuracy and precision under extreme conditions, and surface contamination can be detrimental to the desired performance, especially in cases when the components come into contact with strong oxidizers such as liquid oxygen. Therefore, precision cleaning is an important part of a components preparation prior to utilization in aerospace applications. Current cleaning technologies employ a variety of cleaning agents, many of which are halogenated solvents that are either toxic or cause environmental damage. Thus, this project seeks to identify alternative precision cleaning solvents and technologies, including use of less harmful cleaning solvents, ultrasonic and megasonic agitation, low-pressure plasma cleaning techniques, and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction. Please review all data content found in the Public Data tab located at: https:techport.nasa.govview11697public

  14. NASA's Upper Atmosphere Research Program UARP and Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP): Research Summaries 1994 - 1996. Report to Congress and the Environmental Protection Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Rose (Compiler); Wolfe, Kathy (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    Under the mandate contained in the FY 1976 NASA Authorization Act, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed and is implementing a comprehensive program of research, technology, and monitoring of the Earth's upper atmosphere, with emphasis on the stratosphere. This program aims at expanding our understanding to permit both the quantitative analysis of current perturbations as well as the assessment of possible future changes in this important region of our environment. It is carried out jointly by the Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP) and the Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP), both managed within the Science Division in the Office of Mission to Planet Earth at NASA. Significant contributions to this effort are also provided by the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) of NASA's Office of Aeronautics. The long-term objectives of the present program are to perform research to: understand the physics, chemistry, and transport processes of the upper atmosphere and their effect on the distribution of chemical species in the stratosphere, such as ozone; understand the relationship of the trace constituent composition of the lower stratosphere and the lower troposphere to the radiative balance and temperature distribution of the Earth's atmosphere; and accurately assess possible perturbations of the upper atmosphere caused by human activities as well as by natural phenomena. In compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Public Law 101-549, NASA has prepared a report on the state of our knowledge of the Earth's upper atmosphere, particularly the stratosphere, and on the progress of UARP and ACMAP. The report for the year 1996 is composed of two parts. Part 1 summarizes the objectives, status, and accomplishments of the research tasks supported under NASA UARP and ACMAP in a document entitled, Research Summary 1994-1996. Part 2 is entitled Present State of Knowledge of the Upper Atmosphere

  15. Project-based learning in the secondary chemistry classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Elizabeth L.

    This study investigated the use of project-based learning (PBL) in a high school chemistry classroom. PBL encourages the use of projects, which promote continual learning, rather than a summative project at the end of a unit after the learning has already been done. Along with implementing PBL, the study also incorporated many of the strategies included in the broader strategy known as Assessment for Learning (AfL), which stresses developing assessments that are part of the learning process rather than simply a measurement of the amount of learning that has occurred upon completion of a unit. The hypothesis of this research was that PBL would increase student comprehension and motivation as measured through pre and post-test data and a student survey. The new project-based unit required students to research and present the properties and structures of elements and how we use them. The expectation was that this approach would engage students with the material, the computer modeling would allow for more concrete visualization of structures and the project-based format would allow students to become more invested in their own learning. This study provided evidence to support the hypothesis that the implementation of project-based learning, supported by formative assessment and other assessment for learning strategies, will improve student comprehension and motivation in the secondary chemistry classroom.

  16. Investigating Titan's Atmospheric Chemistry at Low Temperature in Support of the NASA Cassini Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Salama, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere, composed mainly of N2 and CH4, is the siege of a complex chemistry induced by solar UV radiation and electron bombardment from Saturn's magnetosphere. This organic chemistry occurs at temperatures lower than 200 K and leads to the production of heavy molecules and subsequently solid aerosols that form the orange haze surrounding Titan. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment has been developed on the COSMIC simulation chamber at NASA Ames in order to study the different steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature and to provide laboratory data in support for Cassini data analysis. The chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas mixture is adiabatically cooled to Titan-like temperature (approx. 150 K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma discharge. Different gas mixtures containing N2, CH4, and the first products of the N2,-CH4 chemistry (C2H2, C2H4, C6H6...) but also heavier molecules such as PAHs or nitrogen containing PAHs can be injected. Both the gas phase and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed. Here we present the results of recent gas phase and solid phase studies that highlight the chemical growth evolution when injecting heavier hydrocarbon trace elements in the initial N2-CH4 mixture. Due to the short residence time of the gas in the plasma discharge, only the first steps of the chemistry have time to occur in a N2-CH4 discharge. However by adding acetylene and benzene to the initial N2-CH4 mixture, we can study the intermediate steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry as well as specific chemical pathways. These results show the uniqueness of the THS experiment to help understand the first and intermediate steps of Titan fs atmospheric chemistry as well as specific chemical pathways leading to Titan fs haze formation.

  17. Remote sensing of atmospheric chemistry; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 1-3, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, James L. (Editor); Mcneal, Robert J. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on remote sensing of atmospheric chemistry discusses special remote sensing space observations and field experiments to study chemical change in the atmosphere, network monitoring for detection of stratospheric chemical change, stratospheric chemistry studies, and the combining of model, in situ, and remote sensing in atmospheric chemistry. Attention is given to the measurement of tropospheric carbon monoxide using gas filter radiometers, long-path differential absorption measurements of tropospheric molecules, air quality monitoring with the differential optical absorption spectrometer, and a characterization of tropospheric methane through space-based remote sensing. Topics addressed include microwave limb sounder experiments for UARS and EOS, an overview of the spectroscopy of the atmosphere using an FIR emission experiment, the detection of stratospheric ozone trends by ground-based microwave observations, and a FIR Fabry-Perot spectrometer for OH measurements.

  18. Rugged Optical Atmospheric Humidity Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trace species measurement on unmanned atmospheric research craft suitable for interplanetary travel is a demanding application for optical sensing techniques. Yet...

  19. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Atmosphereic Inorganic Chlorine Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Stanley P.; Friedl, Randall R.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last five years substantial progress has been made in defining the realm of new chlorine chemistry in the polar stratosphere. Application of existing experimental techniques to potentially important chlorine-containing compounds has yielded quantitative kinetic and spectroscopic data as well as qualitative mechanistic insights into the relevant reactions.

  20. The Titan Haze Simulation experiment on COSmIC: Probing Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Ricketts, Claire L.; Salama, Farid

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment is to contribute to a better understanding of aerosol formation in Titan's atmosphere through the study of the chemical formation pathways that link the simpler gas phase molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry, to the more complex gas phase precursors of aerosols; and more specifically, to investigate the role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PANHs), among other hydrocarbons, in this process. In the THS experiment developed at the NASA Ames Cosmic simulation facility (COSmIC), Titan's atmospheric chemistry is simulated by a pulsed plasma jet expansion at temperature conditions (∼150 K) close to those found in Titan's atmosphere in regions where aerosols are formed. In addition, because of the very short residence time of the gas in the plasma discharge, only the initial steps of the chemistry occur, making the COSmIC/THS a unique tool to study the first and intermediate (when adding heavier precursors to the initial N2-CH4 mixture) steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature as shown in the study presented here. We further illustrate the potential of COSmIC/THS for the simulation of Titan's atmospheric chemistry by presenting very promising results from a preliminary comparison of the laboratory data to data from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer-Ion Beam Spectrometer (CAPS-IBS) instrument.

  1. Vesper - Venus Chemistry and Dynamics Orbiter - A NASA Discovery Mission Proposal: Submillimeter Investigation of Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Vesper conducts a focused investigation of the chemistry and dynamics of the middle atmosphere of our sister planet- from the base of the global cloud cover to the lower thermosphere. The middle atmosphere controls the stability of the Venus climate system. Vesper determines what processes maintain the atmospheric chemical stability, cause observed variability of chemical composition, control the escape of water, and drive the extreme super-rotation. The Vesper science investigation provides a unique perspective on the Earth environment due to the similarities in the middle atmosphere processes of both Venus and the Earth. Understanding key distinctions and similarities between Venus and Earth will increase our knowledge of how terrestrial planets evolve along different paths from nearly identical initial conditions.

  2. Estimating numerical errors due to operator splitting in global atmospheric chemistry models: Transport and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillana, Mauricio; Zhang, Lin; Yantosca, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We present upper bounds for the numerical errors introduced when using operator splitting methods to integrate transport and non-linear chemistry processes in global chemical transport models (CTM). We show that (a) operator splitting strategies that evaluate the stiff non-linear chemistry operator at the end of the time step are more accurate, and (b) the results of numerical simulations that use different operator splitting strategies differ by at most 10%, in a prototype one-dimensional non-linear chemistry-transport model. We find similar upper bounds in operator splitting numerical errors in global CTM simulations.

  3. Non-equilibrium chemistry in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Saumon, D S; Freedman, R S; Lodders, K

    2002-01-01

    Carbon monoxide and ammonia have been detected in the spectrum of Gl 229B at abundances that differ substantially from those obtained from chemical equilibrium. Vertical mixing in the atmosphere is a mechanism that can drive slowly reacting species out of chemical equilibrium. We explore the effects of vertical mixing as a function of mixing efficiency and effective temperature on the chemical abundances in the atmospheres of brown dwarfs and on their spectra. The models compare favorably with the observational evidence and indicate that vertical mixing plays an important role in brown dwarf atmospheres.

  4. A Code to Compute High Energy Cosmic Ray Effects on Terrestrial Atmospheric Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Krejci, Alex J; Thomas, Brian C

    2008-01-01

    A variety of events such as gamma-ray bursts may expose the Earth to an increased flux of high-energy cosmic rays, with potentially important effects on the biosphere. An atmospheric code, the NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center two-dimensional (latitude, altitude) time-dependent atmospheric model (NGSFC), can be used to study atmospheric chemistry changes. The effect on atmospheric chemistry from astrophysically created high energy cosmic rays can now be studied using the NGSFC code. A table has been created that, with the use of the NGSFC code can be used to simulate the effects of high energy cosmic rays (10 GeV to 1 PeV) ionizing the atmosphere. We discuss the table, its use, weaknesses, and strengths.

  5. Electrostatic activation of prebiotic chemistry in substellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Stark, Craig R; Diver, Declan A; Rimmer, Paul B

    2013-01-01

    Charged dust grains in the atmospheres of exoplanets may play a key role in the formation of prebiotic molecules, necessary to the origin of life. Dust grains submerged in an atmospheric plasma become negatively charged and attract a flux of ions that are accelerated from the plasma. The energy of the ions upon reaching the grain surface may be sufficient to overcome the activation energy of particular chemical reactions that would be unattainable via ion and neutral bombardment from classical, thermal excitation. As a result, prebiotic molecules or their precursors could be synthesised on the surface of dust grains that form clouds in exoplanetary atmospheres. This paper investigates the energization of the plasma ions, and the dependence on the plasma electron temperature, in the atmospheres of substellar objects such as gas giant planets. Calculations show that modest electron temperatures of $\\approx 1$ eV ($\\approx 10^{4}$ K) are enough to accelerate ions to sufficient energies that exceed the activation...

  6. The THS experiment: Simulating Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature (200 K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen T.; Beauchamp, Jack L.; Salama, Farid

    2016-10-01

    In the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, Titan's atmospheric chemistry is simulated by plasma discharge in the stream of a supersonic expansion, i.e. at low Titan-like temperature (150 K). Here, we present complementary gas and solid phase analyses of four N2-CH4-based gas mixtures that demonstrate the unique capability of the THS to monitor the chemical growth evolution in order to better understand Titan's chemistry and the origin of aerosol formation.

  7. Seasonal changes in Titan's middle-atmosphere chemistry and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Nixon, C. A.; de Kok, R.; Vinatier, S.; Coustenis, A.; Sefton-Nash, E.; Calcutt, S. B.; Flasar, F. M.

    2013-09-01

    Titan is the largest satellite of Saturn and is the only moon in our solar system with a significant atmo- sphere. Titan's middle-atmosphere (stratosphere and mesosphere) circulation usually comprises a single hemisphere to hemisphere meridional circulation cell, with upwelling air in the summer hemisphere and sub- siding air at the winter pole with an associated winter polar vortex. Titan has an axial tilt (obliquity) of 26.7°, so during its 29.5 Earth year annual cycle pronounced seasonal effects are encountered as the relative solar insolation in each hemisphere changes. The most dramatic of these changes is the reversal in global meridional circulation as the peak solar heating switches hemispheres after an equinox. Titan's northern spring equinox occurred in August 2009, and since then many middle-atmosphere changes have been observed by Cassini that were previously impossible to study (1,2,3,4). Here we present a detailed analysis of the post equinox changes in middle-atmosphere temperature and composition measured with Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS), use these to infer changes in atmospheric circulation, and explore implications for atmospheric photochemical and dynamical processes. Our results show that the meridional circulation has now reversed (1).

  8. The role of computational chemistry in the science and measurements of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    The role of computational chemistry in determining the stability, photochemistry, spectroscopic parameters, and parameters for estimating reaction rates of atmospheric constituents is discussed. Examples dealing with the photolysis cross sections of HOCl and (1 Delta g) O2 and with the stability of gaseous NH4Cl and asymmetric ClO3 are presented. It is concluded that computational chemistry can play an important role in the study of atmospheric constituents, particularly reactive and short-lived species which are difficult to investigate experimentally.

  9. Strong atmospheric chemistry feedback to climate warming from Arctic methane emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Ivar S.A.; Gauss, Michael; Myhre, Gunnar; Walter Anthony, Katey M.; Ruppel, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    The magnitude and feedbacks of future methane release from the Arctic region are unknown. Despite limited documentation of potential future releases associated with thawing permafrost and degassing methane hydrates, the large potential for future methane releases calls for improved understanding of the interaction of a changing climate with processes in the Arctic and chemical feedbacks in the atmosphere. Here we apply a “state of the art” atmospheric chemistry transport model to show that large emissions of CH4 would likely have an unexpectedly large impact on the chemical composition of the atmosphere and on radiative forcing (RF). The indirect contribution to RF of additional methane emission is particularly important. It is shown that if global methane emissions were to increase by factors of 2.5 and 5.2 above current emissions, the indirect contributions to RF would be about 250% and 400%, respectively, of the RF that can be attributed to directly emitted methane alone. Assuming several hypothetical scenarios of CH4 release associated with permafrost thaw, shallow marine hydrate degassing, and submarine landslides, we find a strong positive feedback on RF through atmospheric chemistry. In particular, the impact of CH4 is enhanced through increase of its lifetime, and of atmospheric abundances of ozone, stratospheric water vapor, and CO2 as a result of atmospheric chemical processes. Despite uncertainties in emission scenarios, our results provide a better understanding of the feedbacks in the atmospheric chemistry that would amplify climate warming.

  10. High Performance Nitrous Oxide Analyzer for Atmospheric Research Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project targets the development of a highly sensitive gas sensor to monitor atmospheric nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide is an important species in Earth science...

  11. Inorganic chemistry of O2 in a dense primitive atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenqvist, J; Chassefière, E

    1995-01-01

    A simple steady-state photochemical model is developed in order to determine typical molecular oxygen concentrations for a comprehensive range of primitive abiotic atmospheres. Carbon dioxide is assumed to be the dominant constituent in these atmospheres since CO2 photodissociation may potentially result in the enhancement of the O2 partial pressure. The respective effects of the H2O content, temperature, eddy diffusion coefficient and UV flux on the results are investigated. It is shown that for any pressure at the surface, the partial pressure of molecular oxygen does not exceed 10 mbar. The peculiar case of a runaway greenhouse which has possibly taken place on Venus is qualitatively envisaged. Although O2 is basically absent in the present Venus atmosphere, a transient presence in a primitive stage cannot be ruled out. Possible mechanisms for O2 removal in such an atmosphere are reviewed. At the present stage, we think that the detection of large O2 amounts would be at least a good clue for the presence of life on an extrasolar planet.

  12. Isoprene nitrates: preparation, separation, identification, yields, and atmospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Lockwood

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Isoprene is an important atmospheric volatile organic compound involved in ozone production and NOx (NO+NO2 sequestration and transport. Isoprene reaction with OH in the presence of NO can form either isoprene hydroxy nitrates ("isoprene nitrates" or convert NO to NO2 which can photolyze to form ozone. While it has been shown that isoprene nitrate production can represent an important sink for NOx in forest impacted environments, there is little experimental knowledge of the relative importance of the individual isoprene nitrate isomers, each of which has a different fate and reactivity. In this work, we have identified the 8 individual isomers and determined their total and individual production yields. The overall yield of isoprene nitrates at atmospheric pressure and 295 K was found to be 0.070(+0.025/−0.015. Three isomers, representing nitrates resulting from OH addition to a terminal carbon, represent 90% of the total IN yield. We also determined the ozone rate constants for three of the isomers, and have calculated their atmospheric lifetimes, which range from ~1–2 h, making their oxidation products likely more important as atmospheric organic nitrates and sinks for nitrogen.

  13. Isoprene nitrates: preparation, separation, identification, yields, and atmospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Lockwood

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Isoprene is an important atmospheric volatile organic compound involved in ozone production and NOx (NO+NO2 sequestration and transport. Isoprene reaction with OH in the presence of NO can form either isoprene nitrates or convert NO to NO2 which can photolyze to form ozone. While it has been shown that isoprene nitrate production can represent an important sink for NOx in forest impacted environments, there is little experimental knowledge of the relative importance of the individual isoprene nitrate isomers, each of which has a different fate and reactivity. In this work, we have identified the 8 individual isomers and determined their total and individual production yields. The overall yield of isoprene nitrates at atmospheric pressure and 295 K was found to be 0.070(+0.025/–0.015. Three isomers, the (4,3-IN, (1,2-IN and Z-(4,1-IN represent 90% of the total IN yield. We also determined the ozone rate constants for three of the isomers, and have calculated their atmospheric lifetimes, which range from ~1–2 h, making their oxidation products likely more important as atmospheric organic nitrates and sinks for nitrogen.

  14. Advances in atmospheric chemistry modeling: the LLNL impact tropospheric/stratospheric chemistry model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotman, D A; Atherton, C

    1999-10-07

    We present a unique modeling capability to understand the global distribution of trace gases and aerosols throughout both the troposphere and stratosphere. It includes the ability to simulate tropospheric chemistry that occurs both in the gas phase as well as on the surfaces of solid particles. We have used this capability to analyze observations from particular flight campaigns as well as averaged observed data. Results show the model to accurately simulate the complex chemistry occurring near the tropopause and throughout the troposphere and stratosphere.

  15. A photochemical reactor for studies of atmospheric chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Elna Johanna Kristina; Eskebjerg, Carsten; Johnson, Matthew Stanley

    2009-01-01

    A photochemical reactor for studies of atmospheric kinetics and spectroscopy has been built at the Copenhagen Center for Atmospheric Research. The reactor consists of a vacuum FTIR spectrometer coupled to a 100 L quartz cylinder by multipass optics mounted on electropolished stainless steel end...... for OH, 3 106 cm3 for O(1D), 3.3 1010 cm3 for O(3P) and 1.6 1012 cm3 for Cl. The reactor can be operated at pressures from 103 to 103 mbar and temperatures from 240 to 330 K. As a test of the system we have studied the reaction CHCl3 þ Cl using the relative rate technique and find kCHCl3þCl/ kCH4þCl ¼ 1...

  16. On the atmospheric chemistry of NO2 - O3 systems; a laboratory study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhees, P.W.C.

    1986-01-01

    In this dissertation a laboratory study dealing with the atmospheric chemistry of NO 2 -O 3 systems is described. Knowledge of this system is relevant for a better understanding of a number of air pollution problems, particularly th

  17. Modelling iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol: Contributions of inorganic and organic iodine chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pechtl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The speciation of iodine in atmospheric aerosol is currently poorly understood. Models predict negligible iodide concentrations but accumulation of iodate in aerosol, both of which is not confirmed by recent measurements. We present an updated aqueous phase iodine chemistry scheme for use in atmospheric chemistry models and discuss sensitivity studies with the marine boundary layer model MISTRA. These studies show that iodate can be reduced in acidic aerosol by inorganic reactions, i.e., iodate does not necessarily accumulate in particles. Furthermore, the transformation of particulate iodide to volatile iodine species likely has been overestimated in previous model studies due to negligence of collision-induced upper limits for the reaction rates. However, inorganic reaction cycles still do not seem to be sufficient to reproduce the observed range of iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol. Therefore, we also investigate the effects of the recently suggested reaction of HOI with dissolved organic matter to produce iodide. If this reaction is fast enough to compete with the inorganic mechanism, it would not only directly lead to enhanced iodide concentrations but, indirectly via speed-up of the inorganic iodate reduction cycles, also to a decrease in iodate concentrations. Hence, according to our model studies, organic iodine chemistry, combined with inorganic reaction cycles, is able to reproduce observations. The presented chemistry cycles are highly dependent on pH and thus offer an explanation for the large observed variability of the iodide – iodate speciation in atmospheric aerosol.

  18. On the numerical treatment of problems in atmospheric chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aro, Colin J. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Atmospheric chemical-radiative-transport (CRT) models are vital in performing research on atmospheric chemical change. Even with the enormous computing capability delivered by massively parallel systems, extended three dimensional CRT simulations are still not computationally feasible. The major obstacle in a CRT model is the nonlinear ODE system describing the chemical kinetics in the model. These ODE systems are usually very stiff and account for anywhere from 75% to 90% of the CPU time required to run a CRT model. In this study, a simple explicit class of time stepping method is developed and demonstrated to be useful in treating chemical ODE systems without the use of a Jacobian matrix. These methods, called preconditioned time differencing methods, are tested on small mathematically idealized problems, box model problems, and full 2-D and 3-D CRT models. The methods are found to be both fast and memory efficient. Studies are performed on both vector and parallel systems. The preconditioned time differencing methods are established as a viable alternative to the more common backward differentiation formulas in terms of CPU speed across architectural platforms.

  19. Aerosol formation and heterogeneous chemistry in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Y.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A general presentation of the Earth’s atmosphere is provided, with the associated photochemical processes and oxidizing capacity. The article focuses on the atmospheric reactivity of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs and the associated reaction products in the gas phase (ozone, oxygenated organic compounds, organic nitrates … and in the particle phase, namely, the Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA. The understanding of the processes leading to SOA formation is currently a “hot topic” because of: i their high concentrations in the measured total organic matter, and ii their potential important impacts on health and climate change. The initial theory of SOA formation was based on thermodynamic phase transfers of oxidized reaction products of VOCs, but it failed to explain the presence of high molecular weight (high-MW compounds observed in SOA as well as a 1 to 2 orders of magnitude discrepancy between models and observations on the quantity of SOA. Therefore, different research investigations have been proposed such as heterogeneous and aqueous phase reactivity of organic compounds.

  20. Bunsen conference 1999. Atmospheric physical chemistry; Bunsentagung 1999. Physikalische Chemie der Atmosphaere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crutzen, P.J.; Zellner, R. [comps.

    2000-07-01

    The main subject of the 1999 Bunsen conference was atmospheric physical chemistry. There were lectures and posters on measurement and distribution of atmospheric trace gases, photochemical reactions in the different parts of the atmosphere, natural and anthropogenic emissions resulting from biomass combustion, thermodynamics and microphysics of aerosol, and air pollution abatement. [German] Die Bunsentagung 1999 beschaeftigte sich mit dem Thema Physikalische Chemie der Atmosphaere. Themen der Vortraege und Poster waren u.a. die Messung und Verteilung von Spurengasen in der Atmosphaere, photochemische Reaktionen in den verschiedenen Schichten der Atmosphaere, natuerliche und anthropogene Emissionen durch Verbrennung von Biomasse, Thermodynamik und Microphysik von Aerosolen und Klimaschutz.

  1. Spiers Memorial Lecture. Introductory lecture: chemistry in the urban atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltensperger, Urs

    2016-07-18

    The urban atmosphere is characterised by a multitude of complex processes. Gaseous and particulate components are continuously emitted into the atmosphere from many different sources. These components are then dispersed in the urban atmosphere via turbulent mixing. Numerous chemical reactions modify the gas phase chemistry on multiple time scales, producing secondary pollutants. Through partitioning, the chemical and physical properties of the aerosol particles are also constantly changing as a consequence of dispersion and gas phase chemistry. This review presents an overview of the involved processes, focusing on the contributions presented at this conference and putting them into a broader context. Advanced methods for aerosol source apportionment are presented as well, followed by some aspects of health effects related to air pollution.

  2. Trends in Mesospheric Dynamics and Chemistry: Simulations With a Model of the Entire Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, G. P.

    2005-05-01

    The cooling resulting from infrared CO2 radiative transfer is a major contribution to the energy budget of the middle atmosphere and thermosphere. The rapid increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration resulting from anthropogenic emissions is therefore expected to lead, in general, to a substantial cooling in this height range. This can potentially be counteracted by heating due to absorption of near infrared radiation by CO2. Changes in ozone as a consequence of increasing methane and water vapor may also have an impact on the energy budget as dynamical changes caused by increased tropospheric temperatures. By means of numerical simulations with a general circulation and chemistry model of the entire atmosphere we will address the following questions: 1.) Can state-of-the-art atmospheric modeling explain the mesospheric temperature trends observed during the last decades? 2.)Which part of the temperature changes resulting from an increase of atmospheric CO2 is caused by local changes in the radiative budget and which part is influenced by remote dynamical effects? The model used is the newly developed Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere (HAMMONIA) that resolves the atmosphere from the Earth's surface up to about 250 km altitude, and is based on the 3-D dynamics from the ECHAM5 general circulation model and the chemistry scheme from MOZART-3. Results from different time slice experiment representative of years 1970 and 2000, and for a doubling of CO2 will be presented.

  3. Making a Natural Product Chemistry Course Meaningful with a Mini Project Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Aliefman; Liliasari; Kadarohman, Asep; Syah, Yana Maolana

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses laboratory activities that can improve the meaningfulness of natural product chemistry course. These laboratory activities can be useful for students from many different disciplines including chemistry, pharmacy, and medicine. Students at the third-year undergraduate level of chemistry education undertake the project to…

  4. Science Project Ideas about Kitchen Chemistry. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Robert

    This book presents science experiments that can be conducted in the kitchen. Contents include: (1) "Safety First"; (2) "Chemistry in and Near the Kitchen Sink"; (3) "Chemistry in the Refrigerator"; (4) "Chemistry on the Stove"; (5) "Chemistry on the Kitchen Counter"; and (6) "Further Reading and Internet Addresses." (YDS)

  5. NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this DOE Cooperative Agreement is to conduct a cost-shared clean coal technology project to demonstrate the feasibility of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology and to evaluate economic, environmental, and operational benefits of CFB steam generators on a utility scale. At the conclusion of the Phase 2 program, testing related to satisfying these objectives was completed. Data analysis and reporting are scheduled for completion by October 1991. (VC)

  6. Understanding Differences in Chemistry Climate Model Projections of Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) are used to project future evolution of stratospheric ozone as concentrations of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) decrease and greenhouse gases increase, cooling the stratosphere. CCM projections exhibit not only many common features but also a broad range of values for quantities such as year of ozone return to 1980 and global ozone level at the end of the 21st century. Multiple linear regression is applied to each of 14 CCMs to separate ozone response to ODS concentration change from that due to climate change. We show that the sensitivity of lower stratospheric ozone to chlorine change Delta Ozone/Delta inorganic chlorine is a near-linear function of partitioning of total inorganic chlorine into its reservoirs; both inorganic chlorine and its partitioning are largely controlled by lower stratospheric transport. CCMs with best performance on transport diagnostics agree with observations for chlorine reservoirs and produce similar ozone responses to chlorine change. After 2035, differences in Delta Ozone/Delta inorganic chlorine contribute little to the spread in CCM projections as the anthropogenic contribution to inorganic chlorine becomes unimportant. Differences among upper stratospheric ozone increases due to temperature decreases are explained by differences in ozone sensitivity to temperature change Delta Ozone/Delta T due to different contributions from various ozone loss processes, each with its own temperature dependence. Ozone decrease in the tropical lower stratosphere caused by a projected speedup in the Brewer-Dobson circulation may or may not be balanced by ozone increases in the middle- and high-latitude lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. This balance, or lack thereof, contributes most to the spread in late 21st century projections.

  7. Trends in the chemistry of atmospheric deposition and surface waters in the Lake Maggiore catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rogora

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lake Maggiore catchment is the area of Italy most affected by acid deposition. Trend analysis was performed on long-term (15-30 years series of chemical analyses of atmospheric deposition, four small rivers draining forested catchments and four high mountain lakes. An improvement in the quality of atmospheric deposition was detected, due to decreasing sulphate concentration and increasing pH. Similar trends were also found in high mountain lakes and in small rivers. Atmospheric deposition, however, is still providing a large and steady flux of nitrogen compounds (nitrate and ammonium which is causing increasing nitrogen saturation in forest ecosystems and increasing nitrate levels in rivers. Besides atmospheric deposition, an important factor controlling water acidification and recovery is the weathering of rocks and soils which may be influenced by climate warming. A further factor is the episodic deposition of Saharan calcareous dust which contributes significantly to base cation deposition. Keywords: trend, atmospheric deposition, nitrogen, stream water chemistry.

  8. SIOUX project: a simultaneous multiband camera for exoplanet atmospheres studies

    CERN Document Server

    Christille, Jean Marc; Borsa, Francesco; Busonero, Deborah; Calcidese, Paolo; Claudi, Riccardo; Damasso, Mario; Giacobbe, Paolo; Molinari, Emilio; Pace, Emanuele; Riva, Alberto; Sozzetti, Alessandro; Toso, Giorgio; Tresoldi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The exoplanet revolution is well underway. The last decade has seen order-of-magnitude increases in the number of known planets beyond the Solar system. Detailed characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres provide the best means for distinguishing the makeup of their outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition chemistry, temperature-pressure atmospheric profiles, dynamics and circulation. While pioneering work on the observational side has produced the first important detections of atmospheric molecules for the class of transiting exoplanets, important limitations are still present due to the lack of sys- tematic, repeated measurements with optimized instrumentation at both visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. It is thus of fundamental importance to explore quantitatively possible avenues for improvements. In this paper we report initial results of a feasibility study for the prototype of a versatile multi-band imaging system for very high-precisi...

  9. A dynamic model reduction algorithm for atmospheric chemistry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillana, Mauricio; Le Sager, Philippe; Jacob, Daniel J.; Brenner, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the chemical composition of our atmosphere is essential to address a wide range of environmental issues from air quality to climate change. Current models solve a very large and stiff system of nonlinear advection-reaction coupled partial differential equations in order to calculate the time evolution of the concentration of over a hundred chemical species. The numerical solution of this system of equations is difficult and the development of efficient and accurate techniques to achieve this has inspired research for the past four decades. In this work, we propose an adaptive method that dynamically adjusts the chemical mechanism to be solved to the local environment and we show that the use of our approach leads to accurate results and considerable computational savings. Our strategy consists of partitioning the computational domain in active and inactive regions for each chemical species at every time step. In a given grid-box, the concentration of active species is calculated using an accurate numerical scheme, whereas the concentration of inactive species is calculated using a simple and computationally inexpensive formula. We demonstrate the performance of the method by application to the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model.

  10. Heterogeneous chemistry and reaction dynamics of the atmospheric oxidants, O3, NO3, and OH, on organic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Chapleski, Robert C.; Zhang, Yafen; Troya, Diego; Morris, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of the most important atmospheric oxidants, O3, NO3, and OH, plays a central role in regulating atmospheric gas concentrations, processing aerosols, and aging materials. Recent experimental and computational studies have begun to reveal the detailed reaction mechanisms and kinetics for gas-phase O3, NO3, and OH when they impinge on organic surfaces. Through new research approaches that merge the fields of traditional surface science with atmospheric chemistry, research...

  11. Non-OH chemistry in oxidation flow reactors for the study of atmospheric chemistry systematically examined by modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Peng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs using low-pressure Hg lamp emission at 185 and 254 nm produce OH radicals efficiently and are widely used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. However, knowledge of detailed OFR chemistry is limited, allowing speculation in the literature about whether some non-OH reactants, including several not relevant for tropospheric chemistry, may play an important role in these OFRs. These non-OH reactants are UV radiation, O(1D, O(3P, and O3. In this study, we investigate the relative importance of other reactants to OH for the fate of reactant species in OFR under a wide range of conditions via box modeling. The relative importance of non-OH species is less sensitive to UV light intensity than to relative humidity (RH and external OH reactivity (OHRext, as both non-OH reactants and OH scale roughly proportional to UV intensity. We show that for field studies in forested regions and also the urban area of Los Angeles, reactants of atmospheric interest are predominantly consumed by OH. We find that O(1D, O(3P, and O3 have relative contributions to VOC consumption that are similar or lower than in the troposphere. The impact of O atoms can be neglected under most conditions in both OFR and troposphere. Under "pathological OFR conditions" of low RH and/or high OHRext, the importance of non-OH reactants is enhanced because OH is suppressed. Some biogenics can have substantial destructions by O3, and photolysis at non-tropospheric wavelengths (185 and 254 nm may also play a significant role in the degradation of some aromatics under pathological conditions. Working under low O2 with the OFR185 mode allows OH to completely dominate over O3 reactions even for the biogenic species most reactive with O3. Non-tropospheric VOC photolysis may have been a problem in some laboratory and source studies, but can be avoided or lessened in future studies by diluting source emissions and working at lower precursor concentrations in lab

  12. Variational fine-grained data assimilation schemes for atmospheric chemistry transport and transformation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, Alexey; Penenko, Vladimir; Tsvetova, Elena

    2015-04-01

    The paper concerns data assimilation problem for an atmospheric chemistry transport and transformation models. Data assimilation is carried out within variation approach on a single time step of the approximated model. A control function is introduced into the model source term (emission rate) to provide flexibility to adjust to data. This function is evaluated as the minimum of the target functional combining control function norm to a misfit between measured and model-simulated analog of data. This provides a flow-dependent and physically-plausible structure of the resulting analysis and reduces the need to calculate model error covariance matrices that are sought within conventional approach to data assimilation. Extension of the atmospheric transport model with a chemical transformations module influences data assimilation algorithms performance. This influence is investigated with numerical experiments for different meteorological conditions altering convection-diffusion processes characteristics, namely strong, medium and low wind conditions. To study the impact of transformation and data assimilation, we compare results for a convection-diffusion model (without data assimilation), convection-diffusion with assimilation, convection-diffusion-reaction (without data assimilation) and convection-diffusion-reaction-assimilation models. Both high dimensionalities of the atmospheric chemistry models and a real-time mode of operation demand for computational efficiency of the algorithms. Computational issues with complicated models can be solved by using a splitting technique. As the result a model is presented as a set of relatively independent simple models equipped with a kind of coupling procedure. With regard to data assimilation two approaches can be identified. In a fine-grained approach data assimilation is carried out on the separate splitting stages [1,2] independently on shared measurement data. The same situation arises when constructing a hybrid model

  13. Interconnection of reactive oxygen species chemistry across the interfaces of atmospheric, environmental, and biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Josep M; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Francisco, Joseph S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-03-17

    Oxidation reactions are ubiquitous and play key roles in the chemistry of the atmosphere, in water treatment processes, and in aerobic organisms. Ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydrogen polyoxides (H2Ox, x > 2), associated hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals (HOx = OH and HO2), and superoxide and ozonide anions (O2(-) and O3(-), respectively) are the primary oxidants in these systems. They are commonly classified as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Atmospheric chemistry is driven by a complex system of chain reactions of species, including nitrogen oxides, hydroxyl and hydroperoxide radicals, alkoxy and peroxy radicals, and ozone. HOx radicals contribute to keeping air clean, but in polluted areas, the ozone concentration increases and creates a negative impact on plants and animals. Indeed, ozone concentration is used to assess air quality worldwide. Clouds have a direct effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. On one hand, cloud droplets absorb many trace atmospheric gases, which can be scavenged by rain and fog. On the other hand, ionic species can form in this medium, which makes the chemistry of the atmosphere richer and more complex. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that air-cloud interfaces might have a significant impact on the overall chemistry of the troposphere. Despite the large differences in molecular composition, concentration, and thermodynamic conditions among atmospheric, environmental, and biological systems, the underlying chemistry involving ROS has many similarities. In this Account, we examine ROS and discuss the chemical characteristics common to all of these systems. In water treatment, ROS are key components of an important subset of advanced oxidation processes. Ozonation, peroxone chemistry, and Fenton reactions play important roles in generating sufficient amounts of hydroxyl radicals to purify wastewater. Biochemical processes within living organisms also involve ROS. These species can come from pollutants in

  14. A New Project-Based Lab for Undergraduate Environmental and Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Gianpiero

    2006-01-01

    A new project-based lab was developed for third year undergraduate chemistry students based on real world applications. The experience suggests that the total analytical procedure (TAP) project offers a stimulating alternative for delivering science skills and developing a greater interest for analytical chemistry and environmental sciences and…

  15. Atmospheric chemistry of carboxylic acids: microbial implication versus photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaïtilingom, M.; Charbouillot, T.; Deguillaume, L.; Maisonobe, R.; Parazols, M.; Amato, P.; Sancelme, M.; Delort, A.-M.

    2011-02-01

    Clouds are multiphasic atmospheric systems in which the dissolved organic compounds, dominated by carboxylic acids, are subject to multiple chemical transformations in the aqueous phase. Among them, solar radiation, by generating hydroxyl radicals (•OH), is considered as the main catalyzer of the reactivity of organic species in clouds. We investigated to which extent the active biomass existing in cloud water represents an alternative route to the chemical reactivity of carboxylic acids. Pure cultures of seventeen bacterial strains (Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Clavibacter, Frigoribacterium, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas and Rhodococcus), previously isolated from cloud water and representative of the viable community of clouds were first individually incubated in two artificial bulk cloud water solutions at 17 °C and 5 °C. These solutions mimicked the chemical composition of cloud water from "marine" and "continental" air masses, and contained the major carboxylic acids existing in the cloud water (i.e. acetate, formate, succinate and oxalate). The concentrations of these carboxylic compounds were monitored over time and biodegradation rates were determined. In average, they ranged from 2 ×10-19 for succinate to 1 × 10-18 mol cell-1 s-1 for formate at 17 °C and from 4 × 10-20 for succinate to 6 × 10-19 mol cell-1 s-1 for formate at 5 °C, with no significant difference between "marine" and "continental" media. In parallel, irradiation experiments were also conducted in these two artificial media to compare biodegradation and photodegradation of carboxylic compounds. To complete this comparison, the photodegradation rates of carboxylic acids by •OH radicals were calculated from literature data. Inferred estimations suggested a significant participation of microbes to the transformation of carboxylic acids in cloud water, particularly for acetate and succinate (up to 90%). Furthermore, a natural cloud water sample was incubated (including its indigenous microflora

  16. Ionization chemistry in the H2O-dominant atmospheres of the icy moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shematovich, V. I.; Johnson, R. E.

    2007-08-01

    The main pathways of the ionization chemistry for pure H2O- and mixed H2O+O2+CO2+NH3+CH4 atmospheres which are representative for neutral and ionized atmospheres of the icy bodies in the Jovian and Saturnian systems are discussed. The gaseous envelopes of the icy moons of the giant planets are formed usually due to the surface radiolysis by the solar UV radiation and energetic magnetospheric plasma (Johnson, 1990). The standard astrochemical UMIST2005 (UDFA05) network is used to infer the main chemical pathways of ionization chemistry in the pure or with admixtures of other volatile molecules water vapor atmospheres. In case of the H2O- dominant atmosphere the parent H2O molecules are easily dissociated and ionized by the solar UVradiation and the energetic magnetospheric electrons. These impact processes result in the formation of the secondary neutral and ionized products - chemically active radicals O and OH, and H+, H2+, O+, OH+, and H2O+ ions. Secondary ions have admixture abundances in the H2O-dominant atmospheres, because they are efficiently transformed to H3O+ hydroxonium ions in the fast ion-molecular reactions. The major H3O+ hydroxonium ion does not chemically interact with other neutrals, and is destroyed in the dissociative recombination with thermal electrons mainly reproducing the chemically simple H, H2, O, and OH species. In case of the mixed H2O+O2-dominant atmosphere corresponding to the near-surface atmospheres of icy moons (Shematovich et al., 2005), the ionization chemistry results in the formation of the second major ion O2+ - because ion of molecular oxygen has the lower ionization potential comparing with other parent species -H2, H2O, CO2. The H+, O+, OH+, and H2O+ ions can be easily converted to O2+ ions through the ion-molecular reactions. In case of significant admixture of molecular hydrogen it is possible to transfer the O2+ ions to the O2H+ ions through the fast reaction with H2 and further to the H3O+ ions through the ion

  17. Role of excited CF3CFHO radicals in the atmospheric chemistry of HFC-134a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallington, T.J.; Hurley, M.D.; Fracheboud, J.M.;

    1996-01-01

    CFHO* radicals limits the formation of CF3C(O)F and hence CF3COOH in the atmospheric degradation of HFC-134a. We estimate that the CF3COOH yield from atmospheric oxidation of HFC-134a is 7-20%. Vibrationally excited alkoxy radicals may play an important role in the atmospheric chemistry of other...

  18. Investigating Titan's Atmospheric Chemistry at Low Temperature with the Titan Haze Simulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, E. M.; Salama, F.

    2012-12-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, possesses a dense atmosphere (1.5 bar at the surface) composed mainly of N2 and CH4. The solar radiation and electron bombardment from Saturn's magnetosphere induces a complex organic chemistry between these two constituents leading to the production of more complex molecules and subsequently to solid aerosols. These aerosols in suspension in the atmosphere form the haze layers giving Titan its characteristic orange color. Since 2004, the instruments onboard the Cassini orbiter have produced large amounts of observational data, unraveling a chemistry much more complex than what was first expected, particularly in Titan's upper atmosphere. Neutral, positively and negatively charged heavy molecules have been detected in the ionosphere of Titan, including benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C6H5CH3). The presence of these critical precursors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds suggests that PAHs might play a role in the production of Titan's aerosols. The aim of the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC facility, is to study the chemical pathways that link the simple molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (PANHs) as precursors to the production of solid aerosols. In the THS experiment, Titan's atmospheric chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas mixture is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma discharge. Due to the short residence time of the gas in the plasma discharge, the THS experiment can be used to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan's chemistry by injecting different gas mixtures in the plasma. The products of the chemistry are detected and studied using two complementary techniques: Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy and Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry. Thin tholin deposits are also produced

  19. The impact of atmospheric circulation on the chemistry of the hot Jupiter HD 209458b

    CERN Document Server

    Agundez, M; Iro, N; Selsis, F; Hersant, F; Hebrard, E; Dobrijevic, M

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the effects of atmospheric circulation on the chemistry of the hot Jupiter HD 209458b. We use a simplified dynamical model and a robust chemical network, as opposed to previous studies which have used a three dimensional circulation model coupled to a simple chemical kinetics scheme. The temperature structure and distribution of the main atmospheric constituents are calculated in the limit of an atmosphere that rotates as a solid body with an equatorial rotation rate of 1 km/s. Such motion mimics a uniform zonal wind which resembles the equatorial superrotation structure found by three dimensional circulation models. The uneven heating of this tidally locked planet causes, even in the presence of such a strong zonal wind, large temperature contrasts between the dayside and nightside, of up to 800 K. This would result in important longitudinal variations of some molecular abundances if the atmosphere were at chemical equilibrium. The zonal wind, however, acts as a powerful disequilibrium process...

  20. Clouds and Chemistry Brown Dwarf Atmospheric Properties from Optical and Infrared Colors

    CERN Document Server

    Marley, M S; Saumon, D S; Lodders, K; Ackerman, A S; Freedman, R

    2001-01-01

    The optical and infrared colors of L and T dwarfs are sensitive to cloud sedimentation and chemical processes in their atmospheres. In particular the J-K color of a cooling brown dwarf is sensitive to the vertical distribution of condensates in its atmosphere. Only atmosphere models which include sedimentation of condensates are able to reproduce the observed trends in J-K in which objects first become redder, then bluer with falling effective temperature. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey color i'-z' is sensitive to assumptions surrounding the alkali metal chemistry. Chemical equilibrium models which account for cloud sedimentation predict redder colors, by up to 2 magnitudes, than models which neglect sedimentation. The i'-z' vs. J-K color-color diagram is thus interesting for the window it opens into diverse atmospheric processes. In addition, we predict the locus in this color-color diagram of brown dwarfs cooler than yet found.

  1. Management of the Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Monsi; Perry, Jay; Howard, David

    2013-01-01

    The Advanced Exploration Systems Program's Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project is working to further optimize atmosphere revitalization and environmental monitoring system architectures. This paper discusses project management strategies that tap into skill sets across multiple engineering disciplines, projects, field centers, and industry to achieve the project success. It is the project's objective to contribute to system advances that will enable sustained exploration missions beyond Lower Earth Orbit (LEO) and improve affordability by focusing on the primary goals of achieving high reliability, improving efficiency, and reducing dependence on ground-based logistics resupply. Technology demonstrations are achieved by infusing new technologies and concepts with existing developmental hardware and operating in a controlled environment simulating various crewed habitat scenarios. The ARREM project's strengths include access to a vast array of existing developmental hardware that perform all the vital atmosphere revitalization functions, exceptional test facilities to fully evaluate system performance, and a well-coordinated partnering effort among the NASA field centers and industry partners to provide the innovative expertise necessary to succeed.

  2. The THS Experiment: Simulating Titans Atmospheric Chemistry at Low Temperature (200K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen; Beauchamp, Jack L.; Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar Sanchez; Bejaoui, Salma; Foing, Bernard; Pascale, Ehrenfreund

    2015-01-01

    In Titan's atmosphere, composed mainly of N2 (95-98%) and CH4 (2-5%), a complex chemistry occurs at low temperature, and leads to the production of heavy organic molecules and subsequently solid aerosols. Here, we used the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, an experimental setup developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC simulation facility to study Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is cooled to Titan-like temperature ( approximately 150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma discharge (approximately 200K). Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of heavier precursors present as trace elements on Titan, in order to monitor the evolution of the chemical growth. Both the gas- and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed using a combination of complementary in situ and ex situ diagnostics. A recent mass spectrometry[1] study of the gas phase has demonstrated that the THS is a unique tool to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at Titan-like temperature. In particular, the mass spectra obtained in a N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 mixture are relevant for comparison to Cassini's CAPS-IBS instrument. The results of a complementary study of the solid phase are consistent with the chemical growth evolution observed in the gas phase. Grains and aggregates form in the gas phase and can be jet deposited on various substrates for ex situ analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy images show that more complex mixtures produce larger aggregates. A mass spectrometry analysis of the solid phase has detected the presence of aminoacetonitrile, a precursor of glycine, in the THS aerosols. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements also show the presence of imine

  3. The THS: Simulating Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen T.; Beauchamp, Jack L.; Salama, Farid

    2015-08-01

    In Titan’s atmosphere, composed mainly of N2 (95-98%) and CH4 (2-5%), a complex chemistry occurs at low temperature, and leads to the production of heavy organic molecules and subsequently solid aerosols. Here, we used the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, an experimental setup developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC simulation facility to study Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma discharge (~200K). Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of heavier precursors present as trace elements on Titan, in order to monitor the evolution of the chemical growth. Both the gas- and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed using a combination of complementary in situ and ex situ diagnostics.A recent mass spectrometry study of the gas phase has demonstrated that the THS is a unique tool to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at Titan-like temperature. In particular, the mass spectra obtained in a N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 mixture are relevant for comparison to Cassini’s CAPS-IBS instrument. The results of a complementary study of the solid phase are consistent with the chemical growth evolution observed in the gas phase. Grains and aggregates form in the gas phase and can be jet deposited on various substrates for ex situ analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy images show that more complex mixtures produce larger aggregates. A DART mass spectrometry analysis of the solid phase has detected the presence of aminoacetonitrile, a precursor of glycine, in the THS aerosols. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements also show the presence of imine and nitrile

  4. An Extended View of Ozone and Chemistry in the Atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ramsey L.; Fast, Kelly E.; Kostiuk, T.; Lefevre, Frank; Hewagama, Tilak; Livengood, Timothy A.

    2011-01-01

    We present an ongoing effort to characterize chemistry in Mars' atmosphere in multiple seasons on timescales longer than spaceflight missions through coordinated efforts by GSFC's HIPWAC spectrometer and Mars Express SPICAM, archival measurements, and tests/application of photochemical models. The trace species ozone (03) is an effective probe of Mars' atmospheric chemistry because it is destroyed by odd-hydrogen species (HOx, from water vapor photolysis). Observed ozone is a critical test for specific predictions by 3-D photochemical models (spatial, diurnal, seasonal). Coordinated measurements by HIPWAC and SPICAM quantitatively linked mission data to the 23-year GSFC ozone data record and also revealed unanticipated inter-decadal variability of same-season ozone abundances, a possible indicator of changing cloud activity (heterogeneous sink for HOx). A detailed study of long-term conditions is critical to characterizing the predictability of Mars' seasonal chemical behavior, particularly in light of the implications of and the lack of explanation for reported methane behavior.

