WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmosphere solving faint

  1. Geological Sulfur Isotopes Indicate Elevated OCS in the Archean Atmosphere, Solving the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Johnson, Matthew Stanley; Danielache, Sebastian Oscar

    2009-01-01

    Distributions of sulfur isotopes in geological samples would provide a record of atmospheric composition if the mechanism producing the isotope effects could be described quantitatively. We determined the UV absorption spectra of 32SO2, 33SO2, and 34SO2 and use them to interpret the geological re......-rich, reducing Archean atmosphere. The radiative forcing, due to this level of OCS, is able to resolve the faint young sun paradox. Further, the decline of atmospheric OCS may have caused the late Archean glaciation....

  2. Fainting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have heavy periods or people with iron-deficiency anemia for other reasons (like not getting enough iron in their diet) may be more likely to faint. Pregnancy. During pregnancy the body normally undergoes a lot ...

  3. Archean Earth Atmosphere Fractal Haze Aggregates: Light Scattering Calculations and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boness, D. A.; Terrell-Martinez, B.

    2010-12-01

    As part of an ongoing undergraduate research project of light scattering calculations involving fractal carbonaceous soot aggregates relevant to current anthropogenic and natural sources in Earth's atmosphere, we have read with interest a recent paper [E.T. Wolf and O.B Toon,Science 328, 1266 (2010)] claiming that the Faint Young Sun paradox discussed four decades ago by Carl Sagan and others can be resolved without invoking heavy CO2 concentrations as a greenhouse gas warming the early Earth enough to sustain liquid water and hence allow the origin of life. Wolf and Toon report that a Titan-like Archean Earth haze, with a fractal haze aggregate nature due to nitrogen-methane photochemistry at high altitudes, should block enough UV light to protect the warming greenhouse gas NH3 while allowing enough visible light to reach the surface of the Earth. To test this hypothesis, we have employed a rigorous T-Matrix arbitrary-particle light scattering technique, to avoid the simplifications inherent in Mie-sphere scattering, on haze fractal aggregates at UV and visible wavelenths of incident light. We generate these model aggregates using diffusion-limited cluster aggregation (DLCA) algorithms, which much more closely fit actual haze fractal aggregates than do diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) algorithms.

  4. The faint young Sun problem

    CERN Document Server

    Feulner, Georg

    2012-01-01

    For more than four decades, scientists have been trying to find an answer to one of the most fundamental questions in paleoclimatology, the `faint young Sun problem'. For the early Earth, models of stellar evolution predict a solar energy input to the climate system which is about 25% lower than today. This would result in a completely frozen world over the first two billion years in the history of our planet, if all other parameters controlling Earth's climate had been the same. Yet there is ample evidence for the presence of liquid surface water and even life in the Archean (3.8 to 2.5 billion years before present), so some effect (or effects) must have been compensating for the faint young Sun. A wide range of possible solutions have been suggested and explored during the last four decades, with most studies focusing on higher concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide, methane or ammonia. All of these solutions present considerable difficulties, however, so the faint young Sun prob...

  5. Variational iteration solving method for El Nino phenomenon atmospheric physics of nonlinear model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A class of El Nino atmospheric physics oscillation model is considered. The El Nino atmospheric physics oscillation is an abnormal phenomenon involved in the tropical Pacific ocean-atmosphere interactions. The conceptual oscillator model should consider the variations of both the eastern and westem Pacific anomaly patterns. An El Nino atmospheric physics model is proposed using a method for the variational iteration theory. Using the variational iteration method, the approximate expansions of the solution of corresponding problem are constructed. That is, firstly, introducing a set of functional and accounting their variationals, the Lagrange multiplicators are counted, and then the variational iteration is defined, finally, the approximate solution is obtained. From approximate expansions of the solution, the zonal sea surface temperature anomaly in the equatorial eastern Pacific and the thermocline depth anomaly of the seaair oscillation for El Nino atmospheric physics model can be analyzed. El Nino is a very complicated natural phenomenon. Hence basic models need to be reduced for the sea-air oscillator and are solved. The variational iteration is a simple and valid approximate method.

  6. Atmosphere Clouds Model Algorithm for Solving Optimal Reactive Power Dispatch Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenin Kanagasabai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new method, called Atmosphere Clouds Model (ACM algorithm, used for solving optimal reactive power dispatch problem. ACM stochastic optimization algorithm stimulated from the behavior of cloud in the natural earth. ACM replicate the generation behavior, shift behavior and extend behavior of cloud. The projected (ACM algorithm has been tested on standard IEEE 30 bus test system and simulation results shows clearly about the superior performance of the proposed algorithm in plummeting the real power loss. Normal 0 false false false EN-IN X-NONE X-NONE

  7. Faint Blue Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Richard S

    1997-01-01

    The physical properties of the faint blue galaxy population are reviewed in the context of observational progress made via deep spectroscopic surveys and Hubble Space Telescope imaging of field galaxies at various limits, and theoretical models for the integrated star formation history of the Universe. Notwithstanding uncertainties in the properties of the local population of galaxies, convincing evidence has emerged from several independent studies for a rapid decline in the volume-averaged star formation rate of field galaxies since a redshift z~1. Together with the small angular sizes and modest mean redshift of the faintest detectable sources, these results can be understood in hierarchical models where the bulk of the star formation occurred at redshifts between z~1-2. The physical processes responsible for the subsequent demise of the faint blue galaxy population remains unclear. Considerable progress will be possible when the evolutionary trends can be monitored in the context of independent physical p...

  8. The Faint Young Sun Paradox: A Simplified Thermodynamic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Angulo-Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical models of the Sun suggest that the energy output in the early stage of its evolution was 30 percent less than today. In this context, radiative balance alone between The Sun and the Earth was not sufficient to explain the early presence of liquid water on Earth’s surface. This difficulty is called the faint young Sun paradox. Many proposals have been published to solve this paradox. In the present work, we propose an oversimplified finite-time thermodynamic approach that describes the air convective cells in the Earth atmosphere. This model introduces two atmospheric modes of thermodynamic performance: a first mode consisting in the maximization of the power output of the convective cells (maximum power regime and a second mode that consists in maximizing a functional representing a good trade-off between power output and entropy production (the ecological regime. Within the assumptions of this oversimplified model, we present different scenarios of albedo and greenhouse effects that seem realistic to preserve liquid water on the Earth in the early stage of formation.

  9. Some Weaker Forms of Fuzzy Faintly Open Mappings

    OpenAIRE

    Hakeem A. Othman

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to introduce and investigate some weak forms of fuzzy open mappings, namely fuzzy faintly semi open (fuzzy faintly semi closed), fuzzy faintly preopen (fuzzy faintly preclosed), fuzzy faintly $\\alpha$-open (fuzzy faintly $\\alpha$-closed), fuzzy faintly semi preopen (fuzzy faintly semi preclosed) and fuzzy faintly $sp$- open (fuzzy faintly $sp$- closed) mappings and their fundamental properties are obtained. Moreover, their relationship with other types of fuzzy open (clo...

  10. Assessment of Tikhonov-type regularization methods for solving atmospheric inverse problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Schreier, Franz; Doicu, Adrian; Trautmann, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Inverse problems occurring in atmospheric science aim to estimate state parameters (e.g. temperature or constituent concentration) from observations. To cope with nonlinear ill-posed problems, both direct and iterative Tikhonov-type regularization methods can be used. The major challenge in the framework of direct Tikhonov regularization (TR) concerns the choice of the regularization parameter λ, while iterative regularization methods require an appropriate stopping rule and a flexible λ-sequence. In the framework of TR, a suitable value of the regularization parameter can be generally determined based on a priori, a posteriori, and error-free selection rules. In this study, five practical regularization parameter selection methods, i.e. the expected error estimation (EEE), the discrepancy principle (DP), the generalized cross-validation (GCV), the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), and the L-curve (LC), have been assessed. As a representative of iterative methods, the iteratively regularized Gauss-Newton (IRGN) algorithm has been compared with TR. This algorithm uses a monotonically decreasing λ-sequence and DP as an a posteriori stopping criterion. Practical implementations pertaining to retrievals of vertically distributed temperature and trace gas profiles from synthetic microwave emission measurements and from real far infrared data, respectively, have been conducted. Our numerical analysis demonstrates that none of the parameter selection methods dedicated to TR appear to be perfect and each has its own advantages and disadvantages. Alternatively, IRGN is capable of producing plausible retrieval results, allowing a more efficient manner for estimating λ.

  11. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly Response Functions: Solving the Fe VIII Problems with Hinode EIS Bright Point Data

    CERN Document Server

    Schmelz, Joan T; Kimble, Jason A; 10.1007/s11207-012-0208-1

    2013-01-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory is a state-of-the-art imager with the potential to do unprecedented time-dependent multi-thermal analysis at every pixel on scales short compared to the radiative and conductive cooling times. Recent results, however, have identified missing spectral lines in the CHIANTI atomic physics data base, which is used to construct the instrument response functions. We have done differential emission measure analysis using simultaneous AIA and Hinode/EIS observations of six X-ray bright points. Our results not only support the conclusion that CHIANTI is incomplete near 131 angstroms, but more importantly, suggest that the peak temperature of the Fe VIII emissivity/response is likely to be closer to log T = 5.8 than to the current value of log T = 5.7. Using a revised emissivity/response calculation for Fe VIII, we find that the observed AIA 131-angstrom flux can be underestimated by about 1.25, which is smaller than previous comparisons.

  12. Faint Dwarfs in Nearby Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Speller, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The number and distribution of dwarf satellite galaxies remain a critical test of cold dark matter-dominated structure formation on small scales. Until recently, observational information about galaxy formation on these scales has been limited mainly to the Local Group. We have searched for faint analogues of Local Group dwarfs around nearby bright galaxies, using a spatial clustering analysis of the photometric catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 8. Several other recent searches of SDSS have detected clustered satellite populations down to $\\Delta m_r \\equiv ({m}_{r,\\, {\\rm sat}} -\\, {m}_{r,\\, {\\rm main}}) \\sim 6$-$8$, using photometric redshifts to reduce background contamination. SDSS photometric redshifts are relatively imprecise, however, for faint and nearby galaxies. Instead we use angular size to select potential nearby dwarfs, and consider only the nearest isolated bright galaxies as primaries. As a result, we are able to detect an excess clustering signal from companions down...

  13. Employing GNSS radio occultation for solving the global climate monitoring problem for the fundamental state of the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchengast, Gottfried; Schwaerz, Marc; Schwarz, Jakob; Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Pock, Christian; Innerkofler, Josef; Proschek, Veronika; Steiner, Andrea; Danzer, Julia; Ladstaedter, Florian; Foelsche, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring the atmosphere to gain accurate and long-term stable records of essential climate variables (ECVs) such as temperature is the backbone of atmospheric and climate science. Earth observation from space is the key to obtain such data globally. Currently, however, not any atmospheric ECV record can serve as authoritative reference from weekly to decadal scales so that climate variability and change is not yet reliably monitored, despite of satellite data since the 1970s. We aim to solve this decades-long problem for the fundamental state of the atmosphere, the thermodynamic state of the gas as expressed by air density, pressure, temperature, and tropospheric water vapor, which are the fundamental ECVs for tracking climate change and in fact fundamental to all weather and climate processes. We base the solution on the unique SI-traceable data of the GNSS radio occultation (RO) space geodetic observing system, available since 2001 and scheduled long-term into the future. We introduce a new system modeling and data analysis approach which, in contrast to current RO retrieval chains using classical data inversion, enables us to exploit the traceability to universal time (SI second) and to realize SI-traced profiles of atmospheric ECVs, accounting also for relevant side influences such as from the ionosphere, with unprecedented utility for climate monitoring and science. We work to establish such a trace first-time in form of the Reference Occultation Processing System rOPS, providing reference RO data for calibration/validation and climate applications. This rOPS development is a current cornerstone endeavor at the WEGC Graz over 2013 to 2016, supported also by colleagues from EUMETSAT Darmstadt, ECMWF Reading, DMI Copenhagen, AIUB Berne, UCAR Boulder, JPL Pasadena, and others. The rOPS approach demands to process the full chain from the SI-tied raw data to the ECVs with integrated uncertainty propagation, both of estimated systematic and estimated random

  14. Towards Solving the Global Climate Monitoring Problem for the Fundamental State of the Atmosphere with GNSS Radio Occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchengast, G.; Schwaerz, M.; Schwarz, J.; Scherllin-Pirscher, B.; Pock, C.; Innerkofler, J.; Proschek, V.; Steiner, A. K.; Danzer, J.; Ladstaedter, F.; Foelsche, U.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring the atmosphere to gain accurate and long-term stable records of essential climate variables (ECVs) such as temperature is the backbone of atmospheric and climate science. Earth observation from space is the key to obtain such data globally. Currently, however, not any atmospheric ECV record can serve as authoritative reference from weekly to decadal scales so that climate variability and change is not yet reliably monitored, despite of satellite data since the 1970s. We aim to solve this decades-long problem for the fundamental state of the atmosphere, the thermodynamic state of the gas as expressed by air density, pressure, temperature, and tropospheric water vapor, which are the fundamental ECVs for tracking climate change and in fact fundamental to all weather and climate processes. We base the solution on the unique SI-traceable data of the GNSS radio occultation (RO) observing system, available since 2001 and scheduled long-term into the future. We introduce a new system modeling and data analysis approach which, in contrast to current RO retrieval chains using classical data inversion, enables us to exploit the traceability to universal time (SI second) and to realize SI-traced ECV profiles, accounting also for relevant side influences, with unprecedented utility for climate monitoring and science. We work to establish such a trace first-time in form of the Reference Occultation Processing System rOPS, providing reference RO data for cal/val and climate applications. This rOPS development is a current cornerstone endeavor at the WEGC Graz over 2013 to 2016, supported also by colleagues from EUMETSAT, ECMWF, DMI Copenhagen, UCAR Boulder, JPL Pasadena, and others. The rOPS approach demands to process the full chain from the SI-tied raw data to the ECVs with integrated uncertainty propagation. We first briefly summarize the RO promise along the above lines and where we currently stand in quantifying RO accuracy and long-term stability. We then

  15. Counting pairs of faint galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, D; Richer, H B; Woods, David; Fahlman, Gregory G; Richer, Harvey B

    1995-01-01

    The number of close pairs of galaxies observed to faint magnitude limits, when compared to nearby samples, determines the interaction or merger rate as a function of redshift. The prevalence of mergers at intermediate redshifts is fundamental to understanding how galaxies evolve and the relative population of galaxy types. Mergers have been used to explain the excess of galaxies in faint blue counts above the numbers expected from no-evolution models. Using deep CFHT (I\\leq24) imaging of a ``blank'' field we find a pair fraction which is consistent with the galaxies in our sample being randomly distributed with no significant excess of ``physical'' close pairs. This is contrary to the pair fraction of 34\\%\\pm9\\% found by Burkey {\\it et al.} for similar magnitude limits and using an identical approach to the pair analysis. Various reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Colors and morphologies of our close pairs are consistent with the bulk of them being random superpositions although, as indicators of int...

  16. Exploring the faint young Sun problem and the possible climates of the Archean Earth with a 3-D GCM

    CERN Document Server

    Charnay, Benjamin; Wordsworth, Robin; Leconte, Jérémy; Millour, Ehouarn; Codron, Francis; Spiga, Aymeric

    2013-01-01

    Different solutions have been proposed to solve the "faint young Sun problem", defined by the fact that the Earth was not fully frozen during the Archean despite the fainter Sun. Most previous studies were performed with simple 1-D radiative convective models and did not account well for the clouds and ice-albedo feedback or the atmospheric and oceanic transport of energy. We apply a global climate model (GCM) to test the different solutions to the faint young Sun problem. We explore the effect of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4), atmospheric pressure, cloud droplet size, land distribution, and Earth's rotation rate. We show that neglecting organic haze, 100 mbar of CO2 with 2 mbar of CH4 at 3.8 Ga and 10 mbar of CO2 with 2 mbar of CH4 at 2.5 Ga allow a temperate climate (mean surface temperature between 10{\\deg}C and 20{\\deg}C). Such amounts of greenhouse gases remain consistent with the geological data. Removing continents produces a warming lower than +4{\\deg}C. The effect of rotation rate is even more limit...

  17. Clouds and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Goldblatt, Colin

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the role which clouds could play in resolving the Faint Young Sun Paradox (FYSP). Lower solar luminosity in the past means that less energy was absorbed on Earth (a forcing of -50 Wm-2 during the late Archean), but geological evidence points to the Earth being at least as warm as it is today, with only very occasional glaciations. We perform radiative calculations on a single global mean atmospheric column. We select a nominal set of three layered, randomly overlapping clouds, which are both consistent with observed cloud climatologies and reproduce the observed global mean energy budget of Earth. By varying the fraction, thickness, height and particle size of these clouds we conduct a wide exploration of how changed clouds could affect climate, thus constraining how clouds could contribute to resolving the FYSP. Low clouds reflect sunlight but have little greenhouse effect. Removing them entirely gives a~forcing of +25 Wm-2 whilst more modest reduction in their efficacy gives a forcing of +10 ...

  18. Hubble Deep Fever A faint galaxy diagnosis

    CERN Document Server

    Driver, S P

    1998-01-01

    The longstanding faint blue galaxy problem is gradually subsiding as a result of technological advancement, most notably from high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging. In particular two categorical facts have recently been established, these are: 1) The excess faint blue galaxies are of irregular morphologies, and, 2) the majority of these irregulars occur at redshifts 1 2. Taking these facts together we favour a scenario where the faint blue excess is primarily due to the formation epoch of spiral systems via merging at redshifts 1 < z < 2. The final interpretation now awaits refinements in our understanding of the local galaxy population !

  19. On the use of a finite difference method for solving anisotropic scattering problems. [for atmospheric radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkstrom, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    A new method of solving the radiative transfer equation is developed in which the scattering and absorption coefficients may have arbitrary variations with depth, and in which both internal (thermal) emission and incident radiation are allowed. Specular and diffuse reflection at both boundaries also is taken into account. The method begins by forming a paired set of coupled first-order differential equations for the symmetric and antisymmetric parts of the radiation field after writing the scattering integral as a numerical quadrature. These differential equations are broken into finite difference form, in which the symmetric and antisymmetric parts of the radiation field are found on alternate grid points. Numerical results for a number of test problems are shown, demonstrating that the method is very fast, that it returns specific intensities and fluxes that are accurate to at least a percent, and that it can be applied to optically thick problems.

  20. Faint Galaxies in deep ACS observations

    CERN Document Server

    Benítez, N; Bouwens, R; Menanteau, F; Blakeslee, J P; Gronwall, C; Illingworth, G D; Meurer, G; Broadhurst, T J; Clampin, M; Franx, M; Hartig, G F; Magee, D; Sirianni, M; Ardila, D R; Bartko, F; Brown, R A; Burrows, C J; Cheng, E S; Cross, N J G; Feldman, P D; Golimowski, D A; Infante, L; Kimble, R A; Krist, J E; Lesser, M P; Levay, Z G; Martel, A R; Miley, G K; Postman, M; Rosati, P; Sparks, W B; Tran, H D; Tsvetanov, Z I; Zheng, R L

    2003-01-01

    We present the analysis of the faint galaxy population in the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Early Release Observation fields VV 29 (UGC 10214) and NGC 4676. Here we attempt to thoroughly consider all aspects relevant for faint galaxy counting and photometry, developing methods which are based on public software and that are easily reproducible by other astronomers. Using simulations we determine the best SExtractor parameters for the detection of faint galaxies in deep HST observations, paying special attention to the issue of deblending, which significantly affects the normalization and shape of the number count distribution. We confirm, as claimed by Bernstein, Freedman and Madore (2002), that Kron-like magnitudes, such as the ones generated by SExtractor, can miss more than half of the light of faint galaxies, what dramatically affects the slope of the number counts. We present catalogs for the VV 29 and NGC 4676 fields with photometry in the g,V and I bands. We also show that combining the bayesian so...

  1. Faint stars and OmegaCAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijken, K; Cristiani, S; Renzini, A; Williams, RE

    2001-01-01

    OmegaCAM will be the wide-field imager on the VLT Survey Telescope. In this contribution I present applications of this instrument to the study of faint stellar populations. Two projects are highlighted: a proper motion study to uncover the galactic halo population, and a microlensing study towards

  2. Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, John J.

    1970-01-01

    Discussed are the nature of a mathematical problem, problem solving in the traditional and modern mathematics programs, problem solving and psychology, research related to problem solving, and teaching problem solving in algebra and geometry. (CT)

  3. Faint Submillimeter Galaxies Behind Lensing Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Lauchlan Cowie, Lennox; Barger, Amy J.; Desai, Vandana; Murphy, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Faint submillimeter galaxies are the major contributors to the submillimeter extragalactic background light and hence the dominant star-forming population in the dusty universe. Determining how much these galaxies overlap the optically selected samples is critical to fully account for the cosmic star formation history. Observations of massive cluster fields are the best way to explore this faint submillimeter population, thanks to gravitational lensing effects. We have been undertaking a lensing cluster survey with the SCUBA-2 camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to map nine galaxy clusters, including the northern five clusters in the HST Frontier Fields program. We have also been using the Submillimeter Array and the Very Large Array to determine the accurate positions of our detected sources. Our observations have discovered high-redshift dusty galaxies with far-infrared luminosities similar to that of the Milky Way or luminous infrared galaxies. Some of these galaxies are still undetected in deep optical and near-infrared images. These results suggest that a substantial amount of star formation in even the faint submillimeter population may be hidden from rest-frame optical surveys.

  4. The Population of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Barker, Ed; Buckalew, Brent; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Frith, James; Gomez, Juan; Kaleida, Catherine; Lederer, Susan M.; Lee, Chris H.

    2016-01-01

    The 6.5-m Magellan telescope 'Walter Baade' at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile has been used for spot surveys of the GEO orbital regime to study the population of optically faint GEO debris. The goal is to estimate the size of the population of GEO debris at sizes much smaller than can be studied with 1-meter class telescopes. Despite the small size of the field of view of the Magellan instrument (diameter 0.5-degree), a significant population of objects fainter than R = 19th magnitude have been found with angular rates consistent with circular orbits at GEO. We compare the size of this population with the numbers of GEO objects found at brighter magnitudes by smaller telescopes. The observed detections have a wide range in characteristics starting with those appearing as short uniform streaks. But there are a substantial number of detections with variations in brightness, flashers, during the 5-second exposure. The duration of each of these flashes can be extremely brief: sometimes less than half a second. This is characteristic of a rapidly tumbling object with a quite variable projected size times albedo. If the albedo is of the order of 0.2, then the largest projected size of these objects is around 10-cm. The data in this paper was collected over the last several years using Magellan's IMACS camera in f/2 mode. The analysis shows the brightness bins for the observed GEO population as well as the periodicity of the flashers. All objects presented are correlated with the catalog: the focus of the paper will be on the uncorrelated, optically faint, objects. The goal of this project is to better characterize the faint debris population in GEO that access to a 6.5-m optical telescope in a superb site can provide.

  5. A simplified approach for solving coagulation-diffusion equation to estimate atmospheric background particle number loading factors contributed by emissions from localized sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, S.; Mayya, Y. S.

    2011-08-01

    Coagulation and condensation/evaporation combined with atmospheric dispersion are the main processes responsible for the evolution of aerosol particle size distributions and number concentrations emitted from localized sources. A crucial question is: what fraction of freshly emitted particles survive intra-coagulation effect to persist in the atmosphere and become available for further interaction with background aerosols?. The difficulty in estimating this quantity, designated as the number survival fraction, arises due chiefly to the joint action of atmospheric diffusion with nonlinear coagulation effects which are computationally intensive to handle. We provide a simplified approach to evaluate this quantity in the context of instantaneous (puff) and continuous (plume) releases based on a reduction of the respective coagulation-diffusion equations under the assumption of a constant coagulation kernel ( K). The condensation/evaporation processes, being number conserving, are not included in the study. The approach consists of constructing moment equations for the evolution of number concentration and variance of the spatial extension of puff or plume in terms of either time or downstream distance. The puff model, applicable to instantaneous releases is solved within a 3-D, spherically symmetric framework, under an additional assumption of a constant diffusion coefficient ( D) which renders itself amenable to a closed form solution that provides a benchmark for developing the solution to the plume model. The latter case, corresponding to continuous releases, is discussed within a 2-D framework under the assumptions of constant advection velocity ( U) and space dependent diffusion coefficient expressed in terms of turbulent energy dissipation rate ( ɛ). The study brings out the special effect of the coagulation-induced flattening of the spatial concentration profiles because of which particle sizes will be larger at the centre of a Gaussian puff. For a puff of

  6. Faint Objects and How to Observe Them

    CERN Document Server

    Cudnik, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Astronomers' Observing Guides provide up-to-date information for amateur astronomers who want to know all about what it is they are observing. This is the basis of the first part of the book. The second part details observing techniques for practical astronomers, working with a range of different instruments. Faint Objects and How to Observe Them is for visual observers who want to "go deep" with their observing. It's a guide to some of the most distant, dim, and rarely observed objects in the sky, with background information on surveys and object lists -- some familiar and some not. Typically, amateur astronomers begin by looking at the brighter objects, and work their way "deeper" as their experience and skills improve. Faint Objects is about the faintest objects we can see with an amateur's telescope -- their physical nature, why they appear so dim, and how to track them down. By definition, these objects are hard to see! But moderate equipment (a decent telescope of at least 10-inch aperture) and the righ...

  7. Serendipitous discovery of the faint solar twin Inti 1

    CERN Document Server

    Galarza, Jhon Yana; Cohen, Judith G

    2016-01-01

    Methods. We determine the atmospheric parameters and differential abundances using high-resolution ($R \\approx 50 000$), high signal-to-noise (S/N $\\approx$ 110 - 240 per pixel) Keck HIRES spectra for our solar twin candidate, the previously known solar twin HD 45184, and the Sun. Results. For the bright solar twin HD 45184, we found $T_{\\rm{eff}} = 5864 \\pm 9$ K, log $g = 4.45 \\pm 0.03$ dex, $v_{t} = 1.11 \\pm 0.02$ $\\rm{km\\ {s}}^{-1}$, and [Fe/H]$ = 0.04 \\pm 0.01$ dex, which are in good agreement with previous works. The star Inti 1 has atmospheric parameters $T_{\\rm{eff}} = 5837 \\pm 11$ K, log $g = 4.42 \\pm 0.03$ dex, $v_{t} = 1.04 \\pm 0.02$ $\\rm{km\\ {s}}^{-1}$, and [Fe/H]$ = 0.07 \\pm 0.01$ dex that are higher than solar. The age and mass of the solar twin HD 45184 (3 Gyr and 1.05 $\\rm{M_{\\odot}}$) and the faint solar twin Inti 1 (4 Gyr and 1.04 $\\rm{M_{\\odot}}$) were estimated using isochrones. The differential analysis shows that HD 45184 presents an abundance pattern that is similar to typical nearby sol...

  8. A new method for imaging faint objects nearby a bright source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In astronomical observation, it is difficult to obtain the image of faint objects in the peripheral area around a bright celestial body. In order to solve the problem, a new method is designed and experimented, which is called the separation readout technique (SRT). SRT is different from either the traditional coronagraphy or the newly-developed anti-blooming CCD technique, and allows an enough-long exposure to the faint objects in the area around a bright celestial body with the well-preserved bright body's image in one frame. This paper describes in detail the principle of SRT, the computer simulation, the experimental devising and result of SRT observation on a telescope.

  9. Solutions to the faint young Sun paradox simulated by a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Eric Theodore

    The faint young Sun paradox has dominated our thinking regarding early climate. Geological evidence abounds for warm, possibly hot, seawater temperatures and the proliferation of early life during the Archean period of Earth's history (3.8-2.5 Ga). However the standard solar model indicates that the Sun was only 75 to 82 percent as bright as today, implying an apparent contradiction between warm surface temperatures and weak solar irradiance. Geological evidence also places constraints on the amount of atmospheric carbon dioxide present early in Earth's history. Over the past four decades there has been much debate amongst geological, planetary, and climate science communities regarding how to properly resolve the issue of the faint young Sun. Up until very recently, 1-dimensional radiative convective models were the standard tool for deep paleoclimate modeling studies. These studies have notably lacked the ability to treat clouds, surface ice, and meridional energy transport. However, advancements in computing technology now allow us to tackle the faint young Sun paradox using a three-dimensional climate model. Here we use a modified version of the Community Atmosphere Model version 3 from the National Center for Atmospheric Research to study early climate. We find that resolving the faint young Sun paradox becomes less problematic when viewing a full representation of the climate system. Modest amounts of carbon dioxide and methane can provide adequate warming for the Archean within given constraints. Cooler climates with large ice caps but temperate tropical regions can be supported with even less carbon dioxide. The incorporation of systematic climate system differences expected during the Archean, such as fewer cloud condensation nuclei, reduced land albedos, and increased atmospheric nitrogen, can provide additional non-greenhouse means of warming the early Earth. A warm Archean no longer appears at odds with a faint young Sun. Here, we will also discuss the

  10. Faint Infrared-Excess Field Galaxies FROGs

    CERN Document Server

    Moustakas, L A; Zepf, S E; Bunker, A J

    1997-01-01

    Deep near-infrared and optical imaging surveys in the field reveal a curious population of galaxies that are infrared-bright (I-K>4), yet with relatively blue optical colors (V-I20, is high enough that if placed at z>1 as our models suggest, their space densities are about one-tenth of phi-*. The colors of these ``faint red outlier galaxies'' (fROGs) may derive from exceedingly old underlying stellar populations, a dust-embedded starburst or AGN, or a combination thereof. Determining the nature of these fROGs, and their relation with the I-K>6 ``extremely red objects,'' has implications for our understanding of the processes that give rise to infrared-excess galaxies in general. We report on an ongoing study of several targets with HST & Keck imaging and Keck/LRIS multislit spectroscopy.

  11. Faint Submillimter Galaxy Counts at 450 micron

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Barger, Amy J; Casey, Caitlin M; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B; Wang, Wei-Hao; Williams, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of SCUBA2 observations at 450 micron and 850 micron of the field lensed by the massive cluster A370. With a total survey area > 100 arcmin2 and 1 sigma sensitivities of 3.92 and 0.82 mJy/beam at 450 and 850 micron respectively, we find a secure sample of 20 sources at 450 micron and 26 sources at 850 micron with a signal-to-noise ratio > 4. Using the latest lensing model of A370 and Monte Carlo simulations, we derive the number counts at both wavelengths. The 450 micron number counts probe a factor of four deeper than the counts recently obtained from the Herschel Space Telescope at similar wavelengths, and we estimate that ~47-61% of the 450 micron extragalactic background light (EBL) resolved into individual sources with 450 micron fluxes greater than 4.5 mJy. The faint 450 micron sources in the 4 sigma sample have positional accuracies of 3 arcseconds, while brighter sources (signal-to-noise > 6 sigma) are good to 1.4 arcseconds. Using the deep radio map (1 sigma ~ 6 uJy) we find tha...

  12. Optically Faint Radio Sources: Reborn AGN?

    CERN Document Server

    Filho, Mercedes E; Lobo, Catarina; Antón, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    We have discovered a number of relatively strong radio sources in the field-of-view of SDSS galaxy clusters which present no optical counterparts down to the magnitude limits of the SDSS. The optically faint radio sources appear as double-lobed or core-jet objects on the FIRST radio images and have projected angular sizes ranging from 0.5 to 1.0 arcmin. We have followed-up these sources with near-infrared imaging using the wide-field imager HAWK-I on the VLT. K_s-band emitting regions, about 1.5 arcsec in size and coincident with the centers of the radio structures, were detected in all the sources, with magnitudes in the range 17-20 mag. We have used spectral modelling to characterize the sample sources. In general, the radio properties are similar to those observed in 3CRR sources but the optical-radio slopes are consistent with moderate to high redshift (z<4) gigahertz-peaked spectrum sources. Our results suggest that these unusual objects are galaxies whose black hole has been recently re-ignited but r...

  13. Observations of Faint Eclipsing Cataclysmic Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Çamurdan, Dicle Zengin; Çamurdan, C Muzaffer

    2010-01-01

    We present time-resolved photometry of six faint (V>17mag) cataclysmic variables (CVs); one of them is V849 Oph and the others are identified from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS J0920+0042, SDSS J1327+6528, SDSS J1227+5139, SDSS J1607.02+3623, SDSS J1457+5148). The optical CCD photometric observations of these objects were performed at the T\\"UB\\.ITAK National Observatory (Turkey) between February 2006 and March 2009. We aimed to detect short time scale orbital variability arisen from hot-spot modulation, flickering structures which occur from rapid fluctuations of material transferring from red star to white dwarf and orbital period changes for selected short-period (P<4h) CVs at quiescence. Results obtained from eclipse timings and light curves morphology related to white dwarf stars, accretion disks and hot-spots are discussed for each system. Analysis of the short time coverage of data, obtained for SDSS J1227+5139 indicates a cyclical period change arisen from magnetic activity on the secondary st...

  14. The Population of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, P.; Barker, E.; Buckalew, B.; Burkhardt, A.; Cowardin, H.; Frith, J.; Kaleida, C.; Lederer, S.; Lee, C.

    2016-09-01

    The 6.5-m Magellan telescope, 'Walter Baade', at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile has been used for spot surveys of the geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) regime to study the population of optically faint GEO debris. The goal is to estimate the population of GEO debris at sizes much smaller than can be studied with 1-meter class telescopes. Despite the small field of view of the Magellan instrument (diameter 0.5-degree), a significant population of objects fainter than R = 19th magnitude has been found with angular rates consistent with circular orbits at GEO. We compare the size of this population with the numbers of GEO objects found at brighter magnitudes by smaller telescopes. The detections have a wide range of characteristics starting with those appearing as short uniform streaks. But there are a substantial number of detections that vary in brightness ("flashers") during the 5-second exposure. The duration of each of these flashes can be extremely brief: sometimes less than half a second. This is characteristic of a rapidly tumbling object with a quite variable projected product of size * albedo. If the albedo is of the order of 0.2, then the largest projected size of these objects is around 10-cm.

  15. Faint spatial object classifier construction based on data mining technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xin; Zhao, Yang; Liao, Yurong; Nie, Yong-ming

    2016-11-01

    Data mining can effectively obtain the faint spatial object's patterns and characteristics, the universal relations and other implicated data characteristics, the key of which is classifier construction. Faint spatial object classifier construction with spatial data mining technology for faint spatial target detection is proposed based on theoretical analysis of design procedures and guidelines in detail. For the one-sidedness weakness during dealing with the fuzziness and randomness using this method, cloud modal classifier is proposed. Simulating analyzing results indicate that this method can realize classification quickly through feature combination and effectively resolve the one-sidedness weakness problem.

  16. a Faint and Lonely Brown Dwarf in the Solar Vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    identical to other known Brown Dwarfs, its measured characteristics indicate that it must be located at a distance of only 10 parsecs, that is about 33 light-years, from the solar system. Its temperature is obviously below 1700 degrees C (where TiO and VO condense as dust grains [3] so that the spectral lines of these molecules are no longer seen). Its mass can be no more than 75 times that of Jupiter, or 6 percent of that of the Sun. During recent years, several Brown Dwarf candidates have been de-masked as low-mass stars and only recently a few Brown Dwarfs were identified in the Pleiades star cluster. Those Brown Dwarfs are quite young and therefore comparatively hotter and brighter. Contrarily, KELU-1 is most probably somewhat older and its unique location so close to us greatly facilitates future investigations. Moreover, it is not at all `disturbed' by the presence of other objects in its immediate surroundings, as this is the case for all other known objects of this type. It will now be important to obtain accurate measurements of KELU-1's parallax , that is, the small annual change of its position in the sky that is caused by the Earth's motion around the Sun and thus the viewing angle of an Earth-based observer. This should be possible within the next year. Moreover, high resolution spectral investigations with large telescope facilities, soon to include the ESO Very Large Telescope at the Paranal observatory in northern Chile, will now for the first time enable us to investigate the processes that take place in the relatively cold upper layers of Brown Dwarfs. For instance, the observed presence of lithium shows that its atmosphere must be different from that of low-mass stars. KELU-1 and the `Dark Matter' From the fact that KELU-1 is so faint that it was barely detectable on the ESO Schmidt plates, it is possible to estimate that the total volume so far surveyed for this type of objects by this research programme is rather small, only about 23 cubic parsecs (800

  17. Chemical enrichment in Ultra-Faint Dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Donatella

    2016-08-01

    Our view of the Milky Way's satellite population has radically changed after the discovery, ten years ago, of the first Ultra-Faint Dwarf galaxies (UFDs). These extremely faint, dark-matter dominated, scarcely evolved stellar systems are found in ever-increasing number in our cosmic neighbourhood and constitute a gold-mine for studies of early star formation conditions and early chemical enrichment pathways. Here we show what can be learned from the measurements of chemical abundances in UFD stars read through the lens of chemical evolution studies, point out the limitations of the classic approach, and discuss the way to go to improve the models.

  18. Short timescale variability in the Faint Sky Variability Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Rueda, L.; Groot, P.J.; Augusteijn, T.; Nelemans, G.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Besselaar, E.J.M. van den

    2006-01-01

    We present the V-band variability analysis of the point sources in the Faint Sky Variability Survey on time-scales from 24 min to tens of days. We find that about one per cent of the point sources down to V = 24 are variables. We discuss the variability-detection probabilities for each field dependi

  19. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2IFRS, but if confirmed, the increased AGN numbers at these redshifts will account for the unresolved part of the X-ray background. The identification of X-ray counterparts of IFRS is considered to be the smoking gun for this hypothesis. We propose to observe 8 IFRS using 30ks pointed observations. X-ray detections of IFRS with different ratios of radio-to-infrared fluxes, will constrain the class-specific SED.

  20. An HST study of three very faint GRB host galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaunsen, A.O.; Andersen, M.I.; Hjorth, J.;

    2003-01-01

    . (2002). We obtain a revised and much higher probability that the galaxies identified as hosts indeed are related to the GRBs (P(n(chance))=0.69, following Bloom et al. 2002), thereby strengthening the conclusion that GRBs are preferentially located in star-forming regions in their hosts. Apart from......As part of the HST/STIS GRB host survey program we present the detection of three faint gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies based on an accurate localisation using ground-based data of the optical afterglows (OAs). A common property of these three hosts is their extreme faintness. The location...... at which GRBs occur with respect to their host galaxies and surrounding environments are robust indicators of the nature of GRB progenitors. The bursts studied here are among the four most extreme outliers, in terms of relative distance from the host center, in the recent comprehensive study of Bloom et al...

  1. Toward a Network of Faint DA White Dwarfs as High-precision Spectrophotometric Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, G.; Axelrod, T.; Holberg, J. B.; Matheson, T.; Saha, A.; Olszewski, E.; Claver, J.; Stubbs, C. W.; Bohlin, R. C.; Deustua, S.; Rest, A.

    2016-05-01

    We present the initial results from a program aimed at establishing a network of hot DA white dwarfs to serve as spectrophotometric standards for present and future wide-field surveys. These stars span the equatorial zone and are faint enough to be conveniently observed throughout the year with large-aperture telescopes. The spectra of these white dwarfs are analyzed in order to generate a non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium model atmosphere normalized to Hubble Space Telescope colors, including adjustments for wavelength-dependent interstellar extinction. Once established, this standard star network will serve ground-based observatories in both hemispheres as well as space-based instrumentation from the UV to the near IR. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this concept and show how two different approaches to the problem using somewhat different assumptions produce equivalent results. We discuss the lessons learned and the resulting corrective actions applied to our program.

  2. Towards a Network of Faint DA White Dwarfs as High-Precision Spectrophotometric Standards

    CERN Document Server

    Narayan, Gautham; Holberg, Jay B; Matheson, Thomas; Saha, Abhijit; Olszewski, Edward W; Claver, Jenna; Stubbs, Christopher W; Bohlin, Ralph C; Deustua, Susana; Rest, Armin

    2016-01-01

    We present initial results from a program aimed at establishing a network of hot DA white dwarfs to serve as spectrophotometric standards for present and future wide-field surveys. These stars span the equatorial zone and are faint enough to be conveniently observed throughout the year with large-aperture telescopes. Spectra of these white dwarfs are analyzed to generate a non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium (NLTE) model atmosphere normalized to HST colors, including adjustments for wavelength-dependent interstellar extinction. Once established, this standard star network will serve ground-based observatories in both hemispheres as well as space-based instrumentation from the UV to the near IR. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this concept and show how two different approaches to the problem using somewhat different assumptions produce equivalent results. We discuss lessons learned and the resulting corrective actions applied to our program.

  3. Spectra of faint sources in crowded fields with FRODOSpec on the Liverpool Robotic Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Shalyapin, Vyacheslav N

    2014-01-01

    We check the performance of the FRODOSpec integral-field spectrograph for observations of faint sources in crowded fields. Although the standard processing pipeline L2 yields too noisy fibre spectra, we present a new processing software (L2LENS) that gives rise to accurate spectra for the two images of the gravitationally lensed quasar Q0957+561. Among other things, this L2LENS reduction tool accounts for the presence of cosmic-ray events, scattered-light backgrounds, blended sources, and chromatic source displacements due to differential atmospheric refraction. Our non-standard reduction of Q0957+561 data shows the ability of FRODOSpec to provide useful information on a wide variety of targets, and thus, the big potential of integral-field spectrographs on current and future robotic telescopes.

  4. The faint radio sky: radio astronomy becomes mainstream

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Radio astronomy has changed. For years it studied relatively rare sources, which emit mostly non-thermal radiation across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, i.e. radio quasars and radio galaxies. Now it is reaching such faint flux densities that it detects mainly star-forming galaxies and the more common radio-quiet active galactic nuclei. These sources make up the bulk of the extragalactic sky, which has been studied for decades in the infrared, optical, and X-ray bands. I follow the transformation of radio astronomy by reviewing the main components of the radio sky at the bright and faint ends, the issue of their proper classification, their number counts, luminosity functions, and evolution. The overall "big picture" astrophysical implications of these results, and their relevance for a number of hot topics in extragalactic astronomy, are also discussed. The future prospects of the faint radio sky are very bright, as we will soon be flooded with survey data. This review should be useful to all extragalac...

  5. Infrared-Faint Radio Sources are at high redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Herzog, Andreas; Norris, Ray P; Sharp, Rob; Spitler, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    Context. Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are characterised by relatively high radio flux densities and associated faint or even absent infrared and optical counterparts. The resulting extremely high radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousands were previously known only for High-redshift Radio Galaxies (HzRGs), suggesting a link between these classes of object. However, the optical and infrared faintness of IFRS makes their study diffcult. So far, no redshift is known for an original IFRS which would help to put IFRS in the context of other classes of object, especially of HzRGs. Aims. This work tests the hypothesis that IFRS follow the relation between 3.6 um flux density and redshift found for HzRGs. Furthermore, redshifts will enable us to reveal the intrinsic radio and infrared properties of IFRS and we will test the current suggestions that IFRS are high-redshift radio-loud active galactic nuclei. Methods. A sample of IFRS was spectroscopically observed using the Focal Reducer and lo...

  6. Faint Galaxies at the North Galactic Pole: The Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, L.; Pritchet, C. J.; Hertling, G.

    The North Galactic Pole Canada--France--Hawaii Telescope Catalogue of faint galaxies is made available. We provide positions, photometric and structural parameters for more than 50,000 galaxies. The J and F magnitudes were obtained from IIIaJ and IIIaF CFHT prime focus plates respectively. This catalogue have been used in many studies of faint galaxy properties. Galaxy counts, colour distributions and clustering properties of faint galaxies have been obtained with these data. Statistical properties of stars have been studie d as well. For details refer to Infante and Pritchet (1992), Pritchet and Infante (1992), Infante (1994a), Infante (1994b) and Infante and Pritchet (1995). Infante, L. and Pritchet, C.J., 1992, ApJ Suppl. 83, 237. Infante, L., 1994a, AA 282, 353. Infante, L., 1994b, AA Suppl. 107, 413. Infante, L. and Pritchet, C.J., 1995, ApJ 439, 565. Pritchet, C.J. and Infante, L., 1992, ApJ 399, L35.

  7. The faint radio sky: radio astronomy becomes mainstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovani, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Radio astronomy has changed. For years it studied relatively rare sources, which emit mostly non-thermal radiation across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, i.e. radio quasars and radio galaxies. Now, it is reaching such faint flux densities that it detects mainly star-forming galaxies and the more common radio-quiet active galactic nuclei. These sources make up the bulk of the extragalactic sky, which has been studied for decades in the infrared, optical, and X-ray bands. I follow the transformation of radio astronomy by reviewing the main components of the radio sky at the bright and faint ends, the issue of their proper classification, their number counts, luminosity functions, and evolution. The overall "big picture" astrophysical implications of these results, and their relevance for a number of hot topics in extragalactic astronomy, are also discussed. The future prospects of the faint radio sky are very bright, as we will soon be flooded with survey data. This review should be useful to all extragalactic astronomers, irrespective of their favourite electromagnetic band(s), and even stellar astronomers might find it somewhat gratifying.

  8. Discovery of a Faint Old Stellar System at 150 kpc

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, T

    2006-01-01

    We report the detection of a faint old stellar system at $(\\alpha,\\delta)=(194.29^\\circ,~34.32^\\circ)$ (SDSS J1257+3419), based on the spatial distribution of bright red-giant branch stars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4. SDSS J1257+3419 has a half-light radius of $38\\pm 12$ pc and an absolute integrated $V$-magnitude of $M_V=-4.8^{+1.4}_{-1.0}$ mag at a heliocentric distance of $150\\pm 15$ kpc. A comparison between SDSS J1257+3419 and known Galactic halo objects suggests that SDSS J1257+3419 is either (a) a faint and small dwarf galaxy or (b) a faint and widely extended globular cluster. In the former case, SDSS J1257+3419 could represent an entity of a postulated subhalo of the Milky Way. Further photometric and dynamical study of this stellar system is vital to discriminate these possibilities.

  9. First faint dual-field off-axis observations in optical long baseline interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woillez, J.; Wizinowich, P.; Ragland, S. [W. M. Keck Observatory, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Akeson, R.; Millan-Gabet, R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Colavita, M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Eisner, J. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Monnier, J. D. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1090 (United States); Pott, J.-U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Heidelberg, D-69117 (Germany)

    2014-03-10

    Ground-based long baseline interferometers have long been limited in sensitivity in part by the short integration periods imposed by atmospheric turbulence. The first observation fainter than this limit was performed on 2011 January 22 when the Keck Interferometer observed a K = 11.5 target, about 1 mag fainter than its K = 10.3 atmospherically imposed limit; the currently demonstrated limit is K = 12.5. These observations were made possible by the Dual-Field Phase-Referencing (DFPR) instrument, part of the NSF-funded ASTrometry and phase-Referenced Astronomy project; integration times longer than the turbulence time scale are made possible by its ability to simultaneously measure the real-time effects of the atmosphere on a nearby bright guide star and correct for it on the faint target. We present the implementation of DFPR on the Keck Interferometer. Then, we detail its on-sky performance focusing on the accuracy of the turbulence correction and the resulting fringe contrast stability.

  10. First results from Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tilvi, V.; Pirzkal, N.; Malhotra, S.;

    2016-01-01

    in the Faint Infrared Grism Survey (FIGS). These spectra, taken with G102 grism on Hubble Space Telescope (HST), show a significant emission line detection (6{\\sigma}) in multiple observational position angles (PA), with total integrated Ly{\\alpha} line flux of 1.06+/- 0.12 e10-17erg s-1cm-2. The line flux......-redshift AGN yet found. Thus, this observation from the Hubble Space Telescope clearly demonstrates the sensitivity of the FIGS survey, and the capability of grism spectroscopy to study the epoch of reionization....

  11. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, A. D.; Keith, M.; Hobbs, G.; Norris, R. P.; Mao, M. Y.; Middelberg, E.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50 per cent duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  12. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, A D Cameron M J; Norris, R P; Mao, M Y; Middelberg, E

    2011-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50% duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  13. CCD time-resolved photometry of faint cataclysmic variables. III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Steve B.; Szkody, Paula; Kreidl, Tobias J.; Mason, Keith O.; Puchnarewicz, E. M.

    1990-01-01

    CCD time-resolved photometry in V, B, and near-IR for 17 faint cataclysmic variables (CVs) is presented and analyzed. The data are obtained at Kitt Peak National Observatory, the Perkins reflector, Lowell Observatory, and the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos from April-June 1989. The degree of variability and periodicities for the CVs are examined. It is observed that the variability of most of the stars is consistent with CV class behavior. Orbital periods for five CVs are determined, and three potential eclipsing systems are detected.

  14. Serendipitous ALMA detections of faint submm galaxies in SERVS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pallavi; Lacy, Mark; Nyland, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    We present a preliminary ALMA study of faint (ALMA observations. The high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and positional accuracy of ALMA have enabled us to probe the nature of the sub-mJy population by resolving their spatial extents and improving constraints on their SEDS and photometric redshifts. We are building a catalog of sources by searching the ALMA archive for moderate to deep observations in the area covered by SERVS. This study will help us begin to understand the contribution of obscured star formation to the total star formation rate at high redshift and guide future wide-area surveys of submm galaxies with ALMA.

  15. A spectroscopic search for faint secondaries in cataclysmic variables

    CERN Document Server

    Putte, D V; Hawkins, N A; Martin, J S; Smith, Robert Connon

    2003-01-01

    The secondary in cataclysmic variables (CV's) is usually detected by cross-correlation of the CV spectrum with that of a K or M dwarf template, to produce a radial velocity curve. Although this method has demonstrated its power, it has its limits in the case of noisy spectra, such as are found when the secondary is faint. A method of co-adding spectra, called skew mapping, has been proposed in the past. Gradually, examples of its application are being published. Nonetheless, so far no journal article has described the technique in detail. To answer this need, this paper explores in detail the capabilities of skew mapping when determining the amplitude of the radial velocity for faint secondaries. It demonstrates the method's power over techniques that are more conventional, when the signal-to-noise (s/n) ratio is poor. The paper suggests an approach to assessing the quality of results. This leads in the case of the investigated objects to a first tier of results, where we find K2=127+-23 km/s for SY Cnc, K2=1...

  16. Exploring the faint source population at 15.7 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Whittam, Imogen H; Green, David A; Jarvis, Matt J

    2016-01-01

    We discuss our current understanding of the nature of the faint, high-frequency radio sky. The Tenth Cambridge (10C) survey at 15.7 GHz is the deepest high-frequency radio survey to date, covering 12 square degrees to a completeness limit of 0.5 mJy, making it the ideal starting point from which to study this population. In this work we have matched the 10C survey to several lower-frequency radio catalogues and a wide range of multi-wavelength data (near- and far-infrared, optical and X-ray). We find a significant increase in the proportion of flat-spectrum sources at flux densities below 1 mJy - the median radio spectral index between 15.7 GHz and 610 MHz changes from 0.75 for flux densities greater than 1.5 mJy to 0.08 for flux densities less than 0.8 mJy. The multi-wavelength analysis shows that the vast majority (> 94 percent) of the 10C sources are radio galaxies; it is therefore likely that these faint, flat spectrum sources are a result of the cores of radio galaxies becoming dominant at high frequenci...

  17. FIGGS2: An HI survey of extremely faint irregular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Patra, Narendra Nath; Karachentsev, Igor D; Sharina, Margarita E

    2016-01-01

    We present the observations and first results from the FIGGS2 survey. FIGGS2 is an extension of the earlier Faint Irregular Galaxies GMRT survey (FIGGS) towards faint luminosity end. The sample consists of 20 galaxies of which 15 were detected in HI 21cm line using the Giant Meter-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The median blue band magnitude of our sample is ~ -11.6, which is more than one magnitude fainter than earlier FIGGS survey. From our GMRT observations we find that, for many of our sample galaxies, the HI disks are offset from their optical disks. The HI diameters of the FIGGS2 galaxies show a tight correlation with their HI mass. The slope of the correlation is 2.08 +/- 0.20 similar to what is found for FIGGS galaxies. We also find that for almost all galaxies, the HI disks are larger than the optical disks which is a common trend for dwarf or spiral galaxies. The mean value of the ratio of HI to optical diameter is ~ 1.54.

  18. A Tool for Optimizing Observation Planning for Faint Moving Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, Anicia; Bosh, Amanda S.; Levine, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    Observations of small solar system bodies such as trans-Neptunian objects and Centaurs are vital for understanding the basic properties of these small members of our solar system. Because these objects are often very faint, large telescopes and long exposures may be necessary, which can result in crowded fields in which the target of interest may be blended with a field star. For accurate photometry and astrometry, observations must be planned to occur when the target is free of background stars; this restriction results in limited observing windows. We have created a tool that can be used to plan observations of faint moving objects. Features of the tool include estimates of best times to observe (when the object is not too near another object), a finder chart output, a list of possible astrometric and photometric reference stars, and an exposure time calculator. This work makes use of the USNOFS Image and Catalogue Archive operated by the United States Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station (S.E. Levine and D.G. Monet 2000), the JPL Horizons online ephemeris service (Giorgini et al. 1996), the Minor Planet Center's MPChecker (http://cgi.minorplanetcenter.net/cgi-bin/checkmp.cgi), and source extraction software SExtractor (Bertin & Arnouts 1996). Support for this work was provided by NASA SSO grant NNX15AJ82G.

  19. First faint dual-field phase-referenced observations on the Keck interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Woillez, Julien; Akeson, Rachel; Colavita, Mark; Eisner, Josh; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Monnier, John; Pott, Jorg-Uwe; Ragland, Sam; Appleby, Eric; Cooper, Andrew; Felizardo, Claude; Herstein, Jennifer; Martin, Olivier; Medeiros, Drew; Morrison, Douglas; Panteleeva, Tatyana; Smith, Brett; Summers, Kellee; Tsubota, Kevin; Tyau, Colette; Wetherell, Ed

    2012-01-01

    Ground-based long baseline interferometers have long been limited in sensitivity by the short integration periods imposed by atmospheric turbulence. The first observation fainter than this limit was performed on January 22, 2011 when the Keck Interferometer observed a K=11.5 target, about one magnitude fainter than its K=10.3 limit. This observation was made possible by the Dual Field Phase Referencing instrument of the ASTRA project: simultaneously measuring the real-time effects of the atmosphere on a nearby bright guide star, and correcting for it on the faint target, integration time longer than the turbulence time scale are made possible. As a prelude to this demonstration, we first present the implementation of Dual Field Phase Referencing on the interferometer. We then detail its on-sky performance focusing on the accuracy of the turbulence correction, and on the resulting fringe contrast stability. We conclude with a presentation of early results obtained with Laser Guide Star AO and the interferomete...

  20. Do the enigmatic ``Infrared-Faint Radio Sources'' include pulsars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, George; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Keith, Michael; Mao, Minnie; Champion, David

    2009-04-01

    The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) team have surveyed seven square degrees of sky at 1.4GHz. During processing some unexpected infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS sources) were discovered. The nature of these sources is not understood, but it is possible that some of these sources may be pulsars within our own galaxy. We propose to observe the IFRS sources with steep spectral indices using standard search techniques to determine whether or not they are pulsars. A pulsar detection would 1) remove a subset of the IFRS sources from the ATLAS sample so they would not need to be observed with large optical/IR telescopes to find their hosts and 2) be intrinsically interesting as the pulsar would be a millisecond pulsar and/or have an extreme spatial velocity.

