WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmosphere simulation chamber

  1. A new plant chamber facility, PLUS, coupled to the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2016-03-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been built and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow-through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees is mixed with synthetic air and transferred to the SAPHIR chamber, where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important environmental parameters (e.g., temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), soil relative humidity (RH)) are well controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leaves of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to only fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 light-emitting diode (LED) panels, which have an emission strength up to 800 µmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light- and temperature- dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental setup and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  2. A new plant chamber facility PLUS coupled to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-11-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been build and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees are mixed with synthetic air and are transferred to the SAPHIR chamber where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important enviromental parameters (e.g. temperature, PAR, soil RH etc.) are well-controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leafes of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to FEP Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces only to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 LED panels which have an emission strength up to 800 μmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOC) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light and temperature dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus Ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus Ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental set up and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  3. Investigation of Monoterpene Degradation in the Atmospheric Simulation Chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Martin; Acir, Ismail-Hakki; Bohn, Birger; Brauers, Theo; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Fuchs, Hendrik; Haeseler, Rolf; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Li, Xin; Lutz, Anna; Nehr, Sascha; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Wahner, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Monoterpenes are the volatile organic compound (VOC) species with the highest emission rates on a global scale beside isoprene. In the atmosphere these compounds are rapidly oxidized. Due to their high reactivity towards hydroxyl radicals (OH) they determine the radical chemistry under biogenic conditions if monoterpene concentration is higher than isoprene concentration. Recent field campaigns showed large discrepancies between measured and modeled OH concentration at low NOx conditions together with high reactivity of VOC towards OH (Hofzumahaus et al. 2009) especially in tropical forest areas (Lelieveld et al. 2008). These discrepancies were partly explained by new reaction pathways in the isoprene degradation mechanism (Whalley et al 2011). However, even an additional recycling rate of 2.7 was insufficient to explain the measured OH concentration. So other VOC species could be involved in a nonclassical OH recycling. Since the discrepancies in OH also occurred in the morning hours when the OH chemistry was mainly dominated by monoterpenes, it was assumed that also the degradation of monoterpenes may lead to OH recycling in the absence of NO. (Whalley et al 2011). The photochemical degradation of four monoterpene species was studied under high VOC reactivity and low NOx conditions in a dedicated series of experiments in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR from August to September 2012 to overcome the lack of mechanistic information for monoterpene degradation schemes. α-Pinene, β-pinene and limonene were chosen as most prominent representatives of this substance class. Moreover the degradation of myrcene was investigated due to its structural analogy to isoprene. The SAPHIR chamber was equipped with instrumentation to measure all important OH precursors (O3, HONO, HCHO), the parent VOC and their main oxidation products, radicals (OH, HO2, RO2), the total OH reactivity, and photolysis frequencies to investigate the degradation mechanism of monoterpenes in

  4. Construction and Characterization of an Atmospheric Simulation Smog Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Currently, air pollution in Beijing has become a complex problem with two types of source pollutants:coal smoke and photochemical smog. Furthermore the maximum hourly mean concentration of O3 increases continuously, especially in the summer. In order to simulate the photochemical reaction, develop an air quality simulation model and further improve the air quality of Beijing, a precisely temperature-controlled,indoor, smog chamber facility was designed and constructed at Tsinghua University. Characterization experiments have been carried out to acquire the basic parameters of the smog chamber, such as the wall loss rates of NO2, NO, 03, C3H6 and particulate matter (PM), the intensity of ultraviolet (UV) light in the chamber, the reactivity of the purified air and the reproducibility of the experimental results. The results indicate that the facility performs up to specifications, and can meet the demands required for simulating the photochemical reaction. The effect of high primary contaminated PM on the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is under investigation.

  5. Mutagenicity in Salmonella of a Simulated Urban-Smog Atmosphere Generated Using a Mobile Reaction Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA Mobile Reaction Chamber (MRC) is a 24-foot trailer containing a 14.3-m3 Teflon lined photochemical chamber used to generate simulated urban atmospheres. Photochemistry in the MRC is catalyzed by 120 fluorescent bulbs evenly mixed with black light bulbs and UV bulbs (300 &...

  6. Technical Note: Intercomparison of formaldehyde measurements at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wisthaler

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at the Research Centre Jülich was used to test the suitability of state-of-the-art analytical instruments for the measurement of gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO in air. Five analyzers based on four different sensing principles were deployed: a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS, cartridges for 2,4-dinitro-phenyl-hydrazine (DNPH derivatization followed by off-line high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis, two different types of commercially available wet chemical sensors based on Hantzsch fluorimetry, and a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS. A new optimized mode of operation was used for the PTR-MS instrument which significantly enhanced its performance for on-line HCHO detection at low absolute humidities.

    The instruments were challenged with typical ambient levels of HCHO ranging from zero to several ppb. Synthetic air of high purity and particulate-filtered ambient air were used as sample matrices in the atmosphere simulation chamber onto which HCHO was spiked under varying levels of humidity and ozone. Measurements were compared to mixing ratios calculated from the chamber volume and the known amount of HCHO injected into the chamber; measurements were also compared between the different instruments. The formal and blind intercomparison exercise was conducted under the control of an independent referee. A number of analytical problems associated with the experimental set-up and with individual instruments were identified, the overall agreement between the methods was good.

  7. Technical Note: Intercomparison of formaldehyde measurements at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisthaler, A.; Apel, E. C.; Bossmeyer, J.; Hansel, A.; Junkermann, W.; Koppmann, R.; Meier, R.; Müller, K.; Solomon, S. J.; Steinbrecher, R.; Tillmann, R.; Brauers, T.

    2008-04-01

    The atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at the Research Centre Jülich was used to test the suitability of state-of-the-art analytical instruments for the measurement of gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO) in air. Five analyzers based on four different sensing principles were deployed: a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS), cartridges for 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatization followed by off-line high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, two different types of commercially available wet chemical sensors based on Hantzsch fluorimetry, and a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). A new optimized mode of operation was used for the PTR-MS instrument which significantly enhanced its performance for online HCHO detection at low absolute humidities. The instruments were challenged with typical ambient levels of HCHO ranging from zero to several ppb. Synthetic air of high purity and particulate-filtered ambient air were used as sample matrices in the atmosphere simulation chamber onto which HCHO was spiked under varying levels of humidity and ozone. Measurements were compared to mixing ratios calculated from the chamber volume and the known amount of HCHO injected into the chamber; measurements were also compared between the different instruments. The formal and blind intercomparison exercise was conducted under the control of an independent referee. A number of analytical problems associated with the experimental set-up and with individual instruments were identified, the overall agreement between the methods was fair.

  8. Technical Note: Intercomparison of formaldehyde measurements at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wisthaler

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at the Research Centre Jülich was used to test the suitability of state-of-the-art analytical instruments for the measurement of gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO in air. Five analyzers based on four different sensing principles were deployed: a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS, cartridges for 2,4-dinitro-phenyl-hydrazine (DNPH derivatization followed by off-line high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis, two different types of commercially available wet chemical sensors based on Hantzsch fluorimetry, and a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS. A new optimized mode of operation was used for the PTR-MS instrument which significantly enhanced its performance for online HCHO detection at low absolute humidities.

    The instruments were challenged with typical ambient levels of HCHO ranging from zero to several ppb. Synthetic air of high purity and particulate-filtered ambient air were used as sample matrices in the atmosphere simulation chamber onto which HCHO was spiked under varying levels of humidity and ozone. Measurements were compared to mixing ratios calculated from the chamber volume and the known amount of HCHO injected into the chamber; measurements were also compared between the different instruments. The formal and blind intercomparison exercise was conducted under the control of an independent referee. A number of analytical problems associated with the experimental set-up and with individual instruments were identified, the overall agreement between the methods was fair.

  9. A tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer for formaldehyde atmospheric measurements validated by simulation chamber instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catoire, V; Bernard, F; Mébarki, Y; Mellouki, A; Eyglunent, G; Daële, V; Robert, C

    2012-01-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) for formaldehyde atmospheric measurements has been set up and validated through comparison experiments with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) in a simulation chamber. Formaldehyde was generated in situ in the chamber from reaction of ethene with ozone. Three HCHO ro-vibrational line intensities (at 2909.71, 2912.09 and 2914.46 cm(-1)) possibly used by TDLAS were calibrated by FT-IR spectra simultaneously recorded in the 1600-3200 cm(-1) domain during ethene ozonolysis, enabling the on-line deduction of the varying concentration for HCHO in formation. The experimental line intensities values inferred confirmed the calculated ones from the updated HITRAN database. In addition, the feasibility of stratospheric in situ HCHO measurements using the 2912.09 cm(-1) line was demonstrated. The TDLAS performances were also assessed, leading to a 2sigma detection limit of 88 ppt in volume mixing ratio with a response time of 60 sec at 30 Torr and 294 K for 112 m optical path. As part of this work, the room-temperature rate constant of this reaction and the HCHO formation yield were found to be in excellent agreement with the compiled literature data.

  10. A tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer for formaldehyde atmospheric measurements validated by simulation chamber instrumentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. Catoire; F. Bernard; Y. MébarKi; A. Mellouki; G. Eyglunent; V. Da(e)le; C. Robert

    2012-01-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) for formaldehyde atmospheric measurements has been set up and validated through comparison experiments with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR) in a simulation chamber.Formaldehyde was generated in situ in the chamber from reaction of ethene with ozone.Three HCHO ro-vibrational line intensities (at 2909.71,2912.09and 2914.46 cm-1) possibly used by TDLAS were calibrated by FT-IR spectra simultaneously recorded in the 1600-3200 cm-1 domain during ethene ozonolysis,enabling the on-line deduction of the varying concentration for HCHO in formation.The experimental line intensities values inferred confirmed the calculated ones from the updated HITRAN database.In addition,the feasibility of stratospheric in situ HCHO measurements using the 2912.09 cm-1 line was demonstrated.The TDLAS performances were also assessed,leading to a 2σ detection limit of 88 ppt in volume mixing ratio with a response time of 60 see at 30 Torr and 294 K for 112 m optical path.As part of this work,the room-temperature rate constant of this reaction and the HCHO formation yield were found to be in excellent agreement with the compiled literature data.

  11. Investigation of isoprene oxidation in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at low NO concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H.; Rohrer, F.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Dorn, H.; Häseler, R.; Holland, F.; Li, X.; Lu, K.; Nehr, S.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2012-12-01

    During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations that were measured by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF) were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low nitrogen monoxide (NO) concentrations. These discrepancies were observed in the Pearl-River-Delta, China, which is an urban-influenced rural area, in rainforests, and forested areas in North America and Europe. Isoprene contributed significantly to the total OH reactivity in these field studies, so that potential explanations for the missing OH focused on new reaction pathways in the isoprene degradation mechanism. These pathways regenerate OH without oxidation of NO and thus without ozone production. In summer 2011, a series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Juelich, Germany, in order to investigate the photochemical degradation of isoprene at low NO concentrations (NOSAPHIR by established chemical models like the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). Moreover, OH concentration measurements of two independent instruments (LIF and DOAS) agreed during all chamber experiments. Here, we present the results of the experiments and compare measurements with model predictions using the MCM. Furthermore, the validity of newly proposed reaction pathways in the isoprene degradation is evaluated by comparison with observations.

  12. Investigation of MACR oxidation by OH in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at low NO concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Acir, Ismail-Hakki; Bohn, Birger; Brauers, Theo; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Häseler, Rolf; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Li, Xin; Lu, Keding; Lutz, Anna; Kaminski, Martin; Nehr, Sascha; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Wahner, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low nitrogen monoxide (NO) concentrations. These discrepancies were observed in forests, where isoprene oxidation turnover rates were large. Methacrolein (MACR) is one of the major first generation products of isoprene oxidation, so that MACR was also an important reactant for OH. Here, we present a detailed investigation of the MACR oxidation mechanism including a full set of accurate and precise radical measurements in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Juelich, Germany. The conditions during the chamber experiments were comparable to those during field campaigns with respect to radical and trace gas concentrations. In particular, OH reactivity was as high as 15 per second and NO mixing ratios were as low as 200pptv. Results of the experiments were compared to model predictions using the Master Chemical Mechanism, in order to identify so far unknown reaction pathways, which potentially recycle OH radicals without reactions with NO.

  13. Comparison of OH reactivity instruments in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hendrik

    2016-04-01

    OH reactivity measurement has become an important measurement to constrain the total OH loss frequency in field experiments. Different techniques have been developed by various groups. They can be based on flow-tube or pump and probe techniques, which include direct OH detection by fluorescence, or on a comparative method, in which the OH loss of a reference species competes with the OH loss of trace gases in the sampled air. In order to ensure that these techniques deliver equivalent results, a comparison exercise was performed under controlled conditions. Nine OH reactivity instruments measured together in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (volume 270 m3) during ten daylong experiments in October 2015 at ambient temperature (5 to 10° C) and pressure (990-1010 hPa). The chemical complexity of air mixtures in these experiments varied from CO in pure synthetic air to emissions from real plants and VOC/NOx mixtures representative of urban atmospheres. Potential differences between measurements were systematically investigated by changing the amount of reactants (including isoprene, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes), water vapour, and nitrogen oxides. Some of the experiments also included the oxidation of reactants with ozone or hydroxyl radicals, in order to elaborate, if the presence of oxidation products leads to systematic differences between measurements of different instruments. Here we present first results of this comparison exercise.

  14. Isotope effect in the formation of H2 from H2CO studied at the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röckmann, T.; Walter, S.; Bohn, B.; Wegener, R.; Spahn, H.; Brauers, T.; Tillmann, R.; Schlosser, E.; Koppmann, R.; Rohrer, F.

    2010-01-01

    Formaldehyde of known, near-natural isotopic composition was photolyzed in the SAPHIR atmosphere simulation chamber under ambient conditions. The isotopic composition of the product H2 was used to determine the isotope effects in formaldehyde photolysis. The experiments are sensitive to the molecula

  15. Model-aided radiometric determination of photolysis frequencies in a sunlit atmosphere simulation chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bohn

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work diurnal and seasonal variations of mean photolysis frequencies for the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich are calculated. SAPHIR has a complex construction with UV permeable teflon walls allowing natural sunlight to enter the reactor volume. The calculations are based on external measurements of solar spectral actinic flux and a model considering the time-dependent impact of shadows from construction elements as well as the influence of the teflon walls. Overcast and clear-sky conditions are treated in a consistent way and different assumptions concerning diffuse sky radiance distributions are tested. Radiometric measurements inside the chamber are used for an inspection of model predictions. Under overcast conditions we obtain 74% and 67% of external values for photolysis frequencies j(NO2 (NO2+hν→NO+O(3P and j(O1D (O3+hν→O2+O(1D, respectively. On a clear sky summer day these values are time-dependent within ranges 0.65–0.86 and 0.60–0.73, for j(NO2 and j(O1D, respectively. A succeeding paper (Bohn et al., 2004 is dealing with an on-road test of the model approach by comparison with photolysis frequencies from chemical actinometry experiments within SAPHIR.

  16. OH regeneration from methacrolein oxidation investigated in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H.; Acir, I.-H.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Dorn, H.-P.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Kaminski, M.; Li, X.; Lu, K.; Lutz, A.; Nehr, S.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wegener, R.; Wahner, A.

    2014-08-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (OH) are the most important reagent for the oxidation of trace gases in the atmosphere. OH concentrations measured during recent field campaigns in isoprene-rich environments were unexpectedly large. A number of studies showed that unimolecular reactions of organic peroxy radicals (RO2) formed in the initial reaction step of isoprene with OH play an important role for the OH budget in the atmosphere at low mixing ratios of nitrogen monoxide (NO) of less than 100 pptv. It has also been suggested that similar reactions potentially play an important role for RO2 from other compounds. Here, we investigate the oxidation of methacrolein (MACR), one major oxidation product of isoprene, by OH in experiments in the simulation chamber SAPHIR under controlled atmospheric conditions. The experiments show that measured OH concentrations are approximately 50% larger than calculated by the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) for conditions of the experiments (NO mixing ratio of 90 pptv). The analysis of the OH budget reveals an OH source that is not accounted for in MCM, which is correlated with the production rate of RO2 radicals from MACR. In order to balance the measured OH destruction rate, 0.77 OH radicals (1σ error: ± 0.31) need to be additionally reformed from each reaction of OH with MACR. The strong correlation of the missing OH source with the production of RO2 radicals is consistent with the concept of OH formation from unimolecular isomerization and decomposition reactions of RO2. The comparison of observations with model calculations gives a lower limit of 0.03 s-1 for the reaction rate constant if the OH source is attributed to an isomerization reaction of MACR-1-OH-2-OO and MACR-2-OH-2-OO formed in the MACR + OH reaction as suggested in the literature (Crounse et al., 2012). This fast isomerization reaction would be a competitor to the reaction of this RO2 species with a minimum of 150 pptv NO. The isomerization reaction would be the dominant

  17. COMPASS – COMparative Particle formation in the Atmosphere using Simulation chamber Study techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bonn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The anthropogenic influence on climate and environment has increased strongly since industrialization about 150 yr ago. The consequences for the atmosphere became more and more apparent and nowadays affect our life quality on Earth progressively. Because of that it is very important to understand the atmospheric processes, on which these effects are based on, in detail. In this study we report the set-up of a novel twin chamber technique that uses the comparative method and establishes an appropriate connection of atmospheric and laboratory methods to broaden the tools for investigations. It is designed to study the impact of certain parameters and gases on ambient processes such as particle formation online and can be applied in a large variety of conditions. The characterisation of both chambers proved that both chambers operate identically with a residence time (xT (COMPASS 1 = 26.5 ± 0.3 min and xT (COMPASS 2 = 26.6 ± 0.4 min at a typical flow rate of 15 L min−1 and a deposition rate (1.6 ± 0.8 × 10−5 s−1. Comparison measurement showed no significant differences. Therefore operation under atmospheric conditions is trustworthy. To indicate the applicability and the benefit of the system a set of experiments was conducted at different conditions, i.e. urban and remote, enhancing ozone and terpenes as well as reducing sunlight. In the ozone enhanced ambient particle number and volume increased substantially at urban and remote conditions in a different strength. Solar radiation displayed a clear positive effect on particle number as well as terpene addition did at remote conditions. Therefore the system is a useful tool to investigate local precursors, the details of ambient particle formation at surface locations as well as future feedback processes.

  18. Intercomparison of NO3 radical detection instruments in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Thieser

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of atmospheric NO3 radicals is still challenging owing to its low mixing ratios (≈ 1 to 300 pptv in the troposphere. While long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS is a well established NO3 detection approach for over 25 yr, newly sensitive techniques have been developed in the past decade. This publication outlines the results of the first comprehensive intercomparison of seven instruments developed for the spectroscopic detection of tropospheric NO3. Four instruments were based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, two utilised open-path cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS, and one applied "classical" long-path DOAS. The intercomparison campaign "NO3Comp" was held at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich (Germany in June 2007. Twelve experiments were performed in the well mixed chamber for variable concentrations of NO3, N2O5, NO2, hydrocarbons, and water vapour, in the absence and in the presence of inorganic or organic aerosol. The overall precision of the cavity instruments varied between 0.5 and 5 pptv for integration times of 1 s to 5 min; that of the DOAS instrument was 9 pptv for an acquisition time of 1 min. The NO3 data of all instruments correlated excellently with the NOAA-CRDS instrument, which was selected as the common reference because of its superb sensitivity, high time resolution, and most comprehensive data coverage. The median of the coefficient of determination (r2 over all experiments of the campaign (60 correlations is r2 = 0.981 (25th/75th percentiles: 0.949/0.994; min/max: 0.540/0.999. The linear regression analysis of the campaign data set yielded very small intercepts (1.2 ± 5.3 pptv and the average slope of the regression lines was close to unity (1.02, min: 0.72, max: 1.36. The deviation of individual regression slopes from unity was always within the combined accuracies of each instrument pair. The very good correspondence between the NO3 measurements

  19. Intercomparison of NO3 radical detection instruments in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-P. Dorn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The detection of atmospheric NO3 radicals is still challenging owing to its low mixing ratios (≈ 1 to 300 pptv in the troposphere. While long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS has been a well-established NO3 detection approach for over 25 yr, newly sensitive techniques have been developed in the past decade. This publication outlines the results of the first comprehensive intercomparison of seven instruments developed for the spectroscopic detection of tropospheric NO3. Four instruments were based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, two utilised open-path cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS, and one applied "classical" long-path DOAS. The intercomparison campaign "NO3Comp" was held at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich (Germany in June 2007. Twelve experiments were performed in the well-mixed chamber for variable concentrations of NO3, N2O5, NO2, hydrocarbons, and water vapour, in the absence and in the presence of inorganic or organic aerosol. The overall precision of the cavity instruments varied between 0.5 and 5 pptv for integration times of 1 s to 5 min; that of the DOAS instrument was 9 pptv for an acquisition time of 1 min. The NO3 data of all instruments correlated excellently with the NOAA-CRDS instrument, which was selected as the common reference because of its superb sensitivity, high time resolution, and most comprehensive data coverage. The median of the coefficient of determination (r2 over all experiments of the campaign (60 correlations is r2 = 0.981 (quartile 1 (Q1: 0.949; quartile 3 (Q3: 0.994; min/max: 0.540/0.999. The linear regression analysis of the campaign data set yielded very small intercepts (median: 1.1 pptv; Q1/Q3: −1.1/2.6 pptv; min/max: −14.1/28.0 pptv, and the slopes of the regression lines were close to unity (median: 1.01; Q1/Q3: 0.92/1.10; min/max: 0.72/1.36. The deviation of individual regression slopes from unity was always within the combined

  20. Intercomparison of NO3 radical detection instruments in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, H.-P.; Apodaca, R. L.; Ball, S. M.; Brauers, T.; Brown, S. S.; Crowley, J. N.; Dubé, W. P.; Fuchs, H.; Häseler, R.; Heitmann, U.; Jones, R. L.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Labazan, I.; Langridge, J. M.; Meinen, J.; Mentel, T. F.; Platt, U.; Pöhler, D.; Rohrer, F.; Ruth, A. A.; Schlosser, E.; Schuster, G.; Shillings, A. J. L.; Simpson, W. R.; Thieser, J.; Tillmann, R.; Varma, R.; Venables, D. S.; Wahner, A.

    2013-05-01

    The detection of atmospheric NO3 radicals is still challenging owing to its low mixing ratios (≈ 1 to 300 pptv) in the troposphere. While long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) has been a well-established NO3 detection approach for over 25 yr, newly sensitive techniques have been developed in the past decade. This publication outlines the results of the first comprehensive intercomparison of seven instruments developed for the spectroscopic detection of tropospheric NO3. Four instruments were based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), two utilised open-path cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), and one applied "classical" long-path DOAS. The intercomparison campaign "NO3Comp" was held at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich (Germany) in June 2007. Twelve experiments were performed in the well-mixed chamber for variable concentrations of NO3, N2O5, NO2, hydrocarbons, and water vapour, in the absence and in the presence of inorganic or organic aerosol. The overall precision of the cavity instruments varied between 0.5 and 5 pptv for integration times of 1 s to 5 min; that of the DOAS instrument was 9 pptv for an acquisition time of 1 min. The NO3 data of all instruments correlated excellently with the NOAA-CRDS instrument, which was selected as the common reference because of its superb sensitivity, high time resolution, and most comprehensive data coverage. The median of the coefficient of determination (r2) over all experiments of the campaign (60 correlations) is r2 = 0.981 (quartile 1 (Q1): 0.949; quartile 3 (Q3): 0.994; min/max: 0.540/0.999). The linear regression analysis of the campaign data set yielded very small intercepts (median: 1.1 pptv; Q1/Q3: -1.1/2.6 pptv; min/max: -14.1/28.0 pptv), and the slopes of the regression lines were close to unity (median: 1.01; Q1/Q3: 0.92/1.10; min/max: 0.72/1.36). The deviation of individual regression slopes from unity was always within the combined accuracies of each

  1. Design of a new multi-phase experimental simulation chamber for atmospheric photosmog, aerosol and cloud chemistry research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new simulation chamber has been built at the Interuniversitary Laboratory of Atmospheric Systems (LISA. The CESAM chamber (French acronym for Experimental Multiphasic Atmospheric Simulation Chamber is designed to allow research in multiphase atmospheric (photo- chemistry which involves both gas phase and condensed phase processes including aerosol and cloud chemistry. CESAM has the potential to carry out variable temperature and pressure experiments under a very realistic artificial solar irradiation. It consists of a 4.2 m3 stainless steel vessel equipped with three high pressure xenon arc lamps which provides a controlled and steady environment. Initial characterization results, all carried out at 290–297 K under dry conditions, concerning lighting homogeneity, mixing efficiency, ozone lifetime, radical sources, NOy wall reactivity, particle loss rates, background PM, aerosol formation and cloud generation are given. Photolysis frequencies of NO2 and O3 related to chamber radiation system were found equal to (4.2 × 10−3 s−1 for JNO2 and (1.4 × 10−5 s−1 for JO1D which is comparable to the solar radiation in the boundary layer. An auxiliary mechanism describing NOy wall reactions has been developed. Its inclusion in the Master Chemical Mechanism allowed us to adequately model the results of experiments on the photo-oxidation of propene-NOx-Air mixtures. Aerosol yields for the α-pinene + O3 system chosen as a reference were determined and found in good agreement with previous studies. Particle lifetime in the chamber ranges from 10 h to 4 days depending on particle size distribution which indicates that the chamber can provide high quality data on aerosol aging processes and their effects. Being evacuable, it is possible to generate in this new chamber

  2. Isotope effect in the formation of H2 from H2CO studied at the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Koppmann

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde of known, near-natural isotopic composition was photolyzed in the SAPHIR atmosphere simulation chamber under ambient conditions. The isotopic composition of the product H2 was used to determine the isotope effects in formaldehyde photolysis. The experiments are sensitive to the molecular photolysis channel, and the radical channel has only an indirect effect and cannot be effectively constrained. The molecular channel kinetic isotope effect KIEmol, the ratio of photolysis frequencies j(HCHO→CO+H2/j(HCDO→CO+HD at surface pressure, is determined to be KIEmol=1.63−0.046+0.038. This is similar to the kinetic isotope effect for the total removal of HCHO from a recent relative rate experiment (KIEtot=1.58±0.03, which indicates that the KIEs in the molecular and radical photolysis channels at surface pressure (≈100 kPa may not be as different as described previously in the literature.

  3. Intercomparison of measurements of NO2 concentrations in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR during the NO3Comp campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fuchs

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available NO2 concentrations were measured by various instruments during the NO3Comp campaign at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany, in June 2007. Analytical methods included photolytic conversion with chemiluminescence (PC-CLD, broadband cavity ring-down spectroscopy (BBCRDS, pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBB\\-CEAS, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF. All broadband absorption spectrometers were optimized for the detection of the main target species of the campaign, NO3, but were also capable of detecting NO2 simultaneously with reduced sensitivity. NO2 mixing ratios in the chamber were within a range characteristic of polluted, urban conditions, with a maximum mixing ratio of approximately 75 ppbv. The overall agreement between measurements of all instruments was excellent. Linear fits of the combined data sets resulted in slopes that differ from unity only within the stated uncertainty of each instrument. Possible interferences from species such as water vapor and ozone were negligible under the experimental conditions.

  4. Intercomparison of measurements of NO2 concentrations in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR during the NO3Comp campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Varma

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available NO2 concentrations were measured by various instruments during the NO3Comp campaign at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany, in June 2007. Analytic methods included photolytic conversion with chemiluminescence (PC-CLD, broadband cavity ring-down spectroscopy (BBCRDS, pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF. All broadband absorption spectrometers were optimized for the detection of the main target species of the campaign, NO2, but were also capable of detecting NO2 simultaneously with reduced sensitivity. NO2 mixing ratios in the chamber were within a range characteristic of polluted, urban conditions, with a maximum mixing ratio of approximately 75 ppbv. The overall agreement between measurements of all instruments was excellent. Linear fits of the combined data sets resulted in slopes that differ from unity only within the stated uncertainty of each instrument. Possible interferences from species such as water vapor and ozone were negligible under the experimental conditions.

  5. Multiphase composition changes and reactive oxygen species formation during limonene oxidation in the new Cambridge Atmospheric Simulation Chamber (CASC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Peter J.; Mahon, Brendan M.; Wragg, Francis P. H.; Fuller, Stephen J.; Giorio, Chiara; Kourtchev, Ivan; Kalberer, Markus

    2017-08-01

    The chemical composition of organic aerosols influences their impacts on human health and the climate system. Aerosol formation from gas-to-particle conversion and in-particle reaction was studied for the oxidation of limonene in a new facility, the Cambridge Atmospheric Simulation Chamber (CASC). Health-relevant oxidising organic species produced during secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation were quantified in real time using an Online Particle-bound Reactive Oxygen Species Instrument (OPROSI). Two categories of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were identified based on time series analysis: a short-lived component produced during precursor ozonolysis with a lifetime of the order of minutes, and a stable component that was long-lived on the experiment timescale (˜ 4 h). Individual organic species were monitored continuously over this time using Extractive Electrospray Ionisation (EESI) Mass Spectrometry (MS) for the particle phase and Proton Transfer Reaction (PTR) MS for the gas phase. Many first-generation oxidation products are unsaturated, and we observed multiphase aging via further ozonolysis reactions. Volatile products such as C9H14O (limonaketone) and C10H16O2 (limonaldehyde) were observed in the gas phase early in the experiment, before reacting again with ozone. Loss of C10H16O4 (7-hydroxy limononic acid) from the particle phase was surprisingly slow. A combination of reduced C = C reactivity and viscous particle formation (relative to other SOA systems) may explain this, and both scenarios were tested in the Pretty Good Aerosol Model (PG-AM). A range of characterisation measurements were also carried out to benchmark the chamber against existing facilities. This work demonstrates the utility of CASC, particularly for understanding the reactivity and health-relevant properties of organic aerosols using novel, highly time-resolved techniques.

  6. New insights into the degradation of terpenoids with OH: a study of the OH budget in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Martin; Fuchs, Hendrik; Acir, Ismail-Hakki; Bohn, Birger; Brauers, Theo; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Häseler, Rolf; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Li, Xin; Lutz, Anna; Nehr, Sascha; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is the main oxidation agent in the atmosphere during daytime. Recent field campaigns studying the radical chemistry in forested areas showed large discrepancies between measured and modeled OH concentration at low NOx conditions and when OH reactivity was dominated by VOC. These observations were only partially explained by the evidence for new efficient hydroxyl radical regeneration pathways in the isoprene oxidation mechanism. The question arises if other reactive VOCs with high global emission rates are also capable of additional OH recycling. Beside isoprene, monoterpenes and 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO) are the volatile organic compounds (VOC) with the highest global emission rates. Due to their high reactivity towards OH monoterpenes and MBO can dominate the radical chemistry of the atmosphere in forested areas under certain conditions. In the present study the photochemical degradation mechanism of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, myrcene and MBO was investigated in the Jülich atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. The focus of this study was in particular on the investigation of the OH budget in the degradation process. The photochemical degradation of these terpenoids was studied in a dedicated series of experiments in the years 2012 and 2013. The SAPHIR chamber was equipped with instrumentation to measure radicals (OH, HO2, RO2), the total OH reactivity, all important OH precursors (O3, HONO, HCHO), the parent VOC, its main oxidation products and photolysis frequencies to investigate the radical budget in the SAPHIR chamber. All experiments were carried out under low NOx conditions (≤ 2ppb) and atmospheric terpenoid concentrations (≤ 5ppb) with and without addition of ozone into the SAPHIR chamber. For the investigation of the OH budget all measured OH production terms were compared to the measured OH destruction. Within the limits of accuracy of the instruments the OH budget was balanced in all cases. Consequently unaccounted

  7. OH Oxidation of α-Pinene in the Atmosphere Simulation Chamber SAPHIR: Investigation of the Role of Pinonaldehyde Photolysis as an HO2 Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, M.; Acir, I. H.; Bohn, B.; Dorn, H. P.; Fuchs, H.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Li, X.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wegener, R.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Wahner, A.