  5. Chemistry and Climate in Asia - An Earth System Modeling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, M. C.; Emmons, L. K.; Massie, S. T.; Pfister, G.; Romero Lankao, P.; Lamarque, J.; Carmichael, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    Asia is one of the most highly populated and economically dynamic regions in the world, with much of the population located in growing mega-cities. It is a region with significant emissions of greenhouse gases, aerosols and other pollutants, which pose high health risks to urban populations. Emissions of these aerosols and gases increased drastically over the last decade due to economic growth and urbanization and are expected to rise further in the near future. As such, the continent plays a role in influencing climate change via its effluent of aerosols and gaseous pollutants. Asia is also susceptible to adverse climate change through interactions between aerosols and clouds, which potentially can have serious implications for freshwater resources. We are developing an integrated inter-disciplinary program to focus on Asia, its climate, air quality, and impact on humans that will include connections with hydrology, ecosystems, extreme weather events, and human health. The primary goal of this project is to create a team to identify key scientific questions and establish networks of specialists to create a plan for future studies to address these questions. A second goal is to establish research facilities and a framework for investigating chemistry and climate over Asia. These facilities include producing high resolution Earth System Model simulations that have been evaluated with meteorological and chemical measurements, producing high-resolution emission inventories, analyzing satellite data, and analyzing the vulnerability of humans to air quality and extreme natural events. In this presentation we will describe in more detail these activities and discuss a future workshop on the impact of chemistry in climate on air quality and human health.

  6. Atmospheric chemistry of n-CxF2x+1CHO (x = 1, 2, 3, 4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, M. D.; Ball, J. C.; Wallington, T. J.;

    2006-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the atmospheric fate of n-C(x)F(2)(x)(+1)C(O) (x = 1, 2, 3, 4) radicals in 700 Torr O(2)/N(2) diluent at 298 +/- 3 K. A competition is observed between reaction with O(2) to form n-C(x)()F(2)(x)()(+1)C(O)O(2) radicals and decomposition to form n-C(x...... to the atmospheric chemistry of n-C(x)F(2)(x)(+1)C(O) radicals and their possible role in contributing to the formation of perfluorocarboxylic acids in the environment....

  7. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume III ? gas phase reactions of inorganic halogens

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, R.; Baulch, D. L.; Cox, R A; J. N. Crowley; Hampson, R. F.; Hynes, R. G.; Jenkin, M. E.; M. J. Rossi; Troe, J.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; This article, the third in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of inorganic halogen species, which were last published in J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, in 2000 (Atkinson et al., 2000), were updated on the IUPAC website in 2003 and are updated again in the present evaluation. The article consists of a summary sheet...

  8. Kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry reactions of the nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, R. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Data sheets for thermal and photochemical reactions of importance in the atmospheric chemistry of the nitrogen oxides are presented. For each reaction the available experimental data are summarized and critically evaluated, and a preferred value of the rate coefficient is given. The selection of the preferred value is discussed and an estimate of its accuracy is given. For the photochemical process, the data are summarized, and preferred for the photoabsorption cross section and primary quantum yields are given.

  9. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume II ? reactions of organic species

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    International audience; This article, the second in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Organic species, which were last published in 1999, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2002. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and eight appendices con...

  10. The Department of Energy's Atmospheric Chemistry Program: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    In response to a request from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry has reviewed OHER's Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). This report contains the committee's evaluation and critique arising from that review. The review process included a two-day symposium held at the National Academy of Sciences on September 25 and 26, 1990, that focused on presenting the ACP's current components, recent scientific accomplishments, and scientific plans. Following the symposium, committee members met in a one-day executive session to formulate and outline this report. In undertaking this review, OHER and ACP management requested that the committee attempt to answer several specific questions involving the program's technical capability and productivity, its leadership and organization, and its future direction. These questions are given in the Appendix. This report represents the committee's response to the questions posed in the Appendix. Chapter I explores the committee's view of the role that atmospheric chemistry could and should assume within the DOE and its prospective National Energy Strategy. Chapter 2 assesses the current ACP, Chapter 3 presents recommendations for revising and strengthening it, and Chapter 4 restates the committee's conclusions and recommendations.

  11. The Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Chemistry Program: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    In response to a request from the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry has reviewed OHER`s Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). This report contains the committee`s evaluation and critique arising from that review. The review process included a two-day symposium held at the National Academy of Sciences on September 25 and 26, 1990, that focused on presenting the ACP`s current components, recent scientific accomplishments, and scientific plans. Following the symposium, committee members met in a one-day executive session to formulate and outline this report. In undertaking this review, OHER and ACP management requested that the committee attempt to answer several specific questions involving the program`s technical capability and productivity, its leadership and organization, and its future direction. These questions are given in the Appendix. This report represents the committee`s response to the questions posed in the Appendix. Chapter I explores the committee`s view of the role that atmospheric chemistry could and should assume within the DOE and its prospective National Energy Strategy. Chapter 2 assesses the current ACP, Chapter 3 presents recommendations for revising and strengthening it, and Chapter 4 restates the committee`s conclusions and recommendations.

  12. Addition of a Project-Based Component to a Conventional Expository Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaparlis, Georgios; Gorezi, Marianna

    2007-01-01

    Students should enjoy their laboratory classes and for this purpose a project-based activity is added to a conventional physical chemistry laboratory. Students were given project work instead of conventional experiment and then they had to make progress in the project according to instructions and then carry out experiments related to the project.

  13. Novel and Improved Nanomaterials, Chemistries and Apparatus for Nanobiotechnology: the NACBO project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Ian James

    2011-02-01

    This article outlines the nature and activities of the recently completed EU Framework Programme 6 Integrated Project, Novel and Improved Nanomaterials, Chemistries and Apparatus for Nanobiotechnology (NACBO). This project was designed to yield new nanomaterials, surface activation and synthetic nucleic acid chemistries, procedures and hardware for applications in forensics and diagnostics. It provides details on the project's structure and partnership along with its principal objectives and successes in terms of publications and commercial exploitation.

  14. Heterogeneous chemistry and reaction dynamics of the atmospheric oxidants, O3, NO3, and OH, on organic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapleski, Robert C; Zhang, Yafen; Troya, Diego; Morris, John R

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry of the most important atmospheric oxidants, O3, NO3, and OH, plays a central role in regulating atmospheric gas concentrations, processing aerosols, and aging materials. Recent experimental and computational studies have begun to reveal the detailed reaction mechanisms and kinetics for gas-phase O3, NO3, and OH when they impinge on organic surfaces. Through new research approaches that merge the fields of traditional surface science with atmospheric chemistry, researchers are developing an understanding for how surface structure and functionality affect interfacial chemistry with this class of highly oxidizing pollutants. Together with future research initiatives, these studies will provide a more complete description of atmospheric chemistry and help others more accurately predict the properties of aerosols, the environmental impact of interfacial oxidation, and the concentrations of tropospheric gases.

  15. Aqueous organic chemistry in the atmosphere: sources and chemical processing of organic aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, V Faye

    2015-02-03

    Over the past decade, it has become clear that aqueous chemical processes occurring in cloud droplets and wet atmospheric particles are an important source of organic atmospheric particulate matter. Reactions of water-soluble volatile (or semivolatile) organic gases (VOCs or SVOCs) in these aqueous media lead to the formation of highly oxidized organic particulate matter (secondary organic aerosol; SOA) and key tracer species, such as organosulfates. These processes are often driven by a combination of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, and therefore their accurate representation in models is important for effective air quality management. Despite considerable progress, mechanistic understanding of some key aqueous processes is still lacking, and these pathways are incompletely represented in 3D atmospheric chemistry and air quality models. In this article, the concepts, historical context, and current state of the science of aqueous pathways of SOA formation are discussed.

  16. The 1-way on-line coupled atmospheric chemistry model system MECO(n – Part 1: Description of the limited-area atmospheric chemistry model COSMO/MESSy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kerkweg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical weather prediction model of the Consortium for Small Scale Modelling (COSMO, maintained by the German weather service (DWD, is connected with the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy. This effort is undertaken in preparation of a new, limited-area atmospheric chemistry model. Limited-area models require lateral boundary conditions for all prognostic variables. Therefore the quality of a regional chemistry model is expected to improve, if boundary conditions for the chemical constituents are provided by the driving model in consistence with the meteorological boundary conditions. The new developed model is as consistent as possible, with respect to atmospheric chemistry and related processes, with a previously developed global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model: the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC model. The combined system constitutes a new research tool, bridging the global to the meso-γ scale for atmospheric chemistry research. MESSy provides the infrastructure and includes, among others, the process and diagnostic submodels for atmospheric chemistry simulations. Furthermore, MESSy is highly flexible allowing model setups with tailor made complexity, depending on the scientific question. Here, the connection of the MESSy infrastructure to the COSMO model is documented and also the code changes required for the generalisation of regular MESSy submodels. Moreover, previously published prototype submodels for simplified tracer studies are generalised to be plugged-in and used in the global and the limited-area model. They are used to evaluate the TRACER interface implementation in the new COSMO/MESSy model system and the tracer transport characteristics, an important prerequisite for future atmospheric chemistry applications. A supplementary document with further details on the technical implementation of the MESSy interface into COSMO with a complete list of modifications to the COSMO code is provided.

  17. A synthesis of atmospheric mercury depletion event chemistry linking atmosphere, snow and water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Steffen

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available It was discovered in 1995 that, during the spring time, unexpectedly low concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM occurred in the Arctic air. This was surprising for a pollutant known to have a long residence time in the atmosphere; however conditions appeared to exist in the Arctic that promoted this depletion of mercury (Hg. This phenomenon is termed atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs and its discovery has revolutionized our understanding of the cycling of Hg in Polar Regions while stimulating a significant amount of research to understand its impact to this fragile ecosystem. Shortly after the discovery was made in Canada, AMDEs were confirmed to occur throughout the Arctic, sub-Artic and Antarctic coasts. It is now known that, through a series of photochemically initiated reactions involving halogens, GEM is converted to a more reactive species and is subsequently associated to particles in the air and/or deposited to the polar environment. AMDEs are a means by which Hg is transferred from the atmosphere to the environment that was previously unknown. In this article we review the history of Hg in Polar Regions, the methods used to collect Hg in different environmental media, research results of the current understanding of AMDEs from field, laboratory and modeling work, how Hg cycles around the environment after AMDEs, gaps in our current knowledge and the future impacts that AMDEs may have on polar environments. The research presented has shown that while considerable improvements in methodology to measure Hg have been made the main limitation remains knowing the speciation of Hg in the various media. The processes that drive AMDEs and how they occur are discussed. As well, the roles that the snow pack, oceans, fresh water and the sea ice play in the cycling of Hg are presented. It has been found that deposition of Hg from AMDEs occurs at marine coasts and not far inland and that a fraction of the deposited Hg does not

  18. On the use of plant emitted volatile organic compounds for atmospheric chemistry simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Hohaus, T.; Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Wegener, R.; Novelli, A.; Fuchs, H.; Wahner, A.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) contribute to about 90% of the emitted VOC globally with isoprene being one of the most abundant BVOC (Guenther 2002). Intensive efforts in studying and understanding the impact of BVOC on atmospheric chemistry were undertaken in the recent years. However many uncertainties remain, e.g. field studies have shown that in wooded areas measured OH reactivity can often not be explained by measured BVOC and their oxidation products (e.g. Noelscher et al. 2012). This discrepancy may be explained by either a lack of understanding of BVOC sources or insufficient understanding of BVOC oxidation mechanisms. Plants emit a complex VOC mixture containing likely many compounds which have not yet been measured or identified (Goldstein and Galbally 2007). A lack of understanding BVOC sources limits bottom-up estimates of secondary products of BVOC oxidation such as SOA. Similarly, the widespread oversimplification of atmospheric chemistry in simulation experiments, using single compound or simple BVOC mixtures to study atmospheric chemistry processes limit our ability to assess air quality and climate impacts of BVOC. We will present applications of the new extension PLUS (PLant chamber Unit for Simulation) to our atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. PLUS is used to produce representative BVOC mixtures from direct plant emissions. We will report on the performance and characterization of the newly developed chamber. As an exemplary application, trees typical of a Boreal forest environment were used to compare OH reactivity as directly measured by LIF to the OH reactivity calculated from BVOC measured by GC-MS and PTRMS. The comparison was performed for both, primary emissions of trees without any influence of oxidizing agents and using different oxidation schemes. For the monoterpene emitters investigated here, we show that discrepancies between measured and calculated total OH reactivity increase with increasing degree of oxidation

  19. Mercury in the global atmosphere: Chemistry, deposition, and land-atmosphere interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selin, Noelle Eckley

    This thesis uses a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem), in conjunction with worldwide atmospheric observations, to better understand and quantify biogeochemical cycling and deposition of mercury. GEOS-Chem includes gaseous elemental (Hg(0)), divalent (Hg(II)), and particulate (Hg(P)) mercury in the atmosphere, and includes coupling with the ocean, developed at University of Washington, and with land, developed in this work. Observed concentrations and seasonal variation of total gaseous mercury (TGM) are consistent with photochemical oxidation for Hg(0) partly balanced by in-cloud photochemical reduction of Hg(II). High TGM concentrations from ship cruises in the Northern Hemisphere are not reproduced, implying a problem either in measurements or our understanding of sources. Model results, supported by observations, suggest Hg(II) to be dominant at higher altitudes. Diurnal variability observed at marine sites suggests uptake by sea salt aerosols is a major deposition mechanism. Global biogeochemical cycles of mercury are constructed for pre-industrial and present-day using the first fully-coupled, global 3-D land-atmosphere-ocean mercury model. Atmosphere-surface cycling increases the effective mercury lifetime more than threefold against transfer to long-lived soil and ocean reservoirs. It is estimated that 68% of deposition to the U.S. is anthropogenic, including 16% from the legacy of anthropogenic mercury accumulated in soils and the deep ocean. Observed seasonal variations in U.S. wet deposition are used to constrain redox and deposition processes influencing the fate of North American and international emissions. The model reproduces the seasonal variation and latitudinal gradient of wet deposition flux measured in the eastern U.S., with a maximum in the Southeast and higher fluxes in summer and at lower latitudes. Seasonal variation is attributed to variations in oxidation and wet deposition rates at northern latitudes, and to seasonal

  20. Chemistry of atmospheres formed during accretion of the Earth and other terrestrial planets

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, L

    2009-01-01

    We used chemical equilibrium and chemical kinetic calculations to model chemistry of the volatiles released by heating different types of carbonaceous, ordinary and enstatite chondritic material as a function of temperature and pressure. Our results predict the composition of atmospheres formed by outgassing during accretion of the Earth and other terrestrial planets. Outgassing of CI and CM carbonaceous chondritic material produces H2O-rich (steam) atmospheres in agreement with the results of impact experiments. However, outgassing of other types of chondritic material produces atmospheres dominated by other gases. Outgassing of ordinary (H, L, LL) and high iron enstatite (EH) chondritic material yields H2-rich atmospheres with CO and H2O being the second and third most abundant gases. Outgassing of low iron enstatite (EL) chondritic material gives a CO-rich atmosphere with H2, CO2, and H2O being the next most abundant gases. Outgassing of CV carbonaceous chondritic material gives a CO2-rich atmosphere with ...

  1. Some current problems in atmospheric ozone chemistry; role of chemical kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, R.A.

    1987-03-01

    A review is given on selected aspects of the reaction mechanisms of current interest in the chemistry of atmospheric ozone. Atmospheric ozone is produced and removed by a complex series of elementary gas-phase photochemical reactions involving O/sub x/, HO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, CIO/sub x/ and hydrocarbon species. At the present time there is a good knowledge of the basic processes involved in ozone chemistry in the stratosphere and the troposphere and the kinetics of most of the key reactions are well defined. There are a number of difficulties in the theoretical descriptions of observed ozone behaviour which may be due to uncertainties in the chemistry. Examples are the failure to predict present day ozone in the photochemically controlled region above 35 Km altitude and the large reductions in the ozone column in the Antartic Spring which has been observed in recent years. In the troposphere there is growing evidence that ozone and other trace gases have changed appreciably from pre-industrial concentrations, due to chemical reactions involving man-made pollutants. Quantitative investigation of the mechanisms by which these changes may occur requires a sound laboratory kinetics data base.

  2. Atmospheric deposition and lake chemistry trends at a high mountain site in the eastern Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertha THALER

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Records of atmospheric precipitation chemistry starting in 1983 and a series of limnological investigations at two high mountain reference lakes starting in 1988 enable us to describe the response of lake water chemistry to changes in precipitation chemistry and climate. The lakes are located at an altitude well above the timberline in a watershed composed of acidic rocks. Despite the observed reduction in the sulphur atmospheric deposition, the reference lakes showed no corresponding decline in sulphate concentrations, but a marked increase in the acid neutralising capacity was apparent. Changes of the seasonal distribution pattern of the precipitation amounts and a general increase of the air temperature have likely produced an increased weathering which increased the concentration of many inlake solutes and drove the lakes toward more buffered conditions. This phenomenon superimposed to changes like other physical factors (radiation, nutritional conditions and biological factors (enhanced production, competition, predation has produced in the last years greater modifications than merely those to be expected from the decreased acidic input.

  3. A synthesis of atmospheric mercury depletion event chemistry in the atmosphere and snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Poulain

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available It was discovered in 1995 that, during the spring time, unexpectedly low concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM occurred in the Arctic air. This was surprising for a pollutant known to have a long residence time in the atmosphere; however conditions appeared to exist in the Arctic that promoted this depletion of mercury (Hg. This phenomenon is termed atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs and its discovery has revolutionized our understanding of the cycling of Hg in Polar Regions while stimulating a significant amount of research to understand its impact to this fragile ecosystem. Shortly after the discovery was made in Canada, AMDEs were confirmed to occur throughout the Arctic, sub-Artic and Antarctic coasts. It is now known that, through a series of photochemically initiated reactions involving halogens, GEM is converted to a more reactive species and is subsequently associated to particles in the air and/or deposited to the polar environment. AMDEs are a means by which Hg is transferred from the atmosphere to the environment that was previously unknown. In this article we review Hg research taken place in Polar Regions pertaining to AMDEs, the methods used to collect Hg in different environmental media, research results of the current understanding of AMDEs from field, laboratory and modeling work, how Hg cycles around the environment after AMDEs, gaps in our current knowledge and the future impacts that AMDEs may have on polar environments. The research presented has shown that while considerable improvements in methodology to measure Hg have been made but the main limitation remains knowing the speciation of Hg in the various media. The processes that drive AMDEs and how they occur are discussed. As well, the role that the snow pack and the sea ice play in the cycling of Hg is presented. It has been found that deposition of Hg from AMDEs occurs at marine coasts and not far inland and that a fraction of the deposited Hg does

  4. Atmospheric Chemistry in Giant Planets, Brown Dwarfs, and Low-Mass Dwarf Stars II. Sulfur and Phosphorus

    CERN Document Server

    Visscher, C

    2005-01-01

    We use thermochemical equilibrium and kinetic calculations to model sulfur and phosphorus chemistry in the atmospheres of giant planets, brown dwarfs, low-mass stars, and extrasolar giant planets (EGPs). The chemical behavior of individual S- and P-bearing gases and condensates is determined as a function of pressure, temperature, and metallicity. Our results are independent of any particular model atmosphere and the behavior of different gases can be used to constrain atmospheric structure and metallicity. Hydrogen sulfide is the dominant sulfur gas in substellar atmospheres and approximately represents the atmospheric sulfur inventory. Depending on the prevailing S and C chemistry, the abundance of minor sulfur gases may constrain atmospheric temperatures or metallicity. Disequilibrium abundances of PH3 are expected in the observable atmospheres of substellar objects, and PH3 is representative of the total P abundance in giant planets and T dwarfs. A number of other phosphorus gases become relatively abunda...

  5. Response of the AMOC to reduced solar radiation - the modulating role of atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthers, Stefan; Raible, Christoph C.; Rozanov, Eugene; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of reduced solar forcing (grand solar minimum or geoengineering scenarios like solar radiation management) on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is assessed in an ensemble of atmosphere-ocean-chemistry-climate model simulations. Ensemble sensitivity simulations are performed with and without interactive chemistry. In both experiments the AMOC is intensified in the course of the solar radiation reduction, which is attributed to the thermal effect of the solar forcing: reduced sea surface temperatures and enhanced sea ice formation increase the density of the upper ocean in the North Atlantic and intensify the deepwater formation. Furthermore, a second, dynamical effect on the AMOC is identified driven by the stratospheric cooling in response to the reduced solar forcing. The cooling is strongest in the tropics and leads to a weakening of the northern polar vortex. By stratosphere-troposphere interactions, the stratospheric circulation anomalies induce a negative phase of the Arctic Oscillation in the troposphere which is found to weaken the AMOC through wind stress and heat flux anomalies in the North Atlantic. The dynamic mechanism is present in both ensemble experiments. In the experiment with interactive chemistry, however, it is strongly amplified by stratospheric ozone changes. In the coupled system, both effects counteract and weaken the response of the AMOC to the solar forcing reduction. Neglecting chemistry-climate interactions in model simulations may therefore lead to an overestimation of the AMOC response to solar forcing.

  6. A Collaborative, Wiki-Based Organic Chemistry Project Incorporating Free Chemistry Software on the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael J.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, postsecondary instructors have recognized the potential of wikis to transform the way students learn in a collaborative environment. However, few instructors have embraced in-depth student use of chemistry software for the creation of interactive chemistry content on the Web. Using currently available software, students are able…

  7. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny's atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

  8. Analytical Models of Exoplanetary Atmospheres. III. Gaseous C-H-O-N Chemistry with Nine Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Kevin; Tsai, Shang-Min

    2016-10-01

    We present novel, analytical, equilibrium-chemistry formulae for the abundances of molecules in hot exoplanetary atmospheres that include the carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen networks. Our hydrogen-dominated solutions involve acetylene (C2H2), ammonia (NH3), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), ethylene (C2H4), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), methane (CH4), molecular nitrogen (N2), and water (H2O). By considering only the gas phase, we prove that the mixing ratio of carbon monoxide is governed by a decic equation (polynomial equation of 10 degrees). We validate our solutions against numerical calculations of equilibrium chemistry that perform Gibbs free energy minimization and demonstrate that they are accurate at the ˜ 1 % level for temperatures from 500 to 3000 K. In hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, the ratio of abundances of HCN to CH4 is nearly constant across a wide range of carbon-to-oxygen ratios, which makes it a robust diagnostic of the metallicity in the gas phase. Our validated formulae allow for the convenient benchmarking of chemical kinetics codes and provide an efficient way of enforcing chemical equilibrium in atmospheric retrieval calculations.

  9. An Adaptive Chemistry Approach to Modeling Emissions Performance of Gas Turbine Combustors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed SBIR project, we seek to implement the Adaptive Chemistry methodology in existing CFD codes used to investigate the emissions performance of gas...

  10. A new Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP experiment designed for climate and chemistry models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tilmes

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A new Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP experiment "G4 specified stratospheric aerosols" (short name: G4SSA is proposed to investigate the impact of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering on atmospheric composition, climate, and the environment. In contrast to the earlier G4 GeoMIP experiment, which requires an emission of sulphur dioxide (SO2 into the model, a prescribed aerosol forcing file is provided to the community, to be consistently applied to future model experiments between 2020 and 2100. This stratospheric aerosol distribution, with a total burden of about 2 Tg S has been derived using the ECHAM5-HAM microphysical model, based on a continuous annual tropical emission of 8 Tg SO2 year−1. A ramp-up of geoengineering in 2020 and a ramp-down in 2070 over a period of two years are included in the distribution, while a background aerosol burden should be used for the last 3 decades of the experiment. The performance of this experiment using climate and chemistry models in a multi-model comparison framework will allow us to better understand the significance of the impact of geoengineering and the abrupt termination after 50 years on climate and composition of the atmosphere in a changing environment. The zonal and monthly mean stratospheric aerosol input dataset is available at https://www2.acd.ucar.edu/gcm/geomip-g4-specified-stratospheric-aerosol-data-set.

  11. Active Upper-atmosphere Chemistry and Dynamics from Polar Circulation Reversal on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teanby, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph; Nixon, Conor A.; DeKok, Remco; Vinatier, Sandrine; Coustenis, Athena; Sefton-Nash, Elliot; Calcutt, Simon B.; Flasar, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Saturn's moon Titan has a nitrogen atmosphere comparable to Earth's, with a surface pressure of 1.4 bar. Numerical models reproduce the tropospheric conditions very well but have trouble explaining the observed middle-atmosphere temperatures, composition and winds. The top of the middle-atmosphere circulation has been thought to lie at an altitude of 450 to 500 kilometres, where there is a layer of haze that appears to be separated from the main haze deck. This 'detached' haze was previously explained as being due to the colocation of peak haze production and the limit of dynamical transport by the circulation's upper branch. Herewe report a build-up of trace gases over the south pole approximately two years after observing the 2009 post-equinox circulation reversal, from which we conclude that middle-atmosphere circulation must extend to an altitude of at least 600 kilometres. The primary drivers of this circulation are summer-hemisphere heating of haze by absorption of solar radiation and winter-hemisphere cooling due to infrared emission by haze and trace gases; our results therefore imply that these effects are important well into the thermosphere (altitudes higher than 500 kilometres). This requires both active upper-atmosphere chemistry, consistent with the detection of high-complexity molecules and ions at altitudes greater than 950 kilometres, and an alternative explanation for the detached haze, such as a transition in haze particle growth from monomers to fractal structures.

  12. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry - general circulation model. Comparison with observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, R.; Dameris, M.; Schnadt, C. [and others

    2000-01-01

    An interactively coupled climate-chemistry model which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks is presented. This is the first model, which interactively combines a general circulation model based on primitive equations with a rather complex model of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry, and which is computational efficient enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. The applied model version extends from the Earth's surface up to 10 hPa with a relatively high number (39) of vertical levels. We present the results of a present-day (1990) simulation and compare it to available observations. We focus on stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. The current model version ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM can realistically reproduce stratospheric dynamics in the Arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to formerly applied model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their interhemispheric differences are reproduced. The consideration of the chemistry feedback on dynamics results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapor concentrations, i.e., the simulated meriodional water vapor gradient in the stratosphere is realistic. The present model version constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic trace gas emissions, and the future evolution of the ozone layer. (orig.)

  13. Contrail: A Module from Physical Chemistry On-Line Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Franklin; Zielinski, Theresa Julia; Long, George

    2007-01-01

    The impact of contrails on Earth's climate is researched to understand the active area. It is suggested that the process of contrail formation involves combustion, cooling and ice formation, which are good comprehensive learning exercise for physical chemistry students.

  14. Atmospheric nucleation: highlights of the EUCAARI project and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.-M. Kerminen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the project EUCAARI (European Integrated project on Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality interactions, atmospheric nucleation was studied by (i developing and testing new air ion and cluster spectrometers, (ii conducting homogeneous nucleation experiments for sulphate and organic systems in the laboratory, (iii investigating atmospheric nucleation mechanism under field conditions, and (iv applying new theoretical and modelling tools for data interpretation and development of parameterisations. The current paper provides a synthesis of the obtained results and identifies the remaining major knowledge gaps related to atmospheric nucleation. The most important technical achievement of the project was the development of new instruments for measuring sub-3 nm particle populations, along with the extensive application of these instruments in both the laboratory and the field. All the results obtained during EUCAARI indicate that sulphuric acid plays a central role in atmospheric nucleation. However, also vapours other than sulphuric acid are needed to explain the nucleation and the subsequent growth processes, at least in continental boundary layers. Candidate vapours in this respect are some organic compounds, ammonia, and especially amines. Both our field and laboratory data demonstrate that the nucleation rate scales to the first or second power of the nucleating vapour concentration(s. This agrees with the few earlier field observations, but is in stark contrast with classical thermodynamic nucleation theories. The average formation rates of 2-nm particles were found to vary by almost two orders of magnitude between the different EUCAARI sites, whereas the formation rates of charged 2-nm particles varied very little between the sites. Overall, our observations are indicative of frequent, yet moderate, ion-induced nucleation usually outweighed by much stronger neutral nucleation events in the continental lower troposphere. The most concrete

  15. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Pollutants from Combustion Formation and Impact on Atmospheric Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This volume is based on the lectures presented at the NATO Advanced Study Institute: (ASI) «Pollutants Formation from Combustion. Formation Mechanisms and Impact on th th Atmospheric Chemistry» held in Maratea, Italy, from 13 to 26 september 1998. Preservation of the environment is of increasing concern in individual countries but also at continental or world scales. The structure of a NATO ASI which involve lecturers and participants of different nationalities was thought as especially well suited to address environmental issues. As combustion is known to substantially contribute to the damaging of the atmosphere, it was natural to concentrate the ASI program on reviewing the currently available knowledge of the formation mechanisms of the main pollutants liberated by combustion systems. In most situations, pollutants are present as trace components and their formation and removal is strongly conditioned by the chemical reactions initiated by fuel consumption. Therefore specific lectures were aimed at defi...

  16. Non-OH chemistry in oxidation flow reactors for the study of atmospheric chemistry systematically examined by modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhe; Day, Douglas A.; Ortega, Amber M.; Palm, Brett B.; Hu, Weiwei; Stark, Harald; Li, Rui; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-04-01

    Oxidation flow reactors (OFRs) using low-pressure Hg lamp emission at 185 and 254 nm produce OH radicals efficiently and are widely used in atmospheric chemistry and other fields. However, knowledge of detailed OFR chemistry is limited, allowing speculation in the literature about whether some non-OH reactants, including several not relevant for tropospheric chemistry, may play an important role in these OFRs. These non-OH reactants are UV radiation, O(1D), O(3P), and O3. In this study, we investigate the relative importance of other reactants to OH for the fate of reactant species in OFR under a wide range of conditions via box modeling. The relative importance of non-OH species is less sensitive to UV light intensity than to water vapor mixing ratio (H2O) and external OH reactivity (OHRext), as both non-OH reactants and OH scale roughly proportionally to UV intensity. We show that for field studies in forested regions and also the urban area of Los Angeles, reactants of atmospheric interest are predominantly consumed by OH. We find that O(1D), O(3P), and O3 have relative contributions to volatile organic compound (VOC) consumption that are similar or lower than in the troposphere. The impact of O atoms can be neglected under most conditions in both OFR and troposphere. We define "riskier OFR conditions" as those with either low H2O ( 200 s-1 in OFR254). We strongly suggest avoiding such conditions as the importance of non-OH reactants can be substantial for the most sensitive species, although OH may still dominate under some riskier conditions, depending on the species present. Photolysis at non-tropospheric wavelengths (185 and 254 nm) may play a significant (> 20 %) role in the degradation of some aromatics, as well as some oxidation intermediates, under riskier reactor conditions, if the quantum yields are high. Under riskier conditions, some biogenics can have substantial destructions by O3, similarly to the troposphere. Working under low O2 (volume mixing

  17. Investigating the Chemical Pathways to PAH- and PANH-Based Aerosols in Titan's Atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella Marion; Contreras, Cesar; Ricketts, Claire Louise; Salama, Farid

    2011-01-01

    A complex organic chemistry between Titan's two main constituents, N2 and CH4, leads to the production of more complex molecules and subsequently to solid organic aerosols. These aerosols are at the origin of the haze layers giving Titan its characteristic orange color. In situ measurements by the Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) and Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) instruments onboard Cassini have revealed the presence of large amounts of neutral, positively and negatively charged heavy molecules in the ionosphere of Titan. In particular, benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C6H5CH3), which are critical precursors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, have been detected, suggesting that PAHs might play a role in the production of Titan s aerosols. Moreover, results from numerical models as well as laboratory simulations of Titan s atmospheric chemistry are also suggesting chemical pathways that link the simple precursor molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry (C2H2, C2H4, HCN ...) to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (or PANHs) as precursors to the production of solid aerosols.

  18. The Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE Model – Part 1: Model description and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Wolfe

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE model, a vertically-resolved 1-D chemical transport model designed to probe the details of near-surface reactive gas exchange. CAFE integrates all key processes, including turbulent diffusion, emission, deposition and chemistry, throughout the forest canopy and mixed layer. It is the first model of its kind to incorporate the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM and a suite of reactions for the oxidation of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, providing a more comprehensive description of the oxidative chemistry occurring within and above the forest. We use CAFE to simulate a young Ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada, CA. Utilizing meteorological constraints from the BEARPEX-2007 field campaign, we assess the sensitivity of modeled fluxes to parameterizations of diffusion, laminar sublayer resistance and radiation extinction. To characterize the general chemical environment of this forest, we also present modeled mixing ratio profiles of biogenic hydrocarbons, hydrogen oxides and reactive nitrogen. The vertical profiles of these species demonstrate a range of structures and gradients that reflect the interplay of physical and chemical processes within the forest canopy, which can influence net exchange.

  19. The Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE Model – Part 1: Model description and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Wolfe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE model, a vertically-resolved 1-D chemical transport model designed to probe the details of near-surface reactive gas exchange. CAFE integrates all key processes, including turbulent diffusion, emission, deposition and chemistry, throughout the forest canopy and mixed layer. CAFE utilizes the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM and is the first model of its kind to incorporate a suite of reactions for the oxidation of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, providing a more comprehensive description of the oxidative chemistry occurring within and above the forest. We use CAFE to simulate a young Ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada, CA. Utilizing meteorological constraints from the BEARPEX-2007 field campaign, we assess the sensitivity of modeled fluxes to parameterizations of diffusion, laminar sublayer resistance and radiation extinction. To characterize the general chemical environment of this forest, we also present modeled mixing ratio profiles of biogenic hydrocarbons, hydrogen oxides and reactive nitrogen. The vertical profiles of these species demonstrate a range of structures and gradients that reflect the interplay of physical and chemical processes within the forest canopy, which can influence net exchange.

  20. Isotopic links between atmospheric chemistry and the deep sulphur cycle on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Heather B; Kim, Sang-Tae; Farquhar, James; Day, James M D; Economos, Rita C; McKeegan, Kevin D; Schmitt, Axel K; Irving, Anthony J; Hoek, Joost; Dottin, James

    2014-04-17

    The geochemistry of Martian meteorites provides a wealth of information about the solid planet and the surface and atmospheric processes that occurred on Mars. The degree to which Martian magmas may have assimilated crustal material, thus altering the geochemical signatures acquired from their mantle sources, is unclear. This issue features prominently in efforts to understand whether the source of light rare-earth elements in enriched shergottites lies in crustal material incorporated into melts or in mixing between enriched and depleted mantle reservoirs. Sulphur isotope systematics offer insight into some aspects of crustal assimilation. The presence of igneous sulphides in Martian meteorites with sulphur isotope signatures indicative of mass-independent fractionation suggests the assimilation of sulphur both during passage of magmas through the crust of Mars and at sites of emplacement. Here we report isotopic analyses of 40 Martian meteorites that represent more than half of the distinct known Martian meteorites, including 30 shergottites (28 plus 2 pairs, where pairs are separate fragments of a single meteorite), 8 nakhlites (5 plus 3 pairs), Allan Hills 84001 and Chassigny. Our data provide strong evidence that assimilation of sulphur into Martian magmas was a common occurrence throughout much of the planet's history. The signature of mass-independent fractionation observed also indicates that the atmospheric imprint of photochemical processing preserved in Martian meteoritic sulphide and sulphate is distinct from that observed in terrestrial analogues, suggesting fundamental differences between the dominant sulphur chemistry in the atmosphere of Mars and that in the atmosphere of Earth.

  1. Analytical Models of Exoplanetary Atmospheres. III. Gaseous C-H-O-N Chemistry with 9 Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We present novel, analytical, equilibrium-chemistry formulae for the abundances of molecules in hot exoplanetary atmospheres that include the carbon, oxygen and nitrogen networks. Our hydrogen-dominated solutions involve acetylene (C$_2$H$_2$), ammonia (NH$_3$), carbon dioxide (CO$_2$), carbon monoxide (CO), ethylene (C$_2$H$_4$), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), methane (CH$_4$), molecular nitrogen (N$_2$) and water (H$_2$O). By considering only the gaseous phase, we prove that the mixing ratio of carbon monoxide is governed by a decic equation (polynomial equation of degree 10). We validate our solutions against numerical calculations of equilibrium chemistry that perform Gibbs free energy minimization and demonstrate that they are accurate for temperatures from 500--3000 K. In hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, the ratio of abundances of HCN to CH$_4$ is nearly constant across a wide range of carbon-to-oxygen ratios, which makes it a robust diagnostic of the metallicity in the gas phase. Our validated formulae allow f...

  2. Poster 6: Influence of traces elements in the organic chemistry of upper atmosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathe, Christophe; Carrasco, Nathalie; Trainer, Melissa G.; Gautier, Thomas; Gavilan, Lisseth; Dubois, David; Li, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    In the upper atmosphere of Titan, complex chemistry leads to the formation of organic aerosols. Since the work of Khare et al. in 1984, several experiments investigated the formation of Titan aerosols, so called tholins, in the laboratory. It has been suggested that nitrogen-containing compounds may contribute significantly to the aerosols formation process. In this study, we focused on the influence of pyridine, the simplest nitrogenous aromatic hydrocarbon, on the chemistry of Titan's atmosphere and on aerosol formation. To assess the effect of pyridine on aerosol formation chemistry, we used two different experimental setups : a capacitively coupled radio-frequency (electronic impact), and a VUV Deuterium lamp (photochemistry) in a collaboration between LATMOS (Guyancourt) and NASA-GSFC (Greenbelt), respectively. Aerosols produced with both setups were first analyzed using a FTIR-ATR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy - Attenuated Total Reflection) with a spectral range of 4000-800 cm-1 to characterize their optical properties. Next the samples were analysed using a Bruker Autoflex Speed MALDI mass spectrometer with a m/z range up to 2000 Da in order to infer their composition. Infrared spectroscopy analysis showed that tholins produced with a nitrogen-methane gas mixture (95:5) and nitrogenpyridine gas mixture (99:250ppm) present very similar spectra features. Tholins produced with a mixture of nitrogenmethane-pyridine (99:1:250ppm) do not present aliphatic CH2 or CH3 vibrational signatures. This could indicate a cyclic polymerization by a pyridine skeleton. Mass spectrometry is still in progress to confirm this.

  3. SIOUX project: a simultaneous multiband camera for exoplanet atmospheres studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christille, Jean Marc; Bonomo, Aldo Stefano; Borsa, Francesco; Busonero, Deborah; Calcidese, Paolo; Claudi, Riccardo; Damasso, Mario; Giacobbe, Paolo; Molinari, Emilio; Pace, Emanuele; Riva, Alberto; Sozzetti, Alesandro; Toso, Giorgio; Tresoldi, Daniela

    2016-08-01

    The exoplanet revolution is well underway. The last decade has seen order-of-magnitude increases in the number of known planets beyond the Solar system. Detailed characterization of exoplanetary atmospheres provide the best means for distinguishing the makeup of their outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition chemistry, temperature-pressure atmospheric profiles, dynamics and circulation. While pioneering work on the observational side has produced the first important detections of atmospheric molecules for the class of transiting exoplanets, important limitations are still present due to the lack of systematic, repeated measurements with optimized instrumentation at both visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. It is thus of fundamental importance to explore quantitatively possible avenues for improvements. In this paper we report initial results of a feasibility study for the prototype of a versatile multi-band imaging system for very high-precision differential photometry that exploits the choice of specifically selected narrow-band filters and novel ideas for the execution of simultaneous VIS and NIR measurements. Starting from the fundamental system requirements driven by the science case at hand, we describe a set of three opto-mechanical solutions for the instrument prototype: 1) a radial distribution of the optical flux using dichroic filters for the wavelength separation and narrow-band filters or liquid crystal filters for the observations; 2) a tree distribution of the optical flux (implying 2 separate foci), with the same technique used for the beam separation and filtering; 3) an 'exotic' solution consisting of the study of a complete optical system (i.e. a brand new telescope) that exploits the chromatic errors of a reflecting surface for directing the different wavelengths at different foci. In this paper we present the first results of the study phase for the three solutions, as well as the

  4. Do organic surface films on sea salt aerosols influence atmospheric chemistry? ─ a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. von Glasow

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic material from the ocean's surface can be incorporated into sea salt aerosol particles often producing a surface film on the aerosol. Such an organic coating can reduce the mass transfer between the gas phase and the aerosol phase influencing sea salt chemistry in the marine atmosphere. To investigate these effects and their importance for the marine boundary layer (MBL we used the one-dimensional numerical model MISTRA. We considered the uncertainties regarding the magnitude of uptake reduction, the concentrations of organic compounds in sea salt aerosols and the oxidation rate of the organics to analyse the possible influence of organic surfactants on gas and liquid phase chemistry with a special focus on halogen chemistry. By assuming destruction rates for the organic coating based on laboratory measurements we get a rapid destruction of the organic monolayer within the first meters of the MBL. Larger organic initial concentrations lead to a longer lifetime of the coating but lead also to an unrealistically strong decrease of O3 concentrations as the organic film is destroyed by reaction with O3. The lifetime of the film is increased by assuming smaller reactive uptake coefficients for O3 or by assuming that a part of the organic surfactants react with OH. With regard to tropospheric chemistry we found that gas phase concentrations for chlorine and bromine species decreased due to the decreased mass transfer between gas phase and aerosol phase. Aqueous phase chlorine concentrations also decreased but aqueous phase bromine concentrations increased. Differences for gas phase concentrations are in general smaller than for liquid phase concentrations. The effect on gas phase NO2 or NO is very small (reduction less than 5% whereas liquid phase NO2 concentrations increased in some cases by nearly 100%. We list suggestions for further laboratory studies which are needed for improved model studies.

  5. Observed variations of methane on Mars unexplained by known atmospheric chemistry and physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Franck; Forget, François

    2009-08-06

    The detection of methane on Mars has revived the possibility of past or extant life on this planet, despite the fact that an abiogenic origin is thought to be equally plausible. An intriguing aspect of the recent observations of methane on Mars is that methane concentrations appear to be locally enhanced and change with the seasons. However, methane has a photochemical lifetime of several centuries, and is therefore expected to have a spatially uniform distribution on the planet. Here we use a global climate model of Mars with coupled chemistry to examine the implications of the recently observed variations of Martian methane for our understanding of the chemistry of methane. We find that photochemistry as currently understood does not produce measurable variations in methane concentrations, even in the case of a current, local and episodic methane release. In contrast, we find that the condensation-sublimation cycle of Mars' carbon dioxide atmosphere can generate large-scale methane variations differing from those observed. In order to reproduce local methane enhancements similar to those recently reported, we show that an atmospheric lifetime of less than 200 days is necessary, even if a local source of methane is only active around the time of the observation itself. This implies an unidentified methane loss process that is 600 times faster than predicted by standard photochemistry. The existence of such a fast loss in the Martian atmosphere is difficult to reconcile with the observed distribution of other trace gas species. In the case of a destruction mechanism only active at the surface of Mars, destruction of methane must occur with an even shorter timescale of the order of approximately 1 hour to explain the observations. If recent observations of spatial and temporal variations of methane are confirmed, this would suggest an extraordinarily harsh environment for the survival of organics on the planet.

  6. The JAERI and Universities joint project research reports on the 4th joint research project between JAERI and Universities on backend chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-02-01

    In the Joint Research Project between JAERI and Universities on Backend Chemistry, the 4th-term researches of it were performed on sixteen themes from April of 1999 to March of 2001 under the four categories, i.e. Nuclear-chemistry and physical-chemistry properties of actinides', 'Solid state chemistry and nuclear fuel engineering of actinides', 'Solution chemistry and technologies for separation and analysis of actinides' and Treatment of radioactive waste and environmental chemistry'. The present report compiled the papers contributed to the Joint Research Project. (author)

  7. The Middle Atmosphere Program: A special project for the Antarctic Middle Atmosphere (AMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirasawa, T.

    1982-01-01

    Areas of concern are: dynamics, structure, and atmospheric composition of the middle atmosphere in Antarctica; particle precipitation and interaction of the middle atmosphere with the lower ionosphere; atmospheric pollution; and the difference between the northern and southern polar middle atmosphere.

  8. UNESCO Chemistry Teaching Project in Asia: Experiments on Nuclear Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabanandana, Salag

    This teacher's guide on nuclear science is divided into two parts. The first part is a discussion of some of the concepts in nuclear chemistry including radioactivity, types of disintegration, radioactive decay and growth, and tracer techniques. The relevant experiments involving the use of radioisotopes are presented in the second part. The…

  9. The Titan Haze Simulation experiment: laboratory simulation of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, E.; Contreras, C. S.; Ricketts, C. L.; Salama, F.

    2012-04-01

    In Titan’s atmosphere, a complex organic chemistry between its two main constituents, N2 and CH4, leads to the production of heavy molecules and subsequently to solid organic aerosols. Several instruments onboard Cassini have detected neutral, positively and negatively charged particles and heavy molecules in the ionosphere of Titan[1,2]. In particular, the presence of benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C6H5CH3)[3], which are critical precursors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, suggests that PAHs might play a role in the production of Titan’s aerosols. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment has been developed at NASA Ames’ Cosmic Simulation facility (COSmIC) to study the chemical pathways that link the simple precursor molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry (C2H2, C2H4, HCN…) to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (or PANHs) as precursors to the production of solid aerosols. In the THS experiment, Titan’s atmospheric chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic jet expansion. With this unique design, the gas mixture is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma discharge. Different gas mixtures containing the first products of Titan’s N2-CH4 chemistry but also much heavier molecules like PAHs or PANHs can be injected to study specific chemical reactions. The products of the chemistry are detected and studied using two complementary techniques: Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy[4] and Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry[5]. Thin tholin deposits are also produced in the THS experiment and can be analyzed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). We will present the results of ongoing mass spectrometry studies on the THS experiment using different gas mixtures: N2-CH4, N2-C2H2, N2-C2H4, N2-C2H6, N2-C6H6, and similar mixtures with an N2-CH4 (90:10) mixture instead of pure N2, to study specific pathways

  10. Atmospheric impact of the 1783–1784 Laki eruption: Part I Chemistry modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Stevenson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Results from the first chemistry-transport model study of the impact of the 1783–1784 Laki fissure eruption (Iceland: 64°N, 17°W upon atmospheric composition are presented. The eruption released an estimated 61 Tg(S as SO2 into the troposphere and lower stratosphere. The model has a high resolution tropopause region, and detailed sulphur chemistry. The simulated SO2 plume spreads over much of the Northern Hemisphere, polewards of ~40°N. About 70% of the SO2 gas is directly deposited to the surface before it can be oxidised to sulphuric acid aerosol. The main SO2 oxidants, OH and H2O2, are depleted by up to 40% zonally, and the lifetime of SO2 consequently increases. Zonally averaged tropospheric SO2 concentrations over the first three months of the eruption exceed 20 ppbv, and sulphuric acid aerosol reaches ~2 ppbv. These compare to modelled pre-industrial/present-day values of 0.1/0.5 ppbv SO2 and 0.1/1.0 ppbv sulphate. A total sulphuric acid aerosol yield of 17–22 Tg(S is produced. The mean aerosol lifetime is 6–10 days, and the peak aerosol loading of the atmosphere is 1.4–1.7 Tg(S (equivalent to 5.9–7.1 Tg of hydrated sulphuric acid aerosol. These compare to modelled pre-industrial/present-day sulphate burdens of 0.28/0.81 Tg(S, and lifetimes of 6/5 days, respectively. Due to the relatively short atmospheric residence times of both SO2 and sulphate, the aerosol loading approximately mirrors the temporal evolution of emissions associated with the eruption. The model produces a reason-able simulation of the acid deposition found in Greenland ice cores. These results appear to be relatively insensitive to the vertical profile of emissions assumed, although if more of the emissions reached higher levels (>12 km, this would give longer lifetimes and larger aerosol yields. Introducing the emissions in episodes generates similar results to using monthly mean emissions, because the atmospheric lifetimes are similar to the repose periods

  11. Influence of a Carrington-like event on the atmospheric chemistry, temperature and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Calisto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We have modeled the atmospheric impact of a major solar energetic particle event similar in intensity to what is thought of the Carrington Event of 1–2 September 1859. Ionization rates for the August 1972 solar proton event, which had an energy spectrum comparable to the Carrington Event, were scaled up in proportion to the fluence estimated for both events. We have assumed such an event to take place in the year 2020 in order to investigate the impact on the modern, near future atmosphere. Effects on atmospheric chemistry, temperature and dynamics were investigated using the 3-D Chemistry Climate Model SOCOL v2.0. We find significant responses of NOx, HOx, ozone, temperature and zonal wind. Ozone and NOx have in common an unusually strong and long-lived response to this solar proton event. The model suggests a 3-fold increase of NOx generated in the upper stratosphere lasting until the end of November, and an up to 10-fold increase in upper mesospheric HOx. Due to the NOx and HOx enhancements, ozone reduces by up to 60–80% in the mesosphere during the days after the event, and by up to 20–40% in the middle stratosphere lasting for several months after the event. Total ozone is reduced by up to 20 DU in the Northern Hemisphere and up to 10 DU in the Southern Hemisphere. Free tropospheric and surface air temperatures show a significant cooling of more than 3 K and zonal winds change significantly by 3–5 m s−1 in the UTLS region. In conclusion, a solar proton event, if it took place in the near future with an intensity similar to that ascribed to of the Carrington Event of 1859, must be expected to have a major impact on atmospheric composition throughout the middle atmosphere, resulting in significant and persistent decrease in total ozone.