  1. Morphology and astrometry of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Randall, Kate; Mao, Minnie; Hales, Christopher

    2008-10-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, are an unexpected class of object discovered in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, ATLAS. They are compact 1.4GHz radio sources with no visible counterparts in co-located (relatively shallow) Spitzer infrared and optical images. We have detected two of these objects with VLBI, indicating the presence of an AGN. These observations and our ATLAS data indicate that IFRS are extended on scales of arcseconds, and we wish to image their morphologies to obtain clues about their nature. These observations will also help us to select optical counterparts from very deep, and hence crowded, optical images which we have proposed. With these data in hand, we will be able to compare IFRS to known object types and to apply for spectroscopy to obtain their redshifts.

  2. A sample of Swift/SDSS faint blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Bernardo; Giommi, Paolo; Turriziani, Sara

    2015-12-01

    We aim here to provide a complete sample of faint (fr ≳ 1 mJy, fx ≳ 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1) blazars and blazar candidates serendipitously discovered in deep Swift images centered on Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). By stacking all available images, we obtain exposures ranging from 104 to more than a million seconds. Since GRBs are thought to explode randomly across the sky, this set of deep fields can be considered as an unbiased survey of ≈ 12 square degrees of extragalactic sky, with sensitivities reaching a few 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 in the 0.5-2 keV band. We then derive the x-ray Log N Log S and show that, considering that our sample may be contaminated by sources other than blazars, we are in agreement with previous estimations based on data and simulations.

  3. Very faint X-ray binaries with XMM-Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas Padilla, M.

    2016-06-01

    A population of very faint X-ray binaries has been discovered in the last years thanks to the improvement in sensitivity and resolution of the new generations of X-ray missions. These systems show anomalously low luminosities, below 10^{36} ergs/sec, challenging our understanding of accretion physics and binary evolution models, and thereby opening new windows for both observational and theoretical work on accretion onto compact objects. XMM-Newton is playing a crucial role in the study of this dim family of objects thanks to its incomparable spectral capabilities at low luminosities. I will review the state-of-the-art of the field and present our XMM results in both black hole and neutron star objects. Finally, I will discuss the possibilities that the new generation of X-ray telescopes offer for this research line.

  4. Abundance ratios of red giants in low mass ultra faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    François, P; Bonifacio, P; Bidin, C Moni; Geisler, D; Sbordone, L

    2015-01-01

    Low mass dwarf spheroidal galaxies are key objects for our understanding of the chemical evolution of the pristine Universe and the Local Group of galaxies. Abundance ratios in stars of these objects can be used to better understand their star formation and chemical evolution. We report on the analysis of a sample of 11 stars belonging to 5 different ultra faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies (UfDSph) based on X-Shooter spectra obtained at the VLT. Medium resolution spectra have been used to determine the detailed chemical composition of their atmosphere. We performed a standard 1D LTE analysis to compute the abundances. Considering all the stars as representative of the same population of low mass galaxies, we found that the [alpha/Fe] ratios vs [Fe/H] decreases as the metallicity of the star increases in a way similar to what is found for the population of stars belonging to dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The main difference is that the solar [alpha/Fe] is reached at a much lower metallicity for the UfDSph than the ...

  5. The radio properties of infrared-faint radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Middelberg, Enno; Hales, Christopher A; Seymour, Nick; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Huynh, Minh T; Lenc, Emil; Mao, Minnie Y

    2010-01-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects that have flux densities of several mJy at 1.4GHz, but that are invisible at 3.6um when using sensitive Spitzer observations with uJy sensitivities. Their nature is unclear and difficult to investigate since they are only visible in the radio. High-resolution radio images and comprehensive spectral coverage can yield constraints on the emission mechanisms of IFRS and can give hints to similarities with known objects. We imaged a sample of 17 IFRS at 4.8GHz and 8.6GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to determine the structures on arcsecond scales. We added radio data from other observing projects and from the literature to obtain broad-band radio spectra. We find that the sources in our sample are either resolved out at the higher frequencies or are compact at resolutions of a few arcsec, which implies that they are smaller than a typical galaxy. The spectra of IFRS are remarkably steep, with a median spectral index of -1.4 and a prominent lack of spec...

  6. VLBI observations of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, Enno; Phillips, Chris; Norris, Ray; Tingay, Steven

    2006-10-01

    We propose to observe a small sample of radio sources from the ATLAS project (ATLAS = Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) with the LBA, to determine their compactness and map their structures. The sample consists of three radio sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubbed Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations: we will map their structure to test whether they resemble core-jet or double-lobed morphologies, and we will measure the flux densities on long baselines, to determine their compactness. Previous snapshot-style LBA observations of two other IFRS yielded no detections, hence we propose to use disk-based recording with 512 Mbps where possible, for highest sensitivity. With the observations proposed here, we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from two to five, soon allowing us to draw general conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  7. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Bazin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence.

  8. HST NICMOS snapshot survey of faint galaxies at z < 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, S.; Im, M.; DEEP Team

    2000-12-01

    During Cycle 7 HST observations, we have obtained NICMOS H-band images of faint field galaxies for which both HST morphological information (in V and/or I) and spectroscopic redshifts are available. The purpose of the NICMOS observation is to provide their morphology in rest frame NIR wavelengths (8000 - 16000 Å), where the effect of dust extinction is less severe, and to obtain their near infrared (NIR) colors. The objects in our field are partly contained in the Groth Strip being studied in detail by the DEEP team. In addition, we have made use of a software package called GIM2D (Simard et al. 2001). This package is designed to perform detailed 2-dimensional decompositions for images of distant galaxies. Using this software, we have obtained structural parameters for the objects in the H-band to complement those parameters in V and I. We will present: i) color gradients inside elliptical galaxies to test models of their formation; ii) the effect of dust extinction on the properties of field galaxies at 0 < z < 1; iii) evolution of V-H, and V-I colors of bulges as well as the B/T ratio of spiral galaxies as a function of redshift; iv) morphological k-correction. The median redshift of our sample is z ~ 0.5 and this corresponds to about one half of the current age of the universe. This work is supported by the STScI grant GO-07895.02-96A.

  9. SUPERNOVA 2003ie WAS LIKELY A FAINT TYPE IIP EVENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sergeev, Sergey G., E-mail: iair.arcavi@weizmann.ac.il [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, P/O Nauchny, Crimea 98409 (Ukraine)

    2013-04-15

    We present new photometric observations of supernova (SN) 2003ie starting one month before discovery, obtained serendipitously while observing its host galaxy. With only a weak upper limit derived on the mass of its progenitor (<25 M{sub Sun }) from previous pre-explosion studies, this event could be a potential exception to the ''red supergiant (RSG) problem'' (the lack of high-mass RSGs exploding as Type IIP SNe). However, this is true only if SN2003ie was a Type IIP event, something which has never been determined. Using recently derived core-collapse SN light-curve templates, as well as by comparison to other known SNe, we find that SN2003ie was indeed a likely Type IIP event. However, with a plateau magnitude of {approx} - 15.5 mag, it is found to be a member of the faint Type IIP class. Previous members of this class have been shown to arise from relatively low-mass progenitors (<12 M{sub Sun }). It therefore seems unlikely that this SN had a massive RSG progenitor. The use of core-collapse SN light-curve templates is shown to be helpful in classifying SNe with sparse coverage. These templates are likely to become more robust as large homogeneous samples of core-collapse events are collected.

  10. Helium shells and faint emission lines from slitless flash spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazin, Cyril; Koutchmy, Serge

    2013-05-01

    At the time of the two last solar total eclipses of August 1st, 2008 in Siberia and July 11th, 2010 in French Polynesia, high frame rate CCD flash spectra were obtained. These eclipses occurred in quiet Sun period and after. The slitless flash spectra show two helium shells, in the weak Paschen α 4686 Å line of the ionized helium HeII and in the neutral helium HeI line at 4713 Å. The extensions of these helium shells are typically 3 Mm. In prominences, the extension of the interface with the corona is much more extended. The observations and analysis of these lines can properly be done only in eclipse conditions, when the intensity threshold reaches the coronal level, and the parasitic scattered light is virtually zero. Under the layers of 1 Mm above the limb, many faint low FIP lines were also seen in emission. These emission lines are superposed on the continuum containing absorption lines. The solar limb can be defined using the weak continuum appearing between the emission lines at the time of the second and third contact. The variations of the singly ionized iron line, the HeI and HeII lines and the continuum intensity are analyzed. The intensity ratio of ionized to neutral helium is studied for evaluating the ionization rate in low layers up to 2 Mm and also around a prominence.

  11. Distribution of Faint Atomic Gas in Hickson Compact Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Heckman, Timothy M; Zhu, Guangtun; Braatz, James A

    2015-01-01

    We present 21cm HI observations of four Hickson Compact Groups with evidence for a substantial intragroup medium using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). By mapping H I emission in a region of 25$^{\\prime}\\times$25$^{\\prime}$ (140-650 kpc) surrounding each HCG, these observations provide better estimates of HI masses. In particular, we detected 65% more \\HI than that detected in the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) imaging of HCG92. We also identify if the diffuse gas has the same spatial distribution as the high-surface brightness (HSB) HI features detected in the VLA maps of these groups by comparing the HI strengths between the observed and modeled masses based on VLA maps. We found that the HI observed with the GBT to have a similar spatial distribution as the HSB structures in HCGs 31 and 68. Conversely, the observed HI distributions in HCGs44 and 92 were extended and showed significant offsets from the modeled masses. Most of the faint gas in HCG44 lies to the Northeast-Southwest region...

  12. Radio faint AGN: a tale of two populations

    CERN Document Server

    Padovani, P; Kellermann, K I; Miller, N; Mainieri, V; Tozzi, P

    2015-01-01

    We study the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDFS) Very Large Array sample, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 32.5 microJy at the field centre and redshift ~ 4, and covers ~ 0.3 deg^2. Number counts are presented for the whole sample while the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions are derived for active galactic nuclei (AGN). The faint radio sky contains two totally distinct AGN populations, characterised by very different evolutions, luminosity functions, and Eddington ratios: radio-quiet (RQ)/radiative-mode, and radio-loud/jet-mode AGN. The radio power of RQ AGN evolves ~ (1+z)^2.5, similarly to star-forming galaxies, while the number density of radio-loud ones has a peak at ~ 0.5 and then declines at higher redshifts. The number density of radio-selected RQ AGN is consistent with that of X-ray selected AGN, which shows that we are sampling the same population. The unbiased fraction of radiative-mode RL AGN, derived from our own and previously published data, is a strong funct...

  13. Improved γ/hadron separation for the detection of faint γ-ray sources using boosted decision trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Maria; Pueschel, Elisa; Maier, Gernot

    2017-03-01

    Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes record an enormous number of cosmic-ray background events. Suppressing these background events while retaining γ-rays is key to achieving good sensitivity to faint γ-ray sources. The differentiation between signal and background events can be accomplished using machine learning algorithms, which are already used in various fields of physics. Multivariate analyses combine several variables into a single variable that indicates the degree to which an event is γ-ray-like or cosmic-ray-like. In this paper we will focus on the use of "boosted decision trees" for γ/hadron separation. We apply the method to data from the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS), and demonstrate an improved sensitivity compared to the VERITAS standard analysis.

  14. The radio properties of infrared-faint radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Hales, C. A.; Seymour, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Huynh, M. T.; Lenc, E.; Mao, M. Y.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects that have flux densities of several mJy at 1.4 GHz, but that are invisible at 3.6 μm when using sensitive Spitzer observations with μJy sensitivities. Their nature is unclear and difficult to investigate since they are only visible in the radio. Aims: High-resolution radio images and comprehensive spectral coverage can yield constraints on the emission mechanisms of IFRS and can give hints to similarities with known objects. Methods: We imaged a sample of 17 IFRS at 4.8 GHz and 8.6 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to determine the structures on arcsecond scales. We added radio data from other observing projects and from the literature to obtain broad-band radio spectra. Results: We find that the sources in our sample are either resolved out at the higher frequencies or are compact at resolutions of a few arcsec, which implies that they are smaller than a typical galaxy. The spectra of IFRS are remarkably steep, with a median spectral index of -1.4 and a prominent lack of spectral indices larger than -0.7. We also find that, given the IR non-detections, the ratio of 1.4 GHz flux density to 3.6 μm flux density is very high, and this puts them into the same regime as high-redshift radio galaxies. Conclusions: The evidence that IFRS are predominantly high-redshift sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) is strong, even though not all IFRS may be caused by the same phenomenon. Compared to the rare and painstakingly collected high-redshift radio galaxies, IFRS appear to be much more abundant, but less luminous, AGN-driven galaxies at similar cosmological distances.

  15. Kinematics and chemistry of faint high latitude dwarf carbon stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jinmi; Beers, Timothy C.; Dietz, Sarah; Lee, Young Sun; Placco, Vinicius M.

    2017-01-01

    The diffuse halo system of the Milky Way is complex, and has been shown to comprise at least two main components: a near-zero net rotation inner-halo and a more rapidly rotating outer-halo component. Studies of the ancient, very metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo system are crucial for understanding its early formation history. The so-called carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars are an important subset of the stars in the halo system, which exhibit distinctive kinematic and chemical signatures that can be used to constrain the star-formation histories and assembly of the various Galactic components.We have examined the sample of main-sequence dwarf and other faint high Galactic latitude carbon-enhanced stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey studied by Green (2013). As noted by Green, many of these starsexhibit high proper motions, which have been later claimed to be related to possible binary ejection models Plant et al. (2016). By use of the CEMP sub-classification approach of Yoon et al. (2016), we investigate whether the kinematics of these stars might instead result from their membership in the inner/outer halo populations of the Galaxy.ReferencesGreen, P. 2013, ApJ, 765, 12Plant, K. et al. 2016, AAS 227.34115Yoon, J. et al. 2016, ApJ, in pressAcknowledgementThis work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1430152 (JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements).

  16. Near-infrared imaging survey of faint companions around young dwarfs in the Pleiades cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoichi Itoh; Yumiko Oasa; Hitoshi Funayama; Masahiko Hayashi; Misato Fukagawa; Toshio Hashiguchi; Thayne Currie

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a near-infrared imaging survey of 11 young dwarfs in the Pleiades cluster using the Subaru Telescope and the near-infrared coronagraph imager.We found ten faint point sources, with magnitudes as faint as 20 mag in the K-band,with around seven dwarfs. Comparison with the Spitzer archive images revealed that a pair of the faint sources around V 1171 Tau is very red in infrared wavelengths, which indicates very low-mass young stellar objects. However, the results of our follow-up proper motion measurements implied that the central star and the faint sources do not share common proper motions, suggesting that they are not physically associated.

  17. FIREBALL: the Faint Intergalactic medium Redshifted Emission Balloon: overview and first science flight results

    OpenAIRE

    Milliard, Bruno; Martin, D. Christopher; Schiminovich, David; Evrard, Jean; Matuszewski, Matt; Rahman, Shahinur; Tuttle, Sarah; McLean, Ryan; Deharveng, Jean-Michel; Mirc, Frederi; Grange, Robert; Chave, Robert

    2010-01-01

    FIREBALL (the Faint Intergalactic Redshifted Emission Balloon) is a balloon-borne 1m telescope coupled to an ultraviolet fiber-fed spectrograph. FIREBALL is designed to study the faint and diffuse emission of the intergalactic medium, until now detected primarily in absorption. FIREBALL is a path finding mission to test new technology and make new constraints on the temperature and density of this gas. We report on the first successful science flight of FIREBALL, in June 2009, which proved ev...

  18. Image Stacking Method Application for Low Earth Orbit Faint Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kurosaki, H.; Oda, H.; Kitazawa, Y.; Hanada, T.

    2013-09-01

    Space situational awareness is one of the most important actions for safe and sustainable space development and its utilization. Tracking and maintaining debris catalog are the basis of the actions. Current minimum size of objects in the catalog that routinely tracked and updated is approximately 10 cm in the Low Earth Orbit region. This paper proposes collaborative observation of space-based sensors and ground facilities to improve tracking capability in low Earth orbit. This observation geometry based on role-sharing idea. A space-based sensor has advantage in sensitivity and observation opportunity however, it has disadvantages in periodic observation which is essential for catalog maintenance. On the other hand, a ground facility is inferior to space-based sensors in sensitivity however; observation network composed of facilities has an advantage in periodic observation. Whole observation geometry is defined as follows; 1) space-based sensors conduct initial orbit estimation for a target 2) ground facility network tracks the target based on estimated orbit 3) the network observes the target periodically and updates its orbit information. The second phase of whole geometry is based on image stacking method developed by the Japan aerospace exploration agency and this method is verified for objects in geostationary orbit. This method enables to detect object smaller than a nominal size limitation by stacking faint light spot along archived time-series frames. The principle of this method is prediction and searching target's motion on the images. It is almost impossible to apply the method to objects in Low Earth Orbit without proper orbit information because Low Earth Orbit objects have varied orbital characteristics. This paper discusses whether or not initial orbit estimation results given by space-based sensors have enough accuracy to apply image stacking method to Low Earth Orbit objects. Ground-based observation procedure is assumed as being composed of

  19. Spitzer ultra faint survey program (surfs up). I. An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradač, Maruša; Huang, Kuang-Han; Cain, Benjamin; Hall, Nicholas; Lubin, Lori [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Ryan, Russell; Casertano, Stefano [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lemaux, Brian C. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Schrabback, Tim; Hildebrandt, Hendrik [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Auf Dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Gonzalez, Anthony H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Allen, Steve; Von der Linden, Anja [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); Gladders, Mike [The University of Chicago, The Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, 933 East 56th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Hinz, Joannah; Zaritsky, Dennis [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Treu, Tommaso, E-mail: marusa@physics.ucdavis.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Spitzer UltRa Faint SUrvey Program is a joint Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescope Exploration Science program using 10 galaxy clusters as cosmic telescopes to study z ≳ 7 galaxies at intrinsically lower luminosities, enabled by gravitational lensing, than blank field surveys of the same exposure time. Our main goal is to measure stellar masses and ages of these galaxies, which are the most likely sources of the ionizing photons that drive reionization. Accurate knowledge of the star formation density and star formation history at this epoch is necessary to determine whether these galaxies indeed reionized the universe. Determination of the stellar masses and ages requires measuring rest-frame optical light, which only Spitzer can probe for sources at z ≳ 7, for a large enough sample of typical galaxies. Our program consists of 550 hr of Spitzer/IRAC imaging covering 10 galaxy clusters with very well-known mass distributions, making them extremely precise cosmic telescopes. We combine our data with archival observations to obtain mosaics with ∼30 hr exposure time in both 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm in the central 4' × 4' field and ∼15 hr in the flanking fields. This results in 3σ sensitivity limits of ∼26.6 and ∼26.2 AB magnitudes for the central field in the IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, respectively. To illustrate the survey strategy and characteristics we introduce the sample, present the details of the data reduction and demonstrate that these data are sufficient for in-depth studies of z ≳ 7 sources (using a z = 9.5 galaxy behind MACS J1149.5+2223 as an example). For the first cluster of the survey (the Bullet Cluster) we have released all high-level data mosaics and IRAC empirical point-spread function models. In the future we plan to release these data products for the entire survey.

  20. Spectrum from Faint Galaxy IRAS F00183-7111

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has detected the building blocks of life in the distant universe, albeit in a violent milieu. Training its powerful infrared eye on a faint object located at a distance of 3.2 billion light-years, Spitzer has observed the presence of water and organic molecules in the galaxy IRAS F00183-7111. With an active galactic nucleus, this is one of the most luminous galaxies in the universe, rivaling the energy output of a quasar. Because it is heavily obscured by dust (see visible-light image in the inset), most of its luminosity is radiated at infrared wavelengths.The infrared spectrograph instrument onboard Spitzer breaks light into its constituent colors, much as a prism does for visible light. The image shows a low-resolution spectrum of the galaxy obtained by the spectrograph at wavelengths between 4 and 20 microns. Spectra are graphical representations of a celestial object's unique blend of light. Characteristic patterns, or fingerprints, within the spectra allow astronomers to identify the object's chemical composition and to determine such physical properties as temperature and density.The broad depression in the center of the spectrum denotes the presence of silicates (chemically similar to beach sand) in the galaxy. An emission peak within the bottom of the trough is the chemical signature for molecular hydrogen. The hydrocarbons (orange) are organic molecules comprised of carbon and hydrogen, two of the most common elements on Earth. Since it has taken more than three billion years for the light from the galaxy to reach Earth, it is intriguing to note the presence of organics in a distant galaxy at a time when life is thought to have started forming on our home planet.Additional features in the spectrum reveal the presence of water ice (blue), carbon dioxide ice (green) and carbon monoxide (purple) in both gas and solid forms. The magenta peak corresponds to singly ionized neon gas, a spectral line often used by astronomers as a

  1. Group Problem Solving

    CERN Document Server

    Laughlin, Patrick R

    2011-01-01

    Experimental research by social and cognitive psychologists has established that cooperative groups solve a wide range of problems better than individuals. Cooperative problem solving groups of scientific researchers, auditors, financial analysts, air crash investigators, and forensic art experts are increasingly important in our complex and interdependent society. This comprehensive textbook--the first of its kind in decades--presents important theories and experimental research about group problem solving. The book focuses on tasks that have demonstrably correct solutions within mathematical

  2. Creative Problem Solving

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳科来

    2016-01-01

    There have considerable number of design philosophies and design methods in this world,but today I’d like to intorduce a new design problem solving system which comes from Chinese traditonal religion Dao.

  3. Problem Solving and Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    One finding of cognitive research is that people do not automatically acquire usable knowledge by spending lots of time on task. Because students' knowledge hierarchy is more fragmented, "knowledge chunks" are smaller than those of experts. The limited capacity of short term memory makes the cognitive load high during problem solving tasks, leaving few cognitive resources available for metacognition. The abstract nature of the laws of physics and the chain of reasoning required to draw meaningful inferences makes these issues critical. In order to help students, it is crucial to consider the difficulty of a problem from the perspective of students. We are developing and evaluating interactive problem-solving tutorials to help students in the introductory physics courses learn effective problem-solving strategies while solidifying physics concepts. The self-paced tutorials can provide guidance and support for a variety of problem solving techniques, and opportunity for knowledge and skill acquisition.

  4. Solving tooth sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    Solving tooth sensitivity requires both you and the patients to be resilient and to understand that if one approach doesn't work, you can try another one that is non-invasive or, at worst, minimally invasive. Much like the clinician who posted the original question, I strongly believe that it is our responsibility to convince patients that jumping to a radical solution could be totally unnecessary--and expensive-- and still might not solve the problem.

  5. An investigation on solving cooperative problem solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Sadat Abtahi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important techniques to improve teaching skills is to use cooperative problem solving (CPS approach. Implementing CPS techniques in elementary schools helps us train more creative generations. This paper presents an empirical investigation to find out how much elementary teachers use CPS techniques at different schools located in city of Zanjan, Iran. The study designs a questionnaire and distributes it among 90 volunteers out of 120 teachers who were enrolled in elementary schools. The study analyzes the data using some basic statistics and the result indicates that teachers maintain an average CPS score of 39.37, which is well above the average level. The study provides some guidelines for exploring teachers CPS’s capabilities.

  6. Study on the faint star extraction technology with MEMS gyro aided APS star tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Fei; Zhao, Borui; Sun, Ting; Xu, Wei; You, Zheng

    2013-08-01

    Star tracker is the most accurate attitude sensor for satellite. Generally speaking, the higher the accuracy, the fainter the star can be sensed by the star tracker. How to extract the faint star from a star image is becoming a critical technology in dynamic condition for star tracker, especially using the APS (Active Pixels Sensor) detector. A novel APS star tracker with MEMS Gyroscope aided system was proposed in this paper that could extremely improve the detection effect and capability for the faint stars. During the exposure time of star tracker, the trajectory of star projection on the detector maybe occupy more than ten pixels due to the satellite rotation. In this situation, the signal-to-noise ratio will decline sharply, and the traditional star extraction method for faint star will take no effect. As a result, the accuracy of star tracker would decline sharply, even more, couldn't work. Using the MEMS Gyroscope, the track of star projection can be predicated and measured, on the basis of which the deconvolution algorithm could be taken to recover the faint star signal. The accuracy of the star projection centroid could be improved obviously, and the dynamic performance of the star tracker would be improved by a magnitude. Meanwhile, the MEMS gyroscope has not less volume, mass and power consumption, which make it more suitable for the application of APS star tracker.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 72 faint CV candidates in CRTS (Breedt+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedt, E.; Gansicke, B. T.; Drake, A. J.; Rodriguez-Gil, P.; Parsons, S. G.; Marsh, T. R.; Szkody, P.; Schreiber, M. R.; Djorgovski, S. G.

    2016-04-01

    We obtained identification spectra of a total of 72 faint CV candidates identified by the CRTS, using the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC; La Palma, Spain) and the Gemini telescopes (North: Mauna Kea, Hawaii and South: Cerro Pachon, Chile). The observations were carried out in service mode during 2010, 2011 and 2013. (5 data files).

  8. On the dearth of ultra-faint extremely metal poor galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, J Sanchez; Vecchia, C Dalla; Skillman, E D

    2016-01-01

    Local extremely metal-poor (XMP) galaxies are of particular astrophysical interest since they allow us to look into physical processes characteristic of the early Universe, from the assembly of galaxy disks to the formation of stars in conditions of low metallicity. Given the luminosity-metallicity relationship, all galaxies fainter than Mr < -13 are expected to be XMPs. Therefore, XMPs should be common in galaxy surveys. However, they are not, because several observational biases hamper their detection. This work compares the number of faint XMPs in the SDSS-DR7 spectroscopic survey with the expected number, given the known biases and the observed galaxy luminosity function. The faint end of the luminosity function is poorly constrained observationally, but it determines the expected number of XMPs. Surprisingly, the number of observed faint XMPs (around 10) is over-predicted by our calculation, unless the upturn in the faint end of the luminosity function is not present in the model. The lack of an uptur...

  9. On the Dearth of Ultra-faint Extremely Metal-poor Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Almeida, J.; Filho, M. E.; Dalla Vecchia, C.; Skillman, E. D.

    2017-02-01

    Local extremely metal-poor galaxies (XMPs) are of particular astrophysical interest since they allow us to look into physical processes characteristic of the early universe, from the assembly of galaxy disks to the formation of stars in conditions of low metallicity. Given the luminosity–metallicity relationship, all galaxies fainter than Mr ≃ ‑13 are expected to be XMPs. Therefore, XMPs should be common in galaxy surveys. However, they are not common, because several observational biases hamper their detection. This work compares the number of faint XMPs in the SDSS-DR7 spectroscopic survey with the expected number, given the known biases and the observed galaxy luminosity function (LF). The faint end of the LF is poorly constrained observationally, but it determines the expected number of XMPs. Surprisingly, the number of observed faint XMPs (∼10) is overpredicted by our calculation, unless the upturn in the faint end of the LF is not present in the model. The lack of an upturn can be naturally understood if most XMPs are central galaxies in their low-mass dark matter halos, which are highly depleted in baryons due to interaction with the cosmic ultraviolet background and to other physical processes. Our result also suggests that the upturn toward low luminosity of the observed galaxy LF is due to satellite galaxies.

  10. Faint Tidal Features in Galaxies within the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Wide Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Atkinson, Adam M; Ferguson, Annette M N

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the detectability of faint tidal features in galaxies from the wide-field component of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. Our sample consists of 1781 luminous M_r10^10.5 M_sun, and red galaxies are twice as likely to show tidal features than are blue galaxies.

  11. A Catalog of Faint Interacting Galaxies in Pairs and Groups: Erratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Duilia F.; Infante, Leopoldo; Menanteau, Felipe

    In the paper ``A Catalog of Faint Interacting Galaxies in Pairs and Groups'' by Duília F. de Mello, Leopoldo Infante, and Felipe Menanteau (ApJS, 108, 99 [1997]), a correction should be made to Table 2. No sextet was found in this survey. The total number of groups is 29.

  12. DISCOVERY OF A FAINT QUASAR AT z ∼ 6 AND IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMIC REIONIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yongjung; Im, Myungshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Duho; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Building 45, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Minjin; Park, Won-Kee [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Karouzos, Marios [Astronomy Program, FPRD, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hoon [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Pak, Soojong, E-mail: yjkim@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr [School of Space Research and Institute of Natural Sciences, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-10

    Recent studies suggest that faint active galactic nuclei may be responsible for the reionization of the universe. Confirmation of this scenario requires spectroscopic identification of faint quasars (M{sub 1450} > −24 mag) at z ≳ 6, but only a very small number of such quasars have been spectroscopically identified so far. Here, we report the discovery of a faint quasar IMS J220417.92+011144.8 at z ∼ 6 in a 12.5 deg{sup 2} region of the SA22 field of the Infrared Medium-deep Survey (IMS). The spectrum of the quasar shows a sharp break at ∼8443 Å, with emission lines redshifted to z = 5.944 ± 0.002 and rest-frame ultraviolet continuum magnitude M{sub 1450} = −23.59 ± 0.10 AB mag. The discovery of IMS J220417.92+011144.8 is consistent with the expected number of quasars at z ∼ 6 estimated from quasar luminosity functions based on previous observations of spectroscopically identified low-luminosity quasars. This suggests that the number of M{sub 1450} ∼ −23 mag quasars at z ∼ 6 may not be high enough to fully account for the reionization of the universe. In addition, our study demonstrates that faint quasars in the early universe can be identified effectively with a moderately wide and deep near-infrared survey such as the IMS.

  13. Faint laser pulses versus a single-photon source in free space quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molotkov, S. N.; Potapova, T. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this letter we present estimates for the distance of secret key transmission through free space for three different protocols of quantum key distribution: for BB84 and phase time-coding protocols in the case of a strictly single-photon source, and for the relativistic quantum key distribution protocol in the case of faint laser pulses.

  14. Signs of a faint disc population at polluted white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Bergfors, Carolina; Dufour, Patrick; Rocchetto, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Observations of atmospheric metals and dust discs around white dwarfs provide important clues to the fate of terrestrial planetary systems around intermediate mass stars. We present Spitzer IRAC observations of 15 metal polluted white dwarfs to investigate the occurrence and physical properties of circumstellar dust created by the disruption of planetary bodies. We find subtle infrared excess emission consistent with warm dust around KUV 15519+1730 and HS 2132+0941, and weaker excess around the DZ white dwarf G245-58, which, if real, makes it the coolest white dwarf known to exhibit a 3.6 micron excess and the first DZ star with a bright disc. All together our data corroborate a picture where 1) discs at metal-enriched white dwarfs are commonplace and most escape detection in the infrared (possibly as narrow rings), 2) the discs are long lived, having lifetimes on the order of 10^6 yr or longer, and 3) the frequency of bright, infrared detectable discs decreases with age, on a timescale of roughly 500 Myr, su...

  15. A Search for Magnesium in Europa's Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Horst, Sarah M

    2013-01-01

    Europa's tenuous atmosphere results from sputtering of the surface. The trace element composition of its atmosphere is therefore related to the composition of Europa's surface. Magnesium salts are often invoked to explain Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer spectra of Europa's surface, thus magnesium may be present in Europa's atmosphere. We have searched for magnesium emission in Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph archival spectra of Europa's atmosphere. Magnesium was not detected and we calculate an upper limit on the magnesium column abundance. This upper limit indicates that either Europa's surface is depleted in magnesium relative to sodium and potassium, or magnesium is not sputtered as efficiently resulting in a relative depletion in its atmosphere.

  16. The Stability of Hydrogen-Rich Atmospheres of Earth-Like Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding hydrogen escape is essential to understanding the limits to habitability, both for liquid water where the Sun is bright, but also to assess the true potential of H2 as a greenhouse gas where the Sun is faint. Hydrogen-rich primary atmospheres of Earth-like planets can result either from gravitational capture of solar nebular gases (with helium), or from impact shock processing of a wide variety of volatile-rich planetesimals (typically accompanied by H2O, CO2, and under the right circumstances, CH4). Most studies of hydrogen escape from planets focus on determining how fast the hydrogen escapes. In general this requires solving hydro- dynamic equations that take into account the acceleration of hydrogen through a critical transonic point and an energy budget that should include radiative heating and cooling, thermal conduction, the work done in lifting the hydrogen against gravity, and the residual heat carried by the hydrogen as it leaves. But for planets from which hydrogen escape is modest or insignificant, the atmosphere can be approximated as hydrostatic, which is much simpler, and for which a relatively full-featured treatment of radiative cooling by embedded molecules, atoms, and ions such as CO2 and H3+ is straightforward. Previous work has overlooked the fact that the H2 molecule is extremely efficient at exciting non-LTE CO2 15 micron emission, and thus that radiative cooling can be markedly more efficient when H2 is abundant. We map out the region of phase space in which terrestrial planets keep hydrogen-rich atmospheres, which is what we actually want to know for habitability. We will use this framework to reassess Tian et al's hypothesis that H2-rich atmospheres may have been rather long-lived on Earth itself. Finally, we will address the empirical observation that rocky planets with thin or negligible atmospheres are rarely or never bigger than 1.6 Earth radii.

  17. Mathematics as Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soifer, Alexander

    This book contains about 200 problems. It is suggested that it be used by students, teachers or anyone interested in exploring mathematics. In addition to a general discussion on problem solving, there are problems concerned with number theory, algebra, geometry, and combinatorics. (PK)

  18. Electric Current Solves Mazes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrinhac, Simon

    2014-01-01

    We present in this work a demonstration of the maze-solving problem with electricity. Electric current flowing in a maze as a printed circuit produces Joule heating and the right way is instantaneously revealed with infrared thermal imaging. The basic properties of electric current can be discussed in this context, with this challenging question:…

  19. Simon on problem solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2006-01-01

    as a general approach to problem solving. We apply these Simonian ideas to organisational issues, specifically new organisational forms. Specifically, Simonian ideas allow us to develop a morphology of new organisational forms and to point to some design problems that characterise these forms....

  20. Problem Solving Techniques Seminar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This booklet is one of six texts from a workplace literacy curriculum designed to assist learners in facing the increased demands of the workplace. Six problem-solving techniques are developed in the booklet to assist individuals and groups in making better decisions: problem identification, data gathering, data analysis, solution analysis,…

  1. Solving Problems through Circles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahamslaw, Laura; Henson, Lisa H.

    2015-01-01

    Several problem-solving interventions that utilise a "circle" approach have been applied within the field of educational psychology, for example, Circle Time, Circle of Friends, Sharing Circles, Circle of Adults and Solution Circles. This research explored two interventions, Solution Circles and Circle of Adults, and used thematic…

  2. Six Sigma: not for the faint of heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Anthony R

    2003-01-01

    Six Sigma is an excellent quality and performance improvement tool. Like any tool, the results of using it are highly dependent on whether you use it with competence and on the right problem. This article will help you decide if your problem is well-suited for a Six Sigma approach and will suggest the optimum approach for planning and implementing Six Sigma methodology. Performance improvement methods can be grouped into two broad categories, based on the problem to be addressed. When the problem is relatively minor and localized, "evolutionary" methods may be suitable (e.g., quality circles, problem-solving staff meetings, continuous quality improvement [CQI], total quality management [TQM]). These tools work best when modest incremental improvements are sought, when major process redesign is not thought to be necessary, and when the avoidance of workplace disruption is desired. Reengineering and Six Sigma are the best-known examples of the "revolutionary" performance improvement methods. These methods should be used when major (drastic, do or die, etc.) improvements are needed. Problems that cross departmental boundaries need these methods. When a process is so dysfunctional that you feel like you need to tear up the standard operating procedure (SOP) and start all over again, you need a revolutionary method. A Six Sigma project requires a major expenditure of money and employee time, and a willingness to make some hard decisions about jobs, employee retention and relationships among stakeholders. An institution's culture should be considered as part of the decision about using Six Sigma. If the institution has a history of making data-driven decisions, or at least has displayed openness to operating in that manner, Six Sigma has a good chance of success. A radiology-driven Six Sigma project should not be undertaken until a comprehensive written description of the scope of the project is approved by the radiology department leadership team and by the appropriate

  3. THE SUBARU HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF FAINT z ∼ 6 QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Furusawa, Hisanori; Niino, Yuu [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Onoue, Masafusa; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Willott, Chris J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Im, Myungshin [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-rho, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hibon, Pascale, E-mail: n.kashikawa@nao.ac.jp [Gemini Observatory, La Serena (Chile)

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ∼ 6 quasars in 6.5 deg{sup 2} utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-z{sub B} ) and (z{sub B} -z{sub R} ) colors, where z{sub B} and z{sub R} are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ∼ 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to z{sub R} < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M {sub 1450} = –23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M {sub 1450} = –22.58 and a narrow Lyα emission with HWHM =427 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman α emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ∼ 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ∼ 6.

  4. Appreciative Problem Solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, David

    2012-01-01

    employee strengths in continuou simprovements of the work system. The research question was: “How can Lean problem solving and Appreciative Inquiry be combined for optimized work system innovation?” The research project was carried out as a co-creation process with close cooperation between researcher......Many industrial production work systems have increased in complexity, and their new business model scompete on innovation, rather than low cost.At a medical device production facility committed to Lean Production, a research project was carried out to use Appreciative Inquiry to better engage...... and participants and was documented by qualitative methods. This paper presents an academic literature review on Appreciative Inquiry and problem solving for continuous improvements that did not reveal successful attempts in combining the two.Both the literature and the empirical study showed one of the main...

  5. Appreciative Problem Solving

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, David

    2012-01-01

    Many industrial production work systems have increased in complexity, and their new business model scompete on innovation, rather than low cost.At a medical device production facility committed to Lean Production, a research project was carried out to use Appreciative Inquiry to better engage employee strengths in continuou simprovements of the work system. The research question was: “How can Lean problem solving and Appreciative Inquiry be combined for optimized work system innovation?”The r...

  6. Creativity and problem Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Victor Valqui Vidal

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes of special relevance for Operational Research workers. Central publications in the area Creativity-Operational Research are shortly reviewed. Some creative tools and the Creative Problem Solving approach are also discussed. Finally, some applications of these concepts and tools are outlined. Some central references are presented for further study of themes related to creativity or creative tools.

  7. Creativity and Problem Solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents some modern and interdisciplinary concepts about creativity and creative processes of special relevance for Operational Research workers. Central publications in the area Creativity-Operational Research are shortly reviewed. Some creative tools and the Creative Problem Solving...... approach are also discussed. Finally, some applications of these concepts and tools are outlined. Some central references are presented for further study of themes related to creativity or creative tools....

  8. A New Faint Milky Way Satellite Discovered in the Pan-STARRS1 3 pi Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Laevens, Benjamin P M; Ibata, Rodrigo A; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bernard, Édouard J; Bell, Eric F; Sesar, Branimir; Ferguson, Annette M N; Schlafly, Edward F; Slater, Colin T; Burgett, William S; Chambers, Kenneth C; Flewelling, Heather; Hodapp, Klaus A; Kaiser, Nicholas; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Lupton, Robert H; Magnier, Eugene A; Metcalfe, Nigel; Morgan, Jeffrey S; Price, Paul A; Tonry, John L; Wainscoat, Richard J; Waters, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of a faint Milky Way satellite, Laevens 2/Triangulum II, found in the Panoramic Survey Telescope And Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS 1) 3 pi imaging data and confirmed with follow-up wide-field photometry from the Large Binocular Cameras. The stellar system, with an absolute magnitude of M_V=-1.8 +/-0.5, a heliocentric distance of 30 +2/-2 kpc, and a half-mass radius of 34 +9/-8 pc, shows remarkable similarity to faint, nearby, small satellites such as Willman 1, Segue 1, Segue 2, and Bo\\"otes II. The discovery of Laevens 2/Triangulum II further populates the region of parameter space for which the boundary between dwarf galaxies and globular clusters becomes tenuous. Follow-up spectroscopy will ultimately determine the nature of this new satellite, whose spatial location hints at a possible connection with the complex Triangulum-Andromeda stellar structures.

  9. Measuring X-ray variability in faint/sparsely-sampled AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Viola, Allevato; Papadakis, Iossif; Ciro, Pinto

    2012-01-01

    We discuss some practical aspects of measuring the variability amplitude of faint and distant active galactic nuclei (AGN), characterized by sparsely sampled lightcurves and low statistic. In such cases the excess variance, commonly used to estimate the intrinsic lightcurve variance, is affected by strong biases and uncertainties since it represents a maximum likelihood variability estimator only for identical/normal distributed measurements errors and uniform sampling. We performed realistic Monte Carlo simulations of AGN lightcurves, reproducing both the sampling pattern and measurement errors typical of multi-epoch deep surveys, such as the XMM-Newton observations of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS), or assuming different sampling patterns that may characterize long surveys with sub-optimal observing conditions. We used the results to estimate our ability to measure the intrinsic source variability as well as to constrain the observing strategy of future X-ray missions studying distant and/or faint AGN ...

  10. The Faint Stellar Object SDSS J1257+3419 is a Dark Matter Dominated System

    CERN Document Server

    Kamaya, Hideyuki

    2007-01-01

    A recent study has revealed SDSS J1257+3419 is either a faint and small dwarf galaxy or a faint and widely extended globular cluster. In this Letter, the author suggests this stellar system is a dwarf spheroidal (dSph). Adopting an observational relation between binding energy and mass of old stellar systems, we derive a relation between mass and size of dSphs by assuming that they are dark matter dominated and virialized objects. Letting half-light radius represent size of SDSS J1257+3419, we find that its mass is $\\sim 7\\times 10^6$ solar mass. This indicates mass-to-light ratio ($M/L$) of SDSS J1257+3419 is about 1000 in the solar unit. This large $M/L$ is expected from a Mateo plot of dSphs. Thus, we insist SDSS J1257+3419 is a dSph.

  11. The faint source population at 15.7 GHz - I. The radio properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whittam, I. H.; Riley, J. M.; Green, D. A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Prandoni, I.; Guglielmino, G.; Morganti, R.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Garrett, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    We have studied a sample of 296 faint (>0.5 mJy) radio sources selected from an area of the Tenth Cambridge (10C) survey at 15.7 GHz in the Lockman Hole. By matching this catalogue to several lower frequency surveys (e.g. including a deep GMRT survey at 610 MHz, a WSRT survey at 1.4 GHz, NVSS, FIRST

  12. Degree of Polarization and Source Counts of Faint Radio Sources from Stacking Polarized Intensity

    OpenAIRE

    Stil, J. M.; Keller, B. W.; George, S. J.; Taylor, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    We present stacking polarized intensity as a means to study the polarization of sources that are too faint to be detected individually in surveys of polarized radio sources. Stacking offers not only high sensitivity to the median signal of a class of radio sources, but also avoids a detection threshold in polarized intensity, and therefore an arbitrary exclusion of source with a low percentage of polarization. Correction for polarization bias is done through a Monte Carlo analysis and tested ...

  13. Studies of the association of faint blue and luminous galaxies using the Hitchhiker parallel camera

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, J B; Phillipps, S; Davies, J I; Morgan, I; Disney, M J

    1996-01-01

    At B magnitudes >~ 24 there is a well-known excess of galaxies (compared to standard models) which is probably due to an (evolving) population of sub-L* galaxies at moderate redshifts (<~ 0.4). One particular hypothesis which is hard to test directly via number counts or even redshift surveys is the possibility that the faint blue galaxies are in fact sub-galactic objects destined to merge by the present day to form current giant galaxies. If this were the case we might expect to find the faint blue galaxies in the vicinity of ~ L* galaxies (at redshifts =~ 0.2 to 0.4) with which they can merge (the blue galaxies are already known to be weakly clustered among themselves, limiting the possibility for multiple mergers of small fragments). In this paper we look for evidence of such clustering of faint blue galaxies around larger systems using candidates chosen photometrically from deep multicolour CCD images using the Hitchhiker parallel camera. A sample of candidate L^\\ast galaxies expected to lie at redshif...

  14. Faint warm debris disks around nearby bright stars explored by AKARI and IRSF

    CERN Document Server

    Ishihara, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Takahiro; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Fujiwara, Hideaki; Onaka, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Context: Debris disks are important observational clues for understanding planetary-system formation process. In particular, faint warm debris disks may be related to late planet formation near 1 AU. A systematic search of faint warm debris disks is necessary to reveal terrestrial planet formation. Aims: Faint warm debris disks show excess emission that peaks at mid-IR wavelengths. Thus we explore debris disks using the AKARI mid-IR all-sky point source catalog (PSC), a product of the second generation unbiased IR all-sky survey. Methods : We investigate IR excess emission for 678 isolated main-sequence stars for which there are 18 micron detections in the AKARI mid-IR all-sky catalog by comparing their fluxes with the predicted fluxes of the photospheres based on optical to near-IR fluxes and model spectra. The near-IR fluxes are first taken from the 2MASS PSC. However, 286 stars with Ks<4.5 in our sample have large flux errors in the 2MASS photometry due to saturation. Thus we have measured accurate J, H...

  15. Galaxy populations in the Antlia cluster - III. Properties of faint early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Castelli, Analia V Smith; Faifer, Favio R; Bassino, Lilia P; Richtler, Tom; Romero, Gisela A; Calderon, Juan Pablo; Caso, Juan Pablo

    2011-01-01

    (Abridge) We present a new analysis of the early-type galaxy population in the central region of the Antlia cluster, focusing on the faint systems like dwarf ellipticals (dE) and dwarf spheroidals (dSph). We confirm 22 early-type galaxies as Antlia members, using GEMINI-GMOS and MAGELLAN-MIKE spectra. Among them, 2 belong to the rare type of compact ellipticals (cE), and 5 are new faint dwarfs that had never been catalogued before. In addition, we present 16 newly identified low surface brightness galaxy candidates, almost half of them displaying morphologies consistent with being Antlia's counterparts of Local Group dSphs, that extend the faint luminosity limit of our study down to MB = -10.1 (BT = 22.6) mag. We built an improved CMR in the Washington photometric system, i.e. integrated T1 magnitudes versus (C - T1) colours, which extends \\sim 4 mag faintwards the limit of spectroscopically confirmed Antlia members. When only confirmed early-type members are considered, this relation extends over 10 mag in l...

  16. On the faint end of the high redshift AGN luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Shankar, F; Shankar, Francesco; Mathur, Smita; Shankar, Francesco; Mathur, Smita

    2007-01-01

    Using the results of recent optical surveys we conclude that the {\\it non}-detection of quasars down to faint magnitudes implies a significant flattening of the high redshift (z~6) optical active galactic nuclei (AGN) luminosity function for M_{1450}>-26.7. We find that all the data are consistent with a faint-end slope for the optical AGN luminosity function of \\beta=-2.2 and \\beta=-2.8, at the 90% and 99% confidence level respectively, flatter than the bright-end slope of \\beta'~ -3.2. We also show that X-ray deep surveys have probed even fainter magnitudes than the optical ones yielding more significant constraints on the shallow faint-end slope of the optical luminosity function. The inclusion of Type II AGN candidates, detected in the Chandra deep fields, hints towards an higher normalization for the total AGN luminosity function, if these sources lie at 5

  17. Eight Ultra-faint Galaxy Candidates Discovered in Year Two of the Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Drlica-Wagner, A; Rykoff, E S; Luque, E; Queiroz, A; Mao, Y -Y; Wechsler, R H; Simon, J D; Santiago, B; Yanny, B; Balbinot, E; Dodelson, S; Neto, A Fausti; James, D J; Li, T S; Maia, M A G; Marshall, J L; Pieres, A; Stringer, K; Walker, A R; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Benoit-Levy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Crocce, M; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Finley, D A; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D W; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Martini, P; Miquel, R; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Reil, K; Roodman, A; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Tucker, D; Vikram, V; Wester, W; Zhang, Y; Zuntz, J

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of eight new ultra-faint dwarf galaxy candidates in the second year of optical imaging data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Six of these candidates are detected at high confidence, while two additional lower-confidence candidates are identified in regions of incomplete or non-uniform survey coverage. The new stellar systems are found using three independent automated search techniques, and are identified as statistically significant overdensities of individually resolved stars consistent with the isochrone and luminosity function of an old and metal-poor simple stellar population. The new systems are faint (Mv > -4.7 mag) and span a broad range of physical sizes (17 pc 27.5 mag arcsec$^2$) consistent with known ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. Roughly half of the DES candidates are more distant, less luminous, and/or have lower surface brightnesses than previously known Milky Way satellite galaxies, and would have had a low probability of detection if observed by the Sloan Digital Sky S...

  18. Double Pendulum: a Second Ultra-faint Milky Way Satellite in the Horologium Constellation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Dongwon

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new ultra-faint Milky Way satellite candidate, Horologium II, detected in the Dark Energy Survey Y1A1 public data. Horologium II features a half light radius of $r_{h}=47\\pm10$ pc and a total luminosity of $M_{V}=-2.6^{+0.2}_{-0.3}$ that place it in the realm of ultra-faint dwarf galaxies on the size-luminosity plane. The stellar population of the new satellite is consistent with an old ($\\sim13.5$ Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H]$\\sim-2.1$) isochrone at a distance modulus of $(m-M)=19.46$, or a heliocentric distance of 78 kpc, in the color-magnitude diagram. Horologium II has a distance similar to the Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxy (79 kpc) and the recently reported ultra-faint satellites Eridanus III (87 kpc) and Horologium I (79 kpc). All four satellites are well aligned on the sky, which suggests a possible common origin. As Sculptor is moving on a retrograde orbit within the Vast Polar Structure when compared to the other classical MW satellite galaxies including the Magellanic ...

  19. Faint disks around classical T Tauri stars: small but dense enough to form planets?

    CERN Document Server

    Piétu, V; di Folco, E; Dutrey, A; Boehler, Y

    2014-01-01

    (abridged) Most Class II sources (of nearby star forming regions) are surrounded by disks with weak millimeter continuum emission. These "faint" disks may hold clues to the disk dissipation mechanism. We attempt to determine the characteristics of such faint disks around classical T Tauri stars, and to explore the link between disk faintness and the proposed disk dispersal mechanisms (accretion, viscous spreading, photo-evaporation, planetary system formation). We performed high-angular resolution (0.3") imaging of a small sample of disks (9 sources) with low 1.3mm continuum flux (mostly <30 mJy) with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer and simultaneously searched for 13CO (or CO) J=2-1 line emission. Using a simple parametric disk model, we determine characteristic sizes of the disks, in dust and gas, and we constrain surface densities in the central 50 AU. All disks are much smaller than the bright disks imaged so far, both in continuum and 13CO lines (5 detections). In continuum, half of the disks a...

  20. Discovery of A Faint Quasar at z~6 and Implications for Cosmic Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Yongjung; Jeon, Yiseul; Kim, Minjin; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Karouzos, Marios; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Duho; Kim, Jae-Woo; Kim, Ji Hoon; Lee, Seong-Kook; Pak, Soojong; Park, Won-Kee; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that faint active galactic nuclei may be responsible for the reionization of the universe. Confirmation of this scenario requires spectroscopic identification of faint quasars ($M_{1450}>-24$ mag) at $z \\gtrsim6$, but only a very small number of such quasars have been spectroscopically identified so far. Here, we report the discovery of a faint quasar IMS J220417.92+011144.8 at z~6 in a 12.5 deg$^{2}$ region of the SA22 field of the Infrared Medium-deep Survey (IMS). The spectrum of the quasar shows a sharp break at $\\sim8443~\\rm{\\AA}$, with emission lines redshifted to $z=5.944 \\pm 0.002$ and rest-frame ultraviolet continuum magnitude $M_{1450}=-23.59\\pm0.10$ AB mag. The discovery of IMS J220417.92+011144.8 is consistent with the expected number of quasars at z~6 estimated from quasar luminosity functions based on previous observations of spectroscopically identified low-luminosity quasars . This suggests that the number of $M_{1450}\\sim-23$ mag quasars at z~6 may not be high enough to...

  1. A peculiar faint satellite in the remote outer halo of M31

    CERN Document Server

    Mackey, Dougal; Martin, Nicolas; Ferguson, Annette; Dotter, Aaron; McConnachie, Alan; Ibata, Rodrigo; Irwin, Mike; Lewis, Geraint; Sakari, Charli; Tanvir, Nial; Venn, Kim

    2013-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope imaging of a newly-discovered faint stellar system, PAndAS-48, in the outskirts of the M31 halo. Our photometry reveals this object to be comprised of an ancient and very metal-poor stellar population with age > 10 Gyr and [Fe/H] < -2.3. Our inferred distance modulus of 24.57 +/- 0.11 confirms that PAndAS-48 is most likely a remote M31 satellite with a 3D galactocentric radius of 149 (+19 -8) kpc. We observe an apparent spread in color on the upper red giant branch that is larger than the photometric uncertainties should allow, and briefly explore the implications of this. Structurally, PAndAS-48 is diffuse, faint, and moderately flattened, with a half-light radius rh = 26 (+4 -3) pc, integrated luminosity Mv = -4.8 +/- 0.5, and ellipticity = 0.30 (+0.08 -0.15). On the size-luminosity plane it falls between the extended globular clusters seen in several nearby galaxies, and the recently-discovered faint dwarf satellites of the Milky Way; however, its characteristics do not...

  2. The Faint End Slopes Of Galaxy Luminosity Functions In The COSMOS 2-Square Degree Field

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Charles T; Mobasher, Bahram; Paglione, Timothy A D; Rich, R Michael; Scoville, Nicholas Z; Tribiano, Shana M; Tyson, Neil D

    2007-01-01

    We examine the faint-end slope of the rest-frame V-band luminosity function (LF), with respect to galaxy spectral type, of field galaxies with redshift z<0.5, using a sample of 80,820 galaxies with photometric redshifts in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. For all galaxy spectral types combined, the LF slope, alpha, ranges from -1.24 to -1.12, from the lowest redshift bin to the highest. In the lowest redshift bin (0.02faint-end slopes grow shallower with increasing redshift; in the highest redshift bin (0.4faint dwarf galaxies, perhaps of l...

  3. The GLARE Survey II. Faint z=6 Ly-alpha Line Emitters in the HUDF

    CERN Document Server

    Stanway, Elizabeth R; Glazebrook, Karl; Abraham, Roberto G; Rhoads, James; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Crampton, David; Colless, Matthew; Chiu, Kuenley; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2007.11469.x

    2008-01-01

    The galaxy population at z~6 has been the subject of intense study in recent years, culminating in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) -- the deepest imaging survey yet. A large number of high redshift galaxy candidates have been identified within the HUDF, but until now analysis of their properties has been hampered by the difficulty of obtaining spectroscopic redshifts for these faint galaxies. Our ''Gemini Lyman-Alpha at Reionisation Era'' (GLARE) project has been designed to undertake spectroscopic follow up of faint (z'5.5, and a further nine possible line emitters with detections at lower significance. We also place tight constraints on the equivalent width of Lyman-alpha emission for a further ten i'-drop galaxies and examine the equivalent width distribution of this faint spectroscopic sample of z~6 galaxies. We find that the fraction of galaxies with little or no emission is similar to that at z~3, but that the z~6 population has a tail of sources with high rest frame equivalent widths. Possible expla...

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Faint Galaxies at the North Galactic Pole (Infante+ 1995)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, L.; Pritchet, C. J.; Hertling, G.