    2015-12-01

    About one third of the land surface is covered by forests, emitting approximately 75% of the total biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). The main atmospheric sink of these BVOCs during daytime is the oxidation by the hydroxyl radical (OH). Over the last decades field campaigns investigating the radical chemistry in forested regions showed that atmospheric chemistry models are often not able to describe the measured OH concentration well. At low NO concentrations and an OH reactivity dominated by BVOCs the OH was underestimated. This discrepancy could only partly be explained by the discovery of new OH regeneration pathways in the isoprene oxidation mechanism. Field campaigns in the U.S.A and Finland (Kim 2013 ACP, Hens 2014 ACP) demonstrated that in monoterpene (e.g. α-pinene) dominated environments model calculations also underpredict the observed HO2 and OH concentrations significantly even if the OH budget was closed by the measured OH production and destruction terms. These observations suggest the existence of an unaccounted source of HO2. One potential HO2 source in forests is the photolysis of monoterpene degradation products such as aldehydes. In the present study the photochemical degradation mechanism of α-pinene was investigated in the Jülich atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. The focus of this study was in particular on the investigation of the role of pinonaldehyde, a main first generation product of α-pinene, as a possible HO2 source. For that purpose the pinonaldehyde yields of the reaction α-pinene + OH were determined at ambient monoterpene concentrations (<5 ppb) under low NOx as well as high NOx conditions. The pinonaldehyde yield under high NOx conditions (30.5 %) is in agreement with literature values of Wisthaler (2001 AE) and Aschmann (2002 JGR), under low NOx conditions the yield (10.8 %) is approximately a factor of three lower than the value published by Eddingsaas (2012 ACP). In a second set of experiments the photolysis

  8. MAN-IN-SIMULANT TEST (MIST) CHAMBER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The MIST chamber uses methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) vapor as a simulant for HD agent to conduct system level evaluations of chemical protective ensembles....

  9. Simulation of space charge effects in resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Lippmann, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Multigap resistive plate chambers with 0.3-mm gas gaps operated in avalanche mode at atmospheric pressure have reached timing accuracies below 50 ps (standard deviation) with efficiencies above 99% . The avalanches in high homogeneous electric fields of 100 kV/cm are strongly influenced by space charge effects which are the main topic of this paper. We extend a previously discussed Monte Carlo simulation model of avalanches in resistive plate chambers by the dynamic calculation of the electric field in the avalanches. We complete the previously presented results on time resolution and efficiency data with simulated charge spectra. The simulated data shows good agreement with measurements. The detailed simulation of the avalanche saturation due to the space charge fields explains the small observed charges, the shape of the spectra, and the linear increase of average charges with high voltage. (22 refs).

  10. Improved climatic chamber for desiccation simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozada Catalina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The climatic chamber at the Universidad de Los Andes was improved for modeling desiccation in soil layers. This chamber allows the measurement of different environmental variables. In this research, evaporation tests were conducted in water imposing boundary conditions for drying, and then these tests were performed in a soil layer. The soil was prepared from a slurry state and was drying controlling the temperature, the infrared radiation, the wind velocity, and the relative humidity. In the first part of this paper, a description of the climatic chamber, operation ranges and theoretical work principles of the climatic chamber are presented. Then, the second part shows the results for desiccation in water and soil. The desiccation tests performed with the climatic chamber allow simulating all environmental conditions accurately during drying coupling the effect of all environmental variables. As a result, the evaporation rate increases with infrared radiation in soil and water. The rate at the beginning of the desiccation tests in clays is the same as in water. However, this evaporation rate decreases as the soil becomes desiccated.

  11. Simulation of the CMS Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Hadjiiska, R; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Dimitrov, A; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Garcia, G; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; Ocampo, A; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Verwilligen, P; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Aleksandrov, A; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Shopova, M; Sultanov, G; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Xue, Z; Ge, Y; Li, Q; Qian, S; Avila, C; Chaparro, L F; Gomez, J P; Moreno, B Gomez; Oliveros, A F Osorio; Sanabria, J C; Assran, Y; Sharma, A; Abbrescia, M; Colaleo, A; Pugliese, G; Loddo, F; Calabria, C; Maggi, M; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Piccolo, D; Carrillo, C; Iorio, O; Buontempo, S; Paolucci, P; Vitulo, P; Berzano, U; Gabusi, M; Kang, M; Lee, K S; Park, S K; Shin, S; Kim, M S; Seo, H; Goh, J; Choi, Y; Shoaib, M

    2013-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) muon subsystem contributes significantly to the formation of the trigger decision and reconstruction of the muon trajectory parameters. Simulation of the RPC response is a crucial part of the entire CMS Monte Carlo software and directly influences the final physical results. An algorithm based on the parametrization of RPC efficiency, noise, cluster size and timing for every strip has been developed. Experimental data obtained from cosmic and proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV have been used for determination of the parameters. A dedicated validation procedure has been developed. A good agreement between the simulated and experimental data has been achieved.

  12. Planetary Simulation Chambers bring Mars to laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateo-Marti, E.

    2016-07-01

    Although space missions provide fundamental and unique knowledge for planetary exploration, they are always costly and extremely time-consuming. Due to the obvious technical and economical limitations of in-situ planetary exploration, laboratory simulations are among the most feasible research options for making advances in planetary exploration. Therefore, laboratory simulations of planetary environments are a necessary and complementary option to expensive space missions. Simulation chambers are economical, more versatile, and allow for a higher number of experiments than space missions. Laboratory-based facilities are able to mimic the conditions found in the atmospheres and on the surfaces of a majority of planetary objects. Number of relevant applications in Mars planetary exploration will be described in order to provide an understanding about the potential and flexibility of planetary simulation chambers systems: mainly, stability and presence of certain minerals on Mars surface; and microorganisms potential habitability under planetary environmental conditions would be studied. Therefore, simulation chambers will be a promising tools and necessary platform to design future planetary space mission and to validate in-situ measurements from orbital or rover observations. (Author)

  13. Planetary Atmosphere and Surfaces Chamber (PASC): A Platform to Address Various Challenges in Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo-Marti, Eva

    2014-08-01

    The study of planetary environments of astrobiological interest has become a major challenge. Because of the obvious technical and economical limitations on in situ planetary exploration, laboratory simulations are one of the most feasible research options to make advances both in planetary science and in developing a consistent description of the origin of life. With this objective in mind, we applied vacuum technology to the design of versatile vacuum chambers devoted to the simulation of planetary atmospheres' conditions. These vacuum chambers are able to simulate atmospheres and surface temperatures representative of the majority of planetary objects, and they are especially appropriate for studying the physical, chemical and biological changes induced in a particular sample by in situ irradiation or physical parameters in a controlled environment. Vacuum chambers are a promising potential tool in several scientific and technological fields, such as engineering, chemistry, geology and biology. They also offer the possibility of discriminating between the effects of individual physical parameters and selected combinations thereof. The implementation of our vacuum chambers in combination with analytical techniques was specifically developed to make feasible the in situ physico-chemical characterization of samples. Many wide-ranging applications in astrobiology are detailed herein to provide an understanding of the potential and flexibility of these experimental systems. Instruments and engineering technology for space applications could take advantage of our environment-simulation chambers for sensor calibration. Our systems also provide the opportunity to gain a greater understanding of the chemical reactivity of molecules on surfaces under different environments, thereby leading to a greater understanding of interface processes in prebiotic chemical reactions and facilitating studies of UV photostability and photochemistry on surfaces. Furthermore, the

  14. Laser Welding Test Results with Gas Atmospheres in Welding Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Hong, Jin-Tae; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Heo, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seo-Yun; Yang, Tae-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The weld beads of specimens welded under identical conditions in the helium and argon gas were cleaner, more regular, and steadier than those in a vacuum. The penetration depth of the FZ in the vacuum was much deeper than those in the helium and argon gas. To measure the irradiation properties of nuclear fuel in a test reactor, a nuclear fuel test rod instrumented with various sensors must be fabricated with assembly processes. A laser welding system to assemble the nuclear fuel test rod was designed and fabricated to develop various welding technologies of the fuel test rods to joint between a cladding tube and end-caps. It is an air-cooling optical fiber type and its emission modes are a continuous (CW) mode of which the laser generates continuous emission, and pulse (QCW) mode in which the laser internally generates sequences of pulses. We considered the system welding a sample in a chamber that can weld a specimen in a vacuum and inert gas atmosphere, and the chamber was installed on the working plate of the laser welding system. In the chamber, the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a cladding tube and an end-cap.

  15. Planetary Atmosphere and Surfaces Chamber (PASC: A Platform to Address Various Challenges in Astrobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Mateo-Marti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of planetary environments of astrobiological interest has become a major challenge. Because of the obvious technical and economical limitations on in situ planetary exploration, laboratory simulations are one of the most feasible research options to make advances both in planetary science and in developing a consistent description of the origin of life. With this objective in mind, we applied vacuum technology to the design of versatile vacuum chambers devoted to the simulation of planetary atmospheres’ conditions. These vacuum chambers are able to simulate atmospheres and surface temperatures representative of the majority of planetary objects, and they are especially appropriate for studying the physical, chemical and biological changes induced in a particular sample by in situ irradiation or physical parameters in a controlled environment. Vacuum chambers are a promising potential tool in several scientific and technological fields, such as engineering, chemistry, geology and biology. They also offer the possibility of discriminating between the effects of individual physical parameters and selected combinations thereof. The implementation of our vacuum chambers in combination with analytical techniques was specifically developed to make feasible the in situ physico-chemical characterization of samples. Many wide-ranging applications in astrobiology are detailed herein to provide an understanding of the potential and flexibility of these experimental systems. Instruments and engineering technology for space applications could take advantage of our environment-simulation chambers for sensor calibration. Our systems also provide the opportunity to gain a greater understanding of the chemical reactivity of molecules on surfaces under different environments, thereby leading to a greater understanding of interface processes in prebiotic chemical reactions and facilitating studies of UV photostability and photochemistry on surfaces

  16. Monte Carlo Simulation Optimizing Design of Grid Ionization Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG; Yu-lai; WANG; Qiang; YANG; Lu

    2013-01-01

    The grid ionization chamber detector is often used for measuring charged particles.Based on Monte Carlo simulation method,the energy loss distribution and electron ion pairs of alpha particle with different energy have been calculated to determine suitable filling gas in the ionization chamber filled with

  17. Simulation of the heat transfer around the ATLAS muon chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    This 2D simulation recently carried out on the ATLAS muon chambers by a small team of CERN engineers specialises in the numerical computation of fluid dynamics, in other words the flow of fluids and heat.

  18. Oxidation of a new Biogenic VOC: Chamber Studies of the Atmospheric Chemistry of Methyl Chavicol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, William; Alam, Mohammed; Adbul Raheem, Modinah; Rickard, Andrew; Hamilton, Jacqui; Pereira, Kelly; Camredon, Marie; Munoz, Amalia; Vazquez, Monica; Vera, Teresa; Rodenas, Mila

    2013-04-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leads to formation of ozone and SOA, with consequences for air quality, health, crop yields, atmospheric chemistry and radiative transfer. Recent observations have identified Methyl Chavicol ("MC": Estragole; 1-allyl-4-methoxybenzene, C10H12O) as a major BVOC above pine forests in the USA, and oil palm plantations in Malaysian Borneo. Palm oil cultivation, and hence MC emissions, may be expected to increase with societal food and bio fuel demand. We present the results of a series of simulation chamber experiments to assess the atmospheric fate of MC. Experiments were performed in the EUPHORE facility, monitoring stable product species, radical intermediates, and aerosol production and composition. We determine rate constants for reaction of MC with OH and O3, and ozonolysis radical yields. Stable product measurements (FTIR, PTRMS, GC-SPME) are used to determine the yields of stable products formed from OH- and O3- initiated oxidation, and to develop an understanding of the initial stages of the MC degradation chemistry. A surrogate mechanism approach is used to simulate MC degradation within the MCM, evaluated in terms of ozone production measured in the chamber experiments, and applied to quantify the role of MC in the real atmosphere.

  19. Simulations of explosion-induced damage to underground rock chambers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A numerical approach is presented to study the explosion-induced pressure load on an underground rock chamber wall and its resultant damage to the rock chamber.Numerical simulations are carried out by using a modified version of the commercial software AUTODYN.Three different criteria,i.e.a peak particle velocity (PPV) criterion,an effective strain (ES) criterion,and a damage criterion,are employed to examine the explosion-induced damaged zones of the underground rock chamber.The results show that the charg...

  20. Simulated equilibrium factor studies in radon chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiehchi Chu; Holing Liu [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Nuclear Science

    1996-05-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted to study the influences of environmental parameters on the equilibrium factor. Most of them were carried out in a walk-in type chamber. The deposition velocity was calculated using the Jacobi model. The ranges of the environmental parameters studied in the experiments are humidity 30-90% r.h. and radon concentration 2-40 kBqm{sup -3}. The aerosol sources included electric fumigator, mosquito coil, incense, a cigarette with the particle concentration 2000-6500 cm{sup -3} and the attachment rate 10-350 h{sup -1}. The results of the experiment show that the equilibrium factor tends to decrease as the radon concentration increases. On the other hand, the equilibrium factor tends to increase as the humidity increases, and so is the increasing attachment rate. Of all the parameters mentioned above, the influence that aerosols have on the equilibrium factor is the predominant factor. The calculated deposition velocity for the unattached fraction of radon daughters tends to increase as the radon concentration increases. However, it tends to decrease as the humidity increases. (Author).

  1. On the acoustic wedge design and simulation of anechoic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Changyong; Zhang, Shangyu; Huang, Lixi

    2016-10-01

    This study proposes an alternative to the classic wedge design for anechoic chambers, which is the uniform-then-gradient, flat-wall (UGFW) structure. The working mechanisms of the proposed structure and the traditional wedge are analyzed. It is found that their absorption patterns are different. The parameters of both structures are optimized for achieving minimum absorber depth, under the condition of absorbing 99% of normal incident sound energy. It is found that, the UGFW structure achieves a smaller total depth for the cut-off frequencies ranging from 100 Hz to 250 Hz. This paper also proposes a modification for the complex source image (CSI) model for the empirical simulation of anechoic chambers, originally proposed by Bonfiglio et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134 (1), 285-291 (2013)]. The modified CSI model considers the non-locally reactive effect of absorbers at oblique incidence, and the improvement is verified by a full, finite-element simulation of a small chamber. With the modified CSI model, the performance of both decorations with the optimized parameters in a large chamber is simulated. The simulation results are analyzed and checked against the tolerance of 1.5 dB deviation from the inverse square law, stipulated in the ISO standard 3745(2003). In terms of the total decoration depth and anechoic chamber performance, the UGFW structure is better than the classic wedge design.

  2. Characterization of the Humidity Calibration Chamber by Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, J.; Sairanen, H.; Grahn, P.; Högström, R.; Lakka, A.; Heinonen, M.

    2017-07-01

    At the Centre for Metrology MIKES of VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT MIKES), we have been developing a humidity calibration apparatus for radiosondes within an EMRP Project Metrology for Essential Climate Variables. The minimum air temperature and absolute humidity are -80°C and 2.576 × 10^{-4} g\\cdot m^{-3} (corresponding the dew-point temperature -90°C), respectively. Recent developments for the apparatus extend its pressure operation range down to 7 hPa (abs). When operating in such dry conditions, the efficiency in calibration is highly limited by the time of humidity stabilization in a measurement chamber: Because the water vapor pressure is very low, the adsorption and desorption of water molecules at the chamber walls have a significant effect on the spatial and temporal humidity differences in the chamber. Inhomogeneity in humidity field inside the calibration chamber increases calibration uncertainty. In order to understand how varying parameters such as pressure, temperature, inflow speed and geometry of chamber effect on stabilization time of humidity field, computational fluid dynamics simulations were developed using Comsol software. Velocity and pressure of fluid, water vapor diffusion, temperature as well as adsorption/desorption of water molecules on the chamber walls were included in the simulations. Adsorption and desorption constants for water on the measurement chamber wall were determined experimentally. The results show that the flow speed and the surface area are the dominant parameters affecting the stabilization time of a calibration chamber. It was also discovered that more homogenous water vapor concentration field is obtained at low pressures.

  3. Mimicking Mars: a vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrado, J M; Martín-Soler, J; Martín-Gago, J A

    2014-03-01

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10(-6) mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  4. Mimicking Mars: A vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobrado, J. M., E-mail: sobradovj@inta.es; Martín-Soler, J. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Martín-Gago, J. A. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-15

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10{sup −6} mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  5. Design, simulation and construction of a Wire Chamber electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istemihan, Zehra

    2017-02-01

    Tracking charged particles has a wide spectrum of applications in scientific and industrial projects. The Delay Wire Chamber (DWC) is a kind of gaseous detector which is a simpler form of the Multi Wire Proportional Chamber, and was developed by the Beam Instrumentation Group at CERN. It is preferred in accelerator and particle physics experiments because of its ease of use, affordability and durability, and it also provides decent position precision. In this work, we describe the working principles of the readout electronics of a new DWC that is being designed and constructed at our laboratory. Results from the simulation of the circuit and the constructed prototype will be presented.

  6. Model for Simulation Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1976-01-01

    A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance, a co....... The method is unique in modeling the three velocity components simultaneously, and it is found that important cross-statistical features are reasonably well-behaved. It is concluded that the model provides a practical, operational simulator of atmospheric turbulence.......A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance......, a correct spectral shape, and non-Gaussian statistics, is selected in order to evaluate the model turbulence. An actual turbulence record is analyzed in detail providing both a standard for comparison and input statistics for the generalized spectral analysis, which in turn produces a set of orthonormal...

  7. A twin-type airflow pulse ionization chamber for continuous alpha-radioactivity monitoring in atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kada, Wataru, E-mail: kada@nf.eie.eng.osaka-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Dwaikat, Nidal; Datemichi, Jun; Sato, Fuminobu; Murata, Isao; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    A simple and inexpensive twin-type airflow pulse ionization chamber was developed for the continuous monitoring of alpha-radioactivity in atmosphere under high humidity condition. The symmetrical structure of the twin-type ionization chamber was effective in the improvement of the ratio of signal to noise in the measurement of pulses induced by alpha-rays. Outdoor alpha-ray measurement was well performed with this ionization chamber by applying sufficiently high bias voltage to the electrodes, except for at very high humidity conditions. It was confirmed that the declination of the counting efficiency due to wetting was easily recovered by the dry-up of the inside of the chamber. Alpha-radioactivity from radon and other alpha-emitting radionuclide in atmosphere was satisfactorily monitored by the detector.

  8. The ASIBIA sea-ice facility: First results from the Atmosphere-Sea-Ice-Biogeochemistry in the Arctic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, James L.; Thomas, Max

    2016-04-01

    Working in the natural ocean-ice-atmosphere system is very difficult, as conducting fieldwork on sea-ice presents many challenges ice including costs, safety, experimental controls and access. The new ASIBIA (Atmosphere-Sea-Ice-Biogeochemistry in the Arctic) coupled Ocean-Sea-Ice-(Snow)-Atmosphere chamber facility at the University of East Anglia, UK, we are aiming to perform controlled first-year sea-ice investigations in areas such as sea-ice physics, physicochemical and biogeochemical processes in sea-ice and quantification of the bi-directional flux of gases in various states of first-year sea-ice conditions. The facility is a medium sized chamber with programmable temperatures from -55°C to +30°C, allowing a full range of first year sea-ice growing conditions in both the Arctic and Antarctic to be simulated. The water depth can be up to 1 m (including up to 25 cm of sea-ice) and an optional 1 m tall Teflon film atmosphere on top of the sea-ice, thus creating a closed and coupled ocean-sea-ice-atmosphere mesocosm. Ice growth in the tank is well suited for studying first-year sea-ice physical properties, with in-situ ice-profile measurements of temperature, salinity, conductivity, pressure and spectral light transmission. Underwater and above ice cameras are installed to record the physical development of the sea-ice. Here, we present the data from the first suites of experiments in the ASIBIA chamber focussing on sea-ice physics and give a brief description of the capabilities of the facility going forward. The ASIBIA chamber was funded as part of an ERC consolidator grant to the late Prof. Roland von Glasow and we hope this work and further development of the facility will act as a lasting legacy.

  9. Particle based plasma simulation for an ion engine discharge chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Sudhakar

    Design of the next generation of ion engines can benefit from detailed computer simulations of the plasma in the discharge chamber. In this work a complete particle based approach has been taken to model the discharge chamber plasma. This is the first time that simplifying continuum assumptions on the particle motion have not been made in a discharge chamber model. Because of the long mean free paths of the particles in the discharge chamber continuum models are questionable. The PIC-MCC model developed in this work tracks following particles: neutrals, singly charged ions, doubly charged ions, secondary electrons, and primary electrons. The trajectories of these particles are determined using the Newton-Lorentz's equation of motion including the effects of magnetic and electric fields. Particle collisions are determined using an MCC statistical technique. A large number of collision processes and particle wall interactions are included in the model. The magnetic fields produced by the permanent magnets are determined using Maxwell's equations. The electric fields are determined using an approximate input electric field coupled with a dynamic determination of the electric fields caused by the charged particles. In this work inclusion of the dynamic electric field calculation is made possible by using an inflated plasma permittivity value in the Poisson solver. This allows dynamic electric field calculation with minimal computational requirements in terms of both computer memory and run time. In addition, a number of other numerical procedures such as parallel processing have been implemented to shorten the computational time. The primary results are those modeling the discharge chamber of NASA's NSTAR ion engine at its full operating power. Convergence of numerical results such as total number of particles inside the discharge chamber, average energy of the plasma particles, discharge current, beam current and beam efficiency are obtained. Steady state results for

  10. Simulation of a Neutron Time Projection Chamber Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Jessica; Foxe, Michael; Bowden, Nathaniel; Heffner, Mike; Bernstein, Adam; Jovanovic, Igor

    2009-10-01

    A neutron time projection chamber (nTPC) prototype constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a promising detector for directional detection of shielded special nuclear material, exhibiting powerful background rejection and neutron/gamma discrimination. The location of the fast neutron source is determined by detection of preferentially forward-pointed proton recoils in our hydrogen/methane-filled nTPC. A simulation of the nTPC in a real environment is conducted, characterizing the angular spread of detected proton recoils by taking into account the detector design, detector environment, and various analysis cuts. Accuracy of nTPC pointing to the neutron source is determined by simulation. Comparison of the simulation results with the experimental data undergoing the identical data analysis indicates the accuracy of the detector model and detector limitations. Among the limitations, particular attention is given to several classes of events which may reduce the pointing accuracy, including multiple scatters within the chamber and neutron scatters off of the surrounding material.

  11. Simulation of ion chamber signals in the n+3 He -> p + t experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Christopher; n3He Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The parity violating proton directional asymmetry from the capture of polarized neutrons on 3He was measured with a pulsed neutron beam at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The target is an ion chamber with 3He at 0.476 atmosphere. Signal wires in the chamber have different sensitivities to the physics asymmetry, depdendent on their location and the configuration of the experiment. These geometry factors must be determined by simulation. In addition, simulation estimates the statistical precision of the experiment, optimizes configuration variables, and assists with systematic analysis. To achieve the most accurate simulation of the detector signals, a custom simulation was written in C++ using weighted variables and taking advantage of parallel execution. The phsyics inputs to the simulation came from measurements of the neutron phase space, ENDF cross sections, and PSTAR ionization data. A cell model was applied to combine this physics to produce an accurate simulation of the experimental data. This simulation can be used to calculate accurate and tunable geometry factors, and to produce desired quanities for use in optimization and analysis.

  12. Interferences of commercial NO2 instruments in the urban atmosphere and in a smog chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kleffmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable measurements of atmospheric trace gases are necessary for both, a better understanding of the chemical processes occurring in the atmosphere, and for the validation of model predictions. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2 is a toxic gas and is thus a regulated air pollutant. Besides, it is of major importance for the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere and plays a pivotal role in the formation of ozone and acid precipitation. Detection of NO2 is a difficult task since many of the different commercial techniques used are affected by interferences. The chemiluminescence instruments that are used for indirect NO2 detection in monitoring networks and smog chambers use either molybdenum or photolytic converters and are affected by either positive (NOy or negative interferences (radical formation in the photolytic converter. Erroneous conclusions on NO2 can be drawn if these interferences are not taken into consideration. In the present study, NO2 measurements in the urban atmosphere, in a road traffic tunnel and in a smog-chamber using different commercial techniques, i.e. chemiluminescence instruments with molybdenum or photolytic converters, a Luminol based instrument and a new NO2-LOPAP, were compared with spectroscopic techniques, i.e. DOAS and FTIR. Interferences of the different instruments observed during atmospheric measurements were partly characterised in more detail in the smog chamber experiments. Whereas all the commercial instruments showed strong interferences, excellent agreement was obtained between a new NO2-LOPAP instrument and the FTIR technique for the measurements performed in the smog chamber.

  13. Using smog chambers to estimate the toxic effects of reactive atmospheric mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Melanie Lynn

    We live in a dynamic environment with atmospheric pollutants constantly transforming, interacting with one another, and generating secondary pollutants. Many of these secondary pollutants have not been identified and, because they are often more oxygenated, many are more toxic than their parent compounds. Continuous emissions from biogenic and anthropogenic sources into this reactive environment create problematic conditions for evaluating the respiratory toxicity of exposure to individual components of urban atmospheres. While previous investigations have studied individual atmospheric components of air pollution, the evaluation of "one atmosphere" effects has been limited by experimental complexities. In this work, new techniques were developed to create an air-liquid interface exposure system coupled with a controllable atmospheric reactor, or "smog chamber", and these were used to examine various reactive atmospheric mixtures using a laboratory setting that still mimicked the outdoor environment. This smog chamber-in vitro exposure system combines common techniques used in classic toxicology with an outdoor environmental chamber system that was developed to investigate chemical reaction mechanisms. This dissertation is divided into three main parts that demonstrate new methods to study reactive atmospheric pollutants utilizing the smog chamber- in vitro exposure system. In the first part, 1,3-butadiene and isoprene were used to evaluate the differences in respiratory toxicity between unreacted parent pollutants and their complete mixture of products generated during photochemical transformations. The second part applied similar techniques to differentiate the roles that specific photochemical products play in the induction of toxicity mediators; in particular, the role of ozone effects compared to the other known, first generation products. In addition to determining the effects induced by product mixtures generated during photochemical transformations

  14. A kinetic study of the reaction of ozone with ethylene in a smog chamber under atmospheric conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yongfu; JIA Long; GE Maofa; DU Lin; WANG Gengchen; WANG Dianxun

    2006-01-01

    Ozone is one of the key species in the processes of atmospheric chemistry, which can be taken as an indicator of oxidation capacity in the troposphere, The reaction of ozone with reactive gases is an important process in the troposphere. Experimental simulation equipment of smog chamber for atmospheric reactions is used to study the reaction of ozone with ethylene in real atmospheric environment with ozone concentrations of 100-200 ppb. The concentrations of ozone and ethylene were monitored during the reaction with the combination of Model 49C-O3 Analyzer and GC-FID. A rate constant of 1.01×10-18 (cm3.mol-1.s-1) was obtained at 286.5 K,under condition of which the half-life of ozone was 88 min. The results obtained from our experiments are in excellent agreement with those reported previously by other researchers under extremely Iow pressure in terms of matrix-isolation technology. This demonstrates that our equipment of smog chamber for atmospheric reactions is reliable, which can be used for further research of the processes of atmospheric reactions.

  15. The role of simulation chambers in the development of spectroscopic techniques: campaigns at EUPHORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ródenas, Milagros; Muñoz, Amalia; Euphore Team

    2016-04-01

    Simulation chambers represent a very useful tool for the study of chemical reactions and their products, but also to characterize instruments. The development of spectroscopic techniques throughout the last decades has benefited from tests and intercomparison exercises carried out in chambers. In fact, instruments can be exposed to various controlled atmospheric scenarios that account for different environmental conditions, eliminating the uncertainties associated to fluctuations of the air mass, which must be taken into account when extrapolating results to the real conditions. Hence, a given instrument can be characterized by assessing its precision, accuracy, detection limits, time response and potential interferences in the presence of other chemical compounds, aerosols, etc. This implies that the instrument can be calibrated and validated, which allows to enhance the features of the instrument. Moreover, chambers are also the scenario of intercomparison trials, permitting multiple instruments to sample from the same well-mixed air mass simultaneously. An overview of different campaigns to characterize and/or intercompare spectroscopic techniques that have taken place in simulation chambers will be given; in particular, those carried out at EUPHORE (two twin domes, 200 m3 each, Spain), where various intercomparison exercises have been deployed under the frame of European projects (e.g. TOXIC, FIONA, PSOA campaigns supported by EUROCHAMP-II). With the common aim of measuring given compounds (e.g. HONO, NO2, OH, glyoxal, m-glyoxal, etc), an important number of spectroscopic instruments and institutions have been involved in chamber experiments, having the chance to intercompare among them and also with other non-spectroscopic systems (e.g. monitors, cromatographs, etc) or model simulations.

  16. Simulation of noncondensable gases in SAGD steam chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gittins, Simon; Gupta, Subodh; Zaman, Maliha [Cenovus Energy (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Cenovus Energy has been successfully using the steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) process at various sites. As these and other wells mature, a greater understanding of non-condensable gasses is required to help to optimize other factors such as methane co-injection and the steam ramp-down and blow-down phases. It is very important to understand fully how non-condensable gasses operate in SAGD chambers in order to lower energy intensity, costs, and the environmental impact while increasing the yield from the reserves. Cenovus Energy also plans on reducing pressure in SAGD and solvent-aided processes in future projects by applying their acquired knowledge of non-condensable gasses. The paper shows results from recent simulations that improve understanding of this subject. Simulation has shown that if there are significant flow restrictions in SAGD injection wells, that would cause the steam to flow at a higher pressure axially along the steam chamber as opposed to axially along the liner and out. This accounts for the production of solution gas.

  17. Atmospheric photochemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons: OH budgets during SAPHIR chamber experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehr, S.; Bohn, B.; Dorn, H.-P.; Fuchs, H.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Li, X.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2014-07-01

    Current photochemical models developed to simulate the atmospheric degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons tend to underestimate OH radical concentrations. In order to analyse OH budgets, we performed experiments with benzene, toluene, p-xylene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. Experiments were conducted under low-NO conditions (typically 0.1-0.2 ppb) and high-NO conditions (typically 7-8 ppb), and starting concentrations of 6-250 ppb of aromatics, dependent on OH rate constants. For the OH budget analysis a steady-state approach was applied in which OH production and destruction rates (POH and DOH) have to be equal. The POH were determined from measurements of HO2, NO, HONO, and O3 concentrations, considering OH formation by photolysis and recycling from HO2. The DOH were calculated from measurements of the OH concentrations and total OH reactivities. The OH budgets were determined from DOH/POH ratios. The accuracy and reproducibility of the approach were assessed in several experiments using CO as a reference compound where an average ratio DOH/POH = 1.13 ± 0.19 was obtained. In experiments with aromatics, these ratios ranged within 1.1-1.6 under low-NO conditions and 0.9-1.2 under high-NO conditions. The results indicate that OH budgets during photo-oxidation experiments with aromatics are balanced within experimental accuracies. Inclusion of a further, recently proposed OH production via HO2 + RO2 reactions led to improvements under low-NO conditions but the differences were small and insignificant within the experimental errors.

  18. Simulation of Enhanced-Explosive Devices in Chambers and Tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, J B; Kuhl, A L; Beckner, V E

    2007-06-05

    Introduction: Shock-dispersed fuel (SDF) explosives use a small chemical charge to disperse a combustible fuel that burns in the post-detonation environment. The energy released in the combustion process has the potential for generating higher pressures and temperatures than conventional explosives. However, the development of these types of novel explosive systems requires a detailed understanding of all of the modes of energy release. Objective: The objective of this project is develop a simulation capability for predicting explosion and combustion phase of SDF charges and apply that capability to quantifying the behavior of these types of explosives. Methodology: We approximate the dynamics of an SDF charge using high Reynolds number, fast chemistry model that effectively captures the thermodynamic behavior of SDF charges and accurately models the key modes of energy release. The overall computational model is combined with Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) , implemented in a parallel adaptive framework suited to the massively parallel computer systems. Results: We have developed a multiphase version of the model and used it to simulate an SDF charge in which the dispersed fuel is aluminum flakes. Flow visualizations show that the combustion field is turbulent for the chamber and tunnel cases studied. During the 3 milli-seconds of simulation, over 90% of the Al fuel was consumed for the chamber case, while about 40% was consumed in the tunnel case in agreement with Al-SDF experiments. Significance to DoD: DoD has a requirement to develop enhanced energetic materials to support future military systems. The SDF charges described here utilize the combustion mechanism to increase energy per gram of fuel by a factor of 7 to 10 over conventional (detonating) charges, and increase the temperature of the explosion cloud to 2,000-4,000 K (depending on the SDF fuel). Accurate numerical simulation of such SDF explosions allows one to understand the energy release mechanism

  19. Atmospheric behaviour of oil-shale combustion fly ash in a chamber study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teinemaa, Erik; Kirso, Uuve; Strommen, Michael R.; Kamens, Richard M.

    There are huge world deposits of oil shale, however, little is known about the fate of atmospheric oil-shale combustion fly ash. In the present work, oil-shale combustion fly-ash aerosol was investigated under simulated daytime and nighttime conditions. Fly-ash particles collected from the Baltic Power Plant (Estonia) were injected directly to a 190 m 3 outdoor Teflon film chamber. The initial concentration of particles was in the range from 15 to 20 mg/m 3. Particle size distributions were monitored continuously by various optical and electrical devices. During the course of an experiment the particle phase was collected on filters, and the gas phase was collected using denuders. The initial aerosol mass concentration decreased quickly due to the deposition of larger particles. Since fine particles dominated the count distribution, the change in aerosol number concentration was less significiant than the mass concentration over time. Experimental data showed a bimodal particle size distribution with maximums at about 0.07 and 4 μm. SEM images of aerosol particles also provided particle shape and size distribution information. The respirable fraction of particles, which contributes most to the health effects of the aerosol, significantly increased during the experiment, being 25% by mass immediately after the injection of fly ash and achieving 65% at the end of the experiment. Results of CG/MS analysis confirm the presence of different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the particle phase of the aerosol. Some of the individual compounds included phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Several PAHs were found in the gas phase of the chamber after fly ash had aged for 2 h, indicating that PAHs desorbed from the particles over time.