  12. Influence of a Carrington-like event on the atmospheric chemistry, temperature and dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Calisto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have modeled the atmospheric impact of a major solar energetic particle event similar in intensity to what is thought of the Carrington Event of 1–2 September 1859. Ionization rates for the August 1972 solar proton event, which had an energy spectrum comparable to the Carrington Event, were scaled up in proportion to the fluence estimated for both events. We have assumed such an event to take place in the year 2020 in order to investigate the impact on the modern, near future atmosphere. Effects on atmospheric chemistry, temperature and dynamics were investigated using the 3-D Chemistry Climate Model SOCOL v2.0. We find significant responses of NOx, HOx, ozone, temperature and zonal wind. Ozone and NOx have in common an unusually strong and long-lived response to this solar proton event. The model suggests a 3-fold increase of NOx generated in the upper stratosphere lasting until the end of November, and an up to 10-fold increase in upper mesospheric HOx. Due to the NOx and HOx enhancements, ozone reduces by up to 60–80% in the mesosphere during the days after the event, and by up to 20–40% in the middle stratosphere lasting for several months after the event. Total ozone is reduced by up to 20 DU in the Northern Hemisphere and up to 10 DU in the Southern Hemisphere. Free tropospheric and surface air temperatures show a significant cooling of more than 3 K and zonal winds change significantly by 3–5 m s−1 in the UTLS region. In conclusion, a solar proton event, if it took place in the near future with an intensity similar to that ascribed to of the Carrington Event of 1859, must be expected to have a major impact on atmospheric composition throughout the middle atmosphere, resulting in significant and persistent decrease in total ozone.

  13. Water chemistry - Thornton Creek Restoration Project Effectiveness Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA has designed and is currently implementing a hyporheic monitoring plan for the Thornton Creek watershed in North Seattle. This work is being conducted for...

  14. Simulating Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature (200K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen T.; Beauchamp, Jesse L.; Salama, Farid

    2016-06-01

    We present our latest results on the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment developed on the COSmIC simulation chamber at NASA Ames Research Center. In Titan’s atmosphere, a complex organic chemistry induced by UV radiation and electron bombardment occurs between N2 and CH4 and leads to the production of larger molecules and solid aerosols. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by pulsed plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion, at Titan-like temperature (150 K). The residence time of the gas in the pulsed plasma discharge is on the order of 3 µs, hence the chemistry is truncated allowing us to probe the first and intermediate steps of the chemistry by adding heavier precursors into the initial N2-CH4 gas mixture.Two complementary studies of the gas phase and solid phase products have been performed in 4 different gas mixtures: N2-CH4, N2-CH4-C2H2, N2-CH4-C6H6 and N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 using a combination of in situ and ex situ diagnostics. The mass spectrometry analysis of the gas phase was the first to demonstrate that the THS is a unique tool to monitor the different steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry (Sciamma-O’Brien et al. 2014). The results of the solid phase study are consistent with the chemical growth evolution observed in the gas phase. Grains and aggregates that form in the gas phase were jet deposited on various substrates then collected for ex situ analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy images have shown that more complex mixtures produce larger aggregates (100-500 nm in N2-CH4, up to 5 µm in N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6). Moreover, the morphology of the grains seems to depend on the precursors, which could have a large impact for Titan’s models. We will present the latest results of the X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure measurements, that show the different functional groups present in our samples and give the C/N ratio; as well as the Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry coupled with Collision Induced Dissociation analyses that have been

  15. Final Report for LDRD Project 05-ERD-050: "Developing a Reactive Chemistry Capability for the NARAC Operational Model (LODI)"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Grant, K; Connell, P

    2008-02-11

    In support of the National Security efforts of LLNL, this project addressed the existing imbalance between dispersion and chemical capabilities of LODI (Lagrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator--the NARAC operational dispersion model). We have demonstrated potentially large effects of atmospheric chemistry on the impact of chemical releases (e.g., industrial chemicals and nerve agents). Prior to our work, LODI could only handle chains of first-order losses (exponential decays) that were independent of time and space, limiting NARAC's capability to respond when reactive chemistry is important. We significantly upgraded the chemistry and aerosol capability of LODI to handle (1) arbitrary networks of chemical reactions, (2) mixing and reactions with ambient species, (3) evaporation and condensation of aerosols, and (4) heat liberated from chemical reactions and aerosol condensation (which can cause a cold and dense plume hugging the ground to rise into the atmosphere, then descend to the ground again as droplets). When this is made operational, it will significantly improve NARAC's ability to respond to terrorist attacks and industrial accidents that involve reactive chemistry, including many chemical agents and toxic industrial chemicals (TICS). As a dual-use, the resulting model also has the potential to be a state-of-the-art air-quality model. Chemical releases are the most common type of airborne hazardous release and many operational applications involve such scenarios. The new capability we developed is therefore relevant to the needs of the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Department of Defense (DoD).

  16. Partial Overhaul and Initial Parallel Optimization of KINETICS, a Coupled Dynamics and Chemistry Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Howard; Willacy, Karen; Allen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    KINETICS is a coupled dynamics and chemistry atmosphere model that is data intensive and computationally demanding. The potential performance gain from using a supercomputer motivates the adaptation from a serial version to a parallelized one. Although the initial parallelization had been done, bottlenecks caused by an abundance of communication calls between processors led to an unfavorable drop in performance. Before starting on the parallel optimization process, a partial overhaul was required because a large emphasis was placed on streamlining the code for user convenience and revising the program to accommodate the new supercomputers at Caltech and JPL. After the first round of optimizations, the partial runtime was reduced by a factor of 23; however, performance gains are dependent on the size of the data, the number of processors requested, and the computer used.

  17. Direct variational data assimilation algorithm for atmospheric chemistry data with transport and transformation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, Alexey; Penenko, Vladimir; Nuterman, Roman; Baklanov, Alexander; Mahura, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric chemistry dynamics is studied with convection-diffusion-reaction model. The numerical Data Assimilation algorithm presented is based on the additive-averaged splitting schemes. It carries out ''fine-grained'' variational data assimilation on the separate splitting stages with respect to spatial dimensions and processes i.e. the same measurement data is assimilated to different parts of the split model. This design has efficient implementation due to the direct data assimilation algorithms of the transport process along coordinate lines. Results of numerical experiments with chemical data assimilation algorithm of in situ concentration measurements on real data scenario have been presented. In order to construct the scenario, meteorological data has been taken from EnviroHIRLAM model output, initial conditions from MOZART model output and measurements from Airbase database.

  18. Troposphere-Stratosphere Coupled Chemistry-Climate Interactions: From Global Warming Projections to Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, P. J.; Abraham, N. L.; Maycock, A. C.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in stratospheric composition can affect tropospheric composition and vice versa. Of particular interest are trace gas concentrations at the interface between these two atmospheric layers in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). This is due to the crucial importance of composition changes in the UTLS for the global energy budget. In a recent study (Nowack et al., 2015), we provided further evidence that composition changes in the tropical UTLS can significantly affect global warming projections. Using a state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean chemistry-climate model, we found a ~20% smaller global warming in response to an abrupt 4xCO2 forcing if composition feedbacks were included in the calculations as compared to simulations in which composition feedbacks were not considered. We attributed this large difference in surface warming mainly to circulation-driven decreases in tropical UTLS ozone and related changes in stratospheric water vapor, partly counteracted by simultaneous changes in ice clouds. Here, we explain why this result is expected to differ between models and how, inter alia, tropospheric chemical mechanisms can contribute to this uncertainty. We highlight that improving our understanding of processes in the tropical UTLS and their representation in Earth system models remains a key challenge in climate research.Finally, taking geoengineering as a new example, we show that changes in the stratosphere can have an impact on air quality in the troposphere. In particular, we explain for a simple solar radiation management scenario how changes in surface ozone can be linked to changes in meteorology and composition in the troposphere and stratosphere. In conclusion, we highlight the importance of considering air quality impacts when evaluating a variety of geoengineering scenarios. Reference: Nowack, P.J., Abraham, N.L., Maycock, A.C., Braesicke, P., Gregory, J.M., Joshi, M.M., Osprey, A., and Pyle, J.A. Nature Climate Change 5, 41

  19. An adaptive reduction algorithm for efficient chemical calculations in global atmospheric chemistry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillana, Mauricio; Le Sager, Philippe; Jacob, Daniel J.; Brenner, Michael P.

    2010-11-01

    We present a computationally efficient adaptive method for calculating the time evolution of the concentrations of chemical species in global 3-D models of atmospheric chemistry. Our strategy consists of partitioning the computational domain into fast and slow regions for each chemical species at every time step. In each grid box, we group the fast species and solve for their concentration in a coupled fashion. Concentrations of the slow species are calculated using a simple semi-implicit formula. Separation of species between fast and slow is done on the fly based on their local production and loss rates. This allows for example to exclude short-lived volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and their oxidation products from chemical calculations in the remote troposphere where their concentrations are negligible, letting the simulation determine the exclusion domain and allowing species to drop out individually from the coupled chemical calculation as their production/loss rates decline. We applied our method to a 1-year simulation of global tropospheric ozone-NO x-VOC-aerosol chemistry using the GEOS-Chem model. Results show a 50% improvement in computational performance for the chemical solver, with no significant added error.

  20. Atmospheric deposition chemistry in a subalpine area of the Julian Alps, NW Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Muri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Wet-only precipitation was collected in Rateče, a remote village in the outskirts of the Julian Alps (Nort-West Slovenia during 2003-2011, in order to characterise atmospheric deposition chemistry. The samples were collected on a daily basis and combined into weekly samples that were analysed for pH, conductivity and major anions and cations. Ammonium, nitrate and sulphate were the most abundant ions, exhibiting volume-weighted mean values (2003-2011 of 22, 17 and 17 µeq L–1, respectively. Furthermore, the trends of the major parameters in the precipitation were assessed using a simple linear regression. A significant downward trend of both nitrate and sulphate was observed, explained by evident reductions in NOx and SOx emissions in the region. The decline of nitrate and sulphate was also reflected in a significant and downward trend of conductivity. While the trend of ammonium could also be downward, the trends of other major ions were not significant. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition, representing inorganic forms of nitrogen (i.e., ammonium and nitrate, was calculated to examine potential threats that the deposition of nitrogen may cause on lake ecosystems. Nitrogen deposition in Rateče ranged from 5.5 to 9.5 kg N ha–1 yr–1. Although this was below the critical threshold that might cause an impact on surface waters, nitrogen deposition in the nearby Julian Alps, where sensitive mountain lakes are situated, might be higher and its impact on the ecosystem greater. In fact, several studies performed on water chemistry, sedimentary organic matter and stable isotopes in Slovenian mountain lakes have shown progressive changes in their water columns and sediments that can be attributed to nitrogen deposition.

  1. The importance of high spatial resolution for the performance of atmospheric chemistry-transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantzius Hansen, Kaj

    2010-05-01

    We have investigated the importance of spatial resolution for the performance of the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model (DEHM), a state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry-transport model covering the majority of the Northern Hemisphere with a horizontal grid resolution of 150 km X 150 km. DEHM has 29 vertical layers in terrain-following sigma-coordinates extending up to a height of 100 hPa. Two-way nesting options with a nesting factor of three can be applied with higher resolution over a limited area of the model. At present the model can be run without nests or with one, two or three nests, each with resolutions of 50 km X 50 km, 16.7 km X 16.7 km, and 5.6 km X 5.6 km, respectively. The model includes a comprehensive chemistry scheme with more than 100 reactions and 67 atmospheric constituents, of which 4 relate to primary particulates (PM2.5, PM10, TSP and sea salt), other species are SOx, NOx, NHx, VOCs, and secondary inorganic particulates. DEHM is driven by meteorological data from the numerical weather prediction model MM5v3. Three simulations were performed with DEHM: one simulation with only the mother domain, one simulation with one nest over Europe, and one simulation with an additional nest covering Denmark and surrounding countries. All three simulations cover the period from 1989 to 2006. The predicted concentrations were evaluated against measurements from the EMEP monitoring network. Only sites within the innermost nest were included in the evaluation and the evaluations of the three simulations were compared to test the influence of spatial resolution on the performance of the model.

  2. The influence of Middle Range Energy Electrons on atmospheric chemistry and regional climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenovic, P.; Rozanov, E.; Stenke, A.; Funke, B.; Wissing, J. M.; Mursula, K.; Tummon, F.; Peter, T.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the influence of Middle Range Energy Electrons (MEE; typically 30-300 keV) precipitation on the atmosphere using the SOCOL3-MPIOM chemistry-climate model with coupled ocean. Model simulations cover the 2002-2010 period for which ionization rates from the AIMOS dataset and atmospheric composition observations from MIPAS are available. Results show that during geomagnetically active periods MEE significantly increase the amount of NOy and HOx in the polar winter mesosphere, in addition to other particles and sources, resulting in local ozone decreases of up to 35%. These changes are followed by an intensification of the polar night jet, as well as mesospheric warming and stratospheric cooling. The contribution of MEE also substantially enhances the difference in the ozone anomalies between geomagnetically active and quiet periods. Comparison with MIPAS NOy observations indicates that the additional source of NOy from MEE improves the model results, however substantial underestimation above 50 km remains and requires better treatment of the NOy source from the thermosphere. A surface air temperature response is detected in several regions, with the most pronounced warming occurring in the Antarctic during austral winter. Surface warming of up to 2 K is also seen over continental Asia during boreal winter.

  3. Cometary airbursts and atmospheric chemistry: Tunguska and a candidate Younger Dryas event

    CERN Document Server

    Melott, Adrian L; Dreschhoff, Gisela; Johnson, Carey K

    2009-01-01

    We estimate atmospheric chemistry changes from ionization at the 1908 Tunguska airburst event, finding agreement with nitrate enhancement in GIS2PH and GISP2 ice cores and noting an unexplained accompanying ammonium spike. We then consider the candidate Younger Dryas comet impact. The estimated NOx production and O3 depletion are large, beyond accurate extrapolation. A modest nitrate deposition signal exists in ice core data. The predicted very large impulsive deposition might be visible in higher resolution data. Ammonium has been attributed to biomass burning, and found coincident with nitrate spikes at YD onset in both the GRIP and GISP2 ice cores. A similar result is well-resolved in Tunguska ice core data, but the Tunguska forest fire was far too small to account for this. Direct input of ammonia from a comet into the atmosphere is consistent with the spike for the candidate YD object, but also inadequate for Tunguska. An analog of the Haber process with hydrogen contributed by the cometary or surface wa...

  4. The atmospheric chemistry general circultation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: Consistent simulation of ozone from the surface to the mesosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jöckel, P.; Tost, H.; Pozzer, A.; Brülh, Ch.; Buchholz, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Hoor, P.; Kerkweg, A.; Lawrence, M.G.; Sander, R.; Steil, B.; Stiller, G.; Tanarhte, M.; Taraborrelli, D.; Aardenne, van J.A.; Lelieveld, J.

    2006-01-01

    The new Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) describes atmospheric chemistry and meteorological processes in a modular framework, following strict coding standards. It has been coupled to the ECHAM5 general circulation model, which has been slightly modified for this purpose. A 90-layer model setup

  5. Design of and initial results from a highly instrumented reactor for atmospheric chemistry (HIRAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Glowacki

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The design of a Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry (HIRAC is described and initial results obtained from HIRAC are presented. The ability of HIRAC to perform in-situ laser-induced fluorescence detection of OH and HO2 radicals with the Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE technique establishes it as internationally unique for a chamber of its size and pressure/temperature variable capabilities. In addition to the FAGE technique, HIRAC features a suite of analytical instrumentation, including: a multipass FTIR system; a conventional gas chromatography (GC instrument and a GC instrument for formaldehyde detection; and NO/NO2, CO, O3, and H2O vapour analysers. Ray tracing simulations and measurements of the blacklamp flux have been utilized to develop a detailed model of the radiation field within HIRAC. Comparisons between the analysers and the FTIR coupled to HIRAC have been performed, and HIRAC has also been used to investigate pressure dependent kinetics of the chlorine atom reaction with ethene and the reaction of O3 and t-2-butene. The results obtained are in good agreement with literature recommendations and Master Chemical Mechanism predictions. HIRAC thereby offers a highly instrumented platform with the potential for: (1 high precision kinetics investigations over a range of atmospheric conditions; (2 detailed mechanism development, significantly enhanced according to its capability for measuring radicals; and (3 field instrument intercomparison, calibration, development, and investigations of instrument response under a range of atmospheric conditions.

  6. Clouds and Chemistry in the Atmosphere of Extrasolar Planet HR8799b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barman, T S; Macintosh, B A; Konopacky, Q M; Marois, C

    2011-03-21

    Using the integral field spectrograph OSIRIS, on the Keck II telescope, broad near-infrared H and K-band spectra of the young exoplanet HR8799b have been obtained. In addition, six new narrow-band photometric measurements have been taken across the H and K bands. These data are combined with previously published photometry for an analysis of the planet's atmospheric properties. Thick photospheric dust cloud opacity is invoked to explain the planet's red near-IR colors and relatively smooth near-IR spectrum. Strong water absorption is detected, indicating a Hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Only weak CH{sub 4} absorption is detected at K band, indicating efficient vertical mixing and a disequilibrium CO/CH{sub 4} ratio at photospheric depths. The H-band spectrum has a distinct triangular shape consistent with low surface gravity. New giant planet atmosphere models are compared to these data with best fitting bulk parameters, T{sub eff} = 1100K {+-} 100 and log(g) = 3.5 {+-} 0.5 (for solar composition). Given the observed luminosity (log L{sub obs}/L{sub {circle_dot}} {approx} -5.1), these values correspond to a radius of 0.75 R{sub Jup{sub 0.12}{sup +0.17}} and mass {approx} 0.72 M{sub Jup{sub -0.6}{sup +2.6}} - strikingly inconsistent with interior/evolution models. Enhanced metallicity (up to {approx} 10 x that of the Sun) along with thick clouds and non-equilibrium chemistry are likely required to reproduce the complete ensemble of spectroscopic and photometric data and the low effective temperatures (< 1000K) required by the evolution models.

  7. Connecting biology and organic chemistry introductory laboratory courses through a collaborative research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltax, Ariana L; Armanious, Stephanie; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S; Pontrello, Jason K

    2015-01-01

    Modern research often requires collaboration of experts in fields, such as math, chemistry, biology, physics, and computer science to develop unique solutions to common problems. Traditional introductory undergraduate laboratory curricula in the sciences often do not emphasize connections possible between the various disciplines. We designed an interdisciplinary, medically relevant, project intended to help students see connections between chemistry and biology. Second term organic chemistry laboratory students designed and synthesized potential polymer inhibitors or inducers of polyglutamine protein aggregation. The use of novel target compounds added the uncertainty of scientific research to the project. Biology laboratory students then tested the novel potential pharmaceuticals in Huntington's disease model assays, using in vitro polyglutamine peptide aggregation and in vivo lethality studies in Drosophila. Students read articles from the primary literature describing the system from both chemical and biological perspectives. Assessment revealed that students emerged from both courses with a deeper understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of biology and chemistry and a heightened interest in basic research. The design of this collaborative project for introductory biology and organic chemistry labs demonstrated how the local interests and expertise at a university can be drawn from to create an effective way to integrate these introductory courses. Rather than simply presenting a series of experiments to be replicated, we hope that our efforts will inspire other scientists to think about how some aspect of authentic work can be brought into their own courses, and we also welcome additional collaborations to extend the scope of the scientific exploration.

  8. Introducing Second Year Chemistry Students to Research Work through Mini-Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Jeffrey G.; Phillips, David N.

    1998-07-01

    In these so-called "mini-projects" second year students in an Applied Chemistry degree course gain their first insight to studying a chemistry-based problem prior to undertaking a major chemistry project at third year. They cover a range of topics including industrially based problems, improving current experiments in the second year Analytical Chemistry unit, or developing new experiments for future cohorts in Inorganic/Analytical Chemistry units. The class is divided into groups of 3 students, with each group being quite deliberately structured to include students of a range of ability. The program consists of one week for literature searching and four weeks of experimental work Each group is required to submit a joint written report and give an oral presentation to the whole class. The mini-projects provide an alternative experience for students to complement the standard laboratory exercises encountered in other sections of the course. They serve to introduce students on how to work in group situations, while also providing an insight to the type of work they will meet in their future employment. The assessment is based on self and peer assessment within each group, with the contribution of the class supervisor being only one-quarter of the total assessment. Valuable feedback has been obtained from student comments and the vast majority of comments reflect very favourably on the overall concept.

  9. Russian contribution to ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter: Atmospheric Chemistry Suite (ACS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakun, Alexey; Korablev, Oleg; Trokhimovskiy, Alexander; Grigoriev, Alexey; Anufreychik, Konstantin; Fedorova, Anna; Ignatiev, Nikolay; Ivanov, Yuriy; Moshkin, Boris; Kalinnikov, Yuriy; Montmessin, Franck

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric Chemistry Suite (ACS) is a part of science payload of Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), ExoMars mission. This project developed by European Space Agency (ESA) in collaboration with Russian Space Agency (Roscosmos). Russian contribution to ExoMars TGO is the Proton rocket and two science instruments ACS (three infrared spectrometers) and FREND (neutron detector). ACS consists of three infrared spectrometers (ACS/NIR, ACS/MIR and ACS/TIRVIM) capable to take spectral measurements from near to thermal infrared range simultaneously or separately. Spectrometric channels of ACS share common mechanical, electrical, and thermal interfaces. Electronic box (ACS/BE) provides to spectrometric channels power and data transfer interfaces. SpaceWire link is used for science data transfer and MIL-1553 link - for commanding and housekeeping data transfer. The NIR channel is an echelle spectrometer with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) for the selection of diffraction orders. ACS NIR is capable to perform nadir and occultation observations. NIR covers the spectral range of 0.7-1.7 μm with resolving power of ~25000. NIR will perform unique for TGO instruments nightglow science (searching for O2, OH, NO nightglow emissions on Mars). From the 1.38 μm band NIR will do water vapour mapping in nadir and H2O vertical profiling in solar occultations. High resolution NIR measurements of 1.27 μm O2(a1Δg) dayglow will supply indirect ozone observations on the dayside on nadir. In solar occultation mode, the O2 vertical profiles will be measured from the surface (in case of low dust activity) to the 40 km altitude based on 0.76 μm absorption band. Together with MIR channel in solar occultation NIR will support the measurements of CO2 density profiles (based on 1.43 μm band) and aerosols characterization from 0.7 to 4 μm. The wide spectral range will allow not just determine aerosol particle sizes and density at different altitudes, but also distinguish between dust and ice particles

  10. The use of mini-projects in an undergraduate laboratory course in chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José F. Vianna

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a three-year study of the effectiveness of mini-projects in a first year laboratory course in chemistry at a Scottish university. A mini-project is a short, practical problem which requires for its solution the application of the knowledge and skills developed in previously completed set experiments. A number of recommendations have been made about the most appropriate ways of introducing mini-projects into undergraduate laboratory course. The main hypothesis of this survey was concerned with the value of mini-projects in laboratory courses formulated within the context of Information Processing Theory.

  11. Atmosphere Resource Recovery & Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) for Long Duration Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project focuses on key physico-chemical process technologies for Atmosphere Revitalization Systems (ARS) that increase reliability, capability, and consumable...

  12. Technical Note: A trace gas climatology derived from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jones

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS aboard the Canadian satellite SCISAT (launched in August 2003 was designed to investigate the composition of the upper troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere. ACE-FTS utilizes solar occultation to measure temperature and pressure as well as vertical profiles of over thirty chemical species including O3, H2O, CH4, N2O, CO, NO, NO2, N2O5, HNO3, HCl, ClONO2, CCl3F, CCl2F2, and HF. Global coverage for each species is obtained approximately over a three month period and measurements are made with a vertical resolution of typically 3–4 km. A quality-controlled climatology has been created for each of these 14 baseline species, where individual profiles are averaged over the period of February 2004 to February 2009. Measurements used are from the ACE-FTS version 2.2 data set including updates for O3 and N2O5. The climatological fields are provided on a monthly and three-monthly basis (DJF, MAM, JJA, SON at 5 degree latitude and equivalent latitude spacing and on 28 pressure surfaces (26 of which are defined by the Stratospheric Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC Chemistry Climate Model validation activity. The ACE-FTS climatological dataset is available through the ACE website.

  13. Capacitively coupled plasma used to simulate Titan's atmospheric chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcouffe, G; Cernogora, G; Ouni, F [Universite de Versailles St Quentin, LATMOS BP3 - 91371 Verrieres-le-Buisson Cedex (France); Cavarroc, M [MID Dreux Innovation, 4 rue Albert Caquot, 28500 Vernouillet (France); Jolly, A [LISA, Universite Paris 12, 61 avenue du General de Gaulle, 94010 Creteil Cedex (France); Boufendi, L [GREMI Universite d' Orleans BP6744 - 45067 Orleans Cedex2 (France); Szopa, C [UPMC, Univ Paris 06, LATMOS BP3-91371 Verrieres-le-Buisson Cedex (France)], E-mail: gregoire.alcouffe@latmos.ipsl.fr

    2010-01-15

    A complex chemistry in Titan's atmosphere leads to the formation of organic solid aerosols. We use a radio-frequency (RF) capacitively coupled plasma discharge produced in different N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} mixtures (from 0% to 10% of CH{sub 4}) to simulate this chemistry. The work presented here was devoted to the study of the plasma discharge. In our experiment, the electron density is measured by the resonant cavity method and is about 10{sup 15} m{sup -3} in pure N{sub 2} plasma at 30 W excitation RF power. It decreases by a factor of 2 as soon as CH{sub 4} is present in the discharge, even for a proportion as small as 2% of CH{sub 4}. An optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic is installed on the experiment to study the evolution of the N{sub 2} bands and to perform actinometry measurements using Ar lines. This diagnostic allowed us to measure variations in the electron temperature and to show that a decrease in the density of the electrons can be compensated by an increase in their energy. We have also used an experimental setup where the plasma is tuned in a pulsed mode, in order to study the formation of dust particles. We observed variations in the self-bias voltage, the RF injected power and the intensities of the nitrogen bands, which indicated that dust particles were formed. The characteristic dust formation time varied, depending on the experimental conditions, from 4 to 110 s. It was faster for higher pressures and for smaller proportions of CH{sub 4} in the gas mixture.

  14. Hydrocarbons. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit O1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on hydrocarbons is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit is divided into sections dealing with alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, arenes, and several aspects of the petroleum industry. Two experiments, exercises (with answers), and pre- and post-tests are included.…

  15. Manhattan Project Technical Series The Chemistry of Uranium (I) Chapters 1-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitch, E. I. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Katz, J. J. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1946-09-30

    This constitutes Chapters 1 through 10. inclusive, of The Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. It is issued fop purposes of review and criticism. It was decided in the Editorial Board meeting on June 11, 1946, that all comments must be communicated to the volume editors at The Argonne National Laboratory within one month after receiving this draft.

  16. Equilibrium II: Acids and Bases. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit P3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on equilibrium is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit, which consists of two levels, focuses on the application of equilibrium principles to equilibria involving weak acids and bases, including buffer solutions and indicators. Level one uses Le Chatelier's…

  17. Equilibrium I: Principles. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on the principles of equilibrium is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit consists of two levels. After a treatment of non-mathematical aspects in level one (the idea of a reversible reaction, characteristics of an equilibrium state, the Le Chatelier's principle),…

  18. A Wiki-Based Group Project in an Inorganic Chemistry Foundation Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    A semester-long group project that utilizes wiki sites to enhance collaboration was developed for a foundation course in inorganic chemistry. Through structured assignments, student groups use metal-based or metal-combating therapeutic agents as a model for applying and understanding course concepts; they also gain proficiency with scientific- and…

  19. A Service-Learning Project in Chemistry: Environmental Monitoring of a Nature Preserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammler, David C.; Truong, Triet M.; VanNess, Garrett; McGowin, Audrey E.

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative environmental service-learning project was implemented between upper-level undergraduate science majors and graduate chemistry students at a large state school and first-year students at a small private liberal arts college. Students analyzed the water quality in a nature preserve by determining the quantities of 12 trace metals,…

  20. Simulation of a Forensic Chemistry Problem: A Multidisciplinary Project for Secondary School Chemistry Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a project that uses a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving in analyzing a crime scene and suspect evidence. Requires each student to work effectively in a team, communicate in both written and oral forms, perform hands-on laboratory manipulations, and realize that the entire class was depending on their individual contributions…

  1. Atmospheric chemistry of polycyclic aromatic compounds with special emphasis on nitro derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feilberg, A.

    2000-04-01

    Field measurements of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) have been carried out at a semi-rural site and at an urban site. Correlation analyses, PAC indicators, and PAC ratios have been used to evaluate the importance of various sources of nitro-PAHs. A major source of nitro-PAHs is atmospheric transformation of PAHs initiated by OH radicals. Especially during long-range transport (LRT) of air pollution from Central Europe, the nitro-PAH composition in Denmark is dominated by nitro-PAHs formed in the atmosphere. Locally emitted nitro-PAHs are primarily from diesel vehicles. Levels of unsubstituted PAHs can also be strongly elevated in connection with LRT episodes. The ratio of 2-nitrofluoranthene relative to 1-nitropyrene is proposed as a measure of the relative photochemical age of particulate matter. Using this ratio, the relative mutagenicity of particle extracts appears to increase with increasing photochemical age. In connection with the field measurements, a method for measuring nitro-PAHs in particle extracts based on MS-MS detection has been developed. The atmospheric chemistry of nitronaphthalenes has been investigated with a smog chamber system combined with simulation with photochemical kinetics software. A methodology to implement gas-particle partitioning in a model based on chemical kinetics is described. Equilibrium constants (KP) for gas-particle partitioning of 1- and 2-nitronaphthalene have been determined. Mass transfer between the two phases appears to occur on a very short timescale. The gas phase photolysis of the nitronaphthalenes depends upon the molecular conformation. Significantly faster photolysis of 1-nitronaphthalene than of 2-nitronaphthalene is observed. The photochemistry of nitro-PAHs, and to some extent other PAC, associated with organic aerosols, has been studied with model systems simulating organic aerosol material. A number of aerosol constituents, including substituted phenols, benzaldehydes, and oxy-PAHs, are demonstrated to

  2. A three-dimensional general circulation model with coupled chemistry for the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, P. J.; Boville, B. A.; Brasseur, G. P.

    1995-05-01

    We document a new middle atmosphere general circulation model that includes ozone photochemistry. The dynamical model component is based on the NCAR middle atmosphere version of the Community Climate Model. The chemistry model component simulates the evolution of 24 chemically reactive gases. The horizontal resolution is approximately 3° in latitude and 6° in longitude. It includes 44 levels, with a maximum vertical grid spacing of about 2.5 km and a top level at around 75 km. The chemical model distinguishes between species where we judge transport to be critical and those for which it may be neglected. Nine longer-lived species (N2O, CH4, H2O, HNO3, N2O5, CO, ClONO2, HCl, and HOCl) and four chemical families (NOy, NOx, Ox and Clx) are advected. Concentrations of 15 species which are typically shorter-lived or are members of the chemical families are diagnosed using quasi-equilibrium assumptions ( O(1D), OH, Cl, O(3P), O3, HO2, NO2, ClO, NO, HNO4, NO3, N, OClO, Cl2O2, H2O2). Distributions for a number of other species are prescribed. Results are presented from a 2-year simulation, which include only gas phase photochemical reactions and in which the ozone distribution forecast from the chemistry module does not affect the radiative forcing of the dynamical fields. The calculated distributions of trace species and their seasonal evolution are often quite realistic, particularly in the northern hemisphere extratropics. Distributions of long-lived species such as N2O and CH4 correspond well to satellite observations. Some features, such as the double peak structure occurring during equinoxes, are not reproduced. The latitudinal variation and seasonal evolution of the ozone column abundance is quite realistic. The calculated vertical distribution of the ozone mixing ratio exhibits significant differences from measured values. The model underestimates significantly the ozone in the upper stratosphere (40 km) and in the extratropics, where the maximum values occur at

  3. Description and evaluation of the Multiscale Online Nonhydrostatic AtmospheRe CHemistry model (NMMB-MONARCH) version 1.0: gas-phase chemistry at global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Alba; Jorba, Oriol; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Dabdub, Donald; Pérez García-Pando, Carlos; Hilboll, Andreas; Gonçalves, María; Janjic, Zavisa

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive description and benchmark evaluation of the tropospheric gas-phase chemistry component of the Multiscale Online Nonhydrostatic AtmospheRe CHemistry model (NMMB-MONARCH), formerly known as NMMB/BSC-CTM, that can be run on both regional and global domains. Here, we provide an extensive evaluation of a global annual cycle simulation using a variety of background surface stations (EMEP, WDCGG and CASTNET), ozonesondes (WOUDC, CMD and SHADOZ), aircraft data (MOZAIC and several campaigns), and satellite observations (SCIAMACHY and MOPITT). We also include an extensive discussion of our results in comparison to other state-of-the-art models. We note that in this study, we omitted aerosol processes and some natural emissions (lightning and volcano emissions). The model shows a realistic oxidative capacity across the globe. The seasonal cycle for CO is fairly well represented at different locations (correlations around 0.3-0.7 in surface concentrations), although concentrations are underestimated in spring and winter in the Northern Hemisphere, and are overestimated throughout the year at 800 and 500 hPa in the Southern Hemisphere. Nitrogen species are well represented in almost all locations, particularly NO2 in Europe (root mean square error - RMSE - below 5 ppb). The modeled vertical distributions of NOx and HNO3 are in excellent agreement with the observed values and the spatial and seasonal trends of tropospheric NO2 columns correspond well to observations from SCIAMACHY, capturing the highly polluted areas and the biomass burning cycle throughout the year. Over Asia, the model underestimates NOx from March to August, probably due to an underestimation of NOx emissions in the region. Overall, the comparison of the modeled CO and NO2 with MOPITT and SCIAMACHY observations emphasizes the need for more accurate emission rates from anthropogenic and biomass burning sources (i.e., specification of temporal variability). The resulting

  4. Parameterization of gaseous dry deposition in atmospheric chemistry models: Sensitivity to aerodynamic resistance formulations under statically stable conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenjiro; Dastoor, Ashu P.; Ryzhkov, Andrei

    2016-12-01

    Turbulence controls the vertical transfer of momentum, heat and trace constituents in the atmospheric boundary layer. In the lowest 10% of this layer lies the surface boundary layer (SBL) where the vertical fluxes of transferred quantities have been successfully parameterized using the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in weather forecast, climate and atmospheric chemistry models. However, there is a large degree of empiricism in the stability-correction parameterizations used to formulate eddy diffusivity and aerodynamic resistance particularly under strongly stable ambient conditions. Although the influence of uncertainties in stability-correction parameterizations on eddy diffusivity is actively studied in boundary-layer meteorological modeling, its impact on dry deposition in atmospheric chemistry modeling is not well characterized. In this study, we address this gap by providing the mathematical basis for the relationship between the formulations of vertical surface flux used in meteorological and atmospheric chemistry modeling communities, and by examining the sensitivity of the modeled dry deposition velocities in statically stable SBL to the choice of stability-correction parameterizations used in three operational and/or research environmental models (GEM/GEM-MACH, ECMWF IFS and CMAQ-MM5). Aerodynamic resistances (ra) calculated by the three sets of parameterizations are notably different from each other and are also different from those calculated by a "z-less" scaling formulation under strongly stable conditions (the bulk Richardson number > 0.2). Furthermore, we show that many atmospheric chemistry models calculate ra using formulations which are inconsistent with the derivation of micro-meteorological parameters. Finally, practical implications of the differences in stability-correction algorithms are discussed for the computations of dry deposition velocities of SO2, O3 and reactive bromine compounds for specific cases of stable SBL.

  5. Chemical isolation in the Asian monsoon anticyclone observed in Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE-FTS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Park

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of chemical isolation in the Asian monsoon anticyclone is presented using chemical constituents obtained from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer instrument during summer (June–August of 2004–2006. Carbon monoxide (CO shows a broad maximum over the monsoon anticyclone region in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS; these enhanced CO values are associated with air pollution transported upward by convection, and confined by the strong anticyclonic circulation. Profiles inside the anticyclone show enhancement of tropospheric tracers CO, HCN, C2H6, and C2H2 between ~12 to 20 km, with maxima near 13–15 km. Strong correlations are observed among constituents, consistent with sources from near-surface pollution and biomass burning. Stratospheric tracers (O3, HNO3 and HCl exhibit decreased values inside the anticyclone between ~12–20 km. These observations are further evidence of transport of lower tropospheric air into the UTLS region, and isolation of air within the anticyclone. The relative enhancements of tropospheric species inside the anticyclone are closely related to the photochemical lifetime of the species, with strongest enhancement for shorter lived species. Vertical profiles of the ratio of C2H2/CO (used to measure the relative age of air suggest relatively rapid transport of fresh emissions up to the tropopause level inside the anticyclone.

  6. Chemical Isolation in the Asian monsoon anticyclone observed in Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE-FTS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Park

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Evidence of chemical isolation in the Asian monsoon anticyclone is presented using chemical constituents obtained from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer instrument during summer (June–August of 2004–2006. Carbon monoxide (CO shows a broad maximum over the monsoon anticyclone region in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS; these enhanced CO values are associated with air pollution transported upward by convection, and confined by the strong anticyclonic circulation. Profiles inside the anticyclone show enhancement of tropospheric tracers CO, HCN, C2H6, and C2H2 between ~12 to 20 km, with maxima near 13–15 km. Strong correlations are observed among constituents, consistent with sources from near-surface pollution and biomass burning. Stratospheric tracers (O3, HNO3 and HCl exhibit decreased values inside the anticyclone between ~12–20 km. These observations are further evidence of transport of lower tropospheric air into the UTLS region, and isolation of air within the anticyclone. The relative enhancements of tropospheric species inside the anticyclone are closely related to the photochemical lifetime of the species, with strongest enhancement for shorter lived species. Vertical profiles of the ratio of C2H2/CO (used to measure the relative age of air suggest relatively rapid transport of fresh emissions up to tropopause level inside the anticyclone.

  7. Evaluation of NO+ reagent ion chemistry for online measurements of atmospheric volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Abigail R.; Warneke, Carsten; Yuan, Bin; Coggon, Matthew M.; Veres, Patrick R.; de Gouw, Joost A.

    2016-07-01

    NO+ chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NO+ CIMS) can achieve fast (1 Hz and faster) online measurement of trace atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that cannot be ionized with H3O+ ions (e.g., in a PTR-MS or H3O+ CIMS instrument). Here we describe the adaptation of a high-resolution time-of-flight H3O+ CIMS instrument to use NO+ primary ion chemistry. We evaluate the NO+ technique with respect to compound specificity, sensitivity, and VOC species measured compared to H3O+. The evaluation is established by a series of experiments including laboratory investigation using a gas-chromatography (GC) interface, in situ measurement of urban air using a GC interface, and direct in situ measurement of urban air. The main findings are that (1) NO+ is useful for isomerically resolved measurements of carbonyl species; (2) NO+ can achieve sensitive detection of small (C4-C8) branched alkanes but is not unambiguous for most; and (3) compound-specific measurement of some alkanes, especially isopentane, methylpentane, and high-mass (C12-C15) n-alkanes, is possible with NO+. We also demonstrate fast in situ chemically specific measurements of C12 to C15 alkanes in ambient air.

  8. Laser flash photolysis studies of atmospheric free radical chemistry using optical diagnostic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wine, Paul H.; Nicovich, J. M.; Hynes, Anthony J.; Stickel, Robert E.; Thorn, R. P.; Chin, Mian; Cronkhite, Jeffrey A.; Shackelford, Christie J.; Zhao, Zhizhong; Daykin, Edward P.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent studies carried out in our laboratory are described where laser flash photolytic production of reactant free radicals has been combined with reactant and/or product detection using time-resolved optical techniques to investigate the kinetics and mechanisms of important atmospheric chemical reactions. Discussed are (1) a study of the radical-radical reaction O + BrO yields Br + O2 where two photolysis lasers are employed to prepare the reaction mixture and where the reactants O and BrO are monitored simultaneously using atomic resonance fluorescence to detect O and multipass UV absorption to detect BrO; (2) a study of the reaction of atomic chlorine with dimethylsulfide (CH3SCH3) where atomic resonance fluorescence detection of Cl is employed to elucidate the kinetics and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy is employed to investigate the HCl product yield; and (3) a study of the aqueous phase chemistry of Cl2(-) radicals where longpath UV absorption spectroscopy is employed to investigate the kinetics of the Cl2(-) + H2O reaction.

  9. Using "Household Chemistry Projects" To Develop Research Skills and To Teach Scientific Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael H.

    1997-04-01

    Students in a junior-level Chemistry library resources and scientific writing course were assigned semester-long "Household Chemistry Projects." Students were asked to independently develop written proposals for research they could do at their homes using ordinary household supplies. Upon approval of their proposals, students performed the research and wrote up in their results in standard journal format. The final drafts were subjected to peer review, and published in a class journal. Through feedback and rewriting, students not only improved their scientific writing skills, but also learned about designing, conducting, and criticizing research.

  10. Disequilibrium Carbon, Oxygen, and Nitrogen Chemistry in the Atmospheres of HD 189733b and HD 209458b

    CERN Document Server

    Moses, Julianne I; Fortney, Jonathan J; Showman, Adam P; Lewis, Nikole K; Griffith, Caitlin A; Shabram, Megan; Friedson, A James; Marley, Mark S; Freedman, Richard S

    2011-01-01

    We have developed 1-D photochemical and thermochemical kinetics and diffusion models for the transiting exoplanets HD 189733b and HD 209458b to study the effects of disequilibrium chemistry on the atmospheric composition of "hot Jupiters." Here we investigate the coupled chemistry of neutral carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen species, and we compare the model results with existing transit and eclipse observations. We find that the vertical profiles of molecular constituents are significantly affected by transport-induced quenching and photochemistry, particularly on cooler HD 189733b; however, the warmer stratospheric temperatures on HD 209458b can help maintain thermochemical equilibrium and reduce the effects of disequilibrium chemistry. For both planets, the methane and ammonia mole fractions are found to be enhanced over their equilibrium values at pressures of a few bar to less than a mbar due to transport-induced quenching, but CH$_4$ and NH$_3$ are photochemically removed at higher altitudes. Atomi...

  11. Impact of Improvements in Volcanic Implementation on Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate in the GISS-E2 Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigaridis, Kostas; LeGrande, Allegra; Bauer, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    The representation of volcanic eruptions in climate models introduces some of the largest errors when evaluating historical simulations, partly due to the crude model parameterizations. We will show preliminary results from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS)-E2 model comparing traditional highly parameterized volcanic implementation (specified Aerosol Optical Depth, Effective Radius) to deploying the full aerosol microphysics module MATRIX and directly emitting SO2 allowing us the prognosically determine the chemistry and climate impact. We show a reasonable match in aerosol optical depth, effective radius, and forcing between the full aerosol implementation and reconstructions/observations of the Mt. Pinatubo 1991 eruption, with a few areas as targets for future improvement. This allows us to investigate not only the climate impact of the injection of volcanic aerosols, but also influences on regional water vapor, O3, and OH distributions. With the skill of the MATRIX volcano implementation established, we explore (1) how the height of the injection column of SO2 influence atmospheric chemistry and climate response, (2) how the initial condition of the atmosphere influences the climate and chemistry impact of the eruption with a particular focus on how ENSO and QBO and (3) how the coupled chemistry could mitigate the climate signal for much larger eruptions (i.e. the 1258 eruption, reconstructed to be approximately 10x Pinatubo). During each sensitivity experiment we assess the impact on profiles of water vapor, O3, and OH, and assess how the eruption impacts the budget of each.

  12. Role of climate feedback on methane and ozone studied with a coupled ocean-atmosphere-chemistry model.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, C E; D. S. Stevenson; Collins, W. J.; R. G. Derwent

    2001-01-01

    We present results from two experiments carried out with a coupled ocean-atmosphere-tropospheric chemistry model run continously over the period 1990 to 2100. In the control experiment, climate is unforced, but emissions of trace gases to the chemical model increase in line with an illustrative scenario for future trace gas emissions with medium high growth. In the climate change experiment trace gas emissions are identical to the control, but climate is also forced using greenhouse gas conce...

  13. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume IV ? gas phase reactions of organic halogen species

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    International audience; This article, the fourth in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data sheets evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of organic halogen species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in 2006. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and four appen...

  14. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume II – gas phase reactions of organic species

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This article, the second in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Organic species, which were last published in 1999, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2002, and subsequently during the preparation of this article. The article consists of a summary table of the recommended rate coefficients, containing the...

  15. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume I - gas phase reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    This article, the first in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on GasKinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Ox, HOx, NOx and SOx species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2001. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and five appendi...

  16. A Review of Atmospheric Chemistry Research in China: Photochemical Smog, Haze Pollution, and Gas-Aerosol Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jianzhong; XU Xiaobin; ZHAO Chunsheng; YAN Peng

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a review of atmospheric chemistry research in China over the period 2006-2010,focusing on tropospheric ozone,aerosol chemistry,and the interactions between trace gases and aerosols in the polluted areas of China.Over the past decade,China has suffered severe photochemical smog and haze pollution,especially in North China,the Yangtze River Delta,and the Pearl River Delta.Much scientific work on atmospheric chemistry and physics has been done to address this large-scale,complex environmental problem.Intensive field experiments,satellite data analyses,and model simulations have shown that air pollution is significantly changing the chemical and physical characters of the natural atmosphere over these parts of China.In addition to strong emissions of primary pollutants,photochemical and heterogeneous reactions play key roles in the formation of complex pollution.More in-depth research is recommended to reveal the formation mechanism of photochemical smog and haze pollution and their climatic effects at the urban,regional,and global scales.

  17. Research in Physical Chemistry and Chemical Education: Part A--Water Mediated Chemistry of Oxidized Atmospheric Compounds Part B--The Development of Surveying Tools to Determine How Effective Laboratory Experiments Contribute to Student Conceptual Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Marta Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation is a combination of two research areas, experimental physical chemistry, Chapters I to V, and chemical education, Chapters VI to VII. Chapters I to V describe research on the water-mediated chemistry of oxidized atmospheric molecules and the impact that water has on the spectra of these environmental systems. The role of water…

  18. Impact of continental outflow on chemistry of atmospheric aerosols over tropical Bay of Bengal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Srinivas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The continental outflow from Indo-Gangetic Plain and south-east Asia dominates the widespread dispersal of pollutants over tropical Bay of Bengal (BoB during the late NE-monsoon (January–March. It is thus pertinent to assess the impact on marine atmospheric boundary layer of BoB. The chemical data, based on analyses of size-segregated (PM2.5 and PM10 aerosols, suggest the dominance of nss-SO42− (range: 1.3 to 28 μg m−3 in PM2.5. Almost all SO42− is of anthropogenic origin and accounts for as much as 65 % of the water-soluble inorganic constituents. The impact of anthropogenic sources is further evident from the widespread depletion of chloride (range: 40 to 100 % compared to sea-salt composition. The carbonaceous species (EC and OC contribute nearly 25 % to PM2.5; and significant linear relationship with K+ suggests biomass burning as their dominant source (biofuels and agricultural waste. The enhancement in the fractional solubility of aerosol Fe, as assessed in PM2.5, re-emphasizes the impact of combustion sources (biomass and fossil-fuel and chemical processing (of dust during the long-range transport. The high enrichment factors of heavy metals (Pb and Cd further demonstrate the influence of pollution sources on the chemistry of MABL. The downwind transport of pollutants and exchange across air-sea interface can, thus, have profound impact on the ocean surface biogeochemistry.