    1998-04-01

    The North Galactic Pole Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Catalogue of faint galaxies is made available. We provide positions, photometric and structural parameters for more than 50000 galaxies. The J and F magnitudes were obtained from IIIaJ and IIIaF CFHT prime focus plates respectively. This catalogue have been used in many studies of faint galaxy properties. Galaxy counts, colour distributions and clustering properties of faint galaxies have been obtained with these data. Statistical properties of stars have been studied as well. For details refer to Infante and Pritchet (1992ApJS...83..237I), Pritchet and Infante (1992ApJ...399L..35P), Infante (1994A&A...282..353), Infante (1994A&AS..107..413I) and Infante and Pritchet (1995ApJ...439..565I). The magnitude errors range from: +/-0.3mag at J=24 to less than +/-0.1 at J=20 +/-0.3mag at F=23 to less than +/-0.1 at F=19 The rms uncertainty in the zero points is 0.022 (J) and 0.038 (F) (1 data file).

  5. An Ultra-Faint Galaxy Candidate Discovered in Early Data from the Magellanic Satellites Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Drlica-Wagner, A; Allam, S; Tucker, D L; Gruendl, R A; Johnson, M D; Walker, A R; James, D J; Nidever, D L; Olsen, K A G; Wechsler, R H; Cioni, M R L; Conn, B C; Kuehn, K; Li, T S; Mao, Y -Y; Martin, N F; Neilsen, E; Noël, N E D; Pieres, A; Simon, J D; Stringfellow, G S; van der Marel, R P; Yanny, B

    2016-01-01

    We report a new ultra-faint stellar system found in Dark Energy Camera data from the first observing run of the Magellanic Satellites Survey (MagLiteS). MagLiteS J0664-5953 (Pictor II or Pic II) is a low surface brightness ({\\mu} = 28.5 mag arcsec$^{-2}$ within its half-light radius) resolved overdensity of old and metal-poor stars located at a heliocentric distance of 45 kpc. The physical size (r$_{1/2}$ = 46 pc) and low luminosity (Mv = -3.2 mag) of this satellite are consistent with the locus of spectroscopically confirmed ultra-faint galaxies. MagLiteS J0664-5953 (Pic II) is located 11.3 kpc from the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and comparisons with simulation results in the literature suggest that this satellite was likely accreted with the LMC. The close proximity of MagLiteS J0664-5953 (Pic II) to the LMC also makes it the most likely ultra-faint galaxy candidate to still be gravitationally bound to the LMC.

  6. Infrared-faint radio sources are at high redshifts. Spectroscopic redshift determination of infrared-faint radio sources using the Very Large Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Sharp, R.; Spitler, L. R.; Parker, Q. A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are characterised by relatively high radio flux densities and associated faint or even absent infrared and optical counterparts. The resulting extremely high radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousands were previously known only for high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs), suggesting a link between the two classes of object. However, the optical and infrared faintness of IFRS makes their study difficult. Prior to this work, no redshift was known for any IFRS in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) fields which would help to put IFRS in the context of other classes of object, especially of HzRGs. Aims: This work aims at measuring the first redshifts of IFRS in the ATLAS fields. Furthermore, we test the hypothesis that IFRS are similar to HzRGs, that they are higher-redshift or dust-obscured versions of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of IFRS was spectroscopically observed using the Focal Reducer and Low Dispersion Spectrograph 2 (FORS2) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The data were calibrated based on the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF) and redshifts extracted from the final spectra, where possible. This information was then used to calculate rest-frame luminosities, and to perform the first spectral energy distribution modelling of IFRS based on redshifts. Results: We found redshifts of 1.84, 2.13, and 2.76, for three IFRS, confirming the suggested high-redshift character of this class of object. These redshifts and the resulting luminosities show IFRS to be similar to HzRGs, supporting our hypothesis. We found further evidence that fainter IFRS are at even higher redshifts. Conclusions: Considering the similarities between IFRS and HzRGs substantiated in this work, the detection of IFRS, which have a significantly higher sky density than HzRGs, increases the number of active galactic nuclei in the early universe and adds to the problems of explaining the formation of

  7. Planning and Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    Artificial Intelig ~ence (Vol. III, edited by Paul R. Cohen and’ Edward A.. Feigenbaum)’, The chapter was written B’ Paul Cohen, with contributions... Artificial Intelligence (Vol. III, edited by Paul R. Cohen and EdWard A. Feigenbaum). The chapter was written by Paul R. Cohen, with contributions by Stephen...Wheevoats"EntermdI’ Planning and Problem ’Solving by Paul R. Cohen Chaptb-rXV-of Volumec III’of the Handbook of Artificial Intelligence edited by Paul R

  8. The history of mass assembly of faint red galaxies in 28 galaxy clusters since z=1.3

    CERN Document Server

    Andreon, S

    2007-01-01

    We measure the relative evolution of the number of bright and faint (as faint as 0.05 L*) red galaxies in a sample of 28 clusters, of which 16 are at 0.50<= z<=1.27, all observed through a pair of filters bracketing the 4000 Angstrom break rest-frame. The abundance of red galaxies, relative to bright ones, is constant over all the studied redshift range, 0faint red galaxies as large as claimed in some past works. Faint red galaxies are largely assembled and in place at z=1.3 and their deficit does not depend on cluster mass, parametrized by velocity dispersion or X-ray luminosity. Our analysis, with respect to previous one, samples a wider redshift range, minimizes systematics and put a more attention to statistical issues, keeping at the same time a large number of clusters.

  9. Solving Differential Equations in R: Package deSolve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetaert, K.E.R.; Petzoldt, T.; Setzer, R.W.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the R package deSolve to solve initial value problems (IVP) written as ordinary differential equations (ODE), differential algebraic equations (DAE) of index 0 or 1 and partial differential equations (PDE), the latter solved using the method of lines approach. The differenti

  10. Solved problems in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Salazar Bloise, Félix; Bayón Rojo, Ana; Gascón Latasa, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the fundamental concepts of electromagnetism through problems with a brief theoretical introduction at the beginning of each chapter. The present book has a strong  didactic character. It explains all the mathematical steps and the theoretical concepts connected with the development of the problem. It guides the reader to understand the employed procedures to learn to solve the exercises independently. The exercises are structured in a similar way: The chapters begin with easy problems increasing progressively in the level of difficulty. This book is written for students of physics and engineering in the framework of the new European Plans of Study for Bachelor and Master and also for tutors and lecturers. .

  11. The Detection of Ultra-faint Low Surface Brightness Dwarf Galaxies in the Virgo Cluster: A Probe of Dark Matter and Baryonic Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Grazian, A.; Fassbender, R.; Fontana, A.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L.

    2015-11-01

    We have discovered 11 ultra-faint (r ≲ 22.1) low surface brightness (LSB, central surface brightness 23 ≲ μr ≲ 26) dwarf galaxy candidates in one deep Virgo field of just 576 arcmin2 obtained by the Large Binocular Camera at the Large Binocular Telescope. Their association with the Virgo cluster is supported by their distinct position in the central surface brightness—total magnitude plane with respect to the background galaxies of similar total magnitude. They have typical absolute magnitudes and scale sizes, if at the distance of Virgo, in the range -13 ≲ Mr ≲ -9 and 250 ≲ rs ≲ 850 pc, respectively. Their colors are consistent with a gradually declining star formation history with a specific star formation rate of the order of 10-11 yr-1, i.e., 10 times lower than that of main sequence star-forming galaxies. They are older than the cluster formation age and appear to be regular in morphology. They represent the faintest extremes of the population of low luminosity LSB dwarfs that has recently been detected in wider surveys of the Virgo cluster. Thanks to the depth of our observations, we are able to extend the Virgo luminosity function down to Mr ˜ -9.3 (corresponding to total masses M ˜ 107 M⊙), finding an average faint-end slope α ≃ -1.4. This relatively steep slope puts interesting constraints on the nature of the dark matter and, in particular, on warm dark matter (WDM) often invoked to solve the overprediction of the dwarf number density by the standard cold dark matter scenario. We derive a lower limit on the WDM particle mass >1.5 keV.

  12. THE DETECTION OF ULTRA-FAINT LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS DWARF GALAXIES IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER: A PROBE OF DARK MATTER AND BARYONIC PHYSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giallongo, E.; Menci, N.; Grazian, A.; Fassbender, R.; Fontana, A.; Paris, D.; Pentericci, L. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    We have discovered 11 ultra-faint (r ≲ 22.1) low surface brightness (LSB, central surface brightness 23 ≲ μ{sub r} ≲ 26) dwarf galaxy candidates in one deep Virgo field of just 576 arcmin{sup 2} obtained by the Large Binocular Camera at the Large Binocular Telescope. Their association with the Virgo cluster is supported by their distinct position in the central surface brightness—total magnitude plane with respect to the background galaxies of similar total magnitude. They have typical absolute magnitudes and scale sizes, if at the distance of Virgo, in the range −13 ≲ M{sub r} ≲ −9 and 250 ≲ r{sub s} ≲ 850 pc, respectively. Their colors are consistent with a gradually declining star formation history with a specific star formation rate of the order of 10{sup −11} yr{sup −1}, i.e., 10 times lower than that of main sequence star-forming galaxies. They are older than the cluster formation age and appear to be regular in morphology. They represent the faintest extremes of the population of low luminosity LSB dwarfs that has recently been detected in wider surveys of the Virgo cluster. Thanks to the depth of our observations, we are able to extend the Virgo luminosity function down to M{sub r} ∼ −9.3 (corresponding to total masses M ∼ 10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙}), finding an average faint-end slope α ≃ −1.4. This relatively steep slope puts interesting constraints on the nature of the dark matter and, in particular, on warm dark matter (WDM) often invoked to solve the overprediction of the dwarf number density by the standard cold dark matter scenario. We derive a lower limit on the WDM particle mass >1.5 keV.

  13. Geochemical and biologic constraints on the Archaean atmosphere and climate – A possible solution to the faint early Sun paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosing, Minik Thorleif; Brid, D. K.; Sleep, N. H.;

    There is ample geological evidence that Earth’s climate resembled the present during the Archaean, despite a much lower solar luminosity. This was cast as a paradox by Sagan and Mullen in 1972. Several solutions to the paradox have been suggested, mostly focusing on adjustments of the radiative p...

  14. Geochemical and biologic constraints on the Archaean atmosphere and climate – A possible solution to the faint early Sun paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosing, Minik Thorleif; Brid, Dennis K.; Sleep, Norman H.

    into account the apparent growth of Earth continents (Collerson and Kamber 1999) and the absence of land vegetation during the Precambrian for the evolution of the surface albedo, and a model for the abundance and properties of clouds that takes into account the lower abundance of biogenic cloud condensation...

  15. DISCOVERY OF A NEW FAINT DWARF GALAXY ASSOCIATED WITH NGC 253

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sand, D. J.; Crnojević, D. [Physics Department, Texas Tech University, Box 41051, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Strader, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Simon, J. D. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Caldwell, N.; McLeod, B. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Seth, A. C., E-mail: david.sand@ttu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    We report the discovery of a new faint dwarf galaxy, which we dub Scl-MM-Dw1, at a projected distance of ∼65 kpc from the spiral galaxy NGC 253. The discovery results from the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS), a program with the Magellan/Megacam imager to study faint substructure in resolved stellar light around massive galaxies outside of the Local Group. We measure a tip of the red giant branch distance to Scl-MM-Dw1 of D = 3.9 ± 0.5 Mpc, consistent with that of NGC 253, making their association likely. The new dwarf's stellar population is complex, with an old, metal-poor red giant branch (≳10 Gyr, [Fe/H] ∼ –2), and an asymptotic giant branch with an age of ∼500 Myr. Scl-MM-Dw1 has a half-light radius of r{sub h} = 340 ± 50 pc and an absolute magnitude of M{sub V}  = –10.3 ± 0.6 mag, comparable to the Milky Way's satellites at the same luminosity. Once complete, our imaging survey of NGC 253 and other nearby massive galaxies will provide a census of faint substructure in halos beyond the Local Group, both to put our own environment into context and to confront models of hierarchical structure formation.

  16. Finding faint H I structure in and around galaxies: Scraping the barrel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punzo, D.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Roerdink, J. B. T. M.

    2016-10-01

    Soon to be operational H I survey instruments such as APERTIF and ASKAP will produce large datasets. These surveys will provide information about the H I in and around hundreds of galaxies with a typical signal-to-noise ratio of ∼10 in the inner regions and ∼1 in the outer regions. In addition, such surveys will make it possible to probe faint H I structures, typically located in the vicinity of galaxies, such as extra-planar-gas, tails and filaments. These structures are crucial for understanding galaxy evolution, particularly when they are studied in relation to the local environment. Our aim is to find optimized kernels for the discovery of faint and morphologically complex H I structures. Therefore, using H I data from a variety of galaxies, we explore state-of-the-art filtering algorithms. We show that the intensity-driven gradient filter, due to its adaptive characteristics, is the optimal choice. In fact, this filter requires only minimal tuning of the input parameters to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of faint components. In addition, it does not degrade the resolution of the high signal-to-noise component of a source. The filtering process must be fast and be embedded in an interactive visualization tool in order to support fast inspection of a large number of sources. To achieve such interactive exploration, we implemented a multi-core CPU (OpenMP) and a GPU (OpenGL) version of this filter in a 3D visualization environment (SlicerAstro).

  17. Dust and Molecular Gas from the Optically Faint Quasars at z 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Carilli, C.; Neri, R.; Riechers, D.; Wagg, J.; Walter, F.; Bertoldi, F.; Omont, A.; Cox, P.; Menten, K.; Fan, X.; Strauss, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present millimeter observations of the twelve z 6 quasars discovered from the SDSS southern survey. These objects are typically one or two magnitudes fainter in the optical (i.e., 20.6 Max Plank Millimeter Bolometer Array (MAMBO) on the IRAM-30m telescope and three of them have been detected. We also searched for Molecular CO (6-5) line emission in the three MAMBO detections with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer and two of them have been detected. The millimeter continuum and CO detections in the optically faint quasars at z 6 reveal strong FIR emission from 40 to 60 K warm dust and highly excited molecular gas in the quasar host galaxies. The molecular gas masses of the two CO detections are all about 10^10 Msun, which are comparable to that of the CO-detected optically bright quasars at z 6. Their FIR-to-CO luminosity ratios are also consistent with that of the previous CO-detected quasars at z 2 to 6 and the dusty starbusrt systems, e.g., the submillimeter galaxies. However, their FIR-to-UV luminosity ratios are higher than that of the millimeter-detected optically bright quasars at z 6. This confirms the shallow nonlinear FIR-to-AGN luminosity relationship found with other AGN-starburst systems at local and high-z universe. All these results suggest massive star formation coeval with rapid black hole accretion in the host galaxies of the millimeter-detected optically faint quasars at z 6. Further high-resolution imaging of the Molecular CO emission (e.g., with ALMA) will be important to measure the dynamical masses of the spheroidal hosts and understand the black hole-bulge relationship of the optically faint quasars at the earliest epoch.

  18. Variable Stars in the Field of the Hydra II Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, A. Katherina; Olsen, Knut; Blum, Robert; Nidever, David L.; Walker, Alistair R.; Martin, Nicolas F.; Besla, Gurtina; Gallart, Carme; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Majewski, Steven R.; Kaleida, Catherine C.; Muñoz, Ricardo R.; Saha, Abhijit; Conn, Blair C.; Jin, Shoko

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of one RR Lyrae star in the ultra-faint satellite galaxy Hydra II based on time series photometry in the g, r and i bands obtained with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile. The association of the RR Lyrae star discovered here with Hydra II is clear because is located at 42\\prime\\prime from the center of the dwarf, well within its half-light radius of 102\\prime\\prime . The RR Lyrae star has a mean magnitude of i=21.30+/- 0.04 which is too faint to be a field halo star. This magnitude translates to a heliocentric distance of 151 ± 8 kpc for Hydra II; this value is ∼ 13% larger than the estimate from the discovery paper based on the average magnitude of several blue horizontal branch star candidates. The new distance implies a slightly larger half-light radius of {76}-10+12 pc and a brighter absolute magnitude of {M}V=-5.1+/- 0.3, which keeps this object within the realm of the dwarf galaxies. A comparison with other RR Lyrae stars in ultra-faint systems indicates similar pulsational properties among them, which are different to those found among halo field stars and those in the largest of the Milky Way satellites. We also report the discovery of 31 additional short period variables in the field of view (RR Lyrae, SX Phe, eclipsing binaries, and a likely anomalous cepheid) which are likely not related with Hydra II.

  19. Infrared Faint Radio Sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh T.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) which have no observable counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE). The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6 to 70 micron) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the SED of these objects shows that they are consistent with high redshift AGN (z > 2).

  20. Evidence for Infrared-faint Radio Sources as z > 1 Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh T.; Norris, Ray P.; Siana, Brian; Middelberg, Enno

    2010-02-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6-70 μm) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the spectral energy distribution of these objects shows that they are consistent with high-redshift (z >~ 1) active galactic nuclei.

  1. Evidence for Infrared-Faint Radio Sources as z > 1 Radio-Loud AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Huynh, M T; Siana, B; Middelberg, E

    2010-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6 to 70 micron) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the SED of these objects shows that they are consistent with high redshift (z > 1) AGN.

  2. New Results for Two Optically Faint Low Mass X-Ray Binary Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wachter, Stefanie

    1997-01-01

    We present optical photometry of the low mass X-ray binary systems GX 349+2 and Ser X-1. Extensive VRI photometry of the faint optical counterpart (V=18.4) to GX 349+2 reveals a period of 22.5 +/- 0.1 h and half-amplitude 0.2 mag. This result confirms and extends our previously reported 22 h period. No color change is detected over the orbit, although the limits are modest. We also report the discovery of two new variable stars in the field of GX 349+2, including a probable W UMa system. Ser ...

  3. Application of digital image processing techniques to faint solar flare phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glackin, D. L.; Martin, S. F.

    1980-01-01

    Digital image processing of eight solar flare events was performed using the Video Information Communication and Retrieval language in order to study moving emission fronts, flare halos, and Moreton waves. The techniques used include contrast enhancement, isointensity contouring, the differencing of images, spatial filtering, and geometrical registration. The spatial extent and temporal behavior of the faint phenomena is examined along with the relation of the three types of phenomena to one another. The image processing techniques make possible the detailed study of the history of the phenomena and provide clues to their physical nature.

  4. Blind Detection of Ultra-faint Streaks with a Maximum Likelihood Method

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, William A; Kamath, Chandrika

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a maximum likelihood source detection method capable of detecting ultra-faint streaks with surface brightnesses approximately an order of magnitude fainter than the pixel level noise. Our maximum likelihood detection method is a model based approach that requires no a priori knowledge about the streak location, orientation, length, or surface brightness. This method enables discovery of typically undiscovered objects, and enables the utilization of low-cost sensors (i.e., higher-noise data). The method also easily facilitates multi-epoch co-addition. We will present the results from the application of this method to simulations, as well as real low earth orbit observations.

  5. Modified Theories of Gravity with Nonminimal Coupling and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    A certain general class of modified gravitational theories with nonminimal coupling predicts a "pressure"-type, non-geodesic acceleration for a non-rotating, massive test particle. The resulting orbital perturbations for a two-body system consist of secular rates of change of all the standard orbital elements. The resulting variation of the mutual distance yields a physical mechanism which has the potential capability to explain, in principle, the Faint Young Sun Paradox in terms of a recession of the Earth from the Sun during the Archean.

  6. The ALHAMBRA survey: Discovery of a faint QSO at z = 5.41

    CERN Document Server

    Matute, I; Márquez, I; Fernández-Soto, A; Husillos, C; del Olmo, A; Perea, J; Pović, M; Ascaso, B; Alfaro, E J; Moles, M; Aguerri, J A L; Aparicio--Villegas, T; Benítez, N; Broadhurst, T; Cabrera--Cano, J; Castander, F J; Cepa, J; Cerviño, M; Cristóbal-Hornillos, D; Infante, L; Delgado, R M González; Martínez, V J; Molino, A; Prada, F; Quintana, J M

    2013-01-01

    We aim to illustrate the potentiality of the Advanced Large, Homogeneous Area, Medium-Band Redshift Astronomical (ALHAMBRA) survey to investigate the high redshift universe through the detection of quasi stellar objects (QSOs) at redshifts larger than 5. The search for z>5 QSOs candidates was done by fitting an extensive library of spectral energy distributions --including active and non-active galaxy templates as well as stars-- to the photometric database of the ALHAMBRA survey (composed of 20 optical medium-band plus the 3 broad-band JHKs filters). Our selection over ~1 square degree of ALHAMBRA data (~1/4 of the total area covered by the survey), combined with GTC/OSIRIS spectroscopy, has yielded the identification of an optically faint QSO at very high redshift (z = 5.41). The QSO has an absolute magnitude of ~-24 at the 1450{\\AA} continuum, a bolometric luminosity of ~2x10^46 erg/s and an estimated black hole mass of ~10^8 Msolar. This QSO adds itself to a reduced number of known UV faint sources at the...

  7. The radio spectral energy distribution of infrared-faint radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Herzog, A; Middelberg, E; Seymour, N; Spitler, L R; Emonts, B H C; Franzen, T M O; Hunstead, R; Intema, H T; Marvil, J; Parker, Q A; Sirothia, S K; Hurley-Walker, N; Bell, M; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Callingham, J R; Deshpande, A A; Dwarakanath, K S; For, B -Q; Greenhill, L J; Hancock, P; Hazelton, B J; Hindson, L; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kapinska, A D; Kaplan, D L; Lenc, E; Lonsdale, C J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Morgan, J; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A; Ord, S M; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Staveley-Smith, L; Subrahmanyan, R; Tingay, S J; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wu, C; Zheng, Q; Chippendale, A P; Harvey-Smith, L; Heywood, I; Indermuehle, B; Popping, A; Sault, R J; Whiting, M T

    2016-01-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a class of radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshifts (z > 1.7) that are characterised by their relative infrared faintness, resulting in enormous radio-to-infrared flux density ratios of up to several thousand. We aim to test the hypothesis that IFRS are young AGN, particularly GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources that have a low frequency turnover. We use the rich radio data set available for the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey fields, covering the frequency range between 150 MHz and 34 GHz with up to 19 wavebands from different telescopes, and build radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 34 IFRS. We then study the radio properties of this class of object with respect to turnover, spectral index, and behaviour towards higher frequencies. We also present the highest-frequency radio observations of an IFRS, observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 105 GHz, and model the multi-wavelength and radio...

  8. Finding faint HI structure in and around galaxies: scraping the barrel

    CERN Document Server

    Punzo, D; Roerdink, J B T M

    2016-01-01

    Soon to be operational HI survey instruments such as APERTIF and ASKAP will produce large datasets. These surveys will provide information about the HI in and around hundreds of galaxies with a typical signal-to-noise ratio of $\\sim$ 10 in the inner regions and $\\sim$ 1 in the outer regions. In addition, such surveys will make it possible to probe faint HI structures, typically located in the vicinity of galaxies, such as extra-planar-gas, tails and filaments. These structures are crucial for understanding galaxy evolution, particularly when they are studied in relation to the local environment. Our aim is to find optimized kernels for the discovery of faint and morphologically complex HI structures. Therefore, using HI data from a variety of galaxies, we explore state-of-the-art filtering algorithms. We show that the intensity-driven gradient filter, due to its adaptive characteristics, is the optimal choice. In fact, this filter requires only minimal tuning of the input parameters to enhance the signal-to-n...

  9. Infrared-Faint Radio Sources in the SERVS deep fields: Pinpointing AGNs at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Maini, Alessandro; Norris, Ray P; Spitler, Lee R; Mignano, Arturo; Lacy, Mark; Morganti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) represent an unexpected class of objects relatively bright at radio wavelength, but unusually faint at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. A recent and extensive campaign on the radio-brightest IFRSs (S_{1.4GHz} >= 10 mJy) has provided evidence that most of them (if not all) contain an AGN. Still uncertain is the nature of the radio-faintest ones (S_{1.4GHz} 4). We analysed a number of IFRS samples identified in SERVS fields, including a new sample (21 sources) extracted from the Lockman Hole. 3.6 and 4.5 mum IR counterparts of the 64 sources located in the SERVS fields were searched for, and, when detected, their IR properties were studied. We compared the radio/IR properties of the IR-detected IFRSs with those expected for a number of known classes of objects. We found that they are mostly consistent with a mixture of high-redshift (z >= 3) radio-loud AGNs. The faintest ones (S_{1.4GHz} ~ 100 muJy), however, could be also associated with nearer (z ~ 2) dust-enshrouded...

  10. VLA survey of the CDFS: the nature of faint radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Tozzi, P; Fomalont, E; Miller, N; Norman, C; Mainieri, V; Padovani, P; Rosati, P

    2009-01-01

    We present the multiwavelength properties of 266 cataloged radio sources identified with 20 and 6 cm VLA deep observations of the CDFS at a flux density limit of 42 \\mu Jy at the field centre at 1.4 GHz. These new observations probe the faint end of both the star formation and radio galaxy/AGN population. X-ray data, including upper limits, turn out to be a key factor in establishing the nature of faint radio sources. We find that, while the well-known flattening of the radio number counts below 1 mJy is mostly due to star forming galaxies, these sources and AGN make up an approximately equal fraction of the sub--millijansky sky, contrary to some previous results. We have also uncovered a population of distant AGN systematically missing from many previous studies of sub-millijansky radio source identifications. The AGN include radio galaxies, mostly of the low-power, Fanaroff-Riley I type, and a significant radio-quiet component, which amounts to approximately one fifth of the total sample. We also find that ...

  11. Theoretical lower limits on sizes of ultra faint dwarf galaxies from dynamical friction

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, X

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are the smallest known stellar systems where under Newtonian interpretations, a significant amount of dark matter is required to explain observed kinematics. In fact, they are in this sense the most heavily dark matter dominated objects known. That, plus the increasingly small sizes of the newly discovered ultra faint dwarfs, puts these systems in the regime where dynamical friction on individual stars starts to become relevant. We calculate the dynamical friction timescales for pressure supported isotropic spherical dark matter dominated stellar systems, yielding $\\tau_{DF} =0.93 (r_{h}/10 pc)^{2} (\\sigma/ kms^{-1}) Gyr$. For a stellar velocity dispersion value of $3 km/s$, as typical for the smallest of the recently detected ultra faint dwarf spheroidals, dynamical friction timescales becomes smaller than the $10 Gyr$ typical of the stellar ages for these systems, for half-light radii $r_{h}<19 pc$. Thus, this becomes a theoretical lower limit below which dark matter dominated s...

  12. Kim 3: an Ultra-faint Star Cluster in the Constellation of Centaurus

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Dongwon; Mackey, Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S; Milone, Antonino P

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of an ultra-faint star cluster in the constellation of Centaurus. This new stellar system, Kim 3, features a half light radius of $r_{h}=2.29^{+1.28}_{-0.52}$ pc and a total luminosity of $M_{V}=+0.7\\pm0.3$. Approximately 26 stars are identified as candidate member stars down to four magnitudes below the main-sequence turn-off, which makes Kim 3 the least luminous star cluster known to date. The compact physical size and extreme low luminosity place it close to faint star clusters in the size-luminosity plane. The stellar population of Kim 3 appears to be relatively young ($9.5^{+3.0}_{-1.7}$ Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H]$=-1.6^{+0.45}_{-0.30}$) at a heliocentric distance of $15.14^{+1.00}_{-0.28}$ kpc. The cluster lacks a well-defined center and a small but prominent group of stars consistent with the Kim 3 isochrone is present approximately 9.7 pc in projection south of the cluster center. Both are signs of the cluster being in the final stage of tidal disruption.

  13. The chemical evolution of the Bootes I ultra-faint dwarf galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Frebel, Anna; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F G

    2016-01-01

    We present chemical abundance measurements of two metal-poor red giant stars in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Bootes I, based on Magellan/MIKE high-resolution spectra. For Boo I-980, with [Fe/H]=-3.1, we present the first elemental abundance measurements while Boo I-127, with [Fe/H]=-2.0, shows abundances in good agreement with previous measurements. Light and iron-peak element abundance ratios in the two Bootes I stars, as well as those of most other Boootes I members, collected from the literature, closely resemble those of regular metal-poor halo stars. Neutron-capture element abundances Sr and Ba are systematically lower than the main halo trend, and also show a significant abundance spread. Overall, this is similar to what has been found for other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We apply corrections to the carbon abundances (commensurate with stellar evolutionary status) of the entire sample and find 21% of stars to be carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, compared to 13% without using the carbon correctio...

  14. Chemical Diversity in the Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy Tucana II

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Alexander P; Ezzeddine, Rana; Casey, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    We present the first detailed chemical abundance study of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Tucana II based on high-resolution Magellan/MIKE spectra of four red giant stars. The metallicity of these stars ranges from [Fe/H] = -3.2 to -2.6, and all stars are low in neutron-capture abundances ([Sr/Fe] and [Ba/Fe] < -1). However, a number of anomalous chemical signatures are present. Three stars are carbon-enhanced, including the most metal-rich star. This star ([Fe/H]=-2.6) shows [Na,$\\alpha$,Sc/Fe] < 0, suggesting an extended star formation history with contributions from AGB stars and Type Ia supernovae. The other carbon-enhanced stars have [Fe/H] < -3 and may be consistent with enrichment by faint supernovae, if such supernovae can produce neutron-capture elements. A fourth star with [Fe/H] = -3 is carbon-normal, and exhibits distinct light element abundance ratios from the carbon-enhanced stars. The carbon-normal star implies that at least two distinct nucleosynthesis sources, both possibly associated w...

  15. Detailed Chemical Abundances in the r-Process-Rich Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxy Reticulum 2

    CERN Document Server

    Roederer, Ian U; Bailey, John I; Song, Yingyi; Bell, Eric F; Crane, Jeffrey D; Loebman, Sarah; Nidever, David L; Olszewski, Edward W; Shectman, Stephen A; Thompson, Ian B; Valluri, Monica; Walker, Matthew G

    2016-01-01

    The ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Reticulum 2 (Ret 2) was recently discovered in images obtained by the Dark Energy Survey. We have observed the four brightest red giants in Ret 2 at high spectral resolution using the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System. We present detailed abundances for as many as 20 elements per star, including 12 elements heavier than the Fe group. We confirm previous detection of high levels of r-process material in Ret 2 (mean [Eu/Fe]=+1.69+/-0.05) found in three of these stars (mean [Fe/H]=-2.88+/-0.10). The abundances closely match the r-process pattern found in the well-studied metal-poor halo star CS22892-052. Such r-process-enhanced stars have not been found in any other ultra-faint dwarf galaxy, though their existence has been predicted by at least one model. The fourth star in Ret 2 ([Fe/H]=-3.42+/-0.20) contains only trace amounts of Sr ([Sr/Fe]=-1.73+/-0.43) and no detectable heavier elements. One r-process enhanced star is also enhanced in C (natal [C/Fe]=+1.1). This is only the third s...

  16. Star/galaxy separation at faint magnitudes: Application to a simulated Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soumagnac, M.T.; et al.

    2013-06-21

    We address the problem of separating stars from galaxies in future large photometric surveys. We focus our analysis on simulations of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). In the first part of the paper, we derive the science requirements on star/galaxy separation, for measurement of the cosmological parameters with the Gravitational Weak Lensing and Large Scale Structure probes. These requirements are dictated by the need to control both the statistical and systematic errors on the cosmological parameters, and by Point Spread Function calibration. We formulate the requirements in terms of the completeness and purity provided by a given star/galaxy classifier. In order to achieve these requirements at faint magnitudes, we propose a new method for star/galaxy separation in the second part of the paper. We first use Principal Component Analysis to outline the correlations between the objects parameters and extract from it the most relevant information. We then use the reduced set of parameters as input to an Artificial Neural Network. This multi-parameter approach improves upon purely morphometric classifiers (such as the classifier implemented in SExtractor), especially at faint magnitudes: it increases the purity by up to 20% for stars and by up to 12% for galaxies, at i-magnitude fainter than 23.

  17. Probing the faint end of the quasar luminosity function at z ~ 4 in the COSMOS field

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, H; Matsuoka, K; Taniguchi, Y; Shioya, Y; Trump, J R; Capak, P; Comastri, A; Enoki, M; Ideue, Y; Kakazu, Y; Koekemoer, A M; Morokuma, T; Murayama, T; Saito, T; Salvato, M; Schinnerer, E; Scoville, N Z; Silverman, J D

    2010-01-01

    We searched for quasars that are ~ 3 mag fainter than the SDSS quasars in the redshift range 3.7 < z < 4.7 in the COSMOS field to constrain the faint end of the quasar luminosity function. Using optical photometric data, we selected 31 quasar candidates with 22 < i' < 24 at z ~ 4. We obtained optical spectra for most of these candidates using FOCAS on the Subaru telescope, and identified 8 low-luminosity quasars at z ~ 4. In order to derive the quasar luminosity function (QLF) based on our spectroscopic follow-up campaign, we estimated the photometric completeness of our quasar survey through detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Our QLF at z ~ 4 has a much shallower faint-end slope beta = -1.67^{+0.11}_{-0.17} than that obtained by other recent surveys in the same redshift. Our result is consistent with the scenario of downsizing evolution of active galactic nuclei inferred by recent optical and X-ray quasar surveys at lower redshifts.

  18. Variable stars in the field of the Hydra II ultra-faint dwarf galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Vivas, A Katherina; Olsen, Knut; Blum, Robert; Walker, Alistair; Martin, Nicolas; Besla, Gurtina; Gallart, Carme; van der Marel, Roeland; Majewski, Steven; Kaleida, Catherine; Muñoz, Ricardo; Conn, Blair; Jin, Shoko

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of one RR Lyrae star in the ultra--faint satellite galaxy Hydra II based on time series photometry in the g, r and i bands obtained with the Dark Energy Camera at Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, Chile. The RR Lyrae star has a mean magnitude of $i = 21.30\\pm 0.04$ which translates to a heliocentric distance of $151\\pm 8$ kpc for Hydra II; this value is $\\sim 13\\%$ larger than the estimate from the discovery paper based on the average magnitude of several blue horizontal branch star candidates. The new distance implies a slightly larger half-light radius of $76^{+12}_{-10}$ pc and a brighter absolute magnitude of $M_V = -5.1 \\pm 0.3$, which keeps this object within the realm of the dwarf galaxies. The pulsational properties of the RR Lyrae star ($P=0.645$ d, $\\Delta g = 0.68$ mag) suggest Hydra II may be a member of the intermediate Oosterhoff or Oosterhoff II group. A comparison with other RR Lyrae stars in ultra--faint systems indicates similar pulsational properties among them...

  19. New Results for Two Optically Faint Low Mass X-Ray Binary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Wachter, S

    1997-01-01

    We present optical photometry of the low mass X-ray binary systems GX 349+2 and Ser X-1. Extensive VRI photometry of the faint optical counterpart (V=18.4) to GX 349+2 reveals a period of 22.5 +/- 0.1 h and half-amplitude 0.2 mag. This result confirms and extends our previously reported 22~h period. No color change is detected over the orbit, although the limits are modest. We also report the discovery of two new variable stars in the field of GX 349+2, including a probable W UMa system. Ser X-1 is one of the most intense persistent X-ray burst sources known. It is also one of only three burst systems for which simultaneous optical and X-ray bursts have been observed. The faint blue optical counterpart MM Ser (B~19.2) has long been known to have a companion 2.1" distant. Our images indicate that MM Ser is itself a further superposition of two stars, separated by only 1". At the very least, the ratio of inferred burst to quiescent optical flux is affected by the discovery of this additional component. In the w...

  20. Star/galaxy separation at faint magnitudes: application to a simulated Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soumagnac, M. T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Lahav, O.; Kirk, D.; Sevilla, I.; Bertin, E.; Rowe, B. T. P.; Annis, J.; Busha, M. T.; Da Costa, L. N.; Frieman, J. A.; Gaztanaga, E.; Jarvis, M.; Lin, H.; Percival, W. J.; Santiago, B. X.; Sabiu, C. G.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wolz, L.; Yanny, B.

    2015-04-14

    We address the problem of separating stars from galaxies in future large photometric surveys. We focus our analysis on simulations of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). In the first part of the paper, we derive the science requirements on star/galaxy separation, for measurement of the cosmological parameters with the gravitational weak lensing and large-scale structure probes. These requirements are dictated by the need to control both the statistical and systematic errors on the cosmological parameters, and by point spread function calibration. We formulate the requirements in terms of the completeness and purity provided by a given star/galaxy classifier. In order to achieve these requirements at faint magnitudes, we propose a new method for star/galaxy separation in the second part of the paper. We first use principal component analysis to outline the correlations between the objects parameters and extract from it the most relevant information. We then use the reduced set of parameters as input to an Artificial Neural Network. This multiparameter approach improves upon purely morphometric classifiers (such as the classifier implemented in SExtractor), especially at faint magnitudes: it increases the purity by up to 20 per cent for stars and by up to 12 per cent for galaxies, at i-magnitude fainter than 23.

  1. The First Science Flight of the Faint Intergalactic medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBALL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher; Milliard, Bruno; Schiminovich, David; Tuttle, Sarah; Matuszewski, Matt; Rahman, Shahin; Evrard, Jean; Frank, Stephan; Deharveng, Jean-Michel; Peroux, Celine

    We have completed the second flight of the path-finding experiment, the Faint Intergalactic medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBALL), designed to discover and map faint emis-sion from the Intergalactic Medium (IGM). The second flight was fully successful, proving a fully functional fine pointing gondola with arcsec level capability, a 1 meter diameter (fixed) parabola primary telescope with planar sidereostat for pointing, a complete closed loop guide camera and control software, and a fiber fed UV integral field spectrograph feeding a spare GALEX Near UV detector. Three scientific targets were observed, and analysis of the data shows that the instrument performed as expected. The flux measurements obtained will be compared to models for IGM emission. We discuss future modifications to the payload that will achieve a 10-to 30-fold increase in sensitivity over science flight 1. We also discuss other instrument configurations that can utilize the 1-meter UV telescope and arcsecond pointing platform, and their corresponding science objectives. FIREBALL is a collaboration of NASA, Caltech, Columbia University, CNES, and Laboratorie Astrophysique Marseille, and is sup-ported by NASA, CNES, and CNRS.

  2. Depression and social problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, E M; Williams, J M; Claridge, G C

    1992-02-01

    Twenty depressed patients with major depressive disorder, 20 nondepressed matched control subjects, and 17 patients with anxiety disorders were compared in different measures of social problem solving. Problem solving was assessed with the Means-Ends Problem-Solving Test (Study 1), the solution of personal problems, and a problem-solving questionnaire (Study 2). Results showed that, as predicted, depressed subjects suffered from a deficit in problem solving in all three measures. The majority of these deficits were also displayed by the clinical control group rather than being specific to a diagnosis of depression. However, depressed subjects produced less effective solutions than did normal and clinical control subjects. The results suggest that depressed and anxious patients may have difficulties at different stages of the problem-solving process.

  3. Improving the ability of image sensors to detect faint stars and moving objects using image deconvolution techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fors, Octavi; Núñez, Jorge; Otazu, Xavier; Prades, Albert; Cardinal, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we show how the techniques of image deconvolution can increase the ability of image sensors as, for example, CCD imagers, to detect faint stars or faint orbital objects (small satellites and space debris). In the case of faint stars, we show that this benefit is equivalent to double the quantum efficiency of the used image sensor or to increase the effective telescope aperture by more than 30% without decreasing the astrometric precision or introducing artificial bias. In the case of orbital objects, the deconvolution technique can double the signal-to-noise ratio of the image, which helps to discover and control dangerous objects as space debris or lost satellites. The benefits obtained using CCD detectors can be extrapolated to any kind of image sensors.

  4. LoCuSS: Exploring the selection of faint blue background galaxies for cluster weak-lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Ziparo, Felicia; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Haines, Chris P; Pereira, Maria J; Egami, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological constraints from galaxy clusters rely on accurate measurements of the mass and internal structure of clusters. An important source of systematic uncertainty in cluster mass and structure measurements is the secure selection of background galaxies that are gravitationally lensed by clusters. This issue has been shown to be particular severe for faint blue galaxies. We therefore explore the selection of faint blue background galaxies, by reference to photometric redshift catalogs derived from the COSMOS survey and our own observations of massive galaxy clusters at z~0.2. We show that methods relying on photometric redshifts of galaxies in/behind clusters based on observations through five filters, and on deep 30-band COSMOS photometric redshifts are both inadequate to identify safely faint blue background galaxies. This is due to the small number of filters used by the former, and absence of massive galaxy clusters at redshifts of interest in the latter. We therefore develop a pragmatic method to c...

  5. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...... localities of tensions between matter and the immaterial, the practical and the ideal, and subject and object. In the colloquial language there can, moreover, often seem to be something authentic or genuine about atmosphere, juxtaposing it to staging, which is implied to be something simulated or artificial....... This introduction seeks to outline how a number of scholars have addressed the relationship between staged atmospheres and experience, and thus highlight both the philosophical, social and political aspects of atmospheres...

  6. The radio spectral energy distribution of infrared-faint radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Seymour, N.; Spitler, L. R.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Hunstead, R.; Intema, H. T.; Marvil, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sirothia, S. K.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Callingham, J. R.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hancock, P.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Morgan, J.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, I.; Indermuehle, B.; Popping, A.; Sault, R. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a class of radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshifts (z ≥ 1.7) that are characterised by their relative infrared faintness, resulting in enormous radio-to-infrared flux density ratios of up to several thousand. Aims: Because of their optical and infrared faintness, it is very challenging to study IFRS at these wavelengths. However, IFRS are relatively bright in the radio regime with 1.4 GHz flux densities of a few to a few tens of mJy. Therefore, the radio regime is the most promising wavelength regime in which to constrain their nature. We aim to test the hypothesis that IFRS are young AGN, particularly GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources that have a low frequency turnover. Methods: We use the rich radio data set available for the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey fields, covering the frequency range between 150 MHz and 34 GHz with up to 19 wavebands from different telescopes, and build radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 34 IFRS. We then study the radio properties of this class of object with respect to turnover, spectral index, and behaviour towards higher frequencies. We also present the highest-frequency radio observations of an IFRS, observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 105 GHz, and model the multi-wavelength and radio-far-infrared SED of this source. Results: We find IFRS usually follow single power laws down to observed frequencies of around 150 MHz. Mostly, the radio SEDs are steep (α IFRS show statistically significantly steeper radio SEDs than the broader RL AGN population. Our analysis reveals that the fractions of GPS and CSS sources in the population of IFRS are consistent with the fractions in the broader RL AGN population. We find that at least % of IFRS contain young AGN, although the fraction might be significantly higher as suggested by the steep SEDs and the compact morphology of IFRS. The detailed multi

  7. Crime Solving Techniques: Training Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Jack M.

    The document is a training bulletin for criminal investigators, explaining the use of probability, logic, lateral thinking, group problem solving, and psychological profiles as methods of solving crimes. One chpater of several pages is devoted to each of the five methods. The use of each method is explained; problems are presented for the user to…

  8. Combinatorial reasoning to solve problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Tom; Hof, Frits; Verhoef, Nellie

    2016-01-01

    This study reports combinatorial reasoning to solve problems. We observed the mathematical thinking of students aged 14-16. We study the variation of the students’ solution strategies in the context of emergent modelling. The results show that the students are tempted to begin the problem solving pr

  9. Solving complex fisheries management problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petter Johnsen, Jahn; Eliasen, Søren Qvist

    2011-01-01

    A crucial issue for the new EU common fisheries policy is how to solve the discard problem. Through a study of the institutional set up and the arrangements for solving the discard problem in Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Iceland and Norway, the article identifies the discard problem as related...

  10. Program Transformation by Solving Equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱鸿

    1991-01-01

    Based on the theory of orthogonal program expansion[8-10],the paper proposes a method to transform programs by solving program equations.By the method,transformation goals are expressed in program equations,and achieved by solving these equations.Although such equations are usually too complicated to be solved directly,the orthogonal expansion of programs makes it possible to reduce such equations into systems of equations only containing simple constructors of programs.Then,the solutions of such equations can be derived by a system of solving and simplifying rules,and algebraic laws of programs.The paper discusses the methods to simplify and solve equations and gives some examples.

  11. Studying the Kinematics of Faint Stellar Populations with the Planetary Nebula Spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Merrifield, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Galaxies are faint enough when one observes just their light distributions, but in studying their full dynamical structure the stars are spread over the six dimensions of phase space rather than just the three spatial dimensions, making their densities very low indeed. This low signal is unfortunate, as stellar dynamics hold important clues to these systems' life histories, and the issue is compounded by the fact that the most interesting information comes from the faintest outer parts of galaxies, where dynamical timescales (and hence memories of past history) are longest. To extract this information, we have constructed a special-purpose instrument, the Planetary Nebula Spectrograph, which observes planetary nebulae as kinematic tracers of the stellar population, and allows one to study the stellar dynamics of galaxies down to extremely low surface brightnesses. Here, we present results from this instrument that illustrate how it can uncover the nature of low surface-brightness features such as thick disks ...

  12. Strategies for Imaging Faint Extended Sources in the Near-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Vaduvescu, O; Vaduvescu, Ovidiu; Call, Marshall L. Mc

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative information about variations in the background at J and K' are presented and used to develop guidelines for the acquisition and reduction of ground-based images of faint extended sources in the near-infrared, especially those which occupy a significant fraction of the field of view of a detector or which are located in areas crowded with foreground or background sources. Findings are based primarily upon data acquired over three photometric nights with the 3.6x3.6 arcmin CFHT-IR array on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope atop Mauna Kea. Although some results are specific to CFHT, overall conclusions should be useful in guiding observing and reduction strategies of extended objects elsewhere.

  13. Can a variable gravitational constant resolve the Faint Young Sun Paradox ?

    CERN Document Server

    Sahni, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Solar models suggest that four billion years ago the young Sun was about $75\\%$ fainter than it is today, rendering Earth's oceans frozen and lifeless. However, there is ample geophysical evidence that Earth had a liquid ocean teeming with life 4 Gyr ago. Since ${\\cal L_\\odot} \\propto G^7M_\\odot^5$, the Sun's luminosity ${\\cal L_\\odot}$ is exceedingly sensitive to small changes in the gravitational constant $G$. We show that a percent-level increase in $G$ in the past would have prevented Earth's oceans from freezing, resolving the faint young Sun paradox. Such small changes in $G$ are consistent with observational bounds on ${\\Delta G}/G$. Since ${\\cal L}_{\\rm SNIa} \\propto G^{-3/2}$, an increase in $G$ leads to fainter supernovae, creating tension between standard candle and standard ruler probes of dark energy. Precisely such a tension has recently been reported by the Planck team.

  14. The faint end of the 250 micron luminosity function at z < 0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, L; Bethermin, M; Bourne, N; Cooray, A; Cowley, W; Dunne, L; Dye, S; Eales, S; Farrah, D; Lacey, C; Loveday, J; Maddox, S; Oliver, S; Viero, M

    2016-01-01

    Aims. We aim to study the 250 micron luminosity function (LF) down to much fainter luminosities than achieved by previous efforts. Methods. We developed a modified stacking method to reconstruct the 250 micron LF using optically selected galaxies from the SDSS survey and Herschel maps of the GAMA equatorial fields and Stripe 82. Our stacking method not only recovers the mean 250 micron luminosities of galaxies that are too faint to be individually detected, but also their underlying distribution functions. Results. We find very good agreement with previous measurements in the overlapping luminosity range. More importantly, we are able to derive the LF down to much fainter luminosities (around 25 times fainter) than achieved by previous studies. We find strong positive luminosity evolution \\propto (1 + z)^4.89\\pm1.07 and moderate negative density evolution \\propto (1 + z)^-1.02\\pm0.54 over the redshift range z=[0.02, 0.5].

  15. Two New Ultra-Faint Star Clusters in the Milky Way Halo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongwon

    2016-08-01

    Kim 1 & 2 are two new star clusters discovered in the Stromlo Missing Satellite Survey. Kim 1, located at a heliocentric distance of 19.8 +/- 0.9 kpc, features an extremely low total luminosity (M V = 0.3 +/- 0.5 mag) and low star concentration. Together with the large ellipticity (ɛ = 0.42 +/- 0.10) and irregular isophotes, these properties suggest that Kim 1 is an intermediate mass star cluster being stripped by the Galactic tidal field. Kim 2 is a rare ultra-faint outer halo globular cluster located at a heliocentric distance of 104.7 +/- 4.1 kpc. The cluster exhibits evidence of significant mass loss such as extra-tidal stars and mass-segregation. Kim 2 is likely to follow an orbit confined to the peripheral region of the Galactic halo, and/or to have formed in a dwarf galaxy that was later accreted into the Galactic halo.

  16. The Faint Young Sun Paradox in the Context of Modern Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Dumin, Yurii V

    2015-01-01

    The Faint Young Sun Paradox comes from the fact that solar luminosity (2-4)x10^9 years ago was insufficient to support the Earth's temperature necessary for the efficient development of geological and biological evolution (particularly, for the existence of considerable volumes of liquid water). It remains unclear by now if the so-called greenhouse effect on the Earth can resolve this problem. An interesting alternative explanation was put forward recently by M.Krizek (New Ast. 2012, 17, 1), who suggested that planetary orbits expand with time due to the local Hubble effect, caused by the uniformly-distributed Dark Energy. Then, under a reasonable value of the local Hubble constant, it is easy to explain why the Earth was receiving an approximately constant amount of solar irradiation for a long period in the past and will continue to do so for a quite long time in future.

  17. Indirect Dark Matter Detection Limits from the Ultra-Faint Milky Way Satellite Segue 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essig, Rouven; /SLAC; Sehgal, Neelima; Strigari, Louis E.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Geha, Marla; /Yale U.; Simon, Joshua D.; /Carnegie Inst. Observ.

    2011-08-11

    We use new kinematic data from the ultra-faint Milky Way satellite Segue 1 to model its dark matter distribution and derive upper limits on the dark matter annihilation cross-section. Using gamma-ray ux upper limits from the Fermi satellite and MAGIC, we determine cross-section exclusion regions for dark matter annihilation into a variety of different particles including charged leptons. We show that these exclusion regions are beginning to probe the regions of interest for a dark matter interpretation of the electron and positron uxes from PAMELA, Fermi, and HESS, and that future observations of Segue 1 have strong prospects for testing such an interpretation. We additionally discuss prospects for detecting annihilation with neutrinos using the IceCube detector, finding that in an optimistic scenario a few neutrino events may be detected. Finally we use the kinematic data to model the Segue 1 dark matter velocity dispersion and constrain Sommerfeld enhanced models.

  18. The ISON international campaigns for monitoring of faint high altitude objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molotov, Igor; Agapov, Vladimir; Rumyantsev, Vasiliy; Biryukov, Vadim; Schildknecht, Thomas; Bakhtigaraev, Nail; Ibrahimov, Mansur; Papushev, Pavel; Minikulov, Nasredin; Andrievsky, Sergei

    The research of the space debris fragments at high orbits is one of the main directions of the International Scientific Optical Network (ISON) activities. Therefore the dedicated ISON subsystem for high altitude faint space debris observations is arranged with the aim of detection and continuous tracking of as large number of unknown high altitude faint objects as possible. The subsystem includes the number of large telescopes that are able to detect the objects down to 20m-21m and the middle-size telescopes for the observations of the space objects of 15m-18m. The 1-m ZIMLAT in Zimmerwald, Switzerland, 1.5-m AZT-33IK in Mondy, Siberia, 64-cm AT- 64 in Nauchniy, Crimea, 60-cm RK-600 in Mayaki near Odessa, Ukraine, 60-cm Zeiss-600 in Maidanak, Uzbekistan, 70-cm AZT-8 in Gissar, Tajikistan are regularly participating in ISON observing campaigns in collaboration with 1-m Zeiss-1000 ESA space debris telescope in Teide, Canaries islands. 2.6-m ZTSh in Nauchniy, Crimea, 2-m Zeiss-2000 in Terskol, North Caucasus, 1-m Zeiss-1000 in Simeiz, Crimea, 1-m Zeiss-1000 in Arkhyz, North Caucasus are joining during few nights per month. The 60-cm Zeiss-600 in Arkhyz, 70-cm AZT-8 in Evpatoria, Crimea, 60-cm Zeiss-600 in Tarija, Bolivia, 80-cm RK-800 in Mayaki, 80-cm K-800 in Terskol, 50-cm in Ussuriysk, Far East will be added to the subsystem during 2008. The observing campaigns are coordinates by the Center on space debris data collection, processing and analysis of the KIAM RAS in cooperation with the AIUB space debris team. 353 faint objects are discovered in GEO region surveys during the last 3 years (about 100000 measurements were collected for this time), including objects with high AMR. Results are publishing monthly by KIAM in High Geocentric Orbit Space Debris Circular. We will discuss the most interesting of obtained results. Many of discovered fragments are associated with space debris clouds appeared as a result of known or suspected fragmentations occurred in GEO region

  19. Color and Variability Characteristics of Point Sources in the Faint Sky Variability Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, M E; Everett, M E; Howell, S B

    2005-03-07

    The authors present an analysis of the color and variability characteristics for point sources in the Faint Sky Variability Survey (FSVS). The FSVS cataloged {approx} 23 square degrees in BVI filters from {approx} 16-24 mag to investigate variability in faint sources at moderate to high Galactic latitudes. Point source completeness is found to be >83% for a selected representative sample (V - 17.5-22.0 mag, B-V = 0.0-1.5) containing both photometric B, V detections and 80% of the time-sampled V data available compared to a basic internal source completeness of 99%. Multi-epoch (10-30) observations in V spanning minutes to years modeled by light curve simulations reveal amplitude sensitivities to {approx} 0.015-0.075 mag over a representative V = 18-22 mag range. Periodicity determinations appear viable to time-scales of an order 1 day or less using the most sampled fields ({approx} 30 epochs). The fraction of point sources is found to be generally variable at 5-8% over V = 17.5-22.0 mag. For V brighter than 19 mag, the variable population is dominated by low amplitude (< 0.05 mag) and blue (B-V < 0.35) sources, possibly representing a population of {gamma} Doradus stars. Overall, the dominant population of variable sources are bluer than B-V = 0.65 and have Main Sequence colors, likely reflecting larger populations of RR Lyrae, SX Phe, {gamma} Doradus, and W UMa variables.