  20. Atmospheric photochemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons: Analysis of OH budgets during SAPHIR chamber experiments and evaluation of MCMv3.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehr, S.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Dorn, H.; Fuchs, H.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Li, X.; Lu, K.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2012-12-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons, almost exclusively originating from anthropogenic sources, comprise a significant fraction of volatile organic compounds observed in urban air. The photo-oxidation of aromatics results in the formation of secondary pollutants and impacts air quality in cities, industrialized areas, and districts of dense traffic. Up-to-date photochemical oxidation schemes of the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCMv3.2) exhibit moderate performance in simulating aromatic compound degradation observed during previous environmental chamber studies. To obtain a better understanding of aromatic photo-oxidation mechanisms, we performed experiments with a number of aromatic hydrocarbons in the outdoor atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR located in Jülich, Germany. These chamber studies were designed to derive OH turnover rates exclusively based on experimental data. Simultaneous measurements of NOx (= NO + NO2), HOx (= OH + HO2), and the total OH loss rate constant k(OH) facilitate a detailed analysis of the OH budgets during photo-oxidation experiments. The OH budget analysis was complemented by numerical model simulations using MCMv3.2. Despite MCM's tendency to overestimate k(OH) and to underpredict radical concentrations, the OH budgets are reasonably balanced for all investigated aromatics. However, the results leave some scope for OH producing pathways that are not considered in the current MCMv3.2. An improved reaction mechanism, derived from MCMv3.2 sensitivity studies, is presented. The model performance is basically improved by changes of the mechanistic representation of ring fragmentation channels.

  1. Laboratory simulation of Martian atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, M. K. D.; Lewis, S. R.; Mason, N. J.; Patel, M. R.

    2012-09-01

    Measurements of the yield of important trace gas species such as ozone, evolved during photolytic reactions have been made under Martian environmental conditions in one of the The Open University's Mars simulation chambers. The simulation chamber can mimic Martian temperatures and pressures and a UV solar simulator can be added to irradiate a Marslike gas mixture within the chamber to drive chemical reactions. The concentration of trace gases is measured in situ using a Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (FTIR). The data obtained will be invaluable in improving the qualitative and quantitative representation of chemical species calculated using Mars global circulation models (MGCMs) and in interpreting a new suite of observational data such as from ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO).

  2. Survival and ice nucleation activity of bacteria as aerosols in a cloud simulation chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Amato

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The residence time of bacterial cells in the atmosphere is predictable by numerical models. However, estimations of their aerial dispersion as living entities are limited by lacks of information concerning survival rates and behavior in relation to atmospheric water. Here we investigate the viability and ice nucleation (IN activity of typical atmospheric ice nucleation active bacteria (Pseudomonas syringae and P. fluorescens when airborne in a cloud simulation chamber (AIDA, Karlsruhe, Germany. Cell suspensions were sprayed into the chamber and aerosol samples were collected by impingement at designated times over a total duration of up to 18 h, and at some occasions after dissipation of a cloud formed by depressurization. Aerosol concentration was monitored simultaneously by online instruments. The cultivability of airborne cells decreased exponentially over time with a half-life time of 250 ± 30 min (about 3.5 to 4.5 h. In contrast, IN activity remained unchanged for several hours after aerosolization, demonstrating that IN activity was maintained after cell death. Interestingly, the relative abundance of IN active cells still airborne in the chamber was strongly decreased after cloud formation and dissipation. This illustrates the preferential precipitation of IN active cells by wet processes. Our results indicate that from 106 = cells aerosolized from a surface, one would survive the average duration of its atmospheric journey estimated at 3.4 days. Statistically, this corresponds to the emission of 1 cell that achieves dissemination every ~33 min per m2 of cultivated crops fields, a strong source of airborne bacteria. Based on the observed survival rates, depending on wind speed, the trajectory endpoint could be situated several hundreds to thousands of kilometers from the emission source. These results should improve the representation of the aerial dissemination of bacteria in numeric models.

  3. First Results from the ASIBIA (Arctic Sea-Ice, snow, Biogeochemistry and Impacts on the Atmosphere) Sea-Ice Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, M. M.; France, J.; von Glasow, R.; Thomas, M.

    2015-12-01

    The ocean-ice-atmosphere system is very complex, and there are numerous challenges with conducting fieldwork on sea-ice including costs, safety, experimental controls and access. By creating a new coupled Ocean-Sea-Ice-(Snow)-Atmosphere facility at the University of East Anglia, UK, we are able to perform controlled investigations in areas such as sea-ice physics, physicochemical and biogeochemical processes in sea-ice, and to quantify the bi-directional flux of gases in established, freezing and melting sea-ice. The environmental chamber is capable of controlled programmable temperatures from -55°C to +30°C, allowing a full range of first year sea-ice growing conditions in both the Arctic and Antarctic to be simulated. The sea-ice tank within the chamber measures 2.4 m x 1.4 m x 1 m water depth, with an identically sized Teflon film atmosphere on top of the tank. The tank and atmosphere forms a coupled, isolated mesocosm. Above the atmosphere is a light bank with dimmable solar simulation LEDs, and UVA and UVB broadband fluorescent battens, providing light for a range of experiments such as under ice biogeochemistry and photochemistry. Ice growth in the tank will be ideally suited for studying first-year sea-ice physical properties, with in-situ ice-profile measurements of temperature, salinity, conductivity, pressure and spectral light transmission. Under water and above ice cameras are installed to observe the physical development of the sea-ice. The ASIBIA facility is also well equipped for gas exchange and diffusion studies through sea-ice with a suite of climate relevant gas measuring instruments (CH4, CO2, O3, NOx, NOy permanently installed, further instruments available) able to measure either directly in the atmospheric component, or via a membrane for water side dissolved gases. Here, we present the first results from the ASIBIA sea-ice chamber, focussing on the physical development of first-year sea-ice and show the future plans for the facility over

  4. Semi-automated operation of Mars Climate Simulation chamber - MCSC modelled for biological experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasashvili, M. V.; Sabashvili, Sh. A.; Tsereteli, S. L.; Aleksidze, N. D.; Dalakishvili, O.

    2017-10-01

    The Mars Climate Simulation Chamber (MCSC) (GEO PAT 12 522/01) is designed for the investigation of the possible past and present habitability of Mars, as well as for the solution of practical tasks necessary for the colonization and Terraformation of the Planet. There are specific tasks such as the experimental investigation of the biological parameters that allow many terrestrial organisms to adapt to the imitated Martian conditions: chemistry of the ground, atmosphere, temperature, radiation, etc. MCSC is set for the simulation of the conduction of various biological experiments, as well as the selection of extremophile microorganisms for the possible Settlement, Ecopoesis and/or Terraformation purposes and investigation of their physiological functions. For long-term purposes, it is possible to cultivate genetically modified organisms (e.g., plants) adapted to the Martian conditions for future Martian agriculture to sustain human Mars missions and permanent settlements. The size of the chamber allows preliminary testing of the functionality of space-station mini-models and personal protection devices such as space-suits, covering and building materials and other structures. The reliability of the experimental biotechnological materials can also be tested over a period of years. Complex and thorough research has been performed to acquire the most appropriate technical tools for the accurate engineering of the MCSC and precious programmed simulation of Martian environmental conditions. This paper describes the construction and technical details of the equipment of the MCSC, which allows its semi-automated, long-term operation.

  5. Two Simulated-Smog Atmospheres with Different Chemical Compositions Produce Contrasting Mutagenicity in Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are criteria pollutants used to evaluate air quality. Using a 14.3-m3 Teflon-lined smog chamber with 120 UV bulbs to simulate solar radiation, we generated 2 simulated-smog atmospheres (SSA-1 & SSA-2) with differ...

  6. Understand ATLAS NSW Thin Gap Chamber from Garfield Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J; Diehl, E; Feng, H; Guan, L; Mikenberg, G; Smakhtin, V; Yu, J M; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zhao, Z

    2014-01-01

    The LHC will be upgraded in several phases with the goal of obtaining an instantaneous lumi- nosity of 5-7 x 10^34 cm-2s-s at the center of mass energy of 14 TeV and integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1. In order to profit from the high luminosity and high energy runs of the LHC, the ATLAS collaboration plans to upgrade the present endcap small wheel muon spectrometer to im- prove the muon triggering as well as precision tracking. The proposed New Small Wheel (nSW) will be composed of two four-layer Micromegas detectors (MM) detector sandwiched between two four-layer small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) quadruplets, where MM for precision tracking and sTGC for Level-1 triggering. In this paper, we focus on the Garfield [ 1 ] simulation of the sTGC detector to understand its timing performance and charge production. We also stud- ied the sTGC timing under different magnetic fields and high voltages. These studies provide important guide lines for the sTGC detector and electronics development.

  7. Physical Properties of CO2 Frost Formed by Radiative Cooling in a Mars Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Stephen; Bruckner, A.; Hansen, G.; Cornwall, C.; Kimber, N.; Alvarez, F.

    2013-10-01

    We have performed realistic laboratory simulations of the thermal and radiative environment at the surface of Mars to produce the first samples of carbon dioxide ice formed as it does on Mars, by radiative cooling from a near-pure CO2 gas. It is important to determine the physical characteristics of Mars' seasonal CO2 polar ice caps because these determine their radiative properties which, in turn, control the polar energy balance and the seasonal variation in global surface pressure. It is not known whether they form as fluffy fine-grained deposits, dense solid ice, or something in between. Previous simulations have used conductive cooling, condensing CO2 onto a substrate cooled by liquid nitrogen (Kieffer 1968, Ditteon and Kieffer 1979). This technique favors the growth of grains having the best thermal contact with the surface, resulting in large grain sizes and a coarse texture. On Mars, however, the latent heat released by condensation must be lost radiatively to space. For this experiment, we have constructed a Mars simulation chamber containing low thermal conductivity analog regolith and low pressure CO2 gas. To grow radiation frost in the laboratory requires simultaneous containment of the atmosphere/vapor while allowing infrared radiation to escape (to balance the latent heat of condensation). Planets accomplish this using gravity to hold down the atmosphere. The key to our simulation is the use of a thin polypropylene film that is largely transparent in the thermal infrared yet strong enough to maintain the required pressure differential between our Mars-like "atmosphere" and the vacuum-enclosed space simulator (a liquid-nitrogen cooled plate). We use internal and external light sources to briefly illuminate the frost and obtain high resolution images of its physical morphology and texture using an in situ fiberscope with an articulated tip. Initial results will be presented.

  8. Backscattered radiation into a transmission ionization chamber: measurement and Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    Backscattered radiation (BSR) from field-defining collimators can affect the response of a monitor chamber in X-radiation fields. This contribution must be considered since this kind of chamber is used to monitor the equipment response. In this work, the dependence of a transmission ionization chamber response on the aperture diameter of the collimators was studied experimentally and using a Monte Carlo (MC) technique. According to the results, the BSR increases the chamber response of over 4.0% in the case of a totally closed collimator and 50 kV energy beam, using both techniques. The results from Monte Carlo simulation confirm the validity of the simulated geometry.

  9. The stellar atmosphere simulation code Bifrost

    CERN Document Server

    Gudiksen, Boris V; Hansteen, Viggo H; Hayek, Wolfgang; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Martínez-Sykora, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Context: Numerical simulations of stellar convection and photospheres have been developed to the point where detailed shapes of observed spectral lines can be explained. Stellar atmospheres are very complex, and very different physical regimes are present in the convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere, transition region and corona. To understand the details of the atmosphere it is necessary to simulate the whole atmosphere since the different layers interact strongly. These physical regimes are very diverse and it takes a highly efficient massively parallel numerical code to solve the associated equations. Aims: The design, implementation and validation of the massively parallel numerical code Bifrost for simulating stellar atmospheres from the convection zone to the corona. Methods: The code is subjected to a number of validation tests, among them the Sod shock tube test, the Orzag-Tang colliding shock test, boundary condition tests and tests of how the code treats magnetic field advection, chromospheric ...

  10. Numerical simulations of the solar atmosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaarts, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis several aspects of the solar atmosphere are investigated using numerical simulations. Simulations and observations of reversed solar granulation are compared. It is concluded that reversed granulation is a hydrodynamical process and is a consequence of convection reversal. Images are

  11. Helium Atmosphere Chamber for Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Matthew Hollis

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) is a powerful technique that can provide important information for the study of biological systems. The study of the structure and chemistry at the active metal sites in metalloproteins is important not only for the understanding of the function of the molecules themselves, but also in the hope that the mechanisms once understood may lead to advancement in catalytic chemistry and materials. While techniques using high-energy "hard" X-rays have been well developed for over three decades, the highly useful low-energy or "soft" X-ray regime has seen more recent application to biomolecules. Furthermore, the technical necessities of soft X-ray experiments - most notably the need for Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) - place restrictions on the form and state of the sample and usually preclude liquid or frozen solution measurements. The Helium atmosphere chamber is designed to allow soft XAS of biomolecules and model compounds in a frozen state without exposure to UHV by isolating the sample inside a cryogenic gaseous exchange gas environment. The implementation allows easier sample handling than typical UHV chambers and measurement in conditions ranging from atmosphere (760 Torr) to 100s of mTorr. The system integrates with the existing end station setup at beam line 4.0.2 at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  12. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope system with an open sample chamber: Configuration and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi, E-mail: hinishiy@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Koizumi, Mitsuru, E-mail: koizumi@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Technics Ltd., 2-6-38 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0021 (Japan); Ogawa, Koji, E-mail: kogawa@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Technics Ltd., 2-6-38 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0021 (Japan); Kitamura, Shinich, E-mail: kitamura@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Konyuba, Yuji, E-mail: ykonyuub@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: watanabeyoshiy@pref.yamagata.jp [Yamagata Research Institute of Technology, 2-2-1, Matsuei, Yamagata 990-2473 (Japan); Ohbayashi, Norihiko, E-mail: n.ohbayashi@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Fukuda, Mitsunori, E-mail: nori@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo, E-mail: msuga@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-4, Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    An atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) with an open sample chamber and optical microscope (OM) is described and recent developments are reported. In this ClairScope system, the base of the open sample dish is sealed to the top of the inverted SEM column, allowing the liquid-immersed sample to be observed by OM from above and by SEM from below. The optical axes of the two microscopes are aligned, ensuring that the same sample areas are imaged to realize quasi-simultaneous correlative microscopy in solution. For example, the cathodoluminescence of ZnO particles was directly demonstrated. The improved system has (i) a fully motorized sample stage, (ii) a column protection system in the case of accidental window breakage, and (iii) an OM/SEM operation system controlled by a graphical user interface. The open sample chamber allows the external administration of reagents during sample observation. We monitored the influence of added NaCl on the random motion of silica particles in liquid. Further, using fluorescence as a transfection marker, the effect of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Varp on Tyrp1 trafficking in melanocytes was examined. A temperature-regulated titanium ASEM dish allowed the dynamic observation of colloidal silver nanoparticles as they were heated to 240 °C and sintered. - Highlights: • Atmospheric SEM (ASEM) allows observation of samples in liquid or gas. • Open sample chamber allows in situ monitoring of evaporation and sintering processes. • in situ monitoring of processes during reagent administration is also accomplished. • Protection system for film breakage is developed for ASEM. • Usability of ASEM has been improved significantly including GUI control.

  13. Two Simulated-Smog Atmospheres with Different Chemical Compositions Produce Contrasting Mutagenicity in Salmonella**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are criteria pollutants used to evaluate air quality. Using EPA’s Mobile Reaction Chamber (MRC), we generated 2 simulated-smog atmospheres (SSA-1 & SSA-2) with different concentrations of these criteria pol...

  14. Simulating super earth atmospheres in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudi, R.; Erculiani, M. S.; Galletta, G.; Billi, D.; Pace, E.; Schierano, D.; Giro, E.; D'Alessandro, M.

    2016-01-01

    Several space missions, such as JWST, TESS and the very recently proposed ARIEL, or ground-based experiments, as SPHERE and GPI, have been proposed to measure the atmospheric transmission, reflection and emission spectra of extrasolar planets. The planet atmosphere characteristics and possible biosignatures will be inferred by studying planetary spectra in order to identify the emission/absorption lines/bands from atmospheric molecules such as water (H2O), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), ammonia (NH3), etc. In particular, it is important to know in detail the optical characteristics of gases in the typical physical conditions of the planetary atmospheres and how these characteristics could be affected by radiation driven photochemical and biochemical reaction. The main aim of the project `Atmosphere in a Test Tube' is to provide insights on exoplanet atmosphere modification due to biological intervention. This can be achieved simulating planetary atmosphere at different pressure and temperature conditions under the effects of radiation sources, used as proxies of different bands of the stellar emission. We are tackling the characterization of extrasolar planet atmospheres by mean of innovative laboratory experiments described in this paper. The experiments are intended to reproduce the conditions on warm earths and super earths hosted by low-mass M dwarfs primaries with the aim to understand if a cyanobacteria population hosted on a Earth-like planet orbiting an M0 star is able to maintain its photosynthetic activity and produce traceable signatures.

  15. [The deposition of tritium in form of HTO from atmosphere moisture to Hypogymnia physodes lichens during chamber experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, V N; Golubev, A V; Kosheleva, T A; Kuznetsova, V F; Mavrin, S V

    2008-01-01

    The results of the deposition of tritium oxide (HTO) from atmosphere to Hypogymnia physodes lichens during chamber experiments are presented. For lichens the content of tissue water tritium (TWT) and organically bound tritium (OBT) were measuremed. Were shown that lichens mainly absorb HTO from atmosphere during first 24 hours. The ratio TWT/HTO of chamber and the velocity of TWT to OBT conversion in lichens were determined. Was noted that the TWT to OBT conversion velocity for lichens is ten times greater than that for deposition of HTO by vascular plant leafs. There was supposed that TWT to OCT conversion in lichens is occurred through alga as well as fungus component of lichens. The intensive deposition HTO from chamber atmosphere by lichens and high velocity of HTO to OBT conversion show the availability to use lichens for determination of atmosphere pollution by HTO.

  16. Mechanistic Study Of The Atmospheric Photooxidation Of Trimethylbenzene In The Smog Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dommen, J.; Steinbacher, M.

    2005-03-01

    Mixtures of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, propene, NO and NO{sub 2} have been irradiated in our smog chamber. The temporal development of these precursors and many of the formed gaseous oxidation products have been measured and compared with model simulations based on the Master chemical mechanism. The fast reaction progress in the beginning of the experiment lets us assume that there is an additional OH radical source probably due to wall production of HONO. Higher production rates of photo oxidants in the model despite lower reactivity point to some mechanistic deficiencies of the model. (author)

  17. Chamber experiments to investigate the release of fungal IN into the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Anna Theresa; Krüger, Mira; Scheel, Jan Frederik; Helleis, Frank; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2015-04-01

    Biological aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. Several types of microorganisms like bacteria, fungi and lichen have been identified as sources of biological ice nuclei (IN). They are a potentially strong source of atmospheric IN, as some of them are able to catalyze ice formation at relatively warm subfreezing temperatures. Common plant-associated bacteria are the best-known biological IN but recently ice nucleation activity in a variety of fungal species such as Mortierella alpina, Isaria farinosa, Acremonium implicatum was found. These fungal species are widely spread throughout the world and are present in soil and air. Their IN seem to be proteins, which are not anchored in the fungal cell wall. To which extent these small, cell-free IN are emitted directly into the atmosphere remains unexplored just as other processes, which probably indirectly release fungal IN e.g. absorbed onto soil dust particles. To analyze the release of fungal IN into the air, we designed a chamber, whose main principle is based on the emission of particles into a closed gas compartment and the subsequent collection of these particles in water. The concentration of the collected IN in the water is determined by droplet freezing assays. For a proof of principles, fungal washing water containing cell-free IN was atomized by an aerosol generator and the produced gas stream was lead through a water trap filled with pure water. Preliminary results show a successful proof of principles. The chamber design is capable of collecting aerosolic IN produced by an aerosol generator with fungal washing water. In ongoing experiments, alive or dead fungal cultures are placed into the chamber and a gentle, particle free air stream is directed over the fungi surface. This gas stream is also lead through water to collect particles, which might be emitted either actively or passively by the fungi. Further experiments will be e.g. conducted under different relative humidities. Results

  18. [Numerical Simulation of Heat Transfer in the Human Anterior Chamber at Different Corneal Temperatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingmin; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Junming

    2015-12-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) model of human anterior chamber is reconstructed to explore the effect of different corneal temperatures on the heat transfer in the chamber. Based on the optical coherence tomography imaging of the volunteers with normal anterior chamber, a 3D anterior chamber model was reconstructed by the method of UG parametric design. Numerical simulation of heat transfer and aqueous humor flow in the whole anterior chamber were analyzed by the finite volume methods at different corneal temperatures. The results showed that different corneal temperatures had obvious influence on the temperature distribution and the aqueous flow in the anterior chamber. The temperature distribution is linear and axial symmetrical around the pupillary axis. As the temperature difference increases, the symmetry becomes poorer. Aqueous floated along the warm side and sank along the cool side which forms a vortexing flow. Its velocity increased with the addition of temperature difference. Heat fluxes of cornea, lens and iris were mainly affected by the aqueous velocity. The higher the velocity, the bigger more absolute value of the above-mentioned heat fluxes became. It is practicable to perform the numerical simulation of anterior chamber by the optical coherence tomography imaging. The results are useful for studying the important effect of corneal temperature on the heat transfer and aqueous humor dynamics in the anterior chamber.

  19. Contamination Control Assessment of the World's Largest Space Environment Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Aaron; Henry, Michael W.; Grisnik, Stanley P.; Sinclair, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    The Space Power Facility s thermal vacuum test chamber is the largest chamber in the world capable of providing an environment for space simulation. To improve performance and meet stringent requirements of a wide customer base, significant modifications were made to the vacuum chamber. These include major changes to the vacuum system and numerous enhancements to the chamber s unique polar crane, with a goal of providing high cleanliness levels. The significance of these changes and modifications are discussed in this paper. In addition, the composition and arrangement of the pumping system and its impact on molecular back-streaming are discussed in detail. Molecular contamination measurements obtained with a TQCM and witness wafers during two recent integrated system tests of the chamber are presented and discussed. Finally, a concluding remarks section is presented.

  20. Re-entry simulation chamber for thermo-mechanical characterisation of space materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Volker

    2003-09-01

    During re-entry, materials and components are subject to very high thermal and mechanical loads. Any failure may cause loss of mission. Therefore, materials and components have to be tested under most rigid conditions to verify the suitability of the material and to verify the design of the components. The Re-Entry Simulation Chamber (RESiC) at ARC Seibersdorf research (ARCS) allows simulating the high thermal loads as well as complex mechanical load profiles that may occur during a re-entry; additionally, the influence of chemical reactions of materials with gaseous components of the atmosphere can be studied. The high vacuum chamber (better than 1×10-6 mbar) has a diameter of 650 mm and allows a sample height of 500 mm, or 1000 mm with extension flange. The gas dosing system is designed to emulate the increasing atmospheric pressure during the re-entry trajectory of a vehicle. Heating is performed by a 30 kW induction generator that allows a sufficiently rapid heating of larger components; electrically conductive materials such as metals or carbon fibre reinforced ceramics are directly heated, while for electrical insulators, susceptor plates or tubes will be employed. The uniaxial servo-hydraulic testing machine has a maximum load of 70 kN, either static or with a frequency of up to 70 Hz, with any given load profile (sinus, rectangular, triangular, ...). Strain measurements will be done by non-contacting laser speckle system for maximum flexibility and minimum instrumentation time effort (currently under application testing), or by strain gauges. All relevant process parameters are controlled and recorded by microcomputer. The highly sophisticated control software allows a convenient and reliable multi-channel data acquisition, e.g. temperatures at various positions of the test piece, pressure, loads, strains, and any other test data according to customer specifications; the data format is suitable for any further data processing. During the set-up and

  1. Modification of a very large thermal-vacuum test chamber for ionosphere and plasmasphere simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, O. L.

    1978-01-01

    No large-volume chamber existed which could simulate the ion and electron environment of near-earth space. A very large thermal-vacuum chamber was modified to provide for the manipulation of the test volume magnetic field and for the generation and monitoring of plasma. Plasma densities of 1 million particles per cu cm were generated in the chamber where a variable magnetic flux density of up to 0.00015 T (1.5 gauss) was produced. Plasma temperature, density, composition, and visual effects were monitored, and plasma containment and control were investigated. Initial operation of the modified chamber demonstrated a capability satisfactory for a wide variety of experiments and hardware tests which require an interaction with the plasma environment. Potential for improving the quality of the simulation exists.

  2. Investigation of the formaldehyde differential absorption cross section at high and low spectral resolution in the simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Brauers

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The results from a simulation chamber study on the formaldehyde (HCHO absorption cross section in the UV spectral region are presented. We performed 4 experiments at ambient HCHO concentrations with simultaneous measurements of two DOAS instruments in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich. The two instruments differ in their spectral resolution, one working at 0.2 nm (broad-band, BB-DOAS, the other at 2.7 pm (high-resolution, HR-DOAS. Both instruments use dedicated multi reflection cells to achieve long light path lengths of 960 m and 2240 m, respectively, inside the chamber. During two experiments HCHO was injected into the clean chamber by thermolysis of well defined amounts of para-formaldehyde reaching mixing rations of 30 ppbV at maximum. The HCHO concentration calculated from the injection and the chamber volume agrees with the BB-DOAS measured value when the absorption cross section of Meller and Moortgat (2000 and the temperature coefficient of Cantrell (1990 were used for data evaluation. In two further experiments we produced HCHO in-situ from the ozone + ethene reaction which was intended to provide an independent way of HCHO calibration through the measurements of ozone and ethene. However, we found an unexpected deviation from the current understanding of the ozone + ethene reaction when CO was added to suppress possible oxidation of ethene by OH radicals. The reaction of the Criegee intermediate with CO could be 240 times slower than currently assumed. Based on the BB-DOAS measurements we could deduce a high-resolution cross section for HCHO which was not measured directly so far.

  3. Study of an extrapolation chamber in a standard diagnostic radiology beam by Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedovato, Uly Pita; Silva, Rayre Janaina Vieira; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Santos, William S.; Perini, Ana Paula, E-mail: anapaula.perini@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (INFIS/UFU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Belinato, Walmir [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we studied the influence of the components of an extrapolation ionization chamber in its response. This study was undertaken using the MCNP-5 Monte Carlo code, and the standard diagnostic radiology quality for direct beams (RQR5). Using tally F6 and 2.1 x 10{sup 9} simulated histories, the results showed that the chamber design and material not alter significantly the energy deposited in its sensitive volume. The collecting electrode and support board were the components with more influence on the chamber response. (author)

  4. Description and simulation of physics of Resistive Plate Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Français, V.

    2016-05-01

    Monte-Carlo simulation of physical processes is an important tool for detector development as it allows to predict signal pulse amplitude and timing, time resolution, efficiency ... Yet despite the fact they are very common, full simulations for RPC-like detector are not widespread and often incomplete. They are often based on mathematical distributions that are not suited for this particular modelisation and over-simplify or neglect some important physical processes. We describe the main physical processes occurring inside a RPC when a charged particle goes through (ionisation, electron drift and multiplication, signal induction ...) through the Riegler-Lippmann-Veenhof model together with a still-in-development simulation. This is a full, fast and multi-threaded Monte-Carlo modelisation of the main physical processes using existing and well tested libraries and framework (such as the Garfield++ framework and the GNU Scientific Library). It is developed in the hope to be a basic ground for future RPC simulation developments.

  5. Use of high-volume outdoor smog chamber photo-reactors for studying physical and chemical atmospheric aerosol formation and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrás, E.; Ródenas, M.; Vera, T.; Muñoz, A.

    2015-12-01

    The atmospheric particulate matter has a large impact on climate, biosphere behaviour and human health. Its study is complex because of large number of species are present at low concentrations and the continuous time evolution, being not easily separable from meteorology, and transport processes. Closed systems have been proposed by isolating specific reactions, pollutants or products and controlling the oxidizing environment. High volume simulation chambers, such as EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE), are an essential tool used to simulate atmospheric photochemical reactions. This communication describes the last results about the reactivity of prominent atmospheric pollutants and the subsequent particulate matter formation. Specific experiments focused on organic aerosols have been developed at the EUPHORE photo-reactor. The use of on-line instrumentation, supported by off-line techniques, has provided well-defined reaction profiles, physical properties, and up to 300 different species are determined in particulate matter. The application fields include the degradation of anthropogenic and biogenic pollutants, and pesticides under several atmospheric conditions, studying their contribution on the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The studies performed at the EUPHORE have improved the mechanistic studies of atmospheric degradation processes and the knowledge about the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric particulate matter formed during these processes.

  6. Numerical simulations of homogeneous freezing processes in the aerosol chamber AIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Haag

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The homogeneous freezing of supercooled H2SO4/H2O aerosols in an aerosol chamber is investigated with a microphysical box model using the activity parameterization of the nucleation rate by Koop et al. (2000. The simulations are constrained by measurements of pressure, temperature, total water mixing ratio, and the initial aerosol size distribution, described in a companion paper Möhler et al. (2003. Model results are compared to measurements conducted in the temperature range between 194 and 235 K, with cooling rates in the range between 0.5 and 2.6 K min-1, and at air pressures between 170 and 1000 hPa. The simulations focus on the time history of relative humidity with respect to ice, aerosol size distribution, partitioning of water between gas and particle phase, onset times of freezing, freezing threshold relative humidities, aerosol chemical composition at the onset of freezing, and the number of nucleated ice crystals. The latter four parameters can be inferred from the experiments, the former three aid in interpreting the measurements. Sensitivity studies are carried out to address the relative importance of uncertainties of basic quantities such as temperature, total H2O mixing ratio, aerosol size spectrum, and deposition coefficient of H2O molecules on ice. The ability of the numerical simulations to provide detailed explanations of the observations greatly increases confidence in attempts to model this process under real atmospheric conditions, for instance with regard to the formation of cirrus clouds or polar stratospheric ice clouds, provided that accurate temperature and humidity measurements are available.

  7. Numerical simulations of homogeneous freezing processes in the aerosol chamber AIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Haag

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The homogeneous freezing of supercooled H2SO4/H2O aerosols in an aerosol chamber is investigated with a microphysical box model using the activity parameterization of the nucleation rate by Koop et al (2000. The simulations are constrained by measurements of pressure, temperature, total water mixing ratio, and the initial aerosol size distribution, described in a companion paper Möhler et al. (2002. Model results are compared to measurements conducted in the temperature range between 194 and 235 K, with cooling rates in the range between 0.5 and 2.6 K min-1, and at air pressures between 170 and 1000 hPa. The simulations focus on the time history of relative humidity with respect to ice, aerosol size distribution, partitioning of water between gas and particle phase, onset times of freezing, freezing threshold relative humidities, aerosol chemical composition at the onset of freezing, and the number of nucleated ice crystals. The latter three parameters can directly be inferred from the experiments, the former three aid in interpreting the measurements. Sensitivity studies are carried out to address the relative importance of uncertainties of basic quantities such as temperature, H2O mixing ratio, aerosol size spectrum, and deposition coefficient of H2O molecules on ice. The ability of the numerical simulations to provide detailed explanations of the observations greatly increases confidence in attempts to model this process under real  atmospheric conditions, for instance with regard to the formation of cirrus clouds or type-II polar stratospheric clouds, provided that accurate temperature and humidity measurements are available.