  19. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Retrievals from Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Solar Occultation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Chiou, Linda; Boone, Chris; Bernath, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment ACE satellite (SCISAT-1) was launched into an inclined orbit on 12 August 2003 and is now recording high signal-to-noise 0.02 per centimeter resolution solar absorption spectra covering 750-4400 per centimeter (2.3-13 micrometers). A procedure has been developed for retrieving average dry air CO2 mole fractions (X(sub CO2)) in the altitude range 7-10 kilometers from the SCISAT-1 spectra. Using the N2 continuum absorption in a window region near 2500 per centimeter, altitude shifts are applied to the tangent heights retrieved in version 2.2 SCISAT-1 processing, while cloudy or aerosol-impacted measurements are eliminated. Monthly-mean XCO2 covering 60 S to 60 N latitude for February 2004 to March 2008 has been analyzed with consistent trends inferred in both hemispheres. The ACE XCO2 time series have been compared with previously-reported surface network measurements, predictions based on upper tropospheric aircraft measurements, and space-based measurements. The retrieved X(sub CO2) from the ACE-FTS spectra are higher on average by a factor of 1.07 plus or minus 0.025 in the northern hemisphere and by a factor of 1.09 plus or minus 0.019 on average in the southern hemisphere compared to surface station measurements covering the same time span. The ACE derived trend is approximately 0.2% per year higher than measured at surface stations during the same observation period.

  20. Response of an aerosol mass spectrometer to organonitrates and organosulfates and implications for atmospheric chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, D K; Matsunaga, A; Docherty, K S; Surratt, J D; Seinfeld, J H; Ziemann, P J; Jimenez, J L

    2010-04-13

    Organonitrates (ON) are important products of gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds in the troposphere; some models predict, and laboratory studies show, the formation of large, multifunctional ON with vapor pressures low enough to partition to the particle phase. Organosulfates (OS) have also been recently detected in secondary organic aerosol. Despite their potential importance, ON and OS remain a nearly unexplored aspect of atmospheric chemistry because few studies have quantified particulate ON or OS in ambient air. We report the response of a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to aerosol ON and OS standards and mixtures. We quantify the potentially substantial underestimation of organic aerosol O/C, commonly used as a metric for aging, and N/C. Most of the ON-nitrogen appears as NO(x)+ ions in the AMS, which are typically dominated by inorganic nitrate. Minor organonitrogen ions are observed although their identity and intensity vary between standards. We evaluate the potential for using NO(x)+ fragment ratios, organonitrogen ions, HNO(3)+ ions, the ammonium balance of the nominally inorganic ions, and comparison to ion-chromatography instruments to constrain the concentrations of ON for ambient datasets, and apply these techniques to a field study in Riverside, CA. OS manifests as separate organic and sulfate components in the AMS with minimal organosulfur fragments and little difference in fragmentation from inorganic sulfate. The low thermal stability of ON and OS likely causes similar detection difficulties for other aerosol mass spectrometers using vaporization and/or ionization techniques with similar or larger energy, which has likely led to an underappreciation of these species.

  1. Validation of NO2 and NO from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of NO2 and NO have been obtained from solar occultation measurements by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE, using an infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer, ACE-FTS, and an ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectrometer, MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation. In this paper, the quality of the ACE-FTS version 2.2 NO2 and NO and the MAESTRO version 1.2 NO2 data are assessed using other solar occultation measurements (HALOE, SAGE II, SAGE III, POAM III, SCIAMACHY, stellar occultation measurements (GOMOS, limb measurements (MIPAS, OSIRIS, nadir measurements (SCIAMACHY, balloon measurements (SPIRALE, SAOZ and ground-based measurements (UV-VIS, FTIR. Time differences between the comparison measurements were reduced using either a tight coincidence criterion, or where possible, chemical box models. ACE-FTS NO2 and NO and the MAESTRO NO2 are generally consistent with the correlative data. The ACE-FTS NO2 VMRs agree with the satellite data sets to within about 20% between 25 and 40 km, and suggest a negative bias between 23 and 40 km of about extminus10%. In comparisons with HALOE, ACE-FTS NO VMRs typically agree to ±8% from 22 to 64 km and to +10% from 93 to 105 km. Partial column comparisons for NO2 show that there is fair agreement between the ACE instruments and the FTIRs, with a mean difference of +7.3% for ACE-FTS and +12.8% for MAESTRO.

  2. Validation of NO2 and NO from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Vertical profiles of NO2 and NO have been obtained from solar occultation measurements by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE, using an infrared Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS and (for NO2 an ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared spectrometer, MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation. In this paper, the quality of the ACE-FTS version 2.2 NO2 and NO and the MAESTRO version 1.2 NO2 data are assessed using other solar occultation measurements (HALOE, SAGE II, SAGE III, POAM III, SCIAMACHY, stellar occultation measurements (GOMOS, limb measurements (MIPAS, OSIRIS, nadir measurements (SCIAMACHY, balloon-borne measurements (SPIRALE, SAOZ and ground-based measurements (UV-VIS, FTIR. Time differences between the comparison measurements were reduced using either a tight coincidence criterion, or where possible, chemical box models. ACE-FTS NO2 and NO and the MAESTRO NO2 are generally consistent with the correlative data. The ACE-FTS and MAESTRO NO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR profiles agree with the profiles from other satellite data sets to within about 20% between 25 and 40 km, with the exception of MIPAS ESA (for ACE-FTS and SAGE II (for ACE-FTS (sunrise and MAESTRO and suggest a negative bias between 23 and 40 km of about 10%. MAESTRO reports larger VMR values than the ACE-FTS. In comparisons with HALOE, ACE-FTS NO VMRs typically (on average agree to ±8% from 22 to 64 km and to +10% from 93 to 105 km, with maxima of 21% and 36%, respectively. Partial column comparisons for NO2 show that there is quite good agreement between the ACE instruments and the FTIRs, with a mean difference of +7.3% for ACE-FTS and +12.8% for MAESTRO.

  3. Enabling drug discovery project decisions with integrated computational chemistry and informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Vickie; Ortwine, Daniel F; Blaney, Jeffrey M

    2016-10-31

    Computational chemistry/informatics scientists and software engineers in Genentech Small Molecule Drug Discovery collaborate with experimental scientists in a therapeutic project-centric environment. Our mission is to enable and improve pre-clinical drug discovery design and decisions. Our goal is to deliver timely data, analysis, and modeling to our therapeutic project teams using best-in-class software tools. We describe our strategy, the organization of our group, and our approaches to reach this goal. We conclude with a summary of the interdisciplinary skills required for computational scientists and recommendations for their training.

  4. Enabling drug discovery project decisions with integrated computational chemistry and informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Vickie; Ortwine, Daniel F.; Blaney, Jeffrey M.

    2016-10-01

    Computational chemistry/informatics scientists and software engineers in Genentech Small Molecule Drug Discovery collaborate with experimental scientists in a therapeutic project-centric environment. Our mission is to enable and improve pre-clinical drug discovery design and decisions. Our goal is to deliver timely data, analysis, and modeling to our therapeutic project teams using best-in-class software tools. We describe our strategy, the organization of our group, and our approaches to reach this goal. We conclude with a summary of the interdisciplinary skills required for computational scientists and recommendations for their training.

  5. Project-focused activity and knowledge tracker: a unified data analysis, collaboration, and workflow tool for medicinal chemistry project teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodney, Marian D; Brosius, Arthur D; Gregory, Tracy; Heck, Steven D; Klug-McLeod, Jacquelyn L; Poss, Christopher S

    2009-12-01

    Advances in the field of drug discovery have brought an explosion in the quantity of data available to medicinal chemists and other project team members. New strategies and systems are needed to help these scientists to efficiently gather, organize, analyze, annotate, and share data about potential new drug molecules of interest to their project teams. Herein we describe a suite of integrated services and end-user applications that facilitate these activities throughout the medicinal chemistry design cycle. The Automated Data Presentation (ADP) and Virtual Compound Profiler (VCP) processes automate the gathering, organization, and storage of real and virtual molecules, respectively, and associated data. The Project-Focused Activity and Knowledge Tracker (PFAKT) provides a unified data analysis and collaboration environment, enhancing decision-making, improving team communication, and increasing efficiency.

  6. The Response of Atmospheric Chemistry on Earthlike Planets around F, G and K Stars to Small Variations in Orbital Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Grenfell, J L; Von Paris, P; Patzer, B; Titz, R; Segura, A; Rauer, H; Grenfell, John Lee; Stracke, Barbara; Paris, Philip von; Patzer, Beate; Titz, Ruth; Segura, Antigona; Rauer, Heike

    2006-01-01

    One of the prime goals of future investigations of extrasolar planets is to search for life as we know it. The Earth's biosphere is adapted to current conditions. How would the atmospheric chemistry of the Earth respond if we moved it to different orbital distances or changed its host star? This question is central to astrobiology and aids our understanding of how the atmospheres of terrestrial planets develop. To help address this question, we have performed a sensitivity study using a coupled radiative-convective photochemical column model to calculate changes in atmospheric chemistry on a planet having Earth's atmospheric composition, which we subjected to small changes in orbital position, of the order of 5-10 per cent for a solar-type G2V, F2V, and K2V star. We then applied a chemical source-sink analysis to the biomarkers in order to understand how chemical processes affect biomarker concentrations. We start with the composition of the present Earth, since this is the only example we know for which a sp...

  7. PREP-CHEM-SRC – 1.0: a preprocessor of trace gas and aerosol emission fields for regional and global atmospheric chemistry models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Freitas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The preprocessor PREP-CHEM-SRC presented in the paper is a comprehensive tool aiming at preparing emission fields of trace gases and aerosols for use in atmospheric-chemistry transport models. The considered emissions are from the most recent databases of urban/industrial, biogenic, biomass burning, volcanic, biofuel use and burning from agricultural waste sources. For biomass burning, emissions can be also estimated directly from satellite fire detections using a fire emission model included in the tool. The preprocessor provides emission fields interpolated onto the transport model grid. Several map projections can be chosen. The inclusion of these emissions in transport models is also presented. The preprocessor is coded using Fortran90 and C and is driven by a namelist allowing the user to choose the type of emissions and the databases.

  8. Joint project final report, Task II: Sulfur chemistry, Task III: Nitrogen Chemistry[Straw fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glarborg, P.; Lans, R. van der; Weigang, L.; Arendt Jensen, P.; Degn Jensen, A.; Dam-Johansen, K.

    2001-09-01

    It is the aim of the project to promote the use of biomass in the production of power and heat in Denmark as well as enhancing the technology base of the Danish industry within this area. The project involves, the following task areas: 1) Deposit Build-up; 2) Sulfur Chemistry; 3) Nitrogen Chemistry; and 4) Furnace Modeling. The present report covers the activities in task 2 and 3, which are carried out at Department of Chemical Engineering, DTU. Task 2: Sulfur chemistry: The lab-scale results show that the amount of sulfur released into the gas-phase increases at high temperatures. Other process parameters such as oxygen concentration have less impact. Little sulfur is apparently released during char oxidation. The experiments show that about 40% of the sulfur is released during pyrolysis at 400 {sup d}eg{sup .}C. At combustion conditions it was found that about 50% of the sulfur is released at 500{sup d}eg.{sup C}; above this temperature an almost linear correlation is found beteen sulfur release and combustion temperature up to 80-85% release at 950{sup d}eg.{sup C}. The experiments are in agreement with results from full scale straw fired grate boilers, indicating that only a small amount of fuel-sulfur is fixed in the bottom ash under typical operating conditions. The results are important in order to understand the varying emission levels observed in full-scala systems and provide guidelines for low SO{sub 2} operation. Task 3: Nitrogen chemistry: In the nitgrogen chemistry submodel volatile-N is released as NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2}. The ammonia can react further to N{sub 2} or NO. Char nitrogen is oxidized to NO, and the char bed acts as a catalyst for the reduction of NO to N{sub 2}. Predictions with the bed-model including the NO submodel indicate that when all volatile nitrogen is converted to NH{sub 3}, the concentrations og NH{sub 3} are significantly overpredicted. This means that either the NH{sub 3} reaction rates are underpredicted or that a smaller

  9. The influence of small-scale variations in isoprene concentrations on atmospheric chemistry over a tropical rainforest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. M. Pugh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs such as isoprene constitute a large proportion of the global atmospheric oxidant sink. Their reactions in the atmosphere contribute to processes such as ozone production and secondary organic aerosol formation. However, over the tropical rainforest, where 50% of the global emissions of BVOCs are believed to occur, atmospheric chemistry models have been unable to simultaneously simulate the measured daytime concentration of isoprene and that of its principal oxidant, hydroxyl (OH. One reason for this model-measurement discrepancy may be incomplete mixing of isoprene within the convective boundary layer, leading to patchiness or segregation in isoprene and OH mixing ratios and average concentrations that appear to be incompatible with each other. One way of capturing this effect in models of atmospheric chemistry is to use a reduced effective rate constant for their reaction. Recent studies comparing atmospheric chemistry global/box models with field measurements have suggested that this effective rate reduction may be as large as 50%; which is at the upper limit of that calculated using large eddy simulation models. To date there has only been one field campaign worldwide that has reported co-located measurements of isoprene and OH at the necessary temporal resolution to calculate the segregation of these compounds. However many campaigns have recorded sufficiently high resolution isoprene measurements to capture the small-scale fluctuations in its concentration. We use a box model of atmospheric chemistry, constrained by the spectrum of isoprene concentrations measured, to estimate segregation intensity of isoprene and OH from high-frequency isoprene time series. The method successfully reproduces the only directly observed segregation. The effective rate constant reduction for the reaction of isoprene and OH over a South-East Asian rainforest is calculated to be typically <15%. This estimate is not

  10. The influence of small-scale variations in isoprene concentrations on atmospheric chemistry over a tropical rainforest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. M. Pugh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs such as isoprene constitute a large proportion of the global atmospheric oxidant sink. Their reactions in the atmosphere contribute to processes such as ozone production and secondary organic aerosol formation. However, over the tropical rainforest, where 50 % of the global emissions of BVOCs are believed to occur, atmospheric chemistry models have been unable to simulate concurrently the measured daytime concentration of isoprene and that of its principal oxidant, hydroxyl (OH. One reason for this model-measurement discrepancy may be incomplete mixing of isoprene within the convective boundary layer, leading to patchiness or segregation in isoprene and OH mixing ratios and average concentrations that appear to be incompatible with each other. One way of capturing this effect in models of atmospheric chemistry is to use a reduced effective rate constant for their reaction. Recent studies comparing atmospheric chemistry global/box models with field measurements have suggested that this effective rate reduction may be as large as 50 %; which is at the upper limit of that calculated using large eddy simulation models. To date there has only been one field campaign worldwide that has reported co-located measurements of isoprene and OH at the necessary temporal resolution to calculate the segregation of these compounds. However many campaigns have recorded sufficiently high resolution isoprene measurements to capture the small-scale fluctuations in its concentration. Assuming uniform distributions of other OH production and loss processes, we use a box model of atmospheric chemistry, constrained by the spectrum of isoprene concentrations measured, as a virtual instrument, to estimate the variability in OH at a point and hence, to estimate the segregation intensity of isoprene and OH from high-frequency isoprene time series. The method successfully reproduces the only directly observed segregation, using

  11. The impact of temperature dependent CO2 cross section measurements: A role for heterogeneous chemistry in the atmosphere of Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbar, A. D.; Allen, M.; Nair, H.; Leu, M-T.; Yung, Y. L.

    1992-01-01

    Carbon dioxide comprises over 95 percent of the Mars atmosphere, despite continuous photolysis of CO2 by solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Since the direct recombination of CO and O is spinforbidden, the chemical stability of CO2 in the Martian atmosphere is thought to be the result of a HO(x)-catalyzed recombination scheme. Thus the rate of CO oxidation is sensitive to the abundance and altitude distribution of OH, H, and HO2. Most Martian atmospheric models assume that HO(x) abundances are governed purely by gas phase chemistry. However, it is well established that reactive HO(x) radical are adsorbed by a wide variety of surfaces. The authors have combined laboratory studies of H, OH, and HO2 adsorption on inorganic surfaces, observational data of aerosol distributions, and an updated photochemical model to demonstrate that adsorption on either dust or ice aerosols is capable of reducing HO(x) abundances significantly, thereby retarding the rate of CO oxidation.

  12. Lightning-driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: implications for ionisation-levels and neutral chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Lightning-generated whistlers lead to coupling between the troposphere, the Van Allen radiation belts and the lower-ionosphere through Whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP. Lightning produced whistlers interact with cyclotron resonant radiation belt electrons, leading to pitch-angle scattering into the bounce loss cone and precipitation into the atmosphere. Here we consider the relative significance of WEP to the lower ionosphere and atmosphere by contrasting WEP produced ionisation rate changes with those from Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR and solar photoionisation. During the day, WEP is never a significant source of ionisation in the lower ionosphere for any location or altitude. At nighttime, GCR is more significant than WEP at altitudes <68 km for all locations, above which WEP starts to dominate in North America and Central Europe. Between 75 and 80 km altitude WEP becomes more significant than GCR for the majority of spatial locations at which WEP deposits energy. The size of the regions in which WEP is the most important nighttime ionisation source peaks at ~80 km, depending on the relative contributions of WEP and nighttime solar Lyman-α. We also used the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC model to consider the atmospheric consequences of WEP, focusing on a case-study period. Previous studies have also shown that energetic particle precipitation can lead to large-scale changes in the chemical makeup of the neutral atmosphere by enhancing minor chemical species that play a key role in the ozone balance of the middle atmosphere. However, SIC modelling indicates that the neutral atmospheric changes driven by WEP are insignificant due to the short timescale of the WEP bursts. Overall we find that WEP is a significant energy input into some parts of the lower ionosphere, depending on the latitude/longitude and altitude, but does not play a significant role in the neutral chemistry of the mesosphere.

  13. Parameterization of dust emissions in the global atmospheric chemistry-climate model EMAC: impact of nudging and soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Astitha

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Airborne desert dust influences radiative transfer, atmospheric chemistry and dynamics, as well as nutrient transport and deposition. It directly and indirectly affects climate on regional and global scales. Two versions of a parameterization scheme to compute desert dust emissions are incorporated into the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy2.41 Atmospheric Chemistry. One uses a globally uniform soil particle size distribution, whereas the other explicitly accounts for different soil textures worldwide. We have tested these two versions and investigated the sensitivity to input parameters, using remote sensing data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET and dust concentrations and deposition measurements from the AeroCom dust benchmark database (and others. The two versions are shown to produce similar atmospheric dust loads in the N-African region, while they deviate in the Asian, Middle Eastern and S-American regions. The dust outflow from Africa over the Atlantic Ocean is accurately simulated by both schemes, in magnitude, location and seasonality. Approximately 70% of the modelled annual deposition data and 70–75% of the modelled monthly aerosol optical depth (AOD in the Atlantic Ocean stations lay in the range 0.5 to 2 times the observations for all simulations. The two versions have similar performance, even though the total annual source differs by ~50%, which underscores the importance of transport and deposition processes (being the same for both versions. Even though the explicit soil particle size distribution is considered more realistic, the simpler scheme appears to perform better in several locations. This paper discusses the differences between the two versions of the dust emission scheme, focusing on their limitations and strengths in describing the global dust cycle and suggests possible future improvements.

  14. Non-Thermal Sanitation By Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a non-thermal technology based on atmospheric-pressure (AP) cold plasma to sanitize foods, food packaging materials, and other hardware...

  15. Rigidized Deployable Lifting Brake for Atmospheric Entry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aerobraking to reduce velocity for planetary capture and landing has long been assumed for use on Mars missions because Mars has an atmosphere, and the use of...

  16. Plasma Extraction of Oxygen from Martian Atmosphere Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Plasma techniques are proposed for the extraction of oxygen from the abundant carbon dioxide contained in the Martian atmosphere (96 % CO2). In this process, CO2 is...

  17. Plasma Catalytic Extraction of Oxygen from the Martian Atmosphere Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Plasma catalytic techniques are proposed for the extraction of oxygen from the abundant carbon dioxide contained in the Martian atmosphere (95% CO2).. The Phase I...

  18. Non-Thermal Sanitation By Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC's Non-Thermal Sanitation by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma technology sanitizes fresh fruits and vegetables without the use of consumable chemicals and without...

  19. Atmospheric Breathing Electric Thruster for Planetary Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This study will investigate the development of an atmosphere-breathing electric propulsion solar-powered vehicle to explore planets such as Mars. The vehicle would...

  20. Harsh Environment Gas Sensor Array for Venus Atmospheric Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Makel Engineering and the Ohio State University propose to develop a harsh environment tolerant gas sensor array for atmospheric analysis in future Venus missions....

  1. Advanced Technologies for Coordinated In Situ Atmospheric Sensing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a great need for better understanding of the continuity of atmospheric processes on multiple scales ranging from several kilometers to the order of a meter....

  2. Design and Simulation Tools for Planetary Atmospheric Entry Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric entry is one of the most critical phases of flight during planetary exploration missions. During the design of an entry vehicle, experimental and...

  3. Fast Temperature Sensor for use in Atmospheric Sciences Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Southwest Sciences proposes a novel sensor to measure atmospheric temperature at high frequency (10 Hz) and with high precision and accuracy (0.1 degrees C)....

  4. A kinetic chemistry tagging technique and its application to modelling the stable isotopic composition of atmospheric trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gromov

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Isotope composition, in many cases, holds unique information on sources, chemical modification and sinks of atmospheric trace gases. Vital to the interpretation and use of an increasing number of isotope analyses is appropriate modelling. However, the exact implementation of isotopic information is a challenge, and often studies use simplifications which limit their applicability. Here we confer a thorough isotopic extension to MECCA, a comprehensive kinetic chemistry sub-model. To this end, we devise a generic tagging technique for the kinetic chemistry mechanisms implemented as the sub-submodel MECCA-TAG. The technique constitutes a diagnostic tool that can benefit the investigation of various aspects of kinetic chemistry schemes; at the same time, the designed numerical optimisation reduces the computational effort while keeping important details unaffected. We further focus specifically on the modelling of stable isotopic composition, including the required extensions of the approach. The results of MECCA-TAG are evaluated against the reference sub-submodel MECCA-DBL, which is implicitly full-detailed, but necessarily is sub-optimal in practical applications due to its high computational demands. Furthermore, we evaluate the elaborate carbon and oxygen isotopic mechanism by simulating the multi-isotope composition of CO and other trace gases in the CAABA/MECCA box-model. The mechanism realistically simulates the oxygen isotope composition of key species resulting from the interchange with ozone and main atmospheric reservoirs, as well as the carbon isotope signature transfer. The model adequately reproduces the isotope chemistry features for CO under the limitation of the modelling domain. In particular, the mass-independently fractionated (MIF composition of CO due to reactions of ozone with unsaturated hydrocarbons (a source effect versus its intrinsic MIF enrichment induced in the removal reaction via oxidation by OH is assessed. As for

  5. The Impacts of Marine Organic Emissions on Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Gantt, B.

    2013-12-01

    Using laboratory studies and global/regional climate model results, this talk will contribute to two main research questions: 1) what can be learned about the carbon emission inducing stress factors for marine algae, and 2) what is a potential impact of marine biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions on global atmospheric chemistry and climate. Marine photosynthetic organisms emit VOCs which can form secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Currently large uncertainty exists in the magnitude of the marine biogenic sources, their spatiotemporal distribution, controlling factors, and contributions to natural background of organic aerosols. Here laboratory results for the production of isoprene and four monoterpene (α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene and d-limonene) compounds as a function of variable light and temperature regimes for 6 different phytoplankton species will be discussed. The experiment was designed to simulate the regions where phytoplankton is subjected to changeable light/temperature conditions. The samples were grown and maintained at a climate controlled room. VOCs accumulated in the water and headspace above the water were measured by passing the sample through a gas chromatography/mass system equipped with a sample pre-concentrator allowing detection of low ppt levels of hydrocarbons. The VOC production rates were distinctly different for light/temperature stressed (the first 12 hour cycle at light/temperature levels higher than what the cultures were acclimated to in a climate controlled room) and photo/temperature-acclimated (the second 12 hour light/temperature cycle) states. In general, all phytoplankton species showed a rapid increase in isoprene and monoterpene production at higher light levels (between 150 to 420 μE m-2 s-1) until a constant production rate was reached. Isoprene and α-pinene, production rates also increased with temperature until a certain level, after which the rates declined as temperature increased further. Two

  6. Exploring Atmospheric Aqueous Chemistry (and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation) through OH Radical Oxidation Experiments, Droplet Evaporation and Chemical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, B. J.; Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Ortiz-Montalvo, D. L.; Sullivan, A.; Häkkinen, S.; Schwier, A. N.; Tan, Y.; McNeill, V. F.; Collett, J. L.; Skog, K.; Keutsch, F. N.; Sareen, N.; Carlton, A. G.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.

    2013-12-01

    Gas phase photochemistry fragments and oxidizes organic emissions, making water-soluble organics ubiquitous in the atmosphere. My group and others have found that several water-soluble compounds react further in the aqueous phase forming low volatility products under atmospherically-relevant conditions (i.e., in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols). Thus, secondary organic aerosol can form as a result of gas followed by aqueous chemistry (aqSOA). We have used aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments coupled with product analysis and chemical modeling to validate and refine the aqueous chemistry of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and acetic acid. The resulting chemical model has provided insights into the differences between oxidation chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. Further, we conducted droplet evaporation experiments to characterize the volatility of the products. Most recently, we have conducted aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments with ambient mixtures of water-soluble gases to identify additional atmospherically-important precursors and products. Specifically, we scrubbed water-soluble gases from the ambient air in the Po Valley, Italy using four mist chambers in parallel, operating at 25-30 L min-1. Aqueous OH radical oxidation experiments and control experiments were conducted with these mixtures (total organic carbon ≈ 100 μM-C). OH radicals (3.5E-2 μM [OH] s-1) were generated by photolyzing H2O2. Precursors and products were characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), ion chromatography (IC), IC-ESI-MS, and ultra high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Chemical modeling suggests that organic acids (e.g., oxalate, pyruvate, glycolate) are major products of OH radical oxidation at cloud-relevant concentrations, whereas organic radical - radical reactions result in the formation of oligomers in wet aerosols. Products of cloud chemistry and droplet evaporation have

  7. A kinetic chemistry tagging technique and its application to modelling the stable isotopic composition of atmospheric trace gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gromov

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Isotope composition, in many cases, holds unique information on the sources, chemical modification and sinks of atmospheric trace gases. Vital to the interpretation and use of an increasing number of isotope analyses is appropriate modelling. However, the exact implementation of isotopic information in chemistry-climate models is a challenge, and often studies use simplifications which limit their applicability. Here we implement a thorough isotopic extension in MECCA, a comprehensive kinetic chemistry sub-model. To this end, we devise a generic tagging technique for the kinetic chemistry mechanisms implemented as the sub-submodel MECCA-TAG. The technique is diagnostic and numerically efficient and supports the investigation of various aspects of kinetic chemistry schemes. We focus specifically on the application to the modelling of stable isotopic composition. The results of MECCA-TAG are evaluated against the reference sub-submodel MECCA-DBL, which is implicitly full-detailed, but computationally expensive and thus sub-optimal in practical applications. Furthermore, we evaluate the elaborate carbon and oxygen isotopic mechanism by simulating the multi-isotope composition of CO and other trace gases in the CAABA/MECCA box-model. The mechanism realistically simulates the oxygen isotope composition of key species, as well as the carbon isotope signature transfer. The model adequately reproduces the isotope chemistry features for CO, taking into account the limits of the modelling domain. In particular, the mass-independently fractionated (MIF composition of CO due to reactions of ozone with unsaturated hydrocarbons (a source effect versus its intrinsic MIF enrichment induced in the removal reaction via oxidation by OH is assessed. The simulated ozone source effect was up to +1‰ in Δ17O(CO. The versatile modelling framework we employ (the Modular Earth Submodel System, MESSy opens the way for implementation of the novel detailed

  8. On the plasma chemistry of a cold atmospheric argon plasma jet with shielding gas device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Winter, Jörn; Bösel, André; Reuter, Stephan; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach combining experimental and numerical methods for the study of reaction mechanisms in a cold atmospheric \\text{Ar} plasma jet is introduced. The jet is operated with a shielding gas device that produces a gas curtain of defined composition around the plasma plume. The shielding gas composition is varied from pure {{\\text{N}}2} to pure {{\\text{O}}2} . The density of metastable argon \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) in the plasma plume was quantified using laser atom absorption spectroscopy. The density of long-living reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), namely {{\\text{O}}3} , \\text{N}{{\\text{O}}2} , \\text{NO} , {{\\text{N}}2}\\text{O} , {{\\text{N}}2}{{\\text{O}}5} and {{\\text{H}}2}{{\\text{O}}2} , was quantified in the downstream region of the jet in a multipass cell using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The jet produces a turbulent flow field and features guided streamers propagating at several \\text{km}~{{\\text{s}}-1} that follow the chaotic argon flow pattern, yielding a plasma plume with steep spatial gradients and a time dependence on the \\text{ns} scale while the downstream chemistry unfolds within several seconds. The fast and highly localized electron impact reactions in the guided streamer head and the slower gas phase reactions of neutrals occurring in the plasma plume and experimental apparatus are therefore represented in two separate kinetic models. The first electron impact reaction kinetics model is correlated to the LAAS measurements and shows that in the guided streamer head primary reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are dominantly generated from \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) . The second neutral species plug-flow model hence uses an \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) source term as sole energy input and yields good agreement with the RONS measured by FTIR spectroscopy.

  9. Downward transport of ozone rich air and implications for atmospheric chemistry in the Amazon rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, Tobias; Wei, Dandan; Chase, Randy J.; Fuentes, Jose D.; Schumacher, Courtney; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Andreoli, Rita V.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Ferreira de Souza, Rodrigo A.; Freire, Livia S.; Jardine, Angela B.; Manzi, Antonio O.; Nascimento dos Santos, Rosa M.; von Randow, Celso; dos Santos Costa, Patrícia; Stoy, Paul C.; Tóta, Julio; Trowbridge, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    From April 2014 to January 2015, ozone (O3) dynamics were investigated as part of GoAmazon 2014/5 project in the central Amazon rainforest of Brazil. Just above the forest canopy, maximum hourly O3 mixing ratios averaged 20 ppbv (parts per billion on a volume basis) during the June-September dry months and 15 ppbv during the wet months. Ozone levels occasionally exceeded 75 ppbv in response to influences from biomass burning and regional air pollution. Individual convective storms transported O3-rich air parcels from the mid-troposphere to the surface and abruptly enhanced the regional atmospheric boundary layer by as much as 25 ppbv. In contrast to the individual storms, days with multiple convective systems produced successive, cumulative ground-level O3 increases. The magnitude of O3 enhancements depended on the vertical distribution of O3 within storm downdrafts and origin of downdrafts in the troposphere. Ozone mixing ratios remained enhanced for > 2 h following the passage of storms, which enhanced chemical processing of rainforest-emitted isoprene and monoterpenes. Reactions of isoprene and monoterpenes with O3 are modeled to generate maximum hydroxyl radical formation rates of 6 × 106 radicals cm-3s-1. Therefore, one key conclusion of the present study is that downdrafts of convective storms are estimated to transport enough O3 to the surface to initiate a series of reactions that reduce the lifetimes of rainforest-emitted hydrocarbons.

  10. Condensing complex atmospheric chemistry mechanisms. 1: The direct constrained approximate lumping (DCAL) method applied to alkane photochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.W.; Georgopoulos, P.G. [Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Li, G.; Rabitz, H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-07-01

    Atmospheric chemistry mechanisms are the most computationally intensive components of photochemical air quality simulation models (PAQSMs). The development of a photochemical mechanism, that accurately describes atmospheric chemistry while being computationally efficient for use in PAQSMs, is a difficult undertaking that has traditionally been pursued through semiempirical (diagnostic) lumping approaches. The limitations of these diagnostic approaches are often associated with inaccuracies due to the fact that the lumped mechanisms have typically been optimized to fit the concentration profile of a specific species. Formal mathematical methods for model reduction have the potential (demonstrated through past applications in other areas) to provide very effective solutions to the need for computational efficiency combined with accuracy. Such methods, that can be used to condense a chemical mechanism, include kinetic lumping and domain separation. An application of the kinetic lumping method, using the direct constrained approximately lumping (DCAL) approach, to the atmospheric photochemistry of alkanes is presented in this work. It is shown that the lumped mechanism generated through the application of the DCAL method has the potential to overcome the limitations of existing semiempirical approaches, especially in relation to the consistent and accurate calculation of the time-concentration profiles of multiple species.

  11. Final Report. "Collaborative Project. Contributions of organic compounds to the growth of freshly nucleated atmospheric nanoparticles"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James N [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2015-12-23

    This is the final technical report for the portion of the project that took place at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, which covers approximately the first year of the three-year project. During this time we focused primarily on analysis and modeling of DOE-funded observations as well as preparation for laboratory studies of individual processes that contribute to atmospheric new particle formation.

  12. Final Technical Report for earmark project "Atmospheric Science Program at the University of Louisville"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Timothy Edward [University of Louisville

    2014-02-11

    We have completed a 3-year project to enhance the atmospheric science program at the University of Louisville, KY (est. 2008). The goals were to complete an undergraduate atmospheric science laboratory (Year 1) and to hire and support an assistant professor (Years 2 and 3). Both these goals were met on schedule, and slightly under budget.

  13. Untangling the Chemical Evolution of Titan's Atmosphere and Surface -- From Homogeneous to Heterogeneous Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Ralf I.; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Ennis, Courtney; Zhang, Fangtong; Gu, Xibin; Krishtal, Sergey P.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-16

    The arrival of the Cassini-Huygens probe at Saturn's moon Titan - the only Solar System body besides Earth and Venus with a solid surface and a thick atmosphere with a pressure of 1.4 atm at surface level - in 2004 opened up a new chapter in the history of Solar System exploration. The mission revealed Titan as a world with striking Earth-like landscapes involving hydrocarbon lakes and seas as well as sand dunes and lava-like features interspersed with craters and icy mountains of hitherto unknown chemical composition. The discovery of a dynamic atmosphere and active weather system illustrates further the similarities between Titan and Earth. The aerosol-based haze layers, which give Titan its orange-brownish color, are not only Titan's most prominent optically visible features, but also play a crucial role in determining Titan's thermal structure and chemistry. These smog-like haze layers are thought to be very similar to those that were present in Earth's atmosphere before life developed more than 3.8 billion years ago, absorbing the destructive ultraviolet radiation from the Sun, thus acting as 'prebiotic ozone' to preserve astrobiologically important molecules on Titan. Compared to Earth, Titan's low surface temperature of 94 K and the absence of liquid water preclude the evolution of biological chemistry as we know it. Exactly because of these low temperatures, Titan provides us with a unique prebiotic 'atmospheric laboratory' yielding vital clues - at the frozen stage - on the likely chemical composition of the atmosphere of the primitive Earth. However, the underlying chemical processes, which initiate the haze formation from simple molecules, have been not understood well to date.

  14. Aviation Safety Program Atmospheric Environment Safety Technologies (AEST) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colantonio, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Engine Icing: Characterization and Simulation Capability: Develop knowledge bases, analysis methods, and simulation tools needed to address the problem of engine icing; in particular, ice-crystal icing Airframe Icing Simulation and Engineering Tool Capability: Develop and demonstrate 3-D capability to simulate and model airframe ice accretion and related aerodynamic performance degradation for current and future aircraft configurations in an expanded icing environment that includes freezing drizzle/rain Atmospheric Hazard Sensing and Mitigation Technology Capability: Improve and expand remote sensing and mitigation of hazardous atmospheric environments and phenomena

  15. Simulating organic species with the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: a comparison of model results with observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozzer, A.; Jöckel, P.; Tost, H.; Sander, R.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Kerkweg, A.; Lelieveld, J.

    2007-01-01

    The atmospheric-chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1 is evaluated with observations of different organic ozone precursors. This study continues a prior analysis which focused primarily on the representation of atmospheric dynamics and ozone. We use the results of the same reference simu

  16. Interfacial Atmospheric Chemistry: Quantum Chemical Calculations on the Mechanism of Protonation and Oligomerization of Isoprene on Aqueous Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, H.; Colussi, A. J.; Enami, S.; Nielsen, R. J.; Hoffmann, M. R.; Goddard, W. A.

    2012-12-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that atmospheric chemistry involves more than gas-phase reactions. Key processes, such as the decay of NO2 in urban plumes and the associated daytime formation of HONO, and the rapid chemistries observed in and over forest canopies at nighttime defy explanation by conventional atmospheric chemistry mechanisms. We have recently reported experimental results on several gas-liquid reactions of atmospheric interest, such as the facile protonation of gaseous isoprene on mildly acidic (pH bioenergetics coupling, 'on-water' catalysis, self-assembly and molecular recognition, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of such reactions. Herein we apply quantum mechanics to investigate how biogenic or anthropogenic olefins may get protonated and undergo oligomerization at the air-water interface by performing model calculations on small water clusters carrying an excess proton as surrogates for the surface of mildly acidic water as sensed by gaseous isoprene (ISO). We find that ISO binds weakly to the surface of water and accepts a proton from H+(H2O)3, leading to ISOH+ via a proton transfer hindered by a ΔG1‡ = 5.6 kcal mol-1 kinetic barrier. Subsequently, another ISO attaches loosely to this ensemble, before being attacked by the ISOH+. This process, which represents the first step of the cationic polymerization of ISO, is hindered by a similar ΔG2‡ = 5.7 kcal mol-1 barrier. Our theoretical results are consistent with experimental (~ 10-4) uptake coefficients for ISO measured on acidic water.

  17. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume IV – gas phase reactions of organic halogen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Atkinson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This article, the fourth in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data sheets evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of organic halogen species, which were last published in 1997, and were updated on the IUPAC website in 2006/07. The article consists of a summary sheet, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and four appendices containing the data sheets, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  18. Evaluated kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry: Volume II – gas phase reactions of organic species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Atkinson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article, the second in the series, presents kinetic and photochemical data evaluated by the IUPAC Subcommittee on Gas Kinetic Data Evaluation for Atmospheric Chemistry. It covers the gas phase and photochemical reactions of Organic species, which were last published in 1999, and were updated on the IUPAC website in late 2002, and subsequently during the preparation of this article. The article consists of a summary table of the recommended rate coefficients, containing the recommended kinetic parameters for the evaluated reactions, and eight appendices containing the data sheets, which provide information upon which the recommendations are made.

  19. The Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE Model – Part 2: Application to BEARPEX-2007 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Wolfe

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In a companion paper, we introduced the Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE model, a vertically-resolved 1-D chemical transport model designed to probe the details of near-surface reactive gas exchange. Here, we apply CAFE to noontime observations from the 2007 Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX-2007. In this work we evaluate the CAFE modeling approach, demonstrate the significance of in-canopy chemistry for forest-atmosphere exchange and identify key shortcomings in the current understanding of intra-canopy processes.

    CAFE generally reproduces BEARPEX-2007 observations but requires an enhanced radical recycling mechanism to overcome a factor of 6 underestimate of hydroxyl (OH concentrations observed during a warm (~29 °C period. Modeled fluxes of acyl peroxy nitrates (APN are quite sensitive to gradients in chemical production and loss, demonstrating that chemistry may perturb forest-atmosphere exchange even when the chemical timescale is long relative to the canopy mixing timescale. The model underestimates peroxy acetyl nitrate (PAN fluxes by 50% and the exchange velocity by nearly a factor of three under warmer conditions, suggesting that near-surface APN sinks are underestimated relative to the sources. Nitric acid typically dominates gross dry N deposition at this site, though other reactive nitrogen (NOy species can comprise up to 28% of the N deposition budget under cooler conditions. Upward NO2 fluxes cause the net above-canopy NOy flux to be ~30% lower than the gross depositional flux. CAFE under-predicts ozone fluxes and exchange velocities by ~20%. Large uncertainty in the parameterization of cuticular and ground deposition precludes conclusive attribution of non-stomatal fluxes to chemistry or surface uptake. Model-measurement comparisons of vertical concentration gradients for several emitted species suggests that the lower canopy airspace may be

  20. Project CONDOR: Middle atmosphere wind structure obtained with lightweight inflatable spheres near the equatorial electrojet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, F. J.

    1987-01-01

    Observed correlations between the atmospheric electric field and the neutral wind were studied using additional atmospheric measurements during Project CONDOR. Project CONDOR obtained measurements near the equatorial electrojet (12 S) during March 1983. Neutral atmosphere wind measurements were obtained using lightweight inflatable spheres and temperatures were obtained using a datasonde. The lightweight sphere technology, the wind structure, and temperature structure are described. Results show that the lightweight sphere gives higher vertical resolution of winds below 75 km compared with the standard sphere, but gives little or no improvement above 80 km, and no usable temperature and density data.

  1. Chemistry Simulations using the MERRA-2 Reanalysis with the GMI CTM and Replay in Support of the Atmospheric Composition Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Luke D.; Strahan, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Simulations using reanalysis meteorological fields have long been used to understand the causes of atmospheric composition change in the recent past. Using the new MERRA-2 reanalysis, we are conducting chemistry simulations to create products covering 1980-2016 for the atmospheric composition community. These simulations use the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical mechanism in two different models: the GMI Chemical Transport Model (CTM) and the GEOS-5 model in Replay mode. Replay mode means an integration of the GEOS-5 general circulation model that is incrementally adjusted each time step toward the MERRA-2 reanalysis. The GMI CTM is a 1 deg x 1.25 deg simulation and the MERRA-2 GMI Replay simulation uses the native MERRA-2 grid of approximately 1/2 deg horizontal resolution on the cubed sphere. A specialized set of transport diagnostics is included in both runs to better understand trace gas transport and its variability in the recent past.

  2. International geophysics series theory of planetary atmospheres an introduction to their physics and chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, John

    1978-01-01

    For advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students in atmospheric, oceanic, and climate science, Atmosphere, Ocean and Climate Dynamics is an introductory textbook on the circulations of the atmosphere and ocean and their interaction, with an emphasis on global scales. It will give students a good grasp of what the atmosphere and oceans look like on the large-scale and why they look that way. The role of the oceans in climate and paleoclimate is also discussed. The combination of observations, theory and accompanying illustrative laboratory experiments sets this text apart by m

  3. Exploring lag times between monthly atmospheric deposition and stream chemistry in Appalachian forests using cross-correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWalle, David R.; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; Buda, Anthony R.

    2016-12-01

    Forecasts of ecosystem changes due to variations in atmospheric emissions policies require a fundamental understanding of lag times between changes in chemical inputs and watershed response. Impacts of changes in atmospheric deposition in the United States have been documented using national and regional long-term environmental monitoring programs beginning several decades ago. Consequently, time series of weekly NADP atmospheric wet deposition and monthly EPA-Long Term Monitoring stream chemistry now exist for much of the Northeast which may provide insights into lag times. In this study of Appalachian forest basins, we estimated lag times for S, N and Cl by cross-correlating monthly data from four pairs of stream and deposition monitoring sites during the period from 1978 to 2012. A systems or impulse response function approach to cross-correlation was used to estimate lag times where the input deposition time series was pre-whitened using regression modeling and the stream response time series was filtered using the deposition regression model prior to cross-correlation. Cross-correlations for S were greatest at annual intervals over a relatively well-defined range of lags with the maximum correlations occurring at mean lags of 48 months. Chloride results were similar but more erratic with a mean lag of 57 months. Few high-correlation lags for N were indicated. Given the growing availability of atmospheric deposition and surface water chemistry monitoring data and our results for four Appalachian basins, further testing of cross-correlation as a method of estimating lag times on other basins appears justified.

  4. Sol-Gel Application for Consolidating Stone: An Example of Project-Based Learning in a Physical Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Santos, Desiree´ M.; Montes, Antonio; Sa´nchez-Coronilla, Antonio; Navas, Javier

    2014-01-01

    A Project Based Learning (PBL) methodology was used in the practical laboratories of the Advanced Physical Chemistry department. The project type proposed simulates "real research" focusing on sol-gel synthesis and the application of the obtained sol as a stone consolidant. Students were divided into small groups (2 to 3 students) to…

  5. A comparison of chemistry and dust cloud formation in ultracool dwarf model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Helling, Ch; Allard, F; Dehn, M; Hauschild, P; Homeier, D; Lodders, K; Marley, M; Rietmeijer, F; Tsuji, T; Woitke, P

    2008-01-01

    The atmospheres of substellar objects contain clouds of oxides, iron, silicates, and other refractory condensates. Water clouds are expected in the coolest objects. The opacity of these `dust' clouds strongly affects both the atmospheric temperature-pressure profile and the emergent flux. Thus any attempt to model the spectra of these atmospheres must incorporate a cloud model. However the diversity of cloud models in atmospheric simulations is large and it is not always clear how the underlying physics of the various models compare. Likewise the observational consequences of different modeling approaches can be masked by other model differences, making objective comparisons challenging. In order to clarify the current state of the modeling approaches, this paper compares five different cloud models in two sets of tests. Test case 1 tests the dust cloud models for a prescribed L, L--T, and T-dwarf atmospheric (temperature T, pressure p, convective velocity vconv)-structures. Test case 2 compares complete mode...

  6. A study of the dissociative recombination of CaO+ with electrons: Implications for Ca chemistry in the upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bones, D. L.; Gerding, M.; Höffner, J.; Martín, Juan Carlos Gómez; Plane, J. M. C.

    2016-12-01

    The dissociative recombination of CaO+ ions with electrons has been studied in a flowing afterglow reactor. CaO+ was generated by the pulsed laser ablation of a Ca target, followed by entrainment in an Ar+ ion/electron plasma. A kinetic model describing the gas-phase chemistry and diffusion to the reactor walls was fitted to the experimental data, yielding a rate coefficient of (3.0 ± 1.0) × 10-7 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 295 K. This result has two atmospheric implications. First, the surprising observation that the Ca+/Fe+ ratio is 8 times larger than Ca/Fe between 90 and 100 km in the atmosphere can now be explained quantitatively by the known ion-molecule chemistry of these two metals. Second, the rate of neutralization of Ca+ ions in a descending sporadic E layer is fast enough to explain the often explosive growth of sporadic neutral Ca layers.

  7. Long-lived halocarbon trends and budgets from atmospheric chemistry modelling constrained with measurements in polar firn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Martinerie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The budgets of seven halogenated gases (CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CFC-114, CFC-115, CCl4 and SF6 are studied by comparing measurements in polar firn air from two Arctic and three Antarctic sites, and simulation results of two numerical models: a 2-D atmospheric chemistry model and a 1-D firn diffusion model. The first one is used to calculate atmospheric concentrations from emission trends based on industrial inventories; the calculated concentration trends are used by the second one to produce depth concentration profiles in the firn. The 2-D atmospheric model is validated in the boundary layer by comparison with atmospheric station measurements, and vertically for CFC-12 by comparison with balloon and FTIR measurements. Firn air measurements provide constraints on historical atmospheric concentrations over the last century. Age distributions in the firn are discussed using a Green function approach. Finally, our results are used as input to a radiative model in order to evaluate the radiative forcing of our target gases. Multi-species and multi-site firn air studies allow to better constrain atmospheric trends. The low concentrations of all studied gases at the bottom of the firn, and their consistency with our model results confirm that their natural sources are insignificant. Our results indicate that the emissions, sinks and trends of CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CFC-115 and SF6 are well constrained, whereas it is not the case for CFC-114 and CCl4. Significant emission-dependent changes in the lifetimes of halocarbons destroyed in the stratosphere were obtained. Those result from the time needed for their transport from the surface where they are emitted to the stratosphere where they are destroyed. Efforts should be made to update and reduce the large uncertainties on CFC lifetimes.