  20. The Chemical Evolution of the Bootes I Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frebel, Anna; Norris, John E.; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2016-08-01

    We present chemical abundance measurements of two metal-poor red giant stars in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Boötes I, based on Magellan/MIKE high-resolution spectra. For Boo-980, with {{[Fe/H]}}=-3.1, we present the first elemental abundance measurements, while Boo-127, with {{[Fe/H]}}=-2.0, shows abundances in good agreement with previous measurements. Light and iron-peak element abundance ratios in the two Boötes I stars, as well as those of most other Boötes I members, collected from the literature, closely resemble those of regular metal-poor halo stars. Neutron-capture element abundances Sr and Ba are systematically lower than the main halo trend and also show a significant abundance spread. Overall, this is similar to what has been found for other ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We apply corrections to the carbon abundances (commensurate with stellar evolutionary status) of the entire sample and find 21% of stars to be carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, compared to 13% without using the carbon correction. We reassess the metallicity distribution functions for the CEMP stars and non-CEMP stars, and confirm earlier claims that CEMP stars might belong to a different, earlier population. Applying a set of abundance criteria to test to what extent Boötes I could be a surviving first galaxy suggests that it is one of the earliest assembled systems that perhaps received gas from accretion from other clouds in the system, or from swallowing a first galaxy or building block type object. This resulted in the two stellar populations observable today. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  1. Photometric and spectroscopic study of the ultra-faint Milky Way satellite Pegasus III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongwon; Jerjen, Helmut; Geha, Marla C.; Chiti, Anirudh; Milone, Antonino; Da Costa, Gary S.; Mackey, Dougal; Frebel, Anna; Conn, Blair

    2017-01-01

    Pegasus III (Peg III) is one of the few known ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) satellite galaxies in the outer halo (R >150 kpc) of the Milky Way (MW). We present results from a recent study of Peg III using Magellan/IMACS and Keck/DEIMOS. Our newly-measured structural parameters confirm that Peg III is large (rh = 53±14pc), elongated (∈ = 0.38+0.22-0.38 ), and faint (MV=-3.4±0.4 mag) — indicative of its nature as a dwarf rather than a globular cluster. In the color-magnitude diagram, Peg III is well described by an old (>12Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H]measurements of individual stars, we identify seven kinematic members of Peg III. The Ca II triplet lines of the brightest members verify that Peg III indeed contains stars with metallicity as low as [Fe/H]=-2.55±0.15 dex. The systemic velocity and velocity dispersion of Peg III are -222.9±2.6 km/s and 5.4+3.0-2.5 km/s, respectively. The inferred dynamical mass within the half-light radius of 1.4+3.0-1.1×106M⊙, and the mass-to-light ratio of M/LV = 1470+5660-1240M⊙/L⊙ provide further evidence that Peg III is a bona fide UFD. Peg III and another distant UFD Pisces II lie relatively close to each other (△dspatial=43±19 kpc) and share similar systemic radial velocities (△vGSR=12.3±3.7 km/s), which suggests that they may share a common origin.

  2. Infrared-faint radio sources in the SERVS deep fields. Pinpointing AGNs at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maini, A.; Prandoni, I.; Norris, R. P.; Spitler, L. R.; Mignano, A.; Lacy, M.; Morganti, R.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) represent an unexpected class of objects which are relatively bright at radio wavelength, but unusually faint at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. A recent and extensive campaign on the radio-brightest IFRSs (S1.4 GHz≳ 10 mJy) has provided evidence that most of them (if not all) contain an active galactic nuclei (AGN). Still uncertain is the nature of the radio-faintest IFRSs (S1.4 GHz≲ 1 mJy). Aims: The scope of this paper is to assess the nature of the radio-faintest IFRSs, testing their classification and improving the knowledge of their IR properties by making use of the most sensitive IR survey available so far: the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). We also explore how the criteria of IFRSs can be fine-tuned to pinpoint radio-loud AGNs at very high redshift (z > 4). Methods: We analysed a number of IFRS samples identified in SERVS fields, including a new sample (21 sources) extracted from the Lockman Hole. 3.6 and 4.5 μm IR counterparts of the 64 sources located in the SERVS fields were searched for and, when detected, their IR properties were studied. Results: We compared the radio/IR properties of the IR-detected IFRSs with those expected for a number of known classes of objects. We found that IR-detected IFRSs are mostly consistent with a mixture of high-redshift (z ≳ 3) radio-loud AGNs. The faintest ones (S1.4 GHz 100 μJy), however, could be also associated with nearer (z 2) dust-enshrouded star-burst galaxies. We also argue that, while IFRSs with radio-to-IR ratios >500 can very efficiently pinpoint radio-loud AGNs at redshift 2 < z < 4, lower radio-to-IR ratios ( 100-200) are expected for higher redshift radio-loud AGNs.

  3. Measuring the orbital history of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Hercules with GSAOI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Tuan; Lu, Jessica; Simon, Josh; Peter, Annika; Boylan-Kolchin, Mike

    2014-02-01

    The Milky Way ultra-faint dwarf galaxies are the most dark matter dominated systems known to date. Their low masses, low luminosities, and extremely low metallicities offer a glimpse into galaxy formation at the earliest epochs, while their high inferred dark matter densities and proximity make them ideal candidates for indirect dark matter detection experiments. However, significant uncertainties remain in key observables such as the mass and infall history of these extreme objects. For example, without knowledge of their orbits, it is difficult to determine whether their masses are overestimated because their radial velocity dispersions have been inflated by past tidal encounters with the Milky Way. We propose to measure the proper motion of the Hercules ultra-faint dwarf galaxy using GSAOI to understand its orbital history. Hercules is a particularly intriguing target because structural and kinematic studies have motivated claims that it is tidally disrupting despite its relatively large present distance from the Milky Way and apparently high mass-to-light ratio. It also has a very old stellar population, making it a prime candidate for a "fossil galaxy" whose star formation was shut off by reionization. With observations in 2014A, 2015A, and 2017A in conjunction with HST data taken in 2011, we will be able to achieve 35 km/s proper motion precision, making it possible to reconstruct the orbit of Hercules. Knowledge of its perigalacticon will allow us to quantify the tidal effects of the Milky Way on its internal stellar dynamics, while its eccentricities and orbital energies will constrain the initial infall time into the Milky Way dark matter halo. This proposal aims to extend the technique developed of HST data to using background galaxies as absolute reference sources to ground based MCAO observations, which will be important for astrometry work after HST and for future extremely large telescopes.

  4. Pulsating Star Mystery Solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    By discovering the first double star where a pulsating Cepheid variable and another star pass in front of one another, an international team of astronomers has solved a decades-old mystery. The rare alignment of the orbits of the two stars in the double star system has allowed a measurement of the Cepheid mass with unprecedented accuracy. Up to now astronomers had two incompatible theoretical predictions of Cepheid masses. The new result shows that the prediction from stellar pulsation theory is spot on, while the prediction from stellar evolution theory is at odds with the new observations. The new results, from a team led by Grzegorz Pietrzyński (Universidad de Concepción, Chile, Obserwatorium Astronomiczne Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Poland), appear in the 25 November 2010 edition of the journal Nature. Grzegorz Pietrzyński introduces this remarkable result: "By using the HARPS instrument on the 3.6-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, along with other telescopes, we have measured the mass of a Cepheid with an accuracy far greater than any earlier estimates. This new result allows us to immediately see which of the two competing theories predicting the masses of Cepheids is correct." Classical Cepheid Variables, usually called just Cepheids, are unstable stars that are larger and much brighter than the Sun [1]. They expand and contract in a regular way, taking anything from a few days to months to complete the cycle. The time taken to brighten and grow fainter again is longer for stars that are more luminous and shorter for the dimmer ones. This remarkably precise relationship makes the study of Cepheids one of the most effective ways to measure the distances to nearby galaxies and from there to map out the scale of the whole Universe [2]. Unfortunately, despite their importance, Cepheids are not fully understood. Predictions of their masses derived from the theory of pulsating stars are 20-30% less than predictions from the theory of the

  5. Exoplanet Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Seager, S

    2010-01-01

    At the dawn of the first discovery of exoplanets orbiting sun-like stars in the mid-1990s, few believed that observations of exoplanet atmospheres would ever be possible. After the 2002 Hubble Space Telescope detection of a transiting exoplanet atmosphere, many skeptics discounted it as a one-object, one-method success. Nevertheless, the field is now firmly established, with over two dozen exoplanet atmospheres observed today. Hot Jupiters are the type of exoplanet currently most amenable to study. Highlights include: detection of molecular spectral features; observation of day-night temperature gradients; and constraints on vertical atmospheric structure. Atmospheres of giant planets far from their host stars are also being studied with direct imaging. The ultimate exoplanet goal is to answer the enigmatic and ancient question, "Are we alone?" via detection of atmospheric biosignatures. Two exciting prospects are the immediate focus on transiting super Earths orbiting in the habitable zone of M-dwarfs, and u...

  6. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki Kajita

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses...

  7. Articulating Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily...... experience in space, presented as middle ground experience. In the field of HCI, middle ground experiences complete the unarticulated spectrum between designing for foreground of attention or background awareness. When “Articulating Atmospheres through Middle Ground Experiences in Interaction Design...

  8. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses atmospheric neutrino experiments and the neutrino oscillation studies with these neutrinos.

  9. Atmospheric electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, J Alan

    1957-01-01

    Atmospheric Electricity brings together numerous studies on various aspects of atmospheric electricity. This book is composed of 13 chapters that cover the main problems in the field, including the maintenance of the negative charge on the earth and the origin of the charges in thunderstorms. After a brief overview of the historical developments of atmospheric electricity, this book goes on dealing with the general principles, results, methods, and the MKS system of the field. The succeeding chapters are devoted to some aspects of electricity in the atmosphere, such as the occurrence and d

  10. The role of cognitions, trait anxiety and disgust sensitivity in generating faintness around blood-injury phobic stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeter-Kent, Holly A; Page, Andrew C

    2006-03-01

    The effects on blood-injury fear and fainting of scripts concerning pain, nausea, and anger and individual differences in trait anxiety and disgust sensitivity were investigated. Eighteen participants were high in disgust sensitivity and trait anxiety, 11 were low in disgust sensitivity but high in trait anxiety, 10 were high in disgust sensitivity but low in trait anxiety, and 16 were low in disgust sensitivity and trait anxiety. Participants were exposed to pain, nausea, and anger scripts during presentation of blood-injury slides. The ability of the scripts to increase symptoms of fear and faintness, on a state version of the Blood-Injection Symptom Scale (BISS; Page, A. C., Bennett, K. S., Carter, O., Smith, J., & Woodmore, K. (1997). Blood-Injection Symptom Scale (BISS): Assessing the structure of phobic symptomatology elicited by blood and injections. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 35, 457-464) were examined. Analyses indicated that individual differences in trait anxiety and disgust sensitivity interact to generate symptoms of faintness when the pain script was read. That is, disgust sensitive and trait anxious participants reported greater faintness relative to other conditions. The implications for theory and treatment of blood-injury-injection phobia are discussed.

  11. A 350-MHz GBT Survey of 50 Faint Fermi Gamma-ray Sources for Radio Millisecond Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Hessels, Jason W T; McLaughlin, Maura A; Ray, Paul S; Bangale, Priyadarshini; Ransom, Scott M; Kerr, Matthew; Camilo, Fernando; DeCesar, Megan E

    2015-01-01

    We have used the Green Bank Telescope at 350MHz to search 50 faint, unidentified Fermi Gamma-ray sources for radio pulsations. So far, these searches have resulted in the discovery of 10 millisecond pulsars, which are plausible counterparts to these unidentified Fermi sources. Here we briefly describe this survey and the characteristics of the newly discovered MSPs.

  12. LoCuSS: Exploring the selection of faint blue background galaxies for cluster weak-lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziparo, Felicia; Smith, Graham P.; Okabe, Nobuhiro; Haines, Chris P.; Pereira, Maria J.; Egami, Eiichi

    2016-10-01

    Cosmological constraints from galaxy clusters rely on accurate measurements of the mass and internal structure of clusters. An important source of systematic uncertainty in cluster mass and structure measurements is the secure selection of background galaxies that are gravitationally lensed by clusters. This issue has been shown to be particular severe for faint blue galaxies. We therefore explore the selection of faint blue background galaxies, by reference to photometric redshift catalogues derived from the COSMOS survey and our own observations of massive galaxy clusters at z ≃ 0.2. We show that methods relying on photometric redshifts of galaxies in/behind clusters based on observations through five filters, and on deep 30-band COSMOS photometric redshifts are both inadequate to safely identify faint blue background galaxies with the same 1 per cent contamination level that we have achieved with red galaxies. This is due to the small number of filters used by the former, and absence of massive galaxy clusters at redshifts of interest in the latter. Nevertheless, our least contaminated blue galaxy sample yields stacked weak-lensing results consistent with our previously published results based on red galaxies, and we show that the stacked clustercentric number density profile of these faint blue galaxies is consistent with expectations from consideration of the lens magnification signal of the clusters. Indeed, the observed number density of blue background galaxies changes by ˜10 - 30 per cent across the radial range over which other surveys assume it to be flat.

  13. Faint Submillimeter Galaxies Revealed by Multifield Deep ALMA Observations: Number Counts, Spatial Clustering, and Dark Submillimeter Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Kurono, Yasutaka; Momose, Rieko

    2014-01-01

    We present the statistics of faint submillimeter/millimeter galaxies (SMGs) and serendipitous detections of submillimeter/millimeter emitters (SMEs) with no multi-wavelength continuum counterpart revealed by the deep ALMA observations. We identify faint SMGs with flux densities of 0.1-1.0 mJy in the deep Band 6 and Band 7 maps of 10 independent fields that reduce cosmic variance effects. The differential number counts at 1.2 mm are found to increase with decreasing flux density down to 0.1 mJy. Our number counts indicate that the faint (0.1-1.0 mJy, or SFR_IR ~ 30-300 Msun/yr) SMGs contribute nearly a half of the extragalactic background light (EBL), while the remaining half of the EBL is mostly contributed by very faint sources with flux densities of 1 mJy) SMGs, but comparable with abundant high-z star-forming populations such as sBzKs, LBGs, and LAEs. Finally, we report the serendipitous detections of SMEs with continuum counterparts neither in our 1.2 mm-band nor multi-wavelength images including ultra de...

  14. Faint submillimeter galaxies revealed by multifield deep ALMA observations: number counts, spatial clustering, and a dark submillimeter line emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Momose, Rieko [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kurono, Yasutaka, E-mail: ono@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago 763-0355 (Chile)

    2014-11-01

    We present the statistics of faint submillimeter/millimeter galaxies (SMGs) and serendipitous detections of a submillimeter/millimeter line emitter (SLE) with no multi-wavelength continuum counterpart revealed by the deep ALMA observations. We identify faint SMGs with flux densities of 0.1-1.0 mJy in the deep Band-6 and Band-7 maps of 10 independent fields that reduce cosmic variance effects. The differential number counts at 1.2 mm are found to increase with decreasing flux density down to 0.1 mJy. Our number counts indicate that the faint (0.1-1.0 mJy, or SFR{sub IR} ∼ 30-300 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) SMGs contribute nearly a half of the extragalactic background light (EBL), while the remaining half of the EBL is mostly contributed by very faint sources with flux densities of <0.1 mJy (SFR{sub IR} ≲ 30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}). We conduct counts-in-cells analysis with multifield ALMA data for the faint SMGs, and obtain a coarse estimate of galaxy bias, b {sub g} < 4. The galaxy bias suggests that the dark halo masses of the faint SMGs are ≲ 7 × 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉}, which is smaller than those of bright (>1 mJy) SMGs, but consistent with abundant high-z star-forming populations, such as sBzKs, LBGs, and LAEs. Finally, we report the serendipitous detection of SLE-1, which has no continuum counterparts in our 1.2 mm-band or multi-wavelength images, including ultra deep HST/WFC3 and Spitzer data. The SLE has a significant line at 249.9 GHz with a signal-to-noise ratio of 7.1. If the SLE is not a spurious source made by the unknown systematic noise of ALMA, the strong upper limits of our multi-wavelength data suggest that the SLE would be a faint galaxy at z ≳ 6.

  15. How to solve mathematical problems

    CERN Document Server

    Wickelgren, Wayne A

    1995-01-01

    Seven problem-solving techniques include inference, classification of action sequences, subgoals, contradiction, working backward, relations between problems, and mathematical representation. Also, problems from mathematics, science, and engineering with complete solutions.

  16. Techniques for Solving Sudoku Puzzles

    CERN Document Server

    Chi, Eric C

    2012-01-01

    Solving Sudoku puzzles is one of the most popular pastimes in the world. Puzzles range in difficulty from easy to very challenging; the hardest puzzles tend to have the most empty cells. The current paper compares the performance of three computer algorithms in solving puzzles. Backtracking, simulated annealing, and alternating projections are generic methods for attacking combinatorial optimization problems. Our results favor backtracking. It infallibly solves Sudoku puzzles or deduces that a unique solution does not exist. However, backtracking does not scale well in high-dimensional combinatorial optimization. Hence, it is useful to expose statistics students to the other two solution techniques in a concrete setting. Simulated annealing shares a common structure with MCMC (Markov chain Monte Carlo) and enjoys wide applicability. The method of alternating projections solves the feasibility problem in convex programming. Converting a discrete optimization problem into a continuous optimization problem opens...

  17. Problem Solving with General Semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, David

    1996-01-01

    Discusses how to use general semantics formulations to improve problem solving at home or at work--methods come from the areas of artificial intelligence/computer science, engineering, operations research, and psychology. (PA)

  18. Solving Optimal Timing Problems Elegantly

    OpenAIRE

    Todorova, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Few textbooks in mathematical economics cover optimal timing problems. Those which cover them do it scantly or in a rather clumsy way, making it hard for students to understand and apply the concept of optimal time in new contexts. Discussing the plentiful illustrations of optimal timing problems, we present an elegant and simple method of solving them. Whether the present value function is exponential or logarithmic, a convenient way to solve it is to convert the base to the exponential numb...

  19. THE VERY FAINT END OF THE UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OVER COSMIC TIME: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE LOCAL GROUP FOSSIL RECORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Conroy, Charlie, E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-10-10

    We present a new technique to estimate the evolution of the very faint end of the UV luminosity function (LF) out to z ∼ 5. Measured star formation histories (SFHs) from the fossil record of Local Group (LG) galaxies are used to reconstruct the LF down to M {sub UV} ∼–5 at z ∼ 5 and M {sub UV} ∼–1.5 at z < 1. Such faint limits are well beyond the current observational limits and are likely to remain beyond the limits of next-generation facilities. The reconstructed LFs, when combined with direct measurements of the LFs at higher luminosity, are well-fit by a standard Schechter function with no evidence of a break to the faintest limits probed by this technique. The derived faint-end slope, α, steepens from ≈ – 1.2 at z < 1 to ≈ – 1.6 at 4 < z < 5. We test the effects of burstiness in the SFHs and find the recovered LFs to be only modestly affected. Incompleteness corrections for the faintest LG galaxies and the (unlikely) possibility of significant luminosity-dependent destruction of dwarf galaxies between high redshift and the present epoch are important uncertainties. These and other uncertainties can be mitigated with more detailed modeling and future observations. The reconstructed faint end LF from the fossil record can therefore be a powerful and complementary probe of the high-redshift faint galaxies believed to play a key role in the reionization of the universe.

  20. Mass and environment as drivers of galaxy evolution. III. The constancy of the faint-end slope and the merging of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Ying-jie; Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, Marcella [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Renzini, Alvio [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy)

    2014-08-01

    Using our continuity approach, we explore the underlying connections between the evolution of the faint-end slope α{sub s} of the stellar mass function of star-forming galaxies, the logarithmic slope β of the specific star formation rate (sSFR)-mass relation, and the merging of galaxies. We derive analytically the consequences of the observed constancy of α{sub s} since redshifts of at least z ∼ 2. If the logarithmic slope β of the sSFR-mass relation is negative, then the faint-end slope α{sub s} should quickly diverge due to the differential mass increase of galaxies on the star-forming main sequence, and this will also quickly destroy the Schechter form of the mass function. This problem can be solved by removing low-mass galaxies by merging them into more massive galaxies. We quantify this process by introducing the specific merger mass rate (sMMR) as the specific rate of mass added to a given galaxy through mergers. For a modest negative value of β ∼ –0.1, an average sMMR ∼ 0.1 sSFR across the population is required to keep α{sub s} constant with epoch, as observed. This in turn implies a merger rate of ∼0.2 sSFR for major mergers, which is consistent with the available observational estimates. More negative values of β require higher sMMR and higher merger rates, and the steepening of the mass function becomes impossible to control for β < –(α{sub s} + 2). The close link that is required between the in situ sSFR and the sMMR probably arises because both are closely linked to the buildup of dark matter halos. These new findings further develop the formalism for the evolving galaxy population that we introduced earlier and show how striking symmetries in the galaxy population can emerge as the result of deep links between the physical processes involved.

  1. New method to solve electromagnetic parabolic equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵小峰; 黄思训; 康林春

    2013-01-01

    This paper puts forward a new method to solve the electromagnetic parabolic equation (EMPE) by taking the vertically-layered inhomogeneous characteristics of the atmospheric refractive index into account. First, the Fourier transform and the convo-lution theorem are employed, and the second-order partial differential equation, i.e., the EMPE, in the height space is transformed into first-order constant coefficient differential equations in the frequency space. Then, by use of the lower triangular characteristics of the coefficient matrix, the numerical solutions are designed. Through constructing ana-lytical solutions to the EMPE, the feasibility of the new method is validated. Finally, the numerical solutions to the new method are compared with those of the commonly used split-step Fourier algorithm.

  2. Statistical Track-Before-Detect Methods Applied to Faint Optical Observations of Resident Space Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, K.; Yanagisawa, T.; Uetsuhara, M.

    Automated detection and tracking of faint objects in optical, or bearing-only, sensor imagery is a topic of immense interest in space surveillance. Robust methods in this realm will lead to better space situational awareness (SSA) while reducing the cost of sensors and optics. They are especially relevant in the search for high area-to-mass ratio (HAMR) objects, as their apparent brightness can change significantly over time. A track-before-detect (TBD) approach has been shown to be suitable for faint, low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) images of resident space objects (RSOs). TBD does not rely upon the extraction of feature points within the image based on some thresholding criteria, but rather directly takes as input the intensity information from the image file. Not only is all of the available information from the image used, TBD avoids the computational intractability of the conventional feature-based line detection (i.e., "string of pearls") approach to track detection for low SNR data. Implementation of TBD rooted in finite set statistics (FISST) theory has been proposed recently by Vo, et al. Compared to other TBD methods applied so far to SSA, such as the stacking method or multi-pass multi-period denoising, the FISST approach is statistically rigorous and has been shown to be more computationally efficient, thus paving the path toward on-line processing. In this paper, we intend to apply a multi-Bernoulli filter to actual CCD imagery of RSOs. The multi-Bernoulli filter can explicitly account for the birth and death of multiple targets in a measurement arc. TBD is achieved via a sequential Monte Carlo implementation. Preliminary results with simulated single-target data indicate that a Bernoulli filter can successfully track and detect objects with measurement SNR as low as 2.4. Although the advent of fast-cadence scientific CMOS sensors have made the automation of faint object detection a realistic goal, it is nonetheless a difficult goal, as measurements

  3. Atmospheric materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    experience and, consequently, to the conceptual and methodological shifts in the production of space, and hence in the way we think about materiality. In this context, architectural space is understood as a contingent construction – a space of engagement that appears to us as a result of continuous...... characteristics of atmosphere as a spatial phenomenon, the aim of this text is to illustrate these associations and draw out design protocols, focusing on ways in which atmosphere can be conditioned architecturally. In other words, the objective is to trace the conceptual contours of ‘atmospheric materiality’....

  4. Dreaming of Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ingo

    2016-10-01

    Radiative transfer retrievals have become the standard in modelling of exoplanetary transmission and emission spectra. Analysing currently available observations of exoplanetary atmospheres often invoke large and correlated parameter spaces that can be difficult to map or constrain.To address these issues, we have developed the Tau-REx (tau-retrieval of exoplanets) retrieval and the RobERt spectral recognition algorithms. Tau-REx is a bayesian atmospheric retrieval framework using Nested Sampling and cluster computing to fully map these large correlated parameter spaces. Nonetheless, data volumes can become prohibitively large and we must often select a subset of potential molecular/atomic absorbers in an atmosphere.In the era of open-source, automated and self-sufficient retrieval algorithms, such manual input should be avoided. User dependent input could, in worst case scenarios, lead to incomplete models and biases in the retrieval. The RobERt algorithm is build to address these issues. RobERt is a deep belief neural (DBN) networks trained to accurately recognise molecular signatures for a wide range of planets, atmospheric thermal profiles and compositions. Using these deep neural networks, we work towards retrieval algorithms that themselves understand the nature of the observed spectra, are able to learn from current and past data and make sensible qualitative preselections of atmospheric opacities to be used for the quantitative stage of the retrieval process.In this talk I will discuss how neural networks and Bayesian Nested Sampling can be used to solve highly degenerate spectral retrieval problems and what 'dreaming' neural networks can tell us about atmospheric characteristics.

  5. Atmospheric Dispositifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    , the conceptual foundations and protocols for the production of atmosphere in architecture might be found beneath the surface of contemporary debates. In this context, the notion of atmospheric dispositif – illustrated through an oeuvre of the German architect Werner Ruhnau and its theoretical and historical...... as a spatial phenomenon, exploring a multiplicity of conditions that constitute their resonant origins – i.e. the production sites from and within they have emerged. The intention is also to argue that despite the fact that atmosphere as an aesthetic category has crystallised over the last few decades...... contextualisation – provides a platform for revealing productive entanglements between heterogeneous elements, disciplines and processes. It also allows rendering atmosphere as a site of co-production open to contingencies and affective interplay on multiples levels: at the moment of its conceptualisation...

  6. Atmospheric composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The earth's atmosphere is made up of a number of gases in different relative amounts. Near sea level and up to about 90 km, the amount of these atmospheric gases in clean, relatively dry air is practically constant. Four of these gases, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon dioxide, make up 99.99 percent by volume of the atmosphere. Two gases, ozone and water vapor, change in relative amounts, but the total amount of these two is very small compared to the amount of the other gases. The atmospheric composition shown in a table can be considered valid up to 90 km geometric altitude. Above 90 km, mainly because of molecular dissociation and diffusive separation, the composition changes.

  7. Problem Solving and Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Guinand, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    The observation and modeling of natural Complex Systems (CSs) like the human nervous system, the evolution or the weather, allows the definition of special abilities and models reusable to solve other problems. For instance, Genetic Algorithms or Ant Colony Optimizations are inspired from natural CSs to solve optimization problems. This paper proposes the use of ant-based systems to solve various problems with a non assessing approach. This means that solutions to some problem are not evaluated. They appear as resultant structures from the activity of the system. Problems are modeled with graphs and such structures are observed directly on these graphs. Problems of Multiple Sequences Alignment and Natural Language Processing are addressed with this approach.

  8. Aging and skilled problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charness, N

    1981-03-01

    Information-processing models of problem solving too often are based on restrictive age ranges. On the other hand, gerontologists have investigated few problem-solving tasks and have rarely generated explicit models. As this article demonstrates, both fields can benefit by closer collaboration. One major issue in gerontology is whether aging is associated with irreversible decrement or developmental plasticity. If both processes occur, then an appropriate strategy for investigating aging is to equate age groups for molar problem-solving performance and search for differences in the underlying components. This strategy was adopted to examine the relation of age and skill to problem solving in chess. Chess players were selected to vary widely in age and skill such that these variables were uncorrelated. Problem-solving and memory tasks were administered. Skill level was the only significant predictor for accuracy in both a choose-a-move task and a speeded end-game evaluation task. Age (negatively) and skill (positively) jointly determined performance in an unexpected recall task. Efficient chunking in recall was positively related to skill, though negatively related to age. Recognition confidence, though not accuracy, was negatively related to age. Thus despite age-related declines in encoding and retrieval of information, older players match the problem-solving performance of equivalently skilled younger players. Apparently, they can search the problem space more efficiently, as evidenced by taking less time to select an equally good move. Models of chess skill that stress that role of encoding efficiency, as indexed by chunking in recall, need to be modified to account for performance over the life span.

  9. Variable Faint Optical Sources Discovered by Comparing POSS and SDSS Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Sesar, B; Ivezic, Z; Lupton, R H; Munn, J A; Finkbeiner, D; Steinhardt, W; Siverd, R J; Johnston, D E; Knapp, G R; Gunn, J E; Rockosi, C M; Schlegel, D J; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Hall, P; Schneider, D P; Brunner, R J

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of variable faint optical sources discovered by comparing the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) catalogs. We use SDSS measurements to photometrically recalibrate several publicly available POSS catalogs; a piecewise recalibration in 100 arcmin2 patches generally results in an improvement of photometric accuracy (rms) by nearly a factor of two, compared to the original data. The POSS I magnitudes can be improved to ~0.15 mag accuracy, and POSS II magnitudes to \\~0.10 mag accuracy. We use the recalibrated catalogs for the ~2,000 deg2 of sky in the SDSS Data Release 1 to construct a catalog of ~60,000 sources variable on time scales 10-50 years. A series of statistical tests based on the morphology of SDSS color-color diagrams, as well as visual comparison of images and comparison with repeated SDSS observations, demonstrate the robustness of the selection methods. We quantify the distribution of variable sources in the SDSS color-color diagrams, and...

  10. VLBA observations of radio faint Fermi-LAT sources above 10 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Lico, R; Orienti, M; D'Ammando, F

    2016-01-01

    The first Fermi-LAT High-energy source catalog (1FHL), containing gamma-ray sources detected above 10 GeV, is an ideal sample to characterize the physical properties of the most extreme gamma-ray sources. We investigate the pc scale properties of a sub-sample of radio faint 1FHL sources with the aim to confirm the proposed blazar associations, by revealing a compact high brightness temperature radio core, and we propose new low-frequency counterparts for the unassociated gamma-ray sources (UGS). Moreover, we increase the number of 1FHL sources with high resolution observations to explore the possible connection between radio and gamma rays at E >10 GeV. We observed 84 1FHL sources, mostly blazars of High Synchrotron Peaked (HSP) type, in the northern sky with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 GHz. These sources lack high resolution radio observations and have at least one NVSS counterpart within the 95% confidence radius. For those sources without a well identified radio counterpart we exploit the VLBA...

  11. The relation between atomic gas and star formation rate densities in faint irregular galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Roychowdhury, Sambit; Kaisin, Serafim S; Karachentsev, Igor D

    2014-01-01

    We use data for faint (M_B > -14.5) dwarf irregular galaxies drawn from the FIGGS survey to study the correlation between the atomic gas density (Sigma_gas,atomic) and star formation rate (Sigma_SFR) in the galaxies. The estimated gas phase metallicity of our sample galaxies is Z ~ 0.1 Z_sun. Understanding star formation in such molecule poor gas is of particular importance since it is likely to be of direct relevance to simulations of early galaxy formation. For about 20% (9/43) of our sample galaxies, we find that the HI distribution is significantly disturbed, with little correspondence between the optical and HI distributions. We exclude these galaxies from the comparison. We also exclude galaxies with very low star formation rates, for which stochastic effects make it difficult to estimate the true star formation rates. For the remaining galaxies we compute the Sigma_gas,atomic and Sigma_SFR averaged over the entire star forming disk of the galaxy. For these galaxies we find a nearly linear relation betw...

  12. Exploding Satellites -- The Tidal Debris of the Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxy Hercules

    CERN Document Server

    Küpper, Andreas H W; Mieske, Steffen; Collins, Michelle L M; Tollerud, Erik J

    2016-01-01

    The ultra-faint satellite galaxy Hercules has a strongly elongated and irregular morphology with detections of tidal features up to 1.3 deg (3 kpc) from its center. This suggests that Hercules may be dissolving under the Milky Way's gravitational influence, and hence could be a tidal stream in formation rather than a bound, dark-matter dominated satellite. Using Bayesian inference in combination with N-body simulations, we show that Hercules has to be on a very eccentric orbit (epsilon~0.95) within the Milky Way in this scenario. On such an orbit, Hercules "explodes" as a consequence of the last tidal shock at pericenter 0.5 Gyr ago. It is currently decelerating towards apocenter of its orbit with a velocity of V=157 km/s -- of which 99% is directed radially outwards. Due to differential orbital precession caused by the non-spherical nature of the Galactic potential, its debris fans out nearly perpendicular to its orbit. This explains why Hercules has an elongated shape without showing a distance gradient alo...

  13. SMASH 1: a very faint globular cluster disrupting in the outer reaches of the LMC?

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Nicolas F; Nidever, David L; Bell, Eric F; Besla, Gurtina; Blum, Robert D; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L; Conn, Blair C; Kaleida, Catherine C; Gallart, Carme; Jin, Shoko; Majewski, Steven R; Martinez-Delgado, David; Monachesi, Antonela; Mñoz, Ricardo R; Noël, Noelia E D; Olsen, Knut; Olszewski, Edward W; Stringfellow, Guy S; van der Marel, Roeland P; Vivas, A Katherina; Walker, Alistair R; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    We present the discovery of a very faint stellar system, SMASH 1, that is potentially a satellite of the Large Magellanic Cloud. Found within the Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH), SMASH 1 is a compact (r_h = 9.1^{+5.9}_{-3.4} pc) and very low luminosity (M_V = -1.0 +/- 0.9, L_V=10^{2.3 +/- 0.4} Lsun) stellar system that is revealed by its sparsely populated main sequence and a handful of red-giant-branch candidate member stars. The photometric properties of these stars are compatible with a metal-poor ([Fe/H]=-2.2) and old (13 Gyr) isochrone located at a distance modulus of ~18.8, i.e. a distance of ~57 kpc. Situated at 11.3{\\deg} from the LMC in projection, its 3-dimensional distance from the Cloud is ~13 kpc, consistent with a connection to the LMC, whose tidal radius is at least 16 kpc. Although the nature of SMASH 1 remains uncertain, its compactness favors it being a stellar cluster and hence dark-matter free. If this is the case, its dynamical tidal radius is only <19 pc at this dista...

  14. An extremely faint stripped-envelope core-collapse supernova and its implications

    CERN Document Server

    Valenti, Stefano; Cappellaro, Enrico; Benetti, Stefano; Mazzali, Paolo; Manteca, Jose; Taubenberger, Stefan; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Ferrando, Rafael; Harutyunyan, Avet; Hentunen, Veli-Pekka; Nissinen, Markku; Pian, Elena; Turatto, Massimo; Zampieri, Luca; Smartt, Stephen J

    2009-01-01

    The final fate of massive stars depends on many factors, including the mass of the helium core, rotation rate, magnetic fields and metallicity. Theory suggests that some massive stars (initially greater than 25-30 solar masses) can die as under-luminous core-collapse supernovae (Ref.1,2,3). The models propose that the core mantle falls back onto the collapsed remnant, mass accretion leads to black hole formation and the remaining envelope including a very small fraction of radioactive elements is ejected with low kinetic energy. An alternative origin for low energy supernovae is the collapse of the oxygen-magnesium-neon core of a relatively low-mass star (7-8 solar masses) through electron capture (Ref 4,5). Only under-luminous type II-plateau (IIP) supernovae have been discovered so far (e.g. Ref. 6), and no weak hydrogen-stripped core-collapse supernova (of type Ib/c) has been detected. Here we show that faint Ib/c Supernovae do exist, and that they have been previously misclassified as peculiar thermonucle...

  15. Antlia B: A faint dwarf galaxy member of the NGC 3109 association

    CERN Document Server

    Sand, D J; Crnojević, D; Hargis, J R; Willman, B; Strader, J; Grillmair, C J

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of Antlia B, a faint dwarf galaxy at a projected distance of $\\sim$72 kpc from NGC 3109 ($M_{V}$$\\sim$$-$15 mag), the primary galaxy of the NGC 3109 dwarf association at the edge of the Local Group. The tip of the red giant branch distance to Antlia B is $D$=1.29$\\pm$0.10 Mpc, which is consistent with the distance to NGC 3109. A qualitative analysis indicates the new dwarf's stellar population has both an old, metal poor red giant branch ($\\gtrsim$10 Gyr, [Fe/H]$\\sim$$-$2), and a younger blue population with an age of $\\sim$200-400 Myr, analogous to the original Antlia dwarf, another likely satellite of NGC 3109. Antlia B has \\ion{H}{1} gas at a velocity of $v_{helio,HI}$=376 km s$^{-1}$, confirming the association with NGC 3109 ($v_{helio}$=403 km s$^{-1}$). The HI gas mass (M$_{HI}$=2.8$\\pm$0.2$\\times$10$^{5}$ M$_{\\odot}$), stellar luminosity ($M_{V}$=$-$9.7$\\pm$0.6 mag) and half light radius ($r_{h}$=273$\\pm$29 pc) are all consistent with the properties of dwarf irregular and dwarf ...

  16. The Search for Faint Radio Supernova Remnants in the Outer Galaxy: Five New Discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbrandt, Stephanie; Kothes, Roland; Geisbuesch, Joern; Tung, Albert

    2014-01-01

    High resolution and sensitivity large-scale radio surveys of the Milky Way are critical in the discovery of very low surface brightness supernova remnants (SNRs), which may constitute a significant portion of the Galactic SNRs still unaccounted for (ostensibly the Missing SNR problem). The overall purpose here is to present the results of a systematic, deep data-mining of the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS) for faint, extended non-thermal and polarized emission structures that are likely the shells of uncatalogued supernova remnants. We examine 5$\\times$5 degree mosaics from the entire 1420 MHz continuum and polarization dataset of the CGPS after removing unresolved point sources and subsequently smoothing them. Newly revealed extended emission objects are compared to similarly-prepared CGPS 408 MHz continuum mosaics, as well as to source-removed mosaics from various existing radio surveys at 4.8 GHz, 2.7 GHz, and 327 MHz, to identify candidates with non-thermal emission characteristics. We integrate fl...

  17. Star Formation Rate and Extinction in Faint z~4 Lyman-Break Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    To, Chun-Hao; Owen, Frazer N

    2014-01-01

    We present a statistical detection of 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission from a sample of faint z~4 Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). LBGs are key tracers of the high-redshift star formation history and important sources of UV photons that ionized the intergalactic medium in the early universe. In order to better constrain the extinction and intrinsic star formation rate (SFR) of high-redshift LBGs, we combine the latest ultradeep Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 1.5 GHz radio image and the Hubble Space Telescope Advance Camera for Surveys (ACS) optical images in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North. We select a large sample of 1771 z~4 LBGs from the ACS catalogue using $\\bband$-dropout color criteria. Our LBG samples have $\\iband$~25-28 (AB), ~0-3 magnitudes fainter than M*_UV at z~4. In our stacked radio images, we find the LBGs to be point-like under our 2" angular resolution. We measure their mean 1.5 GHz flux by stacking the measurements on the individual objects. We achieve a statistical detection ...

  18. Rapidly evolving faint transients from stripped-envelope electron-capture supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Takashi J.; Eldridge, J. J.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the expected rates and bolometric light-curve properties of stripped-envelope electron-capture supernovae (ECSNe) using stellar models from the Binary Population and Spectral Synthesis code. We find that 0.8 per cent (Z = 0.020) and 1.2 per cent (Z = 0.004) of core-collapse supernovae are stripped-envelope ECSNe. Their typical ejecta masses are estimated to be about 0.3 M⊙(Z = 0.020) and 0.6 M⊙ (Z = 0.004). Assuming ECSN explosion properties from numerical explosion simulations, an explosion energy of 1.5 × 1050 erg and a 56Ni mass of 2.5 × 10-3 M⊙, we find that stripped-envelope ECSNe have a typical rise time of around 7 d (Z = 0.020) or 13 d (Z = 0.004) and peak luminosity of around 1041 ergs-1 (-13.8 mag, Z = 0.020) or 7 × 1040 erg s-1 (-13.4 mag, Z = 0.004). Their typical ejecta velocities are around 7000 km s-1 (Z = 0.020) or 5000 km s-1 (Z = 0.004). Thus, stripped-envelope ECSNe are observed as rapidly evolving faint transients with relatively small velocities. SN 2008ha-like supernovae, which are the faintest kind of SN 2002cx-like (also known as Type Iax) supernovae, may be related to stripped-envelope ECSNe.

  19. Stellar Kinematics and Metallicities in the Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxy Reticulum II

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, J D; Li, T S; Nord, B; Geha, M; Bechtol, K; Balbinot, E; Buckley-Geer, E; Lin, H; Marshall, J; Santiago, B; Strigari, L; Wang, M; Wechsler, R H; Yanny, B; Abbott, T; Bauer, A H; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dodelson, S; Cunha, C E; Estrada, J; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Fernandez, E; Finley, D A; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Maia, M A G; March, M; Martini, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Ogando, R; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Rykoff, E S; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Schubnell, M; Sevilla, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Tucker, D; Vikram, V; Walker, A R; Wester, W

    2015-01-01

    We present Magellan/M2FS, VLT/GIRAFFE, and Gemini South/GMOS spectroscopy of the newly discovered Milky Way satellite Reticulum II. Based on the spectra of 25 Ret II member stars selected from Dark Energy Survey imaging, we measure a mean heliocentric velocity of 62.8 +/- 0.5 km/s and a velocity dispersion of 3.3 +/- 0.7 km/s. The mass-to-light ratio of Ret II within its half-light radius is 470 +/- 210 Msun/Lsun, demonstrating that it is a strongly dark matter-dominated system. Despite its spatial proximity to the Magellanic Clouds, the radial velocity of Ret II differs from that of the LMC and SMC by 199 and 83 km/s, respectively, suggesting that it is not gravitationally bound to the Magellanic system. The likely member stars of Ret II span 1.3 dex in metallicity, with a dispersion of 0.28 +/- 0.09 dex, and we identify several extremely metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] < -3. In combination with its luminosity, size, and ellipticity, these results confirm that Ret II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. With a me...

  20. Ultra faint dwarf galaxies: an arena for testing dark matter versus modified gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Weikang

    2016-01-01

    The scenario consistent with a wealth of observations for the missing mass problem is that of weakly interacting dark matter particles. However, arguments or proposals for a Newtonian or relativistic modified gravity scenario continue to be made. A distinguishing characteristic between the two scenarios is that dark matter particles can produce a gravitational effect, in principle, without the need of baryons while this is not the case for the modified gravity scenario where such an effect must be correlated with the amount of baryonic matter. We consider here ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies as a promising arena to test the two scenarios based on the above assertion. We compare the correlation of the luminosity with the velocity dispersion between samples of UFD and non-UFD galaxies, finding a trend of loss of correlation for the UFD galaxies. For example, we find for 28 non-UFD galaxies a strong correlation coefficient of -0.688 which drops to -0.077 for the 23 UFD galaxies. Incoming and future data will de...

  1. Ultra faint dwarf galaxies: an arena for testing dark matter versus modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Weikang; Ishak, Mustapha

    2016-10-01

    The scenario consistent with a wealth of observations for the missing mass problem is that of weakly interacting dark matter particles. However, arguments or proposals for a Newtonian or relativistic modified gravity scenario continue to be made. A distinguishing characteristic between the two scenarios is that dark matter particles can produce a gravitational effect, in principle, without the need of baryons while this is not the case for the modified gravity scenario where such an effect must be correlated with the amount of baryonic matter. We consider here ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies as a promising arena to test the two scenarios based on the above assertion. We compare the correlation of the luminosity with the velocity dispersion between samples of UFD and non-UFD galaxies, finding a significant loss of correlation for UFD galaxies. For example, we find for 28 non-UFD galaxies a strong correlation coefficient of -0.688 which drops to -0.077 for the 23 UFD galaxies. Incoming and future data will determine whether the observed stochasticity for UFD galaxies is physical or due to systematics in the data. Such a loss of correlation (if it is to persist) is possible and consistent with the dark matter scenario for UFD galaxies but would constitute a new challenge for the modified gravity scenario.

  2. A search for AGN activity in Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenc, Emil; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Mao, Minnie

    2010-04-01

    We propose to observe a large sample of radio sources from the ATLAS (Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) source catalogue with the LBA, to determine their compactness. The sample consists of 36 sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubber Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS), is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations. We will measure the flux densities on long baselines to determine their compactness. Only five IFRS have been previously targeted with VLBI observations (resulting in two detections). We propose using single baseline (Parkes-ATCA) eVLBI observations with the LBA at 1 Gbps to maximise sensitivity. With the observations proposed here we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from 5 to 36, allowing us to draw statistical conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  3. The first VLBI image of an infrared-faint radio source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Tingay, S.; Mao, M. Y.; Phillips, C. J.; Hotan, A. W.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We investigate the joint evolution of active galactic nuclei and star formation in the Universe. Aims: In the 1.4 GHz survey with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the Chandra Deep Field South and the European Large Area ISO Survey - S1 we have identified a class of objects which are strong in the radio but have no detectable infrared and optical counterparts. This class has been called Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS. 53 sources out of 2002 have been classified as IFRS. It is not known what these objects are. Methods: To address the many possible explanations as to what the nature of these objects is we have observed four sources with the Australian Long Baseline Array. Results: We have detected and imaged one of the four sources observed. Assuming that the source is at a high redshift, we find its properties in agreement with properties of Compact Steep Spectrum sources. However, due to the lack of optical and infrared data the constraints are not particularly strong.

  4. The first VLBI image of an Infrared-Faint Radio Source

    CERN Document Server

    Middelberg, E; Tingay, S; Mao, M Y; Phillips, C J; Hotan, A W

    2008-01-01

    Context: To investigate the joint evolution of active galactic nuclei and star formation in the Universe. Aims: In the 1.4 GHz survey with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the Chandra Deep Field South and the European Large Area ISO Survey - S1 we have identified a class of objects which are strong in the radio but have no detectable infrared and optical counterparts. This class has been called Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS. 53 sources out of 2002 have been classified as IFRS. It is not known what these objects are. Methods: To address the many possible explanations as to what the nature of these objects is we have observed four sources with the Australian Long Baseline Array. Results: We have detected and imaged one of the four sources observed. Assuming that the source is at a high redshift, we find its properties in agreement with properties of Compact Steep Spectrum sources. However, due to the lack of optical and infrared data the constraints are not particularly strong.

  5. The Dark Energy Survey view of the Sagittarius stream: Discovery of two faint stellar system candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Luque, E; Santiago, B; Yanny, B; Vivas, A K; Queiroz, A; Drlica-Wagner, A; Morganson, E; Balbinot, E; Marshall, J L; Li, T S; Neto, A Fausti; da Costa, L N; Maia, M A G; Bechtol, K; Kim, A G; Bernstein, G M; Dodelson, S; Whiteway, L; Diehl, H T; Finley, D A; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Annis, J; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Burke, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; Desai, S; Doel, P; Evrard, A E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Gerdes, D W; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Martini, P; Miquel, R; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Walker, A R

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of two new candidate stellar systems in the constellation of Cetus using the data from the first two years of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). The objects, DES J0111-1341 and DES J0225+0304, are located at a heliocentric distance of ~ 24 kpc and appear to have old and metal-poor populations. Their distances to the Sagittarius orbital plane, ~ 1.47 kpc (DES J0111-1341) and ~ 0.51 kpc (DES J0225+0304), indicate that they are possibly associated with the Sagittarius dwarf stream. The half-light radius (r_h ~ 4.10 pc) and luminosity (M_V ~ +0.5) of DES J0111-1341 are consistent with it being an ultra-faint stellar cluster, while the half-light radius (r_h ~ 18.70 pc) and luminosity (M_V ~ -1.2) of DES J0225+0304 place it in an ambiguous region of size-luminosity space between stellar clusters and dwarf galaxies. Determinations of the characteristic parameters of the Sagittarius stream, metallicity spread (-2.18 < [Fe/H] < -0.95) and distance gradient (23 kpc < D_sun < 29 kpc), wit...

  6. Hunting for Extremely Faint Planetary Nebulae in the SDSS Spectroscopic Database

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Haibo

    2013-01-01

    Using ~1,700,000 target- and sky-fiber spectra from the SDSS, we have carried out a systematic search for Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) via detections of the [OIII] 4959, 5007 lines. Thanks to the excellent sensitivity of the SDSS spectroscopic surveys, this is by far the deepest search for PNe ever taken, reaching a surface brightness of the [OIII] 5007 line down to about 29.0 mag./arcsec^2. The search recovers 13 previously known PNe in the Galactic Caps. In total, 44 new PN candidates are identified, including 7 candidates of multiple detections and 37 candidates of single detection. The 7 candidates of multiple detections are all extremely large (between 21' - 154') and faint, located mostly in the low Galactic latitude region and with a kinematics similar to disk stars. After checking their images in Ha and other bands, three of them are probably HII regions, one is probably associated with a new supernova remnant, another one is possibly a true PN, and the remaining two could be either PNe or superno...

  7. A faint type of supernova from a white dwarf with a helium-rich companion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perets, H B; Gal-Yam, A; Mazzali, P A; Arnett, D; Kagan, D; Filippenko, A V; Li, W; Arcavi, I; Cenko, S B; Fox, D B; Leonard, D C; Moon, D-S; Sand, D J; Soderberg, A M; Anderson, J P; James, P A; Foley, R J; Ganeshalingam, M; Ofek, E O; Bildsten, L; Nelemans, G; Shen, K J; Weinberg, N N; Metzger, B D; Piro, A L; Quataert, E; Kiewe, M; Poznanski, D

    2010-05-20

    Supernovae are thought to arise from two different physical processes. The cores of massive, short-lived stars undergo gravitational core collapse and typically eject a few solar masses during their explosion. These are thought to appear as type Ib/c and type II supernovae, and are associated with young stellar populations. In contrast, the thermonuclear detonation of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, whose mass approaches the Chandrasekhar limit, is thought to produce type Ia supernovae. Such supernovae are observed in both young and old stellar environments. Here we report a faint type Ib supernova, SN 2005E, in the halo of the nearby isolated galaxy, NGC 1032. The 'old' environment near the supernova location, and the very low derived ejected mass ( approximately 0.3 solar masses), argue strongly against a core-collapse origin. Spectroscopic observations and analysis reveal high ejecta velocities, dominated by helium-burning products, probably excluding this as a subluminous or a regular type Ia supernova. We conclude that it arises from a low-mass, old progenitor, likely to have been a helium-accreting white dwarf in a binary. The ejecta contain more calcium than observed in other types of supernovae and probably large amounts of radioactive (44)Ti.

  8. Ultra-light dark matter in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Erminia; Spergel, David N.

    2016-08-01

    Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models struggle to match the observations at galactic scales. The tension can be reduced either by dramatic baryonic feedback effects or by modifying the particle physics of CDM. Here, we consider an ultra-light scalar field DM particle manifesting a wave nature below a DM particle mass-dependent Jeans scale. For DM mass m ˜ 10-22 eV, this scenario delays galaxy formation and avoids cusps in the centre of the dark matter haloes. We use new measurements of half-light mass in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies Draco II and Triangulum II to estimate the mass of the DM particle in this model. We find that if the stellar populations are within the core of the density profile then the data are in agreement with a Wave Dark Matter model having a DM particle with m ˜ 3.7-5.6 × 10-22 eV. The presence of this extremely light particle will contribute to the formation of a central solitonic core replacing the cusp of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile and bringing predictions closer to observations of cored central density in dwarf galaxies.

  9. Ultraviolet to optical diffuse sky emission as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawara, Kimiaki; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Sano, Kei; Brandt, Timothy D.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Tsumura, Kohji; Oyabu, Shinki; Ienaka, Nobuyuki

    2017-02-01

    We present an analysis of the blank-sky spectra observed with the Faint Object Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We study the diffuse sky emission from ultraviolet to optical wavelengths, which is composed of zodiacal light (ZL), diffuse Galactic light (DGL), and residual emission. The observations were performed towards 54 fields distributed widely over the sky, with spectral coverage from 0.2 to 0.7 μm. In order to avoid contaminating light from earthshine, we use the data collected only in orbital nighttime. The observed intensity is decomposed into the ZL, DGL, and residual emission, in eight photometric bands spanning our spectral coverage. We found that the derived ZL reflectance spectrum is flat in the optical, which indicates major contribution of C-type asteroids to the interplanetary dust (IPD). In addition, the ZL reflectance spectrum has an absorption feature at ∼0.3 μm. The shape of the DGL spectrum is consistent with those found in earlier measurements and model predictions. While the residual emission contains a contribution from the extragalactic background light, we found that the spectral shape of the residual looks similar to the ZL spectrum. Moreover, its optical intensity is much higher than that measured from beyond the IPD cloud by Pioneer 10/11, and also than that of the integrated galaxy light. These findings may indicate the presence of an isotropic ZL component, which is missed in the conventional ZL models.

  10. The Quenching of the Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxies in the Reionization Era

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas M; Geha, Marla; Simon, Joshua D; Vargas, Luis C; VandenBerg, Don A; Kirby, Evan N; Kalirai, Jason S; Avila, Roberto J; Gennaro, Mario; Ferguson, Henry C; Munoz, Ricardo R; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Renzini, Alvio

    2014-01-01

    We present new constraints on the star formation histories of six ultra-faint dwarf galaxies: Bootes I, Canes Venatici II, Coma Berenices, Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I. Our analysis employs a combination of high-precision photometry obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope, medium-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph on the W.M. Keck Observatory, and updated Victoria-Regina isochrones tailored to the abundance patterns appropriate for these galaxies. The data for five of these Milky Way satellites are best fit by a star formation history where at least 75% of the stars formed by z~10 (13.3 Gyr ago). All of the galaxies are consistent with 80% of the stars forming by z~6 (12.8 Gyr ago) and 100% of the stars forming by z~3 (11.6 Gyr ago). The similarly ancient populations of these galaxies support the hypothesis that star formation in the smallest dark matter sub-halos was suppressed by a global outside influence, such as the r...

  11. The faint-end of the galaxy luminosity function in groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, R E; Lambas, D G; Valotto, C

    2005-01-01

    We compute the galaxy luminosity function in groups and clusters extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We apply a background subtraction method to a sample of 728 spectroscopically selected groups. The sample comprises systems in the redshift range $0.03 < z < 0.06$ and the virial mass range is $10^{11}M_\\odot < M_{vir} < 2\\times 10^{14}M_\\odot$. In the $r$ band, the composite galaxy luminosity function shows a slope of $\\alpha=-1.3$ in the bright--end, and an upturn of the slope in the faint--end ranging from -1.6 to -1.9. The upturn of the slope occurs at $M_r\\sim-18+5log(h)$ depending only weakly on group properties. We find that this feature is present also in the $i,g$ and $z$ bands and for all explored group subsamples, irrespective of the group mass or the presence of a hot intra-cluster gas with associated X-ray emission.

  12. The faint radio source population at 15.7 GHz - II. Multi-wavelength properties

    CERN Document Server

    Whittam, I H; Green, D A; Jarvis, M J; Vaccari, M

    2015-01-01

    A complete, flux density limited sample of 96 faint ($> 0.5$ mJy) radio sources is selected from the 10C survey at 15.7 GHz in the Lockman Hole. We have matched this sample to a range of multi-wavelength catalogues, including SERVS, SWIRE, UKIDSS and optical data; multi-wavelength counterparts are found for 80 of the 96 sources and spectroscopic redshifts are available for 24 sources. Photometric reshifts are estimated for the sources with multi-wavelength data available; the median redshift of the sample is 0.91 with an interquartile range of 0.84. Radio-to-optical ratios show that at least 94 per cent of the sample are radio loud, indicating that the 10C sample is dominated by radio galaxies. This is in contrast to samples selected at lower frequencies, where radio-quiet AGN and starforming galaxies are present in significant numbers at these flux density levels. All six radio-quiet sources have rising radio spectra, suggesting that they are dominated by AGN emission. These results confirm the conclusions o...

  13. Isophotal shapes of early-type galaxies to very faint levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaware, Laxmikant; Pandey, S. K. [School of Studies in Physics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur 492010 (India); Cannon, Russell [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Kembhavi, Ajit K. [Inter University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune (India); Mahabal, Ashish [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We report on a study of the isophotal shapes of early-type galaxies to very faint levels, reaching ∼0.1% of the sky brightness. The galaxies are from the Large Format Camera (LFC) fields obtained using the Palomar 5 m Hale Telescope, with integrated exposures ranging from 1 to 4 hr in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey r, i, and z bands. The shapes of isophotes of early-type galaxies are important, as they are correlated with the physical properties of the galaxies and are influenced by galaxy formation processes. In this paper, we report on a sample of 132 E and SO galaxies in one LFC field. We have redshifts for 53 of these, obtained using AAOmega on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The shapes of early-type galaxies often vary with radius. We derive average values of isophotal shape parameters in four different radial bins along the semi-major axis in each galaxy. We obtain empirical fitting formulae for the probability distribution of the isophotal parameters in each bin and investigate for possible correlations with other global properties of the galaxies. Our main finding is that the isophotal shapes of the inner regions are statistically different from those in the outer regions. This suggests that the outer and inner parts of early-type galaxies have evolved somewhat independently.