  8. WE-G-BRA-06: Calibrating an Ionisation Chamber: Gaining Experience Using a Dosimetry 'flight Simulator'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavis, A; Saunderson, J; Ward, J

    2012-06-01

    Recently there has been great interest in the use of simulation training, with the view to enhance safety within radiotherapy practice. We have developed a Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training (VERT) which facilitates this, including the simulation of a number of 'Physics practices'. One such process is the calibration of an ionisation chamber for use in Linac photon beams. The VERT system was used to provide a life sized 3D virtual environment within which we were able to simulate the calibration of a departmental chamber for 6MV and 15 MV beams following the UK 1990 Code of Practice. The characteristics of the beams are fixed parameters in the simulation, whereas default (Absorbed dose to water) correction factors of the chambers are configurable thereby dictating their response in the virtual x-ray beam. When the simulation is started, a random, realistic temperature and pressure is assigned to the bunker. Measurement and chamber positional errors are assigned to the chambers. A virtual water phantom was placed on the Linac couch and irradiated through the side using a 10 × 10 field. With a chamber at the appropriate depths and irradiated iso-centrically, the Quality Indices (QI) of the beams were obtained. The two chambers were 'inter-compared', allowing the departmental chamber calibration factor to be calculated from that of the reference chamber. For the virtual 6/15 MV beams, the QI were found to be 0.668/ 0.761 and the inter-comparison ratios 0.4408/ 0.4402 respectively. The departmental chamber calibration factors were calculated; applying these and appropriate environmental corrections allowed the output of the Linac to be confirmed. We have shown how a virtual training environment can be used to demonstrate practical processes and reinforce learning. The UK CoP was used here, however any relevant protocol could be demonstrated. Two of the authors (Beavis and Ward) are Founders of Vertual Ltd, a spin-out company created to commercialise the

  9. Description and simulation of physics of Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Français, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Monte-Carlo simulation of physical processes is an important tool for detector development as it allows to predict signal pulse amplitude and timing, time resolution, efficiency ... Yet despite the fact they are very common, full simulations for RPC-like detector are not widespread and often incomplete. They are often based on mathematical distributions that are not suited for this particular modelisation and over-simplify or neglect some important physical processes. We describe the main physical processes occurring inside a RPC when a charged particle goes through (ionisation, electron drift and multiplication, signal induction ...) through the Riegler-Lippmann-Veenhof model together with a still-in-development simulation. This is a full, fast and multi-threaded Monte-Carlo modelisation of the main physical processes using existing and well tested libraries and framework (such as the Garfield++ framework and the GNU Scientific Library). It is developed in the hope to be a basic ground for future RPC simulat...

  10. Atmospheric interactions detected in both the upper and the lower chambers at Chacaltaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, N. M.; Arata, N.; Maldonado, R. H. C.

    1985-01-01

    The cosmic ray interactions in the energy region 10 to the 13th power to 10 to the 17th power eV were studied by emulsion chambers exposed at Chacaltaya, 5220 m above sea-level. The chambers have a two-storied structure, and the events observed in both chambers give important informations on these phenomena. The first Centauro event was detected as a small shower at the bottom of the upper chamber and as a big fraction of energy deposit in the lower chamber, which indicates a high contribution of hadronic showers. Results of the events with continuation in the rather low energy region are described.

  11. Computational algorithms for simulations in atmospheric optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyaev, P A; Lukin, V P

    2016-04-20

    A computer simulation technique for atmospheric and adaptive optics based on parallel programing is discussed. A parallel propagation algorithm is designed and a modified spectral-phase method for computer generation of 2D time-variant random fields is developed. Temporal power spectra of Laguerre-Gaussian beam fluctuations are considered as an example to illustrate the applications discussed. Implementation of the proposed algorithms using Intel MKL and IPP libraries and NVIDIA CUDA technology is shown to be very fast and accurate. The hardware system for the computer simulation is an off-the-shelf desktop with an Intel Core i7-4790K CPU operating at a turbo-speed frequency up to 5 GHz and an NVIDIA GeForce GTX-960 graphics accelerator with 1024 1.5 GHz processors.

  12. Simulating rainbows in their atmospheric environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Gedzelman, Stanley

    2008-12-01

    Light and color of geometric optics rainbows are simulated in their atmospheric environment. Sunlight passes through a molecular atmosphere with ozone and an aerosol layer near the ground to strike a cuboidal rain shaft below an overhanging cuboidal cloud. The rainbows are treated as singly scattered sunbeams that are depleted as they pass through the atmosphere and rain shaft. They appear in a setting illuminated by scattered light from behind the observer, from the background beyond the rain shaft, and from the rain shaft. In dark backgrounds the primary and secondary bows first become visible when the optical thickness of rain shafts tau(R) congruent with 0.0003 and tau(R) congruent with 0.003, respectively. The bows are brightest and most colorful for 0.1

  13. Vitreous asteroid hyalosis prolapse into the anterior chamber simulating iris metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Carol L; Romanelli-Gobbi, Massi; Lally, Sara E; Shields, Jerry A

    2012-01-01

    Two asymptomatic elderly women who underwent cataract extraction 7 or more years previously and with intraocular lens placement presented with a linear bead-like white multinodular mass in the inferior angle simulating iris metastasis versus large inflammatory precipitates. There was no iris infiltration. In the first case, the posterior lens capsule was intact and there was no evidence of gelatinous vitreous in the anterior chamber, whereas in the second case, the capsule was open and there was gelatinous vitreous prolapse. In both cases, there was asteroid hyalosis in the vitreous. Both patients were diagnosed with prolapsed vitreous asteroid hyalosis into the anterior chamber and managed with observation. Vitreous asteroid hyalosis can prolapse into the anterior chamber of pseudophakic elderly patients with or without capsular opening and can simulate an intraocular tumor.

  14. Vitreous asteroid hyalosis prolapse into the anterior chamber simulating iris metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol L Shields

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two asymptomatic elderly women who underwent cataract extraction 7 or more years previously and with intraocular lens placement presented with a linear bead-like white multinodular mass in the inferior angle simulating iris metastasis versus large inflammatory precipitates. There was no iris infiltration. In the first case, the posterior lens capsule was intact and there was no evidence of gelatinous vitreous in the anterior chamber, whereas in the second case, the capsule was open and there was gelatinous vitreous prolapse. In both cases, there was asteroid hyalosis in the vitreous. Both patients were diagnosed with prolapsed vitreous asteroid hyalosis into the anterior chamber and managed with observation. Vitreous asteroid hyalosis can prolapse into the anterior chamber of pseudophakic elderly patients with or without capsular opening and can simulate an intraocular tumor.

  15. Developments in numerical simulation of IFE target and chamber physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velarde, G.; Minguez, E.; Alonso, E.; Gil, J.M.; Malerba, L.; Marian, J.; Martel, P.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Munoz, R.; Ogando, F.; Perlado, J.M.; Piera, M.; Reyes, S.; Rubiano, J.G.; Sanz, J.; Sauvan, P.; Velarde, M.; Velarde, P. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, DENIM (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The work presented outlines the global frame given at the Institute of Nuclear Fusion (DENIM) for having an integral perspective of the different research areas with the development of Inertial Fusion for energy generation. The coupling of a new radiation transport (RT) solver with an existing multi-material fluid dynamics code using Adaptive Mesh Refinement (ARM) is presented in Section 2, including improvements and additional information about the solver precision. In Section 3, new developments in the atomic physics codes under target conditions, to determine populations, opacity data and emissivities have been performed. Exotic and innovative ideas about Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), as catalytic fuels and Z-pinches have been explored, and they are explained in Section 4. Numerical simulations demonstrate important reductions in the tritium inventory. Section 5 is devoted to safety and environment of the IFE. Uncertainties analysis in activation calculations have been included in the ACAB activation code, and also calculations on pulse activation in IFE reactors and on the activation of target debris in NIF are presented. A comparison of the accidental releases of tritium from some IFE reactors computed using MACCS2 code is explained. Finally, Section 6 contains the research on the basic mechanisms of neutron damage in SiC (low-activation material) and FeCu alloy using the DENIM/LLNL molecular dynamics code MDCASK. (authors)

  16. Muon DTBX Chamber Trigger Simulation on H2 Test Beam Data

    CERN Document Server

    Grandi, Claudio

    1998-01-01

    Muon data collected at the H2 test beam during summer 1997 with the MB96 prototype of a DTBX chamber are analyzed using the level 1 trigger simulation code. The trigger chain includes BTI, TRACO and Trigger Server, which generate the muon trigger primitives in the CMS barrel system. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated and it is found in good agreement with published numbers based on simulated tracks.

  17. [Studies of ozone formation potentials for benzene and ethylbenzene using a smog chamber and model simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Long; Xu, Yong-Fu

    2014-02-01

    Ozone formation potentials from irradiations of benzene-NO(x) and ethylbenzene-NO(x) systems under the conditions of different VOC/NO(x) ratios and RH were investigated using a characterized chamber and model simulation. The repeatability of the smog chamber experiment shows that for two sets of ethylbenzene-NO(x) irradiations with similar initial concentrations and reaction conditions, such as temperature, relative humidity and relative light intensity, the largest difference in O3 between two experiments is only 4% during the whole experimental run. On the basis of smog chamber experiments, ozone formation of photo-oxidation of benzene and ethylbenzene was simulated in terms of the master chemical mechanism (MCM). The peak ozone values for benzene and ethylbenzene simulated by MCM are higher than the chamber data, and the difference between the MCM-simulated results and chamber data increases with increasing RH. Under the conditions of sunlight irradiations, with benzene and ethylbenzene concentrations being in the range of (10-50) x 10(-9) and NO(x) concentrations in the range of (10-100) x 10(-9), the 6 h ozone contributions of benzene and ethylbenzene were obtained to be (3.1-33) x 10(-9) and (2.6-122) x 10(-9), whereas the peak O3 contributions of benzene and ethylbenzene were (3.5-54) x 10(-9) and (3.8-164) x 10(-9), respectively. The MCM-simulated maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) values for benzene and ethylbenzene were 0.25/C and 0.97/C (per carbon), respectively. The maximum ozone reactivity (MOR) values for these two species were obtained to be 0.73/C and 1.03/C, respectively. The MOR value of benzene from MCM is much higher than that obtained by carter from SAPRC, indicating that SAPRC may underestimate the ozone formation potential of benzene.

  18. Evaporation and ignition of droplets in combustion chambers modeling and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betelin, V. B.; Smirnov, N. N.; Nikitin, V. F.; Dushin, V. R.; Kushnirenko, A. G.; Nerchenko, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulation of liquid fuel jet injection into heated atmosphere of combustion chamber, mixture formation, ignition and combustion need adequate modeling of evaporation, which is extremely important for the curved surfaces in the presence of strong heat and mass diffusion fluxes. Combustion of most widely spread hydrocarbon fuels takes place in a gas-phase regime. Thus, evaporation of fuel from the surface of droplets turns to be one of the limiting factors of the process as well. The problems of fuel droplets atomization, evaporation being the key factors for heterogeneous reacting mixtures, the non-equilibrium effects in droplets atomization and phase transitions will be taken into account in describing thermal and mechanical interaction of droplets with streaming flows. In the present paper processes of non-equilibrium evaporation of small droplets will be discussed. As it was shown before, accounting for non-equilibrium effects in evaporation for many types of widely used liquids is crucial for droplet diameters less than 100 μm, while the surface tension effects essentially manifest only for droplets below 0.1 μm. Investigating the behavior of individual droplets in a heated air flow allowed to distinguish two scenarios for droplet heating and evaporation. Small droplets undergo successively heating, then cooling due to heat losses for evaporation, and then rapid heating till the end of their lifetime. Larger droplets could directly be heated up to a critical temperature and then evaporate rapidly. Droplet atomization interferes the heating, evaporation and combustion scenario. The scenario of fuel spray injection and self-ignition in a heated air inside combustion chamber has three characteristic stages. At first stage of jet injection droplets evaporate very rapidly thus cooling the gas at injection point, the liquid jet is very short and changes for a vapor jet. At second stage liquid jet is becoming longer, because evaporation rate decreases due

  19. Prediction of the Resonance Characteristics of Combustion Chambers on the Basis of Large-Eddy Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Franco MAGAGNATO; Bal(a)zs PRITZ; Horst B(U)CHNER; Martin GABI

    2005-01-01

    @@ In the last few years intensive experimental investigations were performed at the University of Karlsruhe to develop an analytical model for the Helmholtz resonator-type combustion system. In the present work the resonance characteristics of a Helmholtz resonator-type combustion chamber were investigated using large-eddy simulations (LES), to understand better the flow effects in the chamber and to localize the dissipation. In this paper the results of the LES are presented, which show good agreement with the experiments. The comparison of the LES study with the experiments sheds light on the significant role of the wall roughness in the exhaust gas pipe.

  20. Measurements and Simulations of Ionization Chamber Signals in Mixed Radiation Fields for the LHC BLM System

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Ferioli, G; Holzer, EB; Stockner, M

    2006-01-01

    The LHC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system must prevent the super conducting magnets from quenching and protect the machine components from damage. The main monitor type is an ionization chamber. About 4000 of them will be installed around the ring. The lost beam particles initiate hadronic showers through the magnets, which are measured by the monitors installed outside of the cryostat around each quadrupole magnet. They probe the far transverse tail of the hadronic shower. The specification for the BLM system includes a factor of two absolute precision on the prediction of the quench levels. To reach this accuracy a number of simulations are being combined to calibrate the monitor signals. To validate the monitor calibration the simulations are compared with test measurements. This paper will focus on the simulated prediction of the development of the hadronic shower tails and the signal response of ionization chambers to various particle types and energies. Test measurements have been performed at CERN and ...

  1. Characterisation of CIME, an experimental chamber for simulating interactions between materials of the cultural heritage and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabas, A; Fouqueau, A; Attoui, M; Alfaro, S C; Petitmangin, A; Bouilloux, A; Saheb, M; Coman, A; Lombardo, T; Grand, N; Zapf, P; Berardo, R; Duranton, M; Durand-Jolibois, R; Jerome, M; Pangui, E; Correia, J J; Guillot, I; Nowak, S

    2015-12-01

    An approach consisting in combining in situ and laboratory experiments is often favoured for investigating the mechanisms involved in the weathering of the materials of the cultural heritage. However, the realistic simulation in the laboratory of the environmental conditions ruling the interactions of atmospheric compounds with materials is a very complex task. The aim of this work is to characterise CIME, a new chamber specially built to simulate the interactions between materials of the cultural heritage and the environment. The originality of this instrument is that beside the usual climatic parameters (temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation) and gaseous pollutants, it also allows the controlled injection of different types of particulate matter such as terrigenous, marine and anthropogenic. Therefore, varied realistic atmospheric environments (marine or urban) can be easily simulated within CIME. In addition to the technical description of CIME, this paper shows the first results obtained by the impact of gaseous pollutants on non-durable glass, bronze and limestone. The first experiments for the deposition of different particles (calcite, clays, soot and halite) are also presented.

  2. GEANT4 simulation of gamma ray in a double-gap resistive plate chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. T. Rhee; M. Jamil; Steve Hall; Y. J. Jeon

    2006-01-01

    For more than 20 years nuclear physicists have used the GEANT code to simulate particle-matter interaction. In most recent version, GEANT4 is a toolkit for simulating the passage of particles though matter, which contains a complete range of functionality including tracking, geometry, physics models, and hits. In this article, an attempt to use GEANT4 to model a double-gap resistive plate chamber (RFC) with its improved efficiency is presented. The efficiencies of the double-gap RFC have been evaluated as a function of gamma energy range 0.005-1OOOMeV. A comparison to available previous simulation package GEANT3 data is also performed.

  3. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence layers with phase screens by JAVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Chen, Wenqin; Yu, Xin; Yan, Jixiang

    2008-03-01

    In multiconjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO), the phase screens are used to simulate atmospheric turbulence layers to study the optimal turbulence delamination and the determination of layer boundary position. In this paper, the method of power spectrum inversion and sub-harmonic compensation were used to simulate atmospheric turbulence layers and results can be shown by grey map. The simulation results showed that, with the increase of turbulence layers, the RMS of adaptive system decreased, but the amplitude diminished. So the atmospheric turbulence can be split into 2-3 layers and be modeled by phase screens. Otherwise, a small simulation atmospheric turbulence delamination system was realized by JAVA.

  4. Evaluation of a novel reference chamber “stealth chamber” through Monte Carlo simulations and experimental data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Vazquez Quino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate a novel reference chamber (Stealth Chamber by IBA through experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations for 6 and 15 MV photon energies. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations in a water phantom for field sizes ranging from 3×3 and 25×25 cm2 were performed for both energies with and without the Monte Carlo model of the Stealth Chamber in the beam path, and compared to commissioning beam data. Percent depth doses (PDDs, profiles, and gamma analysis of the simulations were performed along with an energy spectrum analysis of the phase-space files generated during the simulation. Experimental data were acquired in water with IBA three-dimensional (3D blue phantom in a set-up identical to the one used in the Monte Carlo simulations. PDD comparisons for fields ranging from 1×1 to 25×25 cm2 were performed for photon energies. Profile comparison for fields ranging from 1×1 to 25×25 cm2 were executed for the depths of dmax, 5, 10 and 20 cm. Criteria of 1%, 1 mm to compare PDDs and profiles were used. Transmission measurements with the Stealth Chamber and a Matrixx detector from IBA were investigated. Measurements for 6 and 15 MV with fields ranging from 3×3 to 25×25 cm2 dimensions were acquired in an open field with and without the Stealth Chamber in the path of the beam. Profiles and gamma analysis with a 1%, 1 mm gamma analysis criterion were performed. Results: Monte Carlo simulations of the PDDs and profiles demonstrate the agreement between both simulations. Furthermore, the gamma analysis (1%, 1 mm result of the comparison of both planes has 100% of the points passing the criteria. The spectral distribution analysis of the phase spaces for an open field with and without the chamber reveals the agreement between both simulations. Experimental measurements of PDDs and profiles have been conducted and reveal the comparability of relative dosimetric data acquired with the Stealth Chamber and our gold standard the CC13 chamber

  5. Simulation of the time-projection chamber with triple GEMs for the LAMPS at RAON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Genie; Lee, Jung Woo; Moon, Byul; Hong, Byungsik; Ahn, Jung Keun; Lee, Jong-Won; Lee, Kyong Sei; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Hyo Sang

    2016-03-01

    The time-projection chamber (TPC) with triple gas-electron multipliers (GEMs) is designed for the large-acceptance multipurpose spectrometer (LAMPS) at the new radioactive ion-beam facility RAON, a pure Korean term for the accelerator complex, in Korea. The simulation environment has been set up to test the performance of the designed chamber, and the software package for analysis has been developed. Particle identification has been demonstrated to be possible up to 2 GeV/ c in momentum for particles with the charge number 1 and 2 by using the simulated heavy-ion events. The transverse-momentum resolutions are expected to be about 2% for protons and about 1.3% for pions in the relatively high-momentum region. The total reconstruction efficiencies are estimated to be about 90 and 80% for charged pions and protons, respectively.

  6. Multiphase CFD Simulation of Solid Propellant Combustion in a Small Gun Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Bougamra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interior ballistics simulations in 9 mm small gun chamber were conducted by implementing the process into the mixture multiphase model of Fluent V6.3 platform. The pressure of the combustion chamber, the velocity, and the travel of the projectile were investigated. The performance of the process, namely, the maximum pressure, the muzzle velocity, and the duration of the process was assessed. The calculation method is validated by the comparison of the numerical simulations results in the small gun with practical tests, and with lumped-parameter model results. In the current numerical study, both the characteristics and the performance of the interior ballistic process were reasonably predicted compared with the practical tests results. The impact of the weight charge on the interior ballistic performances was investigated. It has been found that the maximum pressure and the muzzle velocity increase with the increase of the charge weight.

  7. Research of Arc Chamber Optimization Techniques Based on Flow Field and Arc Joint Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianying; Guo, Yujing; Zhang, Hao

    2016-03-01

    The preliminary design of an arc chamber in the 550 kV SF6 circuit breaker was proposed in accordance with the technical requirements and design experience. The structural optimization was carried out according to the no-load flow field simulation results and verified by no-load pressure measurement. Based on load simulation results such as temperature field variation at the arc area and the tendency of post arc current under different recovery voltage, the second optimal design was completed and its correctness was certificated by a breaking test. Results demonstrate that the interrupting capacity of an arc chamber can be evaluated by the comparison of the gas medium recovery speed and post arc current growth rate.

  8. Thermal Characterization of the Air Force Institute of Technology Solar Simulation Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Decrease KI Decrease Increase Increase Eliminate KD Small Change Decrease Decrease No Change A general process for manually tuning a PID ...solar simulator if restrictions were required. PID Coefficient Tuning Again, due to lack of previous testing of the chamber, the PID coefficients set...prescribed < 0.1°C bound. PID coefficient tuning was done throughout the process of testing in order to get as close to desired performance, with small

  9. Backscatter and depolarization measurements of aerosolized biological simulants using a chamber lidar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David M.; Thrush, Evan P.; Thomas, Michael E.; Santarpia, Josh; Quizon, Jason; Carter, Christopher C.

    2010-04-01

    To ensure agent optical cross sections are well understood from the UV to the LWIR, volume integrated measurements of aerosolized agent material at a few key wavelengths is required to validate existing simulations. Ultimately these simulations will be used to assess the detection performance of various classes of lidar technology spanning the entire range of the optical spectrum. The present work demonstrates an optical measurement architecture based on lidar allowing the measurement of backscatter and depolarization ratio from biological aerosols released in a refereed, 1-m cubic chamber. During 2009, various upgrades have been made to the chamber LIDAR system, which operates at 1.064 μm with sub nanosecond pulses at a 120 Hz repetition rate. The first build of the system demonstrated a sensitivity of aerosolized Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) on the order of 5×105 ppl with 1 GHz InGaAs detectors. To increase the sensitivity and reduce noise, the InGaAs detectors were replaced with larger-area silicon avalanche photodiodes for the second build of the system. In addition, computer controlled step variable neutral density filters are now incorporated to facilitate calibrating the system for absolute back-scatter measurements. Calibrated hard target measurements will be combined with data from the ground truth instruments for cross-section determination of the material aerosolized in the chamber. Measured results are compared to theoretical simulations of cross-sections.

  10. Simulation of ion motion at atmospheric pressure: particle tracing versus electrokinetic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissdorf, Walter; Pohler, Larissa; Klee, Sonja; Müller, David; Benter, Thorsten

    2012-02-01

    Results obtained with two computational approaches for the simulation of ion motion at elevated pressure are compared with experimentally derived ion current data. The computational approaches used are charged particle tracings with the software package SIMION ver. 8 and finite element based calculations using the software package Comsol Multiphysics ver. 4.0/4.0a. The experimental setup consisted of a tubular corona discharge ion source coupled to a cylindrical measurement chamber held at atmospheric pressure. Generated ions are flown into the chamber at essentially subsonic laminar isothermal conditions. In the simulations, strictly stationary conditions were assumed. The results show very good agreement between the SIMION/SDS model and experimental data. For the Comsol model, only qualitative agreement is observed.

  11. Simulated annealing algorithm for solving chambering student-case assignment problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Saadiah; Abdul-Rahman, Syariza

    2015-12-01

    The problem related to project assignment problem is one of popular practical problem that appear nowadays. The challenge of solving the problem raise whenever the complexity related to preferences, the existence of real-world constraints and problem size increased. This study focuses on solving a chambering student-case assignment problem by using a simulated annealing algorithm where this problem is classified under project assignment problem. The project assignment problem is considered as hard combinatorial optimization problem and solving it using a metaheuristic approach is an advantage because it could return a good solution in a reasonable time. The problem of assigning chambering students to cases has never been addressed in the literature before. For the proposed problem, it is essential for law graduates to peruse in chambers before they are qualified to become legal counselor. Thus, assigning the chambering students to cases is a critically needed especially when involving many preferences. Hence, this study presents a preliminary study of the proposed project assignment problem. The objective of the study is to minimize the total completion time for all students in solving the given cases. This study employed a minimum cost greedy heuristic in order to construct a feasible initial solution. The search then is preceded with a simulated annealing algorithm for further improvement of solution quality. The analysis of the obtained result has shown that the proposed simulated annealing algorithm has greatly improved the solution constructed by the minimum cost greedy heuristic. Hence, this research has demonstrated the advantages of solving project assignment problem by using metaheuristic techniques.

  12. On the use of plant emitted volatile organic compounds for atmospheric chemistry simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Hohaus, T.; Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Wegener, R.; Novelli, A.; Fuchs, H.; Wahner, A.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) contribute to about 90% of the emitted VOC globally with isoprene being one of the most abundant BVOC (Guenther 2002). Intensive efforts in studying and understanding the impact of BVOC on atmospheric chemistry were undertaken in the recent years. However many uncertainties remain, e.g. field studies have shown that in wooded areas measured OH reactivity can often not be explained by measured BVOC and their oxidation products (e.g. Noelscher et al. 2012). This discrepancy may be explained by either a lack of understanding of BVOC sources or insufficient understanding of BVOC oxidation mechanisms. Plants emit a complex VOC mixture containing likely many compounds which have not yet been measured or identified (Goldstein and Galbally 2007). A lack of understanding BVOC sources limits bottom-up estimates of secondary products of BVOC oxidation such as SOA. Similarly, the widespread oversimplification of atmospheric chemistry in simulation experiments, using single compound or simple BVOC mixtures to study atmospheric chemistry processes limit our ability to assess air quality and climate impacts of BVOC. We will present applications of the new extension PLUS (PLant chamber Unit for Simulation) to our atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. PLUS is used to produce representative BVOC mixtures from direct plant emissions. We will report on the performance and characterization of the newly developed chamber. As an exemplary application, trees typical of a Boreal forest environment were used to compare OH reactivity as directly measured by LIF to the OH reactivity calculated from BVOC measured by GC-MS and PTRMS. The comparison was performed for both, primary emissions of trees without any influence of oxidizing agents and using different oxidation schemes. For the monoterpene emitters investigated here, we show that discrepancies between measured and calculated total OH reactivity increase with increasing degree of oxidation

  13. LIFE Chamber Chemical Equilibrium Simulations with Additive Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMuth, J A; Simon, A J

    2009-09-03

    In order to enable continuous operation of a Laser Inertial confinement Fusion Energy (LIFE) engine, the material (fill-gas and debris) in the fusion chamber must be carefully managed. The chamber chemical equilibrium compositions for post-shot mixtures are evaluated to determine what compounds will be formed at temperatures 300-5000K. It is desired to know if carbon and or lead will deposit on the walls of the chamber, and if so: at what temperature, and what elements can be added to prevent this from happening. The simulation was conducted using the chemical equilibrium solver Cantera with a Matlab front-end. Solutions were obtained by running equilibrations at constant temperature and constant specific volume over the specified range of temperatures. It was found that if nothing is done, carbon will deposit on the walls once it cools to below 2138K, and lead below 838K. Three solutions to capture the carbon were found: adding pure oxygen, hydrogen/nitrogen combo, and adding pure nitrogen. The best of these was the addition of oxygen which would readily form CO at around 4000K. To determine the temperature at which carbon would deposit on the walls, temperature solutions to evaporation rate equations needed to be found. To determine how much carbon or any species was in the chamber at a given time, chamber flushing equations needed to be developed. Major concerns are deposition of carbon and/or oxygen on the tungsten walls forming tungsten oxides or tungsten carbide which could cause embrittlement and cause failure of the first wall. Further research is needed.

  14. Direct Observation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation during Cloud Condensation-Evaporation Cycles (SOAaq) in Simulation Chamber Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doussin, J. F.; Bregonzio-Rozier, L.; Giorio, C.; Siekmann, F.; Gratien, A.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Ravier, S.; Pangui, E.; Tapparo, A.; Kalberer, M.; Monod, A.

    2014-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) undergo many reactions in the atmosphere and form a wide range of oxidised and water-soluble compounds. These compounds can partition into atmospheric water droplets, and react within the aqueous phase producing higher molecular weight and/or less volatile compounds which can remain in the particle phase after water evaporation and thus increase the organic aerosol mass (Ervens et al., 2011; Altieri et al., 2008; Couvidat et al., 2013). While this hypothesis is frequently discussed in the literature, so far, almost no direct observations of such a process have been provided.The aim of the present work is to study SOA formation from isoprene photooxidation during cloud condensation-evaporation cycles.The experiments were performed during the CUMULUS project (CloUd MULtiphase chemistry of organic compoUndS in the troposphere), in the CESAM simulation chamber located at LISA. CESAM is a 4.2 m3 stainless steel chamber equipped with realistic irradiation sources and temperature and relative humidity (RH) controls (Wang et al., 2011). In each experiment, isoprene was allowed to oxidize during several hours in the presence on nitrogen oxides under dry conditions. Gas phase compounds were analyzed on-line by a Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), NOx and O3 analyzers. SOA formation was monitored on-line with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and an Aerodyne High Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). The experimental protocol was optimised to generate cloud events in the simulation chamber, which allowed us to generate clouds lasting for ca. 10 minutes in the presence of light.In all experiments, we observed that during cloud formation, water-soluble gas-phase oxidation products (e.g., methylglyoxal, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid and glycolaldehyde) readily partitioned into cloud

  15. Analysis of the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber using the CASE/A simulation package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcfadden, Carl D.; Edeen, Marybeth A.

    1992-01-01

    A computer simulation of the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), located at the NASA Johnson Space Center, has been developed using the Computer Aided Systems Engineering and Analysis (CASE/A) package. The model has been used to perform several analyses of the VPGC. The analyses consisted of a study of the effects of a human metabolic load on the VPGC and a study of two new configurations for the temperature and humidity control (THC) subsystem in the VPGC. The objective of the human load analysis was to study the effects of a human metabolic load on the air revitalization and THC subsystems. This included the effects on the quantity of carbon dioxide injected and oxygen removed from the chamber and the effects of the additional sensible and latent heat loads. The objective of the configuration analysis was to compare the two new THC configurations against the current THC configuration to determine which had the best performance.

  16. Chamber simulation of photooxidation of dimethyl sulfide and isoprene in the presence of NOx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To improve the model prediction for the formation of H2SO4 and methanesulfonic acid (MSA, aerosol-phase reactions of gaseous dimethyl sulfide (DMS oxidation products [e.g., dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO] in aerosol have been included in the DMS kinetic model with the recently reported gas-phase reactions and their rate constants. To determine the rate constants of aerosol-phase reactions of both DMSO and its major gaseous products [e.g., dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2 and methanesulfinic acid (MSIA], DMSO was photooxidized in the presence of NOx using a 2 m3 Teflon film chamber. The rate constants tested in the DMSO kinetic mechanisms were then incorporated into the DMS photooxidation mechanism. The model simulation using the newly constructed DMS oxidation mechanims was compared to chamber data obtained from the phototoxiation of DMS in the presence of NOx. Within 120-min simulation, the predicted concentrations of MSA increase by 200–400% and those of H2SO4, by 50–200% due to aerosol-phase chemistry. This was well substantiated with experimental data. To study the effect of coexisting volatile organic compounds, the photooxidation of DMS in the presence of isoprene and NOx has been simulated using the newly constructed DMS kinetic model integrated with the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM for isoprene oxidation, and compared to chamber data. With the high concentrations of DMS (250 ppb and isoprene (560–2248 ppb, both the model simulation and experimental data showed an increase in the yields of MSA and H2SO4 as the isoprene concentration increased.

  17. Application of Large Eddy Simulation in the process of the Multi-Physics Field Coupling in a Combustion Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Rang-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation is the main method to solve turbulence problems. As one of the three methods which are commonly used in large-eddy simulation model (LES is the most effective and promising research method. The basic idea of large-eddy simulation is that the large scale turbulent motion is directly simulated and we use the sub-grid scale model to simulate small-scale turbulent motion. Continuing alternative load exists in aero-engine combustion chamber during operation. This coupling phenomenon is an important reason to the combustion chamber fatigue failure. In this paper, the large-eddy simulation methods are described and applied in researching aero-engine combustion chamber multi-physics field coupling analysis. By comparing with the experimental results we verify the feasibility of this method and there is great significance of actual project.

  18. Accurate simulation of ionization chamber response with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sempau, Josep [Technical University of Catalonia (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    Full text. Ionization chambers (IC) are routinely used in hospitals for the dosimetry of the photon and electron beams used for radiotherapy treatments. The determination of absorbed dose to water from the absorbed dose to the air filling the cavity requires the introduction of stopping power ratios and perturbation factors, which account for the disturbance caused by the presence of the chamber. Although this may seem a problem readily amenable to Monte Carlo simulation, the fact is that the accurate determination of IC response has been, during the last 20 years, one of the most important challenges of the simulation of electromagnetic showers. The main difficulty stems from the use of condensed history techniques for electron and positron transport. This approach, which involves grouping a large number of interactions into a single artificial event, is known to produce the so-called interface effects when particles travel across surfaces separating different media. These effects are extremely important when the electron step length is not negligible compared to the size of the region being crossed, as it is the case with the cavity of an IC. The artifact, which becomes apparent when the chamber response shows a marked dependence on the adopted step size, can be palliated with the use of sophisticated electron transport algorithms. These topics will be discussed in the context of the transport model implemented in the Penelope code. The degree of violation of the Fano theorem for a simple, planar geometry, will be used as a measure of the stability of the algorithm with respect to variations of the electron step length, thus assessing the 'quality' of its condensed history scheme. It will be shown that, with a suitable choice of transport parameters, Penelope can simulate IC response with an accuracy of the order of 0.1%. (author)

  19. Simulation of heat transfer in combustion chamber waterwall tubes of supercritical steam boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grądziel Sławomir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of numerical computations performed for the furnace chamber waterwalls of a supercritical boiler with a steam output of 2400 × 103 kg/h. A model of distributed parameters is proposed for the waterwall operation simulation. It is based on the solution of equations describing the mass, momentum and energy conservation laws. The aim of the calculations was to determine the distribution of enthalpy, mass flow and fluid pressure in tubes. The balance equations can be brought to a form where on the left-hand side space derivatives, and on the right-hand side – time derivatives are obtained. The time derivatives on the right-hand side were replaced with backward difference quotients. This system of ordinary differential equations was solved using the Runge-Kutta method. The calculation also takes account of the variable thermal load of the chamber along its height. This thermal load distribution is known from the calculations of the heat exchange in the combustion chamber. The calculations were carried out with the zone method.