  8. Long-lived halocarbon trends and budgets from atmospheric chemistry modelling constrained with measurements in polar firn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Martinerie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The budgets of seven halogenated gases (CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CFC-114, CFC-115, CCl4 and SF6 are studied by comparing measurements in polar firn air from two Arctic and three Antarctic sites, and simulation results of two numerical models: a 2-D atmospheric chemistry model and a 1-D firn diffusion model. The first one is used to calculate atmospheric concentrations from emission trends based on industrial inventories; the calculated concentration trends are used by the second one to produce depth concentration profiles in the firn. The 2-D atmospheric model is validated in the boundary layer by comparison with atmospheric station measurements, and vertically for CFC-12 by comparison with balloon and FTIR measurements. Firn air measurements provide constraints on historical atmospheric concentrations over the last century. Age distributions in the firn are discussed using a Green function approach. Finally, our results are used as input to a radiative model in order to evaluate the radiative forcing of our target gases. Multi-species and multi-site firn air studies allow to better constrain atmospheric trends. The low concentrations of all studied gases at the bottom of the firn, and their consistency with our model results confirm that their natural sources are small. Our results indicate that the emissions, sinks and trends of CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, CFC-115 and SF6 are well constrained, whereas it is not the case for CFC-114 and CCl4. Significant emission-dependent changes in the lifetimes of halocarbons destroyed in the stratosphere were obtained. Those result from the time needed for their transport from the surface where they are emitted to the stratosphere where they are destroyed. Efforts should be made to update and reduce the large uncertainties on CFC lifetimes.

  9. The Influence of Galactic Cosmic Rays on Ion-Neutral Hydrocarbon Chemistry in the Upper Atmospheres of Free-Floating Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Rimmer, P B; Bilger, C

    2013-01-01

    Cosmic rays may be linked to the formation of volatiles necessary for prebiotic chemistry. We explore the effect of cosmic rays in a hydrogen-dominated atmosphere, as a proof-of-concept that ion-neutral chemistry may be important for modelling hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. In order to accomplish this, we utilize Monte Carlo cosmic ray transport models with particle energies of $10^6$ eV $< E < 10^{12}$ eV in order to investigate the cosmic ray enhancement of free electrons in substellar atmospheres. Ion-neutral chemistry is then applied to a Drift-Phoenix model of a free-floating giant gas planet. Our results suggest that the activation of ion-neutral chemistry in the upper atmosphere significantly enhances formation rates for various species, and we find that C$_2$H$_2$, C$_2$H$_4$, NH$_3$, C$_6$H$_6$ and possibly C$_{10}$H are enhanced in the upper atmospheres because of cosmic rays. Our results suggest a potential connection between cosmic ray chemistry and the hazes observed in the upper atmospher...

  10. The chemistry CATT–BRAMS model (CCATT–BRAMS 4.5: a regional atmospheric model system for integrated air quality and weather forecasting and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Longo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Coupled Chemistry Aerosol-Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CCATT–BRAMS, version 4.5 is an online regional chemical transport model designed for local and regional studies of atmospheric chemistry from surface to the lower stratosphere suitable both for operational and research purposes. It includes gaseous/aqueous chemistry, photochemistry, scavenging and dry deposition. The CCATT–BRAMS model takes advantages of the BRAMS specific development for the tropics/subtropics and of the recent availability of preprocessing tools for chemical mechanisms and of fast codes for photolysis rates. BRAMS includes state-of-the-art physical parameterizations and dynamic formulations to simulate atmospheric circulations of scales down to meters. The online coupling between meteorology and chemistry allows the system to be used for simultaneous atmospheric weather and chemical composition forecasts as well as potential feedbacks between them. The entire system comprises three preprocessing software tools for chemical mechanism (which are user defined, aerosol and trace gases emission fields and atmospheric and chemistry fields for initial and boundary conditions. In this paper, the model description is provided along evaluations performed using observational data obtained from ground-based stations, instruments aboard of aircrafts and retrieval from space remote sensing. The evaluation takes into account model application on different scales from megacities and Amazon Basin up to intercontinental region of the Southern Hemisphere.

  11. An advanced modeling study on the impacts and atmospheric implications of multiphase dimethyl sulfide chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Erik Hans; Tilgner, Andreas; Schrödner, Roland; Bräuer, Peter; Wolke, Ralf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-10-18

    Oceans dominate emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), the major natural sulfur source. DMS is important for the formation of non-sea salt sulfate (nss-SO4(2-)) aerosols and secondary particulate matter over oceans and thus, significantly influence global climate. The mechanism of DMS oxidation has accordingly been investigated in several different model studies in the past. However, these studies had restricted oxidation mechanisms that mostly underrepresented important aqueous-phase chemical processes. These neglected but highly effective processes strongly impact direct product yields of DMS oxidation, thereby affecting the climatic influence of aerosols. To address these shortfalls, an extensive multiphase DMS chemistry mechanism, the Chemical Aqueous Phase Radical Mechanism DMS Module 1.0, was developed and used in detailed model investigations of multiphase DMS chemistry in the marine boundary layer. The performed model studies confirmed the importance of aqueous-phase chemistry for the fate of DMS and its oxidation products. Aqueous-phase processes significantly reduce the yield of sulfur dioxide and increase that of methyl sulfonic acid (MSA), which is needed to close the gap between modeled and measured MSA concentrations. Finally, the simulations imply that multiphase DMS oxidation produces equal amounts of MSA and sulfate, a result that has significant implications for nss-SO4(2-) aerosol formation, cloud condensation nuclei concentration, and cloud albedo over oceans. Our findings show the deficiencies of parameterizations currently used in higher-scale models, which only treat gas-phase chemistry. Overall, this study shows that treatment of DMS chemistry in both gas and aqueous phases is essential to improve the accuracy of model predictions.

  12. Projections of Southern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation interannual variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Simon; Frederiksen, Carsten S.; Zheng, Xiaogu

    2017-02-01

    An analysis is made of the coherent patterns, or modes, of interannual variability of Southern Hemisphere 500 hPa geopotential height field under current and projected climate change scenarios. Using three separate multi-model ensembles (MMEs) of coupled model intercomparison project phase 5 (CMIP5) models, the interannual variability of the seasonal mean is separated into components related to (1) intraseasonal processes; (2) slowly-varying internal dynamics; and (3) the slowly-varying response to external changes in radiative forcing. In the CMIP5 RCP8.5 and RCP4.5 experiments, there is very little change in the twenty-first century in the intraseasonal component modes, related to the Southern annular mode (SAM) and mid-latitude wave processes. The leading three slowly-varying internal component modes are related to SAM, the El Niño-Southern oscillation (ENSO), and the South Pacific wave (SPW). Structural changes in the slow-internal SAM and ENSO modes do not exceed a qualitative estimate of the spatial sampling error, but there is a consistent increase in the ENSO-related variance. Changes in the SPW mode exceed the sampling error threshold, but cannot be further attributed. Changes in the dominant slowly-varying external mode are related to projected changes in radiative forcing. They reflect thermal expansion of the tropical troposphere and associated changes in the Hadley Cell circulation. Changes in the externally-forced associated variance in the RCP8.5 experiment are an order of magnitude greater than for the internal components, indicating that the SH seasonal mean circulation will be even more dominated by a SAM-like annular structure. Across the three MMEs, there is convergence in the projected response in the slow-external component.

  13. NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project. 1990 Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this DOE Cooperative Agreement is to conduct a cost-shared clean coal technology project to demonstrate the feasibility of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology and to evaluate economic, environmental, and operational benefits of CFB steam generators on a utility scale. At the conclusion of the Phase 2 program, testing related to satisfying these objectives was completed. Data analysis and reporting are scheduled for completion by October 1991. (VC)

  14. Response of lake chemistry to atmospheric deposition and climate in selected Class I wilderness areas in the western United States, 1993-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, M. Alisa

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Air Resource Management, conducted a study to evaluate long-term trends in lake-water chemistry for 64 high-elevation lakes in selected Class I wilderness areas in Colorado, Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming during 1993 to 2009. Understanding how and why lake chemistry is changing in mountain areas is essential for effectively managing and protecting high-elevation aquatic ecosystems. Trends in emissions, atmospheric deposition, and climate variables (air temperature and precipitation amount) were evaluated over a similar period of record. A main objective of the study was to determine if changes in atmospheric deposition of contaminants in the Rocky Mountain region have resulted in measurable changes in the chemistry of high-elevation lakes. A second objective was to investigate linkages between lake chemistry and air temperature and precipitation to improve understanding of the sensitivity of mountain lakes to climate variability.

  15. The atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: consistent simulation of ozone from the surface to the mesosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jöckel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The new Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy describes atmospheric chemistry and meteorological processes in a modular framework, following strict coding standards. It has been coupled to the ECHAM5 general circulation model, which has been slightly modified for this purpose. A 90-layer model setup up to 0.01 hPa was used at spectral T42 resolution to simulate the lower and middle atmosphere. With the high vertical resolution the model simulates the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation. The model meteorology has been tested to check the influence of the changes to ECHAM5 and the radiation interactions with the new representation of atmospheric composition. In the simulations presented here a Newtonian relaxation technique was applied in the tropospheric part of the domain to weakly nudge the model towards the analysed meteorology during the period 1998–2005. This allows an efficient and direct evaluation with satellite and in-situ data. It is shown that the tropospheric wave forcing of the stratosphere in the model suffices to reproduce major stratospheric warming events leading e.g. to the vortex split over Antarctica in 2002. Characteristic features such as dehydration and denitrification caused by the sedimentation of polar stratospheric cloud particles and ozone depletion during winter and spring are simulated well, although ozone loss in the lower polar stratosphere is slightly underestimated. The model realistically simulates stratosphere-troposphere exchange processes as indicated by comparisons with satellite and in situ measurements. The evaluation of tropospheric chemistry presented here focuses on the distributions of ozone, hydroxyl radicals, carbon monoxide and reactive nitrogen compounds. In spite of minor shortcomings, mostly related to the relatively coarse T42 resolution and the neglect of inter-annual changes in biomass burning emissions, the main characteristics of the trace gas distributions are generally reproduced well. The MESSy

  16. Impact of acid atmospheric deposition on soils: Field monitoring and aluminium chemistry.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acid atmospheric deposition on concentrations and transfer of major solutes in acid, sandy soils was studied. Emphasis was given to mobilization and transport of potentially toxic aluminum. Data on solute concentrations and fluxes in meteoric water as well as soil solutions were obtained from intensive monitoring programmes conducted at a number of sites in northwestern Europe and North-America. Specific hypotheses were tested in laboratory experiments.Atmospheric acid inputs do...

  17. The impact of dynamic processes on chemistry in atmospheric boundary layers over tropical and boreal forest

    OpenAIRE

    Ouwersloot, H. G.

    2013-01-01

    Improving our knowledge of the atmospheric processes that drive climate and air quality is very relevant for society. The application of this knowledge enables us to predict and mitigate the effects of human induced perturbations to our environment. Key factors in the current and future climate evolution are related to the emissions and atmospheric presence of carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrocarbons. The latter group of chemical species, on which special emphasis is placed in this dissertation,...

  18. Description and Evaluation of the Multiscale Online Nonhydrostatic AtmospheRe CHemistry Model (NMMB-MONARCH) Version 1.0: Gas-Phase Chemistry at Global Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Alba; Jorba, Oriol; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Dabdub, Donald; Garcia-Pando, Carlos Perez; Hilboll, Andreas; Goncalves, Maria; Janjic, Zavisa

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive description and benchmark evaluation of the tropospheric gas-phase chemistry component of the Multiscale Online Nonhydrostatic AtmospheRe CHemistry model (NMMBMONARCH), formerly known as NMMB/BSC-CTM, that can be run on both regional and global domains. Here, we provide an extensive evaluation of a global annual cycle simulation using a variety of background surface stations (EMEP, WDCGG and CASTNET), ozonesondes (WOUDC, CMD and SHADOZ), aircraft data (MOZAIC and several campaigns), and satellite observations (SCIAMACHY and MOPITT).We also include an extensive discussion of our results in comparison to other state-of-the-art models. We note that in this study, we omitted aerosol processes and some natural emissions (lightning and volcano emissions). The model shows a realistic oxidative capacity across the globe. The seasonal cycle for CO is fairly well represented at different locations (correlations around 0.3-0.7 in surface concentrations), although concentrations are underestimated in spring and winter in the Northern Hemisphere, and are overestimated throughout the year at 800 and 500 hPa in the Southern Hemisphere. Nitrogen species are well represented in almost all locations, particularly NO2 in Europe (root mean square error - RMSE - below 5 ppb). The modeled vertical distributions of NOx and HNO3 are in excellent agreement with the observed values and the spatial and seasonal trends of tropospheric NO2 columns correspond well to observations from SCIAMACHY, capturing the highly polluted areas and the biomass burning cycle throughout the year. Over Asia, the model underestimates NOx from March to August, probably due to an underestimation of NOx emissions in the region. Overall, the comparison of the modeled CO and NO2 with MOPITT and SCIAMACHY observations emphasizes the need for more accurate emission rates from anthropogenic and biomass burning sources (i.e., specification of temporal variability).

  19. Formative evaluation of traditional instruction and cooperative inquiry projects in undergraduate chemistry laboratory courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panichas, Michael A.

    Reform agendas for practice in undergraduate chemistry are moving curriculum beyond traditional behaviorist teaching strategies to include constructivist approaches, for extending student learning beyond simple mastery of chemistry content (Bunce & Robinson, 1997; Lagowski, 1998; Herron & Nurrenburn, 1999). Yet implementing new strategies requires assessment of their benefit to learning. This study was undertaken to provide a formal and formative evaluation of the curricula in General and Organic chemistry laboratory courses, which are structured with both Traditional expository lab exercises, and a cooperative inquiry exercise called the Open Ended Project. Using a mixed-methodological case study framework, the primary goal of the research was to determine how the inclusion of these teaching strategies impacts student learning in the areas of Academic Achievement and Affective Learning from the perspective of the students enrolled in these lab classes. The findings suggest that the current curriculum structure of including both Traditional Instruction and the Open Ended Project does address students' Academic Achievement and Affective Learning. However, students perceived that these curriculum components each contributed differently to their learning. For Academic Achievement, Traditional Experiments and the Project had a positive impact on students' operational skills, such as how to use and choose lab techniques for performing or designing experiments, as well as their conceptual learning, such as understanding concepts, and relating those concepts during data analysis. Yet for Affective Learning, such as students' sense of confidence, accomplishment, and engagement, the Project, which has a cooperative learning element, had a positive impact on student learning, while Traditional Experiments, which do not have a cooperative learning element, had a moderate negative impact. The findings point to Cooperative Learning as the key element, which makes the positive

  20. Role of Atmospheric Chemistry in the Climate Impacts of Stratospheric Volcanic Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrande, Allegra N.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2016-01-01

    The climate impact of a volcanic eruption is known to be dependent on the size, location and timing of the eruption. However, the chemistry and composition of the volcanic plume also control its impact on climate. It is not just sulfur dioxide gas, but also the coincident emissions of water, halogens and ash that influence the radiative and climate forcing of an eruption. Improvements in the capability of models to capture aerosol microphysics, and the inclusion of chemistry and aerosol microphysics modules in Earth system models, allow us to evaluate the interaction of composition and chemistry within volcanic plumes in a new way. These modeling efforts also illustrate the role of water vapor in controlling the chemical evolution, and hence climate impacts, of the plume. A growing realization of the importance of the chemical composition of volcanic plumes is leading to a more sophisticated and realistic representation of volcanic forcing in climate simulations, which in turn aids in reconciling simulations and proxy reconstructions of the climate impacts of past volcanic eruptions. More sophisticated simulations are expected to help, eventually, with predictions of the impact on the Earth system of any future large volcanic eruptions.

  1. Atmospheres – Through Projections on a Living Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steijn, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I present my on-going work on a design model aimed at the design of motion graphics applied in spatial contexts.1 In this work I integrate various design elements and components as e.g. line and shape, tone and colour, time and timing, rhythm and movement with conceptualizations...... design and events. The model is being designed with two purposes in mind. One is a tool for analyzing empirical examples or cases where video projections are used in spatial experience design. The second is to create a tool that can be useful in actual design processes. In this paper I describe a case...

  2. The response of atmospheric chemistry on earthlike planets around F, G and K Stars to small variations in orbital distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenfell, John Lee; Stracke, Barbara; von Paris, Philip; Patzer, Beate; Titz, Ruth; Segura, Antigona; Rauer, Heike

    2007-04-01

    One of the prime goals of future investigations of extrasolar planets is to search for life as we know it. The Earth's biosphere is adapted to current conditions. How would the atmospheric chemistry of the Earth respond if we moved it to different orbital distances or changed its host star? This question is central to astrobiology and aids our understanding of how the atmospheres of terrestrial planets develop. To help address this question, we have performed a sensitivity study using a coupled radiative-convective photochemical column model to calculate changes in atmospheric chemistry on a planet having Earth's atmospheric composition, which we subjected to small changes in orbital position, of the order of 5-10% for a solar-type G2V, F2V, and K2V star. We then applied a chemical source-sink analysis to the biomarkers in order to understand how chemical processes affect biomarker concentrations. We start with the composition of the present Earth, since this is the only example we know for which a spectrum of biomarker molecules has been measured. We then investigate the response of the biomarkers to changes in the input stellar flux. Computing the thermal profile for atmospheres rich in H 2O, CO 2 and CH 4 is a major challenge for current radiative schemes, due, among other things, to lacking spectroscopic data. Therefore, as a first step, we employ a more moderate approach, by investigating small shifts in planet-star distance and assuming an earthlike biosphere. To calculate this shift we assumed a criteria for complex life based on the Earth, i.e. the earthlike planetary surface temperature varied between 0 °Cfamily species (and their reservoirs), which can catalytically destroy ozone. Hydrochloric acid (HCl), for example, is a chlorine reservoir (storage) molecule, which increased by a factor 64 in the mid-stratosphere (32 km) on moving outwards for the solar case. For the F2V and K2V stars, similar sources and sinks dominated the chemical biomarker budget

  3. HOCl chemistry in the Antarctic Stratospheric Vortex 2002, as observed with the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. von Clarmann

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In the 2002 Antarctic polar vortex enhanced HOCl mixing ratios were detected by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding both at altitudes of around 35 km (1000 K potential temperature, where HOCl abundances are ruled by gas phase chemistry and at around 18–24 km (475–625 K, which belongs to the altitude domain where heterogeneous chlorine chemistry is relevant. At altitudes of 33 to 40 km polar vortex HOCl mixing ratios were found to be around 0.14 ppbv as long as the polar vortex was intact, centered at the pole, and thus received relatively little sunlight. This is the altitude region where in midlatitudinal and tropic atmospheres peak HOCl mixing ratios significantly above 0.2 ppbv (in terms of daily mean values are observed. After deformation and displacement of the polar vortex in the course of a major warming, ClO-rich vortex air was more exposed to sunlight, where enhanced HOx abundances led to largely increased HOCl mixing ratios (up to 0.3 ppbv, exceeding typical midlatitudinal and tropical amounts significantly. The HOCl increase was preceded by an increase of ClO. Model runs could reproduce these measurements only when the Stimpfle et al. (1979 rate constant for the reaction ClO+HO2→HOCl+O2 was used but not with the current JPL recommendation. At an altitude of 24 km, HOCl mixing ratios of up to 0.15 ppbv were detected. This HOCl enhancement, which is already visible in 18 September data, is attributed to heterogeneous chemistry, which is in agreement with observations of polar stratospheric clouds. The measurements were compared to a model run where no polar stratospheric clouds appeared during the observation period. The fact that HOCl still was produced in the model run suggests that a significant part of HOCl was generated from ClO rather than directly via heterogeneous reaction. Excess ClO, lower ClONO2 and earlier loss of HOCl in the measurements are

  4. HOCl chemistry in the Antarctic stratospheric vortex 2002, as observed with the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. von Clarmann

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In the 2002 Antarctic polar vortex enhanced HOCl mixing ratios were detected by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding both at altitudes of around 35 km, where HOCl abundances are ruled by gas phase chemistry and at around 24 km, which belongs to the altitude domain where heterogeneous chlorine chemistry is relevant. At altitudes of 33 to 40 km, where in midlatitudinal and tropical atmospheres peak HOCl mixing ratios significantly above 0.2 ppbv (in terms of daily mean values are observed, polar vortex HOCl mixing ratios were found to be around 0.14 ppbv as long as the polar vortex was intact, centered at the pole, and thus received relatively little sunlight. After deformation and displacement of the polar vortex in the course of a major warming, ClO rich vortex air was more exposed to sunlight, where enhanced HOx abundances led to largely increased HOCl mixing ratios (up to 0.3 ppbv, exceeding typical midlatitudinal and tropical amounts significantly. The HOCl increase was preceded by an increase of ClO. Model runs could reproduce these measurements only when the Stimpfle et al. (1979 rate constant for the reaction ClO+HO2→HOCl+O2 was used but not with the current JPL recommendation. At an altitude of 24 km, HOCl mixing ratios of up to 0.15 ppbv were detected. This HOCl enhancement, which is already visible in 18 September data, is attributed to heterogeneous chemistry, which is in agreement with observations of polar stratospheric clouds. Comparison with a model run where no polar stratospheric clouds appeared during the observation period suggests that a significant part of HOCl was generated from ClO rather than directly via heterogeneous reaction. Excess ClO and HOCl in the measurements is attributed to ongoing heterogeneous chemistry which is not reproduced by the model. In the following days, a decay of HOCl abundances was observed and on 11 October, polar vortex mean daytime

  5. Probing Titan's Complex Atmospheric Chemistry Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, Martin A.; Nixon, Conor; Charnley, Steven B.; Teanby, Nick; Irwin, Pat; Serigano, Joseph; Palmer, Maureen; Kisiel, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Titan is Saturn's largest moon, with a thick (1.45 bar) atmosphere composed primarily of molecular nitrogen and methane. Atmospheric photochemistry results in the production of a wide range of complex organic molecules, including hydrocarbons, nitriles, aromatics and other species of possible pre-biotic relevance. Titan's carbon-rich atmosphere may be analogous to that of primitive terrestrial planets throughout the universe, yet its origin, evolution and complete chemical inventory are not well understood. Here we present spatially-resolved maps of emission from C2H5CN, HNC, HC3N, CH3CN and CH3CCH in Titan's atmosphere, observed using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in 2012-2013. These data show previously-undetected spatial structures for the observed species and provide the first spectroscopic detection of C2H5CN on Titan. Our maps show spatially resolved peaks in Titan's northern and southern hemispheres, consistent with photochemical production and transport in the upper atmosphere followed by subsidence over the poles. The HNC emission peaks are offset from the polar axis, indicating that Titan's mesosphere may be more longitudinally variable than previously thought.

  6. Atmospheric transport and dispersion modeling for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsdell, J.V.

    1991-07-01

    Radiation doses that may have resulted from operations at the Hanford Site are being estimated in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. One of the project subtasks, atmospheric transport, is responsible for estimating the transport, diffusion and deposition of radionuclides released to the atmosphere. This report discusses modeling transport and diffusion in the atmospheric pathway. It is divided into three major sections. The first section of the report presents the atmospheric modeling approach selected following discussion with the Technical Steering Panel that directs the HEDR Project. In addition, the section discusses the selection of the MESOI/MESORAD suite of atmospheric dispersion models that form the basis for initial calculations and future model development. The second section of the report describes alternative modeling approaches that were considered. Emphasis is placed on the family of plume and puff models that are based on Gaussian solution to the diffusion equations. The final portion of the section describes the performance of various models. The third section of the report discusses factors that bear on the selection of an atmospheric transport modeling approach for HEDR. These factors, which include the physical setting of the Hanford Site and the available meteorological data, serve as constraints on model selection. Five appendices are included in the report. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. DAVINCI: Deep Atmosphere Venus Investigation of Noble gases, Chemistry, and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Garvin, James B.; Robertson, Brent; Johnson, Natasha M.; Amato, Michael J.; Thompson, Jessica; Goodloe, Colby; Everette, Dave

    2017-01-01

    DAVINCI is one of five Discovery-class missions selected by NASA in October 2015 for Phase A studies. Launching in November 2021 and arriving at Venus in June of 2023, DAVINCI would be the first U.S. entry probe to target Venus atmosphere in 45 years. DAVINCI is designed to study the chemical and isotopic composition of a complete cross-section of Venus atmosphere at a level of detail that has not been possible on earlier missions and to image the surface at optical wavelengths and process-relevant scales.

  8. Plasma chemistry in an atmospheric pressure Ar/NH3 dielectric barrier discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, A.; Leipold, F.; Kusano, Y.

    2005-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in Ar/NH3 (0.1 - 10%) mixtures with a parallel plate electrode geometry was studied. The plasma was investigated by emission and absorption spectroscopy in the UV spectral range. Discharge current and voltage were measured as well. UV...... of an atmospheric pressure Ar/NH3 DBD are H-2, N-2 and N2H4. The hydrazine (N2H4) concentration in the plasma and in the exhaust gases at various ammonia concentrations and different discharge powers was measured. Thermal N2H4 decomposition into NH2 radicals may be used for NOx reduction processes....

  9. Atmospheric chemistry of CH3CHF2 (HFC-152a)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taketani, Fumikazu; Nakayama, Tomoki; Takahashi, Kenshi

    2005-01-01

    Smog chamber/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopic techniques were used to study the atmospheric degradation of CH3CHF2. The kinetics and products of the Cl(2P(3/2)) (denoted Cl) atom- and the OH radical-initiated oxidation of CH3CHF2 in 700 Torr...

  10. Impact of acid atmospheric deposition on soils: Field monitoring and aluminium chemistry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, J.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acid atmospheric deposition on concentrations and transfer of major solutes in acid, sandy soils was studied. Emphasis was given to mobilization and transport of potentially toxic aluminum. Data on solute concentrations and fluxes in meteoric water as well as soil solutions were obtain

  11. The impact of dynamic processes on chemistry in atmospheric boundary layers over tropical and boreal forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwersloot, H.G.

    2013-01-01

    Improving our knowledge of the atmospheric processes that drive climate and air quality is very relevant for society. The application of this knowledge enables us to predict and mitigate the effects of human induced perturbations to our environment. Key factors in the current and future climate evol

  12. ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE-IONIZATION MASS-SPECTROMETRY .2. APPLICATIONS IN PHARMACY, BIOCHEMISTRY AND GENERAL-CHEMISTRY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUINS, AP

    1994-01-01

    Mass spectrometer ion sources are normally located inside a high-vacuum envelope. An ion source operating at atmospheric pressure is better suited, it not essential, for a growing number of applications. MS analysis of samples pyrolyzed under controlled conditions makes use of chemical ionization at

  13. Bridging the gap between atmospheric physics and chemistry in studies of small-scale turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.

    2003-01-01

    The current understanding of the influence of atmospheric turbulence on chemical reactions is briefly reviewed. The fundamentals of this influence and the consequences for the transport and mixing of the reactants are discussed. A classification of the turbulent reacting flows is proposed in terms o

  14. Atmospheric chemistry of HFC-134a. Kinetic and mechanistic study of the CF3CFHO2 + NO2 reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møgelberg, T.E.; Nielsen, O.J.; Sehested, J.;

    1994-01-01

    A pulse radiolysis system was used to study the kinetics of the reaction of CF3CFHO2 with NO2. By monitoring the rate of the decay of NO2 using its absorption at 400 nm the reaction rate constant was determined to be k = (5.0 +/- 0.5) x 10(-12) cm3 molecule-1 s-1. A long path length Fourier......-transform infrared technique was used to investigate the thermal decomposition of the product CF3CFHO2NO2. At 296 K in the presence of 700 Torr of air, decomposition of CF3CFHO2NO2 was rapid (greater than 90% decomposition within 3 min). The results are discussed in the context of atmospheric chemistry of CF3CFH2...

  15. Atmospheric Chemistry for Astrophysicists: A Self-consistent Formalism and Analytical Solutions for Arbitrary C/O

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin; Tsai, Shang-Min

    2015-01-01

    We present a self-consistent formalism for computing and understanding the atmospheric chemistry of exoplanets. Starting from the first law of thermodynamics, we demonstrate that the van't Hoff equation (which describes the equilibrium constant), Arrhenius equation (which describes the rate coefficients) and procedures associated with the Gibbs free energy (minimisation, rescaling) have a common physical and mathematical origin. We correct an ambiguity associated with the equilibrium constant, which is used to relate the forward and reverse rate coefficients, and rigorously derive its two definitions. By necessity, one of the equilibrium constants must be dimensionless and equate to an exponential function involving the Gibbs free energy, while the other is a ratio of rate coefficients and must therefore possess physical units. To avoid confusion, we simply term them the dimensionless and dimensional equilibrium constants. We demonstrate that the Arrhenius equation takes on a functional form that is more gene...

  16. Modelling atmospheric chemistry and long-range transport of emerging Asian pollutants

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Kuo-Ying

    2008-01-01

    Modeling is a very important tool for scientific processes, requiring long-term dedication, desire, and continuous reflection. In this work, we discuss several aspects of modeling, and the reasons for doing it. We discuss two major modeling systems that have been built by us over the last 10 years. It is a long and arduous process but the reward of understanding can be enormous, as demonstrated in the examples shown in this work. We found that long-range transport of emerging Asian pollutants can be interpreted using a Lagrangian framework for wind analysis. More detailed processes still need to be modeled but an accurate representation of the wind structure is the most important thing above all others. Our long-term chemistry integrations reveal the capability of the IMS model in simulating tropospheric chemistry on a climate scale. These long-term integrations also show ways for further model development. Modeling is a quantitative process, and the understanding can be sustained only when theories are vigor...

  17. Summary of the Atmospheric Test Data (Film Scanning and Re-Analysis) Project at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, S. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-21

    The goal of the Atmospheric Test Data (ATD) Project is to preserve and make better use of scientific-quality films that were taken during the era of above ground nuclear testing. The project is being done in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory, which is the custodian of the films. Our primary points of contact at LANL have been Alan Carr, Carla Breiner, and Randy Drake.

  18. Reactions of substituted benzene anions with N and O atoms: Chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere and the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2016-06-01

    The likely existence of aromatic anions in many important extraterrestrial environments, from the atmosphere of Titan to the interstellar medium (ISM), is attracting increasing attention. Nitrogen and oxygen atoms are also widely observed in the ISM and in the ionospheres of planets and moons. In the current work, we extend previous studies to explore the reactivity of prototypical aromatic anions (deprotonated toluene, aniline, and phenol) with N and O atoms both experimentally and computationally. The benzyl and anilinide anions both exhibit slow associative electron detachment (AED) processes with N atom, and moderate reactivity with O atom in which AED dominates but ionic products are also formed. The reactivity of phenoxide is dramatically different; there is no measurable reaction with N atom, and the moderate reactivity with O atom produces almost exclusively ionic products. The reaction mechanisms are studied theoretically by employing density functional theory calculations, and spin conversion is found to be critical for understanding some product distributions. This work provides insight into the rich gas-phase chemistry of aromatic ion-atom reactions and their relevance to ionospheric and interstellar chemistry.

  19. Impacts of aerosols on the chemistry of atmospheric trace gases: a case study of peroxides and HO2 radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Liang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Field measurements of atmospheric peroxides were obtained during the summer on two consecutive years over urban Beijing, and focused on the impacts of aerosols on the chemistry of peroxide compounds and hydroperoxyl radicals (HO2. The major peroxides were determined to be hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, methyl hydroperoxide (MHP, and peroxyacetic acid (PAA. A negative correlation was found between H2O2 and PAA in rainwater, providing evidence for a conversion between H2O2 and PAA in the aqueous phase. A standard gas phase chemistry model based on the NCAR Master Mechanism provided a good reproduction of the observed H2O2 profile on non-haze days but greatly overpredicted the H2O2 level on haze days. We attribute this overprediction to the reactive uptake of HO2 by the aerosols, since there was greatly enhanced aerosol loading and aerosol liquid water content on haze days. The discrepancy between the observed and modeled H2O2 can be diminished by adding to the model a newly proposed transition metal ion catalytic mechanism of HO2 in aqueous aerosols. This confirms the importance of the aerosol uptake of HO2 and the subsequent aqueous phase reactions in the reduction of H2O2. The closure of HO2 and H2O2 between the gas and aerosol phases suggests that the aerosols do not have a net reactive uptake of H2O2, because the conversion of HO2 to H2O2 on aerosols compensates for the H2O2 loss. Laboratory studies for the aerosol uptake of H2O2 in the presence of HO2 are urgently required to better understand the aerosol uptake of H2O2 in the real atmosphere.

  20. National Centers for Environmental Prediction-Department of Energy (NCEP-DOE) Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP)-II Reanalysis (Reanalysis-2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NCEP-DOE Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-II) reanalysis is a follow-on project to the "50-year" (1948-present) NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis Project....

  1. Medicinal Chemistry Projects Requiring Imaginative Structure-Based Drug Design Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitessier, Nicolas; Pottel, Joshua; Therrien, Eric; Englebienne, Pablo; Liu, Zhaomin; Tomberg, Anna; Corbeil, Christopher R

    2016-09-20

    Computational methods for docking small molecules to proteins are prominent in drug discovery. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of documented examples-and several pertinent cases within our research program. Fifteen years ago, our first docking-guided drug design project yielded nanomolar metalloproteinase inhibitors and illustrated the potential of structure-based drug design. Subsequent applications of docking programs to the design of integrin antagonists, BACE-1 inhibitors, and aminoglycosides binding to bacterial RNA demonstrated that available docking programs needed significant improvement. At that time, docking programs primarily considered flexible ligands and rigid proteins. We demonstrated that accounting for protein flexibility, employing displaceable water molecules, and using ligand-based pharmacophores improved the docking accuracy of existing methods-enabling the design of bioactive molecules. The success prompted the development of our own program, Fitted, implementing all of these aspects. The primary motivation has always been to respond to the needs of drug design studies; the majority of the concepts behind the evolution of Fitted are rooted in medicinal chemistry projects and collaborations. Several examples follow: (1) Searching for HDAC inhibitors led us to develop methods considering drug-zinc coordination and its effect on the pKa of surrounding residues. (2) Targeting covalent prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibitors prompted an update to Fitted to identify reactive groups and form bonds with a given residue (e.g., a catalytic residue) when the geometry allows it. Fitted-the first fully automated covalent docking program-was successfully applied to the discovery of four new classes of covalent POP inhibitors. As a result, efficient stereoselective syntheses of a few screening hits were prioritized rather than synthesizing large chemical libraries-yielding nanomolar inhibitors. (3) In order to study the metabolism of POP inhibitors by

  2. Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Kroll, Jesse H.; Donahue, Neil M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Kessler, Sean H.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Altieri, Katye E.; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kolb, Charles E.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2010-11-05

    A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations, and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that organics play in human health, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state (OSC), a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of OSC , using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number (nC).

  3. Carbon oxidation state as a metric for describing the chemistry of atmospheric organic aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Jesse H; Donahue, Neil M; Jimenez, Jose L; Kessler, Sean H; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Wilson, Kevin R; Altieri, Katye E; Mazzoleni, Lynn R; Wozniak, Andrew S; Bluhm, Hendrik; Mysak, Erin R; Smith, Jared D; Kolb, Charles E; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2011-02-01

    A detailed understanding of the sources, transformations and fates of organic species in the environment is crucial because of the central roles that they play in human health, biogeochemical cycles and the Earth's climate. However, such an understanding is hindered by the immense chemical complexity of environmental mixtures of organics; for example, atmospheric organic aerosol consists of at least thousands of individual compounds, all of which likely evolve chemically over their atmospheric lifetimes. Here, we demonstrate the utility of describing organic aerosol (and other complex organic mixtures) in terms of average carbon oxidation state, a quantity that always increases with oxidation, and is readily measured using state-of-the-art analytical techniques. Field and laboratory measurements of the average carbon oxidation state, using several such techniques, constrain the chemical properties of the organics and demonstrate that the formation and evolution of organic aerosol involves simultaneous changes to both carbon oxidation state and carbon number.

  4. A Potential Mechanism for Perchlorate Formation on Mars: Surface-Radiolysis-Initiated Atmospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Eric; Atreya, Sushil K.; Kaiser, Ralf-Ingo; Mahaffy, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is prevalent on Earth, and with observations of perchlorate on lunar samples and chondrite meteorites, along with recent observations indicating the presence of perchlorate (ClO4-) in the Martian surface by the Phoenix lander and the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover, it appears that the existence of perchlorate is widespread throughout the solar system. However, the abundance and isotopic composition of Martian perchlorate suggest that the perchlorate formation mechanism on Mars may involve a different path than perchlorate found elsewhere in the solar system. Motivated by this, we employ a one-dimensional chemical model to investigate the viability of perchlorate formation in the atmosphere of Mars, instigated by the radiolysis of the Martian surface by galactic cosmic rays. The surface-atmosphere interaction to produce Martian perchlorate involves the sublimation of chlorine oxides into the atmosphere, through surface radiolysis, and their subsequent synthesis to form perchloric acid (HClO4), followed by surface deposition and mineralization to form surface perchlorates. Considering the chlorine oxide, OClO, we find an OClO surface flux as low as 3.2x107 molecules cm-2 s-1, sublimated into the atmosphere from the surface could produce sufficient HClO4 to explain the perchlorate concentration on Mars, assuming an accumulation depth of 30 cm and integrated over the Amazonian period. Radiolysis provides an efficient pathway for the oxidation of chlorine, bypassing the efficient Cl/HCl recycling mechanism that characterizes HClO4 formation mechanisms proposed for the Earth but not Mars.

  5. Weekly variation of atmospheric particle micromorphology and chemistry in Brussels urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaady, Eli; Carati, D; Brenig, L; Vanderstraeten, P; Lénelle, Y; Meurrens, A; Offer, Z Y

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of urban activities on airborne particle dynamics during weekend periods in Brussels urban area. Differences in the granulometry and micromorphology between particles sampled on working days and weekends were studied. We quantified the area, size, number, and the chemistry parameters of the airborne particles and compared between Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. We report and analyze data on airborne particles up to PM10, measured in the Brussels region from October 2002 to September 2003. Our investigation reveals detailed information regarding chemical composition of the airborne particles over the weekend period in the Brussels urban area. Furthermore, the majority of the airborne particles in the Brussels region may belong to sources geographically outside the (in situ) Brussels area.

  6. The Chemistry CATT-BRAMS model (CCATT-BRAMS 4.5: a regional atmospheric model system for integrated air quality and weather forecasting and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Longo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Coupled Chemistry Aerosol-Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CCATT-BRAMS, version 4.5 is an on-line regional chemical transport model designed for local and regional studies of atmospheric chemistry from the surface to the lower stratosphere suitable both for operational and research purposes. It includes gaseous/aqueous chemistry, photochemistry, scavenging and dry deposition. The CCATT-BRAMS model takes advantage of BRAMS-specific development for the tropics/subtropics as well as the recent availability of preprocessing tools for chemical mechanisms and fast codes for photolysis rates. BRAMS includes state-of-the-art physical parameterizations and dynamic formulations to simulate atmospheric circulations down to the meter. This on-line coupling of meteorology and chemistry allows the system to be used for simultaneous weather and chemical composition forecasts as well as potential feedback between the two. The entire system is made of three preprocessing software tools for user-defined chemical mechanisms, aerosol and trace gas emissions fields and the interpolation of initial and boundary conditions for meteorology and chemistry. In this paper, the model description is provided along with the evaluations performed by using observational data obtained from ground-based stations, instruments aboard aircrafts and retrieval from space remote sensing. The evaluation accounts for model applications at different scales from megacities and the Amazon Basin up to the intercontinental region of the Southern Hemisphere.

  7. Chemistry Simulations Using MERRA-2 Reanalysis with the GMI CTM and Replay in Support of the Atmospheric Composition Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Luke D.; Strahan, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Simulations using reanalyzed meteorological conditions have been long used to understand causes of atmospheric composition change over the recent past. Using the new Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, version 2 (MERRA-2) meteorology, chemistry simulations are being conducted to create products covering 1980-2016 for the atmospheric composition community. These simulations use the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical mechanism in two different models: the GMI Chemical Transport Model (CTM) and the GEOS-5 model developed Replay mode. Replay mode means an integration of the GEOS-5 general circulation model that is incrementally adjusted each time step toward the MERRA-2 analysis. The GMI CTM is a 1 x 1.25 simulation and the MERRA-2 GMI Replay simulation uses the native MERRA-2 approximately horizontal resolution on the cubed sphere. The Replay simulations is driven by the online use of key MERRA-2 meteorological variables (i.e. U, V, T, and surface pressure) with all other variables calculated in response to those variables. A specialized set of transport diagnostics is included in both runs to better understand trace gas transport and changes over the recent past.

  8. Fine-Structure Measurements of Oxygen A Band Absorbance for Estimating the Thermodynamic Average Temperature of the Earth's Atmosphere: An Experiment in Physical and Environmental Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrick, M. L.; Greer, A. E.; Nieuwland, A.; Priore, R. J.; Scaffidi, J.; Andreatta, Daniele; Colavita, Paula

    2006-01-01

    The experiment describe the measures of the A band transitions of atmospheric oxygen, a rich series of rotation-electronic absorption lines falling in the deep red portion of the optical spectrum and clearly visible owing to attenuation of solar radiation. It combines pure physical chemistry with analytical and environmental science and provides a…

  9. Laboratory Studies of Phosphine Chemistry Relevant to the Jovian and Saturnian Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingdi; Matsiev, Daniel; Robertson, Robert; White, Jason

    2016-10-01

    The photochemistry of phosphine (PH3) in the tropospheres of Saturn and Jupiter is initiated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation and then follows a cascade of chemical reactions that result in P-H hydrides as well as the condensed chromophore red phosphorus (P4). A key intermediate in this pathway is diphosphine (P2H4). The rate constants for the photodissociation of phosphine into initial phosphino radicals and consequently into formation of diphosphine are currently unavailable, limiting their applicability to observational measurements. The condensation of diphosphine to ice in the cold tropospheres is also poorly understood due to the difficulties in synthesizing, handling, and analyzing the compound.Our presentation will describe two experiments at SRI International to produce rate constants for the photochemistry initiated by UV light interacting with phosphine and diphosphine and properties related to the condensed phases of these species. One study seeks to produce property values for application in photochemical and cloud/haze models. Specifically, we extend the measured vapor pressure curve for diphosphine to temperatures relevant to temperatures of Saturn and Jupiter. A sophisticated vapor pressure cell has been constructed and tested and is coupled to a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and mass spectrometer for high-fidelity species diagnostics. A companion study investigates phosphine photochemistry to measure the rate constants of key intermediate species related to the loss of PH3 and the formation of P2H4. The experiments employ laser photolysis at 193 nm followed by time-resolved mid-IR laser-based species detection of reactants, and the products provide basic chemical kinetic data useful for interpreting phosphine photochemistry in planetary atmospheres.These two studies are intended to supply basic physical measurements to aid in the interpretation of outer planet atmospheric observations. For both studies, we will present our latest laboratory

  10. Numerical study of variational data assimilation algorithms based on decomposition methods in atmospheric chemistry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penenko, Alexey; Antokhin, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    The performance of a variational data assimilation algorithm for a transport and transformation model of atmospheric chemical composition is studied numerically in the case where the emission inventories are missing while there are additional in situ indirect concentration measurements. The algorithm is based on decomposition and splitting methods with a direct solution of the data assimilation problems at the splitting stages. This design allows avoiding iterative processes and working in real-time. In numerical experiments we study the sensitivity of data assimilation to measurement data quantity and quality.

  11. Status and trend of atmospheric deposition chemistry at the CONECOFOR plots, 1998-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Marchetto

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ion deposition in the open field and under the canopy was monitored in 13 CONECOFOR plots during 1998-2005. In spite of the remote location of most plots, atmospheric deposition carries considerable amounts of anthropogenic ions (sulphate, nitrate and ammonium. Deposition acidity is buffered by the deposition of base cations, partially due to the long-range transport of Saharan dust. In the study period, sulphate deposition and deposition acidity significantly decreased, because of the decrease in sulphur dioxide emissions in Europe, while nitrate and ammonia deposition did not show a clear temporal pattern.

  12. Atmospheric transport and chemistry of trace gases in LMDz5B: evaluation and implications for inverse modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Locatelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Representation of atmospheric transport is a major source of error in the estimation of greenhouse gas sources and sinks by inverse modelling. Here we assess the impact on trace gas mole fractions of the new physical parameterisations recently implemented in the Atmospheric Global Climate Model LMDz to improve vertical diffusion, mesoscale mixing by thermal plumes in the planetary boundary layer (PBL, and deep convection in the troposphere. At the same time, the horizontal and vertical resolution of the model used in the inverse system has been increased. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the impact of these developments on the representation of trace gas transport and chemistry, and to anticipate the implications for inversions of greenhouse gas emissions using such an updated model. Comparison of a one-dimensional version of LMDz with large eddy simulations shows that the thermal scheme simulates shallow convective tracer transport in the PBL over land very efficiently, and much better than previous versions of the model. This result is confirmed in three dimensional simulations, by a much improved reproduction of the Radon-222 diurnal cycle. However, the enhanced dynamics of tracer concentrations induces a stronger sensitivity of the new LMDz configuration to external meteorological forcings. At larger scales, the inter-hemispheric exchange is slightly slower when using the new version of the model, bringing them closer to observations. The increase in the vertical resolution (from 19 to 39 layers significantly improves the representation of stratosphere/troposphere exchange. Furthermore, changes in atmospheric thermodynamic variables, such as temperature, due to changes in the PBL mixing, significantly modify chemical reaction rates and the equilibrium value of reactive trace gases. One implication of LMDz model developments for future inversions of greenhouse gas emissions is the ability of the updated system to assimilate a larger

  13. Development of a Grid-Independent Geos-Chem Chemical Transport Model (v9-02) as an Atmospheric Chemistry Module for Earth System Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, M. S.; Yantosca, R.; Nielsen, J. E; Keller, C. A.; Da Silva, A.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Pawson, S.; Jacob, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    The GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model (CTM), used by a large atmospheric chemistry research community, has been re-engineered to also serve as an atmospheric chemistry module for Earth system models (ESMs). This was done using an Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) interface that operates independently of the GEOSChem scientific code, permitting the exact same GEOSChem code to be used as an ESM module or as a standalone CTM. In this manner, the continual stream of updates contributed by the CTM user community is automatically passed on to the ESM module, which remains state of science and referenced to the latest version of the standard GEOS-Chem CTM. A major step in this re-engineering was to make GEOS-Chem grid independent, i.e., capable of using any geophysical grid specified at run time. GEOS-Chem data sockets were also created for communication between modules and with external ESM code. The grid-independent, ESMF-compatible GEOS-Chem is now the standard version of the GEOS-Chem CTM. It has been implemented as an atmospheric chemistry module into the NASA GEOS- 5 ESM. The coupled GEOS-5-GEOS-Chem system was tested for scalability and performance with a tropospheric oxidant-aerosol simulation (120 coupled species, 66 transported tracers) using 48-240 cores and message-passing interface (MPI) distributed-memory parallelization. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the GEOS-Chem chemistry module scales efficiently for the number of cores tested, with no degradation as the number of cores increases. Although inclusion of atmospheric chemistry in ESMs is computationally expensive, the excellent scalability of the chemistry module means that the relative cost goes down with increasing number of cores in a massively parallel environment.

  14. Development of a grid-independent GEOS-Chem chemical transport model (v9-02) as an atmospheric chemistry module for Earth system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, M. S.; Yantosca, R.; Nielsen, J. E.; Keller, C. A.; da Silva, A.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Pawson, S.; Jacob, D. J.

    2015-03-01

    The GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model (CTM), used by a large atmospheric chemistry research community, has been re-engineered to also serve as an atmospheric chemistry module for Earth system models (ESMs). This was done using an Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) interface that operates independently of the GEOS-Chem scientific code, permitting the exact same GEOS-Chem code to be used as an ESM module or as a stand-alone CTM. In this manner, the continual stream of updates contributed by the CTM user community is automatically passed on to the ESM module, which remains state of science and referenced to the latest version of the standard GEOS-Chem CTM. A major step in this re-engineering was to make GEOS-Chem grid independent, i.e., capable of using any geophysical grid specified at run time. GEOS-Chem data sockets were also created for communication between modules and with external ESM code. The grid-independent, ESMF-compatible GEOS-Chem is now the standard version of the GEOS-Chem CTM. It has been implemented as an atmospheric chemistry module into the NASA GEOS-5 ESM. The coupled GEOS-5-GEOS-Chem system was tested for scalability and performance with a tropospheric oxidant-aerosol simulation (120 coupled species, 66 transported tracers) using 48-240 cores and message-passing interface (MPI) distributed-memory parallelization. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the GEOS-Chem chemistry module scales efficiently for the number of cores tested, with no degradation as the number of cores increases. Although inclusion of atmospheric chemistry in ESMs is computationally expensive, the excellent scalability of the chemistry module means that the relative cost goes down with increasing number of cores in a massively parallel environment.