  14. The Dark Matter Content of the Triangulum II Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.; Simon, Joshua D.

    2017-01-01

    Triangulum II is an ultra-faint galaxy with a luminosity of 450 L⊙ discovered through Pan-STARRS imaging in 2015. Since then, two independent studies—including one of our own—based on Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy found that the galaxy has a stellar velocity dispersion of about 5 km/s, indicating a very high concentration of dark matter. Here, we present additional DEIMOS observations over six epochs. We show that a combination of radial velocity variability (likely due to binarity) and inaccuracies in the previous measurements led to a spurious detection of a velocity dispersion in excess of what would be expected from the stellar population alone. Instead, we place an upper limits of 3.4 km/s (90% C.L.) and 4.3 km/s (95% C.L.) on the velocity dispersion. While these limits are compatible with very high mass-to-light ratios (1700 at 90% C.L. or 2600 at 95% C.L.), Triangulum II no longer seems extreme compared to dwarf galaxies of similar luminosity. Because the stars still span a large range of metallicity (-2.8 < [Fe/H] < -1.5), the galactic nature of Triangulum II is not in dispute.

  15. The Origin of the Heaviest Metals in Most Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Roederer, Ian U

    2016-01-01

    The heaviest metals found in stars in most ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies in the Milky Way halo are generally underabundant by an order of magnitude or more when compared with stars in the halo field. Among the heavy elements produced by n-capture reactions, only Sr and Ba can be detected in red giant stars in most UFD galaxies. This limited chemical information is unable to identify the nucleosynthesis process(es) responsible for producing the heavy elements in UFD galaxies. Similar [Sr/Ba] and [Ba/Fe] ratios are found in three bright halo field stars, BD-18 5550, CS 22185-007, and CS 22891-200. Previous studies of high-quality spectra of these stars report detections of additional n-capture elements, including Eu. The [Eu/Ba] ratios in these stars span +0.41 to +0.86. These ratios and others among elements in the rare earth domain indicate an r-process origin. These stars have some of the lowest levels of r-process enhancement known, with [Eu/H] spanning -3.95 to -3.32, and they may be considered nearby p...

  16. The Phoenix Deep Survey: X-ray properties of faint radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakakis, A; Sullivan, M; Afonso, J; Georgantopoulos, I; Mobasher, B; Cram, L E

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we use a 50ks XMM-Newton pointing overlapping with the Phoenix Deep Survey, a homogeneous radio survey reaching muJy sensitivities, to explore the X-ray properties and the evolution of star-forming galaxies. UV, optical and NIR photometry is available and is used to estimate photometric redshifts and spectral types for radio sources brighter than R=21.5mag (total of 82). Sources with R3.5sigma) is detected in the 0.5-2keV band corresponding to a mean flux of ~3e-16cgs for both subsamples. This flux translates to mean luminosities of ~5e40 and 1.5e41cgs for the z=0.240 and 0.455 subsamples respectively. Only a marginally significant signal (2.6sigma) is detected in the 2-8keV band for the z=0.455 subsample. We argue that the stacked signal above is dominated by star-formation. The mean L_X/L_B ratio and the mean L_X of the two subsamples are found to be higher than optically selected spirals and similar to starbursts. We also find that the mean L_X and L_1.4 of the faint radio sources studied her...

  17. Revealing a strongly reddened, faint active galactic nucleus population by stacking deep co-added images

    CERN Document Server

    Varga, József; Dobos, László; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.21560.x

    2012-01-01

    More than half of the sources identified by recent radio sky surveys have not been detected by wide-field optical surveys. We present a study based on our co-added image stacking technique, in which our aim is to detect the optical emission from unresolved, isolated radio sources of the Very Large Array (VLA) Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST) survey that have no identified optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 co-added data set. From the FIRST catalogue, 2116 such radio point sources were selected, and cut-out images, centred on the FIRST coordinates, were generated from the Stripe 82 images. The already co-added cut-outs were stacked once again to obtain images of high signal-to-noise ratio, in the hope that optical emission from the radio sources would become detectable. Multiple stacks were generated, based on the radio luminosity of the point sources. The resulting stacked images show central peaks similar to point sources. The peaks have very red colours w...

  18. The faint outer regions of the Pegasus Dwarf Irregular galaxy: a much larger and undisturbed galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Kniazev, Alexei; Hoffman, G Lyle; Grebel, Eva K; Zucker, Daniel B; Pustilnik, Simon A

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the spatial extent and structure of the Pegasus dwarf irregular galaxy using deep, wide-field, multicolour CCD photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and new deep HI observations. We study an area of ~0.6 square degrees centred on the Pegasus dwarf that was imaged by SDSS. Using effective filtering in colour-magnitude space we reduce the contamination by foreground Galactic field stars and increase significantly the contrast in the outer regions of the Pegasus dwarf. Our extended surface photometry, reaches down to a surface brightness magnitude mu_r~32 mag/sq.arcsec. It reveals a stellar body with a diameter of ~8 kpc that follows a Sersic surface brightness distribution law, which is composed of a significantly older stellar population than that observed in the ~2 kpc main body. The galaxy is at least five times more extended than listed in NED. The faint extensions of the galaxy are not equally distributed around its circumference; the north-west end is more jagged than the sout...

  19. A Statistical Method to Constrain Faint Radio Source Counts Below the Detection Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell-Wynne, Ketron; Afonso, Jose; Jarvis, Matt J

    2013-01-01

    We present a statistical method based on a maximum likelihood approach to constrain the number counts of extragalactic sources below the nominal flux-density limit of continuum imaging surveys. We extract flux densities from a radio map using positional information from an auxiliary catalogue and show that we can model the number counts of this undetected population down to flux density levels well below the detection threshold of the radio survey. We demonstrate the capabilities that our method will have with future generation wide-area radio surveys by performing simulations over various sky areas with a power-law dN/dS model. We generate a simulated power-law distribution with flux densities ranging from 0.1 \\sigma to 2 \\sigma, convolve this distribution with a Gaussian noise distribution rms of 10 micro-Jy/beam, and are able to recover the counts from the noisy distribution. We then demonstrate the application of our method using data from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters survey (FI...

  20. On the nature of faint Low Surface Brightness galaxies in the Coma cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Adami, C; Ulmer, M P; Cuillandre, J C; Durret, F; Mazure, A; Picat, J P; Scheidegger, R

    2008-01-01

    This project is the continuation of our study of faint Low Surface Brightness Galaxies (fLSBs) in one of the densest nearby galaxy regions known, the Coma cluster. Our goal is to improve our understanding of the nature of these objects by comparing the broad band spectral energy distribution with population synthesis models. The data were obtained with the MEGACAM and CFH12K cameras at the CFHT. We used the resulting photometry in 5 broad band filters (u*, B, V, R, and I), that included new u*-band data, to fit spectral models. With these spectral fits we inferred a cluster membership criterium, as well as the ages, dust extinctions, and photometric types of these fLSBs. We show that about half of the Coma cluster fLSBs have a spectral energy distribution well represented in our template library while the other half present a flux deficit at ultraviolet wavelengths. Among the well represented, ~80% are probably part of the Coma cluster based on their spectral energy distribution. They are relatively young (yo...

  1. Herschel discovery of a new class of cold, faint debris discs

    CERN Document Server

    Eiroa, C; Mora, A; Krivov, A V; Montesinos, B; Absil, O; Ardila, D; Arevalo, M; Augereau, J -Ch; Bayo, A; Danchi, W; del Burgo, C; Ertel, S; Fridlund, M; Gonzalez-Garcıa, B M; Heras, A M; Lebreton, J; Liseau, R; Maldonado, J; Meeus, G; Montes, D; Pilbratt, G L; Roberge, A; Sanz-Forcada, J; Stapelfeldt, K; Thebault, P; White, G J; Wolf, S

    2011-01-01

    We present Herschel PACS 100 and 160 micron observations of the solar-type stars alpha Men, HD 88230 and HD 210277, which form part of the FGK stars sample of the Herschel Open Time Key Programme (OTKP) DUNES (DUst around NEarby S tars). Our observations show small infrared excesses at 160 micron for all three stars. HD 210277 also shows a small excess at 100 micron, while the 100 micron fluxes of alpha Men and HD 88230 agree with the stellar photospheric predictions. We attribute these infrared excesses to a new class of cold, faint debris discs. alpha Men and HD 88230 are spatially resolved in the PACS 160 micron images, while HD 210277 is point-like at that wavelength. The projected linear sizes of the extended emission lie in the range from ~ 115 to ~ 250 AU. The estimated black body temperatures from the 100 and 160 micron fluxes are $\\lesssim$ 22 K, while the fractional luminosity of the cold dust is Ldust/Lstar ~ 10E-6, close to the luminosity of the Solar-System's Kuiper belt. These debris discs are t...

  2. STAR FORMATION IN ULTRA-FAINT DWARFS: CONTINUOUS OR SINGLE-AGE BURSTS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, David; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Sutherland, Ralph, E-mail: d.webster@physics.usyd.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Cotter Rd, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2015-01-30

    We model the chemical evolution of six ultra-faint dwarfs (UFDs): Bootes I, Canes Venatici II, Coma Berenices, Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I based on their recently determined star formation histories. We show that two single-age bursts cannot explain the observed [α/Fe] versus [Fe/H] distribution in these galaxies and that some self-enrichment is required within the first burst. An alternative scenario is modeled, in which star formation is continuous except for short interruptions when one or more supernovae temporarily blow the dense gas out from the center of the system. This model allows for self-enrichment and can reproduce the chemical abundances of the UFDs in which the second burst is only a trace population. We conclude that the most likely star formation history is one or two extended periods of star formation, with the first burst lasting for at least 100 Myr. As found in earlier work, the observed properties of UFDs can be explained by formation at a low mass (M{sub vir}∼10{sup 7} M{sub ⊙}), rather than being stripped remnants of much larger systems.

  3. The Discovery of a Very Faint X-ray Transient in the Globular Cluster M15

    CERN Document Server

    Heinke, Craig O; Lugger, Phyllis M

    2008-01-01

    We have identified an X-ray transient (hereafter M15 X-3) in the globular cluster M15 from an archival Chandra grating observation. M15 X-3 appears at an X-ray luminosity of 6*10^{33} ergs/s with a spectrum consistent with an absorbed power law of photon index 1.51+-0.14. The object is identifiable in archival Chandra HRC-I observations with an X-ray luminosity of 2-6*10^{31} ergs/s and apparently soft colors, suggesting a neutron star low-mass X-ray binary in quiescence. We also observe it in outburst in a 2007 Chandra HRC-I observation, and in archival 1994-1995 ROSAT HRI observations. We identify a likely optical/UV counterpart with a (possibly transient) UV excess from archival HST data, which suggests a main sequence companion. We argue that M15 X-3's behavior is similar to that of the very faint X-ray transients which have been observed in the Galactic Center. We discuss several explanations for its very low X-ray luminosity, with the assumption that we have detected its companion. M15 X-3's uniquely lo...

  4. Four Faint T Dwarfs from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Southern Stripe

    CERN Document Server

    Chiu, Kuenley; Jiang, Linhua; Allers, Katelyn N; Stark, Daniel P; Bunker, Andrew; Fan, Xiaohui; Glazebrook, Karl; Dupuy, Trent J

    2007-01-01

    We present the optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of four faint T dwarfs newly discovered from the UKIDSS first data release. The sample, drawn from an imaged area of ~136 square degrees to a depth of Y=19.9 (5-sigma, Vega), is located in the SDSS Southern Equatorial Stripe, a region of significant future deep imaging potential. We detail the selection and followup of these objects, three of which are spectroscopically confirmed brown dwarfs ranging from type T2.5 to T7.5, and one is photometrically identified as early T. Their magnitudes range from Y=19.01 to 19.88 with derived distances from 34 to 98 pc, making these among the coldest and faintest brown dwarfs known. The sample brings the total number of T dwarfs found or confirmed by UKIDSS data in this region to nine, and we discuss the projected numbers of dwarfs in the future survey data. We estimate that ~240 early- and late-T dwarfs are discoverable in the UKIDSS LAS data, falling significantly short of published model projections a...

  5. A Hero's Dark Horse: Discovery of an Ultra-Faint Milky Way Satellite in Pegasus

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Dongwon; Mackey, Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S; Milone, Antonino P

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of an ultra-faint Milky Way satellite galaxy in the constellation of Pegasus. The concentration of stars was detected by applying our overdensity detection algorithm to the SDSS-DR 10 and confirmed with deeper photometry from the Dark Energy Camera at the 4-m Blanco telescope. Fitting model isochrones indicates that this object, Pegasus III, features an old and metal-poor stellar population ([Fe/H]$\\sim-2.1$) at a heliocentric distance of $205\\pm20$ kpc. The new stellar system has an estimated half-light radius of $r_h=110\\pm6$ pc and a total luminosity of $M_{V}\\sim-4.1\\pm0.5$ that places it into the domain of dwarf galaxies on the size--luminosity plane. Pegasus III is spatially close to the MW satellite Pisces II. It is possible that the two might be physically associated, similar to the Leo IV and Leo V pair. Pegasus III is also well aligned with the Vast Polar Structure, which suggests a possible physical association.

  6. Faint Object Detection in Multi-Epoch Observations via Catalog Data Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Budavari, Tamas; Loredo, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Observational astronomy in the time-domain era faces several new challenges. One of them is the efficient use of observations obtained at multiple epochs. The work presented here addresses faint object detection with multi-epoch data, and describes an incremental strategy for separating real objects from artifacts in ongoing surveys, in situations where the single-epoch data are summaries of the full image data, such as single-epoch catalogs of flux and direction estimates for candidate sources. The basic idea is to produce low-threshold single-epoch catalogs, and use a probabilistic approach to accumulate catalog information across epochs; this is in contrast to more conventional strategies based on co-added or stacked image data across all epochs. We adopt a Bayesian approach, addressing object detection by calculating the marginal likelihoods for hypotheses asserting there is no object, or one object, in a small image patch containing at most one cataloged source at each epoch. The object-present hypothesi...

  7. The Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) - V. Optically Faint Variable Object Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Yasuda, Naoki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro; Furusawa, Hisanori; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Totani, Tomonori; Oda, Takeshi; Nagao, Tohru; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Murayama, Takashi; Ouchi, Masami; Watson, Mike G; Richmond, Michael W; Lidman, Christopher; Perlmutter, Saul; Spadafora, Anthony L; Aldering, Greg; Wang, Lifan; Hook, Isobel M; Knop, Rob A

    2007-01-01

    We present our survey for optically faint variable objects using multi-epoch (8-10 epochs over 2-4 years) $i'$-band imaging data obtained with Subaru Suprime-Cam over 0.918 deg$^2$ in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field (SXDF). We found 1040 optically variable objects by image subtraction for all the combinations of images at different epochs. This is the first statistical sample of variable objects at depths achieved with 8-10m class telescopes or HST. The detection limit for variable components is $i'_{\\rm{vari}}\\sim25.5$ mag. These variable objects were classified into variable stars, supernovae (SNe), and active galactic nuclei (AGN), based on the optical morphologies, magnitudes, colors, and optical-mid-infrared colors of the host objects, spatial offsets of variable components from the host objects, and light curves. Detection completeness was examined by simulating light curves for periodic and irregular variability. We detected optical variability for $36\\pm2%$ ($51\\pm3%$ for a bright sample with $i'150$...

  8. Detection of a faint fast-moving near-Earth asteroid using synthetic tracking technique

    CERN Document Server

    Zhai, Chengxing; Nemati, Bijan; Werne, Thomas A; Zhou, Hanying; Turyshev, Slava G; Sandhu, Jagmit; Hallinan, Gregg W; Harding, Leon K

    2014-01-01

    We report a detection of a faint near-Earth asteroid (NEA), which was done using our synthetic tracking technique and the CHIMERA instrument on the Palomar 200-inch telescope. This asteroid, with apparent magnitude of 23, was moving at 5.97 degrees per day and was detected at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 15 using 30 sec of data taken at a 16.7 Hz frame rate. The detection was confirmed by a second observation one hour later at the same SNR. The asteroid moved 7 arcseconds in sky over the 30 sec of integration time because of its high proper motion. The synthetic tracking using 16.7 Hz frames avoided the trailing loss suffered by conventional techniques relying on 30-sec exposure, which would degrade the surface brightness of image on CCD to an approximate magnitude of 25. This detection was a result of our 12-hour blind search conducted on the Palomar 200-inch telescope over two nights on September 11 and 12, 2013 scanning twice over six 5.0 deg x 0.043 deg fields. The fact that we detected only one NEA, ...

  9. The quenching of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies in the reionization era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Thomas M.; Tumlinson, Jason; Kalirai, Jason S.; Avila, Roberto J.; Gennaro, Mario; Ferguson, Henry C., E-mail: tbrown@stsci.edu, E-mail: tumlinson@stsci.edu, E-mail: jkalirai@stsci.edu, E-mail: avila@stsci.edu, E-mail: ferguson@stsci.edu, E-mail: gennaro@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); and others

    2014-12-01

    We present new constraints on the star formation histories of six ultra-faint dwarf galaxies: Bootes I, Canes Venatici II, Coma Berenices, Hercules, Leo IV, and Ursa Major I. Our analysis employs a combination of high-precision photometry obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope, medium-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph on the W. M. Keck Observatory, and updated Victoria-Regina isochrones tailored to the abundance patterns appropriate for these galaxies. The data for five of these Milky Way satellites are best fit by a star formation history where at least 75% of the stars formed by z ∼ 10 (13.3 Gyr ago). All of the galaxies are consistent with 80% of the stars forming by z ∼ 6 (12.8 Gyr ago) and 100% of the stars forming by z ∼ 3 (11.6 Gyr ago). The similarly ancient populations of these galaxies support the hypothesis that star formation in the smallest dark-matter sub-halos was suppressed by a global outside influence, such as the reionization of the universe.

  10. Faint HI 21-cm Emission Line Wings at Forbidden-Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Ji-hyun

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a search for faint HI 21-cm emission line wings at velocities forbidden by Galactic rotation in the Galactic plane using the Leiden/Dwingeloo HI Survey data and the HI Southern Galactic Plane Survey data. These ``forbidden-velocity wings (FVWs)'' appear as protruding excessive emission in comparison with their surroundings in limited (< 2 deg) spatial regions over velocity extent more than ~20 km/s in large-scale (l-v) diagrams. Their high-velocities imply that there should be some dynamical phenomena associated. We have identified 87 FVWs. We present their catalog, and discuss their distribution and statistical properties. We found that 85% of FVWs are not coincident with known supernova remnants (SNRs), galaxies, or high-velocity clouds. Their natures are currently unknown. We suspect that many of them are fast-moving HI shells and filaments associated with the oldest SNRs that are essentially invisible except via their HI line emission. We discuss other possible origins.

  11. The faint intergalactic-medium red-shifted emission balloon: future UV observations with EMCCDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyne, Gillian; Hamden, Erika T.; Lingner, Nicole; Morrissey, Patrick; Nikzad, Shouleh; Martin, D. Christopher

    2016-08-01

    We present the latest developments in our joint NASA/CNES suborbital project. This project is a balloon-borne UV multi-object spectrograph, which has been designed to detect faint emission from the circumgalactic medium (CGM) around low redshift galaxies. One major change from FIREBall-1 has been the use of a delta-doped Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD). EMCCDs can be used in photon-counting (PC) mode to achieve extremely low readout noise (¡ 1e-). Our testing initially focused on reducing clock-induced-charge (CIC) through wave shaping and well depth optimisation with the CCD Controller for Counting Photons (CCCP) from Nüvü. This optimisation also includes methods for reducing dark current, via cooling and substrate voltage adjustment. We present result of laboratory noise measurements including dark current. Furthermore, we will briefly present some initial results from our first set of on-sky observations using a delta-doped EMCCD on the 200 inch telescope at Palomar using the Palomar Cosmic Web Imager (PCWI).

  12. Variable stars in the ultra-faint dwarf spheroidal galaxy Ursa Major I

    CERN Document Server

    Garofalo, Alessia; Clementini, Gisella; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Dall'Ora, Massimo; Moretti, Maria Ida; Coppola, Giuseppina; Musella, Ilaria; Marconi, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    We have performed the first study of the variable star population of Ursa Major I (UMa I), an ultra-faint dwarf satellite recently discovered around the Milky Way by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Combining time series observations in the B and V bands from four different telescopes, we have identified seven RR Lyrae stars in UMa I, of which five are fundamental-mode (RRab) and two are first-overtone pulsators (RRc). Our V, B-V color-magnitude diagram of UMa I reaches V~23 mag (at a signal-to-noise ratio of ~ 6) and shows features typical of a single old stellar population. The mean pulsation period of the RRab stars = 0.628, {\\sigma} = 0.071 days (or = 0.599, {\\sigma} = 0.032 days, if V4, the longest period and brightest variable, is discarded) and the position on the period-amplitude diagram suggest an Oosterhoff-intermediate classification for the galaxy. The RR Lyrae stars trace the galaxy horizontal branch at an average apparent magnitude of = 20.43 +/- 0.02 mag (average on 6 stars and discarding V4), ...

  13. Ultra-Light Dark Matter in Ultra-Faint Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Calabrese, Erminia

    2016-01-01

    Cold Dark Matter (CDM) models struggle to match the observations at galactic scales. The tension can be reduced either by dramatic baryonic feedback effects or by modifying the particle physics of CDM. Here, we consider an ultra-light scalar field DM particle manifesting a wave nature below a DM particle mass-dependent Jeans scale. For DM mass $m\\sim10^{-22}{\\rm eV}$, this scenario delays galaxy formation and avoids cusps in the center of the dark matter haloes. We use new measurements of half-light mass in ultra-faint dwarf galaxies Draco II and Triangulum II to estimate the mass of the DM particle in this model. We find that if the stellar populations are within the core of the density profile then the data are in agreement with a wave dark matter model having a DM particle with $m\\sim 3.7-5.6\\times 10^{-22}{\\rm eV}$. The presence of this extremely light particle will contribute to the formation of a central solitonic core replacing the cusp of a Navarro-Frenk-White profile and bringing predictions closer t...

  14. Stacking Star Clusters in M51: Searching for Faint X-Ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Vulic, N; Gallagher, S C

    2012-01-01

    The population of low-luminosity (< 10^35 erg/s) X-Ray Binaries (XRBs) has been investigated in our Galaxy and M31 but not further. To address this problem, we have used data from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope to investigate the faint population of XRBs in the grand-design spiral galaxy M51. A matching analysis found 25 star clusters coincident with 20 X-ray point sources within 1.5" (60 pc). From X-ray and optical color-color plots we determine that this population is dominated by high-mass XRBs. A stacking analysis of the X-ray data at the positions of optically-identified star clusters was completed to probe low-luminosity X-ray sources. No cluster type had a significant detection in any X-ray energy band. An average globular cluster had the largest upper limit, 9.23 x 10^34 erg/s, in the full-band (0.3 - 8 keV) while on average the complete sample of clusters had the lowest upper limit, 6.46 x 10^33 erg/s in the hard-band (2 - 8 keV). We determined average luminosities of...

  15. Simon on Problem-Solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kirsten; Foss, Nicolai

    as a general approach to problem solving. We apply these Simonian ideas to organizational issues, specifically new organizational forms. Specifically, Simonian ideas allow us to develop a morphology of new organizational forms and to point to some design problems that characterize these forms.Keywords: Herbert...... Simon, problem-solving, new organizational forms. JEL Code: D23, D83......Two of Herbert Simon's best-known papers are "The Architecture of Complexity" and "The Structure of Ill-Structured Problems." We discuss the neglected links between these two papers, highlighting the role of decomposition in the context of problems on which constraints have been imposed...

  16. Interactive problem solving using LOGO

    CERN Document Server

    Boecker, Heinz-Dieter; Fischer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    This book is unique in that its stress is not on the mastery of a programming language, but on the importance and value of interactive problem solving. The authors focus on several specific interest worlds: mathematics, computer science, artificial intelligence, linguistics, and games; however, their approach can serve as a model that may be applied easily to other fields as well. Those who are interested in symbolic computing will find that Interactive Problem Solving Using LOGO provides a gentle introduction from which one may move on to other, more advanced computational frameworks or more

  17. 2008+ solved problems in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Nasar, Syed

    2007-01-01

    SciTech Publishing is reissuing this extremely valuable learning resource, originally published in 1992 in the Schaum's Problem-Solving Series for students of electromagnetics and those who wish to refresh and solidify their understanding of its challenging applications. Problem-solving drill helps develop confidence, but few textbooks offer the answers, never mind the complete solutions, to their chapter exercises. Here noted author Professor Syed Nasar has divided the book's problems into topic areas similar to a textbook and presented a wide array of problems, followed immediately by their

  18. Chemical abundances in the multiple sub-giant branch of 47 Tucanae: insights on its faint sub-giant branch component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, A. F.; Milone, A. P.; Casagrande, L.; Collet, R.; Dotter, A.; Johnson, C. I.; Lind, K.; Bedin, L. R.; Jerjen, H.; Aparicio, A.; Sbordone, L.

    2016-06-01

    The globular cluster 47 Tuc exhibits a complex sub-giant branch (SGB) with a faint-SGB comprising only about the 10 per cent of the cluster mass and a bright-SGB hosting at least two distinct populations. We present a spectroscopic analysis of 62 SGB stars including 21 faint-SGB stars. We thus provide the first chemical analysis of the intriguing faint-SGB population and compare its abundances with those of the dominant populations. We have inferred abundances of Fe, representative light elements C, N, Na, and Al, α elements Mg and Si for individual stars. Oxygen has been obtained by co-adding spectra of stars on different sequences. In addition, we have analysed 12 stars along the two main RGBs of 47 Tuc. Our principal results are (i) star-to-star variations in C/N/Na among RGB and bright-SGB stars; (ii) substantial N and Na enhancements for the minor population corresponding to the faint-SGB; (iii) no high enrichment in C+N+O for faint-SGB stars. Specifically, the C+N+O of the faint-SGB is a factor of 1.1 higher than the bright-SGB, which, considering random (±1.3) plus systematic errors (±0.3), means that their C+N+O is consistent within observational uncertainties. However, a small C+N+O enrichment for the faint-SGB, similar to what predicted on theoretical ground, cannot be excluded. The N and Na enrichment of the faint-SGB qualitatively agrees with this population possibly being He-enhanced, as suggested by theory. The iron abundance of the bright and faint-SGB is the same to a level of ˜0.10 dex, and no other significant difference for the analysed elements has been detected.

  19. A Faint Star-Forming System Viewed Through the Lensing Cluster Abell 2218 First Light at z~5.6?

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, R; Kneib, J P; Kuijken, K; Ellis, Richard; Santos, Mike; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kuijken, Konrad

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the physical nature of a remarkably faint pair of Lyman alpha-emitting images discovered close to the giant cD galaxy in the lensing cluster Abell 2218 (z=0.18) during a systematic survey for highly-magnified star-forming galaxies beyond z=5. A well-constrained mass model suggests the pair arises via a gravitationally-lensed source viewed at high magnification. Keck spectroscopy confirms the lensing hypothesis and implies the unlensed source is a very faint (I~30) compact (<150 pc) and isolated object at z=5.576 whose optical emission is substantially contained within the Lyman alpha emission line; no stellar continuum is detectable. The available data suggest the source is a promising candidate for an isolated ~10^6 solar mass system seen producing its first generation of stars close to the epoch of reionization.

  20. Solving Differential Equations in R: Package deSolve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karline Soetaert

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the R package deSolve to solve initial value problems (IVP written as ordinary differential equations (ODE, differential algebraic equations (DAE of index 0 or 1 and partial differential equations (PDE, the latter solved using the method of lines approach. The differential equations can be represented in R code or as compiled code. In the latter case, R is used as a tool to trigger the integration and post-process the results, which facilitates model development and application, whilst the compiled code significantly increases simulation speed. The methods implemented are efficient, robust, and well documented public-domain Fortran routines. They include four integrators from the ODEPACK package (LSODE, LSODES, LSODA, LSODAR, DVODE and DASPK2.0. In addition, a suite of Runge-Kutta integrators and special-purpose solvers to efficiently integrate 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional partial differential equations are available. The routines solve both stiff and non-stiff systems, and include many options, e.g., to deal in an efficient way with the sparsity of the Jacobian matrix, or finding the root of equations. In this article, our objectives are threefold: (1 to demonstrate the potential of using R for dynamic modeling, (2 to highlight typical uses of the different methods implemented and (3 to compare the performance of models specified in R code and in compiled code for a number of test cases. These comparisons demonstrate that, if the use of loops is avoided, R code can efficiently integrate problems comprising several thousands of state variables. Nevertheless, the same problem may be solved from 2 to more than 50 times faster by using compiled code compared to an implementation using only R code. Still, amongst the benefits of R are a more flexible and interactive implementation, better readability of the code, and access to R’s high-level procedures. deSolve is the successor of package odesolve which will be deprecated in

  1. Problem-Solving Test: Pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: Maxam-Gilbert sequencing, Sanger sequencing, gel electrophoresis, DNA synthesis reaction, polymerase chain reaction, template, primer, DNA polymerase, deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, orthophosphate, pyrophosphate, nucleoside monophosphates, luminescence, acid anhydride bond,…

  2. Reasoning, Problem Solving, and Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    is a markted adjective, the subject takeS additional time in seriating the relation spatially in the nonpreferCA" (usually bottom-up) direction. If...PROBLE4 SOLVING, AND INTELLIGENCE I have reviewed in this chapter only a small segment of the literature that could sensibly be viewed as dealing with

  3. Students' Problem Solving and Justification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Barbara; Maher, Carolyn A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on methods of students' justifications of their solution to a problem in the area of combinatorics. From the analysis of the problem solving of 150 students in a variety of settings from high-school to graduate study, four major forms of reasoning evolved: (1) Justification by Cases, (2) Inductive Argument, (3) Elimination…

  4. Promote Problem-Solving Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostic, Jonathan; Jacobbe, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen fifth-grade students gather at the front of the classroom as their summer school instructor introduces Jonathan Bostic as the mathematics teacher for the week. Before examining any math problems, Bostic sits at eye level with the students and informs them that they will solve problems over the next four days by working individually as…

  5. On transfer during problem solving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamel, R.; Jakab, E.

    2013-01-01

    A puzzle is equally new for everyone who is presented with it for the first time. However, it is not if we take one’s previous knowledge into account. Some knowledge may be utilised while working on the puzzle. If this is the case, problem solving as well as the development of knowledge about the pu

  6. Common Core: Solve Math Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Erich

    2012-01-01

    The new common core standards for mathematics demand that students (and teachers!) exhibit deeper conceptual understanding. That's music to the ears of education professor John Tapper, who says teachers have overemphasized teaching procedures--and getting right answers. In his new book, "Solving for Why," he makes a powerful case for moving beyond…

  7. Robot computer problem solving system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J. D.; Merriam, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    The conceptual, experimental, and practical aspects of the development of a robot computer problem solving system were investigated. The distinctive characteristics were formulated of the approach taken in relation to various studies of cognition and robotics. Vehicle and eye control systems were structured, and the information to be generated by the visual system is defined.

  8. Human Problem Solving in 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a bibliography of a little more than 100 references related to human problem solving, arranged by subject matter. The references were taken from PsycInfo and Compendex databases. Only journal papers, books and dissertations are included. The topics include human development, education, neuroscience, research in applied…

  9. Teaching Employees to Solve Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lauren E.; Feggestad, Kurt

    1987-01-01

    John Deere's systematic problem-solving training for its employees is applicable in the vocational classroom. The process includes stating the problem, writing its specifications, identifying distinctions, determining changes that occurred at the time, identifying possible causes, testing the possibilities, verifying the most probable cause, and…

  10. Atmospheric Photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Harrie; Potter, A. E.

    1961-01-01

    The upper atmosphere offers a vast photochemical laboratory free from solid surfaces, so all reactions take place in the gaseous phase. At 30 km altitude the pressure has fallen to about one-hundredth of that at ground level, and we shall, rather arbitrarily, regard the upper atmosphere as beginning at that height. By a little less than 100 km the pressure has fallen to 10(exp -3) mm Hg and is decreasing by a power of ten for every 15 km increase in altitude. Essentially we are concerned then with the photochemistry of a nitrogen-oxygen mixture under low-pressure conditions in which photo-ionization, as well as photodissociation, plays an important part. Account must also be taken of the presence of rare constituents, such as water vapour and its decomposition products, including particularly hydroxyl, oxides of carbon, methane and, strangely enough, sodium, lithium and calcium. Many curious and unfamiliar reactions occur in the upper atmosphere. Some of them are luminescent, causing the atmosphere to emit a dim light called the airglow. Others, between gaseous ions and neutral molecules, are almost a complete mystery at this time. Similar interesting phenomena must occur in other planetary atmospheres, and they might be predicted if sufficient chemical information were available.

  11. High-resolution imaging of the Pluto-Charon system with the Faint Object Camera of the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Adorf, H.-M.; Corrain, G.; Gemmo, A.; Greenfield, P.; Hainaut, O.; Hook, R. N.; Tholen, D. J.; Blades, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Images of the Pluto-Charon system were obtained with the Faint Object Camera (FOC) of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) after the refurbishment of the telescope. The images are of superb quality, allowing the determination of radii, fluxes, and albedos. Attempts were made to improve the resolution of the already diffraction limited images by image restoration. These yielded indications of surface albedo distributions qualitatively consistent with models derived from observations of Pluto-Charon mutual eclipses.

  12. Genetics problem solving and worldview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Esther

    The research goal was to determine whether worldview relates to traditional and real-world genetics problem solving. Traditionally, scientific literacy emphasized content knowledge alone because it was sufficient to solve traditional problems. The contemporary definition of scientific literacy is, "The knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts and processes required for personal decision-making, participation in civic and cultural affairs and economic productivity" (NRC, 1996). An expanded definition of scientific literacy is needed to solve socioscientific issues (SSI), complex social issues with conceptual, procedural, or technological associations with science. Teaching content knowledge alone assumes that students will find the scientific explanation of a phenomenon to be superior to a non-science explanation. Formal science and everyday ways of thinking about science are two different cultures (Palmer, 1999). Students address this rift with cognitive apartheid, the boxing away of science knowledge from other types of knowledge (Jedege & Aikenhead, 1999). By addressing worldview, cognitive apartheid may decrease and scientific literacy may increase. Introductory biology students at the University of Minnesota during fall semester 2005 completed a written questionnaire-including a genetics content-knowledge test, four genetic dilemmas, the Worldview Assessment Instrument (WAI) and some items about demographics and religiosity. Six students responded to the interview protocol. Based on statistical analysis and interview data, this study concluded the following: (1) Worldview, in the form of metaphysics, relates to solving traditional genetic dilemmas. (2) Worldview, in the form of agency, relates to solving traditional genetics problems. (3) Thus, worldview must be addressed in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

  13. Atmospheric science and power production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randerson, D. (ed.)

    1984-07-01

    This is the third in a series of scientific publications sponsored by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the two later organizations, the US Energy Research and Development Adminstration, and the US Department of Energy. The first book, Meteorology and Atomic Energy, was published in 1955; the second, in 1968. The present volume is designed to update and to expand upon many of the important concepts presented previously. However, the present edition draws heavily on recent contributions made by atmospheric science to the analysis of air quality and on results originating from research conducted and completed in the 1970s. Special emphasis is placed on how atmospheric science can contribute to solving problems relating to the fate of combustion products released into the atmosphere. The framework of this book is built around the concept of air-quality modeling. Fundamentals are addressed first to equip the reader with basic background information and to focus on available meteorological instrumentation and to emphasize the importance of data management procedures. Atmospheric physics and field experiments are described in detail to provide an overview of atmospheric boundary layer processes, of how air flows around obstacles, and of the mechanism of plume rise. Atmospheric chemistry and removal processes are also detailed to provide fundamental knowledge on how gases and particulate matter can be transformed while in the atmosphere and how they can be removed from the atmosphere. The book closes with a review of how air-quality models are being applied to solve a wide variety of problems. Separate analytics have been prepared for each chapter.

  14. Galaxy Modelling - II. Multi-Wavelength Faint Counts from a Semi-Analytic Model of Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Devriendt, J E G

    2000-01-01

    (Abridged) This paper predicts self-consistent faint galaxy counts from the UV to the submm wavelength range. The STARDUST spectral energy distributions described in Devriendt et al. (1999) are embedded within the explicit cosmological framework of a simple semi-analytic model of galaxy formation and evolution. We build a class of models which capture the luminosity budget of the universe through faint galaxy counts and redshift distributions in the whole wavelength range spanned by our spectra. In contrast with a rather stable behaviour in the optical and even in the far-IR, the submm counts are dramatically sensitive to variations in the cosmological parameters and changes in the star formation history. Faint submm counts are more easily accommodated within an open universe with a low value of $\\Omega_0$, or a flat universe with a non-zero cosmological constant. This study illustrates the implementation of multi-wavelength spectra into a semi-analytic model. In spite of its simplicity, it already provides f...

  15. The Little Galaxies that Could (Reionize the Universe): Predicting Faint End Slopes & Escape Fractions at z > 4

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Lauren; Karcher, Michael; Quinn, Tom; Wadsley, James

    2016-01-01

    The sources that reionized the universe are still unknown, but likely candidates are faint but numerous galaxies. In this paper we present results from running a high resolution, uniform volume simulation, the Vulcan, to predict the number densities of undetectable, faint galaxies and their escape fractions of ionizing radiation, $f_\\mathrm{esc}$, during reionization. Our approach combines a high spatial resolution, a realistic treatment of feedback and hydro processes, a strict threshold for minimum number of resolution elements per galaxy, and a converged measurement of $f_\\mathrm{esc}$. We calibrate our physical model using a novel approach to create realistic galaxies at z=0, so the simulation is predictive at high redshifts. With this approach we can (1) robustly predict the evolution of the galaxy UV luminosity function at faint magnitudes down to $M_\\mathrm{UV}$~-15, two magnitudes fainter than observations, and (2) estimate $f_\\mathrm{esc}$ over a large range of galaxy masses based on the detailed ste...

  16. Characterizing elusive, faint dusty star-forming galaxies: a lensed, optically-undetected ALMA galaxy at z~3.3

    CERN Document Server

    Santini, P; Fontana, A; Merlin, E; Maiolino, R; Mason, C; Mignano, A; Pilo, S; Amorin, R; Berta, S; Bourne, N; Calura, F; Daddi, E; Elbaz, D; Grazian, A; Magliocchetti, M; Michalowski, M J; Pentericci, L; Pozzi, F; Rodighiero, G; Schreiber, C; Valiante, R

    2016-01-01

    We present the serendipitous ALMA detection of a faint submillimeter galaxy (SMG) lensed by a foreground z~1 galaxy. By optimizing the source detection to deblend the system, we accurately build the full spectral energy distribution of the distant galaxy from the I814 band to radio wavelengths. It is extremely red, with a I-K colour larger than 2.5. We estimate a photometric redshift of 3.28 and determine the physical parameters. The distant galaxy turns out to be magnified by the foreground lens by a factor of ~1.5, which implies an intrinsic Ks-band magnitude of ~24.5, a submillimeter flux at 870um of ~2.5 mJy and a SFR of ~150-300Msun/yr, depending on the adopted tracer. These values place our source towards the faint end of the distribution of observed SMGs, and in particular among the still few faint SMGs with a fully characterized spectral energy distribution, which allows us not only to accurately estimate its redshift but also to measure its stellar mass and other physical properties. The galaxy studi...

  17. The LyA-LyC Connection: Evidence for an Enhanced Contribution of UV-faint Galaxies to Cosmic Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkstra, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The escape of ionizing Lyman Continuum (LyC) photons requires the existence of low-N_HI sightlines, which also promote escape of Lyman-Alpha (Lya). We use a suite of 2500 Lya Monte-Carlo radiative transfer simulations through models of dusty, clumpy interstellar (`multiphase') media from Gronke & Dijkstra (2016), and compare the escape fractions of Lya [f_esc(Lya)] and LyC radiation [f_esc(LyC)]. We find that f_esc(LyC) and f_esc(Lya) are correlated: galaxies with a low f_esc(Lya) consistently have a low f_esc(LyC), while galaxies with a high f_esc(Lya) exhibit a large dispersion in f_esc(LyC). We argue that there is increasing observational evidence that Lya escapes more easily from UV-faint galaxies. The correlation between f_esc(LyC) and f_esc(Lya) then implies that UV-faint galaxies contribute more to the ionizing background than implied by the faint-end slope of the UV-luminosity function. In multiphase gases, the ionizing escape fraction is most strongly affected by the cloud covering factor, f_cl, ...

  18. The Lyα-LyC Connection: Evidence for an Enhanced Contribution of UV-faint Galaxies to Cosmic Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Mark; Gronke, Max; Venkatesan, Aparna

    2016-09-01

    The escape of ionizing Lyman continuum (LyC) photons requires the existence of low-N H i sightlines, which also promote escape of Lyα. We use a suite of 2500 Lyα Monte-Carlo radiative transfer simulations through models of dusty, clumpy interstellar (“multiphase”) media from Gronke & Dijkstra, and compare the escape fractions of Lyα ({f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α }) and LyC radiation ({f}{{esc}}{{ion}}). We find that {f}{{esc}}{{ion}} and {f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α } are correlated: galaxies with a low {f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α } consistently have a low {f}{{esc}}{{ion}}, while galaxies with a high {f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α } exhibit a large dispersion in {f}{{esc}}{{ion}}. We argue that there is increasing observational evidence that Lyα escapes more easily from UV-faint galaxies. The correlation between {f}{{esc}}{{ion}} and {f}{{esc}}{{Ly}α } then implies that UV-faint galaxies contribute more to the ionizing background than implied by the faint-end slope of the UV luminosity function. In multiphase gases, the ionizing escape fraction is most strongly affected by the cloud covering factor, f cl, which implies that {f}{{esc}}{{ion}} is closely connected to the observed Lyα spectral line shape. Specifically, LyC-emitting galaxies typically having narrower, more symmetric line profiles. This prediction is qualitatively similar to that for “shell models.”

  19. Sweating the small stuff: simulating dwarf galaxies, ultra-faint dwarf galaxies, and their own tiny satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeler, Coral; Bullock, James S; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Elbert, Oliver; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Hopkins, Philip F; Keres, Dusan

    2015-01-01

    We present FIRE/Gizmo hydrodynamic zoom-in simulations of isolated dark matter halos, two each at the mass of classical dwarf galaxies ($M_{\\rm vir} \\simeq 10^{10} M_{\\odot}$) and ultra-faint galaxies ($M_{\\rm vir} \\simeq 10^9 M_{\\odot}$), and with two feedback implementations. The resultant central galaxies lie on an extrapolated abundance matching relation from $M_{\\star} \\simeq 10^6$ to $10^4 M_{\\odot}$ without a break. Every host is filled with subhalos, many of which form stars. Our dwarfs with $M_{\\star} \\simeq 10^6 M_{\\odot}$ each have 1-2 well-resolved satellites with $M_{\\star} = 3-200 \\times 10^3 M_{\\odot}$. Even our isolated ultra-faint galaxies have star-forming subhalos. If this is representative, dwarf galaxies throughout the universe should commonly host tiny satellite galaxies of their own. We combine our results with the ELVIS simulations to show that targeting $\\sim 50~ \\rm kpc$ regions around nearby isolated dwarfs could increase the chances of discovering ultra-faint galaxies by $\\sim 35\\%...

  20. Atmospheric thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarne, J V

    1973-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the atmosphere is the subject of several chapters in most textbooks on dynamic meteorology, but there is no work in English to give the subject a specific and more extensive treatment. In writing the present textbook, we have tried to fill this rather remarkable gap in the literature related to atmospheric sciences. Our aim has been to provide students of meteorology with a book that can playa role similar to the textbooks on chemical thermodynamics for the chemists. This implies a previous knowledge of general thermodynamics, such as students acquire in general physics courses; therefore, although the basic principles are reviewed (in the first four chapters), they are only briefly discussed, and emphasis is laid on those topics that will be useful in later chapters, through their application to atmospheric problems. No attempt has been made to introduce the thermodynamics of irreversible processes; on the other hand, consideration of heterogeneous and open homogeneous systems permits a...

  1. A Search for Faint Companions to Nearby Stars Using the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Daniel J.; Golimowski, David A.; Brukardt, Ryan A.; Burrows, Christopher J.; Caldwell, John J.; Fastie, William G.; Ford, Holland C.; Hesman, Brigette; Kletskin, Ilona; Krist, John E.; Royle, Patricia; Zubrowski, Richard. A.

    2000-02-01

    We have completed a direct-imaging search for faint companions (FCs) to 23 stars within 13 pc of the Sun using the Hubble Space Telescope Planetary Camera. The strategy of this search changed considerably from that reported in 1996. To maximize the image contrast between potential FCs and a target star's point-spread function, we adopted the F1042M filter (λc~1.02 μm, Δλ~0.04 μm) as the primary bandpass of our search. Although our sensitivity to FCs varied with the brightness of and separation from our target stars, an ultimate 10 σ detection limit of m1042~18 within 17" of the fainter targets was achieved. As the end of the main sequence occurs at M1042~12, this detection limit makes our search for FCs to nearby stars the most sensitive yet published. Despite this great sensitivity, no previously undetected FCs were found. Our survey would have detected all stellar companions within 17" of our target stars, except for any lowest mass companions lying within 0.5"-1" of the brightest (Vmass (less than 10 MJ) brown dwarf companions to the fainter targets within 5 pc. A brown dwarf with mass 40 MJ and age 5 Gyr would have been detected at separations greater than 5" from Gl 559A (α Centauri A). Our search was not sensitive to 1 Gyr-old brown dwarfs with masses masses luminosity and that derived from the theoretical mass-luminosity relation. F1042M images of the astrometric binary Gl 105A do not reveal the presence of a fourth component, as has been proposed to reconcile the differences between the observed location of the M7 V companion Gl 105C and the predicted separations of the perturbing body from two independent astrometric studies.

  2. MEASURING X-RAY VARIABILITY IN FAINT/SPARSELY SAMPLED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allevato, V. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Gustaf Haellstroemin katu 2a, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Paolillo, M. [Department of Physical Sciences, University Federico II, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Papadakis, I. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion (Greece); Pinto, C. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584-CA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    We study the statistical properties of the normalized excess variance of variability process characterized by a ''red-noise'' power spectral density (PSD), as in the case of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We perform Monte Carlo simulations of light curves, assuming both a continuous and a sparse sampling pattern and various signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns). We show that the normalized excess variance is a biased estimate of the variance even in the case of continuously sampled light curves. The bias depends on the PSD slope and on the sampling pattern, but not on the S/N. We provide a simple formula to account for the bias, which yields unbiased estimates with an accuracy better than 15%. We show that the normalized excess variance estimates based on single light curves (especially for sparse sampling and S/N < 3) are highly uncertain (even if corrected for bias) and we propose instead the use of an ''ensemble estimate'', based on multiple light curves of the same object, or on the use of light curves of many objects. These estimates have symmetric distributions, known errors, and can also be corrected for biases. We use our results to estimate the ability to measure the intrinsic source variability in current data, and show that they could also be useful in the planning of the observing strategy of future surveys such as those provided by X-ray missions studying distant and/or faint AGN populations and, more in general, in the estimation of the variability amplitude of sources that will result from future surveys such as Pan-STARRS and LSST.

  3. Stellar Kinematics and Metallicities in the Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy Reticulum II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, J. D.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Li, T. S.; Nord, B.; Geha, M.; Bechtol, K.; Balbinot, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Lin, H.; Marshall, J.; Santiago, B.; Strigari, L.; Wang, M.; Wechsler, R. H.; Yanny, B.; Abbott, T.; Bauer, A. H.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dodelson, S.; Cunha, C. E.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Ogando, R.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.; DES Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    We present Magellan/M2FS, Very Large Telescope/GIRAFFE, and Gemini South/GMOS spectroscopy of the newly discovered Milky Way satellite Reticulum II. Based on the spectra of 25 Ret II member stars selected from Dark Energy Survey imaging, we measure a mean heliocentric velocity of 62.8+/- 0.5 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and a velocity dispersion of 3.3+/- 0.7 {km} {{{s}}}-1. The mass-to-light ratio of Ret II within its half-light radius is 470+/- 210 {M}⊙ /{L}⊙ , demonstrating that it is a strongly dark matter-dominated system. Despite its spatial proximity to the Magellanic Clouds, the radial velocity of Ret II differs from that of the LMC and SMC by 199 and 83 {km} {{{s}}}-1, respectively, suggesting that it is not gravitationally bound to the Magellanic system. The likely member stars of Ret II span 1.3 dex in metallicity, with a dispersion of 0.28 ± 0.09 dex, and we identify several extremely metal-poor stars with {{[Fe/H]}}\\lt -3. In combination with its luminosity, size, and ellipticity, these results confirm that Ret II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. With a mean metallicity of {{[Fe/H]}}=-2.65+/- 0.07, Ret II matches Segue 1 as the most metal-poor galaxy known. Although Ret II is the third-closest dwarf galaxy to the Milky Way, the line-of-sight integral of the dark matter density squared is {{log}}10(J)=18.8+/- 0.6 {GeV}{ }2 {{cm}}-5 within 0.°2, indicating that the predicted gamma-ray flux from dark matter annihilation in Ret II is lower than that of several other dwarf galaxies. Based on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility under request number 157689.

  4. Discovery of a close pair of faint dwarf galaxies in the halo of Centaurus A

    CERN Document Server

    Crnojević, D; Caldwell, N; Guhathakurta, P; McLeod, B; Seth, A; Simon, J; Strader, J; Toloba, E

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS) we report the discovery of a pair of faint dwarf galaxies (CenA-MM-Dw1 and CenA-MM-Dw2) at a projected distance of $\\sim$90 kpc from the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC5128 (CenA). We measure a tip of the red giant branch distance to each dwarf, finding $D=3.63 \\pm 0.41$ Mpc for CenA-MM-Dw1 and $D=3.60 \\pm 0.41$ Mpc for CenA-MM-Dw2, both of which are consistent with the distance to NGC5128. A qualitative analysis of the color magnitude diagrams indicates stellar populations consisting of an old, metal-poor red giant branch ($\\gtrsim 12$ Gyr, [Fe/H]$\\sim-1.7$ to -1.9). In addition, CenA-MM-Dw1 seems to host an intermediate-age population as indicated by its candidate asymptotic giant branch stars. The derived luminosities ($M_V=-10.9\\pm0.3$ for CenA-MM-Dw1 and $-8.4\\pm0.6$ for CenA-MM-Dw2) and half-light radii ($r_{h}=1.4\\pm0.04$ kpc for CenA-MM-Dw1 and $0.36\\pm0.08$ kpc for CenA-MM-Dw2) are consistent with those of Local Group dwarfs. Cen...

  5. A DEEPER LOOK AT FAINT Hα EMISSION IN NEARBY DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Janice C.; Hilbert, Bryan [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Veilleux, Sylvain [Department of Astronomy and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); McDonald, Michael, E-mail: jlee@stsci.edu [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We present deep Hα imaging of three nearby dwarf galaxies, carefully selected to optimize observations with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter (MMTF) on the Magellan 6.5 m telescope. An effective bandpass of ∼13 Å is used, and the images reach 3σ flux limits of ∼8 × 10{sup −18} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}, which is about an order of magnitude lower than standard narrowband observations obtained by the most recent generation of local Hα galaxy surveys. The observations were originally motivated by the finding that the Hα/FUV flux ratio of galaxies systematically declines as global galactic properties such as the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass decrease. The three dwarf galaxies selected for study have SFRs that, when calculated from their Hα luminosities using standard conversion recipes, are ∼50% of those based on the FUV. Follow-up studies of many of the potential causes for the trends in the Hα/FUV flux ratio have been performed, but the possibility that previous observations have missed a non-negligible fraction of faint ionized emission in dwarf galaxies has not been investigated. The MMTF observations reveal both diffuse and structured Hα emission (filaments, shells, possible single-star H ii regions) spanning extents up to 2.5 times larger relative to previous observations. However, only up to an additional ∼5% of Hα flux is captured, which does not account for the trends in the Hα/FUV ratio. Beyond investigation of the Hα/FUV ratio, the impact of the newly detected extended flux on our understanding of star formation, the properties of H ii regions, and the propagation of ionizing photons warrant further investigation.

  6. Solving higher curvature gravity theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Sumanta [IUCAA, Pune (India); SenGupta, Soumitra [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Theoretical Physics Department, Kolkata (India)

    2016-10-15

    Solving field equations in the context of higher curvature gravity theories is a formidable task. However, in many situations, e.g., in the context of f(R) theories, the higher curvature gravity action can be written as an Einstein-Hilbert action plus a scalar field action. We show that not only the action but the field equations derived from the action are also equivalent, provided the spacetime is regular. We also demonstrate that such an equivalence continues to hold even when the gravitational field equations are projected on a lower-dimensional hypersurface. We have further addressed explicit examples in which the solutions for Einstein-Hilbert and a scalar field system lead to solutions of the equivalent higher curvature theory. The same, but on the lower-dimensional hypersurface, has been illustrated in the reverse order as well. We conclude with a brief discussion on this technique of solving higher curvature field equations. (orig.)

  7. Solving Limited Memory Influence Diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Mauá, Denis Deratani; Zaffalon, Marco

    2011-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for exactly solving decision making problems represented as influence diagrams. We do not require the usual assumptions of no forgetting and regularity; this allows us to solve problems with simultaneous decisions and limited information. The algorithm is empirically shown to outperform a state-of-the-art algorithm on randomly generated problems of up to 150 variables and $10^{64}$ solutions. We show that the problem is NP-hard even if the underlying graph structure of the problem has small treewidth and the variables take on a bounded number of states, but that a fully polynomial time approximation scheme exists for these cases. Moreover, we show that the bound on the number of states is a necessary condition for any efficient approximation scheme.

  8. Methods of solving nonstandard problems

    CERN Document Server

    Grigorieva, Ellina

    2015-01-01

    This book, written by an accomplished female mathematician, is the second to explore nonstandard mathematical problems – those that are not directly solved by standard mathematical methods but instead rely on insight and the synthesis of a variety of mathematical ideas.   It promotes mental activity as well as greater mathematical skills, and is an ideal resource for successful preparation for the mathematics Olympiad. Numerous strategies and techniques are presented that can be used to solve intriguing and challenging problems of the type often found in competitions.  The author uses a friendly, non-intimidating approach to emphasize connections between different fields of mathematics and often proposes several different ways to attack the same problem.  Topics covered include functions and their properties, polynomials, trigonometric and transcendental equations and inequalities, optimization, differential equations, nonlinear systems, and word problems.   Over 360 problems are included with hints, ...