  20. Technical note: Conversion of isoprene hydroxy hydroperoxides (ISOPOOHs) on metal environmental simulation chamber walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhammer, Anne-Kathrin; Breitenlechner, Martin; Keutsch, Frank N.; Hansel, Armin

    2017-03-01

    Sources and sinks of isoprene oxidation products from low-NOx isoprene chemistry have been studied at the CERN CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber with a custom-built selective reagent ion time-of-flight mass spectrometer (SRI-ToF-MS), which allows quantitative measurement of isoprene hydroxy hydroperoxides (ISOPOOHs). The measured concentrations of the main oxidation products were compared to chemical box model simulations based on the Leeds Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) v3.3. The modeled ISOPOOH concentrations are a factor of 20 higher than the observed concentrations, and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) concentrations are up to a factor of 2 lower compared to observations, despite the artifact-free detection method. Addition of catalytic conversion of 1,2-ISOPOOH and 4,3-ISOPOOH to methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) on the stainless-steel surface of the chamber to the chemical mechanism resolves the discrepancy between model predictions and observation. This suggests that isoprene chemistry in a metal chamber under low-NOx conditions cannot be described by a pure gas phase model alone. Biases in the measurement of ISOPOOH, MVK, and MACR can be caused not only intra-instrumentally but also by the general experimental setup. The work described here extends the role of heterogeneous reactions affecting gas phase composition and properties from instrumental surfaces, described previously, to general experimental setups. The role of such conversion reactions on real environmental surfaces is yet to be explored.

  1. Technical Note: A numerical test-bed for detailed ice nucleation studies in the AIDA cloud simulation chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Cotton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere aerosol and cloud chamber of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe can be used to test the ice forming ability of aerosols. The AIDA chamber is extensively instrumented including pressure, temperature and humidity sensors, and optical particle counters. Expansion cooling using mechanical pumps leads to ice supersaturation conditions and possible ice formation. In order to describe the evolving chamber conditions during an expansion, a parcel model was modified to account for diabatic heat and moisture interactions with the chamber walls. Model results are shown for a series of expansions where the initial chamber temperature ranged from −20°C to −60°C and which used desert dust as ice forming nuclei. During each expansion, the initial formation of ice particles was clearly observed. For the colder expansions there were two clear ice nucleation episodes. In order to test the ability of the model to represent the changing chamber conditions and to give confidence in the observations of chamber temperature and humidity, and ice particle concentration and mean size, ice particles were simply added as a function of time so as to reproduce the observations of ice crystal concentration. The time interval and chamber conditions over which ice nucleation occurs is therefore accurately known, and enables the model to be used as a test bed for different representations of ice formation.

  2. A space simulation test chamber development for the investigation of radiometric properties of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enlow, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and preliminary utilization of a thermal vacuum space simulation facility are discussed. The facility was required to perform studies on the thermal radiation properties of materials. A test chamber was designed to provide high pumping speed, low pressure, a low photon level radiation background (via high emissivity, coated, finned cryopanels), internal heat sources for rapid warmup, and rotary and linear motion of the irradiated materials specimen. The radiation detection system consists of two wideband infrared photoconductive detectors, their cryogenic coolers, a cryogenic-cooled blackbody source, and a cryogenic-cooled optical radiation modulator.

  3. Three-dimensional Numerical Simulation of Combustion Field in the Combustion Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Ping; QIAN Zhi-bo; YANG Jie; ZHANG Jin-jun

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the effect of rotation on the combustion in the underwater vehicle, a two-phase turbulent combustion process is described with Reynolds stress turbulence model, eddy-dissipation turbulent combustion model, P-1 radiation model and particle tracking model of liquid. The flow in the rotating combustion chamber is simulated at two different working speeds, 0 r/min and 1 000 r/min by Fluent software. The temperature, gas velocity, static pressure of wall and fuel concentration are computed and compared. The results show that the combustion in rotating combustor is faster and more effective.

  4. Investigating the use of secondary organic aerosol as seed particles in simulation chamber experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Hamilton

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of β-caryophyllene secondary organic aerosol particles as seeds for smog chamber simulations has been investigated. A series of experiments were carried out in the Manchester photochemical chamber as part of the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES project to study the effect of seed particles on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA from limonene photo-oxidation. Rather than use a conventional seed aerosol containing ammonium sulfate or diesel particles, a method was developed to use in-situ chamber generated seed particles from β-caryophyllene photo-oxidation, which were then diluted to a desired mass loading (in this case 4–13 μg m−3. Limonene was then introduced into the chamber and oxidised, with the formation of SOA seen as a growth in the size of oxidised organic seed particles from 150 to 325 nm mean diameter. The effect of the partitioning of limonene oxidation products onto the seed aerosol was assessed using aerosol mass spectrometry during the experiment and the percentage of m/z 44, an indicator of degree of oxidation, increased from around 5 to 8 %. The hygroscopicity of the aerosol also changed, with the growth factor for 200 nm particles increasing from less than 1.05 to 1.25 at 90 % RH. The detailed chemical composition of the limonene SOA could be extracted from the complex β-caryophyllene matrix using two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. High resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FTICR-MS was used to determine exact molecular formulae of the seed and the limonene modified aerosol. The average O:C ratio was seen to increase from 0.32 to 0.37 after limonene oxidation products had condensed onto the organic seed.

  5. Investigating the use of secondary organic aerosol as seed particles in simulation chamber experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Hamilton

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of β-caryophyllene secondary organic aerosol particles as seeds for smog chamber simulations has been investigated. A series of experiments were carried out in the Manchester photochemical chamber as part of the Aerosol Coupling in the Earth System (ACES project to study the effect of seed particles on the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA from limonene photo-oxidation. Rather than use a conventional seed aerosol containing ammonium sulphate or diesel particles, a method was developed to use in situ chamber generated seed particles from β-caryophyllene photo-oxidation, which were then diluted to a desired mass loading (in this case 4–13 μg m-3. Limonene was then introduced into the chamber and oxidised, with the formation of SOA seen as a growth in the size of oxidised organic seed particles from 150 to 325 nm mean diameter. The effect of the partitioning of limonene oxidation products onto the seed aerosol was assessed using aerosol mass spectrometry during the experiment and the percentage of m/z 44, an indicator of degree of oxidation, increased from around 5 to 8%. The hygroscopicity of the aerosol also changed, with the growth factor for 200 nm particles increasing from less than 1.05 to 1.25 at 90% RH. The detailed chemical composition of the limonene SOA could be extracted from the complex β-caryophyllene matrix using two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. High resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FTICR-MS was used to determine exact molecular formulae of the seed and the limonene modified aerosol. The average O:C ratio was seen to increase from 0.32 to 0.37 after limonene oxidation products had condensed onto the organic seed.

  6. Atmospheric radiative transfer simulation for atmospheric correction of remote sensing data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunfei Bao; Shengbo Chen

    2006-01-01

    The radiance leaving the earth-atmosphere system which can be sensed by a satellite borne radiometer is the sum of radiation emission from the earth surface and each atmospheric level that are transmitted to the top of the atmosphere. The radiation emission from the earth surface and the radiance of each atmospheric level can be separated from the radiance at the top the atmospheric level measured by a satellite borne radiometer. However, it is very difficult to measure the atmospheric radiance, especially the synchronous measurement with the satellite. Thus some atmospheric radiative transfer models have been developed to provide many options for modeling atmospheric radiation transport, such as LOWTRAN, MODTRAN, 6S, FASCODE, LBLRTM, SHARC, and SAMM. Meanwhile, these models can support the detailed detector system design, the optimization and evaluation of satellite mission parameters, and the data processing procedures. As an example, the newly atmospheric radiative transfer models, MODTRAN will be compared with other models after the atmospheric radiative transfer is described. And the atmospheric radiative transfer simulation procedures and their applications to atmospheric transmittance, retrieval of atmospheric elements, and surface parameters, will also be presented.

  7. Preparation of a Frozen Regolith Simulant Bed for ISRU Component Testing in a Vacuum Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenhenz, Julie; Linne, Diane

    2013-01-01

    In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) systems and components have undergone extensive laboratory and field tests to expose hardware to relevant soil environments. The next step is to combine these soil environments with relevant pressure and temperature conditions. Previous testing has demonstrated how to incorporate large bins of unconsolidated lunar regolith into sufficiently sized vacuum chambers. In order to create appropriate depth dependent soil characteristics that are needed to test drilling operations for the lunar surface, the regolith simulant bed must by properly compacted and frozen. While small cryogenic simulant beds have been created for laboratory tests, this scale effort will allow testing of a full 1m drill which has been developed for a potential lunar prospector mission. Compacted bulk densities were measured at various moisture contents for GRC-3 and Chenobi regolith simulants. Vibrational compaction methods were compared with the previously used hammer compaction, or "Proctor", method. All testing was done per ASTM standard methods. A full 6.13 m3 simulant bed with 6 percent moisture by weight was prepared, compacted in layers, and frozen in a commercial freezer. Temperature and desiccation data was collected to determine logistics for preparation and transport of the simulant bed for thermal vacuum testing. Once in the vacuum facility, the simulant bed will be cryogenically frozen with liquid nitrogen. These cryogenic vacuum tests are underway, but results will not be included in this manuscript.

  8. Performance evaluation of multi sampling ionization chamber for heavy ion beams by comparison with GEANT4 simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanke, Yuki; Himac H093 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    In high-energy heavy-ion accelerator facilities, multi sampling ionization chambers are often used for the identification of the atomic number Z by detecting the energy deposit in it. In the study at GSI, the picture of the escape of secondary electrons, δ rays, from the ionization chamber explains the experimental data of pulse-height resolution. If this picture is correct, the pulse-height resolution should depend on the effective area of the ionization chamber. The experiment have been performed at NIRS-HIMAC. The pulse-height resolutions of two ionization chambers with different effective area were compared by using a 400-MeV/u Ni beam and their fragments. The difference in the pulse-height resolutions was observed. By comparison with the GEANT4 simulation including the δ-rays emission, the performance of the ionization chamber have been evaluated.

  9. The effect of injection pressure and fuel viscosity on the spray characteristics of biodiesel blends injected into an atmospheric chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghurri, Ainul; Kim, Jae Duk; Kim, Hyung Gon; Jung, Jae Youn; Song, Kyu Keun [Chonbuk National Univ., Deokjin Gu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    An experimental study was conducted to examine the effect of injection pressure and fuel type on the spray tip penetration length and the angle of spray injected into atmospheric chamber. The objective of the present study is to formulate empirical correlations of the spray tip penetration and the spray angle for non evaporative condition. The experiment was performed by a common rail type high pressure injector for the diesel engine at the injection pressure 40{approx}100 MPa and four different fuels (D100, BD25, BD45, and BD65). The results showed that the biodiesel content increased the spray tip penetration and decreased the spray angle. The correlation of spray tip penetration is expressed for each region before and after spray break up time in terms of injection pressure, fuel viscosity and time after start of injection. The correlation is also obtained for spray angle equation terms of injection pressure and fuel viscosity.

  10. Stratification in Ap star atmospheres: Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Charles R.; Castelli, Fiorella

    2017-01-01

    It is now well established that the atmospheres of Ap stars can be chemically stratified (cf. Babel, A\\&A 258, 645, 1992; Ryabchikova et al. A\\&A 384, 545, 2002). The most convincing cases have been made with the profiles of very strong lines, such as Ca II K. Weaker line profiles are less obvious indicators. The collective behavior of sets or groups of lines have also been used. For example, if higher abundances are derived for strong lines in an atmosphere with zero microturbulence, one may assume that the absorbing species has been pushed into the higher photospheres. An example are the medium-strong Mn II lines in HgMn stars. In this paper, we probe this assumption by calculating line strengths with various assumed stratification models, and then determining abundances from those lines using an {\\bf unstratified} model with the same Teff and log(g). We use the model from Castelli, Kurucz \\& and Hubrig (A\\&A, 508, 401, 2009) for HR 6000, whose spectrum shows numerous indications of stratification. A variety of stratification models are considered, for example, ones where the majority of an absorbing species is concentrated above (or below) $log(\\tau_{5000}$ = -2.0. Cloud models are also investigated, where a species is concentrated within a range of photospheric depths. Curves of growth are generated in unstratified atmospheres for lines by holding the abundance fixed, and increasing log(gf). Similar curves are made in stratified models, and the ratios of strong to weak linesare compared with and without stratification. The effects of stratification on ionization are also investigated, as well as on the profiles of strong lines. We find, in agreement with previous work, that severe abundance jumps are sometimes required to account for some of the observed peculiarities.

  11. Simulations of neutron background in a time projection chamber relevant to dark matter searches

    CERN Document Server

    Carson, M J; Daw, E; Hollingworth, R J; Kirkpatrick, J A; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lawson, T B; Lightfoot, P K; McMillan, J E; Morgan, B; Paling, S M; Robinson, M; Spooner, N J C; Tovey, Daniel R; Tziaferi, E

    2005-01-01

    Presented here are results of simulations of neutron background performed for a time projection chamber acting as a particle dark matter detector in an underground laboratory. The investigated background includes neutrons from rock and detector components, generated via spontaneous fission and (alpha, n) reactions, as well as those due to cosmic-ray muons. Neutrons were propagated to the sensitive volume of the detector and the nuclear recoil spectra were calculated. Methods of neutron background suppression were also examined and limitations to the sensitivity of a gaseous dark matter detector are discussed. Results indicate that neutrons should not limit sensitivity to WIMP-nucleon interactions down to a level of (1 - 3) x 10^{-8} pb in a 10 kg detector.

  12. Assessing the environmental performance of stabilised rammed earth walls using a climatic simulation chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Matthew R. [School of the Built Environment, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-15

    The SHU climatic simulation chamber is a novel piece of apparatus that allows testing of full-sized walls with realistic inner and outer wall climatic conditions. Four SRE test walls were successfully constructed and tested over four separate regimes to measure physical properties such as pressure-driven moisture ingress, rate of moisture penetration, and internal/interstitial condensation. The walls far exceeded a series of cyclic pressure-driven rainfall penetration tests based on BS 4315-2. After 5 days of exposure to static pressure-driven moisture ingress there was no evidence of moisture penetration or erosion. The embedded sensor array detected no significant increase in the relative humidity or liquid moisture content inside the test walls, throughout a range of temperature differentials with high levels of humidity, indicating a negligible risk of internal or interstitial condensation. (author)

  13. An improved low-temperature equation of state model for integrated IFE target-chamber response simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heltemes, Thad; Moses, Gregory

    2010-11-01

    A new quotidian equation of state model (QEOS) has been developed to perform integrated inertial fusion energy (IFE) target explosion-chamber response simulations. This QEOS model employs a scaled binding energy model for the ion EOS and utilizes both n- and l-splitting for determining the ionization state and electron EOS. This QEOS model, named BADGER, can perform both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE EOS calculations. BADGER has been integrated with the 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code BUCKY to simulate the chamber response of an exploding indirect-drive deuterium-tritium (DT) target, xenon gas-filled chamber and tungsten first-wall armor. The simulated system is a prototypical configuration for the LIFE reactor study being conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  14. Simulation of Atmospheric Muon and Neutrino Fluxes with CORSIKA

    CERN Document Server

    Wentz, J; Bercuci, A; Heck, D; Oehlschläger, J; Rebel, H; Vulpescu, B

    2003-01-01

    The fluxes of atmospheric muons and neutrinos are calculated by a three dimensional Monte Carlo simulation with the air shower code CORSIKA using the hadronic interaction models DPMJET, VENUS, GHEISHA, and UrQMD. For the simulation of low energy primary particles the original CORSIKA has been extended by a parametrization of the solar modulation and a microscopic calculation of the directional dependence of the geomagnetic cut-off functions. An accurate description for the geography of the Earth has been included by a digital elevation model, tables for the local magnetic field in the atmosphere, and various atmospheric models for different geographic latitudes and annual seasons. CORSIKA is used to calculate atmospheric muon fluxes for different locations and the neutrino fluxes for Kamioka. The results of CORSIKA for the muon fluxes are verified by an extensive comparison with recent measurements. The obtained neutrino fluxes are compared with other calculations and the influence of the hadronic interaction...

  15. Formation of amino acids and nucleotide bases in a Titan atmosphere simulation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörst, S M; Yelle, R V; Buch, A; Carrasco, N; Cernogora, G; Dutuit, O; Quirico, E; Sciamma-O'Brien, E; Smith, M A; Somogyi, A; Szopa, C; Thissen, R; Vuitton, V

    2012-09-01

    The discovery of large (>100 u) molecules in Titan's upper atmosphere has heightened astrobiological interest in this unique satellite. In particular, complex organic aerosols produced in atmospheres containing C, N, O, and H, like that of Titan, could be a source of prebiotic molecules. In this work, aerosols produced in a Titan atmosphere simulation experiment with enhanced CO (N(2)/CH(4)/CO gas mixtures of 96.2%/2.0%/1.8% and 93.2%/5.0%/1.8%) were found to contain 18 molecules with molecular formulae that correspond to biological amino acids and nucleotide bases. Very high-resolution mass spectrometry of isotopically labeled samples confirmed that C(4)H(5)N(3)O, C(4)H(4)N(2)O(2), C(5)H(6)N(2)O(2), C(5)H(5)N(5), and C(6)H(9)N(3)O(2) are produced by chemistry in the simulation chamber. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses of the non-isotopic samples confirmed the presence of cytosine (C(4)H(5)N(3)O), uracil (C(5)H(4)N(2)O(2)), thymine (C(5)H(6)N(2)O(2)), guanine (C(5)H(5)N(5)O), glycine (C(2)H(5)NO(2)), and alanine (C(3)H(7)NO(2)). Adenine (C(5)H(5)N(5)) was detected by GC-MS in isotopically labeled samples. The remaining prebiotic molecules were detected in unlabeled samples only and may have been affected by contamination in the chamber. These results demonstrate that prebiotic molecules can be formed by the high-energy chemistry similar to that which occurs in planetary upper atmospheres and therefore identifies a new source of prebiotic material, potentially increasing the range of planets where life could begin.

  16. Numerical simulation of secondary vortex chamber effect on the cooling capacity enhancement of vortex tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmahmoud, Nader; Azar, Farid Sepehrian; Hassanzadeh, Amir

    2014-09-01

    A vortex tube with additional chamber is investigated by computational fluid mechanics techniques to realize the effects of additional chamber in Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube and to understand optimal length for placing the second chamber in order to have maximum cooling effect. Results show that by increasing the distance between two chambers, both minimum cold and maximum hot temperatures increase and maximum cooling effect occurs at Z/ L = 0.047 (dimensionless distance).

  17. Global simulation of UV atmospheric emissions on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Galindo, Francisco; Ángel López-Valverde, Miguel; Forget, Francois; Montmessin, Franck; Stiepen, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    Mars UV atmospheric emissions such as the CO2+ UV doublet, the CO Cameron bands (both in the dayside) and the NO bands (in the nightside) are systematically observed by SPICAM on board Mars Express and IUVS on board MAVEN. The study of these atmospheric emissions allows the determination of the temperature and density in the Martian upper atmosphere, and helps to constrain the thermospheric circulation. While different models have been developed to study these atmospheric emissions, most of them are one dimensional and make a number of assumptions concerning the underlying neutral atmosphere and ionosphere. Within the H2020 project UPWARDS we aim at including models of these atmospheric emissions into a state-of-the-art Global Climate Model for the Martian atmosphere, the LMD-MGCM. This will allow for a self-consistent description of these atmospheric emissions and for the characterizion of their different variability sources. Comparisons with observations will allow to retrieve information about the temperature and density in the Martian upper atmosphere. Here we will present the first results concerning the simulation of these UV emissions and the first comparisons with observations. Acknowledgemnt: This work is supported by the European Union's Horizon 2020 Programme under grant agreement UPWARDS-633127

  18. Numerical simulations of mixing conditions and aerosol dynamics in the CERN CLOUD chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Voigtländer

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of galactic cosmic rays on aerosols and clouds, the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD project was established. Experiments are carried out at a 26.1 m3 tank at CERN (Switzerland. In the experiments, the effect of ionizing radiation on H2SO4 particle formation and growth is investigated. To evaluate the experimental configuration, the experiment was simulated using a coupled multidimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD – particle model. In the model the coupled fields of gas/vapor species, temperature, flow velocity and particle properties were computed to investigate mixing state and mixing times of the CLOUD tank's contents. Simulation results show that a 1-fan configuration, as used in first experiments, may not be sufficient to ensure a homogeneously mixed chamber. To mix the tank properly, two fans and sufficiently high fan speeds are necessary. The 1/e response times for instantaneous changes of wall temperature and saturation ratio were found to be in the order of few minutes. Particle nucleation and growth was also simulated and particle number size distribution properties of the freshly nucleated particles (particle number, mean size, standard deviation of the assumed log-normal distribution were found to be distributed over the tank's volume similar to the gas species.

  19. A correction to Birks' Law in liquid argon ionization chamber simulations for highly ionizing particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdin, Sergey [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Horbatsch, Marko [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada); Taylor, Wendy, E-mail: taylorw@yorku.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3 (Canada)

    2012-02-01

    We present a study of the performance of Birks' Law in liquid argon ionization chamber simulations as applied to highly ionizing particles, such as particles with multiple electric charges or with magnetic charge. We used Birks' Law to model recombination effects in a GEANT4 simulation of heavy ions in a liquid argon calorimeter. We then compared the simulation to published heavy-ion data to extract a highly ionizing particle correction to Birks' Law.

  20. Helicopter Emergency Medical Service Simulation Training in the Extreme: Simulation-based Training in a Mountain Weather Chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, Urs; Ney, Ludwig; Kreuzer, Oliver; Berner, Armin; Lischke, Volker

    Mountain rescue operations often confront crews with extreme weather conditions. Extremely cold temperatures make standard treatment sometimes difficult or even impossible. It is well-known that most manual tasks, including those involved in mountain rescue operations, are slowed by extremely cold weather. To lessen and improve the decrement in performance of emergency medical treatment caused by cold-induced manual impairment and inadequate medical equipment and supplies, simulation training in a weather chamber, which can produce wind and temperatures up to -22°C, was developed. It provides a promising tool to train the management of complex multidisciplinary settings, thus reducing the occurrence of fatal human and technical errors and increasing the safety for both the patient and the mountain emergency medical service crew. Copyright © 2017 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The System of the Calibration for Visibility Measurement Instrument Under the Atmospheric Aerosol Simulation Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Visibility is one of the most important parameters for meteorological observation and numerical weather prediction (NWP.It is also an important factor in everyday life, mainly for surface and air traffic especially in the Aeronautical Meteorology. The visibility decides the taking off and landing of aircraft. If the airport visibility is lower than requirement for aircraft taking off stipulated by International Civil Aviation Administration, then the aircraft must be parked at the airport. So the accurate measurement of visibility is very important. Nowadays, many devices can be measured the visibility or meteorological optical range (MOR such as Scatterometers, Transmissometers and visibility lidar. But there is not effective way to verify the accuracy of these devices expect the artificial visual method. We have developed a visibility testing system that can be calibration and verification these devices. The system consists of laser transmitter, optical chopper, phase-locking amplifier, the moving optic receiving system, signal detection and data acquisition system, atmospheric aerosol simulation chamber. All of them were placed in the atmosphere aerosol simulation chamber with uniform aerosol concentration. The Continuous wave laser, wavelength 550nm, has been transmitted into the collimation system then the laser beam expanded into 40mm diameter for compressing the laser divergence angle before modulated by optical chopper. The expanding beam transmitting in the atmosphere aerosol cabin received by the optic receiving system moving in the 50m length precision guide with 100mm optical aperture. The data of laser signal has been acquired by phase-locking amplifier every 5 meter range. So the 10 data points can be detected in the 50 meters guide once. The slope of the fitting curve can be obtained by linear fitting these data using the least square method. The laser extinction coefficient was calculated from the slope using the Koschmieder

  2. Simulation studies for a high resolution time projection chamber at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muennich, A.

    2007-03-26

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is planned to be the next large accelerator. The ILC will be able to perform high precision measurements only possible at the clean environment of electron positron collisions. In order to reach this high accuracy, the requirements for the detector performance are challenging. Several detector concepts are currently under study. The understanding of the detector and its performance will be crucial to extract the desired physics results from the data. To optimise the detector design, simulation studies are needed. Simulation packages like GEANT4 allow to model the detector geometry and simulate the energy deposit in the different materials. However, the detector response taking into account the transportation of the produced charge to the readout devices and the effects ofthe readout electronics cannot be described in detail. These processes in the detector will change the measured position of the energy deposit relative to the point of origin. The determination of this detector response is the task of detailed simulation studies, which have to be carried out for each subdetector. A high resolution Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with gas amplification based on micro pattern gas detectors, is one of the options for the main tracking system at the ILC. In the present thesis a detailed simulation tool to study the performance of a TPC was developed. Its goal is to find the optimal settings to reach an excellent momentum and spatial resolution. After an introduction to the present status of particle physics and the ILC project with special focus on the TPC as central tracker, the simulation framework is presented. The basic simulation methods and implemented processes are introduced. Within this stand-alone simulation framework each electron produced by primary ionisation is transferred through the gas volume and amplified using Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). The output format of the simulation is identical to the raw data from a

  3. A computer-based simulator of the atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyaev, Petr A.

    2015-11-01

    Computer software for modeling the atmospheric turbulence is developed on the basis of a time-varying random medium simulation algorithm and a split-step Fourier transform method for solving a wave propagation equation. A judicious choice of the simulator parameters, like the velocity of the evolution and motion of the medium, turbulence spectrum and scales, enables different effects of a random medium on the optical wavefront to be simulated. The implementation of the simulation software is shown to be simple and efficient due to parallel programming functions from the MKL Intel ® Parallel Studio libraries.

  4. Multiscale Simulation of Moist Global Atmospheric Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabowski, Wojciech W. [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Smolarkiewicz, P. K. [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-04-13

    The overarching goal of this award was to include phase changes of the water substance and accompanying latent heating and precipitation processes into the all-scale nonhydrostatic atmospheric dynamics EUlerian/LAGrangian (EULAG) model. The model includes fluid flow solver that is based on either an unabbreviated set of the governing equations (i.e., compressible dynamics) or a simplified set of equations without sound waves (i.e., sound-proof, either anelastic or pseudo-incompressible). The latter set has been used in small-scale dynamics for decades, but its application to the all-scale dynamics (from small-scale to planetary) has never been studied in practical implementations. The highlight of the project is the development of the moist implicit compressible model that can be run by applying time steps, as long as the anelastic model is limited only by the computational stability of the fluid flow and not by the speed of sound waves that limit the stability of explicit compressible models. Applying various versions of the EULAG model within the same numerical framework allows for an unprecedented comparison of solutions obtained with various sets of the governing equations and straightforward evaluation of the impact of various physical parameterizations on the model solutions. The main outcomes of this study are reported in three papers, two published and one currently under review. These papers include comparisons between model solutions for idealized moist problems across the range of scales from small to planetary. These tests include: moist thermals rising in the stable-stratified environment (following Grabowski and Clark, J. Atmos. Sci. 1991) and in the moist-neutral environment (after Bryan and Fritsch, Mon. Wea. Rev. 2002), moist flows over a mesoscale topography (as in Grabowski and Smolarkiewicz, Mon. Wea. Rev. 2002), deep convection in a sheared environment (following Weisman and Klemp, Mon. Wea. Rev. 1982), moist extension of the baroclinic wave on

  5. Simulation of ionization-front-forming process at injection of relativistic electron beam with a gas chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolya, S.N.; Zhidkov, E.P.; Rubin, S.B.; Semerdzhiev, Kh.I.

    1982-01-01

    The methodical work on creation of computer program for numerical study of the processes of forming and motion of a virtual cathode at the injection of relativistic electron beam into a short cylindrical chamber, filled with gas, has been carried out. The obtained plots of the distributions of fields, potential and density appearing out of ion and electron gas of the beam itself are presented. The dependence of cross-section ionization on the electron velocity has been taken into account at the calculation; the resonance contribution into summarized cross-section of ionization was simulated. It is shown that the injection into the chamber without gas, some oscillations of the virtual cathode are observed. At the presence of the final front of the beam, the fields level at the initial stage is smaller than for the beam with a sharp front. However, in some time the field amplitudes are compared. The motion of simulated probe ions in the chamber is analyzed.

  6. Numerical simulations of mixing conditions and aerosol dynamics in the CERN CLOUD chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Voigtländer, J; Rondo, L; Kürten, A; Stratmann, F

    2012-01-01

    To study the effect of galactic cosmic rays on aerosols and clouds, the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) project was established. Experiments are carried out at a 26.1 m3 tank at CERN (Switzerland). In the experiments, the effect of ionizing radiation on H2SO4 particle formation and growth is investigated. To evaluate the experimental configuration, the experiment was simulated using a coupled multidimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) – particle model. In the model the coupled fields of gas/vapor species, temperature, flow velocity and particle properties were computed to investigate mixing state and mixing times of the CLOUD tank's contents. Simulation results show that a 1-fan configuration, as used in first experiments, may not be sufficient to ensure a homogeneously mixed chamber. To mix the tank properly, two fans and sufficiently high fan speeds are necessary. The 1/e response times for instantaneous changes of wall temperature and saturation ratio were found to be in the order of fe...

  7. Static opaque chamber-based technique for determination of net exchange of CO2 between terrestrial ecosystem and atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Jianwen; HUANG Yao; ZHENG Xunhua; WANG Yuesi; CHEN Yuquan

    2004-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon cycling is one of the hotspots in global change issues. In this paper, we presented the rationale for determination of net exchange of CO2 between terrestrial and the atmosphere (NEE) and the methods for measuring several relevant components. Three key processes for determination of NEE were addressed, including the separation of shoot autotrophic respiration from total CO2 emissions of the ecosystem, the partition of root respiration from soil CO2 efflux, and the quantification of rhizodeposition C from NPP. With an understanding of the processes involved in the CO2 exchange between terrestrial and the atmosphere, we estimated NEE of rice ecosystem in Nanjing based on field measurements of CO2 emissions and several relevant biotic components as well as abiotic factors. The field measurements of CO2 emissions were made over the rice-growing seasons in 2001 and 2002 with the static opaque chamber method. Calculations indicated that the seasonal pattern of NEE is comparable for two seasons. Either net carbon emission or fractional carbon fixation occurred during 3 weeks after rice transplanting and thereafter net carbon fixation appeared with an increasing trend as rice growing. Higher net carbon fixation occurred in the rice developmental period from elongating to heading. A decline trend in the fixation was documented after rice heading. The mean daily NEE was -6.06 gC·m-2 in 2001 season and -7.95 gC·m-2 in 2002 season, respectively. These values were comparable to the results obtained by Campbell et al. Who made field measurements with the Bowen ratio-energy balance technique in irrigated rice, Texas USA. Moreover, the mean daily NEE in this study was also comparable to the values obtained from a Japanese rice paddy with the eddy covariance method under the similar water regime, either drainage course or waterlogged. It is concluded that NEE determined by the static opaque chamber method is comparable and in agreement with those measured by

  8. The stellar atmosphere simulation code Bifrost. Code description and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiksen, B. V.; Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V. H.; Hayek, W.; Leenaarts, J.; Martínez-Sykora, J.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Numerical simulations of stellar convection and photospheres have been developed to the point where detailed shapes of observed spectral lines can be explained. Stellar atmospheres are very complex, and very different physical regimes are present in the convection zone, photosphere, chromosphere, transition region and corona. To understand the details of the atmosphere it is necessary to simulate the whole atmosphere since the different layers interact strongly. These physical regimes are very diverse and it takes a highly efficient massively parallel numerical code to solve the associated equations. Aims: The design, implementation and validation of the massively parallel numerical code Bifrost for simulating stellar atmospheres from the convection zone to the corona. Methods: The code is subjected to a number of validation tests, among them the Sod shock tube test, the Orzag-Tang colliding shock test, boundary condition tests and tests of how the code treats magnetic field advection, chromospheric radiation, radiative transfer in an isothermal scattering atmosphere, hydrogen ionization and thermal conduction. Results.Bifrost completes the tests with good results and shows near linear efficiency scaling to thousands of computing cores.

  9. Internal atmospheric noise characteristics in twentieth century coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colfescu, Ioana; Schneider, Edwin K.