  15. Development of a grid-independent GEOS-chem chemical transport model as an atmospheric chemistry module for Earth System Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, M. S.; Yantosca, R.; Nielsen, J. E.; Keller, C. A.; da Silva, A.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Pawson, S.; Jacob, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    The GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model (CTM), used by a large atmospheric chemistry research community, has been re-engineered to also serve as an atmospheric chemistry module for Earth System Models (ESMs). This was done using an Earth System Modelling Framework (ESMF) interface that operates independently of the GEOS-Chem scientific code, permitting the exact same GEOS-Chem code to be used as an ESM module or as a stand-alone CTM. In this manner, the continual stream of updates contributed by the CTM user community is automatically passed on to the ESM module, which remains state-of-science and referenced to the latest version of the standard GEOS-Chem CTM. A major step in this re-engineering was to make GEOS-Chem grid-independent, i.e., capable of using any geophysical grid specified at run time. GEOS-Chem data "sockets" were also created for communication between modules and with external ESM code via the ESMF. The grid-independent, ESMF-compatible GEOS-Chem is now the standard version of the GEOS-Chem CTM. It has been implemented as an atmospheric chemistry module into the NASA GEOS-5 ESM. The coupled GEOS-5/GEOS-Chem system was tested for scalability and performance with a tropospheric oxidant-aerosol simulation (120 coupled species, 66 transported tracers) using 48-240 cores and MPI parallelization. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the GEOS-Chem chemistry module scales efficiently for the number of processors tested. Although inclusion of atmospheric chemistry in ESMs is computationally expensive, the excellent scalability of the chemistry module means that the relative cost goes down with increasing number of MPI processes.

  16. The role and importance of ozone for atmospheric chemistry and methods for measuring its concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Dragan M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Depending on where ozone resides, it can protect or harm life on Earth. The thin layer of ozone that surrounds Earth acts as a shield protecting the planet from irradiation by UV light. When it is close to the planet's surface, ozone is a powerful photochemical oxidant that damage, icons frescos, museum exhibits, rubber, plastic and all plant and animal life. Besides the basic properties of some methods for determining the ozone concentration in working and living conditions, this paper presents a detailed description of the electrochemical method. The basic properties of the electrochemical method are used in the construction of mobile equipment for determining the sum of oxidants in the atmosphere. The equipment was used for testing the determination of the ozone concentration in working rooms, where the concentration was at a high level and caused by UV radiation or electrostatic discharge. According to the obtained results, it can be concluded that this equipment for determining the ozone concentration in the atmosphere is very powerful and reproducible in measurements.

  17. Hydration of atmospherically relevant molecular clusters: computational chemistry and classical thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henschel, Henning; Navarro, Juan C Acosta; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Clegg, Simon L; Kurtén, Theo; Riipinen, Ilona; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2014-04-10

    Formation of new particles through clustering of molecules from condensable vapors is a significant source for atmospheric aerosols. The smallest clusters formed in the very first steps of the condensation process are, however, not directly observable by experimental means. We present here a comprehensive series of electronic structure calculations on the hydrates of clusters formed by up to four molecules of sulfuric acid, and up to two molecules of ammonia or dimethylamine. Though clusters containing ammonia, and certainly dimethylamine, generally exhibit lower average hydration than the pure acid clusters, populations of individual hydrates vary widely. Furthermore, we explore the predictions obtained using a thermodynamic model for the description of these hydrates. The similar magnitude and trends of hydrate formation predicted by both methods illustrate the potential of combining them to obtain more comprehensive models. The stabilization of some clusters relative to others due to their hydration is highly likely to have significant effects on the overall processes that lead to formation of new particles in the atmosphere.

  18. Water physics and chemistry data from bottle casts from the AMIGO as part of the SEAGRANT project from 19 January 1972 to 20 April 1973 (NODC Accession 7400540)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected from bottle casts from the AMIGO from 19 January 1972 to 20 April 1973. Data were submitted by the Moss Landing...

  19. Design of the National Trends Network for monitoring the chemistry of atmospheric precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J.K.; Wilson, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Long-term monitoring (10 years minimum) of the chemistry of wet deposition will be conducted at National Trends Network (NTN) sites across the United States. Precipitation samples will be collected at sites that represent broad regional characteristics. Design of the NTN considered four basic elements during construction of a model to distribute 50, 75, 100, 125 or 150 sites. The modeling oriented design was supplemented with guidance developed during the course of the site selection process. Ultimately, a network of 151 sites was proposed. The basic elements of the design are: (1) Assurance that all areas of the country are represented in the network on the basis of regional ecological properties (96 sites); (2) Placement of additional sites east of the Rocky Mountains to better define high deposition gradients (27 sites); (3) Placement of sites to assure that potentially sensitive regions are represented (15 sites); (4) Placement of sites to allow for other considerations, such as urban area effects (5 sites), intercomparison with Canada (3 sites), and apparent disparities in regional coverage (5 sites). Site selection stressed areas away from urban centers, large point sources, or ocean influences. Local factors, such as stable land ownership, nearby small emission sources (about 10 km), and close-by roads and fireplaces (about 0.5 km) were also considered. All proposed sites will be visited as part of the second phase of the study.

  20. Comparison of the HadGEM2 climate-chemistry model against in situ and SCIAMACHY atmospheric methane data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Hayman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are a major emission source of methane (CH4 globally. In this study, we evaluate wetland emission estimates derived using the UK community land surface model (JULES, the Joint UK Land Earth Simulator against atmospheric observations of methane, including, for the first time, total methane columns derived from the SCIAMACHY instrument on board the ENVISAT satellite. Two JULES wetland emission estimates are investigated: (a from an offline run driven with Climatic Research Unit–National Centers for Environmental Prediction (CRU-NCEP meteorological data and (b from the same offline run in which the modelled wetland fractions are replaced with those derived from the Global Inundation Extent from Multi-Satellites (GIEMS remote sensing product. The mean annual emission assumed for each inventory (181 Tg CH4 per annum over the period 1999–2007 is in line with other recently published estimates. There are regional differences as the unconstrained JULES inventory gives significantly higher emissions in the Amazon (by ~36 Tg CH4 yr−1 and lower emissions in other regions (by up to 10 Tg CH4 yr−1 compared to the JULES estimates constrained with the GIEMS product. Using the UK Hadley Centre's Earth System model with atmospheric chemistry (HadGEM2, we evaluate these JULES wetland emissions against atmospheric observations of methane. We obtain improved agreement with the surface concentration measurements, especially at high northern latitudes, compared to previous HadGEM2 runs using the wetland emission data set of Fung et al. (1991. Although the modelled monthly atmospheric methane columns reproduce the large-scale patterns in the SCIAMACHY observations, they are biased low by 50 part per billion by volume (ppb. Replacing the HadGEM2 modelled concentrations above 300 hPa with HALOE–ACE assimilated TOMCAT output results in a significantly better agreement with the SCIAMACHY observations. The use of the GIEMS product to constrain the JULES

  1. Comparison of the HadGEM2 climate-chemistry model against in-situ and SCIAMACHY atmospheric methane data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Hayman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are a major emission source of methane (CH4 globally. In this study, we have evaluated wetland emission estimates derived using the UK community land surface model (JULES, the Joint UK Land Earth Simulator against atmospheric observations of methane, including, for the first time, total methane columns derived from the SCIAMACHY instrument on board the ENVISAT satellite. Two JULES wetland emission estimates were investigated: (a from an offline run driven with CRU-NCEP meteorological data and (b from the same offline run in which the modelled wetland fractions were replaced with those derived from the Global Inundation Extent from Multi-Satellites (GIEMS remote sensing product. The mean annual emission assumed for each inventory (181 Tg CH4 per annum over the period 1999–2007 is in line with other recently-published estimates. There are regional differences as the unconstrained JULES inventory gave significantly higher emissions in the Amazon and lower emissions in other regions compared to the JULES estimates constrained with the GIEMS product. Using the UK Hadley Centre's Earth System model with atmospheric chemistry (HadGEM2, we have evaluated these JULES wetland emissions against atmospheric observations of methane. We obtained improved agreement with the surface concentration measurements, especially at northern high latitudes, compared to previous HadGEM2 runs using the wetland emission dataset of Fung (1991. Although the modelled monthly atmospheric methane columns reproduced the large–scale patterns in the SCIAMACHY observations, they were biased low by 50 part per billion by volume (ppb. Replacing the HadGEM2 modelled concentrations above 300 hPa with HALOE–ACE assimilated TOMCAT output resulted in a significantly better agreement with the SCIAMACHY observations. The use of the GIEMS product to constrain JULES-derived wetland fraction improved the description of the wetland emissions in JULES and gave a good description

  2. Comparison of the HadGEM2 climate-chemistry model against in situ and SCIAMACHY atmospheric methane data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, G. D.; O'Connor, F. M.; Dalvi, M.; Clark, D. B.; Gedney, N.; Huntingford, C.; Prigent, C.; Buchwitz, M.; Schneising, O.; Burrows, J. P.; Wilson, C.; Richards, N.; Chipperfield, M.

    2014-12-01

    Wetlands are a major emission source of methane (CH4) globally. In this study, we evaluate wetland emission estimates derived using the UK community land surface model (JULES, the Joint UK Land Earth Simulator) against atmospheric observations of methane, including, for the first time, total methane columns derived from the SCIAMACHY instrument on board the ENVISAT satellite. Two JULES wetland emission estimates are investigated: (a) from an offline run driven with Climatic Research Unit-National Centers for Environmental Prediction (CRU-NCEP) meteorological data and (b) from the same offline run in which the modelled wetland fractions are replaced with those derived from the Global Inundation Extent from Multi-Satellites (GIEMS) remote sensing product. The mean annual emission assumed for each inventory (181 Tg CH4 per annum over the period 1999-2007) is in line with other recently published estimates. There are regional differences as the unconstrained JULES inventory gives significantly higher emissions in the Amazon (by ~36 Tg CH4 yr-1) and lower emissions in other regions (by up to 10 Tg CH4 yr-1) compared to the JULES estimates constrained with the GIEMS product. Using the UK Hadley Centre's Earth System model with atmospheric chemistry (HadGEM2), we evaluate these JULES wetland emissions against atmospheric observations of methane. We obtain improved agreement with the surface concentration measurements, especially at high northern latitudes, compared to previous HadGEM2 runs using the wetland emission data set of Fung et al. (1991). Although the modelled monthly atmospheric methane columns reproduce the large-scale patterns in the SCIAMACHY observations, they are biased low by 50 part per billion by volume (ppb). Replacing the HadGEM2 modelled concentrations above 300 hPa with HALOE-ACE assimilated TOMCAT output results in a significantly better agreement with the SCIAMACHY observations. The use of the GIEMS product to constrain the JULES-derived wetland

  3. Episodic perturbations of end-Permian atmosphere recorded in plant spore chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Wesley; Lomax, Barry; Beerling, David; James, David; Pyle, John; Self, Stephen; Sephton, Mark; Wellman, Charles

    2016-04-01

    The largest marine Phanerozoic extinction occurred 251 million years ago at the end of the Permian period with a contemporaneous major reorganisation of terrestrial. Previous work suggests the eruption of the Siberian Traps large igneous province could have generated substantial volumes of ozone depleting substances; the result being a partial collapse of the stratospheric ozone layer, and commensurate increase in ultraviolet-B (UV-B, 280-315nm) radiation. Increased UV-B flux would contribute additional pressures to an already stressed environment and flora and fauna. Here we present data utilising a new biogeochemical proxy for UV-B radiation to analyse clubmoss (lycophyta) megaspores to track UV-B radiation across the end-Permian interval. Our biogeochemical data when combined with published work on spore and pollen mutations suggests a highly dynamic global atmospheric system, oscillating between episodes of high and low UV-B flux, most likely driven by pulsed eruptive phases of the Siberian Traps.

  4. Climate change and atmospheric chemistry: how will the stratospheric ozone layer develop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dameris, Martin

    2010-10-25

    The discovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica in 1985 was a surprise for science. For a few years the reasons of the ozone hole was speculated about. Soon it was obvious that predominant meteorological conditions led to a specific situation developing in this part of the atmosphere: Very low temperatures initiate chemical processes that at the end cause extreme ozone depletion at altitudes of between about 15 and 30 km. So-called polar stratospheric clouds play a key role. Such clouds develop at temperatures below about 195 K. Heterogeneous chemical reactions on cloud particles initiate the destruction of ozone molecules. The future evolution of the ozone layer will not only depend on the further development of concentrations of ozone-depleting substances, but also significantly on climate change.

  5. Fundamental Heterogeneous Reaction Chemistry Related to Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, H.

    2016-11-01

    Typical reaction pathways of formation of dicarboxylic acids, larger multifunctional compounds, oligomers, and organosulfur and organonitrogen compounds in secondary organic aerosols (SOA), revealed by laboratory experimental studies are reviewed with a short introduction to field observations. In most of the reactions forming these compounds, glyoxal, methyl glyoxal and related difunctional carbonyl compounds play an important role as precursors, and so their formation pathways in the gas phase are discussed first. A substantial discussion is then presented for the OH-initiated aqueous phase radical oxidation reactions of glyoxal and other carbonyls which form dicarboxylic acids, larger multifunctional compounds and oligomers, and aqueous-phase non-radical reactions which form oligomers, organosulfates and organonitrogen compounds. Finally, the heterogeneous oxidation reaction of gaseous O3, OH and NO3 with liquid and solid organic aerosols at the air-particle interface is discussed relating to the aging of SOA in the atmosphere.

  6. The Quixote project: Collaborative and Open Quantum Chemistry data management in the Internet age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Sam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Computational Quantum Chemistry has developed into a powerful, efficient, reliable and increasingly routine tool for exploring the structure and properties of small to medium sized molecules. Many thousands of calculations are performed every day, some offering results which approach experimental accuracy. However, in contrast to other disciplines, such as crystallography, or bioinformatics, where standard formats and well-known, unified databases exist, this QC data is generally destined to remain locally held in files which are not designed to be machine-readable. Only a very small subset of these results will become accessible to the wider community through publication. In this paper we describe how the Quixote Project is developing the infrastructure required to convert output from a number of different molecular quantum chemistry packages to a common semantically rich, machine-readable format and to build respositories of QC results. Such an infrastructure offers benefits at many levels. The standardised representation of the results will facilitate software interoperability, for example making it easier for analysis tools to take data from different QC packages, and will also help with archival and deposition of results. The repository infrastructure, which is lightweight and built using Open software components, can be implemented at individual researcher, project, organisation or community level, offering the exciting possibility that in future many of these QC results can be made publically available, to be searched and interpreted just as crystallography and bioinformatics results are today. Although we believe that quantum chemists will appreciate the contribution the Quixote infrastructure can make to the organisation and and exchange of their results, we anticipate that greater rewards will come from enabling their results to be consumed by a wider community. As the respositories grow they will become a valuable source of

  7. Identification of the biologically active liquid chemistry induced by a nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wende, Kristian; Williams, Paul; Dalluge, Joe; Gaens, Wouter Van; Aboubakr, Hamada; Bischof, John; von Woedtke, Thomas; Goyal, Sagar M; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Bogaerts, Annemie; Masur, Kai; Bruggeman, Peter J

    2015-06-06

    The mechanism of interaction of cold nonequilibrium plasma jets with mammalian cells in physiologic liquid is reported. The major biological active species produced by an argon RF plasma jet responsible for cell viability reduction are analyzed by experimental results obtained through physical, biological, and chemical diagnostics. This is complemented with chemical kinetics modeling of the plasma source to assess the dominant reactive gas phase species. Different plasma chemistries are obtained by changing the feed gas composition of the cold argon based RF plasma jet from argon, humidified argon (0.27%), to argon/oxygen (1%) and argon/air (1%) at constant power. A minimal consensus physiologic liquid was used, providing isotonic and isohydric conditions and nutrients but is devoid of scavengers or serum constituents. While argon and humidified argon plasma led to the creation of hydrogen peroxide dominated action on the mammalian cells, argon-oxygen and argon-air plasma created a very different biological action and was characterized by trace amounts of hydrogen peroxide only. In particular, for the argon-oxygen (1%), the authors observed a strong negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation and metabolism. This effect was distance dependent and showed a half life time of 30 min in a scavenger free physiologic buffer. Neither catalase and mannitol nor superoxide dismutase could rescue the cell proliferation rate. The strong distance dependency of the effect as well as the low water solubility rules out a major role for ozone and singlet oxygen but suggests a dominant role of atomic oxygen. Experimental results suggest that O reacts with chloride, yielding Cl2(-) or ClO(-). These chlorine species have a limited lifetime under physiologic conditions and therefore show a strong time dependent biological activity. The outcomes are compared with an argon MHz plasma jet (kinpen) to assess the differences between these (at least seemingly) similar plasma sources.

  8. Technical Note: A trace gas climatology derived from the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS data set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jones

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS aboard the Canadian satellite SCISAT (launched in August 2003 was designed to investigate the composition of the upper troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere. ACE-FTS utilizes solar occultation to measure temperature and pressure as well as vertical profiles of over thirty chemical species including O3, H2O, CH4, N2O, CO, NO, NO2, N2O5, HNO3, HCl, ClONO2, CCl3F, CCl2F2, and HF. Global coverage for each species is obtained approximately over a three month period and measurements are made with a vertical resolution of typically 3–4 km. A quality-controlled climatology has been created for each of these 14 baseline species, where individual profiles are averaged over the period of February 2004 to February 2009. Measurements used are from the ACE-FTS version 2.2 data set including updates for O3 and N2O5. The climatological fields are provided on a monthly and three-monthly basis (DJF, MAM, JJA, SON at 5 degree latitude and equivalent latitude spacing and on 28 pressure surfaces (26 of which are defined by the Stratospheric Processes And their Role in Climate (SPARC Chemistry-Climate Model Validation Activity. The ACE-FTS climatological data set is available through the ACE website.

  9. Observations of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN in the upper troposphere by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Tereszchuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxyacetyl nitrate (CH3CO·O2NO2, abbreviated as PAN is a trace molecular species present in the troposphere and lower stratosphere due primarily to pollution from fuel combustion and the pyrogenic outflows from biomass burning. In the lower troposphere, PAN has a relatively short life-time and is principally destroyed within a few hours through thermolysis, but it can act as a reservoir and carrier of NOx in the colder temperatures of the upper troposphere where UV photolysis becomes the dominant loss mechanism. Pyroconvective updrafts from large biomass burning events can inject PAN into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS, providing a means for the long-range transport of NOx. Given the extended lifetimes at these higher altitudes, PAN is readily detectable via satellite remote sensing.

    A new PAN data product is now available for the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS Version 3.0 data set. We report measurements of PAN in Boreal biomass burning plumes recorded during the Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites (BORTAS campaign. The retrieval method employed and errors analysis are described in full detail.

    The retrieved volume mixing ratio (VMR profiles are compared to coincident measurements made by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS instrument on the European Space Agency (ESA ENVIronmental SATellite (ENVISAT. Three ACE-FTS occultations containing measurements of Boreal biomass burning outflows, recorded during BORTAS, were identified as having coincident measurements with MIPAS. In each case, the MIPAS measurements demonstrated good agreement with the ACE-FTS VMR profiles for PAN.

    The ACE-FTS PAN data set is used to obtain zonal mean distributions of seasonal averages from ~5 to 20 km. A strong

  10. Peroxyacetic acid in urban and rural atmosphere: concentration, feedback on PAN-NOx cycle and implication on radical chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Li

    2010-01-01

    kinetics analysis indicate that the formation and removal processes of H2O2 may be different from those of MHP and PAA. (iv Considering that PAA is the reservior of free radicals, its fate is expected to have an effect on the free radical budget in the atmosphere. A box model based on the CBM-IV mechanism has been performed to access its influence on the radical budget. We suggest that the detailed information on PAA in the atmosphere is of importance to better understand the free radical chemistry.

  11. Peroxyacetic acid in urban and rural atmosphere: concentration, feedback on PAN-NOx cycle and implication on radical chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Li

    2009-10-01

    analysis reveals that a possible unknown pathway results in the significant removal of H2O2 and the extent of H2O2 undergoing this pathway needs a further study. (iv Considering that PAA is the reservior of free radicals, its fate is expected to have an effect on the free radical budget in the atmosphere. A box model based on the CBM-IV mechanism has been performed to access its influence on the radical budget. We suggest that the detailed information on PAA in the atmosphere is of importance to better understand the free radical chemistry.

  12. A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

    2009-10-20

    elevated Legionella concentrations when the dew point temperature was high--a summertime occurrence. However, analysis of the three years of Legionella monitoring data of the 14 different SRS Cooling Towers demonstrated that elevated concentrations are observed at all temperatures and seasons. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ecology of L. pneumophila including serogroups and population densities, chemical, and atmospheric data, on cooling towers at SRS to determine whether relationships exist among water chemistry, and atmospheric conditions. The goal is to more fully understand the conditions which inhibit or encourage L. pneumophila growth and supply this data and associated recommendations to SRS Cooling Tower personnel for improved management of operation. Hopefully this information could then be used to help control L. pneumophila growth more effectively in SRS cooling tower water.

  13. Biogenic non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC). Nature`s contribution to regional and global atmospheric chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klockow, D.; Hoffman, T. [Inst. of Spectrochemistry and Applied Spectroscopy, Dortmund (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Terrestrial vegetation provides an important source of volatile hydrocarbons, especially isoprene, monoterpenes and in addition possibly sesquiterpenes as well as oxygenated compounds. Although there exist considerable uncertainties in the estimation of the magnitude of these biogenic NMHC emissions, it is generally accepted that the majority of global NMHC release is from natural and not from anthropogenic sources. Taking into consideration the high reactivity of the mostly unsaturated biogenic emissions, their impact on tropospheric processes can be assumed to be of great importance. Together with anthropogenic NO{sub x} emissions, the highly reactive natural alkenes can act as precursors in photochemical oxidant formation and contribute to regional-scale air pollution. Their oxidation in the atmosphere and the subsequent gas-to-particle conversion of the products lead to the formation of organic aerosols. Because of the formation of phytotoxic compounds, the interaction of the biogenic hydrocarbons with ozone inside or outside the leaves and needles of plants has been suggested to play a role in forest decline. (author)

  14. Palmitic Acid on Salt Subphases and in Mixed Monolayers of Cerebrosides: Application to Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen M. Adams

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Palmitic acid (PA has been found to be a major constituent in marine aerosols, and is commonly used to investigate organic containing atmospheric aerosols, and is therefore used here as a proxy system. Surface pressure-area isotherms (π-A, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM, and vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG were used to observe a PA monolayer during film compression on subphases of ultrapure water, CaCl2 and MgCl2 aqueous solutions, and artificial seawater (ASW. π-A isotherms indicate that salt subphases alter the phase behavior of PA, and BAM further reveals that a condensation of the monolayer occurs when compared to pure water. VSFG spectra and BAM images show that Mg2+ and Ca2+ induce ordering of the PA acyl chains, and it was determined that the interaction of Mg2+ with the monolayer is weaker than Ca2+. π-A isotherms and BAM were also used to monitor mixed monolayers of PA and cerebroside, a simple glycolipid. Results reveal that PA also has a condensing effect on the cerebroside monolayer. Thermodynamic analysis indicates that attractive interactions between the two components exist; this may be due to hydrogen bonding of the galactose and carbonyl headgroups. BAM images of the collapse structures show that mixed monolayers of PA and cerebroside are miscible at all surface pressures. These results suggest that the surface morphology of organic-coated aerosols is influenced by the chemical composition of the aqueous core and the organic film itself.

  15. Experimental simulation of negative ion chemistry in Martian atmosphere using ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Martin; Lichvanová, Zuzana; Orszagh, Juraj; Mason, Nigel; Matejčík, Štefan

    2014-08-01

    We have studied the formation of negative ions in a negative Corona Discharge (CD) fed by CO2/N2 mixtures (with 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10% N2) using the technique of ion mobility spectrometry-orthogonal acceleration time of flight mass spectrometry (IMS-oaTOF). The composition of the negative ions was found to be dependent on the initial gas composition, the gas flow regime, the concentrations of neutral reactive species formed in the discharge and the trace amounts on water in the gases were found to play an important role in the negative ions formation. In a pure CO2 discharge operating under standard gas flow conditions of IMS (associated with strong interaction of ions with neutral reactive species formed in discharge) the ions CO3 - (H2O) and CO4 -(H2O) dominated the measured negative ion spectrum while in CO2/N2 mixtures NO3 -(H2O) n , NO3 -(HNO3) ( n = 0, 1) ions prevailed. In the case of reverse gas flow regime (low interaction of ions with neutral reactive species formed in discharge), the negative ions detected were O2 -(H2O) n , and O2 -.CO2(H2O) n both in pure CO2 and N2/CO2 mixtures. The spectra of negative ions recorded for a gas mixture containing 4% N2 in CO2 were compared with theoretical predictions of negative ion composition in the lower atmosphere of Mars.

  16. Interaction of pollution plumes and discontinuous fields in atmospheric chemistry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillana, Mauricio; Brenner, Michael P.; Rastigeyev, Yevgeniy; Jacob, Daniel J.

    2010-11-01

    Atmospheric pollutants originate from concentrated sources such as cities, power plants, and biomass fires. They are injected in the troposphere where eddies and convective motions of various scales act to shear and dilute the pollution plumes as they are advected downwind. Despite this shear and dilution, observations from aircraft, sondes, and satellites show that pollution plumes in the remote free troposphere can preserve their identity as well-defined layers for a week or more as they are transported on intercontinental scales. This structure cannot be reproduced in the standard Eulerian chemical transport models used for global modeling of tropospheric composition, instead, the plumes dissipate far too quickly. In this work, we study how the structure of plumes is modified when they cross discontinuities arising for example: from the moving day-night boundaries or from abrupt unresolved horizontal temperature changes (for example in horizontal ocean-land or ocean-ice transitions). Chemical reactions within the plumes depend strongly on photon availability and temperature, and thus, discontinuities in these variables lead to discontinuous changes in reaction rate constants.

  17. Characterization of vehicle emissions in São Paulo and the impacts on atmospheric chemistry and secondary aerosol formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira De Brito, J.; Godoy, M.; Godoy, J.; Varanda Rizzo, L.; Artaxo, P.

    2012-12-01

    Megacities emissions are increasingly becoming a global issue, where emissions from the transportation sector play an important role. São Paulo, located in Southeast of Brazil, is a megacity with a population of 18 million people, 7 million cars and large-scale industrial emissions. As a result of the vehicular and industrial emissions, the air quality in São Paulo is considered one of the worst worldwide. Despite the large impact on human health and atmospheric chemistry/dynamics, many uncertainties are found on gas- and particulate matter vehicular emission factors and their following atmospheric processes, e.g. secondary organic aerosol formation. Due to the uniqueness of the vehicular fuel in Brazil, largely based on ethanol use, such characterization currently holds further uncertainties. To improve the understanding of the role of this unique emission pattern, we are running a source apportionment study in São Paulo. One of the goals of this study is a quantitative aerosol source apportionment focused on vehicular emissions, including ethanol and gasohol (both fuels used by light-duty vehicles) and diesel (heavy-duty vehicles). Whereas the latter shows usually much higher emission factors compared with ethanol or gasohol, heavy-duty vehicles have increasingly limited access within the São Paulo city limits, thus increasing the importance of light duty vehicles on air quality degradation. This study comprises four sampling sites, where trace elements and organic aerosol are being measured for PM2.5 and PM10 along with real-time NOx, ozone, PM10 and CO measurements. Aerosol optical properties and size distribution are being measured on a rotation basis between sampling stations. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to real-time VOC analysis and aerosol composition, respectively. Results show aerosol number concentrations ranging between 10^4 and 3.10^4 cm-3, mostly

  18. A new Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy instrument to study atmospheric chemistry from a high-altitude unmanned aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Jochen; Werner, Bodo; Spolaor, Max; Scalone, Lisa; Festa, James; Tsai, Catalina; Cheung, Ross; Colosimo, Santo F.; Tricoli, Ugo; Raecke, Rasmus; Hossaini, Ryan; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Feng, Wuhu; Gao, Ru-Shan; Hintsa, Eric J.; Elkins, James W.; Moore, Fred L.; Daube, Bruce; Pittman, Jasna; Wofsy, Steven; Pfeilsticker, Klaus

    2017-03-01

    Observations of atmospheric trace gases in the tropical upper troposphere (UT), tropical tropopause layer (TTL), and lower stratosphere (LS) require dedicated measurement platforms and instrumentation. Here we present a new limb-scanning Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument developed for NASA's Global Hawk (GH) unmanned aerial system and deployed during the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX). The mini-DOAS system is designed for automatic operation under unpressurized and unheated conditions at 14-18 km altitude, collecting scattered sunlight in three wavelength windows: UV (301-387 nm), visible (410-525 nm), and near infrared (900-1700 nm). A telescope scanning unit allows selection of a viewing angle around the limb, as well as real-time correction of the aircraft pitch. Due to the high altitude, solar reference spectra are measured using diffusors and direct sunlight. The DOAS approach allows retrieval of slant column densities (SCDs) of O3, O4, NO2, and BrO with relative errors similar to other aircraft DOAS systems. Radiative transfer considerations show that the retrieval of trace gas mixing ratios from the observed SCD based on O4 observations, the most common approach for DOAS measurements, is inadequate for high-altitude observations. This is due to the frequent presence of low-altitude clouds, which shift the sensitivity of the O4 SCD into the lower atmosphere and make it highly dependent on cloud coverage. A newly developed technique that constrains the radiative transfer by comparing in situ and DOAS O3 observations overcomes this issue. Extensive sensitivity calculations show that the novel O3-scaling technique allows the retrieval of BrO and NO2 mixing ratios at high accuracies of 0.5 and 15 ppt, respectively. The BrO and NO2 mixing ratios and vertical profiles observed during ATTREX thus provide new insights into ozone and halogen chemistry in the UT, TTL, and LS.

  19. The Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE Model – Part 2: Application to BEARPEX-2007 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Wolfe

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In a companion paper, we have introduced the Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE model, a vertically-resolved 1-D chemical transport model designed to probe the details of near-surface reactive gas exchange. Here, we use CAFE to interpret noontime observations from the 2007 phase of the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX-2007, conducted at a young Ponderosa pine plantation in the western Sierra Nevada. The model reproduces many features of the BEARPEX-2007 data and offers new insights into the forest-atmosphere exchange of reactive molecules at this location. Nitrogen oxide (NOx = NO + NO2 fluxes are driven by soil emissions of NO, while the partitioning between NO and NO2 fluxes is sensitive to in-canopy photochemical gradients. Enhanced thermolysis at the ground increases downward acyl peroxy nitrate (APN fluxes by as much as 50%, in general agreement with previous findings. APN fluxes are also influenced by in-canopy chemical production, especially when their formation is tied closely to oxidation of BVOC emissions. Gross dry N deposition is typically dominated by nitric acid, though other reactive nitrogen (NOy species can comprise up to 28% of the N deposition budget under cooler conditions. Upward NO2 fluxes cause the net above-canopy NOy flux to be ~30% lower than the gross depositional flux. Model-measurement comparison of hydrogen peroxide mixing ratios suggests this molecule deposits at the aerodynamic limit. CAFE under-predicts ozone fluxes by ~20%, which may indicate additional in-canopy chemical losses that are missing from the current model.

  20. Atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide from SCIAMACHY satellite data: initial comparison with chemistry and transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Buchwitz

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The remote sensing of the atmospheric greenhouse gases methane (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2 in the troposphere from instrumentation aboard satellites is a new area of research. In this manuscript, results obtained from observations of the up-welling radiation in the near-infrared by SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY, which flies on board ENVISAT, are presented. Vertical columns of CH4, CO2 and oxygen (O2 have been retrieved and the (air or O2-normalized CH4 and CO2 column amounts, the dry air column averaged mixing ratios XCH4 and XCO2 derived. In this manuscript the first results, obtained by using the version 0.4 of the Weighting Function Modified (WFM DOAS retrieval algorithm applied to SCIAMACHY data, are described and compared with global models. This is an important step in assessing the quality and information content of the data products derived from SCIAMACHY observations. This study investigates the behaviour of CO2 and CH4 in the period from January to October 2003. The SCIAMACHY greenhouse gas column amounts and their mixing ratios for cloud free scenes over land are shown to be in reasonable agreement with models. Over the ocean, as a result of the lower surface spectral reflectance and resultant low signal to noise with the exception of sun glint conditions, the accuracy of the individual data products is poorer. The measured methane column amounts agree with the model columns within a few percent. The inter-hemispheric difference of the methane mixing ratios, determined from single day cloud free measurements over land, is in the range 30–110 ppbv and in reasonable agreement with the corresponding model data (48–71 ppbv. For the set of individual measurements the standard deviations of the difference with respect to the models are in the range ~100

  1. Prospects for simulating macromolecular surfactant chemistry at the ocean-atmosphere boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, S.; Burrows, S. M.; Deal, C.; Liu, X.; Long, M.; Ogunro, O.; Russell, L. M.; Wingenter, O.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic lipids and polymers are surveyed for their ability to adsorb at the water-air interfaces associated with bubbles, marine microlayers and particles in the overlying boundary layer. Representative ocean biogeochemical regimes are defined in order to estimate local concentrations for the major macromolecular classes. Surfactant equilibria and maximum excess are then derived based on a network of model compounds. Relative local coverage and upward mass transport follow directly, and specific chemical structures can be placed into regional rank order. Lipids and denatured protein-like polymers dominate at the selected locations. The assigned monolayer phase states are variable, whether assessed along bubbles or at the atmospheric spray droplet perimeter. Since oceanic film compositions prove to be irregular, effects on gas and organic transfer are expected to exhibit geographic dependence as well. Moreover, the core arguments extend across the sea-air interface into aerosol-cloud systems. Fundamental nascent chemical properties including mass to carbon ratio and density depend strongly on the geochemical state of source waters. High surface pressures may suppress the Kelvin effect, and marine organic hygroscopicities are almost entirely unconstrained. While bubble adsorption provides a well-known means for transporting lipidic or proteinaceous material into sea spray, the same cannot be said of polysaccharides. Carbohydrates tend to be strongly hydrophilic so that their excess carbon mass is low despite stacked polymeric geometries. Since sugars are abundant in the marine aerosol, gel-based mechanisms may be required to achieve uplift. Uncertainties distill to a global scale dearth of information regarding two dimensional kinetics and equilibria. Nonetheless simulations are recommended, to initiate the process of systems level quantification.

  2. Prospects for Simulating Macromolecular Surfactant Chemistry at the Ocean-Atmosphere Boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, S.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Deal, C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Long, M.; Ogunro, O.; Russell, Lynn M.; Wingenter, O.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic lipids and polymers are surveyed for their ability to adsorb at the water-air interfaces associated with bubbles, marine microlayers and particles in the overlying boundary layer. Representative ocean biogeochemical regimes are defined in order to estimate local concentrations for the major macromolecular classes. Surfactant equilibria and maximum excess are then derived based on a network of model compounds. Relative local coverage and upward mass transport follow directly, and specific chemical structures can be placed into regional rank order. Lipids and denatured protein-like polymers dominate at the selected locations. The assigned monolayer phase states are variable, whether assessed along bubbles or at the atmospheric spray droplet perimeter. Since oceanic film compositions prove to be irregular, effects on gas and organic transfer are expected to exhibit geographic dependence as well. Moreover, the core arguments extend across the sea-air interface into aerosol-cloud systems. Fundamental nascent chemical properties including mass to carbon ratio and density depend strongly on the geochemical state of source waters. High surface pressures may suppress the Kelvin effect, and marine organic hygroscopicities are almost entirely unconstrained. While bubble adsorption provides a well-known means for transporting lipidic or proteinaceous material into sea spray, the same cannot be said of polysaccharides. Carbohydrates tend to be strongly hydrophilic so that their excess carbon mass is low despite stacked polymeric geometries. Since sugars are abundant in the marine aerosol, gel-based mechanisms may be required to achieve uplift. Uncertainties in the surfactant logic distill to a global scale dearth of information regarding two dimensional kinetics and equilibria. Nonetheless simulations are recommended, to initiate the process of systems level quantification.

  3. Atmospheric chemistry of 2,3-pentanedione: photolysis and reaction with OH radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Emese; Djehiche, Mokhtar; Riva, Matthieu; Fittschen, Christa; Coddeville, Patrice; Sarzyński, Dariusz; Tomas, Alexandre; Dóbé, Sándor

    2011-08-25

    The kinetics of the overall reaction between OH radicals and 2,3-pentanedione (1) were studied using both direct and relative kinetic methods at laboratory temperature. The low pressure fast discharge flow experiments coupled with resonance fluorescence detection of OH provided the direct rate coefficient of (2.25 ± 0.44) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The relative-rate experiments were carried out both in a collapsible Teflon chamber and a Pyrex reactor in two laboratories using different reference reactions to provide the rate coefficients of 1.95 ± 0.27, 1.95 ± 0.34, and 2.06 ± 0.34, all given in 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The recommended value is the nonweighted average of the four determinations: k(1) (300 K) = (2.09 ± 0.38) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), given with 2σ accuracy. Absorption cross sections for 2,3-pentanedione were determined: the spectrum is characterized by two wide absorption bands between 220 and 450 nm. Pulsed laser photolysis at 351 nm was used and the depletion of 2,3-pentanedione (2) was measured by GC to determine the photolysis quantum yield of Φ(2) = 0.11 ± 0.02(2σ) at 300 K and 1000 mbar synthetic air. An upper limit was estimated for the effective quantum yield of 2,3-pentanedione applying fluorescent lamps with peak wavelength of 312 nm. Relationships between molecular structure and OH reactivity, as well as the atmospheric fate of 2,3-pentanedione, have been discussed.

  4. Monitoramento atmosférico passivo de SO2, NO2 e O3 em áreas urbanas e de influência industrial como prática de química ambiental para alunos de graduação Atmospheric passive monitoring of SO2, NO2 and O3 in urban areas and in those under industrial influence as an environmental chemistry experiment for undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânia P. Campos

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is a result of undergraduate student participation in the Environmental Chemistry discipline provided by the Chemistry Institute/UFBA. The students were involved in the development of passive samplers, a project of the LAQUAM (Environmental Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The students' residences and other neighborhoods were used to create a passive sampling network, allowing the measurement of atmospheric levels of pollutants in urban areas and in those under industrial influence. The assembly of the passive samplers, including impregnation of filters and chemical analysis were part of the students' practice tasks. The results were analyzed taking into consideration the Brazilian legislation.

  5. Effects of atmospheric deposition nitrogen flux and its composition on soil solution chemistry from a red soil farmland, southeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jian; Zhou, Jing; Peng, Ying; Chan, Andrew; Mao, Jingdong

    2015-12-01

    A detailed study on the solution chemistry of red soil in South China is presented. Data are collected from two simulated column-leaching experiments with an improved setup to evaluate the effects of atmospheric N deposition (ADN) composition and ADN flux on agricultural soil acidification using a (15)N tracer technique and an in situ soil solution sampler. The results show that solution pH values decline regardless of the increase of the NH4(+)/NO3(-) ratio in the ADN composition or ADN flux, while exchangeable Al(3+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and K(+) concentrations increase at different soil depths (20, 40, and 60 cm). Compared with the control, ADN (60 kg per ha per year N, NH4(+)/NO3(-) ratio of 2 : 1) decreases solution pH values, increases solution concentrations of NO3(-)-N, Al(3+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) at the middle and lower soil depths, and promotes their removal. NH4(+)-N was not detected in red soil solutions of all the three soil layers, which might be attributed to effects of nitrification, absorption and fixation in farmland red soil. Some of the NO3(-)-N concentrations at 40-60 cm soil depth exceed the safe drinking level of 10 mg L(-1), especially when the ADN flux is beyond 60 kg ha(-1) N. These features are critical for understanding the ADN agro-ecological effects, and for future assessment of ecological critical loads of ADN in red soil farmlands.

  6. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY FOR ASTROPHYSICISTS: A SELF-CONSISTENT FORMALISM AND ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS FOR ARBITRARY C/O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heng, Kevin; Tsai, Shang-Min [University of Bern, Center for Space and Habitability, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland); Lyons, James R., E-mail: kevin.heng@csh.unibe.ch [Arizona State University, School of Earth and Space Exploration, Bateman Physical Sciences, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    We present a self-consistent formalism for computing and understanding the atmospheric chemistry of exoplanets from the viewpoint of an astrophysicist. Starting from the first law of thermodynamics, we demonstrate that the van’t Hoff equation (which describes the equilibrium constant), Arrhenius equation (which describes the rate coefficients), and procedures associated with the Gibbs free energy (minimization, rescaling) have a common physical and mathematical origin. We address an ambiguity associated with the equilibrium constant, which is used to relate the forward and reverse rate coefficients, and restate its two definitions. By necessity, one of the equilibrium constants must be dimensionless and equate to an exponential function involving the Gibbs free energy, while the other is a ratio of rate coefficients and must therefore possess physical units. We demonstrate that the Arrhenius equation takes on a functional form that is more general than previously stated without recourse to tagging on ad hoc functional forms. Finally, we derive analytical models of chemical systems, in equilibrium, with carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. We include acetylene and are able to reproduce several key trends, versus temperature and carbon-to-oxygen ratio, published in the literature. The rich variety of behavior that mixing ratios exhibit as a function of the carbon-to-oxygen ratio is merely the outcome of stoichiometric book-keeping and not the direct consequence of temperature or pressure variations.

  7. Atmospheric Chemistry Measurements in Schools and Outreach Activities with Low-cost Air Quality Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Z.; Monks, P. S.; McKenzie, K.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing range of low cost air quality sensors entering the market-place or being developed in-house in the last couple of years has led to many possibilities for using these instruments for public outreach activities or citizen science projects. A range of instruments sent out into local schools for the children to interpret and analyse the data and put the air quality in their area into context. A teaching package with tutorials has been developed to bring the data to life and link in with curriculum.The instruments have also been positioned around the city of Leicester in the UK to help understand the spatial variations in air quality and to assess the impact of retro-fitting buses on a busy bus route. The data is easily accessible online on a near real time basis and the various instruments can be compared with others around the country or the world from classrooms around the world.We will give an overview of the instrumentation with a comparison with commercial and cutting edge research instrumentation, the type of activities that were carried out and the public outreach forums where the data can be used.

  8. Five-year record of atmospheric precipitation chemistry in urban Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F.; Tan, J.; Shi, Z. B.; Cai, Y.; He, K.; Ma, Y.; Duan, F.; Okuda, T.; Tanaka, S.; Chen, G.

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the chemical characteristics of precipitation in the polluted urban atmosphere in Beijing and possible mechanisms influencing their variations, a total of 131 event-based precipitation samples were collected from March 2001 to August 2005. The concentrations of major ions in the samples were analyzed by using ion chromatography. Intermediate pH (6.1-7.3) was recorded in approximately two-thirds of the precipitation samples and acidic pH (4.2-5.6) in only 16% of the samples. However, the precipitation acidity was on the growth track and the process was likely being accelerated. SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and Ca2+ were the most abundant ions in the precipitations, with their single volume-weighted mean (VWM) concentration all above 100 μeq l-1. The two major anions and two major cations accounted for more than 80% of total anionic and cationic mass, respectively. The VWM SO42- concentration decreased by 13% compared to that during 1995-1998, much less than the 58% reduction in the annual average SO2 concentration from 1998 to 2005 in Beijing. What seems more counterintuitive is that the VWM NO3- concentration nearly doubled over the period although the annual average NO2 concentration decreased by 5% from 1998 to 2005. These results imply that the conversion of gaseous precursors to acid compounds and/or the regional transport were reinforced over the decade. The average ratio of neutralizing potential to acidifying potential (i.e. NP/AP) was as high as 1.2 but experienced an evident decline trend. This was mainly ascribed to reduced input of NH4+ and Ca2+ and increased input of NO3-. Furthermore, the equivalent mass ratio of NO3- to non-sea-salt SO42- presented an increasing trend over the study period, suggesting that the contribution of NO3- to the precipitation acidity increased in recent years. However, the mean ratio was only 0.37 ± 0.11 in the study period, which is significantly lower than those reported in some metropolitan areas in developed

  9. Atmospheric methane and carbon dioxide from SCIAMACHY satellite data: initial comparison with chemistry and transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Buchwitz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The remote sensing of the atmospheric greenhouse gases methane (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2 in the troposphere from instrumentation aboard satellites is a new area of research. In this manuscript, results obtained from observations of the up-welling radiation in the near-infrared by SCIAMACHY on board ENVISAT are presented. Vertical columns of CH4, CO2 and oxygen (O2 have been retrieved and the (air or O2-normalised CH4 and CO2 column amounts, the dry air column averaged mixing ratios XCH4 and XCO2 derived. In this manuscript the first results, obtained by using the version 0.4 of the Weighting Function Modified (WFM DOAS retrieval algorithm applied to SCIAMACHY data, are described and compared with global models. For the set of individual cloud free measurements over land the standard deviation of the difference with respect to the models is in the range ~100–200 ppbv (5–10% for XCH4 and ~14–32 ppmv (4–9% for XCO2. The inter-hemispheric difference of the methane mixing ratio, as determined from single day data, is in the range 30–110 ppbv and in reasonable agreement with the corresponding model data (48–71 ppbv. The weak inter-hemispheric difference of the CO2 mixing ratio can also be detected with single day data. The spatiotemporal pattern of the measured and the modelled XCO2 are in reasonable agreement. However, the amplitude of the difference between the maximum and the minimum for SCIAMACHY XCO2 is about ±20 ppmv which is about a factor of four larger than the variability of the model data which is about ±5 ppmv. More studies are needed to explain the observed differences. The XCO2 model field shows low CO2 concentrations beginning of January 2003 over a spatially extended CO2 sink region located in southern tropical/sub-tropical Africa. The SCIAMACHY data also show low CO2 mixing ratios over this area. According to the model the sink region becomes a source region about six months later and exhibits higher mixing ratios

  10. Studying the atmospheric chemistry: Statististical study of epiphyte plant Spanish Moss in Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S.; Parker, W.; Odom, L.

    2003-04-01

    determine where the elements came in from based on the following study done by HT Shacklette and JJ Connor in 1973. The first method used, R mode Cluster Analysis (CA) in this report has resulted in some specific group of elements that tend to be coming from the same kind of sources. The Rare Earth Elements (REEs) show an excellent grouping. Their probable source maybe from samples, which had lots of intake of soil dust and rock dust. The grouping of elements Co-Pb-V-Ni-W-Ba probably is because they are all from samples collected near highway where there is a lot of automotive exhaust. Again, clustering of Zn-Sn-Mo-In-Sb probably show that they are from samples, which came from some industrial sites. Samples probably collected from and around sea beaches will have the following elements clustering together: Na-Mg-Li-B. The second method, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) in this project has resulted in a specific descriptive model of chemical variation in Spanish moss. The model appears to be mathematically adequate, in that 4 components describe nearly 64% of the total observed variation and also informative in identifying some major probable sources for the different elements analyzed. Two kinds of sources have been identified: one is natural particulates from soil and rock dust and agricultural sources &the other being technological metals from automotive exhaust and industrial output. The first two components have been labeled as "natural particulates" and the remaining as "technological metals" after Connor and Shacklette. The elements with highest loadings on first and second component are lithium, boron, sodium, magnesium, aluminum, calcium, scandium, titanium, iron, selenium, strontium, yttrium, molybdenum, indium, antimony, lanthanum, uranium and bismuth and Rare earth elements (REE) which in general have mainly agricultural and natural sources. The elements with highest loadings on third and fourth component are potassium, copper, arsenic, barium, vanadium

  11. General chemistry: expanding the learning outcomes and promoting interdisciplinary connections through the use of a semester-long project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    The laboratory component of a first-semester general chemistry course for science majors is described. The laboratory involves a semester-long project undertaken in a small-group format. Students are asked to examine whether plants grown in soil contaminated with lead take up more lead than those grown in uncontaminated soil. They are also asked to examine whether the acidity of the rainwater affects the amount of lead taken up by the plants. Groups are then given considerable independence in the design and implementation of the experiment. Once the seeds are planted, which takes about 4 wk into the term, several shorter experiments are integrated in before it is time to harvest and analyze the plants. The use of a project and small working groups allows for the development of a broader range of learning outcomes than occurs in a "traditional" general chemistry laboratory. The nature of these outcomes and some of the student responses to the laboratory experience are described. This particular project also works well at demonstrating the connections among chemistry, biology, geology, and environmental studies.