  9. On the atmospheric internal ship waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桑建国

    1997-01-01

    The analytical solutions of the atmospheric internal ship waves induced by three-dimensional terrain are obtained by solving the atmospheric wave equation. The solutions show that the waves consist of the untrapped and trapped parts. The patterns of the diverging wave and transverse wave in the untrapped parts are mainly determined by the shape and orientation of the terrain. This kind of wave may transport the wave energy to the upper atmosphere. The patterns of trapped lee waves are decided by the atmospheric conditions such as stratification, mean wind speeds and wind shear.

  10. Atmospheric Refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Calculations of atmospheric refraction are generally based on a simplified model of atmospheric density in the troposphere which assumes that the temperature decreases at a constant lapse rate from sea level up to a height equal to eleven km, and that afterwards it remains constant. In this model, the temperature divided by the lapse rate determines the length scale in the calculations for altitudes less than this height. But daily balloon measurements across the U.S.A. reveal that in some cases the air temperature actually increases from sea level up to a height of about one km, and only after reaching a plateau, it decreases at an approximately constant lapse rate. Moreover, in three examples considered here, the temperature does not remain constant at eleven km , but continues to decreases to a minimum at about sixteen kilometers , and then increases at higher altitudes at a lower rate. Calculations of atmospheric refraction based on this atmospheric data is compared with the results of simplified models.

  11. Mathematical problem solving by analogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, L R; Holyoak, K J

    1991-05-01

    We report the results of 2 experiments and a verbal protocol study examining the component processes of solving mathematical word problems by analogy. College students first studied a problem and its solution, which provided a potential source for analogical transfer. Then they attempted to solve several analogous problems. For some problems, subjects received one of a variety of hints designed to reduce or eliminate the difficulty of some of the major processes hypothesized to be involved in analogical transfer. Our studies yielded 4 major findings. First, the process of mapping the features of the source and target problems and the process of adapting the source solution procedure for use in solving the target problem were clearly distinguished: (a) Successful mapping was found to be insufficient for successful transfer and (b) adaptation was found to be a major source of transfer difficulty. Second, we obtained direct evidence that schema induction is a natural consequence of analogical transfer. The schema was found to co-exist with the problems from which it was induced, and both the schema and the individual problems facilitated later transfer. Third, for our multiple-solution problems, the relation between analogical transfer and solution accuracy was mediated by the degree of time pressure exerted for the test problems. Finally, mathematical expertise was a significant predictor of analogical transfer, but general analogical reasoning ability was not. The implications of the results for models of analogical transfer and for instruction were considered.

  12. Solving the drift control problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melda Ormeci Matoglu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We model the problem of managing capacity in a build-to-order environment as a Brownian drift control problem. We formulate a structured linear program that models a practical discretization of the problem and exploit a strong relationship between relative value functions and dual solutions to develop a functional lower bound for the continuous problem from a dual solution to the discrete problem. Refining the discretization proves a functional strong duality for the continuous problem. The linear programming formulation is so badly scaled, however, that solving it is beyond the capabilities of standard solvers. By demonstrating the equivalence between strongly feasible bases and deterministic unichain policies, we combinatorialize the pivoting process and by exploiting the relationship between dual solutions and relative value functions, develop a mechanism for solving the LP without ever computing its coefficients. Finally, we exploit the relationship between relative value functions and dual solutions to develop a scheme analogous to column generation for refining the discretization so as to drive the gap between the discrete approximation and the continuous problem to zero quickly while keeping the LP small. Computational studies show our scheme is much faster than simply solving a regular discretization of the problem both in terms of finding a policy with a low average cost and in terms of providing a lower bound on the optimal average cost.

  13. Journey toward Teaching Mathematics through Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakshaug, Lynae E.; Wohlhuter, Kay A.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching mathematics through problem solving is a challenge for teachers who learned mathematics by doing exercises. How do teachers develop their own problem solving abilities as well as their abilities to teach mathematics through problem solving? A group of teachers began the journey of learning to teach through problem solving while taking a…

  14. Anticipating Student Responses to Improve Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ann H.

    2007-01-01

    This article illustrates how problem solving can be enhanced through careful planning and problem presentation. Often, students shut down or are turned off when presented with a problem to solve. The author describes how to motivate students to embrace a problem to be solved and provides helpful prompts to further the problem-solving process.…

  15. Assessing Algebraic Solving Ability: A Theoretical Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Lim Hooi; Yew, Wun Thiam

    2012-01-01

    Algebraic solving ability had been discussed by many educators and researchers. There exists no definite definition for algebraic solving ability as it can be viewed from different perspectives. In this paper, the nature of algebraic solving ability in terms of algebraic processes that demonstrate the ability in solving algebraic problem is…

  16. Chemical abundances in the multiple sub-giant branch of 47 Tucanae: insights on its faint sub-giant branch component

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, A F; Casagrande, L; Collet, R; Dotter, A; Johnson, C I; Lind, K; Bedin, L R; Jerjen, H; Aparicio, A; Sbordone, L

    2016-01-01

    The globular cluster 47 Tuc exhibits a complex sub-giant branch (SGB) with a faint-SGB comprising only about the 10% of the cluster mass and a bright-SGB hosting at least two distinct populations.We present a spectroscopic analysis of 62 SGB stars including 21 faint-SGB stars. We thus provide the first chemical analysis of the intriguing faint-SGB population and compare its abundances with those of the dominant populations. We have inferred abundances of Fe, representative light elements C, N, Na, and Al, {\\alpha} elements Mg and Si for individual stars. Oxygen has been obtained by co-adding spectra of stars on different sequences. In addition, we have analysed 12 stars along the two main RGBs of 47 Tuc. Our principal results are: (i) star-to-star variations in C/N/Na among RGB and bright-SGB stars; (ii) substantial N and Na enhancements for the minor population corresponding to the faint-SGB; (iii) no high enrichment in C+N+O for faint-SGB stars. Specifically, the C+N+O of the faint-SGB is a factor of 1.1 hi...

  17. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Gaisser, Thomas K

    2016-01-01

    In view of the observation by IceCube of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos, it is important to quantify the uncertainty in the background of atmospheric neutrinos. There are two sources of uncertainty, the imperfect knowledge of the spectrum and composition of the primary cosmic rays that produce the neutrinos and the limited understanding of hadron production, including charm, at high energy. This paper is an overview of both aspects.

  18. GPU-accelerated Faint Streak Detection for Uncued Surveillance of LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, P.; Ackermann, M.; McGraw, J. T.

    2013-09-01

    By astronomical standards, small objects (<10cm) in LEO illuminated by the Sun under terminator conditions are quite bright, depositing 100's to 1000's of photons per second into small telescope apertures (< 1m diameter). The challenge in discovering these objects with no a priori knowledge of their orbit (i.e. uncued surveillance) is that their relative motion with respect to a ground-based telescope makes them appear to have large angular rates of motion, up to and exceeding 1 degree per second. Thus in even a short exposure, the signal from the object is smeared out in a streak with low signal-to-noise per pixel. Go Green Termite (GGT), Inc. of Gilroy, CA, in collaboration with the University of New Mexico (UNM), is building two proof-of-concept wide-field imaging systems to test, develop and prove a novel streak detection technique. The imaging systems are built from off-the-shelf optics and detectors resulting in a 350mm aperture and a 6 square degree field of view. For streak detection, field of view is of critical importance because the maximum exposure time on the object is limited by its crossing time. In this way, wider fields of view impact surveys for LEO objects both by increasing the survey volume and increasing sensitivity. Using our newly GPU-accelerated detection scheme, the proof-of-concept systems are expected to be able to detect objects fainter than 12th magnitude moving at 1 degree per second and possibly as faint as 13th magnitude for slower moving objects. Meter-class optical systems using these techniques should be able to detect objects fainter than 14th magnitude, which is roughly equivalent to a golf ball at 1000km altitude. The goal of this work is to demonstrate a scalable system for near real time detection of fast moving objects that can be then handed off to other instruments capable of tracking and characterizing them. The two proof-of-concept systems, separated by ~30km, work together by taking simultaneous images of the same

  19. APPLICATION OF A DAMPED LOCALLY OPTIMIZED COMBINATION OF IMAGES METHOD TO THE SPECTRAL CHARACTERIZATION OF FAINT COMPANIONS USING AN INTEGRAL FIELD SPECTROGRAPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pueyo, Laurent [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 366 Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Crepp, Justin R.; Hinkley, Sasha; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Dekany, Richard; Bouchez, Antonin; Roberts, Jenny [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Vasisht, Gautam; Roberts, Lewis C.; Shao, Mike; Burruss, Rick [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Brenner, Douglas; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Zimmerman, Neil [American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Parry, Ian [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Rd., Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Beichman, Charles [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, 770 S. Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States); Soummer, Remi, E-mail: lap@pha.jhu.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Marin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    High-contrast imaging instruments are now being equipped with integral field spectrographs (IFSs) to facilitate the detection and characterization of faint substellar companions. Algorithms currently envisioned to handle IFS data, such as the Locally Optimized Combination of Images (LOCI) algorithm, rely on aggressive point-spread function (PSF) subtraction, which is ideal for initially identifying companions but results in significantly biased photometry and spectroscopy owing to unwanted mixing with residual starlight. This spectrophotometric issue is further complicated by the fact that algorithmic color response is a function of the companion's spectrum, making it difficult to calibrate the effects of the reduction without using iterations involving a series of injected synthetic companions. In this paper, we introduce a new PSF calibration method, which we call 'damped LOCI', that seeks to alleviate these concerns. By modifying the cost function that determines the weighting coefficients used to construct PSF reference images, and also forcing those coefficients to be positive, it is possible to extract companion spectra with a precision that is set by calibration of the instrument response and transmission of the atmosphere, and not by post-processing. We demonstrate the utility of this approach using on-sky data obtained with the Project 1640 IFS at Palomar. Damped LOCI does not require any iterations on the underlying spectral type of the companion, nor does it rely on priors involving the chromatic and statistical properties of speckles. It is a general technique that can readily be applied to other current and planned instruments that employ IFSs.

  20. Problem solving through recreational mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Averbach, Bonnie

    1999-01-01

    Historically, many of the most important mathematical concepts arose from problems that were recreational in origin. This book takes advantage of that fact, using recreational mathematics - problems, puzzles and games - to teach students how to think critically. Encouraging active participation rather than just observation, the book focuses less on mathematical results than on how these results can be applied to thinking about problems and solving them. Each chapter contains a diverse array of problems in such areas as logic, number and graph theory, two-player games of strategy, solitaire ga

  1. Enigma of Runaway Stars Solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Supernova Propels Companion Star through Interstellar Space The following success story is a classical illustration of scientific progress through concerted interplay of observation and theory. It concerns a 35-year old mystery which has now been solved by means of exciting observations of a strange double star. An added touch is the successive involvement of astronomers connected to the European Southern Observatory. For many years, astronomers have been puzzled by the fact that, among the thousands of very young, hot and heavy stars which have been observed in the Milky Way, there are some that move with exceptionally high velocities. In some cases, motions well above 100 km/sec, or ten times more than normal for such stars, have been measured. How is this possible? Which mechanism is responsible for the large amounts of energy needed to move such heavy bodies at such high speeds? Could it be that these stars are accelerated during the powerful explosion of a companion star as a supernova? Such a scenario was proposed in 1961 by Adriaan Blaauw [1], but until now, observational proof has been lacking. Now, however, strong supporting evidence for this mechanism has become available from observations obtained at the ESO La Silla observatory. The mysterious runaway stars OB-runaway stars [2] are heavy stars that travel through interstellar space with an anomalously high velocity. They have been known for several decades, but it has always been a problem to explain their high velocities. Although most OB-runaway stars are located at distances of several thousands of lightyears, their high velocity results in a measurable change in position on sky photos taken several years apart. The velocity component in the direction of the Earth can be measured very accurately from a spectrogram. From a combination of such observations, it is possible to measure the space velocity of OB-runaways. Bow shocks reveal runaway stars It has also been found that some OB-runaways display

  2. Algorithms in Solving Polynomial Inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Cordero

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A new method to solve the solution set of polynomial inequalities was conducted. When −1 −2 >0 ℎ 1,2∈ ℝ 10 if n is even. Then, the solution set is ∈ ℝ ∈ −∞,1 ∪ ,+∞ ∪ ,+1 : }. Thus, when −1−2…−≥0, the solution is ∈ ℝ ∈−∞, 1∪ ,+∞∪, +1: }. If is odd, then the solution set is ∈ ℝ ∈ ,+∞ ∪ ,+1 : }. Thus, when −1 −2…−≥0, the solution set is ∈ ℝ ∈ ,+∞∪, +1: }. Let −1−2…−<0 if n is even. Then, the solution set is ∈ ℝ ∈ ,+1 ∶ }. Thus, when −1 −2…−≤0, then the solution set is ∈ ℝ ∈, +1: }. If is an odd, then the solution set is ∈ ℝ ∈ −∞,1 ∪ ,+1 : }. Thus, when −1 −2 … − ≤0, the solution set is ∈ ℝ ∈ −∞,1 ∪ ,+1 : }. This research provides a novel method in solving the solution set of polynomial inequalities, in addition to other existing methods.

  3. Characterizing Transiting Planet Atmospheres through 2025

    CERN Document Server

    Cowan, N B; Angerhausen, D; Batalha, N E; Clampin, M; Colon, K; Crossfield, I J M; Fortney, J J; Gaudi, B S; Harrington, J; Iro, N; Lillie, C F; Linsky, J L; Lopez-Morales, M; Mandell, A M; Stevenson, K B; SAG-X, on behalf of ExoPAG

    2015-01-01

    [Abridged] We have only been able to comprehensively characterize the atmospheres of a handful of transiting planets, because most orbit faint stars. TESS will discover transiting planets orbiting the brightest stars, enabling, in principle, an atmospheric survey of 10^2 to 10^3 bright hot Jupiters and warm sub-Neptunes. Uniform observations of such a statistically significant sample would provide leverage to understand---and learn from---the diversity of short-period planets. We argue that the best way to maximize the scientific returns of TESS is with a follow-up space mission consisting of a ~1 m telescope with an optical--NIR spectrograph: it could measure molecular absorption for non-terrestrial planets, as well as eclipses and phase variations for the hottest jovians. Such a mission could observe up to 10^3 transits per year, thus enabling it to survey a large fraction of the bright (J<11) TESS planets. JWST could be used to perform detailed atmospheric characterization of the most interesting transi...

  4. SELFI: an object-based, Bayesian method for faint emission line source detection in MUSE deep field data cubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meillier, Céline; Chatelain, Florent; Michel, Olivier; Bacon, Roland; Piqueras, Laure; Bacher, Raphael; Ayasso, Hacheme

    2016-04-01

    We present SELFI, the Source Emission Line FInder, a new Bayesian method optimized for detection of faint galaxies in Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) deep fields. MUSE is the new panoramic integral field spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) that has unique capabilities for spectroscopic investigation of the deep sky. It has provided data cubes with 324 million voxels over a single 1 arcmin2 field of view. To address the challenge of faint-galaxy detection in these large data cubes, we developed a new method that processes 3D data either for modeling or for estimation and extraction of source configurations. This object-based approach yields a natural sparse representation of the sources in massive data fields, such as MUSE data cubes. In the Bayesian framework, the parameters that describe the observed sources are considered random variables. The Bayesian model leads to a general and robust algorithm where the parameters are estimated in a fully data-driven way. This detection algorithm was applied to the MUSE observation of Hubble Deep Field-South. With 27 h total integration time, these observations provide a catalog of 189 sources of various categories and with secured redshift. The algorithm retrieved 91% of the galaxies with only 9% false detection. This method also allowed the discovery of three new Lyα emitters and one [OII] emitter, all without any Hubble Space Telescope counterpart. We analyzed the reasons for failure for some targets, and found that the most important limitation of the method is when faint sources are located in the vicinity of bright spatially resolved galaxies that cannot be approximated by the Sérsic elliptical profile. The software and its documentation are available on the MUSE science web service (muse-vlt.eu/science).

  5. Physical characteristics of faint meteors by light curve and high-resolution observations, and the implications for parent bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasinghe, Dilini; Campbell-Brown, Margaret D.; Stokan, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Optical observations of faint meteors (10-7 single body objects) show mostly symmetric light curves, surprisingly, and this indicates that light-curve shape is not an indication of fragility or fragmentation behaviour. Approximately 90 per cent of meteors observed with high-resolution video cameras show some form of fragmentation. Our results also show, unexpectedly, that meteors which show negligible fragmentation are more often on high-inclination orbits (i > 60°) than low-inclination ones. We also find that dynamically asteroidal meteors fragment as often as dynamically cometary meteors, which may suggest mixing in the early Solar system, or contamination between the dynamic groups.

  6. Alarming atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Kinch, Sofie

    2014-01-01

    . As a response to this situation, our design artefact, the interactive furniture Kidkit, invites children to become accustomed to the alarming sounds sampled from the ward while they are waiting in the waiting room. Our design acknowledges how atmospheres emerge as temporal negotiations between the rhythms......, a familiar relationship with the alarming sounds in the ward, enabling her to focus later more on the visit with the relative. The article discusses the proposed design strategy behind this solution and the potentiality for its use in hospital environments in general....

  7. Heisenberg Honeycombs Solve Veneziano Puzzle

    CERN Document Server

    Kholodenko, A L

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we reformulate some results obtained by Heisenberg into modern mathematical language of honeycombs. This language was developed in connection with complete solution of the Horn conjecture problem. Such a reformulation is done with the purpose of posing and solving the following problem. Is by analysing the (spectroscopic) experimental data it possible to restore the underlying microscopic physical model generating these data? Development of Heisenberg's ideas happens to be the most useful for this purpose. Solution is facilitated by our earlier developed string-theoretic formalism. In this paper only qualitative arguments are presented (with few exceptions). These arguments provide enough evidence that the underelying microscopic model compatible with Veneziano-type amplitudes is the standard (i.e. non supersymmetric!) QCD. In addition, usefulness of the formalism is illustrated on numerous examples such as physically motivated solution of the saturation conjecture, derivation of the Yang-Baxter...

  8. Solving the structure of metakaolin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proffen, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; White, Claire E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Provis, John L [UNIV. OF MELBOURNE; Riley, Daniel P [UNIV. OF MELBOURNE; Van Deventer, Jannie S J [UNIV. OF MELBOURNE

    2009-01-01

    Metakaolin has been used extensively as a cement additive and paint extender, and recently as a geopolymer precursor. This disordered layered aluminosilicate is formed via the dehydroxylation of kaolinite. However, an accurate representation of its atomic structure has bever before been presented. Here, a novel synergy between total scattering and density functional modeling is presented to solve the structure of metakaolin. The metastable structure is elucidated by iterating between least-squares real-space refinement using neutron pair distribution function data, and geometry optimization using density functional modeling. The resulting structural representation is both energetically feasible and in excellent agreement with experimental data. This accurate structure of metakaolin provides new insight into the local environment of the aluminum atoms, with evidence of the existence of tri-coordinated aluminum. By the availability of this detailed atomic description, there exists the opportunity to tailor chemical and mechanical processes involving metakaolin at the atomic level to obtain optimal performance at the macro-scale.

  9. Solving rational expectations models using Excel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strulik, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Problems of discrete time optimal control can be solved using backward iteration and Microsoft Excel. The author explains the method in general and shows how the basic models of neoclassical growth and real business cycles are solved...

  10. Infrared-faint radio sources remain undetected at far-infrared wavelengths. Deep photometric observations using the Herschel Space Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Herzog, Andreas; Middelberg, Enno; Spitler, Lee R; Leipski, Christian; Parker, Quentin A

    2015-01-01

    Showing 1.4 GHz flux densities in the range of a few to a few tens of mJy, infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a type of galaxy characterised by faint or absent near-infrared counterparts and consequently extreme radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousand. Recent studies showed that IFRS are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at redshifts >=2. This work explores the far-infrared emission of IFRS, providing crucial information on the star forming and AGN activity of IFRS and on the potential link between IFRS and high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs). A sample of six IFRS was observed with the Herschel Space Observatory between 100 um and 500 um. Using these results, we constrained the nature of IFRS by modelling their broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED). Furthermore, we set an upper limit on their infrared SED and decomposed their emission into contributions from an AGN and from star forming activity. All six observed IFRS were undetected in all five Herschel far-infrared ...

  11. Towards a Solution to the Early Faint Sun Paradox: A Lower Cosmic Ray Flux from a Stronger Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Shaviv, N J

    2003-01-01

    The solar luminosity obtained in standard solar models should have gradually increased by about 30% over the past 4.5 billion years. Under the faint sun, Earth should have been frozen solid for most of its existence. Yet, running water is observed to have been present since very early in Earth's history. This enigma is known as the faint sun paradox. We show here that it can be significantly extenuated once we consider the cooling effect that cosmic rays are suspected to have on the global climate and that the younger sun must have had a stronger solar wind, such that it was more effective at stopping cosmic rays from reaching Earth. We therefore find that even modest greenhouse warming in sufficient to completely resolve the paradox. When coupled to the variable star formation rate in the Milky Way, we recover that the past Eon and the Eon between 2 and 3 Gyr before present should have had glaciations, while others not. As to the future, we find that without human intervention, the average global temperature...

  12. Faint Submillimeter Galaxies identified through their optical/near-infrared colours I: spatial clustering and halo masses

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Swinbank, A M; Simpson, James M; Almaini, Omar; Conselice, Christopher J; Hartley, Will G; Mortlock, Alice; Simpson, Chris; Wilkinson, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    The properties of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) that are fainter than the confusion limit of blank-field single-dish surveys ($S_{850} \\lesssim$ 2 mJy) are poorly constrained. Using a newly developed color selection technique, Optical-Infrared Triple Color (OIRTC), that has been shown to successfully {select} such faint SMGs, we identify a sample of 2938 OIRTC-selected galaxies, dubbed Triple Color Galaxies (TCGs), in the UKIDSS-UDS field. We show that these galaxies have a median 850 $\\mu$m flux of S$_{850} = 0.96\\pm0.04$ mJy (equivalent to a star-formation rate SFR $\\sim60-100$ M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ based on SED fitting), representing the first large sample of faint SMGs that bridges the gap between bright SMGs and normal star-forming galaxies in S$_{850}$ and $L_{\\rm IR}$. We assess the basic properties of TCGs and their relationship with other galaxy populations at $z\\sim2$. We measure the two-point autocorrelation function for this population and derive a typical halo mass of log$_{10}$(M$_{\\rm halo}$) $=1...

  13. MOA-2008-BLG-379Lb: A Massive Planet from a High Magnification Event with a Faint Source

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, D; Sumi, T; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Abe, F; Botzler, C S; Freeman, M; Fukagawa, M; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Itow, Y; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N; Saito, To; Shibai, H; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, K; Sweatman, W L; Takino, S; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Szymański, M K; Kubiak, M; Soszyński, I; Pietrzyński, G; Poleski, R; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł

    2013-01-01

    We report analysis of high microlensing event MOA-2008-BLG-379, which has a strong microlensing anomaly at its peak, due to a massive planet with a mass ratio of q = 6.9 x 10^{-3}. Because the faint source star crosses the large resonant caustic, the planetary signal dominates the light curve. This is unusual for planetary microlensing events, and as a result, the planetary nature of this light curve was not immediately noticed. The planetary nature of the event was found when the MOA Collaboration conducted a systematic study of binary microlensing events previously identified by the MOA alert system. We have conducted a Bayesian analysis based on a standard Galactic model to estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. This yields a host star mass of M_L = 0.66_{-0.33}^{+0.29} M_Sun orbited by a planet of mass m_P = 4.8_{-2.4}^{+2.1} M_Jup at an orbital separation of a = 4.1_{-1.5}^{+1.9} AU at a distance of D_L = 3.6 +/- 1.3 kpc. The faint source magnitude of I_S = 21.30 and relatively high lens-so...

  14. Optical and Near-IR Observations of the Faint and Fast 2008ha-like Supernova 2010ae

    CERN Document Server

    Stritzinger, M D; Valenti, S; Taddia, F; Rivera-Thorsen, T J; Leloudas, G; Maeda, K; Pastorello, A; Phillips, M M; Pignata, G; Baron, E; Burns, C R; Contreras, C; Folatelli, G; Hamuy, M; Hoeflich, P; Morrell, N; Prieto, J L; Benetti, S; Campillay, A; Haislip, J B; LaClutze, A P; Moore, J P; Reichart, D E

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive set of optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry and spectroscopy is presented for the faint and fast 2008ha-like supernova (SN) 2010ae. Contingent on the adopted value of host extinction SN 2010ae reached a peak brightness of ~ -13.8 > M_V > -15.3 mag, while modeling of the UVOIR light curve suggests it produced 0.003--0.007 M_sun of 56^Ni, ejected ~ 0.30--0.60 M_sun of material, and had an explosion energy of ~ 0.04--0.30x10^51 erg. The values of these explosion parameters are similar to the peculiar SN 2008ha --for which we also present previously unpublished early phase optical and NIR light curves-- and places these two transients at the faint end of the 2002cx-like SN population. Detailed inspection of the post maximum NIR spectroscopic sequence indicates the presence of a multitude of spectral features, which are identified through SYNAPPS modeling to be mainly attributed to Co II. Comparison with a collection of published and unpublished NIR spectra of other 2002cx-like SNe, reveals t...

  15. Hydra II: a faint and compact Milky Way dwarf galaxy found in the Survey of the Magellanic Stellar History

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Nicolas F; Besla, Gurtina; Olsen, Knut; Walker, Alistair R; Vivas, A Katherina; Gruendl, Robert A; Muñoz, Ricardo R; Blum, Robert D; Saha, Abhijit; Conn, Blair C; Bell, Eric F; Chu, You-Hua; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L; de Boer, Thomas J L; Gallart, Carme; Jin, Shoko; Kunder, Andrea; Majewski, Steven R; Martinez-Delgado, David; Monachesi, Antonela; Monelli, Matteo; Monteagudo, Lara; Noël, Noelia E D; Olszewski, Edward W; Stringfellow, Guy S; van der Marel, Roeland P; Zaritsky, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of a new dwarf galaxy, Hydra II, found serendipitously within the data from the ongoing Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History (SMASH) conducted with the Dark Energy Camera on the Blanco 4m Telescope. The new satellite is compact (r_h = 68 +/- 11 pc) and faint (M_V = -4.8 +/- 0.3), but well within the realm of dwarf galaxies. The stellar distribution of HydraII in the color-magnitude diagram is well-described by a metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.2) and old (13 Gyr) isochrone and shows a distinct blue horizontal branch, some possible red clump stars, and faint stars that are suggestive of blue stragglers. At a heliocentric distance of 134 +/- 10 kpc, Hydra II is located in a region of the Galactic halo that models have suggested may host material from the leading arm of the Magellanic Stream. A comparison with N-body simulations hints that the new dwarf galaxy could be or could have been a satellite of the Magellanic Clouds.

  16. Collis-Romberg Mathematical Problem Solving Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, K. F.; Romberg, T. A.

    Problem solving has become a focus of mathematics programs in Australia in recent years, necessitating the assessment of students' problem-solving abilities. This manual provides a problem-solving assessment and teaching resource package containing four elements: (1) profiles assessment items; (2) profiles diagnostic forms for recording individual…

  17. Developing Creativity through Collaborative Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Lillie R.; Kim, Rina

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses an alternative approach for developing problem solving experiences for students. The major argument is that students can develop their creativity by engaging in collaborative problem solving activities in which they apply a variety of mathematical methods creatively to solve problems. The argument is supported by: considering…

  18. Applying Cooperative Techniques in Teaching Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczi, Krisztina

    2013-01-01

    Teaching how to solve problems--from solving simple equations to solving difficult competition tasks--has been one of the greatest challenges for mathematics education for many years. Trying to find an effective method is an important educational task. Among others, the question arises as to whether a method in which students help each other might…

  19. LEGO Robotics: An Authentic Problem Solving Tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castledine, Alanah-Rei; Chalmers, Chris

    2011-01-01

    With the current curriculum focus on correlating classroom problem solving lessons to real-world contexts, are LEGO robotics an effective problem solving tool? This present study was designed to investigate this question and to ascertain what problem solving strategies primary students engaged with when working with LEGO robotics and whether the…

  20. Problem Solving Appraisal of Delinquent Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Ruperto M.; And Others

    The study investigated the following: (1) the relationship of problem solving appraisal to narcissistic vulnerability, locus of control, and depression; (2) the differences in problem solving appraisal, locus of control, and depression in first-time and repeat offenders; and (3) the prediction of problem solving appraisal by narcissistic…

  1. Perspectives on Problem Solving and Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2013-01-01

    Most educators claim that problem solving is important, but they take very different perspective on it and there is little agreement on how it should be taught. This article aims to sort out the different perspectives and discusses problem solving as a goal, a method, and a skill. As a goal, problem solving should not be limited to well-structured…

  2. ON ALGEBRICO-DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS-SOLVING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Wenjun(Wu Wen-tsun)

    2004-01-01

    The char-set method of polynomial equations-solving is naturally extended to the differential case which gives rise to an algorithmic method of solving arbitrary systems of algebrico-differential equations. As an illustration of the method, the Devil's Problem of Pommaret is solved in details.

  3. Solving equations through particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, S.; Neuman, M.; Edström, P.; Olin, H.

    2015-12-01

    The present work evaluates a recently developed particle method (DFPM). The basic idea behind this method is to utilize a Newtonian system of interacting particles that through dissipation solves mathematical problems. We find that this second order dynamical system results in an algorithm that is among the best methods known. The present work studies large systems of linear equations. Of special interest is the wide eigenvalue spectrum. This case is common as the discretization of the continuous problem becomes dense. The convergence rate of DFPM is shown to be in parity with that of the conjugate gradient method, both analytically and through numerical examples. However, an advantage with DFPM is that it is cheaper per iteration. Another advantage is that it is not restricted to symmetric matrices only, as is the case for the conjugate gradient method. The convergence properties of DFPM are shown to be superior to the closely related approach utilizing only a first order dynamical system, and also to several other iterative methods in numerical linear algebra. The performance properties are understood and optimized by taking advantage of critically damped oscillators in classical mechanics. Just as in the case of the conjugate gradient method, a limitation is that all eigenvalues (spring constants) are required to be of the same sign. DFPM has no other limitation such as matrix structure or a spectral radius as is common among iterative methods. Examples are provided to test the particle algorithm's merits and also various performance comparisons with existent numerical algorithms are provided.

  4. Bit Preservation: A Solved Problem?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. H. Rosenthal

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available For years, discussions of digital preservation have routinely featured comments such as “bit preservation is a solved problem; the real issues are ...”. Indeed, current digital storage technologies are not just astoundingly cheap and capacious, they are astonishingly reliable. Unfortunately, these attributes drive a kind of “Parkinson’s Law” of storage, in which demands continually push beyond the capabilities of systems implementable at an affordable price. This paper is in four parts:Claims, reviewing a typical claim of storage system reliability, showing that it provides no useful information for bit preservation purposes.Theory, proposing “bit half-life” as an initial, if inadequate, measure of bit preservation performance, expressing bit preservation requirements in terms of it, and showing that the requirements being placed on bit preservation systems are so onerous that the experiments required to prove that a solution exists are not feasible.Practice, reviewing recent research into how well actual storage systems preserve bits, showing that they fail to meet the requirements by many orders of magnitude.Policy, suggesting ways of dealing with this unfortunate situation.

  5. Spectral Analysis and Atmospheric Models of Microflares

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Fang; Yu-Hua Tang; Zhi Xu

    2006-01-01

    By use of the high-resolution spectral data obtained with THEMIS on 2002 September 5, the spectra and characteristics of five well-observed microflares have been analyzed. Our results indicate that some of them are located near the longitudinal magnetic polarity inversion lines. All the microflares are accompanied by mass motions. The most obvious characteristic of the Hα microflare spectra is the emission at the center of both Hα and CaII 8542(A) lines. For the first time both thermal and non-thermal semi-empirical atmospheric models for the conspicuous and faint microflares are computed. In computing the non-thermal models, we assume that the electron beam resulting from magnetic reconnection is produced in the chromosphere, because it requires lower energies for the injected particles.It is found there is obvious heating in the low chromosphere. The temperature enhancement is about 1000-2200 K in the thermal models. If the non-thermal effects are included, then the required temperature increase can be reduced by 100-150 K. These imply that the Hα microflares can probably be produced by magnetic reconnection in the solar Iower atmosphere.The radiative and kinetic energies of the Hα microflares are estimated and the total energy is found to be 1027 - 4× 1028 erg.

  6. IDEAL Problem Solving dalam Pembelajaran Matematika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eny Susiana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most educators agree that problem solving is among the most meaningful and importantkinds of learning and thingking. That is, the central focus of learning and instructionshould be learning to solve problems. There are several warrants supporting that claims.They are authenticity, relevance, problem solving engages deeper learning angtherefore enhances meaning making, and constructed to represent problems (problemsolving is more meaningful. It is the reason why we must provide teaching and learningto make student’s problem solving skill in progress. There are many informationprocessingmodels of problem solving, such as simplified model of the problem-solvingprocess by Gicks, Polya’s problem solving process etc. One of them is IDEAL problemsolving. Each letter of IDEAL is stand for an aspect of thinking that is important forproblem solving. IDEAL is identify problem, Define Goal, Explore possible strategies,Anticipate outcme and Act, and Look back and learn. Using peer interaction andquestion prompt in small group in IDEAL problem solving teaching and Learning canimprove problem solving skill.Kata kunci: IDEAL Problem Solving, Interaksi Sebaya, Pertanyaan Penuntun, KelompokKecil.

  7. First redshift determination of an optically/UV faint submillimeter galaxy using CO emission lines

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, A; Downes, D; Walter, F; Cirasuolo, M; Menten, K M

    2009-01-01

    We report the redshift of a distant, highly obscured submm galaxy (SMG), based entirely on the detection of its CO line emission. We have used the newly commissioned Eight-MIxer Receiver (EMIR) at the IRAM 30m telescope, with its 8 GHz of instantaneous dual-polarization bandwidth, to search the 3-mm atmospheric window for CO emission from SMMJ14009+0252, a bright SMG detected in the SCUBA Lens Survey. A detection of the CO(3--2) line in the 3-mm window was confirmed via observations of CO(5--4) in the 2-mm window. Both lines constrain the redshift of SMMJ14009+0252 to z=2.9344, with high precision (dz=2 10^{-4}). Such observations will become routine in determining redshifts in the era of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).

  8. Fundamental Physics with the Hubble Frontier Fields: Constraining Dark Matter Models with the Abundance of Extremely Faint and Distant Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menci, N.; Merle, A.; Totzauer, M.; Schneider, A.; Grazian, A.; Castellano, M.; Sanchez, N. G.

    2017-02-01

    We show that the measured abundance of ultra-faint lensed galaxies at z≈ 6 in the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) provides stringent constraints on the parameter space of (i) dark matter models based on keV sterile neutrinos; (ii) “fuzzy” wavelike dark matter models, based on Bose–Einstein condensates of ultra-light particles. For the case of sterile neutrinos, we consider two production mechanisms: resonant production through mixing with active neutrinos and the decay of scalar particles. For the former model, we derive constraints for the combination of sterile neutrino mass {m}ν and mixing parameter {\\sin }2(2θ ) which provide the tightest lower bounds on the mixing angle (and hence on the lepton asymmetry) derived so far by methods independent of baryonic physics. For the latter we compute the allowed combinations of the scalar mass, its coupling to the Higgs field, and the Yukawa coupling of scalar to sterile neutrinos. We compare our results to independent existing astrophysical bounds on sterile neutrinos in the same mass range. For the case of “fuzzy” dark matter, we show that the observed number density ≈ 1/{{Mpc}}3 of high-redshift galaxies in the HFF sets a lower limit {m}\\psi ≥slant 8\\cdot {10}-22 eV (at the 3-σ confidence level) on the particle mass, a result that strongly disfavors wavelike bosonic dark matter as a viable model for structure formation. We discuss the impact on our results of uncertainties due to systematics in the selection of highly magnified, faint galaxies at high redshift.

  9. Deconvolution of post-adaptive optics images of faint circumstellar environments by means of the inexact Bregman procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfenati, A.; La Camera, A.; Carbillet, M.

    2016-02-01

    Aims: High-dynamic range images of astrophysical objects present some difficulties in their restoration because of the presence of very bright point-wise sources surrounded by faint and smooth structures. We propose a method that enables the restoration of this kind of images by taking these kinds of sources into account and, at the same time, improving the contrast enhancement in the final image. Moreover, the proposed approach can help to detect the position of the bright sources. Methods: The classical variational scheme in the presence of Poisson noise aims to find the minimum of a functional compound of the generalized Kullback-Leibler function and a regularization functional: the latter function is employed to preserve some characteristic in the restored image. The inexact Bregman procedure substitutes the regularization function with its inexact Bregman distance. This proposed scheme allows us to take under control the level of inexactness arising in the computed solution and permits us to employ an overestimation of the regularization parameter (which balances the trade-off between the Kullback-Leibler and the Bregman distance). This aspect is fundamental, since the estimation of this kind of parameter is very difficult in the presence of Poisson noise. Results: The inexact Bregman procedure is tested on a bright unresolved binary star with a faint circumstellar environment. When the sources' position is exactly known, this scheme provides us with very satisfactory results. In case of inexact knowledge of the sources' position, it can in addition give some useful information on the true positions. Finally, the inexact Bregman scheme can be also used when information about the binary star's position concerns a connected region instead of isolated pixels.

  10. Solving global optimization problems on GPU cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkalov, Konstantin; Gergel, Victor; Lebedev, Ilya

    2016-06-01

    The paper contains the results of investigation of a parallel global optimization algorithm combined with a dimension reduction scheme. This allows solving multidimensional problems by means of reducing to data-independent subproblems with smaller dimension solved in parallel. The new element implemented in the research consists in using several graphic accelerators at different computing nodes. The paper also includes results of solving problems of well-known multiextremal test class GKLS on Lobachevsky supercomputer using tens of thousands of GPU cores.

  11. IDEAL Problem Solving dalam Pembelajaran Matematika

    OpenAIRE

    Eny Susiana

    2012-01-01

    Most educators agree that problem solving is among the most meaningful and importantkinds of learning and thingking. That is, the central focus of learning and instructionshould be learning to solve problems. There are several warrants supporting that claims.They are authenticity, relevance, problem solving engages deeper learning angtherefore enhances meaning making, and constructed to represent problems (problemsolving) is more meaningful. It is the reason why we must provide teaching and l...

  12. Geometric constraint solving with geometric transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes two algorithms for solving geometric constraint systems. The first algorithm is for constrained systems without loops and has linear complexity. The second algorithm can solve constraint systems with loops. The latter algorithm is of quadratic complexity and is complete for constraint problems about simple polygons. The key to it is to combine the idea of graph based methods for geometric constraint solving and geometric transformations coming from rule-based methods.

  13. Distance Measurement Solves Astrophysical Mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Location, location, and location. The old real-estate adage about what's really important proved applicable to astrophysics as astronomers used the sharp radio "vision" of the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to pinpoint the distance to a pulsar. Their accurate distance measurement then resolved a dispute over the pulsar's birthplace, allowed the astronomers to determine the size of its neutron star and possibly solve a mystery about cosmic rays. "Getting an accurate distance to this pulsar gave us a real bonanza," said Walter Brisken, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. Monogem Ring The Monogem Ring, in X-Ray Image by ROSAT satellite CREDIT: Max-Planck Institute, American Astronomical Society (Click on Image for Larger Version) The pulsar, called PSR B0656+14, is in the constellation Gemini, and appears to be near the center of a circular supernova remnant that straddles Gemini and its neighboring constellation, Monoceros, and is thus called the Monogem Ring. Since pulsars are superdense, spinning neutron stars left over when a massive star explodes as a supernova, it was logical to assume that the Monogem Ring, the shell of debris from a supernova explosion, was the remnant of the blast that created the pulsar. However, astronomers using indirect methods of determining the distance to the pulsar had concluded that it was nearly 2500 light-years from Earth. On the other hand, the supernova remnant was determined to be only about 1000 light-years from Earth. It seemed unlikely that the two were related, but instead appeared nearby in the sky purely by a chance juxtaposition. Brisken and his colleagues used the VLBA to make precise measurements of the sky position of PSR B0656+14 from 2000 to 2002. They were able to detect the slight offset in the object's apparent position when viewed from opposite sides of Earth's orbit around the Sun. This effect, called parallax, provides a direct measurement of

  14. Establishing atmospheric neutrino oscillations with Super-Kamiokande

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajita, T.; Kearns, E.; Shiozawa, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this article we review the discovery of atmospheric neutrino oscillation by the Super-Kamiokande experiment. This review outlines the sequence of observations and their associated publications that solved the atmospheric neutrino anomaly and established the existence of neutrino oscillations with nearly maximal mixing of muon neutrinos and tau neutrinos. We also discuss subsequent and ongoing studies that use atmospheric neutrinos to continue to reveal the nature of the neutrino.

  15. Fibonacci's Triangle: A Vehicle for Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Hugh

    1979-01-01

    A method for solving certain types of problems is illustrated by problems related to Fibonacci's triangle. The method involves pattern recognition, generalizing, algebraic manipulation, and mathematical induction. (MP)

  16. Applying Cooperative Techniques in Teaching Problem Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisztina Barczi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Teaching how to solve problems – from solving simple equations to solving difficult competition tasks – has been one of the greatest challenges for mathematics education for many years. Trying to find an effective method is an important educational task. Among others, the question arises as to whether a method in which students help each other might be useful. The present article describes part of an experiment that was designed to determine the effects of cooperative teaching techniques on the development of problem-solving skills.

  17. Mobile serious games for collaborative problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jaime; Mendoza, Claudia; Salinas, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results obtained from the implementation of a series of learning activities based on mobile serious games (MSG) for the development of problem-solving and collaborative skills in Chilean 8th grade students. Three MSGs were developed and played by teams of four students, who had to solve the problems posed by the game collaboratively. The data shows that the experimental group had a higher perception of their own skills of collaboration and of the plan execution dimension of problem solving than the control group, providing empirical evidence regarding the contribution of MSGs to the development of collaborative problem-solving skills.

  18. Multi-Wavelength Spectroscopy of Super-Earth Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragomir, Diana; Benneke, Björn; Crossfield, Ian; Lothringer, Joshua; Knutson, Heather

    2017-01-01

    The Kepler mission has revealed that super-Earths (planets with radii between 1 and 4 R_Earth) are the most common class of planets in the Galaxy, though none are known in our own Solar System. These planets can theoretically have a wide range of compositions which we are just beginning to explore observationally. While studies based on Kepler data have revolutionized many areas of exoplanet research, the relative faintness of most of the host stars in the Kepler field means that atmospheric characterization of these super-Earths with currently available instruments is extremely challenging. However, a handful of transiting super-Earths are within reach of existing facilities. We have pointed both the HST and Spitzer toward these systems in an effort to paint a thorough picture of their atmospheres. Our transmission spectroscopy observations explore the transition region between terrestrial planets and miniature gas giants, and contribute to distinguishing between low-density hydrogen-dominated atmospheres and compact high-metallicity atmospheres. Transmission spectroscopy over a wide wavelength range is also essential to understanding the properties and effects of clouds in these atmospheres. The results of this program will inform the direction to be taken by future multi-wavelength studies of these worlds, in particular those enabled when the HST joins forces with the upcoming JWST.

  19. Does social problem solving differ from other types of problem solving during the adult years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, S M; Denney, N W

    1994-01-01

    One hundred thirteen individuals, ages 18-81, were presented with a test of social problem solving, a test of practical problem solving, the Twenty Questions task (a test of traditional problem solving), the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale--Revised Vocabulary subtest (a measure of crystallized intelligence), and Raven's Progressive Matrices (a measure of fluid intelligence). The effects of age, sex, education, and intellectual abilities on problem-solving performance were examined. Social problem solving was positively related to higher education and higher Vocabulary scores, but it was not related to age. Social problem solving and practical problem solving were significantly related to each other and to scores on the Vocabulary subtest, whereas traditional problem solving was significantly related to scores on Raven's Progressive Matrices. These results suggest that different types of problem solving are differentially related to other intellectual abilities and to age.

  20. Free from the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    /07 ESO PR Photo 27e/07 Active Galaxy NGC 4945 (NACO-LGS/VLT) Still closer to home, the LGS system can also be applied to solar system objects, such as asteroids or satellites, but also to the study of particular regions of spatially extended bodies like the polar regions of giant planets, where aurora activity is concentrated. During their science verification, the scientists turned the SINFONI instrument with the LGS to a Trans-Neptunian Object, 2003 EL 61. The high image contrast and sensitivity obtained with the use of the LGS mode permit the detection of the two faint satellites known to orbit the TNO. "From such observations one can study the chemical composition of the surface material of the TNO and its satellites (mainly crystalline water ice), estimate their surface properties and constrain their internal structure," explains Christophe Dumas, from ESO. The VLT Laser Guide System is the result of a collaborative work by a team of scientists and engineers from ESO and the Max Planck Institutes for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching and for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany. NACO was built by a Consortium of French and German institutes and ESO. SINFONI was built by a Consortium of German and Dutch Institutes and ESO. More Information Normally, the achievable image sharpness of a ground-based telescope is limited by the effect of atmospheric turbulence. This drawback can be surmounted with adaptive optics, allowing the telescope to produce images that are as sharp as if taken from space. This means that finer details in astronomical objects can be studied, and also that fainter objects can be observed. In order to work, adaptive optics needs a nearby reference star that has to be relatively bright, thereby limiting the area of the sky that can be surveyed to a few percent only. To overcome this limitation, astronomers use a powerful laser that creates an artificial star, where and when they need it. The laser beam takes advantage of the layer of sodium atoms

  1. Extremely Small Sizes for Faint z~2-8 Galaxies in the Hubble Frontier Fields: A Key Input For Establishing their Volume Density and UV Emissivity

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwens, R J; Oesch, P A; Atek, H; Lam, D; Stefanon, M

    2016-01-01

    We provide the first observational constraints on the sizes of the faintest galaxies lensed by the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) clusters. Ionizing radiation from faint galaxies likely drives cosmic reionization, and the HFF initiative provides a key opportunity to find such galaxies. Yet, we cannot really assess their ionizing emissivity without a robust measurement of their sizes, since this is key to quantifying both their prevalence and the faint-end slope to the UV luminosity function. Here we provide the first such size constraints with 2 new techniques. The first utilizes the fact that the detectability of highly-magnified galaxies as a function of shear is very dependent on a galaxy's size. Only the most compact galaxies will remain detectable in regions of high shear (vs. a larger detectable size range for low shear), a phenomenon we carefully quantify using simulations. Remarkably, however, no correlation is found between the surface density of faint galaxies and the predicted shear, using 87 faint h...

  2. On the properties of galaxies at the faint-end of the H$\\alpha$ luminosity function at $z\\sim0.62$

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Guijarro, Carlos; Villar, Víctor; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Lucía; Clément, Benjamin; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Studies measuring the star formation rate density, luminosity function and properties of star-forming galaxies are numerous. However, it exists a gap at $0.5faint H$\\alpha$ emitters at $z\\sim0.62$. We focus on their contribution to the faint-end of the luminosity function and derived star formation rate density, characterising their morphologies and basic photometric and spectroscopic properties. We use a narrow-band technique in the near-infrared, with a filter centered at 1.06 $\\mu$m. The data come from ultra-deep VLT/HAWK-I observations in the GOODS-S field with a total of 31.9 h in the narrow-band filter. We perform a visual classification of the sample and study their morphologies from structural parameters available in CANDELS. Our 28 H$\\alpha$-selected sample of faint star-forming galaxies reveals a robust faint-end slope of the luminosity function $\\alpha=-1.46_{-0.08}^{+0.16}$. The derived star formation...

  3. Fostering Student Engagement: Creative Problem-Solving in Small Group Facilitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    Creative Problem-Solving (CPS) can be a transformative teaching methodology that supports a dialogical learning atmosphere that can transcend the traditional classroom and inspire excellence in students by linking real life experiences with the curriculum. It supports a sense of inquiry that incorporates both experiential learning and the…

  4. Atmosphere: Power, Critique, Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    This paper hans three interrelated parts. First, atmosphere is approached through the concept of power. Atmospheres 'grip' us directly or mediate power indirectly by manipulating moods and evoking emotions. How does atmosphere relate to different conceptions of power? Second, atmospheric powers m...... be critiqued. Which conception of critique can be involved? Third, critiquing atmospheric powers can generate political conflict. How does atmospheric disputes relate to conceptions of politics and the political?...

  5. Conceptual Problem Solving in High School Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docktor, Jennifer L.; Strand, Natalie E.; Mestre, José P.; Ross, Brian H.

    2015-01-01

    Problem solving is a critical element of learning physics. However, traditional instruction often emphasizes the quantitative aspects of problem solving such as equations and mathematical procedures rather than qualitative analysis for selecting appropriate concepts and principles. This study describes the development and evaluation of an…

  6. Solving Cubic Equations by Polynomial Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Raghavendra G.

    2011-01-01

    Several mathematicians struggled to solve cubic equations, and in 1515 Scipione del Ferro reportedly solved the cubic while participating in a local mathematical contest, but did not bother to publish his method. Then it was Cardano (1539) who first published the solution to the general cubic equation in his book "The Great Art, or, The Rules of…

  7. Problem Solving Methods in Engineering Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartvig, Susanne C

    1999-01-01

    This short paper discusses typical engineering tasks and problem solving methods, based on a field study of engineering tasks at a Danish engineering firm. The field study has identified ten classes of design tasks and in this paper these classes are related to problem solving methods. The descri...

  8. Mathematical problem solving in primary school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolovou, A.

    2011-01-01

    A student is engaged in (non-routine) problem solving when there is no clear pathway to the solution. In contrast to routine problems, non-routine ones cannot be solved through the direct application of a standard procedure. Consider the following problem: In a quiz you get two points for each corre

  9. Creativity and Insight in Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnabi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the thought process involved in problem solving and its categorization as creative thinking as defined by psychologist R. Weisberg (2006). Additionally, the notion of insight, sometimes present in unconscious creative thinking and often leading to creative ideas, is discussed in the context of geometry problem solving. In…

  10. The Process of Solving Complex Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andreas; Greiff, Samuel; Funke, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    This article is about Complex Problem Solving (CPS), its history in a variety of research domains (e.g., human problem solving, expertise, decision making, and intelligence), a formal definition and a process theory of CPS applicable to the interdisciplinary field. CPS is portrayed as (a) knowledge acquisition and (b) knowledge application…

  11. Measuring Problem Solving Skills in "Portal 2"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shute, Valerie J.; Wang, Lubin

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines possible improvement to problem solving skills as a function of playing the video game "Portal 2." Stealth assessment is used in the game to evaluate students' problem solving abilities--specifically basic and flexible rule application. The stealth assessment measures will be validated against commonly accepted…

  12. Mathematics Teachers Circle around Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Anthony; Koehler, Jacob; Reiter, Harold

    2011-01-01

    Making problem solving a central part of teaching may be challenging to teachers who have limited experiences in learning and teaching mathematics in this way. Math Teachers' Circles were developed with the aim of establishing a "culture of problem solving" among middle school mathematics teachers. This culture could then be carried back into…

  13. Computer-Based Assessment of Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, E. L.; Mayer, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the components required to assess student problem solving in technology environments. Discusses the purposes of testing, provides an example demonstrating the difference between retention and transfer, defines and analyzes problem solving, and explores techniques and standards for measuring the quality of student understanding. Contains…

  14. Problem-solving and Cognitive Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Roger M.

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed are 15 studies on cognitive style and problem solving in science education. The effects of problem context, problem type, and three kinds of cognitive style on subjects' abilities to encounter and solve problems are investigated. Three protocols of the subjects' encountering activities are provided. (YP)

  15. Metacognition: Student Reflections on Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wismath, Shelly; Orr, Doug; Good, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-first century teaching and learning focus on the fundamental skills of critical thinking and problem solving, creativity and innovation, and collaboration and communication. Metacognition is a crucial aspect of both problem solving and critical thinking, but it is often difficult to get students to engage in authentic metacognitive…

  16. Numerical method for solving fuzzy wave equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermani, M. Afshar

    2013-10-01

    In this study a numerical method for solving "fuzzy partial differential equation" (FPDE) is considered. We present difference method to solve the FPDEs such as fuzzy hyperbolic equation, then see if stability of this method exist, and conditions for stability are given.

  17. ALGORITHM FOR SOLVING EXTREME SCHEDULING PROBLEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Gennady A. Berketov

    2015-01-01

    The article considers the original algorithmfor solving the generalized problem ofscheduling theory, based on the branch and bound method. Task schedulingperform works (operations) and restrictions on resources used often occur with scheduling discrete manufacturing operations, optimizing network implementationschedules of scientific, economic or technical projects. Tools to solve suchproblems are included in the decisionsupport system ACS in many businesses.The effectiveness of the proposed ...

  18. Toward a Design Theory of Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonassen, David H.

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a metatheory of problem solving. Describes differences among problems in terms of their structured ness, domain specificity (abstractness), and complexity; describes individual differences that affect problem solving; and presents a typology of problems, each of which engages different cognitive, affective, and conative process and…

  19. Concept mapping instrumental support for problem solving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoyanov, Slavi; Kommers, Piet

    2008-01-01

    The main theoretical position of this paper is that it is the explicit problem-solving support in concept mapping software that produces a stronger effect in problem-solving performance than the implicit support afforded by the graphical functionality of concept mapping software. Explicit problem-so

  20. Teaching Effective Problem Solving Strategies for Interns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Louis L.

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study investigates what problem solving strategies interns learn from their clinical teachers during their internships. Twenty-four interns who completed their internship in the elementary grades shared what problem solving strategies had the greatest impact upon them in learning how to deal with problems during their internship.…

  1. Mathematical Problem Solving through Sequential Process Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codina, A.; Cañadas, M. C.; Castro, E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The macroscopic perspective is one of the frameworks for research on problem solving in mathematics education. Coming from this perspective, our study addresses the stages of thought in mathematical problem solving, offering an innovative approach because we apply sequential relations and global interrelations between the different…

  2. The Functions of Pictures in Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Iliada; Philippou, George

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we assert that pictures serve four functions in problem solving: decorative, representational, organizational and informational. We, therefore, investigate the effects of pictures based on their functions in mathematical problem solving (MPS), by high achievement students of Grade 6 in Cyprus, in a communication setting. A…

  3. Multiple Null Point Reconnections in a limb faint cool jet ejection event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavabi, E.; Koutchmy, S.