    2017-09-01

    The statistical characteristics of the atmospheric internal variability (hereafter internal atmospheric noise) for surface pressure (PS) in twentieth century simulations of a coupled general circulation model are documented. The atmospheric noise is determined from daily post-industrial (1871-1998) Community Climate System Model 3 simulations by removing the SST and externally forced responses from the total fields. The forced responses are found from atmosphere-only simulations forced by the SST and external forcing of the coupled runs. However, we do not address the influence of the SST variability on the synoptic scale high frequency weather noise.The spatial patterns of the main seasonal modes of atmospheric noise variability are found for boreal winter and summer from empirical orthogonal function analyses performed globally and for various regions, including the North Atlantic, the North Pacific, and the equatorial Pacific. The temporal characteristics of the modes are illustrated by power spectra and probability density functions (PDF) of the principal components (PC). Our findings show that, for two different realizations of noise, the variability is dominated by large scale spatial structures of the atmospheric noise that resemble observed patterns, and that their relative amplitudes in the CGCM and AGCM simulations are very similar. The regional expression of the dominant global mode, a seasonally dependent AO-like or AAO-like pattern is also found in the regional analyses, with similar time dependence. The PCs in the CGCM and the corresponding SST forced AGCM simulations are uncorrelated, but the spectra and PDFs of the CGCM and AGCM PCs are similar.The temporal structures of the noise PCs are white at timescales larger than few months, so that these modes can be thought of as stochastic forcings (in time) for the climate system. The PDFs of the noise PCs are not statistically distinguishable from Gaussian distributions with the same standard deviation

  10. Early attempts at atmospheric simulations for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Rulten, Cameron B

    2014-01-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be the world's first observatory for detecting gamma-rays from astrophysical phenomena and is now in its prototyping phase with construction expected to begin in 2015/16. In this work we present the results from early attempts at detailed simulation studies performed to assess the need for atmospheric monitoring. This will include discussion of some lidar analysis methods with a view to determining a range resolved atmospheric transmission profile. We find that under increased aerosol density levels, simulated gamma-ray astronomy data is systematically shifted leading to softer spectra. With lidar data we show that it is possible to fit atmospheric transmission models needed for generating lookup tables, which are used to infer the energy of a gamma-ray event, thus making it possible to correct affected data that would otherwise be considered unusable.

  11. The stellar atmosphere simulation code Bifrost. Code description and validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gudiksen, B.V.; Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V.H.; Hayek, W.; Leenaarts, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837946; Martínez-Sykora, J.

    2011-01-01

    Context. Numerical simulations of stellar convection and photospheres have been developed to the point where detailed shapes of observed spectral lines can be explained. Stellar atmospheres are very complex, and very different physical regimes are present in the convection zone, photosphere,

  12. An Atmospheric Science Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meemong; Weidner, Richard; Qu, Zheng; Bowman, Kevin; Eldering, Annmarie

    2010-01-01

    An atmospheric sounding mission starts with a wide range of concept designs involving measurement technologies, observing platforms, and observation scenarios. Observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) is a technical approach to evaluate the relative merits of mission and instrument concepts. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the OSSE team has developed an OSSE environment that allows atmospheric scientists to systematically explore a wide range of mission and instrument concepts and formulate a science traceability matrix with a quantitative science impact analysis. The OSSE environment virtually creates a multi-platform atmospheric sounding testbed (MAST) by integrating atmospheric phenomena models, forward modeling methods, and inverse modeling methods. The MAST performs OSSEs in four loosely coupled processes, observation scenario exploration, measurement quality exploration, measurement quality evaluation, and science impact analysis.

  13. A simulation study of air flow in different types of combustion chambers for a single cylinder diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaramoorthy Premnath

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research work is to improve the in-cylinder air flow for facilitate better mixing and ultimately achieve complete combustion. From the literature it is revealed that the bowl shape of the piston has influence on creating effective swirl, tumble, and cross tumble motions during intake and initial stages of compression stroke. Different types of combustion chambers have been designed by keeping the same bowl volume to maintain the constant compression ratio and to ensure that the improvement is only due to geometric parameters such as bulge diameter, lip distance, and bowl to bore diameter ratio. Simulation work is carried out using ANSYS Fluent 14.5 computational fluid dynamics tool. The influence of these parameters on in-cylinder flow was also studied in this paper. The values of swirl, tumble, and cross tumble were calculated. Further to ensure the results of theoretical simulation a modified re-entrant combustion chamber was fabricated and the experimental work has been carried out in Kirloskar TAF 1 single cylinder, 4-stroke, compression ignition engine for diesel and jatropha methyl ester blend 20%. The experimental results were compared with the conventional chamber. It is found that the modified re-entrant chamber improves the brake thermal efficiency and reduced HC, CO, and smoke emissions of diesel and jatropha methyl ester blend 20% for all the tested conditions when compared to the conventional chamber.

  14. Simulation of atmospheric turbulence for optical systems with extended sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Majid; Hranilovic, Steve

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the method of random wave vectors for simulation of atmospheric turbulence is extended to 2D×2D space to provide spatial degrees of freedom at both input and output planes. The modified technique can thus simultaneously simulate the turbulence-induced log-amplitude and phase distortions for optical systems with extended sources either implemented as a single large aperture or multiple apertures. The reliability of our simulation technique is validated in different conditions and its application is briefly investigated in a multibeam free-space optical communication scenario.

  15. Large-eddy simulation of atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    layer transport processes. Velocity and turbulence profiles are in good agreement with measurements. Simulation of the flow over the Askervein hill is also performed. Speed-up and turbulence intensities show good agreement with measurements, except 400m downstream of the hill summit where speed......The present report describes the development and validation of a turbulence model designed for atmospheric flows based on the concept of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The background for the work is the high Reynolds number k - #epsilon# model, which has been implemented on a finite-volume code...... turbulence model is able to handle both engineering and atmospheric flows and can be run in both RANS or LES mode. For LES simulations a time-dependent wind field that accurately represents the turbulent structures of a wind environment must be prescribed at the computational inlet. A method is implemented...

  16. Remote sensing of atmospheric duct parameters using simulated annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Xiao-Feng; Huang Si-Xun; Xiang Jie; Shi Wei-Lai

    2011-01-01

    Simulated annealing is one of the robust optimization schemes. Simulated annealing mimics the annealing process of the slow cooling of a heated metal to reach a stable minimum energy state. In this paper,we adopt simulated annealing to study the problem of the remote sensing of atmospheric duct parameters for two different geometries of propagation measurement. One is from a single emitter to an array of radio receivers (vertical measurements),and the other is from the radar clutter returns (horizontal measurements). Basic principles of simulated annealing and its applications to refractivity estimation are introduced. The performance of this method is validated using numerical experiments and field measurements collected at the East China Sea. The retrieved results demonstrate the feasibility of simulated annealing for near real-time atmospheric refractivity estimation. For comparison,the retrievals of the genetic algorithm are also presented. The comparisons indicate that the convergence speed of simulated annealing is faster than that of the genetic algorithm,while the anti-noise ability of the genetic algorithm is better than that of simulated annealing.

  17. GCM simulations of cold dry Snowball Earth atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, A.; Held, I.; Marotzke, J.

    2009-12-01

    We use the full-physics atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 to investigate cold and virtually dry Snowball Earth atmospheres. These result from specifying sea ice as the surface boundary condition everywhere, corresponding to a frozen aquaplanet, while keeping total solar irradiance at its present-day value of 1365 Wm-2 and setting atmospheric carbon dioxide to 300 ppmv. Here, we present four simulations corresponding to the four possible combinations of enabled or disabled diurnal and seasonal cycles. The aim of this study is twofold. First, we focus on the zonal-mean circulation of Snowball Earth atmospheres, which, due to missing moisture, might constitute an ideal though yet unexplored testbed for theories of atmospheric dynamics. Second, we investigate tropical surface temperatures with an emphasis on the impact of the diurnal and seasonal cycles. This will indicate whether the presence of the diurnal or seasonal cycle would facilitate or anticipate the escape from Snowball Earth conditions when total solar irradiance or atmospheric CO2 levels were increased. The dynamics of the tropical circulation in Snowball Earth atmospheres differs substantially from that in the modern atmosphere. The analysis of the mean zonal momentum budget reveals that the mean flow meridional advection of absolute vorticity is primarily balanced by vertical diffusion of zonal momentum. The contribution of eddies is found to be even smaller than the contribution of mean flow vertical advection of zonal momentum, the latter being usually neglected in theories for the Hadley circulation, at least in its upper tropospheric branch. Suppressing vertical diffusion of horizontal momentum above 850 hPa leads to a stronger Hadley circulation. This behaviour cannot be understood from axisymmetric models of the atmosphere, nor idealized atmospheric general circulation models, which both predict a weakening of the Hadley circulation when the vertical viscosity is decreased globally. We

  18. Large eddy simulation of city micro-atmospheric environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Air quality is one of the important conditions for a better residence life in the populated urban area and it is closed related to the micro-atmospheric environment. Atmospheric environment is controlled by air motion with multi-scales in the city,while air flows in the residence area are of micro-scale atmospheric motion. This paper introduces a modern numerical simulation method,i.e. large eddy simulation(LES) ,for studying micro-atmospheric flows in the city residence area. For the complex flow features in the residence area,the proper application of LES is studied and various numerical methods are compared in order to investigate their effects on the prediction accuracy of micro-atmospheric flows,for instance,roughness elements and immersed boundary method for complex terrain,different subgrid models and so on. The wind field(including turbulence properties) and contaminant dispersion are computed by the proposed method for a model and a realistic residence area,and the numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  19. Simulation of atmospherics in KM3NeT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heid, Thomas [ECAP, FAU Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany); Collaboration: ANTARES-KM3NeT-Erlangen-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    With the installation of the first KM3NeT line, a new facility for neutrino astronomy started operation at the end of 2015. KM3NeT detectors are built of several thousands of digital optical modules(DOM) deployed in a three-dimensional grid. The DOMs receive light from particles passing the detector or created in neutrino interactions in the vicinity of the detector. A primary physics goal is to detect point-like neutrino sources. An important step in understanding the signal of astrophysical sources, is to understand the background to the measurement originating in the atmosphere. It consists of muons and neutrinos. Dedicated simulations optimized for KM3NeT have been performed. This contribution describes the simulation chain, starting with an atmospheric air shower simulation and propagating particles from the sea surface to the detector at a depth of 2.5 to 3.5 km. The nature of the background expected to most strongly affect KM3NeT's sensitivity to astrophysical neutrino fluxes is presented, as are methods for dealing with it. Besides their role as background, studying atmospheric particles can improve the understanding of particle creation in the atmosphere, especially the charm production mechanism.

  20. Airflow and thermal simulation in a controlled test chamber with different heating configurations using CFD modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candanedo, L.; Karava, P.; Bessoudo, M.; Tzempelikos, A.; Athienitis, A. [Concordia Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering; Handfield, L. [Inst. de Recherche d' Hydro-Quebec, Shawnigan, PQ (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Efficient windows and facades can reduce perimeter heating and energy consumption costs in buildings. In this study, 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were developed to model airflow and heat transfer in a controlled test chamber at a Hydro-Quebec laboratory. The aim of the study was to investigate thermofluidic phenomena in the vicinity of windows and facades for rooms heated with baseboard heaters and rooms heated with heated windows. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique was employed to study the airflow in a plane close to a window that was heated with either embedded heaters or indirectly with a baseboard heater. The PIV system was synchronized with a data acquisition system which collected temperature data from the 4 walls, ceiling, floor, and each of the 5 windows. Time-averaged values were used for boundaries. Navier-Stokes equations were used to calculate laminar flow and heat transfer. An indoor zero-equation turbulence model was used to characterize indoor airflow. The Rayleigh number was used to categorize the nature of the buoyancy-induced flow. The simulations showed good agreement with experimental data. The largest differences in air speed measurements were found in the cavity formed by the blind and the window glazing. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs.

  1. Theoretical Calculation and Monte Carlo Simulation of Photon Energy Response of Large Size Cavity Ionization Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Ming-zhe; WEI; Ke-xin; HOU; Jin-bing; WANG; Hong-yu; GAO; Fei; NI; Ning

    2015-01-01

    The Bragg-Gray cavity theory(B-G theory)provided a theoretical basis for the analytical calculation of the energy response for ionization chamber.It was widely used in the theoretical calculation of the ionization chamber detector and the tissue equivalent detector.However,the B-G

  2. Simulation of Wind turbines in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    and higher moments. As an example, figure (1) shows a 2D snapshot of stream-wise velocity contours (in SI units) in an infinite row of wind turbines simulated in stably stratified flow. Simulations are performed usind the in-house CFD code Ellipsys3D, which is a multi-block general purpose, parallelized...... of the specific turbine, however the method reduces the computational costs significantly while giving accurate prediction of wakes and statistical quantities behind the turbine. The simulations start with a neutral prescribed boundary layer that follows a logarithmic profile with the velocity of 8 m/s at the hub......Large eddy simulation of an arbitrary wind farm is studied in the neutral and thermally stratified atmospheric boundary Layer. Large eddy simulations of industrial flows usually requires full resolution of the flow near the wall and this is believed to be one of the main deficiencies of LES because...

  3. Detection of Amines and Ammonia with an Ambient Pressure Mass Spectrometer using a Corona Discharge Ion Source, in an Urban Atmosphere and in a Teflon Film Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M.; Hanson, D. R.; Grieves, C.; Ortega, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    Amines and ammonia are an important group of molecules that can greatly affect atmospheric particle formation that can go on to impact cloud formation and their scattering of thermal and solar radiation, and as a result human health and ecosystems. In this study, an Ambient Pressure Mass Spectrometer (AmPMS) that is selective and sensitive to molecules with a high proton affinity, such as amines, was coupled with a newly built corona discharge ion source. AmPMS was used to monitor many different nitrogenous compound that are found in an urban atmosphere (July 2015, Minneapolis), down to the single digit pmol/mol level. Simultaneous to this, a proton transfer mass spectrometer also sampled the atmosphere through an inlet within 20 m of the AmPMS inlet. In another set of studies, a similar AmPMS was attached to a large Teflon film chamber at the Atmospheric Chemistry Division at NCAR (August 2015, Boulder). Exploratory studies are planned on the sticking of amines to the chamber walls as well as oxidizing the amine and monitoring products. Depending on the success of these studies, results will be presented on the reversability of amine partitioning and mass balance for these species in the chamber.

  4. DBD Plasma Actuators for Flow Control in Air Vehicles and Jet Engines - Simulation of Flight Conditions in Test Chambers by Density Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashpis, David E.; Thurman, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma actuators for active flow control in aircraft and jet engines need to be tested in the laboratory to characterize their performance at flight operating conditions. DBD plasma actuators generate a wall-jet electronically by creating weakly ionized plasma, therefore their performance is affected by gas discharge properties, which, in turn, depend on the pressure and temperature at the actuator placement location. Characterization of actuators is initially performed in a laboratory chamber without external flow. The pressure and temperature at the actuator flight operation conditions need to be simultaneously set in the chamber. A simplified approach is desired. It is assumed that the plasma discharge depends only on the gas density, while other temperature effects are assumed to be negligible. Therefore, tests can be performed at room temperature with chamber pressure set to yield the same density as in operating flight conditions. The needed chamber pressures are shown for altitude flight of an air vehicle and for jet engines at sea-level takeoff and altitude cruise conditions. Atmospheric flight conditions are calculated from standard atmosphere with and without shock waves. The engine data was obtained from four generic engine models; 300-, 150-, and 50-passenger (PAX) aircraft engines, and a military jet-fighter engine. The static and total pressure, temperature, and density distributions along the engine were calculated for sea-level takeoff and for altitude cruise conditions. The corresponding chamber pressures needed to test the actuators were calculated. The results show that, to simulate engine component flows at in-flight conditions, plasma actuator should be tested over a wide range of pressures. For the four model engines the range is from 12.4 to 0.03 atm, depending on the placement of the actuator in the engine. For example, if a DBD plasma actuator is to be placed at the compressor exit of a 300 PAX engine, it

  5. Numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection in the lower solar atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yan Xu; Cheng Fang; Ming-De Ding; Dan-Hui Gao

    2011-01-01

    Observations indicate that Ellerman bombs (EBs) and chromospheric microflares both occur in the lower solar atmosphere, and share many common features,such as temperature enhancements, accompanying jet-like mass motions, short lifetime, and so on. These strongly suggest that EBs and chromospheric microflares could both probably be induced by magnetic reconnection in the lower solar atmosphere.With gravity, ionization and radiation considered, we perform two-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection in the lower solar atmosphere. The influence of different parameters, such as intensity of the magnetic field and anomalous resistivity, on the results are investigated. Our result demonstrates that the temperature increases are mainly due to the joule dissipation caused by magnetic reconnection.The spectral profiles of EBs and chromospheric microflares are calculated with the non-LTE radiative transfer theory and compared with observations. It is found that the typical features of the two phenomena can be qualitatively reproduced.

  6. Flight Measurements of Base Pressure on Bodies of Revolution with and Without Simulated Rocket Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Robert F

    1955-01-01

    Base pressures were measured on fin-stabilized bodies of revolution with and without rocket chambers and with and without a converging afterbody. At Mach numbers between 0.7 and 1.2, the results show that the presence of a "cold" rocket chamber increased the pressure (less suction) over the center portion of the bases. The effects of rocket chambers on pressures near the edge of the bases were not as consistent throughout the Mach number range nor as appreciable at most speeds as were the effects of pressures measured on the center line.

  7. Temperature field simulation of gob influenced by atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王刚; 罗海珠; 梁运涛; 王继仁

    2015-01-01

    The current temperature field model of mine gob does not take the boundary conditions of the atmospheric pressure into account, while the actual atmospheric pressure is influenced by weather, so as to produce differences between ventilation negative pressure of the working face and the negative pressure of gas drainage in gob, thus interfering the calculated results of gob temperature field. According to the characteristics of the actual air flow and temperature change in gob, a two-dimensional temperature field model of the gob was built, and the relational model between the air pressure of intake and outlet of the gob and the atmospheric pressure was established, which was introduced into the boundary conditions of temperature field to conduct calculation. By means of analysis on the simulation example, and comparison with the traditional model, the results indicate that atmospheric pressure change had notable impact on the distribution of gob temperature field. The laboratory test system of gob temperature field was constructed, and the relative error between simulated and measured value was no greater than 9.6%, which verified the effectiveness of the proposed model. This work offers theoretical basis for accurate calculation of temperature and prediction of ignition source in mine gob, and has important implications on preventing spontaneous combustion of coal.

  8. Optical intensity scintillation in the simulated atmospherical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Lukas; Latal, Jan; Vanderka, Ales; Vitasek, Jan; Bojko, Marian; Bednarek, Lukas; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    There are several parameters of the atmospheric environment which have an effect on the optical wireless connection. Effects like fog, snow or rain are ones of the effects which appears tendentiously and which are bound by season, geographic location, etc. One of the effects that appear with various intensity for the whole time is airflow. The airflow changes the local refractive index of the air and areas with lower or higher refractive index form. The light going through these areas refracts and due to the optical intensity scintillates on the detector of the receiver. The airflow forms on the basis of two effects in the atmosphere. The first is wind cut and flowing over barriers. The other is thermal flow when warm air rises to the higher layers of the atmosphere. The heart of this article is creation such an environment that will form airflow and the refractive index will scintillate. For the experiment, we used special laboratory box with high-speed ventilators and heating units to simulate atmospheric turbulence. We monitor the impact of ventilator arrangement and air temperature on the scintillation of the gas laser with wavelength 633 nm/15 mW. In the experiment, there is watched the difference in behavior between real measurement and flow simulation with the same peripheral conditions of the airflow in the area of 500 x 500 cm.

  9. Simulating Meteor Shower Observations In The Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, J. P.; Christou, A. A.

    2005-08-01

    It is known that fast meteoroids entering the martian atmosphere give rise to bright, detectable meteors (Adolfsson et al, Icarus 119, 144, 1996). Although single meteors have already been detected at Mars (Selsis et al., Nature 435, 581, 2005), the characterisation of the martian meteor year will require a large number of detections. Experience at the Earth suggests that data storage and bandwidth resources to conduct such surveys will be substantial, and may be prohibitive. In an attempt to quantify the problem in detail, we have simulated meteor shower detection in the martian and terrestrial atmospheres. For a given shower, we assume a meteoroid stream flux, size distribution and velocity based on current knowledge of Earth streams as well as the proximity of certain comets' orbits to that of Mars. A numerical code is used to simulate meteoroid ablation in a model martian and terrestrial atmosphere. Finally, using the same baseline detector characteristics (limiting magnitude, sky coverage) we generate detection statistics for the two planets. We will present results for different types of showers, including strong annual activity and episodic outbursts from Halley-type and Jupiter family comets. We will show how detection efficiency at Mars compares to the Earth for these showers and discuss optimum strategies for monitoring the martian atmosphere for meteor activity. Astronomy research at Armagh Observatory is funded by the Northern Ireland Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL).

  10. Simulation of Wind turbines in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    Large eddy simulation of an arbitrary wind farm is studied in the neutral and thermally stratified atmospheric boundary Layer. Large eddy simulations of industrial flows usually requires full resolution of the flow near the wall and this is believed to be one of the main deficiencies of LES because...... layer. In the current study, another approach has been implemented to simulate the flow in a fully developed wind farm boundary layer. The approach is based on Immersed Boundary Method and involves implementation of an arbitrary prescribed initial boundary layer. An initial boundary layer is enforced...... height and the flow development is seen based on the temperature variations and wind turbine wake generations and interactions of wakes occurs as soon as the wakes of the upwind turbine reach the downwind turbines. References: [1] U. Piomelli, Wall-layer models for large-eddy simulations, Progress...

  11. Simulation of all-scale atmospheric dynamics on unstructured meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.; Szmelter, Joanna; Xiao, Feng

    2016-10-01

    The advance of massively parallel computing in the nineteen nineties and beyond encouraged finer grid intervals in numerical weather-prediction models. This has improved resolution of weather systems and enhanced the accuracy of forecasts, while setting the trend for development of unified all-scale atmospheric models. This paper first outlines the historical background to a wide range of numerical methods advanced in the process. Next, the trend is illustrated with a technical review of a versatile nonoscillatory forward-in-time finite-volume (NFTFV) approach, proven effective in simulations of atmospheric flows from small-scale dynamics to global circulations and climate. The outlined approach exploits the synergy of two specific ingredients: the MPDATA methods for the simulation of fluid flows based on the sign-preserving properties of upstream differencing; and the flexible finite-volume median-dual unstructured-mesh discretisation of the spatial differential operators comprising PDEs of atmospheric dynamics. The paper consolidates the concepts leading to a family of generalised nonhydrostatic NFTFV flow solvers that include soundproof PDEs of incompressible Boussinesq, anelastic and pseudo-incompressible systems, common in large-eddy simulation of small- and meso-scale dynamics, as well as all-scale compressible Euler equations. Such a framework naturally extends predictive skills of large-eddy simulation to the global atmosphere, providing a bottom-up alternative to the reverse approach pursued in the weather-prediction models. Theoretical considerations are substantiated by calculations attesting to the versatility and efficacy of the NFTFV approach. Some prospective developments are also discussed.

  12. Large eddy simulation of the atmosphere on various scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, M J P; Brown, A R

    2009-07-28

    Numerical simulations of the atmosphere are routinely carried out on various scales for purposes ranging from weather forecasts for local areas a few hours ahead to forecasts of climate change over periods of hundreds of years. Almost without exception, these forecasts are made with space/time-averaged versions of the governing Navier-Stokes equations and laws of thermodynamics, together with additional terms representing internal and boundary forcing. The calculations are a form of large eddy modelling, because the subgrid-scale processes have to be modelled. In the global atmospheric models used for long-term predictions, the primary method is implicit large eddy modelling, using discretization to perform the averaging, supplemented by specialized subgrid models, where there is organized small-scale activity, such as in the lower boundary layer and near active convection. Smaller scale models used for local or short-range forecasts can use a much smaller averaging scale. This allows some of the specialized subgrid models to be dropped in favour of direct simulations. In research mode, the same models can be run as a conventional large eddy simulation only a few orders of magnitude away from a direct simulation. These simulations can then be used in the development of the subgrid models for coarser resolution models.

  13. Computer simulations of the atmospheric composition climate of Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadzhev, G.; Ganev, K.; Syrkov, D.; Prodanova, M.; Georgieva, I.; Georgiev, G.

    2015-07-01

    Some extensive numerical simulations of the atmospheric composition fields in Bulgaria have been recently performed. The US EPA Model-3 system was chosen as a modelling tool. As the NCEP Global Analysis Data with 1 degree resolution was used as meteorological background, the MM5 and CMAQ nesting capabilities were applied for downscaling the simulations to a 3 km resolution over Bulgaria. The TNO emission inventory was used as emission input. Special pre-processing procedures are created for introducing temporal profiles and speciation of the emissions. The biogenic emissions of VOC are estimated by the model SMOKE. The simulations were carried out for years 2000-2007. The numerical experiments have been carried out for different emission scenarios, which makes it possible the contribution of emissions from different source categories to be evaluated. The Models-3 “Integrated Process Rate Analysis” option is applied to discriminate the role of different dynamic and chemical processes for the air pollution formation. The obtained ensemble of numerical simulation results is extensive enough to allow statistical treatment – calculating not only the mean concentrations and different source categories contribution mean fields, but also standard deviations, skewness, etc. with their dominant temporal modes (seasonal and/or diurnal variations). Thus some basic facts about the atmospheric composition climate of Bulgaria can be retrieved from the simulation ensemble. (Author)

  14. Computer simulations of the atmospheric composition climate of Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadzhev, G.; Ganev, K.; Syrakov, D.; Prodanova, M.; Georgieva, I.; Georgiev, G.

    2015-07-01

    Some extensive numerical simulations of the atmospheric composition fields in Bulgaria have been recently performed. The US EPA Model-3 system was chosen as a modelling tool. As the NCEP Global Analysis Data with 1 degree resolution was used as meteorological background, the MM5 and CMAQ nesting capabilities were applied for downscaling the simulations to a 3 km resolution over Bulgaria. The TNO emission inventory was used as emission input. Special pre-processing procedures are created for introducing temporal profiles and speciation of the emissions. The biogenic emissions of VOC are estimated by the model SMOKE. The simulations were carried out for years 2000-2007. The numerical experiments have been carried out for different emission scenarios, which makes it possible the contribution of emissions from different source categories to be evaluated. The Models-3 Integrated Process Rate Analysis option is applied to discriminate the role of different dynamic and chemical processes for the air pollution formation. The obtained ensemble of numerical simulation results is extensive enough to allow statistical treatment calculating not only the mean concentrations and different source categories contribution mean fields, but also standard deviations, skewness, etc. with their dominant temporal modes (seasonal and/or diurnal variations). Thus some basic facts about the atmospheric composition climate of Bulgaria can be retrieved from the simulation ensemble. (Author)

  15. Large-eddy simulation of atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechmann, A.

    2006-11-15

    The present report describes the development and validation of a turbulence model designed for atmospheric flows based on the concept of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The background for the work is the high Reynolds number k - epsilon model, which has been implemented on a finite-volume code of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS). The k - epsilon model is traditionally used for RANS computations, but is here developed to also enable LES. LES is able to provide detailed descriptions of a wide range of engineering flows at low Reynolds numbers. For atmospheric flows, however, the high Reynolds numbers and the rough surface of the earth provide difficulties normally not compatible with LES. Since these issues are most severe near the surface they are addressed by handling the near surface region with RANS and only use LES above this region. Using this method, the developed turbulence model is able to handle both engineering and atmospheric flows and can be run in both RANS or LES mode. For LES simulations a time-dependent wind field that accurately represents the turbulent structures of a wind environment must be prescribed at the computational inlet. A method is implemented where the turbulent wind field from a separate LES simulation can be used as inflow. To avoid numerical dissipation of turbulence special care is paid to the numerical method, e.g. the turbulence model is calibrated with the specific numerical scheme used. This is done by simulating decaying isotropic and homogeneous turbulence. Three atmospheric test cases are investigated in order to validate the behavior of the presented turbulence model. Simulation of the neutral atmospheric boundary layer, illustrates the turbulence model ability to generate and maintain the turbulent structures responsible for boundary layer transport processes. Velocity and turbulence profiles are in good agreement with measurements. Simulation of the flow over the Askervein hill is also

  16. Simulation of atmospheric temperature effects on cosmic ray muon flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tognini, Stefano Castro; Gomes, Ricardo Avelino [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, CP 131, 74001-970, Goiânia, GO (Brazil)

    2015-05-15

    The collision between a cosmic ray and an atmosphere nucleus produces a set of secondary particles, which will decay or interact with other atmosphere elements. This set of events produced a primary particle is known as an extensive air shower (EAS) and is composed by a muonic, a hadronic and an electromagnetic component. The muonic flux, produced mainly by pions and kaons decays, has a dependency with the atmosphere’s effective temperature: an increase in the effective temperature results in a lower density profile, which decreases the probability of pions and kaons to interact with the atmosphere and, consequently, resulting in a major number of meson decays. Such correlation between the muon flux and the atmosphere’s effective temperature was measured by a set of experiments, such as AMANDA, Borexino, MACRO and MINOS. This phenomena can be investigated by simulating the final muon flux produced by two different parameterizations of the isothermal atmospheric model in CORSIKA, where each parameterization is described by a depth function which can be related to the muon flux in the same way that the muon flux is related to the temperature. This research checks the agreement among different high energy hadronic interactions models and the physical expected behavior of the atmosphere temperature effect by analyzing a set of variables, such as the height of the primary interaction and the difference in the muon flux.

  17. MLAM Simulation of Martian Atmosphere around Curiosity Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlaskin, Evgeny; Harri, Ari-Matti; Kauhanen, Janne; Määttänen, Anni; Paton, Mark; Savijärvi, Hannu; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero

    2013-04-01

    The NASA Mars Science Laboratory 'Curiosity' landed successfully in the Martian Gale crater close to the equator on 6 Aug 2012. As part of the environment monitoring instrument package REMS [1] the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) provided the pressure and humidity sensors. A similar pressure sensor was successfully flown earlier on the Phoenix lander mission in 2008 and on the Cassini / Huygens probe to Titan in 2005. The behaviour of the Martian atmosphere inside the Gale crater is dominated by its location close to the equator, the steep outer rims and the slopes of the central mountain. These complex topographical features make it ideally suited for a mesoscale atmospheric model like the Mars Limited Area Model (MLAM), developed jointly by the University of Helsinki (UH) and FMI to study mesoscale phenomena in the Martian Atmosphere [2]. MLAM is based on the hydro-static dynamical core of the HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM), an operational weather prediction model-analysis system used by several European countries. Using the simulation tools already published observational data from the first three months of Curiosity's operations and detailed topographical feature information we will show the observations in the context of the atmospheric conditions in the wider Gale crater region. In preparation of the simulation also the UH 1-dimensional model [3] is being used to study the boundary layer behaviour in that area. The expected long operation time of the rover will additionally provide insight in the seasonal change of atmospheric conditions at the equator. Some aspects might already become visible by the time of the conference. Newest Curiosity/REMS data will be shown in session PS2.5 "Curiosity on Mars: First results". Reference: [1] Gómez-Elvira J. et al. (2012), Space Sci. Rev. 170, 583-640. [2] Kauhanen, J., Siili T., Järvenoja, S. and Savijärvi, H. (2008) , The Mars Limited Area Model (MLAM) and simulations of atmospheric circulations

  18. An Initial Investigation into the Use of a Flux Chamber Technique to Measure Soil-Atmosphere Gas Exchanges from Application of Biosolids to UK Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Donovan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available While a significant amount of work has been conducted to assess the concentration of pollutants in soils and waterways near land that has been amended with biosolids, a relatively small body of research investigating emissions to atmosphere is available in the literature. Some studies have indicated that while the CO2 emissions from soils decrease with fertiliser application, the CH4 and N2O emissions might be increased, offsetting the benefit. The objective of the research presented in this paper was to address this gap, by the use of a flux chamber technique to measure soil-atmosphere gas exchanges from the application of biosolids to land. This was done by applying three different types of biosolids to soils and measuring gases at the soil-atmosphere interface. The measurements were taken on areas with three different types of vegetation. The gases were collected using a flux chamber technique and analysed by gas chromatography. The results presented here are preliminary findings of an ongoing experiment. Insignificant variation appeared to occur between different areas of vegetation; however, small variations in gas concentrations were observed indicating a need for continued monitoring of soil-atmosphere gas exchanges to determine the long-term impacts on the atmosphere and the environment.