  12. Measurements and modelling of atmospheric pollution over the Paris area: an overview of the ESQUIF project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menut, L.; Vautard, R.; Flamant, P.H. [Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France). Lab. de Meteorologie Dynamique; Flamant, C.; Beekmann, M.; Megie, G.; Sicard, M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 91 - Verrieres-le-Buisson (France). Service d' Aeronomie; Abonnel, C.; Lefebvre, M.P.; Lossec, B. [Meteo-France, 75 - Paris (France); Chazette, P.; Martin, D. [CNRS (France). Lab. des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement; Gombert, D. [AIRPARIF, Paris (France); Guedalia, D. [CNRS-Universite Paul Sabatier (France). Lab. d' Aerologie; Kley, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); Perros, P.; Toupance, G. [CNRS (France). Lab. Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques

    2000-11-01

    The ''etude et simulation de la qualite de l'air en ile de France'' (ESQUIF) project is the first integrated project dedicated to the study of the processes leading to air pollution events over the Paris area. The project was carried out over two years (summer 1998 to winter 2000) to document all types of meteorological conditions favourable to air quality degradation, and in particular to photo oxydant formation. The goals of ESQUIF are (1) to improve our understanding of the relevant chemical and dynamical processes and, in turn, improve their parametrizations in numerical models, and (2) to improve and validate existing models dedicated to pollution analysis, scenarios and/or forecasting, by establishing a comprehensive and thorough database. We present the rationale of the ESQUIF project and we describe the experimental set-up. We also report on the first experiments which took place during the summer of 1998 involving surface networks, and remote sensing instruments as well as several aircraft. Focusing on three days of August 1998, the relative contributions of long-range transported and locally-produced ozone to the elevated ozone concentrations observed during this period are discussed and chemistry-transport model preliminary results on this period are compared to measurements. (orig.)

  13. Implementation of the chemistry module MECCA (v2.5 in the modal aerosol version of the Community Atmosphere Model component (v3.6.33 of the Community Earth System Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Long

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate system model was developed using the modal aerosol version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (modal-CAM and the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry's Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere (MECCA to provide enhanced resolution of multiphase processes, particularly those involving inorganic halogens, and associated impacts on atmospheric composition and climate. Three Rosenbrock solvers (Ros-2, Ros-3, RODAS-3 were tested in conjunction with the basic load balancing options available to modal CAM (1 to establish an optimal configuration of the implicitly-solved multiphase chemistry module that maximizes both computational speed and repeatability of Ros-2 and RODAS-3 results versus Ros-3, and (2 to identify potential implementation strategies for future versions of this and similar coupled systems. RODAS-3 was faster than Ros-2 and Ros-3 with good reproduction of Ros-3 results, while Ros-2 was both slower and substantially less reproducible relative to Ros-3 results. Modal-CAM with MECCA chemistry was a factor of 15 slower than modal-CAM using standard chemistry. MECCA chemistry integration times demonstrated a systematic frequency distribution for all three solvers, and revealed that the change in run-time performance was due to a change in the frequency distribution chemical integration times; the peak frequency was similar for all solvers. This suggests that efficient chemistry-focused load-balancing schemes can be developed that rely on the parameters of this frequency distribution.

  14. Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Poloski, Adam P.

    2007-08-17

    This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from the sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. The proposed testing builds on the approach and laboratory test findings for both K Basin sludge and simulated sludge garnered during prior testing from September 2006 to March 2007. The outlined testing in this plan is designed to yield further understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions, the effects of compositional and process variations and the effectiveness of various strategies to mitigate the observed high shear strength phenomenon observed during the prior testing. These tests are designed to provide process validation and refinement vs. process development and design input. The expected outcome is to establish a level of understanding of the chemistry such that successful operating strategies and parameters can be implemented within the confines of the existing STP corrosion vessel design. In July 2007, the DOE provided direction to FH regarding significant changes to the scope of the overall STP. As a result of the changes, FH directed PNNL to stop work on most of the planned activities covered in this test plan. Therefore, it is unlikely the testing described here will be performed. However, to preserve the test strategy and details developed to date, the test plan has been published.

  15. Projected land photosynthesis constrained by changes in the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Sabrina; Cox, Peter M.; Eyring, Veronika; Friedlingstein, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Uncertainties in the response of vegetation to rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations contribute to the large spread in projections of future climate change. Climate-carbon cycle models generally agree that elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations will enhance terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP). However, the magnitude of this CO2 fertilization effect varies from a 20 per cent to a 60 per cent increase in GPP for a doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentrations in model studies. Here we demonstrate emergent constraints on large-scale CO2 fertilization using observed changes in the amplitude of the atmospheric CO2 seasonal cycle that are thought to be the result of increasing terrestrial GPP. Our comparison of atmospheric CO2 measurements from Point Barrow in Alaska and Cape Kumukahi in Hawaii with historical simulations of the latest climate-carbon cycle models demonstrates that the increase in the amplitude of the CO2 seasonal cycle at both measurement sites is consistent with increasing annual mean GPP, driven in part by climate warming, but with differences in CO2 fertilization controlling the spread among the model trends. As a result, the relationship between the amplitude of the CO2 seasonal cycle and the magnitude of CO2 fertilization of GPP is almost linear across the entire ensemble of models. When combined with the observed trends in the seasonal CO2 amplitude, these relationships lead to consistent emergent constraints on the CO2 fertilization of GPP. Overall, we estimate a GPP increase of 37 ± 9 per cent for high-latitude ecosystems and 32 ± 9 per cent for extratropical ecosystems under a doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentrations on the basis of the Point Barrow and Cape Kumukahi records, respectively.

  16. New molecular species of potential interest to atmospheric chemistry: isomers on the [H, S2, Br] potential energy surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira-Filho, Antonio Gustavo S; Aoto, Yuri Alexandre; Ornellas, Fernando R

    2009-02-19

    This work reports a state-of-the-art theoretical characterization of four new sulfur-bromine species and five transition states on the [H, S(2), Br] potential energy surface. Our highest level theoretical approach employed the method coupled cluster singles and doubles with perturbative contributions of connected triples, CCSD(T), along with the series of correlation-consistent basis sets and with extrapolation to the complete basis set (CBS) limit in the optimization of the geometrical parameters and to quantify the energetic quantities. The structural and vibrational frequencies here reported are unique and represent the most accurate investigation to date of these species. The global minimum corresponds to a skewed structure HSSBr with a disulfide bond; this is followed by a pyramidal-like structure, SSHBr, 18.85 kcal/mol above the minimum. Much higher in energy, we found another skewed structure, HSBrS (50.29 kcal/mol), with one S-Br dative-type bond, and another pyramidal-like one, HBrSS (109.80 kcal/mol), with two S-Br dative-type bonds. The interconversion of HSSBr into SSHBr can occur via a transfer of either the hydrogen or the bromine atom but involves a very high barrier of about 43 kcal/mol. These molecules are potentially a new route of coupling the sulfur and bromine chemistry in the atmosphere, and conditions of high concentration of H(2)S like in volcanic eruptions might contribute to their formation. We note that HSSBr can act as a reservoir molecule for the reaction between the radicals HSS and Br. Also, an assessment of the methods DFT/B3LYP/CBS and MP2/CBS relative to CCSD(T)/CBS provides insights on the expected performance of these methods on the characterization of polysulfides and also of more complex systems containing disulfide bridges.

  17. The research project Winter In Northern Europe (WINE) of the international Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonzahn, U.

    1983-06-01

    The MAP/WINE study of the structure and dynamics of the middle atmosphere above northern Europe during winter is outlined. The project measures the morphology of small scale dynamic features, in order to study the control exerted by gravity waves and tides on the mean flow in the mesosphere, and to develop improved parameterizations of the interactions of small scale dynamic processes with mesospheric temperature, structure, and mean flow. Sudden stratospheric warmings, their cause, the time history of their large scale spatial structures, and their effect on the mesosphere temperature and dynamics are investigated. The effects of dynamics and temperature structure on the distribution of minor constituents, including ionospheric plasma, in the middle atmosphere are examined. Remote sensing and in-situ techniques for measuring mesospheric parameters are compared.

  18. Research in physical chemistry and chemical education: Part A: Water Mediated Chemistry of Oxidized Atmospheric Compounds Part B: The Development of Surveying Tools to Determine How Effective Laboratory Experiments Contribute to Student Conceptual Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Marta Katarzyna

    This dissertation is a combination of two research areas, experimental physical chemistry, Chapters I to V, and chemical education, Chapters VI to VII. Chapters I to V describe research on the water-mediated chemistry of oxidized atmospheric molecules and the impact that water has on the spectra of these environmental systems. The role of water in the Earth's atmosphere has been of considerable interest due to its ability to impact chemistry and climate. Oxidized atmospheric molecules in the presence of water have the ability to form hydrogen bonded water complexes. The spectroscopic investigation of nitric acid-water complexes, outlined in Chapter III, was undertaken to characterize intermolecular hydrogen bonds in a water-restricted environment at ambient temperatures. Additionally, this characterization of nitric acid-water complexes allowed for the comparison of calculated overtone OH-stretching vibrational band frequencies, intensities, and anharmonicities of intermolecular hydrogen-bonded water complexes with experimental observations. Oxidized organic molecules, such as aldehydes and ketones, in addition to forming hydrogen-bonded water complexes can undergo a hydration reaction of the carbonyl group and form germinal diols in the presence of water. This chemistry has been studied extensively in bulk aqueous media, however little is known about this process in the gas-phase at low water concentrations. The focus of the studies outlined in Chapters IV and V is motivated by the ability of pyruvic acid and formaldehyde to form germinal diols and water complexes in water-restricted environment. This water-mediated chemistry changes the physical and chemical properties of these organic molecules, therefore, impacting the partitioning between gas and particle phase, as well as the chemistry and photochemistry of oxidized organic molecules in the Earth's atmosphere. The results presented in this dissertation may help resolve the significant discrepancy between

  19. Collaborative Project. A Flexible Atmospheric Modeling Framework for the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gettelman, Andrew [University Corporation For Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-10-01

    In this project we have been upgrading the Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), also known as Super-Parameterized CAM (SP-CAM). This has included a major effort to update the coding standards and interface with CAM so that it can be placed on the main development trunk. It has also included development of a new software structure for CAM to be able to handle sub-grid column information. These efforts have formed the major thrust of the work.

  20. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility upgrades project - A model for waste minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, M.L.; Durrer, R.E.; Kennicott, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility, constructed in 1952, is currently undergoing a major, multi-year construction project. Many of the operations required under this project (i.e., design, demolition, decontamination, construction, and waste management) mimic the processes required of a large scale decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) job and are identical to the requirements of any of several upgrades projects anticipated for LANL and other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. For these reasons the CMR Upgrades Project is seen as an ideal model facility - to test the application, and measure the success of - waste minimization techniques which could be brought to bear on any of the similar projects. The purpose of this paper will be to discuss the past, present, and anticipated waste minimization applications at the facility and will focus on the development and execution of the project`s {open_quotes}Waste Minimization/Pollution Prevention Strategic Plan.{close_quotes}

  1. A chemistry-transport model simulation of middle atmospheric ozone from 1980 to 2019 using coupled chemistry GCM winds and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damski, J.; Thölix, L.; Backman, L.; Kaurola, J.; Taalas, P.; Austin, J.; Butchart, N.; Kulmala, M.

    2007-05-01

    A global 40-year simulation from 1980 to 2019 was performed with the FinROSE chemistry-transport model based on the use of coupled chemistry GCM-data. The main focus of our analysis is on climatological-scale processes in high latitudes. The resulting trend estimates for the past period (1980-1999) agree well with observation-based trend estimates. The results for the future period (2000-2019) suggest that the extent of seasonal ozone depletion over both northern and southern high-latitudes has likely reached its maximum. Furthermore, while climate change is expected to cool the stratosphere, this cooling is unlikely to accelerate significantly high latitude ozone depletion. However, the recovery of seasonal high latitude ozone losses will not take place during the next 15 years.

  2. A new 2D climate model with chemistry and self consistent eddy-parameterization. The impact of airplane NO{sub x} on the chemistry of the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gepraegs, R.; Schmitz, G.; Peters, D. [Institut fuer Atmosphaerenphysik, Kuehlungsborn (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A 2D version of the ECHAM T21 climate model has been developed. The new model includes an efficient spectral transport scheme with implicit diffusion. Furthermore, photodissociation and chemistry of the NCAR 2D model have been incorporated. A self consistent parametrization scheme is used for eddy heat- and momentum flux in the troposphere. It is based on the heat flux parametrization of Branscome and mixing-length formulation for quasi-geostrophic vorticity. Above 150 hPa the mixing-coefficient K{sub yy} is prescribed. Some of the model results are discussed, concerning especially the impact of aircraft NO{sub x} emission on the model chemistry. (author) 6 refs.

  3. Payette River Basin Project: Improving Operational Forecasting in Complex Terrain through Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blestrud, D.; Kunkel, M. L.; Parkinson, S.; Holbrook, V. P.; Benner, S. G.; Fisher, J.

    2015-12-01

    Idaho Power Company (IPC) is an investor owned hydroelectric based utility, serving customers throughout southern Idaho and eastern Oregon. The University of Arizona (UA) runs an operational 1.8-km resolution Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) model for IPC, which is incorporated into IPC near and real-time forecasts for hydro, solar and wind generation, load servicing and a large-scale wintertime cloud seeding operation to increase winter snowpack. Winter snowpack is critical to IPC, as hydropower provides ~50% of the company's generation needs. In efforts to improve IPC's near-term forecasts and operational guidance to its cloud seeding program, IPC is working extensively with UA and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to improve WRF performance in the complex terrain of central Idaho. As part of this project, NCAR has developed a WRF based cloud seeding module (WRF CS) to deliver high-resolution, tailored forecasts to provide accurate guidance for IPC's operations. Working with Boise State University (BSU), IPC is conducting a multiyear campaign to validate the WRF CS's ability to account for and disperse the cloud seeding agent (AgI) within the boundary layer. This improved understanding of how WRF handles the AgI dispersion and fate will improve the understanding and ultimately the performance of WRF to forecast other parameters. As part of this campaign, IPC has developed an extensive ground based monitoring network including a Remote Area Snow Sampling Device (RASSD) that provides spatially and temporally discrete snow samples during active cloud seeding periods. To quantify AgI dispersion in the complex terrain, BSU conducts trace element analysis using LA-ICP-MS on the RASSD sampled snow to provide measurements (at the 10-12 level) of incorporated AgI, measurements are compare directly with WRF CS's estimates of distributed AgI. Modeling and analysis results from previous year's research and plans for coming seasons will be presented.

  4. Projected changes in atmospheric rivers affecting Europe in CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Alexandre M.; Tomé, Ricardo; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Pinto, Joaquim G.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) are elongated bands of high water vapor concentration extending to the midlatitudes, which can be associated with intense precipitation and floods over continental areas. We analyze ARs reaching Europe in simulations from six Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) global climate models (GCMs) to quantify possible changes during the current century, with emphasis in five western European prone coastal areas. ARs are represented reasonably well in GCMs for recent climate conditions (1980-2005). Increased vertically integrated horizontal water transport is found for 2074-2099 (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) compared to 1980-2005, while the number of ARs is projected to double on average for the same period. These changes are robust between models and are associated with higher air temperatures and thus enhanced atmospheric moisture content, together with higher precipitation associated with extratropical cyclones. This suggests an increased risk of intense precipitation and floods along the Atlantic European Coasts from the Iberian Peninsula to Scandinavia.

  5. Projected changes in atmospheric river events in Arizona as simulated by global and regional climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Erick R.; Dominguez, Francina

    2016-09-01

    Inland-penetrating atmospheric rivers (ARs) affect the United States Southwest and significantly contribute to cool season precipitation. In this study, we examine the results from an ensemble of dynamically downscaled simulations from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) and their driving general circulation models (GCMs) in order to determine statistically significant changes in the intensity of the cool season ARs impacting Arizona and the associated precipitation. Future greenhouse gas emissions follow the A2 emission scenario from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report simulations. We find that there is a consistent and clear intensification of the AR-related water vapor transport in both the global and regional simulations which reflects the increase in water vapor content due to warmer atmospheric temperatures, according to the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. However, the response of AR-related precipitation intensity to increased moisture flux and column-integrated water vapor is weak and no significant changes are projected either by the GCMs or the NARCCAP models. This lack of robust precipitation variations can be explained in part by the absence of meaningful changes in both the large-scale water vapor flux convergence and the maximum positive relative vorticity in the GCMs. Additionally, some global models show a robust decrease in relative humidity which may also be responsible for the projected precipitation patterns.

  6. Aviation Trends Related to Atmospheric Environment Safety Technologies Project Technical Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveley, Mary S.; Withrow, Colleen A.; Barr, Lawrence C.; Evans, Joni K.; Leone, Karen M.; Jones, Sharon M.

    2014-01-01

    Current and future aviation safety trends related to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Atmospheric Environment Safety Technologies Project's three technical challenges (engine icing characterization and simulation capability; airframe icing simulation and engineering tool capability; and atmospheric hazard sensing and mitigation technology capability) were assessed by examining the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) accident database (1989 to 2008), incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) accident/incident database (1989 to 2006), and literature from various industry and government sources. The accident and incident data were examined for events involving fixed-wing airplanes operating under Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Parts 121, 135, and 91 for atmospheric conditions related to airframe icing, ice-crystal engine icing, turbulence, clear air turbulence, wake vortex, lightning, and low visibility (fog, low ceiling, clouds, precipitation, and low lighting). Five future aviation safety risk areas associated with the three AEST technical challenges were identified after an exhaustive survey of a variety of sources and include: approach and landing accident reduction, icing/ice detection, loss of control in flight, super density operations, and runway safety.

  7. Dynamics of the middle atmosphere as observed by the ARISE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, E.

    2015-12-01

    It has been strongly demonstrated that variations in the circulation of the middle atmosphere influence weather and climate all the way to the Earth's surface. A key part of this coupling occurs through the propagation and breaking of planetary and gravity waves. However, limited observations prevent to faithfully reproduce the dynamics of the middle atmosphere in numerical weather prediction and climate models. The main challenge of the ARISE (Atmospheric dynamics InfraStructure in Europe) project is to combine existing national and international observation networks including: the International infrasound monitoring system developed for the CTBT (Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) verification, the NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) lidar network, European observation infrastructures at mid latitudes (OHP observatory), tropics (Maïdo observatory), high latitudes (ALOMAR and EISCAT), infrasound stations which form a dense European network and satellites. The ARISE network is unique by its coverage (polar to equatorial regions in the European longitude sector), its altitude range (from troposphere to mesosphere and ionosphere) and the involved scales both in time (from seconds to tens of years) and space (from tens of meters to thousands of kilometers). Advanced data products are produced with the scope to assimilate data in the Weather Prediction models to improve future forecasts over weeks and seasonal time scales. ARISE observations are especially relevant for the monitoring of extreme events such as thunderstorms, volcanoes, meteors and at larger scales, deep convection and stratospheric warming events for physical processes description and study of long term evolution with climate change. Among the applications, ARISE fosters integration of innovative methods for remote detection of non-instrumented volcanoes including distant eruption characterization to provide notifications with reliable confidence indices to the

  8. New satellite project Aerosol-UA: Remote sensing of aerosols in the terrestrial atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, G.; Yatskiv, Ya.; Degtyaryov, O.; Syniavskyi, I.; Mishchenko, M.; Rosenbush, V.; Ivanov, Yu.; Makarov, A.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Danylevsky, V.; Sosonkin, M.; Moskalov, S.; Bovchaliuk, V.; Lukenyuk, A.; Shymkiv, A.; Udodov, E.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the development of the Ukrainian space project Aerosol-UA which has the following three main objectives: (1) to monitor the spatial distribution of key characteristics of terrestrial tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols; (2) to provide a comprehensive observational database enabling accurate quantitative estimates of the aerosol contribution to the energy budget of the climate system; and (3) quantify the contribution of anthropogenic aerosols to climate and ecological processes. The remote sensing concept of the project is based on precise orbital measurements of the intensity and polarization of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere and the surface with a scanning polarimeter accompanied by a wide-angle multispectral imager-polarimeter. Preparations have already been made for the development of the instrument suite for the Aerosol-UA project, in particular, of the multi-channel scanning polarimeter (ScanPol) designed for remote sensing studies of the global distribution of aerosol and cloud properties (such as particle size, morphology, and composition) in the terrestrial atmosphere by polarimetric and spectrophotometric measurements of the scattered sunlight in a wide range of wavelengths and viewing directions from which a scene location is observed. ScanPol is accompanied by multispectral wide-angle imager-polarimeter (MSIP) that serves to collect information on cloud conditions and Earth's surface image. Various components of the polarimeter ScanPol have been prototyped, including the opto-mechanical and electronic assemblies and the scanning mirror controller. Preliminary synthetic data simulations for the retrieval of aerosol parameters over land surfaces have been performed using the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) algorithm. Methods for the validation of satellite data using ground-based observations of aerosol properties are also discussed. We assume that designing, building, and launching into orbit a multi

  9. New Satellite Project Aerosol-UA: Remote Sensing of Aerosols in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, G.; Yatskiv, Ya.; Degtyaryov, O.; Syniavskyi, I.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rosenbush, V.; Ivanov, Yu.; Makarov, A.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Danylevsky, V.; Sosonkin, M.; Moskalov, S.; Bovchaliuk, V; Lukenyuk, A.; Shymkiv, A.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the development of the Ukrainian space project Aerosol-UA which has the following three main objectives: (1) to monitor the spatial distribution of key characteristics of terrestrial tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols; (2) to provide a comprehensive observational database enabling accurate quantitative estimates of the aerosol contribution to the energy budget of the climate system; and (3) quantify the contribution of anthropogenic aerosols to climate and ecological processes. The remote sensing concept of the project is based on precise orbital measurements of the intensity and polarization of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere and the surface with a scanning polarimeter accompanied by a wide-angle multispectral imager-polarimeter. Preparations have already been made for the development of the instrument suite for the Aerosol-UA project, in particular, of the multi-channel scanning polarimeter (ScanPol) designed for remote sensing studies of the global distribution of aerosol and cloud properties (such as particle size, morphology, and composition) in the terrestrial atmosphere by polarimetric and spectrophotometric measurements of the scattered sunlight in a wide range of wavelengths and viewing directions from which a scene location is observed. ScanPol is accompanied by multispectral wide-angle imager-polarimeter (MSIP) that serves to collect information on cloud conditions and Earths surface image. Various components of the polarimeter ScanPol have been prototyped, including the opto-mechanical and electronic assemblies and the scanning mirror controller. Preliminary synthetic data simulations for the retrieval of aerosol parameters over land surfaces have been performed using the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) algorithm. Methods for the validation of satellite data using ground-based observations of aerosol properties are also discussed. We assume that designing, building, and launching into orbit a multi

  10. Incorporating Students' Self-Designed, Research-Based Analytical Chemistry Projects into the Instrumentation Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruomei

    2015-01-01

    In a typical chemistry instrumentation laboratory, students learn analytical techniques through a well-developed procedure. Such an approach, however, does not engage students in a creative endeavor. To foster the intrinsic motivation of students' desire to learn, improve their confidence in self-directed learning activities and enhance their…

  11. Connecting Biology and Organic Chemistry Introductory Laboratory Courses through a Collaborative Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltax, Ariana L.; Armanious, Stephanie; Kosinski-Collins, Melissa S.; Pontrello, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Modern research often requires collaboration of experts in fields, such as math, chemistry, biology, physics, and computer science to develop unique solutions to common problems. Traditional introductory undergraduate laboratory curricula in the sciences often do not emphasize connections possible between the various disciplines. We designed an…

  12. Learning Nuclear Chemistry through Practice: A High School Student Project Using PET in a Clinical Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Lucia; Adamsen, Tom Christian Holm

    2013-01-01

    Practical experience is vital for promoting interest in science. Several aspects of chemistry are rarely taught in the secondary school curriculum, especially nuclear and radiochemistry. Therefore, we introduced radiochemistry to secondary school students through positron emission tomography (PET) associated with computer tomography (CT). PET-CT…

  13. Stereoscopic Projection in Organic Chemistry: Bridging the Gap between Two and Three Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozzelle, Arlene A.; Rosenfeld, Stuart M.

    1985-01-01

    Shows how to make stereo slides of three-dimensional molecular models. The slides have been used to teach chirality, conformational isomerism, how models and two-dimensional representations embody selected aspects of structure, and fundamentals of using the specific model set required in a particular organic chemistry course. (JN)

  14. Changes in precipitation extremes projected by a 20-km mesh global atmospheric model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Kitoh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution modeling is necessary to project weather and climate extremes and their future changes under global warming. A global high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model with grid size about 20 km is able to reproduce climate fields as well as regional-scale phenomena such as monsoonal rainfall, tropical and extratropical cyclones, and heavy precipitation. This 20-km mesh model is applied to project future changes in weather and climate extremes at the end of the 21st century with four different spatial patterns in sea surface temperature (SST changes: one with the mean SST changes by the 28 models of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5 under the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP-8.5 scenario, and the other three obtained from a cluster analysis, in which tropical SST anomalies derived from the 28 CMIP5 models were grouped. Here we focus on future changes in regional precipitation and its extremes. Various precipitation indices averaged over the Twenty-two regional land domains are calculated. Heavy precipitation indices (maximum 5-day precipitation total and maximum 1-day precipitation total increase in all regional domains, even where mean precipitation decrease (Southern Africa, South Europe/Mediterranean, Central America. South Asia is the domain of the largest extreme precipitation increase. In some domains, different SST patterns result in large precipitation changes, possibly related to changes in large-scale circulations in the tropical Pacific.

  15. D-region ion-neutral coupled chemistry (Sodankylä Ion Chemistry, SIC) within the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM 4) - WACCM-SIC and WACCM-rSIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Tamás; Plane, John M. C.; Feng, Wuhu; Nagy, Tibor; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Verronen, Pekka T.; Andersson, Monika E.; Newnham, David A.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Marsh, Daniel R.

    2016-09-01

    This study presents a new ion-neutral chemical model coupled into the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). The ionospheric D-region (altitudes ˜ 50-90 km) chemistry is based on the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC) model, a one-dimensional model containing 307 ion-neutral and ion recombination, 16 photodissociation and 7 photoionization reactions of neutral species, positive and negative ions, and electrons. The SIC mechanism was reduced using the simulation error minimization connectivity method (SEM-CM) to produce a reaction scheme of 181 ion-molecule reactions of 181 ion-molecule reactions of 27 positive and 18 negative ions. This scheme describes the concentration profiles at altitudes between 20 km and 120 km of a set of major neutral species (HNO3, O3, H2O2, NO, NO2, HO2, OH, N2O5) and ions (O2+, O4+, NO+, NO+(H2O), O2+(H2O), H+(H2O), H+(H2O)2, H+(H2O)3, H+(H2O)4, O3-, NO2-, O-, O2, OH-, O2-(H2O), O2-(H2O)2, O4-, CO3-, CO3-(H2O), CO4-, HCO3-, NO2-, NO3-, NO3-(H2O), NO3-(H2O)2, NO3-(HNO3), NO3-(HNO3)2, Cl-, ClO-), which agree with the full SIC mechanism within a 5 % tolerance. Four 3-D model simulations were then performed, using the impact of the January 2005 solar proton event (SPE) on D-region HOx and NOx chemistry as a test case of four different model versions: the standard WACCM (no negative ions and a very limited set of positive ions); WACCM-SIC (standard WACCM with the full SIC chemistry of positive and negative ions); WACCM-D (standard WACCM with a heuristic reduction of the SIC chemistry, recently used to examine HNO3 formation following an SPE); and WACCM-rSIC (standard WACCM with a reduction of SIC chemistry using the SEM-CM method). The standard WACCM misses the HNO3 enhancement during the SPE, while the full and reduced model versions predict significant NOx, HOx and HNO3 enhancements in the mesosphere during solar proton events. The SEM-CM reduction also identifies the important ion-molecule reactions that affect the partitioning of

  16. Atmospheric chemistry and physics in the atmosphere of a developed megacity (London: an overview of the REPARTEE experiment and its conclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Harrison

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The REgents PARk and Tower Environmental Experiment (REPARTEE comprised two campaigns in London in October 2006 and October/November 2007. The experiment design involved measurements at a heavily trafficked roadside site, two urban background sites and an elevated site at 160–190 m above ground on the BT Tower, supplemented in the second campaign by Doppler lidar measurements of atmospheric vertical structure. A wide range of measurements of airborne particle physical metrics and chemical composition were made as well as measurements of a considerable range of gas phase species and the fluxes of both particulate and gas phase substances. Significant findings include (a demonstration of the evaporation of traffic-generated nanoparticles during both horizontal and vertical atmospheric transport; (b generation of a large base of information on the fluxes of nanoparticles, accumulation mode particles and specific chemical components of the aerosol and a range of gas phase species, as well as the elucidation of key processes and comparison with emissions inventories; (c quantification of vertical gradients in selected aerosol and trace gas species which has demonstrated the important role of regional transport in influencing concentrations of sulphate, nitrate and secondary organic compounds within the atmosphere of London; (d generation of new data on the atmospheric structure and turbulence above London, including the estimation of mixed layer depths; (e provision of new data on trace gas dispersion in the urban atmosphere through the release of purposeful tracers; (f the determination of spatial differences in aerosol particle size distributions and their interpretation in terms of sources and physico-chemical transformations; (g studies of the nocturnal oxidation of nitrogen oxides and of the diurnal behaviour of nitrate aerosol in the urban atmosphere, and (h new information on the chemical composition and source apportionment of particulate

  17. Atmospheric chemistry and physics in the atmosphere of a developed megacity (London: an overview of the REPARTEE experiment and its conclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Harrison

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Regents Park and Tower Environmental Experiment (REPARTEE comprised two campaigns in London in October 2006 and October/November 2007. The experiment design involved measurements at a heavily trafficked roadside site, two urban background sites and an elevated site at 160–190 m above ground on the BT Tower, supplemented in the second campaign by Doppler lidar measurements of atmospheric vertical structure. A wide range of measurements of airborne particle physical metrics and chemical composition were made as well as measurements of a considerable range of gas phase species and the fluxes of both particulate and gas phase substances. Significant findings include (a demonstration of the evaporation of traffic-generated nanoparticles during both horizontal and vertical atmospheric transport; (b generation of a large base of information on the fluxes of nanoparticles, accumulation mode particles and specific chemical components of the aerosol and a range of gas phase species, as well as the elucidation of key processes and comparison with emissions inventories; (c quantification of vertical gradients in selected aerosol and trace gas species which has demonstrated the important role of regional transport in influencing concentrations of sulphate, nitrate and secondary organic compounds within the atmosphere of London; (d generation of new data on the atmospheric structure and turbulence above London, including the estimation of mixed layer depths; (e provision of new data on trace gas dispersion in the urban atmosphere through the release of purposeful tracers; (f the determination of spatial differences in aerosol particle size distributions and their interpretation in terms of sources and physico-chemical transformations; (g studies of the nocturnal oxidation of nitrogen oxides and of the diurnal behaviour of nitrate aerosol in the urban atmosphere, and (h new information on the chemical composition and source apportionment of particulate

  18. Atmospheric chemistry and physics in the atmosphere of a developed megacity (London): an overview of the REPARTEE experiment and its conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. M.; Dall'Osto, M.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Thorpe, A. J.; Bloss, W. J.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Dorsey, J. R.; Gallagher, M.; Martin, C.; Whitehead, J.; Williams, P. I.; Jones, R. L.; Langridge, J. M.; Benton, A. K.; Ball, S. M.; Langford, B.; Hewitt, C. N.; Davison, B.; Martin, D.; Petersson, K. F.; Henshaw, S. J.; White, I. R.; Shallcross, D. E.; Barlow, J. F.; Dunbar, T.; Davies, F.; Nemitz, E.; Phillips, G. J.; Helfter, C.; Di Marco, C. F.; Smith, S.

    2012-03-01

    The REgents PARk and Tower Environmental Experiment (REPARTEE) comprised two campaigns in London in October 2006 and October/November 2007. The experiment design involved measurements at a heavily trafficked roadside site, two urban background sites and an elevated site at 160-190 m above ground on the BT Tower, supplemented in the second campaign by Doppler lidar measurements of atmospheric vertical structure. A wide range of measurements of airborne particle physical metrics and chemical composition were made as well as measurements of a considerable range of gas phase species and the fluxes of both particulate and gas phase substances. Significant findings include (a) demonstration of the evaporation of traffic-generated nanoparticles during both horizontal and vertical atmospheric transport; (b) generation of a large base of information on the fluxes of nanoparticles, accumulation mode particles and specific chemical components of the aerosol and a range of gas phase species, as well as the elucidation of key processes and comparison with emissions inventories; (c) quantification of vertical gradients in selected aerosol and trace gas species which has demonstrated the important role of regional transport in influencing concentrations of sulphate, nitrate and secondary organic compounds within the atmosphere of London; (d) generation of new data on the atmospheric structure and turbulence above London, including the estimation of mixed layer depths; (e) provision of new data on trace gas dispersion in the urban atmosphere through the release of purposeful tracers; (f) the determination of spatial differences in aerosol particle size distributions and their interpretation in terms of sources and physico-chemical transformations; (g) studies of the nocturnal oxidation of nitrogen oxides and of the diurnal behaviour of nitrate aerosol in the urban atmosphere, and (h) new information on the chemical composition and source apportionment of particulate matter size

  19. Middle atmosphere response to different descriptions of the 11-yr solar cycle in spectral irradiance in a chemistry-climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Swartz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The 11-yr solar cycle in solar spectral irradiance (SSI inferred from measurements by the SOlar Radiation & Climate Experiment (SORCE suggests a much larger variation in the ultraviolet than previously accepted. We present middle atmosphere ozone and temperature responses to the solar cycles in SORCE SSI and the ubiquitous Naval Research Laboratory (NRL SSI reconstruction using the Goddard Earth Observing System chemistry-climate model (GEOSCCM. The results are largely consistent with other recent modeling studies. The modeled ozone response is positive throughout the stratosphere and lower mesosphere using the NRL SSI, while the SORCE SSI produces a response that is larger in the lower stratosphere but out of phase with respect to total solar irradiance above 45 km. The modeled responses in total ozone are similar to those derived from satellite and ground-based measurements, 3–6 Dobson Units per 100 units of 10.7-cm radio flux (F10.7 in the tropics. The peak zonal mean tropical temperature response using the SORCE SSI is nearly 2 K per 100 units F10.7 – 3 times larger than the simulation using the NRL SSI. The GEOSCCM and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC 2-D coupled model are used to examine how the SSI solar cycle affects the atmosphere through direct solar heating and photolysis processes individually. Middle atmosphere ozone is affected almost entirely through photolysis, whereas the solar cycle in temperature is caused both through direct heating and photolysis feedbacks, processes that are mostly linearly separable. This is important in that it means that chemistry-transport models should simulate the solar cycle in ozone well, while general circulation models without coupled chemistry will underestimate the temperature response to the solar cycle significantly in the middle atmosphere. Further, the net ozone response results from the balance of ozone production at wavelengths less than 242 nm

  20. A spatial framework for assessing current conditions and monitoring future change in the chemistry of the Antarctic atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Dixon

    2011-03-01

    , Pb, Bi, As, and Li are enriched across Antarctica relative to both ocean and upper crust elemental ratios. Global volcanic outgassing accounts for the majority of the Bi measured in East and West Antarctica and for a significant fraction of the Cd in East Antarctica. Nonetheless, global volcanic outgassing cannot account for the enriched values of Pb or As. Local volcanic outgassing from Mount Erebus may account for a significant fraction of the As and Cd in West Antarctica and for a significant fraction in East Antarctic glaze/dune areas. However, despite potential contributions from local and global volcanic sources, significant concentrations of Pb, Cd, and As remain across much of Antarctica.

    Most importantly, this study provides a baseline from which changes in the chemistry of the atmosphere over Antarctica can be monitored under expected warming scenarios and continued intensification of industrial activities in the Southern Hemisphere.

  1. Computer Interactives for the Mars Atmospheric and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Mission through NASA's "Project Spectra!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    "Project Spectra!" is a standards-based E-M spectrum and engineering program that includes paper and pencil activities as well as Flash-based computer games that help students solidify understanding of high-level planetary and solar physics. Using computer interactive games, students experience and manipulate information making abstract concepts accessible, solidifying understanding and enhancing retention of knowledge. Since students can choose what to watch and explore, the interactives accommodate a broad range of learning styles. Students can go back and forth through the interactives if they've missed a concept or wish to view something again. In the end, students are asked critical thinking questions and conduct web-based research. As part of the Mars Atmospheric and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission education programming, we've developed two new interactives. The MAVEN mission will study volatiles in the upper atmosphere to help piece together Mars' climate history. In the first interactive, students explore black body radiation, albedo, and a simplified greenhouse effect to establish what factors contribute to overall planetary temperature. Students design a planet that is able to maintain liquid water on the surface. In the second interactive, students are asked to consider conditions needed for Mars to support water on the surface, keeping some variables fixed. Ideally, students will walk away with the very basic and critical elements required for climate studies, which has far-reaching implications beyond the study of Mars. These interactives were pilot tested at Arvada High School in Colorado.

  2. Different coupled atmosphere-recharge oscillator Low Order Models for ENSO: a projection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianucci, Marco; Mannella, Riccardo; Merlino, Silvia; Olivieri, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    El Ninõ-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a large scale geophysical phenomenon where, according to the celebrated recharge oscillator model (ROM), the Ocean slow variables given by the East Pacific Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and the average thermocline depth (h), interact with some fast "irrelevant" ones, representing mostly the atmosphere (the westerly wind burst and the Madden-Julian Oscillation). The fast variables are usually inserted in the model as an external stochastic forcing. In a recent work (M. Bianucci, "Analytical probability density function for the statistics of the ENSO phenomenon: asymmetry and power law tail" Geophysical Research Letters, under press) the author, using a projection approach applied to general deterministic coupled systems, gives a physically reasonable explanation for the use of stochastic models for mimicking the apparent random features of the ENSO phenomenon. Moreover, in the same paper, assuming that the interaction between the ROM and the fast atmosphere is of multiplicative type, i.e., it depends on the SST variable, an analytical expression for the equilibrium density function of the anomaly SST is obtained. This expression fits well the data from observations, reproducing the asymmetry and the power law tail of the histograms of the NINÕ3 index. Here, using the same theoretical approach, we consider and discuss different kind of interactions between the ROM and the other perturbing variables, and we take into account also non linear ROM as a low order model for ENSO. The theoretical and numerical results are then compared with data from observations.

  3. Atmospheric Chemistry of (CF3)2CF-C≡N: A Replacement Compound for the Most Potent Industrial Greenhouse Gas, SF6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulbaek Andersen, Mads P; Kyte, Mildrid; Andersen, Simone Thirstrup; Nielsen, Claus J; Nielsen, Ole John

    2017-02-07

    FTIR/smog chamber experiments and ab initio quantum calculations were performed to investigate the atmospheric chemistry of (CF3)2CFCN, a proposed replacement compound for the industrially important sulfur hexafluoride, SF6. The present study determined k(Cl + (CF3)2CFCN) = (2.33 ± 0.87) × 10(-17), k(OH + (CF3)2CFCN) = (1.45 ± 0.25) × 10(-15), and k(O3 + (CF3)2CFCN) ≤ 6 × 10(-24) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively, in 700 Torr of N2 or air diluent at 296 ± 2 K. The main atmospheric sink for (CF3)2CFCN was determined to be reaction with OH radicals. Quantum chemistry calculations, supported by experimental evidence, shows that the (CF3)2CFCN + OH reaction proceeds via OH addition to -C(≡N), followed by O2 addition to -C(OH)═N·, internal H-shift, and OH regeneration. The sole atmospheric degradation products of (CF3)2CFCN appear to be NO, COF2, and CF3C(O)F. The atmospheric lifetime of (CF3)2CFCN is approximately 22 years. The integrated cross section (650-1500 cm(-1)) for (CF3)2CFCN is (2.22 ± 0.11) × 10(-16) cm(2) molecule(-1) cm(-1) which results in a radiative efficiency of 0.217 W m(-2) ppb(-1). The 100-year Global Warming Potential (GWP) for (CF3)2CFCN was calculated as 1490, a factor of 15 less than that of SF6.

  4. High-Speed Atmospheric Correction Algorithm for Spectral Image Processing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Generating land and ocean data products from NASA multispectral and hyperspectral imagery missions requires atmospheric correction, the removal of atmospheric...

  5. Implementation of the chemistry module MECCA (v2.5 in the modal aerosol version of the Community Atmosphere Model component (v3.6.33 of the Community Earth System Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Long

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate system model was developed using the modal aerosol version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmosphere Model (modal-CAM; v3.6.33 and the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry's Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere (MECCA; v2.5 to provide enhanced resolution of multiphase processes, particularly those involving inorganic halogens, and associated impacts on atmospheric composition and climate. Three Rosenbrock solvers (Ros-2, Ros-3, RODAS-3 were tested in conjunction with the basic load-balancing options available to modal-CAM (1 to establish an optimal configuration of the implicitly-solved multiphase chemistry module that maximizes both computational speed and repeatability of Ros-2 and RODAS-3 results versus Ros-3, and (2 to identify potential implementation strategies for future versions of this and similar coupled systems. RODAS-3 was faster than Ros-2 and Ros-3 with good reproduction of Ros-3 results, while Ros-2 was both slower and substantially less reproducible relative to Ros-3 results. Modal-CAM with MECCA chemistry was a factor of 15 slower than modal-CAM using standard chemistry. MECCA chemistry integration times demonstrated a systematic frequency distribution for all three solvers, and revealed that the change in run-time performance was due to a change in the frequency distribution of chemical integration times; the peak frequency was similar for all solvers. This suggests that efficient chemistry-focused load-balancing schemes can be developed that rely on the parameters of this frequency distribution.

  6. Atmospheric chemistry of 3-pentanol: kinetics, mechanisms, and products of Cl atom and OH radical initiated oxidation in the presence and absence of NOX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, M D; Wallington, T J; Bjarrum, M; Javadi, M S; Nielsen, O J

    2008-09-04

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the atmospheric chemistry of 3-pentanol and determine rate constants of k(Cl+3-pentanol) = (2.03 +/- 0.23) x 10 (-10) and k(OH+3-pentanol) = (1.32 +/- 0.15) x 10 (-11) cm (3) molecule (-1) s (-1) in 700 Torr of N 2/O 2 diluent at 296 +/- 2 K. The primary products of the Cl atom initiated oxidation of 3-pentanol in the absence of NO were (with molar yields) 3-pentanone (26 +/- 2%), propionaldehyde (12 +/- 2%), acetaldehyde (13 +/- 2%) and formaldehyde (2 +/- 1%). The primary products of the Cl atom initiated oxidation of 3-pentanol in the presence of NO were (with molar yields) 3-pentanone (51 +/- 4%), propionaldehyde (39 +/- 2%), acetaldehyde (44 +/- 4%) and formaldehyde (4 +/- 1%). The primary products of the OH radical initiated oxidation of 3-pentanol in the presence of NO were (with molar yields) 3-pentanone (58 +/- 3%), propionaldehyde (28 +/- 2%), and acetaldehyde (37 +/- 2%). In all cases the product yields were independent of oxygen concentration over the partial pressure range 10-700 Torr. The reactions of Cl atoms and OH radicals with 3-pentanol proceed 26 +/- 2 and 58 +/- 3%, respectively, via attack on the 3-position to give an alpha-hydroxyalkyl radical, which reacts with O 2 to give 3-pentanone. The results are discussed with respect to the literature data and atmospheric chemistry of 3-pentanol.

  7. Corrosion and protection of metals in the rural atmosphere of "El Pardo" Spain (PATINA / CYTED project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simancas, J.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric corrosion tests of metallic and organic coatings on steel, zinc and aluminium have been conducted in "El Pardo" (Spain as part of the PATINA/CYTED project "Anticorrosive Protection of Metals in the Atmosphere". This is a rural atmosphere with the following ISO corrosivity categories: C2 (Fe, C2 (Zn, C3 (Cu and Cl (Al. Its average temperature and relative humidity is 13 °C and 62.8 %, respectively, and it has low SO2 and Cl- contents. Results of 42 months exposure are discussed. Atmospheric exposure tests were carried out for the following types of coatings: conventional paint coatings for steel and hot-dip galvanized steel (group 1, new painting technologies for steel and galvanized steel (group 2, zinc-base metallic coatings (group 3, aluminium-base metallic coatings (group 4, coatings on aluminium (group 5 and coil-coatings on steel, hot-dip galvanized steel and 55 % Al-Zn coated steel (group 6.

    Como parte del proyecto PATINA/CYTED "Protección anticorrosiva de metales en la atmósfera" se han llevado a cabo en la estación de ensayo de "El Pardo" (España, ensayos de corrosión atmosférica de recubrimientos metálicos y orgánicos sobre acero, zinc y aluminio. Se trata de una atmósfera rural según la clasificación ISO de grado de corrosividad: C2 (Fe, C2 (Zn, C3 (Cu y Cl (Al. La temperatura y humedad relativa media es de 13 °C y 62,8 %, respectivamente, y tiene bajos contenidos de SO2 y Cl-. Se discuten los resultados obtenidos después de 42 meses de exposición. Los ensayos de corrosión atmosférica se llevaron a cabo para tres tipos de recubrimientos: recubrimientos de pintura convencional sobre acero y acero zincado (grupo 1, nuevas tecnologías en pinturas para acero y acero galvanizado (grupo 2, recubrimientos metálicos base zinc (grupo 3, recubrimientos metálicos base aluminio (grupo 4, recubrimientos sobre aluminio (grupo 5 y recubrimientos de banda en continuo

  8. Collaborative project. Ocean-atmosphere interaction from meso- to planetary-scale. Mechanics, parameterization, and variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saravanan, Ramalingam [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Small, Justin [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Most climate models are currently run with grid spacings of around 100km, which, with today’s computing power, allows for long (up to 1000 year) simulations, or ensembles of simulations to explore climate change and variability. However this grid spacing does not resolve important components of the weather/climate system such as atmospheric fronts and mesoscale systems, and ocean boundary currents and eddies. The overall aim of this project has been to look at the effect of these small-scale features on the weather/climate system using a suite of high and low resolution climate models, idealized models and observations. High-resolution global coupled integrations using CAM/CESM were carried out at NCAR by the lead PI. At TAMU, we have complemented the work at NCAR by analyzing datasets from the high-resolution (28km) CESM integrations (Small et al., 2014) as well as very high resolution (9km, 3km) runs using a coupled regional climate (CRCM) carried out locally. The main tasks carried out were: 1. Analysis of surface wind in observations and high-resolution CAM/CCSM simulations 2. Development of a feature-tracking algorithm for studying midlatitude air-sea interaction by following oceanic mesoscale eddies and creating composites of the atmospheric response overlying the eddies. 3. Applying the Lagrangian analysis technique in the Gulf Stream region to compare data from observational reanalyses, global CESM coupled simulations, 9km regional coupled simulations and 3km convection-resolving regional coupled simulations. Our main findings are that oceanic mesoscale eddies influence not just the atmospheric boundary layer above them, but also the lower portions of the free troposphere above the boundary layer. Such a vertical response could have implications for a remote influence of Gulf Stream oceanic eddies on North Atlantic weather patterns through modulation of the storm track, similar to what has been noted in the North Pacific. The coarse resolution

  9. A Statistical and Theoretical Investigation of the Chemistry of the Formation of Atmospheric Particles in Beltsville, Maryland via Observations of Physical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Rufus Tyrone

    Ion and trace gas measurements were performed with a newly developed Monitoring Instruments for Aerosols and Gases (MARGA) instrument. The MARGA gas measurements were successfully compared to similar instruments. A Laser Particle Counter (LPC) and Thermo Environmental Instrument Company (TECO) analyzers were used to obtain in-situ number density distribution and trace gas concentrations, respectively. Their ambient measurements showed that sulfuric acid and sulfate aerosols dominate the new particle formation events. In addition, statistical analytics show that the major determining factors that influenced the new particle formation (NPF) were wind speed and the amount of surface area available from preexisting aerosol particles. NPF occurred during the nights with low wind speed, and RH levels greater than 65%. The observed ratio ammonium to sulfate was 1:1, which suggest that sulfuric acid with ammonia partial neutralizes and ammonium bisulfate is the dominant species in the clusters. Other variables that influenced particle formation include emissions from nearby highway traffic and solar radiation. This study has also shown that the chemistry of new particle formation or production and subsequent growth are affected by three major components regional transport chemistry, local transformation chemistry, and rate of local pollution emissions. In addition, we find that the influence of these chemical processes can change based on diurnal cycles. This work may provide additional insights into the compounds and environmental conditions participating both in the initial formation and in subsequent growth of atmospheric aerosol particles. The results show the NPF is associated with Sulfur dioxide oxidation, condensation of volatile gases, and hygroscopic reactions, which are inhibited by the liquid aerosol surface area such that NPF competes with the liquid aerosol surface reactions. The principal components and correlation statistical analysis coefficients may

  10. Oxidative capacity and radical chemistry in the polluted atmosphere of Hong Kong and Pearl River Delta region: analysis of a severe photochemical smog episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Likun; Gu, Rongrong; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xinfeng; Saunders, Sandra; Blake, Donald; Louie, Peter K. K.; Luk, Connie W. Y.; Simpson, Isobel; Xu, Zheng; Wang, Zhe; Gao, Yuan; Lee, Shuncheng; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Wang, Wenxing

    2016-08-01

    We analyze a photochemical smog episode to understand the oxidative capacity and radical chemistry of the polluted atmosphere in Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region. A photochemical box model based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.2) is constrained by an intensive set of field observations to elucidate the budgets of ROx (ROx = OH+HO2+RO2) and NO3 radicals. Highly abundant radical precursors (i.e. O3, HONO and carbonyls), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) facilitate strong production and efficient recycling of ROx radicals. The OH reactivity is dominated by oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), followed by aromatics, alkenes and alkanes. Photolysis of OVOCs (except for formaldehyde) is the dominant primary source of ROx with average daytime contributions of 34-47 %. HONO photolysis is the largest contributor to OH and the second-most significant source (19-22 %) of ROx. Other considerable ROx sources include O3 photolysis (11-20 %), formaldehyde photolysis (10-16 %), and ozonolysis reactions of unsaturated VOCs (3.9-6.2 %). In one case when solar irradiation was attenuated, possibly by the high aerosol loadings, NO3 became an important oxidant and the NO3-initiated VOC oxidation presented another significant ROx source (6.2 %) even during daytime. This study suggests the possible impacts of daytime NO3 chemistry in the polluted atmospheres under conditions with the co-existence of abundant O3, NO2, VOCs and aerosols, and also provides new insights into the radical chemistry that essentially drives the formation of photochemical smog in the high-NOx environment of Hong Kong and the PRD region.