    2016-09-01

    Giant spicules and macro- spicules are an important extended rather cool structure between the solar surface and the corona, partly filling the space inside the chromosphere and surrounded by a transition thin region. Their formation and dynamical properties are still mysterious. In order to explain solar limb and disc periodic recurrences of these events, a simulation model assuming quasi- random positions of spicules above the solar limb was studied. We allow a set number of spicules with different physical properties (such as height, lifetime and tilt angle as shown by an individual spicule) randomly occurring. It is assumed that after reaching a maximum length, the spicules are less rapidly falling back to the solar surface. This kind of limb event was often reported in the literature (spike; giant spicule; Ha ejection event; spray etc) but no serious quantitative analysis could be done. Indeed from ground-based observations, it is impossible to deduce precised parameters because the earth atmospheric turbulent effects makes impossible to make small scale measurements. SOT space-borne observations we use are unique in providing well reproducible observations permitting very precise measurements. The study of X-ray jets is an important topic to understand the heating of the solar corona and the origin of the fast wind. The recently launched Hinode mission permitted to observe the cool proxies of these jets with an unprecedented high spatial resolution of 120 km on the Sun. We selected a high cadence sequence of SOT (Hinode) observations taken with both the HCaII and the Hα filter to look at the details of the dynamics revealed by a large jet event. Both wavelet and amplitude spectra analysis were used to analyze the observed kink wave and the time variations of intensities during the event. The results are discussed in the frame of different models implying reconnections with the inference of the dynamical phenomena occurring in the vicinity of several null

  4. First Super-Earth Atmosphere Analysed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    The atmosphere around a super-Earth exoplanet has been analysed for the first time by an international team of astronomers using ESO's Very Large Telescope. The planet, which is known as GJ 1214b, was studied as it passed in front of its parent star and some of the starlight passed through the planet's atmosphere. We now know that the atmosphere is either mostly water in the form of steam or is dominated by thick clouds or hazes. The results will appear in the 2 December 2010 issue of the journal Nature. The planet GJ 1214b was confirmed in 2009 using the HARPS instrument on ESO's 3.6-metre telescope in Chile (eso0950) [1]. Initial findings suggested that this planet had an atmosphere, which has now been confirmed and studied in detail by an international team of astronomers, led by Jacob Bean (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), using the FORS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope. "This is the first super-Earth to have its atmosphere analysed. We've reached a real milestone on the road toward characterising these worlds," said Bean. GJ 1214b has a radius of about 2.6 times that of the Earth and is about 6.5 times as massive, putting it squarely into the class of exoplanets known as super-Earths. Its host star lies about 40 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Ophiuchus (the Serpent Bearer). It is a faint star [2], but it is also small, which means that the size of the planet is large compared to the stellar disc, making it relatively easy to study [3]. The planet travels across the disc of its parent star once every 38 hours as it orbits at a distance of only two million kilometres: about seventy times closer than the Earth orbits the Sun. To study the atmosphere, the team observed the light coming from the star as the planet passed in front of it [4]. During these transits, some of the starlight passes through the planet's atmosphere and, depending on the chemical composition and weather on the planet, specific wavelengths of light are

  5. The stellar atmosphere simulation code Bifrost

    CERN Document Server

    Gudiksen, Boris V; Hansteen, Viggo H; Hayek, Wolfgang; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Martínez-Sykora, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Context: Numerical simulations of stellar convection and photospheres have been developed to the point where detailed shapes of observed spectral lines can be explained. Stellar atmospheres are very complex, and very different physical regimes are present in the convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere, transition region and corona. To understand the details of the atmosphere it is necessary to simulate the whole atmosphere since the different layers interact strongly. These physical regimes are very diverse and it takes a highly efficient massively parallel numerical code to solve the associated equations. Aims: The design, implementation and validation of the massively parallel numerical code Bifrost for simulating stellar atmospheres from the convection zone to the corona. Methods: The code is subjected to a number of validation tests, among them the Sod shock tube test, the Orzag-Tang colliding shock test, boundary condition tests and tests of how the code treats magnetic field advection, chromospheric ...

  6. Free Radicals and Reactive Intermediates for the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James G.

    2001-01-01

    This grant provided partial support for participation in the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment. The NASA-sponsored SOLVE mission was conducted Jointly with the European Commission-sponsored Third European Stratospheric Experiment on Ozone (THESEO 2000). Researchers examined processes that control ozone amounts at mid to high latitudes during the arctic winter and acquired correlative data needed to validate the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III satellite measurements that are used to quantitatively assess high-latitude ozone loss. The campaign began in September 1999 with intercomparison flights out of NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards. CA. and continued through March 2000. with midwinter deployments out of Kiruna. Sweden. SOLVE was co-sponsored by the Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP). Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP). Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP). and Earth Observing System (EOS) of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) as part of the validation program for the SAGE III instrument.

  7. Pre-Service Class Teacher' Ability in Solving Mathematical Problems and Skills in Solving Daily Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljaberi, Nahil M.; Gheith, Eman

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the ability of pre-service class teacher at University of Petrain solving mathematical problems using Polya's Techniques, their level of problem solving skills in daily-life issues. The study also investigates the correlation between their ability to solve mathematical problems and their level of problem solving…

  8. Lesion mapping of social problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbey, Aron K; Colom, Roberto; Paul, Erick J; Chau, Aileen; Solomon, Jeffrey; Grafman, Jordan H

    2014-10-01

    Accumulating neuroscience evidence indicates that human intelligence is supported by a distributed network of frontal and parietal regions that enable complex, goal-directed behaviour. However, the contributions of this network to social aspects of intellectual function remain to be well characterized. Here, we report a human lesion study (n = 144) that investigates the neural bases of social problem solving (measured by the Everyday Problem Solving Inventory) and examine the degree to which individual differences in performance are predicted by a broad spectrum of psychological variables, including psychometric intelligence (measured by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), emotional intelligence (measured by the Mayer, Salovey, Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test), and personality traits (measured by the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness Personality Inventory). Scores for each variable were obtained, followed by voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that working memory, processing speed, and emotional intelligence predict individual differences in everyday problem solving. A targeted analysis of specific everyday problem solving domains (involving friends, home management, consumerism, work, information management, and family) revealed psychological variables that selectively contribute to each. Lesion mapping results indicated that social problem solving, psychometric intelligence, and emotional intelligence are supported by a shared network of frontal, temporal, and parietal regions, including white matter association tracts that bind these areas into a coordinated system. The results support an integrative framework for understanding social intelligence and make specific recommendations for the application of the Everyday Problem Solving Inventory to the study of social problem solving in health and disease.

  9. Disciplinary Foundations for Solving Interdisciplinary Scientific Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongmei; Shen, Ji

    2015-10-01

    Problem-solving has been one of the major strands in science education research. But much of the problem-solving research has been conducted on discipline-based contexts; little research has been done on how students, especially individuals, solve interdisciplinary problems. To understand how individuals reason about interdisciplinary problems, we conducted an interview study with 16 graduate students coming from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds. During the interviews, we asked participants to solve two interdisciplinary science problems on the topic of osmosis. We investigated participants' problem reasoning processes and probed in their attitudes toward general interdisciplinary approach and specific interdisciplinary problems. Through a careful inductive content analysis of their responses, we studied how disciplinary, cognitive, and affective factors influenced their interdisciplinary problems-solving. We found that participants' prior discipline-based science learning experiences had both positive and negative influences on their interdisciplinary problem-solving. These influences were embodied in their conceptualization of the interdisciplinary problems, the strategies they used to integrate different disciplinary knowledge, and the attitudes they had toward interdisciplinary approach in general and specific interdisciplinary problems. This study sheds light on interdisciplinary science education by revealing the complex relationship between disciplinary learning and interdisciplinary problem-solving.

  10. Infrared-faint radio sources remain undetected at far-infrared wavelengths. Deep photometric observations using the Herschel Space Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Spitler, L. R.; Leipski, C.; Parker, Q. A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Showing 1.4 GHz flux densities in the range of a few to a few tens of mJy, infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a type of galaxy characterised by faint or absent near-infrared counterparts and consequently extreme radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousand. Recent studies showed that IFRS are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at redshifts ≳2, potentially linked to high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs). Aims: This work explores the far-infrared emission of IFRS, providing crucial information on the star forming and AGN activity of IFRS. Furthermore, the data enable examining the putative relationship between IFRS and HzRGs and testing whether IFRS are more distant or fainter siblings of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of six IFRS was observed with the Herschel Space Observatory between 100 μm and 500 μm. Using these results, we constrained the nature of IFRS by modelling their broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED). Furthermore, we set an upper limit on their infrared SED and decomposed their emission into contributions from an AGN and from star forming activity. Results: All six observed IFRS were undetected in all five Herschel far-infrared channels (stacking limits: σ = 0.74 mJy at 100 μm, σ = 3.45 mJy at 500 μm). Based on our SED modelling, we ruled out the following objects to explain the photometric characteristics of IFRS: (a) known radio-loud quasars and compact steep-spectrum sources at any redshift; (b) starburst galaxies with and without an AGN and Seyfert galaxies at any redshift, even if the templates were modified; and (c) known HzRGs at z ≲ 10.5. We find that the IFRS analysed in this work can only be explained by objects that fulfil the selection criteria of HzRGs. More precisely, IFRS could be (a) known HzRGs at very high redshifts (z ≳ 10.5); (b) low-luminosity siblings of HzRGs with additional dust obscuration at lower redshifts; (c) scaled or unscaled versions of Cygnus A at any

  11. Properties of galaxies at the faint end of the Hα luminosity function at z ~ 0.62

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Guijarro, Carlos; Gallego, Jesús; Villar, Víctor; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Lucía; Clément, Benjamin; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2016-07-01

    Context. Studies measuring the star formation rate density, luminosity function, and properties of star-forming galaxies are numerous. However, it exists a gap at 0.5 basic photometric and spectroscopic properties. Methods: We use a narrow-band technique in the near-infrared, with a filter centred at 1.06 μm. The data come from ultra-deep VLT/HAWK-I observations in the GOODS-S field with a total of 31.9 h in the narrow-band filter. In addition to our survey, we mainly make use of ancillary data coming from the CANDELS and Rainbow Cosmological Surveys Database, from the 3D-HST for comparison, and also spectra from the literature. We perform a visual classification of the sample and study their morphologies from structural parameters available in CANDELS. In order to obtain the luminosity function, we apply a traditional V/Vmax method and perform individual extinction corrections for each object to accurately trace the shape of the function. Results: Our 28 Hα-selected sample of faint star-forming galaxies reveals a robust faint-end slope of the luminosity function α = - 1.46-0.08+0.16 . The derived star formation rate density at z ~ 0.62 is ρSFR = 0.036-0.008+0.012 M⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3 . The sample is mainly composed of disks, but an important contribution of compact galaxies with Sérsic indexes n ~ 2 display the highest specific star formation rates. Conclusions: The luminosity function at z ~ 0.62 from our ultra-deep data points towards a steeper α when an individual extinction correction for each object is applied. Compact galaxies are low-mass, low-luminosity, and starburst-dominated objects with a light profile in an intermediate stage from early to late types. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (ESO), Chile, Prog-Id 181.A-0485(A).

  12. Problem solving III: factors influencing classroom problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayonara Salvador Cabral da Costa

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a review of the literature in the area of problem solving, particularly in physics, focusing only on factors that influence classroom problem solving. Fifty-seven papers have been analyzed in terms of theoretical basis, investigated factors/methodology and findings/relevant factors, which were organized in a table that served as support for a synthesis made by the authors. It is the third of a four-paper series reviewing different aspects of the problem solving subject.

  13. PSQP: Puzzle Solving by Quadratic Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andalo, Fernanda A; Taubin, Gabriel; Goldenstein, Siome

    2017-02-01

    In this article we present the first effective method based on global optimization for the reconstruction of image puzzles comprising rectangle pieces-Puzzle Solving by Quadratic Programming (PSQP). The proposed novel mathematical formulation reduces the problem to the maximization of a constrained quadratic function, which is solved via a gradient ascent approach. The proposed method is deterministic and can deal with arbitrary identical rectangular pieces. We provide experimental results showing its effectiveness when compared to state-of-the-art approaches. Although the method was developed to solve image puzzles, we also show how to apply it to the reconstruction of simulated strip-shredded documents, broadening its applicability.

  14. Solving the Schroedinger equation using Smolyak interpolants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Gustavo; Carrington, Tucker

    2013-10-07

    In this paper, we present a new collocation method for solving the Schroedinger equation. Collocation has the advantage that it obviates integrals. All previous collocation methods have, however, the crucial disadvantage that they require solving a generalized eigenvalue problem. By combining Lagrange-like functions with a Smolyak interpolant, we device a collocation method that does not require solving a generalized eigenvalue problem. We exploit the structure of the grid to develop an efficient algorithm for evaluating the matrix-vector products required to compute energy levels and wavefunctions. Energies systematically converge as the number of points and basis functions are increased.

  15. Stochastic Optimization Approaches for Solving Sudoku

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Meir

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the Sudoku problem is solved using stochastic search techniques and these are: Cultural Genetic Algorithm (CGA), Repulsive Particle Swarm Optimization (RPSO), Quantum Simulated Annealing (QSA) and the Hybrid method that combines Genetic Algorithm with Simulated Annealing (HGASA). The results obtained show that the CGA, QSA and HGASA are able to solve the Sudoku puzzle with CGA finding a solution in 28 seconds, while QSA finding a solution in 65 seconds and HGASA in 1.447 seconds. This is mainly because HGASA combines the parallel searching of GA with the flexibility of SA. The RPSO was found to be unable to solve the puzzle.

  16. A First Course in Atmospheric Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilson, Phillip

    2009-08-01

    It is not uncommon to find textbooks that have been written with the intention of catering to a broad spectrum of readers. Often, though not always, the result is a book appropriate for neither advanced nor beginning students. However, Grant Petty had a very specific target audience in mind when he wrote A First Course in Atmospheric Thermodynamics. The book is clearly gauged for atmospheric science and meteorology students who have had introductory courses in physics and calculus but who have not necessarily established a firm foundation in analytic problem solving.

  17. Reducing malaria misdiagnosis: the importance of correctly interpreting Paracheck Pf® "faint test bands" in a low transmission area of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Lisa K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs have been extensively evaluated since their introduction in the early 1990's, sensitivity and specificity vary widely limiting successful integration into clinical practice. This paper reviews specific issues surrounding RDT use in field settings and presents results of research investigating how to interpret "faint test bands" on ParaCheck Pf® in areas of low transmission in order to reduce malaria misdiagnosis. Methods A multi-phase cross-sectional study was conducted at a remote hospital in the northern Tanzanian highlands. Capillary blood samples were taken from consenting participants (n = 319 for blood smear and ParaCheck Pf® testing. Primary outcome variables were sensitivity, specificity and proportion misdiagnosed by ParaCheck Pf® and local microscopy. ParaCheck Pf® "faint bands" were classified as both true positives or true negatives during evaluation to determine appropriate clinical interpretation. Multivariate logistic regression adjusted for age and gender was conducted to determine odds of misdiagnosis for local microscopy and ParaCheck Pf®. Results Overall, 23.71% of all ParaCheck Pf® tests resulted in a "faint band" and 94.20% corresponded with true negatives. When ParaCheck Pf® "faint bands" were classified as positive, specificity was 75.5% (95% CI = 70.3% - 80.6% as compared to 98.9% (95% CI = 97.0% - 99.8% when classified as negative. The odds of misdiagnosis by local microscopy for those > 5 years as compared to those ≤ 5 years are 0.370 (95% CI = 0.1733 - 0.7915, p = 0.010. In contrast, even when ParaCheck Pf® faint bands are considered positive, the odds of misdiagnosis by ParaCheck Pf® for those > 5 years as compared to those ≤ 5 years are 0.837 (95% CI = 0.459 - 1.547, p = 0.5383. Conclusions We provide compelling evidence that in areas of low transmission, "faint bands" should be considered a negative test when used to inform clinical

  18. Productive Dialog During Collaborative Problem Solving

    CERN Document Server

    Hausmann, Robert G M; van de Sande, Carla; VanLehn, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration is an important problem-solving skill; however, novice collaboration generally benefits from some kind of support. One possibility for supporting productive conversations between collaborators is to encourage pairs of students to provide explanations for their problem-solving steps. To test this possibility, we contrasted individuals who were instructed to self-explain problem-solving steps with dyads who were instructed to jointly explain problem-solving steps in the context of an intelligent tutoring system (ITS). The results suggest that collaboratively developed explanations prompted students to remediate their errors in dialog, as opposed to relying on the ITS for assistance, which is provided in the form of on-demand hints. The paper concludes with a discussion about implications for combining proven learning interventions.

  19. Problem solving using soft systems methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, L

    This article outlines a method of problem solving which considers holistic solutions to complex problems. Soft systems methodology allows people involved in the problem situation to have control over the decision-making process.

  20. An Open Environment for Cooperative Equational Solving

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We describe a system called CFLP which aims at the integration ofthe best featu res of functional logic programming (FLP), cooperative constraint solving (CCS), and distributed computing. FLP provides support for defining one's own abstract ions over a constraint domain in an easy and comfortable way, whereas CCS is emp loyed to solve systems of mixed constraints by iterating specialized constraint solving methods in accordance with a well defined strategy. The system is a di s tributed implementation of a cooperative constraint functional logic programming scheme that combines higher-order lazy narrowing with cooperative constraint s o lving. The model takes advantage of the existence of several constraint solving resources located in a distributed environment (e.g., a network of computers), w hich communicate asynchronously via message passing. To increase the openness of the system, we are redesigning CFLP based on CORBA. We discuss some design and implementation issues of the system.

  1. Information problem solving and mental effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Frerejean, Jimmy

    2012-01-01

    Brand-Gruwel, S., & Frerejean, J. (2012, 5 September). Information problem solving and mental effort. Presentation at the EARLI ASC 2012 "Using eye tracking to design and evaluate education & training methods", Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  2. Physics: Quantum problems solved through games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2016-04-01

    Humans are better than computers at performing certain tasks because of their intuition and superior visual processing. Video games are now being used to channel these abilities to solve problems in quantum physics. See Letter p.210

  3. Photoreactors for Solving Problems of Environmental Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Sokolova, I. V.

    2015-04-01

    Designs and physical aspects of photoreactors, their capabilities for a study of kinetics and mechanisms of processes proceeding under illumination with light, as well as application of photoreactors for solving various applied problem are discussed.

  4. Solving traveling salesman problems by genetic algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The gene section ordering on solving traveling salesman problems is analyzed by numerical experiments. Some improved crossover operations are presented. Several combinations of genetic operations are examined and the functions of these operations are analyzed. The essentiality of the ordering of the gene section and the significance of the evolutionary inversion operation are discussed. Some results and conclusions are obtained and given, which provide useful information for the implementation of the genetic operations for solving the traveling salesman problem.

  5. Exact Algorithms for Solving Stochastic Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Koucky, Michal; Lauritzen, Niels;

    2012-01-01

    Shapley's discounted stochastic games, Everett's recursive games and Gillette's undiscounted stochastic games are classical models of game theory describing two-player zero-sum games of potentially infinite duration. We describe algorithms for exactly solving these games.......Shapley's discounted stochastic games, Everett's recursive games and Gillette's undiscounted stochastic games are classical models of game theory describing two-player zero-sum games of potentially infinite duration. We describe algorithms for exactly solving these games....

  6. Solving recurrence relations supported by Wolfram Mathematica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Vílchez-Quesada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces some algorithms for solving linear relationships, homogeneous and non-homogeneous recurrence with constant and non-constant coefficients, using software as the main resource in solving processes. The Mathematica commercial application has provided the technical support necessary for the implementation of the methods used. It also presents other examples of recurrence relations, showing the effectiveness and limitations of the algorithms created by the author and programmed in Mathematica environment that provides.

  7. Faint COSMOS AGN at z~3.3 - I. Black Hole Properties and Constraints on Early Black Hole Growth

    CERN Document Server

    Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Urry, C Megan; Marchesi, Stefano; Schawinski, Kevin; Elvis, Martin; Rosario, David; Suh, Hyewon; Mejia-Restrepo, Julian; Simmons, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    We present new Keck/MOSFIRE K-band spectroscopy for a sample of 14 faint, X-ray selected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) in the COSMOS field. The data covers the spectral region surrounding the broad Balmer emission lines, which enables the estimation of black hole masses (M_BH) and accretion rates (in terms of L/L_Edd). We focus on ten AGN at z~3.3, where the we observe the Hbeta spectral region, while for the other four z~2.4 sources we use the Halpha broad emission line. Compared with previous detailed studies of unobscured AGNs at these high redshifts, our sources are fainter by an order of magnitude, corresponding to number densities of order ~10^-6--10^-5 Mpc^-3. The lower luminosities also allow for a robust identification of the host galaxies emission, necessary to obtain reliable intrinsic AGN luminosities, BH masses and accretion rates. We find the AGNs in our sample to be powered by SMBHs with a typical mass of M_BH~6*10^8 M_Sol - significantly lower than the higher-luminosity, rarer quasars reported...

  8. X- and γ-Ray Pulsations of the Nearby Radio-faint PSR J1741-2054

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, M.; Belfiore, A.; Saz Parkinson, P.; Caraveo, P.; De Luca, A.; Sarazin, C.; Salvetti, D.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Camilo, F.

    2014-07-01

    We report the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of the radio-faint γ-ray pulsar J1741-2054 and its nebula together with the analysis of five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. The X-ray spectrum of the pulsar is consistent with an absorbed power law plus a blackbody, originating at least partly from the neutron star cooling. The nebular emission is consistent with that of a synchrotron pulsar wind nebula, with hints of spatial spectral variation. We extended the available Fermi LAT ephemeris and folded the γ-ray and X-ray data. We detected X-ray pulsations from the neutron star: both the thermal and non-thermal components are ~35%-40% pulsed, with phase-aligned maxima. A sinusoid fits the thermal-folded profile well. A 10 bin phase-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission shows softening of the non-thermal spectrum during the on-pulse phases. The radio, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves are single-peaked, not phase-aligned, with the X-ray peak trailing the γ-ray peak by more than half a rotation. Spectral considerations suggest that the most probable pulsar distance is in the 0.3-1.0 kpc range, in agreement with the radio dispersion measure.

  9. An Experimental Model of Vasovagal Syncope Induces Cerebral Hypoperfusion and Fainting-Like Behavior in Awake Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Devin W.; Reis, Cesar; Frank, Ethan; Klebe, Damon W.; Zhang, John H.; Applegate, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Vasovagal syncope, a contributing factor to elderly falls, is the transient loss of consciousness caused by decreased cerebral perfusion. Vasovagal syncope is characterized by hypotension, bradycardia, and reduced cerebral blood flow, resulting in fatigue, altered coordination, and fainting. The purpose of this study is to develop an animal model which is similar to human vasovagal syncope and establish an awake animal model of vasovagal syncope. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS). Blood pressure, heart rate, and cerebral blood flow were monitored before, during, and post-stimulation. sGVS resulted in hypotension, bradycardia, and decreased cerebral blood flow. One cohort of animals was subjected to sGVS while freely moving. sGVS in awake animals produced vasovagal syncope-like symptoms, including fatigue and uncoordinated movements; two animals experienced spontaneous falling. Another cohort of animals was preconditioned with isoflurane for several days before being subjected to sGVS. Isoflurane preconditioning before sGVS did not prevent sGVS-induced hypotension or bradycardia, yet isoflurane preconditioning attenuated sGVS-induced cerebral blood flow reduction. The sGVS rat model mimics elements of human vasovagal syncope pathophysiology (hypotension, bradycardia, and decreased cerebral perfusion), including behavioral symptoms such as fatigue and altered balance. This study indicates that the sGVS rat model is similar to human vasovagal syncope and that therapies directed at preventing cerebral hypoperfusion may decrease syncopal episodes and reduce injuries from syncopal falls. PMID:27658057

  10. Detection of satellite remnants in the Galactic Halo with Gaia III. Detection limits for Ultra Faint Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Antoja, Teresa; Aguilar, Luis; Figueras, Francesca; Antiche, Erika; Hernandez-Perez, Fabiola; Brown, Anthony; Valenzuela, Octavio; Aparicio, Antonio; Hidalgo, Sebastian; Velazquez, Hector

    2015-01-01

    We present a method to identify Ultra Faint Dwarf Galaxy (UFDG) candidates in the halo of the Milky Way using the future Gaia catalogue and we explore its detection limits and completeness. The method is based on the Wavelet Transform and searches for over-densities in the combined space of sky coordinates and proper motions, using kinematics in the search for the first time. We test the method with a Gaia mock catalogue that has the Gaia Universe Model Snapshot (GUMS) as a background, and use a library of around 30 000 UFDGs simulated as Plummer spheres with a single stellar population. For the UFDGs we use a wide range of structural and orbital parameters that go beyond the range spanned by real systems, where some UFDGs may remain undetected. We characterize the detection limits as function of the number of observable stars by Gaia in the UFDGs with respect to that of the background and their apparent sizes in the sky and proper motion planes. We find that the addition of proper motions in the search impro...

  11. Detection of Faint BLR Components in the Starburst/Seyfert Galaxy NGC 6221 and Measure of the Central BH Mass

    CERN Document Server

    La Franca, Fabio; Ricci, Federica; Bianchi, Stefano; Marconi, Alessandro; Sani, Eleonora; Vignali, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, using single epoch virial based techniques in the optical band, it has been possible to measure the central black hole mass on large AGN1 samples. However these measurements use the width of the broad line region as a proxy of the virial velocities and are therefore difficult to be carried out on those obscured (type 2) or low luminosity AGN where the nuclear component does not dominate in the optical. Here we present the optical and near infrared spectrum of the starburst/Seyfert galaxy NGC 6221, observed with X-shooter/VLT. Previous observations of NGC 6221 in the X-ray band show an absorbed (N_H=8.5 +/- 0.4 x 10^21 cm^-2) spectrum typical of a type 2 AGN with luminosity log(L_14-195 keV) = 42.05 erg/s, while in the optical band its spectrum is typical of a reddened (A_V=3) starburst. Our deep X-shooter/VLT observations have allowed us to detect faint broad emission in the H_alpha, HeI and Pa_beta lines (FWHM ~1400-2300 km/s) confirming previous studies indicating that NGC 6221 is a redd...

  12. The Low-Mass Stellar IMF at High Redshift Faint Stars in the Ursa Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Wyse, R F G; Feltzing, S; Houdashelt, M L; Wyse, Rosemary F.G.; Gilmore, Gerard; Feltzing, Sofia; Houdashelt, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Low-mass stars, those with main-sequence lifetimes that are of order the age of the Universe, provide unique constraints on the Initial Mass Function (IMF) when they formed. Star counts in systems with simple star-formation histories are particularly straightforward to interpret, and those in old systems allow one to determine the low-mass stellar IMF at large look-back times and thus at high redshift. We present the faint stellar luminosity function (based on optical HST data) in an external galaxy, the Ursa Minor dwarf Spheroidal (dSph). This relatively-nearby (distance 70kpc) companion galaxy to the Milky Way has a stellar population with narrow distributions of age and of metallicity, remarkably similar to that of a classical halo globular cluster such as M92 or M15, i.e. old and metal-poor. Contrasting with globular clusters, the internal velocity dispersion of the Ursa Minor dSph indicates the presence of significant amounts of dark matter. We find that the main sequence stellar luminosity function of t...

  13. Constraints on photoionization feedback from number counts of ultra-faint high-redshift galaxies in the Frontier Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, M; Ferrara, A; Merlin, E; Fontana, A; Amorín, R; Grazian, A; Mármol-Queralto, E; Michałowski, M J; Mortlock, A; Paris, D; Parsa, S; Pilo, S; Santini, P

    2016-01-01

    We exploit a sample of ultra-faint high-redshift galaxies (demagnified HST $H_{160}$ magnitude $>30$) in the Frontier Fields clusters A2744 and M0416 to constrain a theoretical model for the UV luminosity function (LF) in the presence of photoionization feedback. The objects have been selected on the basis of accurate photometric redshifts computed from multi-band photometry including 7 HST bands and deep $K_s$ and IRAC observations. Magnification is computed on an object-by-object basis from all available lensing models of the two clusters. We take into account source detection completeness as a function of luminosity and size, magnification effects and systematics in the lens modeling of the clusters under investigation. We find that our sample of high-$z$ galaxies constrain the cut-off halo circular velocity below which star-formation is suppressed by photo-ionization feedback to $v_c^{\\rm cut} < 50$ km s$^{-1}$. This circular velocity corresponds to a halo mass of $\\approx5.6\\times10^9~M_\\odot$ and $\\a...

  14. A Common Origin for Globular Clusters and Ultra-faint Dwarfs in Simulations of the First Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ricotti, Massimo; Gnedin, Nickolay Y

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the first in a series on galaxy formation before reionization, we focus on understanding what determines the size and morphology of stellar objects in the first low mass galaxies, using parsec- scale cosmological simulations performed with an adaptive mesh hydrodynamics code. Although the dense gas in which stars are formed tends to have a disk structure, stars are found in spheroids with little rotation. Halos with masses between 10^6 M_sun and 5x10^8 M_sun form stars stochastically, with stellar masses in the range 10^4 M_sun to 2x10^6 M_sun. Nearly independent of stellar mass, we observe a large range of half-light radii for the stars, from a few parsecs to a few hundred parsecs and surface brightnesses and mass-to-light ratios ranging from those typical of globular clusters to ultra-faint dwarfs. In our simulations, stars form in dense stellar clusters with high gas-to-star conversion efficiencies and rather uniform metallicities. A fraction of these clusters remain bound after the gas is r...

  15. Infrared-Faint Radio Sources: A Cosmological View - AGN Number Counts, the Cosmic X-Ray Background and SMBH Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Zinn, Peter-Christian; Ibar, Edo

    2011-01-01

    Context. Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are extragalactic emitters clearly detected at radio wavelengths but barely detected or undetected at optical and infrared wavelengths, with 5 sigma sensitivities as low as 1 uJy. Aims. Recent SED-modelling and analysis of their radio properties shows that IFRS are consistent with a population of (potentially extremely obscured) high-redshift AGN at 3

  16. The faint source population at 15.7 GHz - III. A high-frequency study of HERGs and LERGs

    CERN Document Server

    Whittam, Imogen H; Green, David A; Jarvis, Matt J

    2016-01-01

    A complete sample of 96 faint ($S > 0.5$ mJy) radio galaxies is selected from the Tenth Cambridge (10C) survey at 15.7~GHz. Optical spectra are used to classify 17 of the sources as high-excitation or low-excitation radio galaxies (HERGs and LERGs respectively), for the remaining sources three other methods are used; these are optical compactness, X-ray observations and mid-infrared colour--colour diagrams. 32 sources are HERGs and 35 are LERGs while the remaining 29 sources could not be classified. We find that the 10C HERGs tend to have higher 15.7-GHz flux densities, flatter spectra, smaller linear sizes and be found at higher redshifts than the LERGs. This suggests that the 10C HERGs are more core dominated than the LERGs. Lower-frequency radio images, linear sizes and spectral indices are used to classify the sources according to their radio morphology; 18 are Fanaroff and Riley type I or II sources, a further 13 show some extended emission, and the remaining 65 sources are compact and are referred to as...

  17. Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Camera Spectroscopy of the Narrow-Line Region of NGC 4151. I. Gas Kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Winge, C; Macchetto, F D; Capetti, A; Marconi, A; Winge, Claudia; Axon, David J.

    1999-01-01

    We present the results from a detailed kinematic analysis of both ground-based, and Hubble Space Telescope/Faint Object Camera long-slit spectroscopy at sub-arcsec spatial resolution, of the narrow-line region of NGC 4151. In agreement with previous work, the extended emission gas (R > 4") is found to be in normal rotation in the galactic plane, a behaviour that we were able to trace even across the nuclear region, where the gas is strongly disturbed by the interaction with the radio jet, and connects smoothly with the large scale rotation defined by the neutral gas emission. The HST data, at 0.029" spatial resolution, allow us for the first time to truly isolate the kinematic behaviour of the individual clouds in the inner narrow-line region. We find that, underlying the perturbations introduced by the radio ejecta, the general velocity field can still be well represented by planar rotation down to a radius of ~ 0.5" (30 pc), distance at which the rotation curve has its turnover. The most striking result tha...

  18. Portrait of a dark horse: photometric properties and kinematics of the ultra-faint Milky Way satellite Pegasus III

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Dongwon; Geha, Marla; Chiti, Anirudh; Milone, Antonino P; Mackey, Dougal; Da Costa, Gary; Frebel, Anna; Conn, Blair

    2016-01-01

    Pegasus III (Peg III) is one of the few known ultra-faint stellar systems in the outer halo of the Milky Way. We present the results from a follow-up campaign with Magellan/IMACS and Keck/DEIMOS. Deep stellar photometry down to $r_0\\approx 26$ mag has allowed accurate measurements of its photometric and structural properties. The color-magnitude diagram of Peg III confirms that the stellar system is well described by an old ($\\sim$13.5 Gyr), metal-poor ($\\langle\\lbrack$Fe/H$\\rbrack\\rangle\\sim -2.5$ dex) and $\\alpha$-enhanced ([$\\alpha$/Fe]$\\sim+0.4$ dex.) stellar population at a heliocentric distance of $215\\pm12$ kpc. The revised half-light radius $r_{h}=53\\pm14$ pc, ellipticity $\\epsilon=0.38^{+0.22}_{-0.38}$, and total luminosity $M_{V}=-3.4\\pm0.4$ are in good agreement with the values quoted in our previous paper. We further report on the spectroscopic identification of seven, possibly eight member stars of Peg III. Peg III has a systemic velocity of $-222.9 \\pm 2.6$ km s$^{-1}$ and a velocity dispersion ...

  19. Deflagrations in hybrid CONe white dwarfs: a route to explain the faint Type Iax supernova 2008ha

    CERN Document Server

    Kromer, M; Pakmor, R; Ruiter, A J; Hillebrandt, W; Marquardt, K S; Roepke, F K; Seitenzahl, I R; Sim, S A; Taubenberger, S

    2015-01-01

    Stellar evolution models predict the existence of hybrid white dwarfs (WDs) with a carbon-oxygen core surrounded by an oxygen-neon mantle. Being born with masses ~1.1 Msun, hybrid WDs in a binary system may easily approach the Chandrasekhar mass (MCh) by accretion and give rise to a thermonuclear explosion. Here, we investigate an off-centre deflagration in a near-MCh hybrid WD under the assumption that nuclear burning only occurs in carbon-rich material. Performing hydrodynamics simulations of the explosion and detailed nucleosynthesis post-processing calculations, we find that only 0.014 Msun of material is ejected while the remainder of the mass stays bound. The ejecta consist predominantly of iron-group elements, O, C, Si and S. We also calculate synthetic observables for our model and find reasonable agreement with the faint Type Iax SN 2008ha. This shows for the first time that deflagrations in near-MCh WDs can in principle explain the observed diversity of Type Iax supernovae. Leaving behind a near-MCh...

  20. Imaging of four planetary nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds using the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blades, J. C.; Barlow, M. J.; Albrecht, R.; Barbieri, C.; Boksenberg, A.; Crane, P.; Deharveng, J. M.; Disney, M. J.; Jakobsen, P.; Kamperman, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    Using the Faint Object Camera on-board the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained images of four planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Magellanic Clouds, namely N2 and N5 in the SMC and N66 and N201 in the LMC. Each nebula was imaged through two narrow-band filters isolating forbidden O III 5007 and H-beta, for a nominal exposure time of 1000 s in each filter. In forbidden O III, SMC N5 shows a circular ring structure, with a peak-to-peak diameter of 0.26 arcsec and a FWHM of 0.35 arcsec while SMC N2 shows an elliptical ring structure with a peak-to-peak diameter of 0.26 x 0.21. The expansion ages corresponding to the observed structures in SMC N2 and N5 are of the order of 3000 yr. LMC N201 is very compact, with a FWHM of 0.2 arcsec in H-beta. The Type I PN LMC N66 is a multipolar nebula, with the brightest part having an extent of about 2 arcsec and with fainter structures extending over 4 arcsec.

  1. The Origin of Dwarf Galaxies in Clusters: The Faint-End Slope of Abell 85 Galaxy Luminosity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agulli, I.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrena, R.; Diaferio, A.; Sánchez-Janssen, R.

    2016-10-01

    Dwarf galaxies (Mb>-18) are important because of their cosmological interest as tests of hierarchical theories. The formation of these galaxies is still an open question but red dwarf galaxies are preferentially located in high density environments, indicating that they are end-products of galaxy transformations in clusters. Deep spectroscopic studies of galaxy clusters are needed to put some constraints on dwarf galaxy formation and evolution. We have observed and analyzed Abell 85, a nearby (z = 0.055) and massive cluster down to M*+6, using the MOS instruments VIMOS@VLT and AF2@WHT. The first and powerful tool to study the characteristics of galaxies and compare with different density environments is the galaxy luminosity function. The comparison of the results for Abell 85 with literature outcomes for clusters and field, allows us to conclude that, at least for this cluster, the environment plays a major role in the nature of the faint-end galaxies, transforming blue dwarfs in the field into red ones in the cluster, but not in the formation of the luminosity function slope.

  2. Another Faint UV Object Associated with a Globular Cluster X-Ray Source The Case of M92

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R; Rood, R T; Pecci, F F; Buonanno, R; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Paltrinieri, Barbara; Rood, Robert T.; Pecci, Flavio Fusi; Buonanno, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    The core of the metal poor Galactic Globular Cluster M92 (NGC 6341) has been observed with WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope through visual, blue and mid-UV filters in a program devoted to study the evolved stellar population in a selected sample of Galactic Globular Clusters. In the UV $(m_{255}, m_{255}-U)$ color magnitude diagram we have discovered a faint `UV-dominant' object. This star lies within the error box of a Low Luminosity Globular Cluster X-ray source (LLGCX) recently found in the core of M92. The properties of the UV star discovered in M92 are very similar to those of other UV stars found in the core of some clusters (M13, 47 Tuc, M80, etc)---all of them are brighter in the UV than in the visible and are located in the vicinity of a LLGCX. We suggest that these stars are a new sub-class of cataclysmic variables.

  3. Faint Ultraviolet Objects in the Core of M13 Optical Counterparts of the Low Luminosity X-ray Source?

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, F R; Pecci, F F; Rood, R T; Dorman, B; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Paltrinieri, Barbara; Pecci, Flavio Fusi; Rood, Robert T.; Dorman, Ben

    1997-01-01

    The core of the galactic globular cluster M13 (NGC 6205) has been observed with WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope through visual, blue and mid- and far-UV filters in a programme devoted to study the UV population in a sample of Galactic globular clusters. In the UV Color Magnitude Diagrams derived from the HST images we have discovered three faint objects with a strong UV excess, which lie significantly outside the main loci defined by more than 12,000 normal cluster stars. The positions of two of the UV stars are nearly coincident (7" & 1") to those of a low luminosity X-ray source recently found in the core of M13 and to a 3.5-sigma peak in the X-ray contour map. We suggest that the UV stars are physically connected to the X-ray emission. The UV stars are very similar to the quiescent nova in the globular cluster M80, and they might be a, perhaps new, subclass of cataclysmic variable.

  4. Diffuse light in z~0.25 galaxy clusters: constraining tidal damage and the faint end of the Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Zibetti, S; Zibetti, Stefano; White, Simon D.M.

    2005-01-01

    The starlight coming from the intergalactic space in galaxy clusters and groups witnesses the violent tidal interactions that galaxies experience in these dense environments. Such interactions may be (at least partly) responsible for the transformation of normal star-forming galaxies into passive dwarf ellipticals (dEs). In this contribution we present the first systematic study of the IntraCluster Light (ICL) for a statistically representative sample (Zibetti et al. 2005), which comprises 683 clusters selected between z=0.2 and 0.3 from ~1500 deg^2 in the SDSS. Their ICL is studied by stacking the images in the g-, r-, and i-band after masking out all galaxies and polluting sources. In this way a very uniform background illumination is obtained, that allows us to measure surface brightnesses as faint as 31 mag/arcsec^2 and to trace the ICL out to 700 kpc from the central galaxy. We find that the local fraction of light contributed by intracluster stars rapidly decreases as a function of the clustercentric di...

  5. The Proper Motion of Pyxis: the first use of Adaptive Optics in tandem with HST on a faint halo object

    CERN Document Server

    Fritz, Tobias K; Zivick, Paul; Kallivayalil, Nitya; Beaton, Rachael; Bovy, Jo; Sales, Laura V; Sohn, Tony; Angell, Dylan; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Carrasco, Eleazar R; Damke, Gulliermo; Davies, Richard; Majewski, Steve; Neichel, Benoit; van der Marel, Roeland

    2016-01-01

    We present a proper motion measurement for the halo globular cluster Pyxis, using HST/ACS data as the first epoch, and GeMS/GSAOI Adaptive Optics data as the second, separated by a baseline of about 5 years. This is both the first measurement of the proper motion of Pyxis and the first calibration and use of Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics data to measure an absolute proper motion for a faint, distant halo object. Consequently, we present our analysis of the Adaptive Optics data in detail. We obtain a proper motion of mu_alpha cos(delta)=0.89+/-0.30 mas/yr and mu_delta=0.62+/-0.29 mas/yr. From the proper motion and the line-of-sight velocity we find the orbit of Pyxis is rather eccentric with its apocenter at 100 to 400 kpc and its pericenter at about 27 kpc. We also investigate two literature-proposed associations for Pyxis with the recently discovered ATLAS stream and the Magellanic system. Combining our measurements with dynamical modeling and cosmological numerical simulations we find it unlikely Pyxis is...

  6. X- and γ-ray pulsations of the nearby radio-faint PSR J1741–2054

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marelli, M.; Belfiore, A.; Caraveo, P.; De Luca, A.; Salvetti, D. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Saz Parkinson, P. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Sarazin, C.; Sivakoff, G. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Camilo, F., E-mail: marelli@lambrate.inaf.it [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    We report the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of the radio-faint γ-ray pulsar J1741–2054 and its nebula together with the analysis of five years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data. The X-ray spectrum of the pulsar is consistent with an absorbed power law plus a blackbody, originating at least partly from the neutron star cooling. The nebular emission is consistent with that of a synchrotron pulsar wind nebula, with hints of spatial spectral variation. We extended the available Fermi LAT ephemeris and folded the γ-ray and X-ray data. We detected X-ray pulsations from the neutron star: both the thermal and non-thermal components are ∼35%-40% pulsed, with phase-aligned maxima. A sinusoid fits the thermal-folded profile well. A 10 bin phase-resolved analysis of the X-ray emission shows softening of the non-thermal spectrum during the on-pulse phases. The radio, X-ray, and γ-ray light curves are single-peaked, not phase-aligned, with the X-ray peak trailing the γ-ray peak by more than half a rotation. Spectral considerations suggest that the most probable pulsar distance is in the 0.3-1.0 kpc range, in agreement with the radio dispersion measure.

  7. The Nature of Faint Blue Stars in the PHL and Ton Catalogues based on Digital Sky Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Andernach, H; W., W Copo Cordova; Santiago-Bautista, I del C

    2015-01-01

    We determined accurate positions for 3000 of the "faint blue stars" in the PHL (Palomar-Haro-Luyten) and Ton/TonS catalogues. These were published from 1957 to 1962, and, aimed at finding new white dwarfs, provide approximate positions for about 10750 blue stellar objects. Some of these "stars" had become known as quasars, a type of objects unheard-of before 1963. We derived subarcsec positions from a comparison of published finding charts with images from the first-epoch Digitized Sky Survey. Numerous objects are now well known, but unfortunately neither their PHL or Ton numbers, nor their discoverers, are recognized in current databases. A comparison with modern radio, IR, UV and X-ray surveys leads us to suggest that the fraction of extragalactic objects in the PHL and Ton catalogues is at least 15 per cent. However, because we failed to locate the original PHL plates or finding charts, it may be impossible to correctly identify the remaining 7726 PHL objects.

  8. Conceptual problem solving in high school physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docktor, Jennifer L.; Strand, Natalie E.; Mestre, José P.; Ross, Brian H.

    2015-12-01

    Problem solving is a critical element of learning physics. However, traditional instruction often emphasizes the quantitative aspects of problem solving such as equations and mathematical procedures rather than qualitative analysis for selecting appropriate concepts and principles. This study describes the development and evaluation of an instructional approach called Conceptual Problem Solving (CPS) which guides students to identify principles, justify their use, and plan their solution in writing before solving a problem. The CPS approach was implemented by high school physics teachers at three schools for major theorems and conservation laws in mechanics and CPS-taught classes were compared to control classes taught using traditional problem solving methods. Information about the teachers' implementation of the approach was gathered from classroom observations and interviews, and the effectiveness of the approach was evaluated from a series of written assessments. Results indicated that teachers found CPS easy to integrate into their curricula, students engaged in classroom discussions and produced problem solutions of a higher quality than before, and students scored higher on conceptual and problem solving measures.

  9. Collection of solved problems in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koupilová, ZdeÅka; Mandíková, Dana; Snětinová, Marie

    2017-01-01

    To solve physics problems is a key ability which students should reach during their physics education. Ten years ago we started to develop a Collection of fully solved problems. The structure of problems' solutions is specially designed to substitute tutor's help during lesson and encourage students to solve at least some parts of a problem independently. Nowadays the database contains about 770 fully solved problems in physics in Czech, more than 100 problems in Polish and more than 140 problems in English. Other problems are still being translated. Except for physics problems, the Collection has also a mathematical part, which contains more than 300 fully solved problems in mathematics. This paper follows the presentation of the Collection of solved problems from previous years and introduces a new interface of the Collection, its enhanced functionality, new topics, newly created interface for teachers, user feedback and plans for future development. The database is placed at the website of the Department of Physics Education, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague, the links are: http://reseneulohy.cz/fyzika (Czech version); http://www.physicstasks.eu/ (English version).

  10. MULTILEVEL AUGMENTATION METHODS FOR SOLVING OPERATOR EQUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhongying; Wu Bin; Xu Yuesheng

    2005-01-01

    We introduce multilevel augmentation methods for solving operator equations based on direct sum decompositions of the range space of the operator and the solution space of the operator equation and a matrix splitting scheme. We establish a general setting for the analysis of these methods, showing that the methods yield approximate solutions of the same convergence order as the best approximation from the subspace. These augmentation methods allow us to develop fast, accurate and stable nonconventional numerical algorithms for solving operator equations. In particular, for second kind equations, special splitting techniques are proposed to develop such algorithms. These algorithms are then applied to solve the linear systems resulting from matrix compression schemes using wavelet-like functions for solving Fredholm integral equations of the second kind. For this special case, a complete analysis for computational complexity and convergence order is presented. Numerical examples are included to demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of the methods. In these examples we use the proposed augmentation method to solve large scale linear systems resulting from the recently developed wavelet Galerkin methods and fast collocation methods applied to integral equations of the secondkind. Our numerical results confirm that this augmentation method is particularly efficient for solving large scale linear systems induced from wavelet compression schemes.

  11. Atmospheric cloud physics thermal systems analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Engineering analyses performed on the Atmospheric Cloud Physics (ACPL) Science Simulator expansion chamber and associated thermal control/conditioning system are reported. Analyses were made to develop a verified thermal model and to perform parametric thermal investigations to evaluate systems performance characteristics. Thermal network representations of solid components and the complete fluid conditioning system were solved simultaneously using the Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer (SINDA) computer program.

  12. Unified treatment of lifting atmospheric entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachtsheim, P. R.; Lehman, L. L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents a unified treatment of the effect of lift on peak acceleration during atmospheric entry. Earlier studies were restricted to different regimes because of approximations invoked to solve the same transcendental equation. This paper shows the connection between the earlier studies by employing a general expression for the peak acceleration and obtains solutions to the transcendental equation without invoking the earlier approximations. Results are presented and compared with earlier studies where appropriate.

  13. Models of magnetized neutron star atmospheres: thin atmospheres and partially ionized hydrogen atmospheres with vacuum polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, V F; Werner, K

    2009-01-01

    Observed X-ray spectra of some isolated magnetized neutron stars display absorption features, sometimes interpreted as ion cyclotron lines. Modeling the observed spectra is necessary to check this hypothesis and to evaluate neutron star parameters.We develop a computer code for modeling magnetized neutron star atmospheres in a wide range of magnetic fields (10^{12} - 10^{15} G) and effective temperatures (3 \\times 10^5 - 10^7 K). Using this code, we study the possibilities to explain the soft X-ray spectra of isolated neutron stars by different atmosphere models. The atmosphere is assumed to consist either of fully ionized electron-ion plasmas or of partially ionized hydrogen. Vacuum resonance and partial mode conversion are taken into account. Any inclination of the magnetic field relative to the stellar surface is allowed. We use modern opacities of fully or partially ionized plasmas in strong magnetic fields and solve the coupled radiative transfer equations for the normal electromagnetic modes in the plas...

  14. A finite difference method of solving anisotropic scattering problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkstrom, B. R.

    1976-01-01

    A new method of solving radiative transfer problems is described including a comparison of its speed with that of the doubling method, and a discussion of its accuracy and suitability for computations involving variable optical properties. The method uses a discretization in angle to produce a coupled set of first-order differential equations which are integrated between discrete depth points to produce a set of recursion relations for symmetric and anti-symmetric angular sums of the radiation field at alternate depth points. The formulation given here includes depth-dependent anisotropic scattering, absorption, and internal sources, and allows arbitrary combinations of specular and non-Lambertian diffuse reflection at either or both boundaries. Numerical tests of the method show that it can return accurate emergent intensities even for large optical depths. The method is also shown to conserve flux to machine accuracy in conservative atmospheres

  15. The Effect of Learning Environments Based on Problem Solving on Students’ Achievements of Problem Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhan KARATAS

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Problem solving is recognized as an important life skill involving a range of processes including analyzing, interpreting, reasoning, predicting, evaluating and reflecting. For that reason educatingstudents as efficient problem solvers is an important role of mathematics education. Problem solving skill is the centre of mathematics curriculum. Students’ gaining of that skill in school mathematics is closely related with the learning environment to beformed and the roles given to the students. The aim of this study is to create a problem solving based learning environment to enhance the students’ problem solving skill. Within this scope, students’practiced activities and problems that provide them to proceed in Polya (1945’s problem solving phases and throughout the study, students’ success in problem solving have been evaluated. While experimental group students received problem solving based learning environment performed, control group students have continued their present program in this quise1experimental study. Eleven problem solving activities were given to the students at the beginning, middle and end of the study and the students’ performances wereanalyzed based on problem solving phases. The findings illustrated that the experimental group students’ success in problem solving activities has increased while the control group students’ success has not changed significantly.

  16. Atmospheric composition change: Ecosystems-Atmosphere interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fowler, D.; Pilegaard, K.; Sutton, M.A.; Ambus, P.; Raivonen, M.; Duyzer, J.; Simpson, D.; Fagerli, H.; Fuzzi, S.; Schjoerring, J.K.; Granier, C.; Neftel, A.; Isaksen, I.S.A.; Laj, P.; Maione, M.; Monks, P.S.; Burkhardt, J.; Daemmgen, U.; Neirynck, J.; Personne, E.; Wichink Kruit, R.J.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Flechard, C.; Tuovinen, J.P.; Coyle, M.; Gerosa, G.; Loubet, B.; Altimir, N.; Gruenhage, L.; Ammann, C.; Cieslik, S.; Paoletti, E.; Mikkelsen, T.N.; Ro-Poulsen, H.; Cellier, P.; Cape, J.N.; Horvath, L.; Loreto, F.; Niinemets, U.; Palmer, P.I.; Rinne, J.; Misztal, P.; Nemitz, E.; Nilsson, D.; Pryor, S.; Gallagher, M.W.; Vesala, T.; Skiba, U.; Brueggemann, N.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.; Williams, J.; O'Dowd, C.; Facchini, M.C.; Leeuw, de G.; Flossman, A.; Chaumerliac, N.; Erisman, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Ecosystems and the atmosphere: This review describes the state of understanding the processes involved in the exchange of trace gases and aerosols between the earth's surface and the atmosphere. The gases covered include NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, NH3, SO2, DMS, Biogenic VOC, O-3, CH4, N2O and particles i

  17. Discovery of an unusual new radio source in the star-forming galaxy M82: Faint supernova, supermassive blackhole, or an extra-galactic microquasar?

    CERN Document Server

    Muxlow, T W B; Garrington, S T; Pedlar, A; Fenech, D M; Argo, M K; van Eymeren, J; Ward, M; Zezas, A; Brunthaler, A

    2010-01-01

    A faint new radio source has been detected in the nuclear region of the starburst galaxy M82 using MERLIN radio observations designed to monitor the flux density evolution of the recent bright supernova SN2008iz. This new source was initially identified in observations made between 1-5th May 2009 but had not been present in observations made one week earlier, or in any previous observations of M82. In this paper we report the discovery of this new source and monitoring of its evolution over its first 9 months of existence. The true nature of this new source remains unclear, and we discuss whether this source may be an unusual and faint supernova, a supermassive blackhole associated with the nucleus of M82, or intriguingly the first detection of radio emission from an extragalactic microquasar.

  18. Diffuse light in z˜0.25 galaxy clusters: constraining tidal damage and the faint end of the luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibetti, Stefano; White, Simon D. M.

    The starlight coming from the intergalactic space in galaxy clusters and groups witnesses the violent tidal interactions that galaxies experience in these dense environments. Such interactions may be (at least partly) responsible for the transformation of normal star-forming galaxies into passive dwarf ellipticals (dEs).In this contribution we present the first systematic study of the IntraCluster Light (ICL) for a statistically representative sample (Zibetti et al. 2005), which comprises 683 clusters selected between z=0.2 and 0.3 from {˜}1500 °2 in the SDSS. Their ICL is studied by stacking the images in the g-, r-, and i-band after masking out all galaxies and polluting sources. In this way a very uniform background illumination is obtained, that allows us to measure surface brightnesses as faint as 31 mag arcsec-2 and to trace the ICL out to 700 kpc from the central galaxy. We find that the local fraction of light contributed by intracluster stars rapidly decreases as a function of the clustercentric distance, from ˜40% at 100 kpc to ˜5% at 500 kpc. By comparing the distribution and colours of the ICL and of the clusters galaxies, we find indication that the main source of ICL are the stars stripped from galaxies that plunge deeply into the cluster potential well along radial orbits. Thus, if dEs are the remnants of these stripped progenitors we should expect similar radial orbital anisotropies and correlations between the dE luminosity function and the amount of ICL in different clusters.The diffuse emission we measure is contaminated by faint unresolved galaxies: this makes our flux estimate depend to some extent on the assumed luminosity function, but, on the other hand, allows us to constrain the number of faint galaxies. Our present results disfavour steep (α) faint-end powerlaw slopes.

  19. HUBBLE FRONTIER FIELDS FIRST COMPLETE CLUSTER DATA: FAINT GALAXIES AT z ∼ 5-10 FOR UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND COSMIC REIONIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigaki, Masafumi; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kawamata, Ryota; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Oguri, Masamune, E-mail: ishigaki@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-01-20

    We present comprehensive analyses of faint dropout galaxies up to z ∼ 10 with the first full-depth data set of the A2744 lensing cluster and parallel fields observed by the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) program. We identify 54 dropouts at z ∼ 5-10 in the HFF fields and enlarge the size of the z ∼ 9 galaxy sample obtained to date. Although the number of highly magnified (μ ∼ 10) galaxies is small because of the tiny survey volume of strong lensing, our study reaches the galaxies' intrinsic luminosities comparable to the deepest-field HUDF studies. We derive UV luminosity functions with these faint dropouts, carefully evaluating by intensive simulations the combination of observational incompleteness and lensing effects in the image plane, including magnification, distortion, and multiplication of images, with the evaluation of mass model dependencies. Our results confirm that the faint-end slope, α, is as steep as –2 at z ∼ 6-8 and strengthen the evidence for the rapid decrease of UV luminosity densities, ρ{sub UV}, at z > 8 from the large z ∼ 9 sample. We examine whether the rapid ρ{sub UV} decrease trend can be reconciled with the large Thomson scattering optical depth, τ{sub e}, measured by cosmic microwave background experiments, allowing a large space of free parameters, such as an average ionizing photon escape fraction and a stellar-population-dependent conversion factor. No parameter set can reproduce both the rapid ρ{sub UV} decrease and the large τ {sub e}. It is possible that the ρ{sub UV} decrease moderates at z ≳ 11, that the free parameters significantly evolve toward high z, or that there exist additional sources of reionization such as X-ray binaries and faint active galactic nuclei.