  19. Atmospheric extinction in simulation tools for solar tower plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrieder, Natalie; Wilbert, Stefan; Schroedter-Homscheidt, Marion; Schnell, Franziska; Guevara, Diana Mancera; Buck, Reiner; Giuliano, Stefano; Pitz-Paal, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Atmospheric extinction causes significant radiation losses between the heliostat field and the receiver in a solar tower plants. These losses vary with site and time. State of the art is that in ray-tracing and plant optimization tools, atmospheric extinction is included by choosing between few constant standard atmospheric conditions. Even though some tools allow the consideration of site and time dependent extinction data, such data sets are nearly never available. This paper summarizes and compares the most common model equations implemented in several ray-tracing tools. There are already several methods developed and published to measure extinction on-site. An overview of the existing methods is also given here. Ray-tracing simulations of one exemplary tower plant at the Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA) are presented to estimate the plant yield deviations between simulations using standard model equations instead of extinction time series. For PSA, the effect of atmospheric extinction accounts for losses between 1.6 and 7 %. This range is caused by considering overload dumping or not. Applying standard clear or hazy model equations instead of extinction time series lead to an underestimation of the annual plant yield at PSA. The discussion of the effect of extinction in tower plants has to include overload dumping. Situations in which overload dumping occurs are mostly connected to high radiation levels and low atmospheric extinction. Therefore it can be recommended that project developers should consider site and time dependent extinction data especially on hazy sites. A reduced uncertainty of the plant yield prediction can significantly reduce costs due to smaller risk margins for financing and EPCs. The generation of extinction data for several locations in form of representative yearly time series or geographical maps should be further elaborated.

  20. Numerical simulation of {sup 222}RN exhalation from phosphogypsum building blocks and accumulation inside a closed chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabi Junior, Jose A. [Sao Paulo Univ., Pirassununga, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Zootecnia e Engenharia de Alimentos]. E-mail: jrabi@fzea.usp.br; Silva, Nivaldo C. da [Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Minas Gerais, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)]|[Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio]. E-mail: ncsilva@pucpcaldas.br; ncsilva@cnen.gov.br

    2005-07-01

    Zero-order models for {sup 222}Rn exhalation from phosphogypsum-bearing building materials and its transient indoor accumulation assume uniform distribution inside the enclosure. Conversely, this paper numerically simulates a transient two-dimensional {sup 222}Rn accumulation in a test chamber that contains a phosphogypsum board at one wall. Results show that above hypothesis might be oversimplified when spatial dependence is considered. (author)

  1. A 3-d simulation of the atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Favier, Jean; Vialle, J P

    2003-01-01

    The first AMS flight in June 1998 on board of the space shuttle Discovery at an altitude of approximately 380 km unveiled unexpected features of the cosmic rays spectra below the Earth geomagnetic cut-off. In addition to a secondary flux of particles at all latitude, a ring of high energy particles (up to 6 GeV) and an anomalous ratio e+/e- as high as 4 was observed near the geomagnetic equator. This paper describes a simulation of the interaction of primary cosmic rays with atmosphere in which the effect of the Earth magnetic field is included . Using the GEANT3 package for the tracking of particles with the GFLUKA associated package for the physics of interactions, this simulation reproduces quite well the AMS experimental results and the CAPRICE muon data at ground level. The predictions of this model for the flux of atmospheric neutrino are compared with the Super-Kamiokande results and with the results of other atmospheric neutrino models.

  2. A dual-chamber method for quantifying the effects of atmospheric perturbations on secondary organic aerosol formation from biomass burning emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkacik, Daniel S.; Robinson, Ellis S.; Ahern, Adam; Saleh, Rawad; Stockwell, Chelsea; Veres, Patrick; Simpson, Isobel J.; Meinardi, Simone; Blake, Donald R.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Presto, Albert A.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Donahue, Neil M.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2017-06-01

    Biomass burning (BB) is a major source of atmospheric pollutants. Field and laboratory studies indicate that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from BB emissions is highly variable. We investigated sources of this variability using a novel dual-smog-chamber method that directly compares the SOA formation from the same BB emissions under two different atmospheric conditions. During each experiment, we filled two identical Teflon smog chambers simultaneously with BB emissions from the same fire. We then perturbed the smoke with UV lights, UV lights plus nitrous acid (HONO), or dark ozone in one or both chambers. These perturbations caused SOA formation in nearly every experiment with an average organic aerosol (OA) mass enhancement ratio of 1.78 ± 0.91 (mean ± 1σ). However, the effects of the perturbations were highly variable ranging with OA mass enhancement ratios ranging from 0.7 (30% loss of OA mass) to 4.4 across the set of perturbation experiments. There was no apparent relationship between OA enhancement and perturbation type, fuel type, and modified combustion efficiency. To better isolate the effects of different perturbations, we report dual-chamber enhancement (DUCE), which is the quantity of the effects of a perturbation relative to a reference condition. DUCE values were also highly variable, even for the same perturbation and fuel type. Gas measurements indicate substantial burn-to-burn variability in the magnitude and composition of SOA precursor emissions, even in repeated burns of the same fuel under nominally identical conditions. Therefore, the effects of different atmospheric perturbations on SOA formation from BB emissions appear to be less important than burn-to-burn variability.

  3. High-resolution numerical simulation of Venus atmosphere by AFES (Atmospheric general circulation model For the Earth Simulator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko; AFES project Team

    2016-10-01

    We have developed an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) for Venus on the basis of AFES (AGCM For the Earth Simulator) and performed a high-resolution simulation (e.g., Sugimoto et al., 2014a). The highest resolution is T639L120; 1920 times 960 horizontal grids (grid intervals are about 20 km) with 120 vertical layers (layer intervals are about 1 km). In the model, the atmosphere is dry and forced by the solar heating with the diurnal and semi-diurnal components. The infrared radiative process is simplified by adopting Newtonian cooling approximation. The temperature is relaxed to a prescribed horizontally uniform temperature distribution, in which a layer with almost neutral static stability observed in the Venus atmosphere presents. A fast zonal wind in a solid-body rotation is given as the initial state.Starting from this idealized superrotation, the model atmosphere reaches a quasi-equilibrium state within 1 Earth year and this state is stably maintained for more than 10 Earth years. The zonal-mean zonal flow with weak midlatitude jets has almost constant velocity of 120 m/s in latitudes between 45°S and 45°N at the cloud top levels, which agrees very well with observations. In the cloud layer, baroclinic waves develop continuously at midlatitudes and generate Rossby-type waves at the cloud top (Sugimoto et al., 2014b). At the polar region, warm polar vortex surrounded by a cold latitude band (cold collar) is well reproduced (Ando et al., 2016). As for horizontal kinetic energy spectra, divergent component is broadly (k > 10) larger than rotational component compared with that on Earth (Kashimura et al., in preparation). We will show recent results of the high-resolution run, e.g., small-scale gravity waves attributed to large-scale thermal tides. Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014a), Baroclinic modes in the Venus atmosphere simulated by GCM, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Vol. 119, p1950-1968.Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014b), Waves in a Venus general

  4. Performance investigation of the pulse and Campbelling modes of a fission chamber using a Poisson pulse train simulation code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elter, Zs.; Jammes, C.; Pázsit, I.; Pál, L.; Filliatre, P.

    2015-02-01

    The detectors of the neutron flux monitoring system of the foreseen French GEN-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) will be high temperature fission chambers placed in the reactor vessel in the vicinity of the core. The operation of a fission chamber over a wide-range neutron flux will be feasible provided that the overlap of the applicability of its pulse and Campbelling operational modes is ensured. This paper addresses the question of the linearity of these two modes and it also presents our recent efforts to develop a specific code for the simulation of fission chamber pulse trains. Our developed simulation code is described and its overall verification is shown. An extensive quantitative investigation was performed to explore the applicability limits of these two standard modes. It was found that for short pulses the overlap between the pulse and Campbelling modes can be guaranteed if the standard deviation of the background noise is not higher than 5% of the pulse amplitude. It was also shown that the Campbelling mode is sensitive to parasitic noise, while the performance of the pulse mode is affected by the stochastic amplitude distributions.

  5. Emission sources of atmospheric phosphine and simulation of phosphine formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary results on the emission sources of atmospheric phosphine and the types of its precursors in the environment are described. Sunlight plays a more important role than oxygen in its degradation. The vertical profile of phosphine levels in ambient air has been measured. Laboratory simulation of phosphine formation under anaerobic conditions shows that addition of chicken manure, bone powder, or lecithin leads to an increment in phosphine emission. Phosphine can also be adsorbed to soil matrix and thus can survive in soil and sediment. Adsorption and light degradation explain the low ambient levels of phosphine.

  6. A Bubble Chamber Simulator: A New Tool for the Physics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Mainly used in the 1960s, bubble chambers played a major role in particle physics. Now replaced with modern electronic detectors, we believe they remain an important didactic tool to introduce particle physics as they provide visual, appealing and insightful pictures. Sadly, this rare type of detector is mostly accessible through open-door events…

  7. Laboratory simulation of atmospheric turbulence-induced optical wavefront distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Travis S.; Gregory, Don A.

    2002-11-01

    Real-time liquid crystal television-based technique for simulating optical wavefront distortion due to atmospheric turbulence is presented and demonstrated. A liquid crystal television (LCTV) operating in the "phase mostly" mode was used as an array of spatially correlated phase delays. A movie of the arrays in motion was then generated and displayed on the LCTV. The turbulence simulation system was verified by passing a collimated and doubled diode pumped Nd:YVO 4 laser beam (532 nm) through the transparent LCTV screen. The beam was then passed through a lens and the power spectra of the turbulence information carrying beam was detected as a measure of the far-field distribution. The same collimated laser beam, without the LCTV, was also transmitted down an open-air range and the power spectra detected as a measure of a real far-field distribution. Accepted turbulence parameters were measured for both arrangements and then compared.

  8. A new method for simulating atmospheric turbulence for rotorcraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, J. V. R.; Schrage, D. P.; Gaonkar, G. H.; Riaz, J.

    1991-01-01

    Simulation of atmospheric turbulence as seen by a rotating blade element involves treatment of cyclostationary processes. Conventional filtering techniques do not lend themselves well to the generation of such turbulence sample functions as are required in rotorcraft flight dynamics simulation codes. A method to generate sample functions containing second-order statistics of mean and covariance is presented. Compared to ensemble averaging involving excessive computer time, the novelty is to exploit cycloergodicity and thereby, replace ensemble averaging by averaging over a single-path sample function of long duration. The method is validated by comparing its covariance results with the analytical and ensemble-averaged results for a widely used one-dimensional turbulence approximation.

  9. Electricity Production Through Treatment of Simulated Wastewater of Food Industries Using Dual Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC with Nafions Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Jaafarzadeh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Microbial fuel cells are the electrochemical exchangers that convert the microbial reduced power, generated via the metabolism of organic substrate, to electrical energy. The aim of this study is to find out the rate of produced electricity and also treatment rate of simulated wastewater of food industries using dual chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC without mediator and catalyst. Materials and Methods: MFC used in this study was consisted of two compartments including anaerobic anode chamber containing simulated food industries wastewater as synthetic substrate and aerobic cathode chamber containing phosphate buffer, respectively. These two chambers were separated by proton exchange membrane made of Nafion. Produced voltage and current intensity were measured using a digital ohm meter and the amount of electricity was calculated by Ohms law. Effluent from the anode compartment was tested for COD, BOD5, NH3, P, TSS, VSS, SO42- and alkalinity in accordance with the Standard Methods. Results: In this study, maximum current intensity and power production at anode surface in the OLR of 0.79 Kg/m3.d were measured as 1.71 mA and 140 mW/m2, respectively. The maximum voltage of 0.422 V was obtained in the OLR of 0.36 Kg/m3.d. The greatest columbic efficiency of the system was 15% in the OLR of 0.18 Kg/m3.d. Maximum removal efficiency of COD, BOD5, NH3, P, TSS, VSS, SO42- and alkalinity, were obtained 78, 72, 66, 7, 56, 49, 26 and 40%, respectively.Conclusion: The findings showed that the MFC can be used as a new technology to produce electricity from renewable organic materials and for the treatment of different municipal and industrial wastewaters such as food industries.

  10. Resistive-plate-chamber background particles simulation studies for the endcap region of a compact muon solenoid/large hadron collider using the geometry and tracking code

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jamil, M; Rhee, J T

    2005-01-01

    We present a method to simulate the double-gap resistive plate chambers (RPC) background particles for the endcap region of a compact muon solenoid/large hadron collider using the geometry and tracking (GEANT) code...

  11. Large-eddy simulations of contrails in a turbulent atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Picot

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the evolution of contrails in the vortex and dissipation regimes is studied by means of fully three-dimensional large-eddy simulation (LES coupled to a Lagrangian particle tracking method to treat the ice phase. This is the first paper where fine-scale atmospheric turbulence is generated and sustained by means of a stochastic forcing that mimics the properties of stably stratified turbulent flows as those occurring in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere. The initial flow-field is composed by the turbulent background flow and a wake flow obtained from separate LES of the jet regime. Atmospheric turbulence is the main driver of the wake instability and the structure of the resulting wake is sensitive to the intensity of the perturbations, primarily in the vertical direction. A stronger turbulence accelerates the onset of the instability, which results in shorter contrail decent and more effective mixing in the interior of the plume. However, the self-induced turbulence that is produced in the wake after the vortex break-up dominates over background turbulence at the end of the vortex regime and dominates the mixing with ambient air. This results in global microphysical characteristics such as ice mass and optical depth that are be slightly affected by the intensity of atmospheric turbulence. On the other hand, the background humidity and temperature have a first order effect on the survival of ice crystals and particle size distribution, which is in line with recent and ongoing studies in the literature.

  12. Atmospheric river landfall-latitude changes in future climate simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Christine A.; Kiehl, Jeffrey T.

    2016-08-01

    The latitude of landfall for atmospheric rivers (ARs) is examined in the fully coupled half-degree version of the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) for warm future climate simulations. Two regions are examined: U.S. West Coast/North Pacific ARs and United Kingdom/North Atlantic ARs. Changes in AR landfall-latitude reflect changes in the atmospheric steering flow. West Coast U.S. ARs are projected to push equatorward in response to the subtropical jet climate change. UK AR response is dominated by eddy-driven jets and is seasonally dependent. UK simulated AR response is modest in the winter with the largest relative changes occurring in the seasonal transition months. Precipitation associated with ARs is also projected to increase in intensity under global warming. CCSM4 projects a marked shift to higher rainfall rates for Southern California. Small to modest rainfall rates may increase for all UK latitudes, for the Pacific Northwest, and central and northern California.

  13. Novel Experimental Simulations of the Atmospheric Injection of Meteoric Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Martín, J. C.; Bones, D. L.; Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D.; James, A. D.; Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.; Fegley, B., Jr.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2017-02-01

    A newly developed laboratory, Meteoric Ablation Simulator (MASI), is used to test model predictions of the atmospheric ablation of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) with experimental Na, Fe, and Ca vaporization profiles. MASI is the first laboratory setup capable of performing time-resolved atmospheric ablation simulations, by means of precision resistive heating and atomic laser-induced fluorescence detection. Experiments using meteoritic IDP analogues show that at least three mineral phases (Na-rich plagioclase, metal sulfide, and Mg-rich silicate) are required to explain the observed appearance temperatures of the vaporized elements. Low melting temperatures of Na-rich plagioclase and metal sulfide, compared to silicate grains, preclude equilibration of all the elemental constituents in a single melt. The phase-change process of distinct mineral components determines the way in which Na and Fe evaporate. Ca evaporation is dependent on particle size and on the initial composition of the molten silicate. Measured vaporized fractions of Na, Fe, and Ca as a function of particle size and speed confirm differential ablation (i.e., the most volatile elements such as Na ablate first, followed by the main constituents Fe, Mg, and Si, and finally the most refractory elements such as Ca). The Chemical Ablation Model (CABMOD) provides a reasonable approximation to this effect based on chemical fractionation of a molten silicate in thermodynamic equilibrium, even though the compositional and geometric description of IDPs is simplistic. Improvements in the model are required in order to better reproduce the specific shape of the elemental ablation profiles.

  14. Development of a self-cleaning dispersion and exposure chamber: application to the monitoring of simulated accidents involving the generation of airborne nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Alberto; Lobera, M Pilar; Balas, Francisco; Santamaria, Jesus

    2014-09-15

    The release of hazardous nanoparticulate matter in accidental situations was simulated in a specially designed 13-m(3) stainless steel airtight chamber, which allowed the dispersion analysis of airborne matter in a practically particle-free environment (less than 2 #/cm(3)) and in presence of background atmospheric aerosols. A fast recovering of the initial situation was achieved by means of a tandem HEPA-filtered air and deionized water system. Both unintended spilling of silica-based nanoparticulate powders and continuous emission of 100-nm SiO2 nanoparticles were used as aerosol generation events. The emission of airborne nanoparticles was analyzed in terms of particle number concentrations (PNC), size distributions and source strengths. The emission of nanoparticulate aerosols reached peak PNC for particles in the range from 5 nm to 1 μm with source strengths about 10(8) #/h in a background-filled environment and 10(10) #/h in a practically particle-free atmosphere. No agglomeration was noticed for the released nanoparticles, suggesting that PNC was low enough to prevent coagulation and that particle diameters were over 80 nm. Results indicate that emitted matter was within the range of the most penetrating particle sizes and with source strengths similar to accidental scenarios.

  15. The dynamic chamber method: trace gas exchange fluxes (NO, NO2, O3 between plants and the atmosphere in the laboratory and in the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. X. Meixner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a dynamic chamber system to determine reactive trace gas exchange fluxes between plants and the atmosphere under laboratory and, with small modifications, also under field conditions. The system allows measurements of the flux density of the reactive NO-NO2-O3 triad and additionally of the non-reactive trace gases CO2 and H2O. The chambers are made of transparent and chemically inert wall material and do not disturb plant physiology. For NO2 detection we used a highly NO2 specific blue light converter coupled to chemiluminescence detection of the photolysis product, NO. Exchange flux densities derived from dynamic chamber measurements are based on very small concentration differences of NO2 (NO, O3 between inlet and outlet of the chamber. High accuracy and precision measurements are therefore required, and high instrument sensitivity (limit of detection and the statistical significance of concentration differences are important for the determination of corresponding exchange flux densities, compensation point concentrations, and deposition velocities. The determination of NO2 concentrations at sub-ppb levels (2 analyzer with a lower detection limit (3σ-definition of 0.3 ppb or better. Deposition velocities and compensation point concentrations were determined by bi-variate weighted linear least-squares fitting regression analysis of the trace gas concentrations, measured at the inlet and outlet of the chamber. Performances of the dynamic chamber system and data analysis are demonstrated by studies of Picea abies L. (Norway Spruce under field and laboratory conditions. Our laboratory data show that the quality selection criterion based on the use of only significant NO2 concentration differences has a considerable impact on the resulting compensation point concentrations yielding values closer to zero. The results of field experiments demonstrate the need to consider photo-chemical reactions of NO, NO2, and O3 inside the chamber for

  16. Monte Carlo calculation of beam quality correction factors in proton beams using detailed simulation of ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomà, Carles; Andreo, Pedro; Sempau, Josep

    2016-03-01

    This work calculates beam quality correction factors (k Q ) in monoenergetic proton beams using detailed Monte Carlo simulation of ionization chambers. It uses the Monte Carlo code penh and the electronic stopping powers resulting from the adoption of two different sets of mean excitation energy values for water and graphite: (i) the currently ICRU 37 and ICRU 49 recommended {{I}\\text{w}}=75~\\text{eV} and {{I}\\text{g}}=78~\\text{eV} and (ii) the recently proposed {{I}\\text{w}}=78~\\text{eV} and {{I}\\text{g}}=81.1~\\text{eV} . Twelve different ionization chambers were studied. The k Q factors calculated using the two different sets of I-values were found to agree with each other within 1.6% or better. k Q factors calculated using current ICRU I-values were found to agree within 2.3% or better with the k Q factors tabulated in IAEA TRS-398, and within 1% or better with experimental values published in the literature. k Q factors calculated using the new I-values were also found to agree within 1.1% or better with the experimental values. This work concludes that perturbation correction factors in proton beams—currently assumed to be equal to unity—are in fact significantly different from unity for some of the ionization chambers studied.

  17. Numerical simulation of flow, H2SO4 cycle and new particle formation in the CERN CLOUD chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Stratmann

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of galactic cosmic rays on aerosols and clouds, the Cosmic Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD project was established. Experiments are carried out at a 26 m3 tank at CERN (Switzerland. In the experiments, the effect of ionising particle radiation on H2SO4 particle formation and growth is investigated. To evaluate the experimental configuration, the experiment was simulated using a coupled multidimensional CFD – particle model (CLOUD-FPM. In the model the coupled fields of gas/vapour species, temperature, flow velocity and particle properties were computed to investigate the tank's mixing state and mixing times. Simulation results show that the mixing state of the tank's contents largely depends on the characteristics of the mixing fans and a 1-fan configuration, as used in first experiments, may not be sufficient to ensure a homogeneously mixed chamber. To mix the tank properly, 2 fans are necessary. The 1/e response times for instantaneous changes of wall temperature and saturation ratio inside the chamber were found to be in the order of few minutes. Particle nucleation and growth was also simulated and particle number size distribution properties of the freshly nucleated particles (particle number, mean size, standard deviation of the assumed log-normal distribution were found to be mixed over the tank's volume similar to the gas species.

  18. Effect of a metallized chamber upon the field response of a kicker magnet: simulations results and analytical calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M J; Atanasov, M G; Kramer, T; Stadlbauer, T

    2012-01-01

    Metallized racetrack vacuum chambers will be used in the pulsed magnets of the Austrian cancer therapy and research facility, MedAustron. It is important that the metallization does not unduly degrade field rise and fall times or the flattop of the field pulse in the kicker magnets. This was of particular concern for a tune kicker magnet, which has a specified rise and fall time of 100 ns. The impact of the metallization, upon the transient field response, has been studied using Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations: the dependency of the field response to the metallization thickness and resistivity are presented in this paper and formulae for the field response, for a ramped transient excitation current, are given. An equivalent circuit for the metallization allows the effect of an arbitrary excitation to be studied, with a circuit simulator, and the circuit optimized. Furthermore, results of simulations of the effect of a magnetic brazing collar, located between the ceramic vacuum chamber and flange, of t...

  19. CFD simulation of neutral ABL flows; Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaodong Zhang

    2009-04-15

    This work is to evaluate the CFD prediction of Atmospheric Boundary Layer flow field over different terrains employing Fluent 6.3 software. How accurate the simulation could achieve depend on following aspects: viscous model, wall functions, agreement of CFD model with inlet wind velocity profile and top boundary condition. Fluent employ wall function roughness modifications based on data from experiments with sand grain roughened pipes and channels, describe wall adjacent zone with Roughness Height (Ks) instead of Roughness Length (z{sub 0}). In a CFD simulation of ABL flow, the mean wind velocity profile is generally described with either a logarithmic equation by the presence of aerodynamic roughness length z{sub 0} or an exponential equation by the presence of exponent. As indicated by some former researchers, the disagreement between wall function model and ABL velocity profile description will result in some undesirable gradient along flow direction. There are some methods to improve the simulation model in literatures, some of them are discussed in this report, but none of those remedial methods are perfect to eliminate the streamwise gradients in mean wind speed and turbulence, as EllipSys3D could do. In this paper, a new near wall treatment function is designed, which, in some degree, can correct the horizontal gradients problem. Based on the corrected model constants and near wall treatment function, a simulation of Askervein Hill is carried out. The wind condition is neutrally stratified ABL and the measurements are best documented until now. Comparison with measured data shows that the CFD model can well predict the velocity field and relative turbulence kinetic energy field. Furthermore, a series of artificial complex terrains are designed, and some of the main simulation results are reported. (au)

  20. Filter Media Tests Under Simulated Martian Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.

    2016-01-01

    Human exploration of Mars will require the optimal utilization of planetary resources. One of its abundant resources is the Martian atmosphere that can be harvested through filtration and chemical processes that purify and separate it into its gaseous and elemental constituents. Effective filtration needs to be part of the suite of resource utilization technologies. A unique testing platform is being used which provides the relevant operational and instrumental capabilities to test articles under the proper simulated Martian conditions. A series of tests were conducted to assess the performance of filter media. Light sheet imaging of the particle flow provided a means of detecting and quantifying particle concentrations to determine capturing efficiencies. The media's efficiency was also evaluated by gravimetric means through a by-layer filter media configuration. These tests will help to establish techniques and methods for measuring capturing efficiency and arrestance of conventional fibrous filter media. This paper will describe initial test results on different filter media.

  1. Coupling atmospheric and ocean wave models for storm simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting

    This thesis studies the wind-wave interactions through the coupling between the atmospheric model and ocean surface wave models. Special attention is put on storm simulations in the North Sea for wind energy applications in the coastal zones. The two aspects, namely storm conditions and coastal...... areas, are challenging for the wind-wave coupling system because: in storm cases, the wave field is constantly modified by the fast varying wind field; in coastal zones, the wave field is strongly influenced by the bathymetry and currents. Both conditions have complex, unsteady sea state varying...... with time and space that challenge the current coupled modeling system. The conventional approach of estimating the momentum exchange is through parameterizing the aerodynamic roughness length (z0) with wave parameters such as wave age, steepness, significant wave height, etc. However, it is found in storm...

  2. Simulating halos and coronas in their atmospheric environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Gedzelman, Stanley

    2008-12-01

    Models are developed that simulate the light and color of the sky and of circular halos and coronas as a function of atmospheric pressure, cloud height, width, and optical depth, solar zenith angle, aerosol concentration and size, and ozone content. Halos, coronas, and skylight are treated as singly scattered sunbeams that are depleted in their passage through the atmosphere and cloud. Multiple scattering is included only for background cloud light. Halos produced by hexagonal crystal prisms and coronas produced by monodisperse droplets are visible for cloud optical depths in the range 0.0003

  3. Computerized atmospheric trace contaminant control simulation for manned spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Buildup of atmospheric trace contaminants in enclosed volumes such as a spacecraft may lead to potentially serious health problems for the crew members. For this reason, active control methods must be implemented to minimize the concentration of atmospheric contaminants to levels that are considered safe for prolonged, continuous exposure. Designing hardware to accomplish this has traditionally required extensive testing to characterize and select appropriate control technologies. Data collected since the Apollo project can now be used in a computerized performance simulation to predict the performance and life of contamination control hardware to allow for initial technology screening, performance prediction, and operations and contingency studies to determine the most suitable hardware approach before specific design and testing activities begin. The program, written in FORTRAN 77, provides contaminant removal rate, total mass removed, and per pass efficiency for each control device for discrete time intervals. In addition, projected cabin concentration is provided. Input and output data are manipulated using commercial spreadsheet and data graphing software. These results can then be used in analyzing hardware design parameters such as sizing and flow rate, overall process performance and program economics. Test performance may also be predicted to aid test design.

  4. Numerical simulation of the groundwater-flow system in the Chambers-Clover Creek Watershed and Vicinity, Pierce County, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth H.; Savoca, Mark E.; Clothier, Burt

    2011-01-01

    A groundwater-flow model was developed to contribute to an improved understanding of water resources in the Chambers-Clover Creek Watershed. The model covers an area of about 491 square miles in western Pierce County, Washington, and is bounded to the northeast by the Puyallup River valley, to the southwest by the Nisqually River valley, and extends northwest to Puget Sound, and southeast to Tanwax Creek. The Puyallup and Nisqually Rivers occupy large, relatively flat alluvial valleys that are separated by a broad, poorly drained, upland area that covers most of the model area. Chambers and Clover Creeks drain much of the central uplands and flow westward to Puget Sound. The model area is underlain by a northwest-thickening sequence of unconsolidated glacial (till and outwash) and interglacial (fluvial and lacustrine) deposits. Ten unconsolidated hydrogeologic units in the model area form the basis of the groundwater-flow model. Groundwater flow in the Chambers-Clover Creek Watershed and vicinity was simulated using the groundwater-flow model, MODFLOW-2000. The finite-difference model grid comprises 146 rows, 132 columns, and 11 layers. Each model cell has a horizontal dimension of 1,000 by 1,000 feet, and the model contains a total of 123,602 active cells. The thickness of model layers varies throughout the model area and ranges from 1.5 feet in the A3 aquifer unit to 1,567 feet in the G undifferentiated unit. Groundwater flow was simulated for both steady-state and transient conditions. Steady-state conditions were simulated using average recharge, discharge, and water levels for the 24-month period September 2006-August 2008. Transient conditions were simulated for the period September 2006-August 2008 using 24 monthly stress periods. Resource managers and local stakeholders intend to use the model to evaluate a range of water resource issues under both steady-state and transient conditions. Initial conditions for the transient model were developed from a 3-year

  5. Overestimation of soil CO2 fluxes from closed chamber measurements at low atmospheric turbulence biases the diurnal pattern and the annual soil respiration budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braendholt, Andreas; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Ibrom, Andreas; Pilegaard, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Precise quantification of the diurnal and seasonal variation of soil respiration (Rs) is crucial to correctly estimate annual soil carbon fluxes as well as to correctly interpret the response of Rs to biotic and abiotic factors on different time scale. In this study we found a systematic effect of low atmospheric turbulence on continuous hourly Rs measurements with closed chambers throughout one year in a temperate Danish beech forest. Using friction velocity (u⋆) measured at the site above the canopy, we filtered out chamber flux data measured at low atmospheric turbulence. The non-filtered data showed a clear diurnal pattern of Rs across all seasons with highest fluxes during night time suggesting an implausible negative temperature sensitivity of Rs. When filtering out data at low turbulence, the annually averaged diurnal pattern changed, such that the highest Rs fluxes were seen during day time, i.e. following the course of soil temperatures. This effect on the diurnal pattern was due to low turbulence primarily occurring during night time. We calculated different annual Rs budgets by filtering out fluxes for different levels of u⋆. The highest annual Rs budget was found when including all data and it decreased with an increasing u⋆ filter threshold. Our results show that Rs was overestimated at low atmospheric turbulence throughout the year and that this overestimation considerably biased the diurnal pattern of Rs and led to an overestimation of the annual Rs budget. Thus we recommend that that any analysis of the diurnal pattern of Rs must consider overestimation of Rs at low atmospheric turbulence, to yield unbiased diurnal patterns. This is crucial when investigating temperature responses and potential links between CO2 production and Rs on a short time scale, but also for correct estimation of annual Rs budgets. Acknowledgements: This study was funded by the free Danish Ministry for Research, Innovation and higher Education, the free Danish Research

  6. A new Open Top Chamber designed to test in situ effects of climatic and atmospheric changes on nitrogen fixation in boreal forest floor mosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringuier, Charline; Bradley, Robert; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Morin, Hubert; Lindo, Zoë

    2014-05-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) by cyanobacteria dwelling in forest floor moss layers is an important determinant of boreal black spruce forest productivity. Recent studies have suggested that these BNF rates may increase with increasing atmospheric CO2 and increasing temperature, as predicted by current weather models. This potential increase in BNF may be offset, however, by increasing atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, or by increasing demands for phosphorus (i.e. driving nodular ATP content) and for micronutrients such as Mo, Va and Fe (i.e. co-factors of nitrogenase enzyme). In order to study the relative and interactive effects of these factors controlling in situ BNF rates in boreal forest floor moss layers, a new Open Top Chamber (OTC) was developed in summer of 2013. The chambers measure 1.60 cm dia. × 60 cm height, and are equipped with an automated CO2 delivery system designed to maintain atmospheric daytime CO2 concentrations at 800 ppm, as well as buried heating coils that increase soil temperature by 4 ° C for 3 weeks in springtime. These 2 experimental factors are crossed in a full factorial (2 × 2) design that is replicated in 4 complete blocks. Each of the 16 OTCs is divided into 4 compartments, each of which are assigned 1 of 4 sub-plot factors. These include chronic additions of either atmospheric nitrogen, phosphorus, micronutrients or a non-amended control. Staring in summer 2014, a series of measurements will be made to assess the effects of treatments on BNF rates, cyanobacterial colonization and soil nitrogen cycling. Our poster will describe in detail the design and operation of the OTCs, as well as their construction and maintenance costs.

  7. Beta-efficiency of a typical gas-flow ionization chamber using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Abid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out for the determination of efficiency and conversion factors of a gas-flow ionization chamber for beta particles emitted by 86 different radioisotopes covering the average-b energy range of 5.69 keV-2.061 MeV. Good agreements were found between the GEANT4 predicted values and corresponding experimental data, as well as with EGS4 based calculations. For the reported set of b-emitters, the values of the conversion factor have been established in the range of 0.5×1013-2.5×1013 Bqcm-3/A. The computed xenon-to-air conversion factor ratios have attained the minimum value of 0.2 in the range of 0.1-1 MeV. As the radius and/or volume of the ion chamber increases, conversion factors approach a flat energy response. These simulations show a small, but significant dependence of ionization efficiency on the type of wall material.

  8. Numerical simulation of thermal-hydraulic processes in the riser chamber of installation for clinker production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borsuk Grzegorz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinker burning process has a decisive influence on energy consumption and the cost of cement production. A new problem is to use the process of decarbonization of alternative fuels from waste. These issues are particularly important in the introduction of a two-stage combustion of fuel in a rotary kiln without the typical reactor-decarbonizator. This work presents results of numerical studies on thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the riser chamber, which will be designed to burn fuel in the system where combustion air is supplied separately from the clinker cooler. The mathematical model is based on a combination of two methods of motion description: Euler description for the gas phase and Lagrange description for particles. Heat transfer between particles of raw material and gas was added to the numerical calculations. The main aim of the research was finding the correct fractional distribution of particles. For assumed particle distribution on the first stage of work, authors noted that all particles were carried away by the upper outlet to the preheater tower, what is not corresponding to the results of experimental studies. The obtained results of calculations can be the basis for further optimization of the design and operating conditions in the riser chamber with the implementation of the system.