  11. Uncertainties in Projecting Future Changes in Atmospheric Rivers and Their Impacts on Heavy Precipitation over Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yang; Lu, Jian; Leung, L. Ruby

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates the North Atlantic atmospheric rivers (ARs) making landfall over western Europe in the present and future climate from the multi-model ensemble of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). Overall, CMIP5 captures the seasonal and spatial variations of historical landfalling AR days, with the large inter-model variability strongly correlated with the inter-model spread of historical jet position. Under RCP 8.5, AR frequency is projected to increase a few times by the end of this century. While thermodynamics plays a dominate role in the future increase of ARs, wind changes associated with the midlatitude jet shifts also significantly contribute to AR changes, resulting in dipole change patterns in all seasons. In the North Atlantic, the model projected jet shifts are strongly correlated with the simulated historical jet position. As models exhibit predominantly equatorward biases in the historical jet position, the large poleward jet shifts reduce AR days south of the historical mean jet position through the dynamical connections between the jet positions and AR days. Using the observed historical jet position as an emergent constraint, dynamical effects further increase AR days in the future above the large increases due to thermodynamical effects. In the future, both total and extreme precipitation induced by AR contribute more to the seasonal mean and extreme precipitation compared to present primarily because of the increase in AR frequency. While AR precipitation intensity generally increases more relative to the increase in integrated vapor transport, AR extreme precipitation intensity increases much less.

  12. Scanning imaging absorption spectrometer for atmospheric chartography carbon monoxide total columns: statistical evaluation and comparison with chemistry transport model results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, A.T.J.; Gloudemans, A.M.S.; Aben, I.; Krol, M.C.; Meirink, J.F.; van der Werf, G.R.; Schrijver, H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed statistical analysis of one year (September 2003 to August 2004) of global Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) carbon monoxide (CO) total column retrievals from the Iterative Maximum Likelihood Method (IMLM) algorithm, vers

  13. Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography carbon monoxide total columns: Statistical evaluation and comparison with chemistry transport model results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, de A.T.J.; Gloudemans, A.M.S.; Aben, I.; Krol, M.C.; Meirink, J.F.; Werf, van der G.R.; Schrijver, H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed statistical analysis of one year (September 2003 to August 2004) of global Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) carbon monoxide (CO) total column retrievals from the Iterative Maximum Likelihood Method (IMLM) algorithm, vers

  14. Sunscreen synthesis and their immobilisation on polymethylmethacrylate: an integrated project in organic chemistry, polymer chemistry and photochemistry; Sintese de fotoprotetores e sua imobilizacao em poli(metacrilato de metilo): um projeto integrado de quimica organica, quimica de polimeros e fotoquimica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtinho, Dina Maria B.; Serra, Maria Elisa S.; Pineiro, Marta, E-mail: dmurtinho@ci.uc.p [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia. Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    Dibenzalacetone and other aldol condensation products are known sunscreens commonly used in cosmetics. This type of compounds can easily be prepared in an Organic Chemistry Lab by reaction of aldehydes with ketones in basic medium. These compounds can be incorporated in poly(methyl methacrylate) and used as UV light absorbers, for example in sunglasses. This project has the advantage of using inexpensive reagents which are readily available in Chemistry Laboratories. This experiment can also be a base starting point for discussions of organic, polymer and photochemistry topics. (author)

  15. The Florida citrus soil water atmosphere plant (SWAP) project: review and final summary of yields and tree health

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Florida Citrus Soil Water Atmosphere Plant (SWAP) Project at the UF-IFAS Indian River Research and Education Center had three blocks each of soil tillage (mixing ) treatments of shallow tilled (ST), deep tilled (DT), and deep tilled plus lime (DTL) on a Spodosol (Oldsmar fine sandy loam). Each ...

  16. The Florida citrus soil water atmosphere plant (SWAP) project: final summary of cumulative yields and tree health

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Florida Citrus Soil Water Atmosphere Plant (SWAP) Project at the Fort Pierce had three blocks each of soil tillage treatments of shallow tilled (ST), deep tilled (DT), and deep tilled plus lime (DTL) on a Spodosol (Oldsmar fine sandy loam). Each block had three adjacent submerged subsurface pla...

  17. DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) INTEGRITY PROJECT HIGH LEVEL WASTE CHEMISTRY OPTIMIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WASHENFELDER DJ

    2008-01-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Office (DOE) of River Protection (ORP) has a continuing program for chemical optimization to better characterize corrosion behavior of High-Level Waste (HLW). The DOE controls the chemistry in its HLW to minimize the propensity of localized corrosion, such as pitting, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in nitrate-containing solutions. By improving the control of localized corrosion and SCC, the ORP can increase the life of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) carbon steel structural components and reduce overall mission costs. The carbon steel tanks at the Hanford Site are critical to the mission of safely managing stored HLW until it can be treated for disposal. The DOE has historically used additions of sodium hydroxide to retard corrosion processes in HLW tanks. This also increases the amount of waste to be treated. The reactions with carbon dioxide from the air and solid chemical species in the tank continually deplete the hydroxide ion concentration, which then requires continued additions. The DOE can reduce overall costs for caustic addition and treatment of waste, and more effectively utilize waste storage capacity by minimizing these chemical additions. Hydroxide addition is a means to control localized and stress corrosion cracking in carbon steel by providing a passive environment. The exact mechanism that causes nitrate to drive the corrosion process is not yet clear. The SCC is less of a concern in the newer stress relieved double shell tanks due to reduced residual stress. The optimization of waste chemistry will further reduce the propensity for SCC. The corrosion testing performed to optimize waste chemistry included cyclic potentiodynamic volarization studies. slow strain rate tests. and stress intensity factor/crack growth rate determinations. Laboratory experimental evidence suggests that nitrite is a highly effective:inhibitor for pitting and SCC in alkaline nitrate environments. Revision of the corrosion control

  18. Introduction of the NWP Model Development Project at Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems - KIAPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) launched a 9-year project in 2011 to develop Korea's own global NWP system with the total funding of about 100 million US dollars. To lead the effort, Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems (KIAPS) was founded by KMA as a non-profit foundation. The project consists of three stages. We are in the middle of the first stage (2011-2013), which is to set up the Institute, recruit researchers, lay out plans for the research and development, and design the basic structure and explore/develop core NWP technologies. The second stage (2014-2016) aims at developing the modules for the dynamical core, physical parameterizations and data assimilation systems as well as the system framework and couplers to connect the modules in a systematic and efficient way, and eventually building a prototype NWP system. The third stage (2017-2019) is for evaluating the prototype system by selecting/improving modules, and refining/finalizing it for operational use at KMA as well as developing necessary post-processing systems. In 2012, we are designing key modules for the dynamical core by adopting existing and/or developing new cores, and developing the barographic model first and the baroclinic model later with code parallelization and optimization in mind. We are collecting various physical parameterization schemes, mostly developed by Korean scientists, and evaluating and improving them by using single-column and LES models, etc. We are designing control variables for variational data assimilation systems, constructing testbeds for observational data pre-processing systems, developing linear models for a barographic system, designing modules for cost function minimization. We are developing the module framework, which is flexible for prognostic and diagnostic variables, designing the I/O structure of the system, coupling modules for external systems, and also developing post-processing systems. At the meeting, we will present the

  19. Future Changes Projections of Atmospheric Circulation and Precipitation and Temperature Patterns Over South America in Austral Summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, M. H.; Cavalcanti, I. F.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric circulation is primarily driven by temperature gradients across the globe due to differential heating of Earth's surface which leads to a surplus of energy in the tropics and a deficit in the high latitudes. However, due to global warming, changes in atmospheric circulation are expected, which could result in modifications also in precipitation pattern. There are some evidences of changes in atmospheric circulation, such as the expansion of tropical belt and the poleward shift of large-scale atmospheric circulation systems, such as jet streams. These changes can be enhanced in a scenario with increasing greenhouse gases concentration. The objective of this study was to analyze future changes of atmospheric circulation and precipitation and temperature patterns in the austral summer over South America under Representative Pathway Concentration 8.5 (RCP 8.5) emission scenario. This evaluation was made according to model projections based on the coordinated climate change experiments defined by Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). Historical simulations were used to evaluate model performance in reproduce main climatic features over South America in the Austral Summer. This analysis showed that some models perform better than others, with a wide range of difference between simulations and Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) and European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim data sets. In general, the models captured the main features of Austral Summer such as the northwest-southeast precipitation band associated with the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) and the anticyclonic circulation at high levels related to Bolivian High. The projections from different models pointed out in general to a reduction of precipitation, however the signal was not the same over all the continent and for all models. For example, Met Office's HadGEM2-ES projection indicated a reduction of precipitation in most of

  20. Forecasts of the atmospherical parameters close to the ground at the LBT site in the context of the ALTA project

    CERN Document Server

    Turchi, Alessio; Fini, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the abilities of an atmospherical mesoscale model in forecasting the classical atmospherical parameters relevant for astronomical applications at the surface layer (wind speed, wind direction, temperature, relative humidity) on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) site - Mount Graham, Arizona. The study is carried out in the framework of the ALTA project aiming at implementing an automated system for the forecasts of atmospherical parameters (Meso-Nh code) and the optical turbulence (Astro-Meso-Nh code) for the service-mode operation of the LBT. The final goal of such an operational tool is to provide predictions with high time frequency of atmospheric and optical parameters for an optimized planning of the telescope operation (dome thermalization, wind-dependent dome orientation, observation planning based on predicted seeing, adaptive optics optimization, etc...). Numerical simulations are carried out with the Meso-Nh and Astro-Meso-Nh codes, which were proven to give excellent results...

  1. High C/O Chemistry and Weak Thermal Inversion in the Extremely Irradiated Atmosphere of Exoplanet WASP-12b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Harrington, Joseph; Nymeyer, Sarah; Campo, Christopher J.; Wheatley, Peter J.; Deming, Drake; Blecie, Jasmina; Hardy, Ryan A.; Lust, Nate B.; Anderson, David R.; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Britt, Christopher B. T.; Bowman, William C.; Hebb, Leslie; Hellier, Coel; Maxted, Pierre F. L.; Pollacco, Don; West, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    The carbon-to-oxygen ratio (C/O) in a planet provides critical information about its primordial origins and subsequent evolution. A primordial C/O greater than 0.8 causes a carbide-dominated interior as opposed to the silicate-dominated composition as found on Earth; the solar C/O is 0.54. Theory, shows that high C/O leads to a diversity of carbon-rich planets that can have very different interiors and atmospheres from those in the solar system. Here we report the detection of C/O greater than or equal to 1 in a planetary atmosphere. The transiting hot Jupiter WASP-12b has a dayside atmosphere depleted in water vapour and enhanced in methane by over two orders of magnitude compared to a solar-abundance chemical equilibrium model at the expected temperatures. The observed concentrations of the prominent molecules CO, CH4, and H2O are consistent with theoretical expectations for an atmosphere with the observed C/O = 1. The C/O ratios are not known for giant planets in the solar system, although they are expected to equal the solar value. If high C/O ratios are common, then extrasolar planets are likely very different in interior composition, and formed very differently, from expectations based on solar composition, potentially explaining the large diversity in observed radii. We also find that the extremely irradiated atmosphere (greater than 2500 K) of WASP-12b lacks a prominent thermal inversion, or a stratosphere, and has very efficient day-night energy circulation. The absence of a strong thermal inversion is in stark contrast to theoretical predictions for the most highly irradiated hot-Jupiter atmospheres.

  2. Tapping Water from the Atmosphere: The Bureau of Reclamation's Project Skywater (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, K.

    2010-12-01

    Since President Theodore Roosevelt signed the Reclamation Act on 17 June 1902—creating the forerunner of today’s Bureau of Reclamation that was established under Interior in 1907—this agency has been tasked with developing water resources in the US West. These efforts focused on building dams, reservoirs, and irrigation systems. But by the early 1960s, the federal government’s increasing interest in weather control began to attract the attention of BuRec’s leaders. Deciding that it was time to track down solid information on rainmaking techniques, the bureau called upon weather control pioneer Vincent Schaefer for assistance with its plan use weather modification as an adjunct to its water resources development portfolio. In response, Schaefer—writing to the National Science Foundation’s Earl Droessler in late 1961—declared that the Bureau’s proposed project would bring a “responsible, capable, and enthusiastic” group to represent the government and take over the engineering parts of weather modification. Enthusiastic was a bit of an understatement. BuRec was eager to use the atmosphere as a water reservoir, which could dispense moisture to watersheds feeding their earth-bound reservoirs. Contracting with universities—and working to get ahead of its nemesis, the skeptical US Weather Bureau—BuRec announced the artificial precipitation successes of its “Laboratory in the Sky” in early 1963. Although this headquarters-announced “success” was disputed by BuRec’s Denver field office, BuRec’s colorful commissioner Floyd Dominy was determined to press forward. Within months, the bureau was publishing reports indicating that the US West was a “potential future food deficit area” due to an increasing population that was outstripping the availability of ground and surface waters for agriculture. New approaches would be necessary to bring water to BuRec reservoirs for further distribution to municipalities, irrigators, and industries

  3. The Variation Theorem Applied to H-2+: A Simple Quantum Chemistry Computer Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiette, Alan G.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a student project which requires limited knowledge of Fortran and only minimal computing resources. The results illustrate such important principles of quantum mechanics as the variation theorem and the virial theorem. Presents sample calculations and the subprogram for energy calculations. (GS)

  4. Synthesis and Hydrogenation of Disubstituted Chalcones: A Guided-Inquiry Organic Chemistry Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohrig, Jerry R.; Hammond, Christina Noring; Schatz, Paul F.; Davidson, Tammy A.

    2009-01-01

    Guided-inquiry experiments offer the same opportunities to participate in the process of science as classical organic qualitative analysis used to do. This three-week guided-inquiry project involves an aldol-dehydration synthesis of a chalcone chosen from a set of nine, followed by a catalytic transfer hydrogenation reaction using ammonium formate…

  5. The significance of land-atmosphere interactions in the Earth system-iLEAPS achievements and perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suni, T.; Guenther, A.; Hansson, H.C.; Kulmala, M.; Andreae, M.O.; Arneth, A.; Artaxo, P.; Blyth, E.; Brus, M.; Ganzeveld, L.; Kabat, P.; de. Noblet-Ducoudré, N.; Reichstein, M.; Reissell, A.; Rosenfeld, D.; Seneviratne, S.

    2015-01-01

    The integrated land ecosystem-atmosphere processes study (iLEAPS) is an international research project focussing on the fundamental processes that link land-atmosphere exchange, climate, the water cycle, and tropospheric chemistry. The project, iLEAPS, was established 2004 within the Internationa

  6. Pathways of PFOA to the Arctic: variabilities and contributions of oceanic currents and atmospheric transport and chemistry sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Stemmler

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA and other perfluorinated compounds are industrial chemicals in use since decades which resist degradation in the environment and seem to accumulate in polar regions. Transport of PFOA was modeled using a spatially resolved global multicompartment model including fully coupled three-dimensional ocean and atmosphere general circulation models, and two-dimensional top soil, vegetation surfaces, and sea ice compartments. In addition to primary emissions, the formation of PFOA in the atmosphere from degradation of 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol was included as a PFOA source. Oceanic transport, delivered 14.8±5.0 (8–23 t a−1 to the Arctic, strongly influenced by changes in water transport, which determined its interannual variability. This pathway constituted the dominant source of PFOA to the Arctic. Formation of PFOA in the atmosphere lead to episodic transport events (timescale of days into the Arctic with small spatial extent. Deposition in the polar region was found to be dominated by wet deposition over land, and shows maxima in boreal winter. The total atmospheric deposition of PFOA in the Arctic in the 1990s was ≈1 t a−1, much higher than previously estimated, and is dominated by primary emissions rather than secondarily formed.

  7. Atmospheric chemistry of dimethyl sulfide. Kinetics of the CH3SCH2O2 + NO2 reaction in the gas phase at 296 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.J.; Sehested, J.; Wallington, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    The pulse radiolysis of SF6/CH3SCH3/O-2/NO2 gas mixtures was used to generate CH3SCH2O2 radicals in the presence of NO2. By monitoring the rate of NO2 decay using its absorption at 400 nm, rate constants for the reaction of CH3SCH2O2 radicals with NO2 were measured to be (9.2 +/- 0.9) x 10......(-12) and (7.1 +/- 0.9) X 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) at room temperature in 1000 and 300 mbar of SF6 diluent, respectively. Results are discussed with respect to the atmospheric chemistry of dimethyl sulfide....

  8. Atmospheric chemistry of 4:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (n-Csub>4sub>F>9sub>CH>2sub>CH>2sub>OH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Nielsen, Ole John; Hurley, M. D.

    2005-01-01

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to study the Cl atom initiated oxidation of 4:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (C4F9CH2CH2OH, 4:2 FTOH) in the presence of NOx in 700 Torr of N-2/O-2 diluent at 296 K. Chemical activation effects play an important role in the atmospheric chemistry of the peroxy......, and possibly the alkoxy, radicals derived from 4:2 FTOH. Cl atoms react with C4F9CH2CH2OH to give C4F9CH2C.HOH radicals which add O-2 to give chemically activated alpha-hydroxyperoxy radicals, [C4F9CH2C(OO.)HOH]*. In 700 Torr of N-2/ O-2 at 296 K, approximately 50% of the [C4F9CH2C(OO.)HOH]* radicals decompose...

  9. Multiple sulfur-isotope signatures in Archean sulfates and their implications for the chemistry and dynamics of the early atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Élodie; Philippot, Pascal; Rollion-Bard, Claire; Cartigny, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Sulfur isotopic anomalies (∆33S and ∆36S) have been used to trace the redox evolution of the Precambrian atmosphere and to document the photochemistry and transport properties of the modern atmosphere. Recently, it was shown that modern sulfate aerosols formed in an oxidizing atmosphere can display important isotopic anomalies, thus questioning the significance of Archean sulfate deposits. Here, we performed in situ 4S-isotope measurements of 3.2- and 3.5-billion-year (Ga)-old sulfates. This in situ approach allows us to investigate the diversity of Archean sulfate texture and mineralogy with unprecedented resolution and from then on to deconvolute the ocean and atmosphere Archean sulfur cycle. A striking feature of our data is a bimodal distribution of δ34S values at ˜+5‰ and +9‰, which is matched by modern sulfate aerosols. The peak at +5‰ represents barite of different ages and host-rock lithology showing a wide range of ∆33S between -1.77‰ and +0.24‰. These barites are interpreted as primary volcanic emissions formed by SO2 photochemical processes with variable contribution of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) shielding in an evolving volcanic plume. The δ34S peak at +9‰ is associated with non-33S-anomalous barites displaying negative ∆36S values, which are best interpreted as volcanic sulfate aerosols formed from OCS photolysis. Our findings confirm the occurrence of a volcanic photochemical pathway specific to the early reduced atmosphere but identify variability within the Archean sulfate isotope record that suggests persistence throughout Earth history of photochemical reactions characteristic of the present-day stratosphere.

  10. Atmospheric gas phase chemistry of CH2═NH and HNC. A first-principles approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkan, Arne Joakim C; Tang, Yizhen; Sellevåg, Stig R; Nielsen, Claus J

    2014-07-17

    Quantum chemical methods were used to investigate the OH initiated atmospheric degradation of methanimine, CH2═NH, the major primary product in the atmospheric photo-oxidation of methylamine, CH3NH2. Energies of stationary points on potential energy surfaces of reaction were calculated using multireference perturbation theory and coupled cluster theory. The results show that hydrogen abstraction dominates over the addition route in the CH2═NH + OH reaction, and that the major primary product is HCN, while HNC and CHONH2 are minor primary products. HNC is found to react with OH exclusively via addition to the carbon atom followed by O-H scission leading to HNCO; N2O is not a product in the atmospheric photo-oxidation of HNC. Additional G4 calculations of the CH2═NH + O3 reaction show that this is too slow to be of importance at atmospheric conditions. Rate coefficients for the CH2═NH + OH and HNC + OH reactions were calculated as a function of temperature and pressure using a master equation model based on the coupled cluster theory results. The rate coefficients for OH reaction with CH2═NH and HNC at 1000 mbar and room temperature are calculated to be 3.0 × 10(-12) and 1.3 × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively. The atmospheric fate of CH2═NH is discussed and a gas phase photo-oxidation mechanism is presented.

  11. Middle Atmosphere Response to Different Descriptions of the 11-Year Solar Cycle in Spectral Irradiance in a Chemistry-Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, W. H.; Stolarski, R. S.; Oman, L. D.; Fleming, E. L.; Jackman, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    The 11-year solar cycle in solar spectral irradiance (SSI) inferred from measurements by the SOlar Radiation & Climate Experiment (SORCE) suggests a much larger variation in the ultraviolet than previously accepted. We present middle atmosphere ozone and temperature responses to the solar cycles in SORCE SSI and the ubiquitous Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) SSI reconstruction using the Goddard Earth Observing System chemistry-climate model (GEOS CCM). The results are largely consistent with other recent modeling studies. The modeled ozone response is positive throughout the stratosphere and lower mesosphere using the NRL SSI, while the SORCE SSI produces a response that is larger in the lower stratosphere but out of phase with respect to total solar irradiance above 45 km. The modeled responses in total ozone are similar to those derived from satellite and ground-based measurements, 3-6 Dobson Units per 100 units of 10.7-cm radio flux (F10.7) in the tropics. The peak zonal mean tropical temperature response 50 using the SORCE SSI is nearly 2 K per 100 units 3 times larger than the simulation using the NRL SSI. The GEOS CCM and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) 2-D coupled model are used to examine how the SSI solar cycle affects the atmosphere through direct solar heating and photolysis processes individually. Middle atmosphere ozone is affected almost entirely through photolysis, whereas the solar cycle in temperature is caused both through direct heating and photolysis feedbacks, processes that are mostly linearly separable. Further, the net ozone response results from the balance of ozone production at wavelengths less than 242 nm and destruction at longer wavelengths, coincidentally corresponding to the wavelength regimes of the SOLar STellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) and Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) on SORCE, respectively. A higher wavelength-resolution analysis of the spectral response could allow for a better prediction of the

  12. MATCH–SALSA – Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model – Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Andersson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA in the European scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry. The new model is called MATCH–SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC in central Europe and lower concentrations in remote regions. The model PNC size distribution peak occurs at the same or smaller particle size as the observed peak at five measurement sites spread across Europe. Total PNC is underestimated at Northern and Central European sites and accumulation mode PNC is underestimated at all investigated sites. On the other hand the model performs well for particle mass, including secondary inorganic aerosol components. Elemental and organic carbon concentrations are underestimated at many of the sites. Further development is needed, primarily for treatment of secondary organic aerosol, both in terms of biogenic emissions and chemical transformation, and for nitrogen gas-particle partitioning. Updating the biogenic SOA scheme will likely have a large impact on modeled PM2.5 and also affect the model performance for PNC through impacts on nucleation and condensation. An improved nitrogen partitioning model may also improve the description of condensational growth.

  13. Theoretical studies on atmospheric chemistry of HFE-245mc and perfluoro-ethyl formate: Reaction with OH radicals, atmospheric fate of alkoxy radical and global warming potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lily, Makroni; Baidya, Bidisha; Chandra, Asit K.

    2017-02-01

    Theoretical studies have been performed on the kinetics, mechanism and thermochemistry of the hydrogen abstraction reactions of CF3CF2OCH3 (HFE-245mc) and CF3CF2OCHO with OH radical using DFT based M06-2X method. IRC calculation shows that both hydrogen abstraction reactions proceed via weakly bound hydrogen-bonded complex preceding to the formation of transition state. The rate coefficients calculated by canonical transition state theory along with Eckart's tunnelling correction at 298 K: k1(CF3CF2OCH3 + OH) = 1.09 × 10-14 and k2(CF3CF2OCHO + OH) = 1.03 × 10-14 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 are in very good agreement with the experimental values. The atmospheric implications of CF3CF2OCH3 and CF3CF2OCHO are also discussed.

  14. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

  15. Sediment cores and chemistry for the Kootenai River White Sturgeon Habitat Restoration Project, Boundary County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Gary J.; Weakland, Rhonda J.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Cox, Stephen E.; Williams, Marshall L.

    2012-01-01

    The Kootenai Tribe of Idaho, in cooperation with local, State, Federal, and Canadian agency co-managers and scientists, is assessing the feasibility of a Kootenai River habitat restoration project in Boundary County, Idaho. This project is oriented toward recovery of the endangered Kootenai River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population, and simultaneously targets habitat-based recovery of other native river biota. Projects currently (2010) under consideration include modifying the channel and flood plain, installing in-stream structures, and creating wetlands to improve the physical and biological functions of the ecosystem. River restoration is a complex undertaking that requires a thorough understanding of the river. To assist in evaluating the feasibility of this endeavor, the U.S. Geological Survey collected and analyzed the physical and chemical nature of sediment cores collected at 24 locations in the river. Core depths ranged from 4.6 to 15.2 meters; 21 cores reached a depth of 15.2 meters. The sediment was screened for the presence of chemical constituents that could have harmful effects if released during restoration activities. The analysis shows that concentrations of harmful chemical constituents do not exceed guideline limits that were published by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in 2006.

  16. ESA STSE Project “Sea Surface Temperature Diurnal Variability: Regional Extend – Implications in Atmospheric Modelling”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna

    , atmospheric and oceanic modelling, bio-chemical processes and oceanic CO2 studies. The diurnal variability of SST, driven by the coincident occurrence of low enough wind and solar heating, is currently not properly understood. Atmospheric, oceanic and climate models are currently not adequately resolving...... present the final project findings regarding the analysis of hourly SEVIRI SSTs from SEVIRI over the Atlantic Ocean and the European Seas, revealing the regional extend of diurnal warming. As satellite SSTs are representative of the upper centimetre of the water column, they do not provide information...

  17. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the New York Bight as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 10 April 1984 - 31 October 1984 (NODC Accession 8500225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the New York Bight from April 10, 1984 to October 31, 1984. Data were...

  18. Water physics and chemistry data from XBT casts from the OCEAN PRINCE and other platforms as part of the Ocean Dumping project from 04 December 1976 to 27 October 1977 (NODC Accession 7800049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected from XBT casts from the OCEAN PRINCE and other platforms from 04 December 1976 to 27 October 1977. Data were...

  19. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 04 December 1979 - 11 June 1980 (NODC Accession 8000476)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico from December 4, 1979 to June 11, 1980. Data were...

  20. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 02 September 1980 - 06 September 1980 (NODC Accession 8100628)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from September 2, 1980 to September 6,...

  1. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 05 November 1973 to 06 June 1974 (NODC Accession 7500931)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from November 5, 1973 to June 6,...

  2. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 27 August 1973 - 27 November 1974 (NODC Accession 7600777)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from August 27, 1973 to November 7,...

  3. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 21 May 1963 - 08 July 1975 (NODC Accession 7601561)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from May 21, 1963 to July 8, 1975....

  4. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 03 June 1981 - 09 June 1981 (NODC Accession 8100724)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from June 3, 1981 to June 9, 1981. Data...

  5. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 08 March 1974 - 13 May 1974 (NODC Accession 7501210)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from March 8, 1974 to May 13, 1974....

  6. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 27 July 1982 - 02 August 1982 (NODC Accession 8400002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from July 27, 1982 to August 2, 1982....

  7. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 15 April 1981 - 20 April 1981 (NODC Accession 8100656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from April 15, 1981 to April 20, 1981....

  8. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 21 April 1980 - 18 July 1980 (NODC Accession 8100501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from April 21, 1980 to July 18, 1980....

  9. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 10 April 1978 - 09 August 1978 (NODC Accession 7900249)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from April 10, 1978 to August 9,...

  10. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project from 12 April 1976 - 13 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700770)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from April 12, 1976 to September 13,...

  11. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 09 April 1979 - 23 August 1979 (NODC Accession 8100440)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from April 9, 1979 to August 23,...

  12. The atmospheric circulation of a nine-hot Jupiter sample: Probing circulation and chemistry over a wide phase space

    CERN Document Server

    Kataria, Tiffany; Lewis, Nikole K; Visscher, Channon; Showman, Adam P; Fortney, Jonathan J; Marley, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    We present results from an atmospheric circulation study of nine hot Jupiters that comprise a large transmission spectral survey using the Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescopes. These observations exhibit a range of spectral behavior over optical and infrared wavelengths which suggest diverse cloud and haze properties in their atmospheres. By utilizing the specific system parameters for each planet, we naturally probe a wide phase space in planet radius, gravity, orbital period, and equilibrium temperature. First, we show that our model "grid" recovers trends shown in traditional parametric studies of hot Jupiters, particularly equatorial superrotation and increased day-night temperature contrast with increasing equilibrium temperature. We show how spatial temperature variations, particularly between the dayside and nightside and west and east terminators, can vary by hundreds of K, which could imply large variations in Na, K, CO and CH4 abundances in those regions. These chemical variations can be large enough...

  13. Water Planets in the Habitable Zone: Atmospheric Chemistry, Observable Features, and the case of Kepler-62e and -62f

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltenegger, L; Rugheimer, S

    2013-01-01

    Water planets in the habitable zone are expected to have distinct geophysics and geochemistry of their surfaces and atmospheres. We explore these properties motivated by two key questions: whether such planets could provide habitable conditions and whether they exhibit discernable spectral features that distinguish a water planet from a rocky Earth-like planet. We show that the recently discovered planets Kepler-62e and -62f are the first viable candidates for habitable zone water planet. We use these planets as test cases for discussing those differences in detail. We generate atmospheric spectral models and find that potentially habitable water planets show a distinctive spectral fingerprint in transit depending on their position in the habitable zone.

  14. Halogen Chemistry in the CMAQ Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halogens (iodine and bromine) emitted from oceans alter atmospheric chemistry and influence atmospheric ozone mixing ratio. We previously incorporated a representation of detailed halogen chemistry and emissions of organic and inorganic halogen species into the hemispheric Commun...

  15. Discriminating among multiple components affecting bulk atmospheric deposition chemistry: a multivariate approach using data from a forest plot in Calabria (Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio BADIANI

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationships between meteorology and atmospheric deposition chemistry on the basis of 4 years of monitoring in an area of Calabria (Piano Limina under the National Integrated Programme for the Control of Forest Ecosystems. The location of the area and its low anthropogenic impact meant that phenomena of locally originating alkaline dust deposition could be distinguished from those originating long distances away. The analysis performed on the whole dataset revealed the interaction between temperature, solar radiation and ionic concentrations; the effects of the atmospheric transport of compounds, with lower concentrations during calm conditions; and a marked increase of calcium, alkalinity and pH with winds from W-SW, owing to the transport of alkaline dust from North Africa, in agreement with thematic maps on the synoptic scale. The possible influence of two volcanic events deriving from Stromboli and Etna is discussed. After elimination of the Saharan dust and volcanic events, a multivariate analysis showed the effects of compounds deriving from anthropogenic activities. Sulphate, nitrate and ammonium were closely correlated with NW winds; air masses from this direction come from the continental land mass and the sea, crossing the Calabrian plain before being deposited as precipitation on the Apennine chain. The component from NW also includes a high marine contribution, with maximum values of chloride and sodium.

  16. Atmospheric chemistry of mercury in Antarctica and the role of cryptogams to assess deposition patterns in coastal ice-free areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargagli, R

    2016-11-01

    Mercury in the Antarctic troposphere has a distinct chemistry and challenging long-term measurements are needed for a better understanding of the atmospheric Hg reactions with oxidants and the exchanges of the various mercury forms among air-snow-sea and biota. Antarctic mosses and lichens are reliable biomonitors of airborne metals and in short time they can give useful information about Hg deposition patterns. Data summarized in this review show that although atmospheric Hg concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere are lower than those in the Northern Hemisphere, Antarctic cryptogams accumulate Hg at levels in the same range or higher than those observed for related cryptogam species in the Arctic, suggesting an enhanced deposition of bioavailable Hg in Antarctic coastal ice-free areas. In agreement with the newest findings in the literature, the Hg bioaccumulation in mosses and lichens from a nunatak particularly exposed to strong katabatic winds can be taken as evidence for a Hg contribution to coastal ecosystems by air masses from the Antarctic plateau. Human activities on the continent are mostly concentrated in coastal ice-free areas, and the deposition in these areas of Hg from the marine environment, the plateau and anthropogenic sources raises concern. The use of Antarctic cryptogams as biomonitors will be very useful to map Hg deposition patterns in costal ice-free areas and will contribute to a better understanding of Hg cycling in Antarctica and its environmental fate in terrestrial ecosystems.

  17. Simulating organic species with the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: a comparison of model results with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pozzer

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric-chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1 is evaluated with observations of different organic ozone precursors. This study continues a prior analysis which focused primarily on the representation of atmospheric dynamics and ozone. We use the results of the same reference simulation and apply a statistical analysis using data from numerous field campaigns. The results serve as a basis for future improvements of the model system. ECHAM5/MESSy1 generally reproduces the spatial distribution and the seasonal cycle of carbon monoxide (CO very well. However, for the background in the Northern Hemisphere we obtain a negative bias (mainly due to an underestimation of emissions from fossil fuel combustion, and in the high latitude Southern Hemisphere a yet unexplained positive bias. The model results agree well with observations of alkanes, whereas severe problems in the simulation of alkenes and isoprene are present. For oxygenated compounds the results are ambiguous: The model results are in good agreement with observations of formaldehyde, but systematic biases are present for methanol and acetone. The discrepancies between the model results and the observations are explained (partly by means of sensitivity studies.

  18. Simulating organic species with the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: a comparison of model results with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pozzer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The atmospheric-chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1 is evaluated with observations of different organic ozone precursors. This study continues a prior analysis which focused primarily on the representation of atmospheric dynamics and ozone. We use the results of the same reference simulation and apply a statistical analysis using data from numerous field campaigns. The results serve as a basis for future improvements of the model system. ECHAM5/MESSy1 generally reproduces the spatial distribution and the seasonal cycle of carbon monoxide (CO very well. However, for the background in the northern hemisphere we obtain a negative bias (mainly due to an underestimation of emissions from fossil fuel combustion, and in the high latitude southern hemisphere a yet unexplained positive bias. The model results agree well with observations of alkanes, whereas severe problems in the simulation of alkenes are present. For oxygenated compounds the results are ambiguous: The model results are in good agreement with observations of formaldehyde, but systematic biases are present for methanol and acetone. The discrepancies between the model results and the observations are explained (partly by means of sensitivity studies.

  19. A Dropsonde UAV for Atmospheric Sensing in a Turbulent Environment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Dropsondes are one of the primary atmospheric measurement tools available to researchers. Current dropsondes are deployed with a free fall parachute trajectory,...

  20. A Risk-Hedged Approach to Traffic Flow Management under Atmospheric Uncertainties Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Volcanic ash and other atmospheric hazards impact air transportation by introducing uncertainty in the National Airspace System (NAS) capacity. Deterministic traffic...

  1. High Pressure Atmospheric Sampling Inlet System for Venus or the Gas Giants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thorleaf Research, Inc. proposes to develop a miniaturized high pressure atmospheric sampling inlet system for sample acquisition in extreme planetary environments,...

  2. Isotope modeling of nitric acid formation in the atmosphere using ISO-RACM: testing the importance of NO oxidation, heterogeneous reactions, and trace gas chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Michalski

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we present ISO-RACM, an isotope mass balance model that utilizes the Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism to predict Δ17O values in atmospheric nitrate. A large number of simulations were carried out that varied atmospheric parameters that are important in altering the magnitude and range of Δ17O values generated in photochemically produce nitrate. These parameters included temperature, relative humidity, actinic flux, aerosol surface area and chemical speciation, and three different N2O5 uptake parameterizations. Trace gas mixing ratios were also varied including CH4, CO, NOx, O3, volatile organic compounds and biogenic organic compounds. The model predicts that there are seasonal, latitudinal and diurnal variations in Δ17O values due to changes in actinic flux with lower values corresponding to higher actinic fluxes. There was also a minor positive correlation between higher Δ17O values and increased temperature. There were distinct differences in Δ17O depending on which N2O5 parameterization was used, mostly the result of changing relative humidity being a factor in two of the parameterization schemes. Changing CO and CH4 mixing ratios had negligible impact on Δ17O values but significant variation in magnitude and range were predicted with NOx, O3, and organic loading. High NOx and O3 generated high Δ17O with a narrow (10 ‰ range, while high organics led to low Δ17O values and a wider range of possible values. Implications for using Δ17O to evaluate NOx-NOy chemistry and aerosol formation processes are discussed, as is needed future research.

  3. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, May 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    Progress is reported on the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. The specific tasks addressed were to determine the formation rates of {center_dot}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations. Initial measurements were conducted of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants. A prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited {sup 210}Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon are described. Methodology was developed to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

  4. Fine mode aerosol chemistry over a rural atmosphere near the north-east coast of Bay of Bengal in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Anandamay; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay; Raha, Sibaji; Roy, Arindam

    2016-07-01

    A study was conducted on the chemical characterization of fine mode aerosol or PM2.5 over a rural atmosphere near the coast of Bay of Bengal in eastern India. Samples were collected and analyzed during March 2013 - February 2014. The concentration of PM2.5 was found span over a wide range from as low as 3 µg m-3 to as high as 180 µg m-3. The average concentration of PM2.5 was 62 µg m-3. Maximum accumulation of fine mode aerosol was observed during winter whereas minimum was observed during monsoon. Water soluble ionic species of fine mode aerosol were characterized over this rural atmosphere. In spite of being situated near the coast of Bay of Bengal, we observed significantly higher concentrations for anthropogenic species like ammonium and sulphate. The concentrations of these two species were much higher than the sea-salt aerosols. Ammonium and sulphate contributed around 30 % to the total fine mode aerosols. Even dust aerosol species like calcium also showed higher concentrations. Chloride to sodium ratio was found to be much less than that in standard sea-water indicating strong interaction between sea-salt and anthropogenic aerosols. Use of fertilizers in various crop fields and human and animal wastes significantly increased ammonium in fine mode aerosols. Dust aerosol species were accumulated in the atmosphere which could be due to transport of finer dust species from nearby metropolis or locally generated. Non-sea-sulphate and nitrate showed significant contributions in fine mode aerosols having both local and transported sources. Source apportionment shows prominent emission sources of anthropogenic aerosols from local anthropogenic activities and transported from nearby Kolkata metropolis as well.

  5. Impacts of changes in land use and land cover on atmospheric chemistry and air quality over the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of future land use and land cover change on the chemical composition of the atmosphere and air quality are largely unknown. To investigate the potential effects associated with future changes in vegetation driven by atmospheric CO2 concentrations, climate, and anthropogenic land use over the 21st century, we performed a series of model experiments combining a general circulation model with a dynamic global vegetation model and an atmospheric chemical-transport model. Our results indicate that climate- and CO2-induced changes in vegetation composition and density could lead to decreases in summer afternoon surface ozone of up to 10 ppb over large areas of the northern mid-latitudes. This is largely driven by the substantial increases in ozone dry deposition associated with changes in the composition of temperate and boreal forests where conifer forests are replaced by those dominated by broadleaf tree types, as well as a CO2-driven increase in vegetation density. Climate-driven vegetation changes over the period 2000–2100 lead to general increases in isoprene emissions, globally by 15 % in 2050 and 36 % in 2100. These increases in isoprene emissions result in decreases in surface ozone concentrations where the NOx levels are low, such as in remote tropical rainforests. However, over polluted regions, such as the northeastern United States, ozone concentrations are calculated to increase with higher isoprene emissions in the future. Increases in biogenic emissions also lead to higher concentrations of secondary organic aerosols, which increase globally by 10 % in 2050 and 20 % in 2100. Surface concentrations of secondary organic aerosols are calculated to increase by up to 1 μg m−3 for large areas in Eurasia. When we use a scenario of future anthropogenic land use change, we find less increase in global isoprene emissions due to replacement of higher-emitting forests by lower

  6. Pyro-chemistry within the FP7 ACSEPT Project-Program and Objective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravaca, Concha [CIEMAT/Nuclear Fission Division/URAA, Avda. Complutense, 22.Madrid 28040 (Spain); Bourg, Stephane [CEA/DEN/MAR/DRCP, CEA Marcoule. BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    Actinide recycling by partitioning and transmutation is considered as one of the most promising strategies to reduce the inventory of radioactive waste, thus contributing to make nuclear energy sustainable. To make advances beyond the current state of the art in pyrochemical separations processes, the Domain 2 (DM2) of ACSEPT has been built on considering a process approach based on system studied. Four work packages that represent the main steps of a process block diagram have been identified: head-end steps, core process development, and salt treatment for recycling and waste conditioning. The results obtained in this domain will be integrated in DM 3 (Process) in order to orientate the R and D studies of DM2 and to propose and validate flowsheets at the end of the project. The state of the art on pyrochemical separation within the European Community and the working program of ACSEPT in pyrometallurgy are presented in this work. (authors)

  7. Collaborative project. Ocean-atmosphere interaction from meso-to planetary-scale. Mechanisms, parameterization, and variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, Richard [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Bryan, Frank [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Tribbia, Joseph [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Park, Sungsu [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Dennis, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Saravanan, R. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Schneider, Niklas [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Kwon, Young-Oh [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-06-11

    This project aims to improve long term global climate simulations by resolving ocean mesoscale activity and the corresponding response in the atmosphere. The main computational objectives are; i) to perform and assess Community Earth System Model (CESM) simulations with the new Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) spectral element dynamical core; ii) use static mesh refinement to focus on oceanic fronts; iii) develop a new Earth System Modeling tool to investigate the atmospheric response to fronts by selectively filtering surface flux fields in the CESM coupler. The climate research objectives are 1) to improve the coupling of ocean fronts and the atmospheric boundary layer via investigations of dependency on model resolution and stability functions: 2) to understand and simulate the ensuing tropospheric response that has recently been documented in observations: and 3) to investigate the relationship of ocean frontal variability to low frequency climate variability and the accompanying storm tracks and extremes in high resolution simulations. This is a collaborative multi-institution project consisting of computational scientists, climate scientists and climate model developers. It specifically aims at DOE objectives of advancing simulation and predictive capability of climate models through improvements in resolution and physical process representation.

  8. The chemistry of atmospheric deposition in Italy in the framework of the National Programme for Forest Ecosystems Control (CONECOFOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana REMBGES

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Under the CONECOFOR programme, allied to the UE and UN-ECE programme on forests (ICP Forests, the chemistry of open field, throughfall and stemflow deposition was measured in 15 permanent plots over a two year period. Characteristics of the plots, sampling methods, treatment and analyses are in strict agreement with those adopted in the European programme. The plots are representative of different geographical conditions, from the Mediterranean area of the southern plots to the Alpine environment. Results show the highest amount of ion deposition related to anthropogenic emissions in the northern (PIE1, VEN1, FRI2 and central (EMI1, TOS1 stations, while most of the central and southern sites show a net flux of alkalinity. The acidity is however buffered by dust and dry deposition present on the canopy, so that the throughfall deposition is always alkaline. Nitrogen, both as ammonium and nitrate, is an important component of precipitation and critical loads are exceeded in most of the areas. This situation is confirmed by analyses of nitrate in runoff, performed in four plots, which show a release from the watershed in all seasons, indicating an overload of nitrogen compared to its possible uptake by vegetation and soil. N saturation is high in the northern and central plots of PIE1 and EMI2, moderate in the central and alpine plots of LAZ1 and FRI2.

  9. Atmospheric chemistry of Z- and E-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østerstrøm, Freja F; Andersen, Simone Thirstrup; Sølling, Theis I; Nielsen, Ole John; Sulbaek Andersen, Mads P

    2016-12-21

    The atmospheric fates of Z- and E-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3 have been studied, investigating the kinetics and the products of the reactions of the two compounds with Cl atoms, OH radicals, OD radicals, and O3. FTIR smog chamber experiments measured: k(Cl + Z-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3) = (2.59 ± 0.47) × 10(-11), k(Cl + E-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3) = (1.36 ± 0.27) × 10(-11), k(OH + Z-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3) = (4.21 ± 0.62) × 10(-13), k(OH + E-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3) = (1.72 ± 0.42) × 10(-13), k(OD + Z-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3) = (6.94 ± 1.25) × 10(-13), k(OD + E-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3) = (5.61 ± 0.98) × 10(-13), k(O3 + Z-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3) = (6.25 ± 0.70) × 10(-22), and k(O3 + E-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3) = (4.14 ± 0.42) × 10(-22) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) in 700 Torr of air/N2/O2 diluents at 296 ± 2 K. E-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3 reacts with Cl atoms to give CF3CHClC(O)CF3 in a yield indistinguishable from 100%. Z-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3 reacts with Cl atoms to give (95 ± 10)% CF3CHClC(O)CF3 and (7 ± 1)% E-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3. CF3CHClC(O)CF3 reacts with Cl atoms to give the secondary product CF3C(O)Cl in a yield indistinguishable from 100%, with the observed co-products C(O)F2 and CF3O3CF3. The main atmospheric fate for Z- and E-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3 is reaction with OH radicals. The atmospheric lifetimes of Z- and E-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3 are estimated as 27 and 67 days, respectively. IR absorption cross sections are reported and the global warming potentials (GWPs) of Z- and E-CF3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCF3 for the 100 year time horizon are calculated to be GWP100 = 2 and 7, respectively. This study provides a comprehensive description of the atmospheric fate and impact of Z- and E

  10. Separation of the atmospheric variability into non-Gaussian multidimensional sources by projection pursuit techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Carlos A. L.; Ribeiro, Andreia F. S.

    2017-02-01

    We develop an expansion of space-distributed time series into statistically independent uncorrelated subspaces (statistical sources) of low-dimension and exhibiting enhanced non-Gaussian probability distributions with geometrically simple chosen shapes (projection pursuit rationale). The method relies upon a generalization of the principal component analysis that is optimal for Gaussian mixed signals and of the independent component analysis (ICA), optimized to split non-Gaussian scalar sources. The proposed method, supported by information theory concepts and methods, is the independent subspace analysis (ISA) that looks for multi-dimensional, intrinsically synergetic subspaces such as dyads (2D) and triads (3D), not separable by ICA. Basically, we optimize rotated variables maximizing certain nonlinear correlations (contrast functions) coming from the non-Gaussianity of the joint distribution. As a by-product, it provides nonlinear variable changes `unfolding' the subspaces into nearly Gaussian sc