  20. A Deep Search for Faint Galaxies Associated with Very Low-Redshift C IV Absorbers: A Case with Cold-Accretion Characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Burchett, Joseph N; Werk, Jessica K; Howk, J Christopher; Prochaska, J Xavier; Ford, Amanda Brady; Davé, Romeel

    2013-01-01

    Studies of QSO absorber-galaxy connections are often hindered by inadequate information on whether faint/dwarf galaxies are located near the QSO sight lines. To investigate the contribution of faint galaxies to QSO absorber populations, we are conducting a deep galaxy redshift survey near low-z C IV absorbers. Here we report a blindly-detected C IV absorption system (z(abs) = 0.00348) in the spectrum of PG1148+549 that appears to be associated either with an edge-on dwarf galaxy with an obvious disk (UGC 6894, z(gal) = 0.00283) at an impact parameter of rho = 190 kpc or with a very faint dwarf irregular galaxy at rho = 23 kpc, which is closer to the sightline but has a larger redshift difference (z(gal) = 0.00107, i.e., dv = 724 km/s). We consider various gas/galaxy associations, including infall and outflows. Based on current theoretical models, we conclude that the absorber is most likely tracing (1) the remnants of an outflow from a previous epoch, a so-called 'ancient outflow', or (2) intergalactic gas ac...

  1. The Lyman-alpha luminosity function at z=5.7-6.6 and the steep drop of the faint end: implications for reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Sérgio; Matthee, Jorryt

    2016-01-01

    We present new results from the widest narrow band survey search for Lyman-alpha (Lya) emitters at z=5.7, just after reionization. We survey a total of 7 deg$^2$ spread over the COSMOS, UDS and SA22 fields. We find over 11,000 line emitters, out of which 514 are robust Lya candidates at z=5.7 within a volume of 6.3x10$^6$ Mpc$^3$. Our Lya emitters span a wide range in Lya luminosities, from faint to bright (L$_{\\rm Ly\\alpha}\\sim10^{42.5-44}$ erg s$^{-1}$) and rest-frame equivalent widths (EW$_0$~25-1000 \\AA) in a single, homogeneous data-set. By combining all our fields we find that the faint end slope of the z=5.7 Lya luminosity function is very steep, with $\\alpha=-2.3^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$. We also present an updated z=6.6 Lya luminosity function, based on comparable volumes and obtained with the same methods, which we directly compare with that at z=5.7. We find a significant decline of the number density of faint Lya emitters from z=5.7 to z=6.6 (by $0.5\\pm0.1$ dex), but no evolution at the bright end/no evolut...

  2. Faint AGNs at z>4 in the CANDELS GOODS-S field: looking for contributors to the reionization of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Giallongo, E; Fiore, F; Fontana, A; Pentericci, L; Vanzella, E; Dickinson, M; Kocevski, D; Castellano, M; Cristiani, S; Ferguson, H; Finkelstein, S; Grogin, N; Hathi, N; Koekemoer, A M; Newman, J A; Salvato, M

    2015-01-01

    In order to derive the AGN contribution to the cosmological ionizing emissivity we have selected faint AGN candidates at $z>4$ in the CANDELS GOODS-South field which is one of the deepest fields with extensive multiwavelength coverage from Chandra, HST, Spitzer and various groundbased telescopes. We have adopted a relatively novel criterion. As a first step high redshift galaxies are selected in the NIR $H$ band down to very faint levels ($H\\leq27$) using reliable photometric redshifts. This corresponds at $z>4$ to a selection criterion based on the galaxy rest-frame UV flux. AGN candidates are then picked up from this parent sample if they show X-ray fluxes above a threshold of $F_X\\sim 1.5\\times 10^{-17}$ cgs (0.5-2 keV). We have found 22 AGN candidates at $z>4$ and we have derived the first estimate of the UV luminosity function in the redshift interval $4faint end of the derived lum...

  3. Surgical biopsy is still necessary for BI-RADS 4 calcifications found on digital mammography that are technically too faint for stereotactic core biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Deborah O; Neal, Colleen H; Noroozian, Mitra; Joe, Annette I; Pinsky, Renee W; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Helvie, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of faint BI-RADS 4 calcifications detected with digital mammography that were not amenable to stereotactic core biopsy due to suboptimal visualization. Following Institutional Review Board approval, a HIPAA compliant retrospective search identified 665 wire-localized surgical excisions of calcifications in 606 patients between 2007 and 2010. We included all patients that had surgical excision for initial diagnostic biopsy due to poor calcification visualization, whose current imaging was entirely digital and performed at our institution and who did not have a diagnosis of breast cancer within the prior 2 years. The final study population consisted of 20 wire-localized surgical biopsies in 19 patients performed instead of stereotactic core biopsy due to poor visibility of faint calcifications. Of the 20 biopsies, 4 (20% confidence intervals 2, 38%) were malignant, 5 (25%) showed atypia and 11 (55%) were benign. Of the malignant cases, two were invasive ductal carcinoma (2 and 1.5 mm), one was intermediate grade DCIS and one was low-grade DCIS. Malignant calcifications ranged from 3 to 12 mm. The breast density was scattered in 6/19 (32%), heterogeneously dense in 11/19 (58%) and extremely dense in 2/19 (10%). Digital mammography-detected faint calcifications that were not amenable to stereotactic biopsy due to suboptimal visualization had a risk of malignancy of 20%. While infrequent, these calcifications should continue to be considered suspicious and surgical biopsy recommended.

  4. ALMA Census of Faint 1.2 mm Sources Down to ~0.01 mJy: Extragalactic Background Light and Dust-Poor High-z Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Seiji; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Ishigaki, Masafumi; Momose, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    We present statistics of 89 faint 1.2-mm continuum sources with a flux density of ~0.01-1 mJy detected by about 100 deep ALMA pointing data that include the complete deep datasets archived by 2015 March. These faint sources are identified in 50 blank fields and behind one cluster, Abell 1689, that magnifies the background sources by gravitational lensing. Evaluating various important effects including the false detection, detection completeness, and flux boosting as well as the lensing magnification by modeling and simulations, we derive number counts of 1.2 mm continuum sources. We find that the number counts are well represented by the Schechter function down to ~0.01 mJy, and that the total integrated 1.2 mm flux of the securely identified sources is 22.8^(+6.1)_(-6.4) Jy deg^(-2) that corresponds to 104^(+27)_(-30)% of the extragalactic background light (EBL) measured by COBE observations. These results suggest that the major 1.2 mm EBL contributors are sources with >~0.01 mJy, and that very faint 1.2 mm ...

  5. The Evolution Of The Faint End Of The UV Luminosity Function During The Peak Epoch Of Star Formation (1

    CERN Document Server

    Alavi, Anahita; Richard, Johan; Rafelski, Marc; Jauzac, Mathilde; Limousin, Marceau; Freeman, William R; Scarlata, Claudia; Robertson, Brant; Stark, Daniel P; Teplitz, Harry I; Desai, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    We present a robust measurement of the rest-frame UV luminosity function (LF) and its evolution during the peak epoch of cosmic star formation at 1faint galaxies with M_UV<-12.5 AB mag at 1faint multiply imaged systems in A1689. We run a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the completeness correction and effective volume for each cluster using the latest published lensing models. We compute the rest-frame UV LF and find the best-fit faint-end slopes of alpha=-1.56\\pm0.04, alpha=-1.72\\pm0.04 and alpha=-1.94\\pm0.06 at 1.0

  6. Hubble Frontier Fields First Complete Cluster Data: Faint Galaxies at $z\\sim 5-10$ for UV Luminosity Functions and Cosmic Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Ishigaki, Masafumi; Ouchi, Masami; Oguri, Masamune; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Ono, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    We present the comprehensive analyses of faint dropout galaxies up to $z\\sim 10$ with the first full-depth data set of Abell 2744 lensing cluster and parallel fields completed by the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) program in July 2014. We identify $54$ dropouts at $z \\sim 5-10$ in the HFF fields, and strikingly enlarge the size of $z\\sim 9$ galaxy sample obtained to date. Although the number of highly magnified ($\\mu \\sim 10$) galaxies is small due to the tiny survey volume of strong lensing, our study reaches the galaxies' intrinsic luminosities comparable to the deepest-field HUDF studies. We derive UV luminosity functions with these faint dropouts, carefully evaluating the combination of observational incompleteness and lensing effects in the image plane by intensive simulations including magnification, distortion, and multiplication of images, with the evaluations of mass model dependences. Our results confirm that the faint-end slope, $\\alpha$, is as steep as $-2$ at $z \\sim 6-8$, and significantly strengt...

  7. Transfer Between Analogies: How Solving One Analogy Problem Helps to Solve Another

    OpenAIRE

    Keane, Mark T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with transfer between analogies; with what people acquire from one analogy problem-solving episode that can be re-applied to a subsequent analogy, problem-solving episode. This issue must be resolved if we are to understand the nature of expertise and the appropriate use of analogy in education. There are two main explanations of what subjects acquire from an analogy problem-solving episode. The schema-induction hypothesis maintains that subjects acquire an abs...

  8. VARIATIONAL ITERATION SOLVING METHOD FOR SEA-AIR OSCILLATOR MODEL OF INTERDECADAL CLIMATE FLUCTUATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Jia-qi; LIN Yi-hua; WANG Hui

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric physics is a very complicated natural phenomenon and needs to simplify its basic models for the sea-air oscillator. And it is solved by using the approximate method. The variational iteration method is a simple and valid method. In this paper the coupled system for a sea-air oscillator model of interdecadal climate fluctuations is considered. Firstly, through introducing a set of functions, and computing the variations, the Lagrange multipliers are obtained. And then, the generalized expressions of variational iteration are constructed. Finally, through selecting appropriate initial iteration from the iteration expressions, the approximations of solution for the sea-air oscillator model are solved successively.

  9. Why students still can't solve physics problems after solving over 2000 problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Taejin; Lee, Gyoungho

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the belief that solving a large number of physics problems helps students better learn physics. We investigated the number of problems solved, student confidence in solving these problems, academic achievement, and the level of conceptual understanding of 49 science high school students enrolled in upper-level physics classes from Spring 2010 to Summer 2011. The participants solved an average of 2200 physics problems before entering high school. Despite having solved so many problems, no statistically significant correlation was found between the number of problems solved and academic achievement on either a mid-term or physics competition examination. In addition, no significant correlation was found between the number of physics problems solved and performance on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI). Lastly, four students were selected from the 49 participants with varying levels of experience and FCI scores for a case study. We determined that their problem solving and learning strategies was more influential in their success than the number of problems they had solved.

  10. The Effect of Problem Solving Teaching with Texts of Turkish Lesson on Students’ Problem Solving Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havva ILGIN

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research, by carrying out activities based on texts, effect of providing problem solving skill on students’ levels of problem solving attainment was tried to be identified. Research was performed according to pretest-posttest Experimental Model with Control Group, in 2008-2009 educational year at second grade of an elementary school in Denizli province. For nine weeks, four hours in a week, while teacher guide book was being followed in control group in Turkish language lesson, texts were carried out with problem solving activities in experimental group. In the research, “Problem Solving Test” which were used as data collection tools, were developed by benefiting from matching of attainment-problem solving steps-cognitive domain steps. Problem Solving Test is made up of 16 multiple choice and 9 open ended questions. In the analysis of data, t test was used. It was found that problem solving teaching succeeded at “identifying different possible solutions in the light of collected data, applying the decided way of solution, evaluating types of solutions, evaluating used problem solving method” stages of problem solving.

  11. Mirador - Atmospheric Composition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. Atmospheric Composition is focused on the composition of Earth's atmosphere in relation to climate prediction, solar effects,...

  12. Planetary Atmospheric Electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Leblanc, F; Yair, Y; Harrison, R. G; Lebreton, J. P; Blanc, M

    2008-01-01

    This volume presents our contemporary understanding of atmospheric electricity at Earth and in other solar system atmospheres. It is written by experts in terrestrial atmospheric electricity and planetary scientists. Many of the key issues related to planetary atmospheric electricity are discussed. The physics presented in this book includes ionisation processes in planetary atmospheres, charge generation and separation, and a discussion of electromagnetic signatures of atmospheric discharges. The measurement of thunderstorms and lightning, including its effects and hazards, is highlighted by articles on ground and space based instrumentation, and new missions.Theory and modelling of planetary atmospheric electricity complete this review of the research that is undertaken in this exciting field of space science. This book is an essential research tool for space scientists and geoscientists interested in electrical effects in atmospheres and planetary systems. Graduate students and researchers who are new to t...

  13. Our shared atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our atmosphere is a precious and fascinating resource, providing air to breath, shielding us from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV), and maintaining a comfortable climate. Since the industrial revolution, people have significantly altered the composition of the atmosphere throu...

  14. Transform methods for solving partial differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Duffy, Dean G

    2004-01-01

    Transform methods provide a bridge between the commonly used method of separation of variables and numerical techniques for solving linear partial differential equations. While in some ways similar to separation of variables, transform methods can be effective for a wider class of problems. Even when the inverse of the transform cannot be found analytically, numeric and asymptotic techniques now exist for their inversion, and because the problem retains some of its analytic aspect, one can gain greater physical insight than typically obtained from a purely numerical approach. Transform Methods for Solving Partial Differential Equations, Second Edition illustrates the use of Laplace, Fourier, and Hankel transforms to solve partial differential equations encountered in science and engineering. The author has expanded the second edition to provide a broader perspective on the applicability and use of transform methods and incorporated a number of significant refinements: New in the Second Edition: ·...

  15. Methods of solving sequence and series problems

    CERN Document Server

    Grigorieva, Ellina

    2016-01-01

    This book aims to dispel the mystery and fear experienced by students surrounding sequences, series, convergence, and their applications. The author, an accomplished female mathematician, achieves this by taking a problem solving approach, starting with fascinating problems and solving them step by step with clear explanations and illuminating diagrams. The reader will find the problems interesting, unusual, and fun, yet solved with the rigor expected in a competition. Some problems are taken directly from mathematics competitions, with the name and year of the exam provided for reference. Proof techniques are emphasized, with a variety of methods presented. The text aims to expand the mind of the reader by often presenting multiple ways to attack the same problem, as well as drawing connections with different fields of mathematics. Intuitive and visual arguments are presented alongside technical proofs to provide a well-rounded methodology. With nearly 300 problems including hints, answers, and solutions,Met...

  16. Local Strategy Improvement for Parity Game Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Friedmann

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of solving a parity game is at the core of many problems in model checking, satisfiability checking and program synthesis. Some of the best algorithms for solving parity game are strategy improvement algorithms. These are global in nature since they require the entire parity game to be present at the beginning. This is a distinct disadvantage because in many applications one only needs to know which winning region a particular node belongs to, and a witnessing winning strategy may cover only a fractional part of the entire game graph. We present a local strategy improvement algorithm which explores the game graph on-the-fly whilst performing the improvement steps. We also compare it empirically with existing global strategy improvement algorithms and the currently only other local algorithm for solving parity games. It turns out that local strategy improvement can outperform these others by several orders of magnitude.

  17. On Teaching Problem Solving in School Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkki Pehkonen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article begins with a brief overview of the situation throughout the world regarding problem solving. The activities of the ProMath group are then described, as the purpose of this international research group is to improve mathematics teaching in school. One mathematics teaching method that seems to be functioning in school is the use of open problems (i.e., problem fields. Next we discuss the objectives of the Finnish curriculum that are connected with problem solving. Some examples and research results are taken from a Finnish–Chilean research project that monitors the development of problem-solving skills in third grade pupils. Finally, some ideas on “teacher change” are put forward. It is not possible to change teachers, but only to provide hints for possible change routes: the teachers themselves should work out the ideas and their implementation.

  18. Solving jigsaw puzzles using image features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ture R.; Drewsen, Peter; Hansen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    algorithm which exploits the divide and conquer paradigm to reduce the combinatorially complex problem by classifying the puzzle pieces and comparing pieces drawn from the same group. The paper includes a brief preliminary investigation of some image features used in the classification.......In this article, we describe a method for automatic solving of the jigsaw puzzle problem based on using image features instead of the shape of the pieces. The image features are used for obtaining an accurate measure for edge similarity to be used in a new edge matching algorithm. The algorithm...... is used in a general puzzle solving method which is based on a greedy algorithm previously proved successful. We have been able to solve computer generated puzzles of 320 pieces as well as a real puzzle of 54 pieces by exclusively using image information. Additionally, we investigate a new scalable...

  19. Detection of faint BLR components in the starburst/Seyfert galaxy NGC 6221 and measure of the central BH mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eLa Franca

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, using single epoch virial based techniques in the optical band, it has been possible to measure the central black hole mass on large type 1 Active Galactive Nuclei (AGN samples. However these measurements use the width of the broad line region as a proxy of the virial velocities and are therefore difficult to be carried out on those obscured (type 2 or low luminosity AGN where the nuclear component does not dominate in the optical. Here we present the optical and near infrared spectrum of the starburst/Seyfert galaxy NGC 6221, observed with X-shooter/VLT. Previous observations of NGC 6221 in the X-ray band shows an absorbed (N_H=8.5 +/- 0.4 x 10^21 cm^-2 spectrum typical of a type 2 AGN with luminosity log(L_14-195/ erg s^-1 = 42.05, while in the optical band its spectrum is typical of a reddened (A_V=3 starburst. Our deep X-shooter/VLT observations have allowed us to detect faint broad emission in the H_alpha, HeI and Pa_beta lines (FWHM=1400-2300 km s^-1 confirming previous studies indicating that NGC 6221 is a reddened starbust galaxy which hosts an AGN. We use the measure of the broad components to provide a first estimate of its central black hole mass (M_BH = 10^6.6+/-0.3 Msol, lambda_Edd=0.01-0.03, obtained using recently calibrated virial relations suitable for moderately obscured (N_H<10^24 cm^-2 AGN.

  20. Detection of faint BLR components in the starburst/Seyfert galaxy NGC 6221 and measure of the central BH mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Franca, Fabio; Onori, Francesca; Ricci, Federica; Bianchi, Stefano; Marconi, Alessandro; Sani, Eleonora; Vignali, Cristian

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, using single epoch virial based techniques in the optical band, it has been possible to measure the central black hole mass on large type 1 Active Galactive Nuclei (AGN) samples. However these measurements use the width of the broad line region as a proxy of the virial velocities and are therefore difficult to be carried out on those obscured (type 2) or low luminosity AGN where the nuclear component does not dominate in the optical. Here we present the optical and near infrared spectrum of the starburst/Seyfert galaxy NGC 6221, observed with X-shooter/VLT. Previous observations of NGC 6221 in the X-ray band shows an absorbed (N_H=8.5 +/- 0.4 x 10^21 cm^-2) spectrum typical of a type 2 AGN with luminosity log(L_14-195/ erg s^-1) = 42.05, while in the optical band its spectrum is typical of a reddened (A_V=3) starburst. Our deep X-shooter/VLT observations have allowed us to detect faint broad emission in the H_alpha, HeI and Pa_beta lines (FWHM=1400-2300 km s^-1) confirming previous studies indicating that NGC 6221 is a reddened starbust galaxy which hosts an AGN. We use the measure of the broad components to provide a first estimate of its central black hole mass (M_BH = 10^6.6+/-0.3 Msol, lambda_Edd=0.01-0.03), obtained using recently calibrated virial relations suitable for moderately obscured (N_H<10^24 cm^-2) AGN.

  1. Infrared-faint radio sources: a cosmological view. AGN number counts, the cosmic X-ray background and SMBH formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, P.-C.; Middelberg, E.; Ibar, E.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are extragalactic emitters clearly detected at radio wavelengths but barely detected or undetected at optical and infrared wavelengths, with 5σ sensitivities as low as 1 μJy. Aims: Spectral energy distribution (hereafter SED) modelling and analyses of their radio properties indicate that IFRS are consistent with a population of (potentially extremely obscured) high-redshift AGN at 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. We demonstrate some astrophysical implications of this population and compare them to predictions from models of galaxy evolution and structure formation. Methods: We compiled a list of IFRS from four deep extragalactic surveys and extrapolated the IFRS number density to a survey-independent value of (30.8 ± 15.0) deg-2. We computed the IFRS contribution to the total number of AGN in the Universe to account for the cosmic X-ray background. By estimating the black hole mass contained in IFRS, we present conclusions for the SMBH mass density in the early universe and compare it to relevant simulations of structure formation after the Big Bang. Results: The number density of AGN derived from the IFRS density was found to be ~310 deg-2, which is equivalent to a SMBH mass density of the order of 103 M⊙ Mpc-3 in the redshift range 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. This produces an X-ray flux of 9 × 10-16 W m-2 deg-2 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band and 3 × 10-15 W m-2 deg-2 in the 2.0-10 keV band, in agreement with the missing unresolved components of the Cosmic X-ray Background. To address SMBH formation after the Big Bang we invoke a scenario involving both halo gas accretion and major mergers.

  2. THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS: HST SPECTROSCOPY OF FAINT GALAXIES LENSED BY THE FRONTIER FIELDS CLUSTER MACSJ0717.5+3745

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, K. B.; Treu, T.; Wang, X.; Jones, T. A.; Mason, C. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Brammer, G. B.; Stiavelli, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bradač, M.; Hoag, A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Dijkstra, M. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, Postboks 1029, 0858 Oslo (Norway); Dressler, A. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Fontana, A.; Pentericci, L. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma Via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Gavazzi, R. [Institute d' Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, 98bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Henry, A. L. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kelly, P. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Malkan, M. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Poggianti, B. [INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Padova (Italy); Trenti, M. [Institute of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Cosmology, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Von der Linden, A., E-mail: kschmidt@physics.ucsb.edu [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen Juliane Maries Vej 30, 2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); and others

    2014-02-20

    The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Large Program, which will obtain 140 orbits of grism spectroscopy of the core and infall regions of 10 galaxy clusters, selected to be among the very best cosmic telescopes. Extensive HST imaging is available from many sources including the CLASH and Frontier Fields programs. We introduce the survey by analyzing spectra of faint multiply-imaged galaxies and z ≳ 6 galaxy candidates obtained from the first 7 orbits out of 14 targeting the core of the Frontier Fields cluster MACSJ0717.5+3745. Using the G102 and G141 grisms to cover the wavelength range 0.8-1.7 μm, we confirm four strongly lensed systems by detecting emission lines in each of the images. For the 9 z ≳ 6 galaxy candidates clear from contamination, we do not detect any emission lines down to a 7 orbit 1σ noise level of ∼5 × 10{sup –18} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. Taking lensing magnification into account, our flux sensitivity reaches ∼0.2-5 × 10{sup –18} erg s{sup –1}cm{sup –2}. These limits over an uninterrupted wavelength range rule out the possibility that the high-z galaxy candidates are instead strong line emitters at lower redshift. These results show that by means of careful modeling of the background—and with the assistance of lensing magnification—interesting flux limits can be reached for large numbers of objects, avoiding pre-selection and the wavelength restrictions inherent to ground-based multi-slit spectroscopy. These observations confirm the power of slitless HST spectroscopy even in fields as crowded as a cluster core.

  3. Through the Looking GLASS: HST Spectroscopy of Faint Galaxies Lensed by the Frontier Fields Cluster MACSJ0717.5+3745

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K. B.; Treu, T.; Brammer, G. B.; Bradač, M.; Wang, X.; Dijkstra, M.; Dressler, A.; Fontana, A.; Gavazzi, R.; Henry, A. L.; Hoag, A.; Jones, T. A.; Kelly, P. L.; Malkan, M. A.; Mason, C.; Pentericci, L.; Poggianti, B.; Stiavelli, M.; Trenti, M.; von der Linden, A.; Vulcani, B.

    2014-02-01

    The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) is a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Large Program, which will obtain 140 orbits of grism spectroscopy of the core and infall regions of 10 galaxy clusters, selected to be among the very best cosmic telescopes. Extensive HST imaging is available from many sources including the CLASH and Frontier Fields programs. We introduce the survey by analyzing spectra of faint multiply-imaged galaxies and z >~ 6 galaxy candidates obtained from the first 7 orbits out of 14 targeting the core of the Frontier Fields cluster MACSJ0717.5+3745. Using the G102 and G141 grisms to cover the wavelength range 0.8-1.7 μm, we confirm four strongly lensed systems by detecting emission lines in each of the images. For the 9 z >~ 6 galaxy candidates clear from contamination, we do not detect any emission lines down to a 7 orbit 1σ noise level of ~5 × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2. Taking lensing magnification into account, our flux sensitivity reaches ~0.2-5 × 10-18 erg s-1cm-2. These limits over an uninterrupted wavelength range rule out the possibility that the high-z galaxy candidates are instead strong line emitters at lower redshift. These results show that by means of careful modeling of the background—and with the assistance of lensing magnification—interesting flux limits can be reached for large numbers of objects, avoiding pre-selection and the wavelength restrictions inherent to ground-based multi-slit spectroscopy. These observations confirm the power of slitless HST spectroscopy even in fields as crowded as a cluster core.

  4. The Carnegie-Chicago Hubble Program: Discovery of the Most Distant Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy in the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Gyoon; Jang, In Sung; Beaton, Rachael; Seibert, Mark; Bono, Giuseppe; Madore, Barry

    2017-02-01

    Ultra-faint dwarf galaxies (UFDs) are the faintest known galaxies, and due to their incredibly low surface brightness, it is difficult to find them beyond the Local Group. We report a serendipitous discovery of a UFD, Fornax UFD1, in the outskirts of NGC 1316, a giant galaxy in the Fornax cluster. The new galaxy is located at a projected radius of 55 kpc in the south–east of NGC 1316. This UFD is found as a small group of resolved stars in the Hubble Space Telescope images of a halo field of NGC 1316, obtained as part of the Carnegie-Chicago Hubble Program. Resolved stars in this galaxy are consistent with being mostly metal-poor red giant branch (RGB) stars. Applying the tip of the RGB method to the mean magnitude of the two brightest RGB stars, we estimate the distance to this galaxy, 19.0 ± 1.3 Mpc. Fornax UFD1 is probably a member of the Fornax cluster. The color–magnitude diagram of these stars is matched by a 12 Gyr isochrone with low metallicity ([Fe/H] ≈ ‑2.4). Total magnitude and effective radius of Fornax UFD1 are MV ≈ ‑7.6 ± 0.2 mag and reff = 146 ± 9 pc, which are similar to those of Virgo UFD1 that was discovered recently in the intracluster field of Virgo by Jang & Lee. Fornax UFD1 is the most distant known UFD that is confirmed by resolved stars. This indicates that UFDs are ubiquitous and that more UFDs remain to be discovered in the Fornax cluster. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs #10505 and #13691.

  5. A Novel Approach for Solving Semidefinite Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Wei Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel linearizing alternating direction augmented Lagrangian approach is proposed for effectively solving semidefinite programs (SDP. For every iteration, by fixing the other variables, the proposed approach alternatively optimizes the dual variables and the dual slack variables; then the primal variables, that is, Lagrange multipliers, are updated. In addition, the proposed approach renews all the variables in closed forms without solving any system of linear equations. Global convergence of the proposed approach is proved under mild conditions, and two numerical problems are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented approach.

  6. Mathematical problem solving in primary school

    OpenAIRE

    Kolovou, A

    2011-01-01

    A student is engaged in (non-routine) problem solving when there is no clear pathway to the solution. In contrast to routine problems, non-routine ones cannot be solved through the direct application of a standard procedure. Consider the following problem: In a quiz you get two points for each correct answer. If a question is not answered or the answer is wrong, one point is subtracted from your score. The quiz contains 10 questions. Tina received 8 points in total. How many questions did Tin...

  7. Solve the Master Equation in Python

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Wei; Chen, Bing; Ye, Qianqian

    2011-01-01

    A brief introduction to the Python computing environment is given. By solving the master equation encountered in quantum transport, we give an example of how to solve the ODE problems in Python. The ODE solvers used are the ZVODE routine in Scipy and the bsimp solver in GSL. For the former, the equation can be in its complex-valued form, while for the latter, it has to be rewritten to a real-valued form. The focus is on the detailed workflow of the implementation process, rather than on the syntax of the python language, with the hope to help readers simulate their own models in Python.

  8. SOLVING GLOBAL PROBLEMS USING COLLABORATIVE DESIGN PROCESSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Mejborn, Christina Okai

    2011-01-01

    new solutions that would help solve the global problem of sanitation. Lack of sanitation is a problem for 42% of the world’s population but it is also a taboo topic that only very few people will engage in. In the one-day workshop participants from very different areas came together and brought...... forward proposed solutions for how to design, brand and make business models for how to solve aspects of the sanitation problem. The workshop showed that it was possible to work freely with such a taboo topic and that in particular the use of visualisation tools, i.e. drawing posters and building simple...

  9. Vacuum engineering, calculations, formulas, and solved exercises

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Armand

    1992-01-01

    This book was written with two main objectives in mind-to summarize and organize the vast material of vacuum technology in sets of useful formulas, and to provide a collection of worked out exercises showing how to use these formulas for solving technological problems. It is an ideal reference source for those with little time to devote to a full mathematical treatment of the many problems issued in vacuum practice, but who have a working knowledge of the essentials of vacuum technology, elementary physics, and mathematics. This time saving book employs a problem-solving approach throughout, p

  10. Atmospheric and accelerator neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Yoichiro [Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida-City, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    Results from the atmospheric neutrino measurements are presented. Evidence for the {nu}{sub {tau}} appearance in the atmospheric neutrino events was shown by statistical methods. The long baseline oscillation experiment using man-made neutrinos has confirmed the atmospheric neutrino oscillation. The future accelerator experiments are briefly discussed.

  11. Atmospheric refraction : a history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehn, WH; van der Werf, S

    2005-01-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of un

  12. An atmosphere monitoring system for the Sardinia radio telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffa, F.; Bolli, P.; Sanna, G.; Serra, G.

    2017-01-01

    The Sardinia radio telescope (SRT) is a new facility managed by the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF). SRT will detect the extremely faint radio wave signals emitted by astronomical objects in a wide frequency range from decimeter to millimeter wavelengths. Especially at high frequencies (>10 GHz), specific weather conditions and interactions between signal and atmospheric constituents (mainly water and oxygen molecules) affect the radio astronomic observation reducing the antenna performances. Thus, modern ground-based telescopes are usually equipped with systems able to examine in real-time several atmospheric parameters (opacity, integrated water vapor, etc.), and in some cases to forecast the weather conditions (wind, rain, snow, etc.), in order to ensure the antenna safety and support the schedule of the telescope observations. Here, we describe the atmosphere monitoring system (AMS) realized with the aim to improve the SRT operative efficiency. It consists of a network of different sensors such as radiometers, radiosondes, weather stations, GPS and some well-established weather models. After a validation of the scheme, we successfully tested the AMS in two real practical scenarios, comparing the AMS outcomes with those of independent techniques. In the first one we were able to detect an incoming storm front applying different techniques (GPS, radiometer and the weather forecast model), while in the last one we modeled the SRT antenna system temperature at 22 GHz processing the AMS data set.

  13. Complex source rate estimation for atmospheric transport and dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, L.L.

    1993-09-13

    The accuracy associated with assessing the environmental consequences of an accidental atmospheric release of radioactivity is highly dependent on our knowledge of the source release rate which is generally poorly known. This paper reports on a technique that integrates the radiological measurements with atmospheric dispersion modeling for more accurate source term estimation. We construct a minimum least squares methodology for solving the inverse problem with no a priori information about the source rate.

  14. Assessing Affect after Mathematical Problem Solving Tasks: Validating the Chamberlin Affective Instrument for Mathematical Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Scott A.; Powers, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The focus of the article is the validation of an instrument to assess gifted students' affect after mathematical problem solving tasks. Participants were 225 students identified by their district as gifted in grades four to six. The Chamberlin Affective Instrument for Mathematical Problem Solving was used to assess feelings, emotions, and…

  15. The Effect of Learning Environments Based on Problem Solving on Students' Achievements of Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Ilhan; Baki, Adnan

    2013-01-01

    Problem solving is recognized as an important life skill involving a range of processes including analyzing, interpreting, reasoning, predicting, evaluating and reflecting. For that reason educating students as efficient problem solvers is an important role of mathematics education. Problem solving skill is the centre of mathematics curriculum.…

  16. Students' Errors in Solving the Permutation and Combination Problems Based on Problem Solving Steps of Polya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukoriyanto; Nusantara, Toto; Subanji; Chandra, Tjang Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This article was written based on the results of a study evaluating students' errors in problem solving of permutation and combination in terms of problem solving steps according to Polya. Twenty-five students were asked to do four problems related to permutation and combination. The research results showed that the students still did a mistake in…

  17. Encouraging Sixth-Grade Students' Problem-Solving Performance by Teaching through Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostic, Jonathan D.; Pape, Stephen J.; Jacobbe, Tim

    2016-01-01

    This teaching experiment provided students with continuous engagement in a problem-solving based instructional approach during one mathematics unit. Three sections of sixth-grade mathematics were sampled from a school in Florida, U.S.A. and one section was randomly assigned to experience teaching through problem solving. Students' problem-solving…

  18. Understanding Individual Problem-Solving Style: A Key to Learning and Applying Creative Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treffinger, Donald J.; Selby, Edwin C.; Isaksen, Scott G.

    2008-01-01

    More than five decades of research and development have focused on making the Creative Problem Solving process and tools accessible across a wide range of ages and contexts. Recent evidence indicates that when individuals, in both school and corporate settings, understand their own style of problem solving, they are able to learn and apply process…

  19. Writing about the Problem-Solving Process To Improve Problem-Solving Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kenneth M.

    2003-01-01

    Concludes that writing about the executive processes of problem solving, difficulties encountered, alternative strategies that might have been used, and the problem solving process in general helped students in the treatment group learn to use executive processes more quickly and more effectively than students in the control group. (Author/NB)

  20. Dizziness and Fainting Spells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco Treatments Injuries & ...

  1. Atmospheric Habitable Zones in Y Dwarf Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Jack S.; Palmer, Paul I.; Biller, Beth; Cockell, Charles S.

    2017-02-01

    We use a simple organism lifecycle model to explore the viability of an atmospheric habitable zone (AHZ), with temperatures that could support Earth-centric life, which sits above an environment that does not support life. To illustrate our model, we use a cool Y dwarf atmosphere, such as WISE J085510.83–0714442.5, whose 4.5–5.2 μm spectrum shows absorption features consistent with water vapor and clouds. We allow organisms to adapt to their atmospheric environment (described by temperature, convection, and gravity) by adopting different growth strategies that maximize their chance of survival and proliferation. We assume a constant upward vertical velocity through the AHZ. We found that the organism growth strategy is most sensitive to the magnitude of the atmospheric convection. Stronger convection supports the evolution of more massive organisms. For a purely radiative environment, we find that evolved organisms have a mass that is an order of magnitude smaller than terrestrial microbes, thereby defining a dynamical constraint on the dimensions of life that an AHZ can support. Based on a previously defined statistical approach, we infer that there are of the order of 109 cool Y brown dwarfs in the Milky Way, and likely a few tens of these objects are within 10 pc from Earth. Our work also has implications for exploring life in the atmospheres of temperate gas giants. Consideration of the habitable volumes in planetary atmospheres significantly increases the volume of habitable space in the galaxy.

  2. The art and science of problem solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we will document that real-life problem solving in complex situations demands both rational (scientific) and intuitive (artistic) thinking. First, the concepts of art and science will be discussed; differences and similarities will be enhanced. Thereafter the concept of group proble...

  3. Should Children Learn to Solve Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watras, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this comparative essay, the author discusses the opposing educational theories of John Dewey and Gregory Bateson. While Dewey believed that the scientific method was the dominant method of solving problems and thereby acquiring knowledge that mattered, Bateson warned that this one-sided approach would lead to actions that could destroy the…

  4. ADHD and Problem-Solving in Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a small-scale study to determine whether there is a difference in problem-solving abilities, from a play perspective, between individuals who are diagnosed as ADHD and are on medication and those not on medication. Ten children, five of whom where on medication and five not, diagnosed as ADHD predominantly inattentive type, were…

  5. Solving Nonlinear Wave Equations by Elliptic Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zun-Tao; LIU Shi-Da; LIU Shi-Kuo

    2003-01-01

    The elliptic equation is taken as a transformation and applied to solve nonlinear wave equations. It is shown that this method is more powerful to give more kinds of solutions, such as rational solutions, solitary wave solutions,periodic wave solutions and so on, so it can be taken as a generalized method.

  6. GIS Live and Web Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagevik, R.; Hales, D.; Harrell, J.

    2007-01-01

    GIS Live is a live, interactive, web problem-solving (WPS) program that partners Geographic Information Systems (GIS) professionals with educators to implement geospatial technologies as curriculum-learning tools. It is a collaborative effort of many government agencies, educational institutions, and professional organizations. Problem-based…

  7. Emerging representation technologies for problem solving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Ton; Spector, J. Michael; Merrill, M. David; Elen, Jan; Bishop, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    When learners solve problems they often create an external representation to organize the information given in the problem statement, to translate this problem description into underlying domain terms, and to complete this with knowledge they already have. This representation is subsequently used to

  8. Stoichiometric Problem Solving in High School Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to create and test questions on stoichiometry with number ratios for quick mental calculations and to identify students' problem-solving strategies. The present study was a component of a more comprehensive investigation in which 7,441 German senior high school students were asked to work on 154 test items…

  9. Discovering Steiner Triple Systems through Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriraman, Bharath

    2004-01-01

    An attempt to implement problem solving as a teacher of ninth grade algebra is described. The problems selected were not general ones, they involved combinations and represented various situations and were more complex which lead to the discovery of Steiner triple systems.

  10. Metaphor and analogy in everyday problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Lucas A; Landau, Mark J

    2016-11-01

    Early accounts of problem solving focused on the ways people represent information directly related to target problems and possible solutions. Subsequent theory and research point to the role of peripheral influences such as heuristics and bodily states. We discuss how metaphor and analogy similarly influence stages of everyday problem solving: Both processes mentally map features of a target problem onto the structure of a relatively more familiar concept. When individuals apply this structure, they use a well-known concept as a framework for reasoning about real world problems and candidate solutions. Early studies found that analogy use helped people gain insight into novel problems. More recent research on metaphor goes further to show that activating mappings has subtle, sometimes surprising effects on judgment and reasoning in everyday problem solving. These findings highlight situations in which mappings can help or hinder efforts to solve problems. WIREs Cogn Sci 2016, 7:394-405. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1407 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  11. Nanomedicine: Problem Solving to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemling, Melissa A.; Sammel, Lauren M.; Zenner, Greta; Payne, Amy C.; Crone, Wendy C.

    2006-01-01

    Many traditional classroom science and technology activities often ask students to complete prepackaged labs that ensure that everyone arrives at the same "scientifically accurate" solution or theory, which ignores the important problem-solving and creative aspects of scientific research and technological design. Students rarely have the…

  12. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  13. New Ways to Solve the Schroedinger Equation

    CERN Document Server

    Friedberg, R

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a new approach to solve the low lying states of the Schroedinger equation. For a fairly large class of problems, this new approach leads to convergent iterative solutions, in contrast to perturbative series expansions. These convergent solutions include the long standing difficult problem of a quartic potential with either symmetric or asymmetric minima.

  14. Latest Trends in Problem Solving Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Karyotaki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Problem solving is the skill that coordinates all the cognitive, metacognitive and behavioral processes taking place when individuals encounter a previously unprecedented situation or difficulty. Metacognitive processes seem to play the most important role for resolving a problematic situation as individuals reflect on their acquired knowledge, skills and experiences, thus become aware of their capabilities and how to regulate them. Therefore, metacognitive awareness is the competence that mostly assists individuals in their attempt to construct new knowledge and reach their goals. Furthermore, individuals’ self-assessment and peer-assessment processes could reveal their level of metacognitive awareness and therefore, by far, their problem solving competency. Consequently, ICTs could capture individuals’ problem solving skills through tracking down and analyzing the latters’ cognitive and metacognitive processes as well as their behavioral patterns. The aforementioned computer-based assessment could consist of a fuzzy expert system with domain knowledge from an automated task-based test with particular solution strategies in combination with log data for identifying and classifying one’s level of problem solving ability according to specific criteria.

  15. Solving Wicked Problems through Action Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crul, Liselore

    2014-01-01

    This account of practice outlines the Oxyme Action Learning Program which was conducted as part of the Management Challenge in my final year of the MSc in Coaching and Behavioral Change at Henley Business School. The central research questions were: (1) how action learning can help to solve wicked problems and (2) what the effect of an action…

  16. Insightful problem solving in an Asian elephant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preston Foerder

    Full Text Available The "aha" moment or the sudden arrival of the solution to a problem is a common human experience. Spontaneous problem solving without evident trial and error behavior in humans and other animals has been referred to as insight. Surprisingly, elephants, thought to be highly intelligent, have failed to exhibit insightful problem solving in previous cognitive studies. We tested whether three Asian elephants (Elephas maximus would use sticks or other objects to obtain food items placed out-of-reach and overhead. Without prior trial and error behavior, a 7-year-old male Asian elephant showed spontaneous problem solving by moving a large plastic cube, on which he then stood, to acquire the food. In further testing he showed behavioral flexibility, using this technique to reach other items and retrieving the cube from various locations to use as a tool to acquire food. In the cube's absence, he generalized this tool utilization technique to other objects and, when given smaller objects, stacked them in an attempt to reach the food. The elephant's overall behavior was consistent with the definition of insightful problem solving. Previous failures to demonstrate this ability in elephants may have resulted not from a lack of cognitive ability but from the presentation of tasks requiring trunk-held sticks as potential tools, thereby interfering with the trunk's use as a sensory organ to locate the targeted food.

  17. Facilitating Problem Solving in High School Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Dorothy L.; Sherwood, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Investigated superiority of instructional strategies (factor-label method, proportionality, use of analogies, use of diagrams) in teaching problem-solving related to mole concept, gas laws, stoichiometry, and molarity. Also investigated effectiveness of strategies for students (N=609) with different verbal-visual preferences, proportional…

  18. Solving Problems of Practice in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Robert D.; Menlo, Allen

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the many complexities involved in the translation of scientific information in the social sciences into forms usable for solving problems of practice in education. Prescribes a series of stages to be followed from the advent of a practitioner's situational problem to the design of a response to it. (Author/JN)

  19. Euler's Amazing Way to Solve Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flusser, Peter

    1992-01-01

    Presented is a series of examples that illustrate a method of solving equations developed by Leonhard Euler based on an unsubstantiated assumption. The method integrates aspects of recursion relations and sequences of converging ratios and can be extended to polynomial equation with infinite exponents. (MDH)

  20. Solving Problems with the Percentage Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Galen, Frans; van Eerde, Dolly

    2013-01-01

    At the end of primary school all children more of less know what a percentage is, but yet they often struggle with percentage problems. This article describes a study in which students of 13 and 14 years old were given a written test with percentage problems and a week later were interviewed about the way they solved some of these problems. In a…

  1. Mental Imagery in Creative Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polland, Mark J.

    In order to investigate the relationship between mental imagery and creative problem solving, a study of 44 separate accounts reporting mental imagery experiences associated with creative discoveries were examined. The data included 29 different scientists, among them Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking, and 9 artists, musicians, and writers,…

  2. A reflexive perspective in problem solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chio, José Angel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to favour the methodological process of reflexive analysis in problem solving in the general teaching methods that concentrates in strengthening the dimensional analysis, to gain a greater preparation of the students for the solution of mathematical problems.

  3. Teaching, Learning and Assessing Statistical Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, John; Davies, Neville; Gibson, Liz

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report the results from a major UK government-funded project, started in 2005, to review statistics and handling data within the school mathematics curriculum for students up to age 16. As a result of a survey of teachers we developed new teaching materials that explicitly use a problem-solving approach for the teaching and…

  4. Newton type methods for solving nonsmooth equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Yan

    2005-01-01

    Numerical methods for the solution of nonsmooth equations are studied. A new subdifferential for a locally Lipschitzian function is proposed. Based on this subdifferential, Newton methods for solving nonsmooth equations are developed and their convergence is shown. Since this subdifferential is easy to be computed, the present Newton methods can be executed easily in some applications.

  5. Using Bibliotherapy To Teach Problem Solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgan, James W.

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses how students with high-incidence disabilities can benefit from using bibliotherapy by learning to become proactive problem solvers. A sample lesson plan is presented based on a teaching framework for bibliotherapy and problem solving that contains the elements of prereading, guided reading, post-reading discussion, and a…

  6. Using CAS to Solve Classical Mathematics Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Maurice J.; Burroughs, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, calculus has displaced many algebraic methods for solving classical problems. This article illustrates an algebraic method for finding the zeros of polynomial functions that is closely related to Newton's method (devised in 1669, published in 1711), which is encountered in calculus. By exploring this problem, precalculus students…

  7. A program to solve rotating plasma problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Berg, M.S. van den

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that the solution of a rotating plasma problem minimizes a quitably chosen funtional. This variational problem is solved by the Ritz-Galerkin methud using piecewise bilinear functions and applying some Newton-Côtes-like quadrature. The resulting linear system with a sparse nonegative def

  8. Why Some Communities Can Solve Their Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, David

    1989-01-01

    Effective communities are well-educated about themselves, have a better understanding of public information, talk through public issues to generate shared knowledge, appreciate the difference between public opinion and public judgment, and believe in public leadership as the key to using public power to solve community problems. (SK)

  9. Problem-Solving: Scaling the "Brick Wall"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Dave

    2011-01-01

    Across the primary and secondary phases, pupils are encouraged to use and apply their knowledge, skills, and understanding of mathematics to solve problems in a variety of forms, ranging from single-stage word problems to the challenge of extended rich tasks. Amongst many others, Cockcroft (1982) emphasised the importance and relevance of…

  10. Tree Searching and Student Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Donald L.

    1978-01-01

    Tree searching was applied as a computer model of simple addition sentences. Results indicated that the number of problem reductions performed in tree searching accounted for most of the variance across problems in student error rate and solution time. The technique constitutes a computer test for the adequacy of a problem solving prescription.…

  11. Domestic atmospheric pressure thermal deaerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, P. V.; Gimmelberg, A. S.; Mikhailov, V. G.; Baeva, A. N.; Chuprakov, M. V.; Grigoriev, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    Based on many years of experience and proven technical solutions, modern atmospheric pressure deaerators of the capacity of 0.4 to 800 t/h were designed and developed. The construction of such deaerators is based on known and explored technical solutions. A two-stage deaeration scheme is applied where the first stage is a jet dripping level (in a column) and the second one is a bubble level (in a tank). In the design of deaeration columns, low-pressure hydraulic nozzles (Δ p tests of the new deaerator prototypes of the capacity of 800 and 500 t/h in the HPP conditions showed their sustainable, reliable, and efficient work in the designed range of hydraulic and thermal loads. The content of solved oxygen and free carbon dioxide in make-up water after deaerators meets the requirements of State Standard GOST 16860-88, the operating rules and regulations, and the customer's specifications. Based on these results, the proposals were developed on the structure and the design of deaerators of the productivity of more than 800 t/h for the use in circuits of large heating systems and the preparation of feed water to the TPP at heating and industrial-heating plants. The atmospheric pressure thermal deaerators developed at NPO TsKTI with consideration of the current requirements are recommended for the use in water preparation schemes of various power facilities.

  12. Portrait of a Dark Horse: a Photometric and Spectroscopic Study of the Ultra-faint Milky Way Satellite Pegasus III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongwon; Jerjen, Helmut; Geha, Marla; Chiti, Anirudh; Milone, Antonino P.; Da Costa, Gary; Mackey, Dougal; Frebel, Anna; Conn, Blair

    2016-12-01

    Pegasus III (Peg III) is one of the few known ultra-faint stellar systems in the outer halo of the Milky Way. We present the results from a follow-up campaign with Magellan/IMACS and Keck/DEIMOS. Deep stellar photometry down to {r}0≈ 25 mag at 50% completeness level has allowed accurate measurements of its photometric and structural properties. The color-magnitude diagram of Peg III confirms that the stellar system is well described by an old (≳12 Gyr) and metal-poor ([Fe/H] ≲ -2.0 dex) stellar population at a heliocentric distance of 215 ± 12 kpc. The revised half-light radius {r}h=53+/- 14 pc, ellipticity ɛ ={0.38}-0.38+0.22, and total luminosity {M}V=-3.4+/- 0.4 are in good agreement with the values quoted in our previous paper. We further report on the spectroscopic identification of seven, possibly eight, member stars of Peg III. The Ca ii triplet lines of the brightest member stars indicate that Peg III contains stars with metallicity as low as [Fe/H] = -2.55 ± 0.15 dex. Peg III has a systemic velocity of -222.9 ± 2.6 km s-1 and a velocity dispersion of {5.4}-2.5+3.0 km s-1. The inferred dynamical mass within the half-light radius is {1.4}-1.1+3.0× {10}6{M}⊙ and the mass-to-light ratio M/{L}V={1470}-1240+5660 {M}⊙ /{L}⊙ , providing further evidence that Peg III is a dwarf galaxy satellite. We find that Peg III and another distant dwarf satellite Pisces II lie relatively close to each other ({{Δ }}{d}{spatial}=43+/- 19 kpc) and share similar radial velocities in the Galactic standard-of-rest frame ({{Δ }}{v}{GSR}=12.3+/- 3.7 km s-1). This suggests that they may share a common origin. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  13. How to Solve the Torus Puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the following sliding puzzle called torus puzzle. In an m by n board, there are mn pieces numbered from 1 to mn. Initially, the pieces are placed in ascending order. Then they are scrambled by rotating the rows and columns without the player’s knowledge. The objective of the torus puzzle is to rearrange the pieces in ascending order by rotating the rows and columns. We provide a solution to this puzzle. In addition, we provide lower and upper bounds on the number of steps for solving the puzzle. Moreover, we consider a variant of the torus puzzle in which each piece is colored either black or white, and we present a hardness result for solving it.

  14. A Heuristic Approach to Innovative Problem Solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertil Hök

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A methodic approach to innovative problem solving is suggested. First, Bayesian techniques are analyzed for quantifying, monitoring and predicting the process. The symmetry of Bayes‟ theorem implicates that the chances of success offrail ideas with small base rates can be boosted by highly accurate tests built on solid scientific ground. Second, a hypothesis is presented in which five methodic elements – connection, selection, transformation, balance and finish - are deemed to be necessary and sufficient to explain innovative solutions to complex problems. The hypothesis is supported by the analysis of disruptive innovations in several fields, and by emulation of a data base including 40,000 inventions.The reported findings may become useful in the further methodic development of innovative problem solving, especially in the risky and lengthy preconceptual phases

  15. A Problem Solving Environment Based on CORBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lancaster

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated aspects of the design of Problem Solving Environments (PSE by constructing a prototype using CORBA as middleware. The two issues we are mainly concerned with are the use of non-trivial (containing more than just a start method CORBA interfaces for the computational components, and the provision of interactivity using the same mechanisms used for flow control. After describing the design decisions that allow us to investigate these issues, and contrasting them with alternatives, we describe the architecture of the prototype and its use in the context of a study of photonic materials. We argue that having several methods on a component interface can be used to mitigate performance problems that may arise when trying to solve problems in PSE's based on small components. We describe how our mechanism allows a high degree of computational steering over all components.

  16. Imagination as the crank of problem solving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte

    and the imagination of the preferred present or future. Imagination is the foundation of problem solving, in this case the problems identified in the PR. The role of imagination cannot be underestimated in this collaborative process in which the interface between the individual and the collective dimensions merge...... and encourage the participants’ imagination to flow freely in order to redefine reality at work. I see different paths for this exploration: I could look into cultural practices and values concerning relations and interactions among colleagues who have solved a task together (Branco & lopes). Or I could dig...... into who “says” or “decides” what is preferred or favored in the sense of who seems to get the power in the team (Latour, Dunne & Raby). Or I could concentrate on the term “dialogue” (Bakhtin, Bohm, Oliveira). I hope the winterschool will add more view angles to this study.My premature research question is...

  17. Learning Matlab a problem solving approach

    CERN Document Server

    Gander, Walter

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive and stimulating introduction to Matlab, a computer language now widely used for technical computing, is based on an introductory course held at Qian Weichang College, Shanghai University, in the fall of 2014.  Teaching and learning a substantial programming language aren’t always straightforward tasks. Accordingly, this textbook is not meant to cover the whole range of this high-performance technical programming environment, but to motivate first- and second-year undergraduate students in mathematics and computer science to learn Matlab by studying representative problems, developing algorithms and programming them in Matlab. While several topics are taken from the field of scientific computing, the main emphasis is on programming. A wealth of examples are completely discussed and solved, allowing students to learn Matlab by doing: by solving problems, comparing approaches and assessing the proposed solutions.

  18. Atmospheric Habitable Zones in Y Dwarf Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, Jack S; Biller, Beth; Cockell, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    We use a simple organism lifecycle model to explore the viability of an atmospheric habitable zone (AHZ), with temperatures that could support Earth-centric life, which sits above an environment that does not support life. We illustrate this idea using the object WISE J085510.83-0714442.5, which is a cool, free-floating brown dwarf. We allow organisms to adapt to their atmospheric environment (described by temperature, convection, and gravity) by adopting different growth strategies that maximize their chance of survival and proliferation. We assume a constant upward vertical velocity through the AHZ. We found that the organism growth strategy is most sensitive to the magnitude of the atmospheric convection. Stronger convection supports the evolution of more massive organisms. For a purely radiative environment we find that evolved organisms have a mass that is an order of magnitude smaller than terrestrial microbes, thereby defining a dynamical constraint on the dimensions of life that an AHZ can support. Ba...

  19. Measurement of the Atmospheric $\

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose1, D; Boser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegard, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glusenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Gora, D; Grant, D; Gross, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klas, J; Klein, S R; Kohne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Kopke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lunemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Meszaros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Perez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Radel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schoneberg, S; Schonherr, L; Schonwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoss, A; Strahler, E A; Strom, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge1, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    We report the first observation in a high energy neutrino telescope of cascades induced by atmospheric electron neutrinos and by neutral current interactions of atmospheric neutrinos of all flavors. Using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low energy extension, a sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data. The number of observed cascades is $N_{\\rm cascade} = 496 \\pm 66 (stat.) \\pm 88(syst.)$ and the rest of the sample consists of residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is determined in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV and is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos.

  20. Atmospheric Circulation of Exoplanets

    CERN Document Server

    Showman, Adam P; Menou, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    We survey the basic principles of atmospheric dynamics relevant to explaining existing and future observations of exoplanets, both gas giant and terrestrial. Given the paucity of data on exoplanet atmospheres, our approach is to emphasize fundamental principles and insights gained from Solar-System studies that are likely to be generalizable to exoplanets. We begin by presenting the hierarchy of basic equations used in atmospheric dynamics, including the Navier-Stokes, primitive, shallow-water, and two-dimensional nondivergent models. We then survey key concepts in atmospheric dynamics, including the importance of planetary rotation, the concept of balance, and scaling arguments to show how turbulent interactions generally produce large-scale east-west banding on rotating planets. We next turn to issues specific to giant planets, including their expected interior and atmospheric thermal structures, the implications for their wind patterns, and mechanisms to pump their east-west jets. Hot Jupiter atmospheric d...