  9. Numerical simulation of thermal-hydraulic processes in the riser chamber of installation for clinker production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsuk, Grzegorz; Dobrowolski, Bolesław; Nowosielski, Grzegorz; Wydrych, Jacek; Duda, Jerzy

    2016-03-01

    Clinker burning process has a decisive influence on energy consumption and the cost of cement production. A new problem is to use the process of decarbonization of alternative fuels from waste. These issues are particularly important in the introduction of a two-stage combustion of fuel in a rotary kiln without the typical reactor-decarbonizator. This work presents results of numerical studies on thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the riser chamber, which will be designed to burn fuel in the system where combustion air is supplied separately from the clinker cooler. The mathematical model is based on a combination of two methods of motion description: Euler description for the gas phase and Lagrange description for particles. Heat transfer between particles of raw material and gas was added to the numerical calculations. The main aim of the research was finding the correct fractional distribution of particles. For assumed particle distribution on the first stage of work, authors noted that all particles were carried away by the upper outlet to the preheater tower, what is not corresponding to the results of experimental studies. The obtained results of calculations can be the basis for further optimization of the design and operating conditions in the riser chamber with the implementation of the system.

  10. Simulating atmospheric free-space optical propagation: rainfall attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Maha

    2002-04-01

    With recent advances and interest in Free-Space Optics (FSO) for commercial deployments, more attention has been placed on FSO weather effects and the availability of global weather databases. The Meteorological Visual Range (Visibility) is considered one of the main weather parameters necessary to estimate FSO attenuation due to haze, fog and low clouds. Proper understanding of visibility measurements conducted throughout the years is essential. Unfortunately, such information is missing from most of the databases, leaving FSO players no choice but to use the standard visibility equation based on 2% contrast and other assumptions on the source luminance and its background. Another challenge is that visibility is measured using the visual wavelength of 550 nm. Extrapolating the measured attenuations to longer infrared wavelengths is not trivial and involves extensive experimentations. Scattering of electromagnetic waves by spherical droplets of different sizes is considered to simulate FSO scattering effects. This paper serves as an introduction to a series of publications regarding simulation of FSO atmospheric propagation. This first part focuses on attenuation due to rainfall. Additional weather parameters, such as rainfall rate, temperature and relative humidity are considered to effectively build the rain model. Comparison with already published experimental measurement is performed to validate the model. The scattering cross section due to rain is derived from the density of different raindrop sizes and the raindrops fall velocity is derived from the overall rainfall rate. Absorption due the presence of water vapor is computed using the temperature and relative humidity measurements.

  11. Atmospheric Retrievals from Exoplanet Observations and Simulations with BART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Joseph

    the planet has uniform composition and the same temperature profile everywhere. We do not know this assumption's impact. While Spitzer and HST have few exoplanet observing modes, JWST will have over 20. Given the signal challenges and the complexity of retrieval, modeling the observations and data analysis is the best way to optimize an observing plan. Our project solves all of these problems. Using only open-source codes, with tools available to the community for their immediate application in JWST and HST proposals and analyses, we will produce a faithful simulator of 2D spectral and photometric frames from each JWST exoplanet mode (WFC3 spatial scan mode works already), including jitter and intrapixel effects. We will extract and calibrate data, analyzing them with BART. Given planetary input spectra for terrestrial, super-Earth, Neptune, and Jupiterclass planets, and a variety of stellar spectra, we will determine the best combination of observations to recover each atmosphere, and the limits where low SNR or spectral coverage produce deceptive results. To facilitate these analyses, we will adapt an existing cloud model to BART, add condensate code now being written to its thermochemical model, include scattering, add a 3D atmosphere module (for dayside occultation mapping and the 1D vs. 3D question), and improve performance and documentation, among other improvements. We will host a web site and community discussions online and at conferences about retrieval issues. We will develop validation tests for radiative-transfer and BART-style retrieval codes, and provide examples to validate others' codes. We will engage the retrieval community in data challenges. We will provide web-enabled tools to specify planets easily for modeling. We will make all of these tools, tests, and comparisons available online so everyone can use them to maximize NASA's investment in high-end observing capabilities to characterize exoplanets.

  12. [Effects of elevated ozone on Pinus armandii growth: a simulation study with open-top chamber].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Fu; Liu, Chen; He, Xing-Yuan; Ruan, Ya-Nan; Xu, Sheng; Chen, Zhen-Ju; Peng, Jun-Jie; Li, Teng

    2013-10-01

    By using open-top chamber (OTC) and the techniques of dendrochronology, this paper studied the growth of Pinus armandii under elevated ozone, and explored the evolution dynamics and adaptation mechanisms of typical forest ecosystems to ozone enrichment. Elevated ozone inhibited the stem growth of P. armandii significantly, with the annual growth of the stem length and diameter reduced by 35.0% and 12.9%, respectively. The annual growth of tree-ring width and the annual ring cells number decreased by 11.5% and 54.1%, respectively, but no significant change was observed in the diameter of tracheid. At regional scale, the fluctuation of ozone concentration showed significant correlation with the variation of local vegetation growth (NDVI).

  13. Bacillus subtilis spore survival and expression of germination-induced bioluminescence after prolonged incubation under simulated Mars atmospheric pressure and composition: implications for planetary protection and lithopanspermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Wayne L.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial endospores in the genus Bacillus are considered good models for studying interplanetary transfer of microbes by natural or human processes. Although spore survival during transfer itself has been the subject of considerable study, the fate of spores in extraterrestrial environments has received less attention. In this report we subjected spores of a strain of Bacillus subtilis, containing luciferase resulting from expression of an sspB-luxAB gene fusion, to simulated martian atmospheric pressure (7-18 mbar) and composition (100% CO(2)) for up to 19 days in a Mars simulation chamber. We report here that survival was similar between spores exposed to Earth conditions and spores exposed up to 19 days to simulated martian conditions. However, germination-induced bioluminescence was lower in spores exposed to simulated martian atmosphere, which suggests sublethal impairment of some endogenous spore germination processes.

  14. Emulsion chamber experiments; critical comments and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamada, M. [School of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, Higashi-Osaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    Emulsion chamber data give valuable information about particle production in the forward region of very high-energy nuclear interactions. Many characteristics of high-energy atmospheric families, observed by emulsion chambers, have not been fully described by simulations employing existing nuclear interaction models. Some of the events and the phenomena observed in emulsion chamber experiments have been considered to be unusual and new, never seen in lower energy accelerator experiments. We re-examine emulsion chamber data critically in order to get unbiased views of these unusual events and phenomena. It is shown that some of the previous interpretations need to be changed. We take up for the discussions scaling violation in C-jets, Centauro events, alignment of showers in high-energy families, hadrons of anomalous absorption in thick lead chambers. We will also discuss the results on the hybrid experiments of emulsion chamber and EAS-array.

  15. Measured and Monte Carlo simulated electron backscatter to the monitor chamber for the Varian TrueBeam Linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Samantha A. M.; Gagne, Isabelle M.; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Zavgorodni, Sergei

    2016-12-01

    To accurately simulate therapeutic electron beams using Monte Carlo methods, backscatter from jaws into the monitor chamber must be accounted for via the backscatter factor, S b. Measured and simulated values of S b for the TrueBeam are investigated. Two approaches for measuring S b are presented. Both require service mode operation with the dose and pulse forming networking servos turned off in order to assess changes in dose rate with field size. The first approach samples an instantaneous dose rate, while the second approach times the delivery of a fixed number of monitor units to assess dose rate. Dose rates were measured for 6, 12 and 20 MeV electrons for jaw- or MLC-shaped apertures between 1× 1 and 40× 40 cm2. The measurement techniques resulted in values of S b that agreed within 0.21% for square and asymmetric fields collimated by the jaws. Measured values of S b were used to calculate the forward dose component in a virtual monitor chamber using BEAMnrc. Based on this forward component, simulated values of S b were calculated and compared to measurement and Varian’s VirtuaLinac simulations. BEAMnrc results for jaw-shaped fields agreed with measurements and with VirtuaLinac simulations within 0.2%. For MLC-shaped fields, the respective measurement techniques differed by as much as 0.41% and BEAMnrc results differed with measurement by as much as 0.4%, however, all measured and simulated values agreed within experimental uncertainty. Measurement sensitivity was not sufficient to capture the small backscatter effect due to the MLC, and Monte Carlo predicted backscatter from the MLC to be no more than 0.3%. Backscatter from the jaws changed the electron dose rate by up to 2.6%. This reinforces the importance of including a backscatter factor in simulations of electron fields shaped with secondary collimating jaws, but presents the option of ignoring it when jaws are retracted and collimation is done with the MLC.

  16. The dynamic chamber method: trace gas exchange fluxes (NO, NO2, O3) between plants and the atmosphere in the laboratory and in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuninger, C.; Oswald, R.; Kesselmeier, J.; Meixner, F. X.

    2012-05-01

    We describe a dynamic chamber system to determine reactive trace gas exchange fluxes between plants and the atmosphere under laboratory and, with small modifications, also under field conditions. The system allows measurements of the flux density of the reactive NO-NO2-O3 triad and additionally of the non-reactive trace gases CO2 and H2O. The chambers are made of transparent and chemically inert wall material and do not disturb plant physiology. For NO2 detection we used a highly NO2 specific blue light converter coupled to chemiluminescence detection of the photolysis product, NO. Exchange flux densities derived from dynamic chamber measurements are based on very small concentration differences of NO2 (NO, O3) between inlet and outlet of the chamber. High accuracy and precision measurements are therefore required, and high instrument sensitivity (limit of detection) and the statistical significance of concentration differences are important for the determination of corresponding exchange flux densities, compensation point concentrations, and deposition velocities. The determination of NO2 concentrations at sub-ppb levels (data analysis are demonstrated by studies of Picea abies L. (Norway Spruce) under field and laboratory conditions. Our laboratory data show that the quality selection criterion based on the use of only significant NO2 concentration differences has a considerable impact on the resulting compensation point concentrations yielding values closer to zero. The results of field experiments demonstrate the need to consider photo-chemical reactions of NO, NO2, and O3 inside the chamber for the correct determination of the exchange flux densities, deposition velocities, as well as compensation point concentrations. Under our field conditions NO2 deposition velocities would have been overestimated up to 80%, if NO2 photolysis has not been considered. We also quantified the photolysis component for some previous NO2 flux measurements. Neglecting photo

  17. Numerical simulation of turbulent flow in the throttle of the MBIR reactor's low-pressure chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarunichev, V. A.; Orlova, E. E.; Lemekhov, Yu. V.; Shpanskii, V. A.

    2015-08-01

    This work in devoted to numerical calculation of turbulent flow in a labyrinth-type throttle. A system of such throttles is installed at the inlet to the MBIR reactor's low-pressure chamber and serves for setting up the required pressure difference and coolant flow rate. MBIR is a multipurpose fourthgeneration fast-neutron research reactor intended for investigating new kinds of nuclear fuel, structural materials, and coolants. The aim of this work is to develop a verified procedure for carrying out 3D calculation of the throttle using CFD modeling techniques. The investigations on determining the throttle hydraulic friction coefficient were carried out in the range of Reynolds numbers Re = 52000-136000. The reactor coolant (liquid sodium) was modeled by tap water. The calculations were carried out using high-Reynolds-number turbulence models with the near-wall functions k-ɛ and RNG k-ɛ, where k is the turbulent pulsation kinetic energy and ɛ is the turbulence kinetic energy dissipation rate. The obtained results have shown that the calculated value of hydraulic friction coefficient differs from its experimental value by no more than 10%. The developed procedure can be applied in determining the hydraulic friction coefficient of a modified labyrinth throttle design. The use of such calculation will make it possible to predict an experiment with the preset accuracy.

  18. Photooxidation of cyclohexanone in simulated atmosphere: A potential source of atmospheric formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Aparajeo; Mondal, Koushik; Samanta, Monoj; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2017-05-01

    Gas phase photooxidation of cyclohexanone (CH) has been studied in the laboratory in a simulated atmospheric environment (synthetic air, 1 bar pressure) under the exposure of 311 nm UV light. Formic acid along with formaldehyde and ethylene are identified as the major photooxidation products. Quantum yield for the production of these species is measured and the values are compared with previous studies on the photo dissociation of CH. For 6 h of light irradiation with initial CH concentration of 9.19 ± 0.1 × 1016 molecules cm-3, the measured quantum yield values of ethylene and formaldehyde, the two primary photooxidation products, are 0.0395 ± 0.001 and 0.0028 ± 0.002, respectively. These values are comparable with CH dissociation quantum yield, 0.24 ± 0.02, and also the quantum yield of CO production, 0.0940 ± 0.001. The energetic parameters of different steps of the proposed reaction mechanism are calculated by electronic structure theory method at DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G** level. A reaction modeling has been performed, and similarity in simulated quantum yield values with that of the experimentally measured ones validates the suggested reaction mechanism. Experimentally measured values of rate constants of most of the elementary reaction steps incorporated in the modeling are not known, and the calculated values, obtained by use of CVT and RRKM theoretical methods are used. The total yield of formic acid, which has been assigned as a secondary oxidation product, is 3.46 ± 0.25 × 1015 molecules cm-3 as obtained from experiment and this data matches well with the value of 2.67 × 1015 molecules cm-3 obtained from reaction modeling for 6 h of UV irradiation. The yield of formic acid is comparable with the yield of primary photo products. The results imply that photooxidation of CH and analogous compounds might have significant contributions to production of formic acid in the earth's troposphere. According to the prediction of the modeling results presented

  19. Morphological analysis and preoperative simulation of a double-chambered right ventricle using 3-dimensional printing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Takashi; Koyama, Yasushi; Mizoguchi, Hiroki; Yoshitatsu, Masao

    2016-05-01

    We present a case of a double-chambered right ventricle in adulthood, in which we tried a detailed morphological assessment and preoperative simulation using 3-dimensional (3D) heart models for improved surgical planning. Polygonal object data for the heart were constructed from computed tomography images of this patient, and transferred to a desktop 3D printer to print out models in actual size. Medical staff completed all of the work processes. Because the 3D heart models were examined by hand, observed from various viewpoints and measured by callipers with ease, we were able to create an image of the complete form of the heart. The anatomical structure of an anomalous bundle was clearly observed, and surgical approaches to the lesion were simulated accurately. During surgery, we used an incision on the pulmonary infundibulum and resected three muscular components of the stenosis. The similarity between the models and the actual heart was excellent. As a result, the operation for this rare defect was performed safely and successfully. We concluded that the custom-made model was useful for morphological analysis and preoperative simulation.

  20. SU-E-T-242: Monte Carlo Simulations Used to Test the Perturbation of a Reference Ion Chamber Prototype Used for Small Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez Quino, L; Calvo, O; Huerta, C; DeWeese, M [Midsouth Radation Physics, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the perturbation due to the use of a novel Reference Ion Chamber designed to measure small field dosimetry (KermaX Plus C by IBA). Methods: Using the Phase-space files for TrueBeam photon beams available by Varian in IAEA-compliant format for 6 and 15 MV. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc to investigate the perturbation introduced by a reference chamber into the PDDs and profiles measured in water tank. Field sizes ranging from 1×1, 2×2,3×3, 5×5 cm2 were simulated for both energies with and without a 0.5 mm foil of Aluminum which is equivalent to the attenuation equivalent of the reference chamber specifications in a water phantom of 30×30×30 cm3 and a pixel resolution of 2 mm. The PDDs, profiles, and gamma analysis of the simulations were performed as well as a energy spectrum analysis of the phase-space files generated during the simulation. Results: Examination of the energy spectrum analysis performed shown a very small increment of the energy spectrum at the build-up region but no difference is appreciated after dmax. The PDD, profiles and gamma analysis had shown a very good agreement among the simulations with and without the Al foil, with a gamma analysis with a criterion of 2% and 2mm resulting in 99.9% of the points passing this criterion. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential benefits of using the KermaX Plus C as reference chamber in the measurement of PDD and Profiles for small fields since the perturbation due to in the presence of the chamber the perturbation is minimal and the chamber can be considered transparent to the photon beam.

  1. Physical fundamentals for the functional simulation of the ionization transmission chamber in X-ray diagnostics; Physikalische Grundlagen fuer die Funktionssimulation der Ionisations-Durchstrahlkammer in der Roentgendiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Horst

    2012-11-01

    The presentation of the physical fundamentals for the functional simulation of the ionization transmission chamber in X-ray diagnostics covers the mathematical description of the interaction of photons with solid materials in Mote Carlo compliable way, including Rayleigh and Compton scattering and photoabsorption. The energy dependence of the emitted secondary electrons is described according the Coulomb and Moeller scattering theory. The simulation is aimed to determine the spectral electron flux density in the air-filled measuring space of the ionization chamber for the defined X-ray energy spectrum dependent on the voltage at the X-ray tube. The influence of geometry and materials on the spectral energy flux density provides hints for the construction of the ionization transmission chamber. The differential energy loss of the secondary electrons in air is determined allowing the calculation of the ionization rate. The ionization of air is described, providing the conditions for a linear relation between ionization rate and ionic current.

  2. Chamber transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  3. The Mobile Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  4. 3-D simulation of transient flow patterns in a corridor-shaped air-cushion surge chamber based on computational fluid dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Lin-sheng; CHENG Yong-guang; ZHOU Da-qing

    2013-01-01

    The 3-D characteristics of the water-air flow patterns in a corridor-shaped air-cushion surge chamber during hydraulic transients need to be considered in the shape optimization.To verify the reliability of the water-air two-phase model,namely,the volume of fluid model,the process of charging water into a closed air chamber is successfully simulated.Using the model,the 3-D flow characteristics under the load rejection and acceptance conditions within the air-cushion surge chamber of a specific hydropower station are studied.The flee surface waves,the flow patterns,and the pressure changes during the surge wave process are analyzed in detail.The longitudinal flow of water in the long corridor-shaped surge chamber is similar to the open channel flow with respect to the wave propagation,reflection and superposition characteristics.The lumped parameters of the 3-D numerical simulation agree with the results of a 1-D calculation of hydraulic transients in the whole water conveying system,which validates the 3-D method.The 3-D flow structures obtained can be applied to the shape optimization of the chamber.

  5. Design and Simulation Tools for Planetary Atmospheric Entry Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric entry is one of the most critical phases of flight during planetary exploration missions. During the design of an entry vehicle, experimental and...

  6. Simulation and theory of ions at atmospherically relevant aqueous liquid-air interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Douglas J; Stern, Abraham C; Baer, Marcel D; Levin, Yan; Mundy, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry occurring at or near the surface of aqueous droplets and thin films in the atmosphere influences air quality and climate. Molecular dynamics simulations are becoming increasingly useful for gaining atomic-scale insight into the structure and reactivity of aqueous interfaces in the atmosphere. Here we review simulation studies of atmospherically relevant aqueous liquid-air interfaces, with an emphasis on ions that play important roles in the chemistry of atmospheric aerosols. In addition to surveying results from simulation studies, we discuss challenges to the refinement and experimental validation of the methodology for simulating ion adsorption to the air-water interface and recent advances in elucidating the driving forces for adsorption. We also review the recent development of a dielectric continuum theory capable of reproducing simulation and experimental data on ion behavior at aqueous interfaces.

  7. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma O'Brien, Ella; Foing, Bernard; Pascale, Ehrenfreund

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates a plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examined.

  8. 3D Simulations of methane convective storms on Titan's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, R.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2005-08-01

    The arrival of the Cassini/Huygens mission to Titan has opened an unprecedented opportunity to study the atmosphere of this satellite. Under the pressure-temperature conditions on Titan, methane, a large atmospheric component amounting perhaps to a 3-5% of the atmosphere, is close to its triple point, potentially playing a similar role as water on Earth. The Huygens probe has shown a terrain shaped by erosion of probably liquid origin, suggestive of past rain. On the other hand, Voyager IRIS spectroscopic observations of Titan imply a saturated atmosphere of methane (amounting perhaps to 150 covered by methane clouds, if we think on Earth meteorology. However, observations from Earth and Cassini have shown that clouds are localized, transient and fast evolving, in particular in the South Pole (currently in its summer season). This might imply a lack of widespread presence on Titan of nuclei where methane could initiate condensation and particle growth with subsequent precipitation. We investigate different scenarios of moist convective storms on Titan using a complete 3D atmospheric model that incorporates a full microphysics treatment required to study cloud formation processes under a saturated atmosphere with low concentration of condensation nuclei. We study local convective development under a variety of atmospheric conditions: sub-saturation, super-saturation, abundances of condensation nuclei fall, condensation nuclei lifted from the ground or gently falling from the stratosphere. We show that under the appropriate circumstances, precipitation rates comparable to typical tropical storms on Earth can be found. Acknowledgements: This work has been funded by Spanish MCYT PNAYA2003-03216, fondos FEDER and Grupos UPV 15946/2004. R. Hueso acknowledges a post-doc fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  9. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs [1, 2]. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions [see 3 for a review]. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique [4] and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examinedReferences[1] F. Salama, E. Bakes, L.J. Allamandola, A.G.G.M. Tielens, Astrophys. J., 458 (1996) p.621[2] F. Salama, The ISO Revolution, EDP Sciences, Les Ulis, France (1999) p.65[3] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press,4, S251,(2008), p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[4

  10. First GEANT4-based simulation investigation of a Li-coated resistive plate chamber for low-energy neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, J.T. [Institute for Advanced Physics, Department of Physics, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jamil, M., E-mail: mjamil@konkuk.ac.kr [Institute for Advanced Physics, Department of Physics, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Division of International Studies, University College, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Y.J. [LCD Research Lab, Department of Chemistry, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-01

    A simulation study of the performance of a single-gap resistive plate chamber coated with Li-layer for the detection of low energy neutrons was performed by means of GEANT4 Monte Carlo code. Low energy neutrons were detected via {sup 7}Li(n, α) {sup 3}He nuclear reaction. To make the detector sensitive to low energy neutrons, Li- coating was employed both on the forward and backward electrodes of the converter. Low energy neutrons were transported onto the Li-coating RPC by GEANT4 MC code. A detector with converter area of 5×5 cm{sup 2} was utilized for this work. The detection response was evaluated as a function of incident low energy neutrons in the range of 25 MeV–100 MeV. The evaluated results predicted higher detection response for the backward-coated converter detector than that of forward coated converter RPC setup. This type of detector can be useful for the detection of low energy neutrons.

  11. Simulating Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature (200K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen T.; Beauchamp, Jesse L.; Salama, Farid

    2016-06-01

    We present our latest results on the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment developed on the COSmIC simulation chamber at NASA Ames Research Center. In Titan’s atmosphere, a complex organic chemistry induced by UV radiation and electron bombardment occurs between N2 and CH4 and leads to the production of larger molecules and solid aerosols. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by pulsed plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion, at Titan-like temperature (150 K). The residence time of the gas in the pulsed plasma discharge is on the order of 3 µs, hence the chemistry is truncated allowing us to probe the first and intermediate steps of the chemistry by adding heavier precursors into the initial N2-CH4 gas mixture.Two complementary studies of the gas phase and solid phase products have been performed in 4 different gas mixtures: N2-CH4, N2-CH4-C2H2, N2-CH4-C6H6 and N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 using a combination of in situ and ex situ diagnostics. The mass spectrometry analysis of the gas phase was the first to demonstrate that the THS is a unique tool to monitor the different steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry (Sciamma-O’Brien et al. 2014). The results of the solid phase study are consistent with the chemical growth evolution observed in the gas phase. Grains and aggregates that form in the gas phase were jet deposited on various substrates then collected for ex situ analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy images have shown that more complex mixtures produce larger aggregates (100-500 nm in N2-CH4, up to 5 µm in N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6). Moreover, the morphology of the grains seems to depend on the precursors, which could have a large impact for Titan’s models. We will present the latest results of the X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure measurements, that show the different functional groups present in our samples and give the C/N ratio; as well as the Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry coupled with Collision Induced Dissociation analyses that have been

  12. A test of sensitivity to convective transport in a global atmospheric CO2 simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, H.; Kawa, S. R.; M. Chin; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Rasch, P.; Wu, S.

    2011-01-01

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO2 distributions. Global CO2 in the year 2000 is simulated using the CTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA's Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO2 by adopting the same CO2 emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et...

  13. Influence of the North Atlantic on simulated atmospheric variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. X. Li

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available An atmospheric general circulation model is used to investigate the influence of the North Atlantic Ocean on atmospheric variability. The study covers the period from 1950 to 1994. The observed sea surface temperature and sea ice extension are used to force the atmospheric model. Several configurations of the oceanic boundary conditions were made to isolate the role of the North Atlantic and to study its non-linear interaction with forcings from other oceanic basins. The multi-realization character of the experiments distinguishes between the internal random part and the external forced part of the total variability. The potential predictability can thus be evaluated. The response of the atmosphere is also studied with a modal approach in terms of hemispheric teleconnection patterns. The North Atlantic Ocean has a direct influence on both the Northern Hemisphere annular mode and the Pacific-North-America pattern, leading to a weak predictability. However the direct response is largely modulated by forcings from other oceanic basins. The non-linearity of the system compensates the predictable component of the annular mode induced by the North Atlantic forcing. Furthermore it reduces the forced component of the Pacific-North-America pattern, increasing its chaoticity.

  14. Technical Note: A minimally invasive experimental system for pCO2 manipulation in plankton cultures using passive gas exchange (atmospheric carbon control simulator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Brooke A.; Olson, M. Brady; Wuori, Tristen

    2017-05-01

    As research into the biotic effects of ocean acidification has increased, the methods for simulating these environmental changes in the laboratory have multiplied. Here we describe the atmospheric carbon control simulator (ACCS) for the maintenance of plankton under controlled pCO2 conditions, designed for species sensitive to the physical disturbance introduced by the bubbling of cultures and for studies involving trophic interaction. The system consists of gas mixing and equilibration components coupled with large-volume atmospheric simulation chambers. These chambers allow gas exchange to counteract the changes in carbonate chemistry induced by the metabolic activity of the organisms. The system is relatively low cost, very flexible, and when used in conjunction with semi-continuous culture methods, it increases the density of organisms kept under realistic conditions, increases the allowable time interval between dilutions, and/or decreases the metabolically driven change in carbonate chemistry during these intervals. It accommodates a large number of culture vessels, which facilitate multi-trophic level studies and allow the tracking of variable responses within and across plankton populations to ocean acidification. It also includes components that increase the reliability of gas mixing systems using mass flow controllers.

  15. spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    A few cosmic rays pass through your body every second of every day, no matter where you are. Look at the spark chamber to your right – every flash is the track made by a cosmic ray from outer space. The spark chamber is filled with a special gas mixture. Cosmic rays knock electrons out of the atoms in the gas. These electrons accelerate towards high voltage metal strips layered throughout the chamber, creating sparks like little bolts of lightning.

  16. spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    A few cosmic rays pass through your body every second of every day, no matter where you are. Look at the spark chamber to your right – every flash is the track made by a cosmic ray from outer space. The spark chamber is filled with a special gas mixture. Cosmic rays knock electrons out of the atoms in the gas. These electrons accelerate towards high voltage metal strips layered throughout the chamber, creating sparks like little bolts of lightning.

  17. A compact multi-chamber setup for degradation and lifetime studies of organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    chambers with temperature and atmosphere control. The four chambers are situated at close proximity in the setup thereby allowing the solar cells to be subjected to as uniform an illumination distribution as possible for the given solar simulator employed. The cell substrates serve as the front window...... and present a tight seal. Hence no illumination correction needs to be performed due to transmission and reflection losses as otherwise seen with test chambers employing a window as a seal. The solar cells in each chamber are continuously and individually electrically monitored under biased conditions...

  18. A combined atmospheric radiative transfer (CART) model and its applications for cirrus clouds simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Heli; Cao, Ya'nan; Chen, Xiuhong

    2012-11-01

    A fast atmospheric radiative transfer model called Combined Atmospheric Radiative Transfer model (CART) has been developed to rapidly calculate atmospheric transmittance and background radiance in the wavenumber range from 1 to 25000 cm-1 with spectral resolution of 1 cm-1. The spectral radiative properties of cirrus clouds at various effective sizes, optical thicknesses, and altitudes from visible to infrared wavelength region are simulated using the CART. The analyses show that the properties of cirrus clouds might be retrieved from the satellite-base spectral characteristics of cirrus clouds based on these simulations.

  19. Simulation of Motion of Satellite under the Effect of Oblateness of Earth and Atmospheric Drag

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Jaita; Pirzada, U M; Shah, Vishant

    2016-01-01

    The equations governing motion of the satellite under the effect of oblateness of Earth and atmospheric drag have been simulated, for a fixed initial position and three different initial velocities, till satellite collapses on Earth. Simulation of motion of artificial Earth satellite subject to the combined effects of oblate Earth and atmospheric drag is presented. The atmospheric model considered here takes in to account of exponential variation of the density with initial distance of Satellite from Earth's surface, scale height and radial distance. The minimum and maximum values of orbital elements and their variation over a time for different initial velocities have been reported.

  20. Simulation of low temperature atmospheric pressure corona discharge in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekasov, Vladimir; Kirsanov, Gennady; Eliseev, Stepan; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Sisoev, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to construct a numerical model of corona discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. The calculation was based on the two-dimensional hybrid model. Two different plasma-chemical models were considered. Models were built for RF corona and negative DC corona discharge. The system of equations is solved by the finite element method in the COMSOL Multiphysics. Main parameters of the discharge (the density of charged and excited particles, the electron temperature) and their dependence on the input parameters of the model (geometry, electrode voltage, power) were calculated. The calculations showed that the shape of the electron distribution near the electrode depends on the discharge power. The neutral gas heating data obtained will allow predicting the temperature of the gases at the designing of atmospheric pressure helium plasma sources.

  1. Land-atmosphere interactions in an high resolution atmospheric simulation coupled with a surface data assimilation scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Campo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A valid tool for the retrieving of the turbulent fluxes that characterize the surface energy budget is constituted by the remote sensing of land surface states. In this study sequences of satellite-derived observations (from SEVIRI sensors aboard the Meteosat Second Generation of Land Surface Temperature have been used as input in a data assimilation scheme in order to retrieve parameters that describe energy balance at the ground surface in the Tuscany region, in central Italy, during summer 2005. A parsimonious 1-D multiscale variational assimilation procedure has been followed, that requires also near surface meteorological observations. A simplified model of the surface energy balance that includes such assimilation scheme has been coupled with the limited area atmospheric model RAMS, in order to improve in the latter the accuracy of the energy budget at the surface. The coupling has been realized replacing the assimilation scheme products, in terms of surface turbulent fluxes and temperature and humidity states during the meteorological simulation. Comparisons between meteorological model results with and without coupling with the assimilation scheme are discussed, both in terms of reconstruction of surface variables and of vertical characterization of the lower atmosphere. In particular, the effects of the coupling on the moisture feedback between surface and atmosphere are considered and estimates of the precipitation recycling ratio are provided. The results of the coupling experiment showed improvements in the reconstruction of the surface states by the atmospheric model and considerable influence on the atmospheric dynamics.

  2. Intercomparison of oceanic and atmospheric forced and coupled mesoscale simulations Part I: Surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Giordani

    Full Text Available A mesoscale non-hydrostatic atmospheric model has been coupled with a mesoscale oceanic model. The case study is a four-day simulation of a strong storm event observed during the SEMAPHORE experiment over a 500 × 500 km2 domain. This domain encompasses a thermohaline front associated with the Azores current. In order to analyze the effect of mesoscale coupling, three simulations are compared: the first one with the atmospheric model forced by realistic sea surface temperature analyses; the second one with the ocean model forced by atmospheric fields, derived from weather forecast re-analyses; the third one with the models being coupled. For these three simulations the surface fluxes were computed with the same bulk parametrization. All three simulations succeed well in representing the main oceanic or atmospheric features observed during the storm. Comparison of surface fields with in situ observations reveals that the winds of the fine mesh atmospheric model are more realistic than those of the weather forecast re-analyses. The low-level winds simulated with the atmospheric model in the forced and coupled simulations are appreciably stronger than the re-analyzed winds. They also generate stronger fluxes. The coupled simulation has the strongest surface heat fluxes: the difference in the net heat budget with the oceanic forced simulation reaches on average 50 Wm-2 over the simulation period. Sea surface-temperature cooling is too weak in both simulations, but is improved in the coupled run and matches better the cooling observed with drifters. The spatial distributions of sea surface-temperature cooling and surface fluxes are strongly inhomogeneous over the simulation domain. The amplitude of the flux variation is maximum in the coupled run. Moreover the weak correlation between the cooling and heat flux patterns indicates that the surface fluxes are not responsible for the whole cooling and suggests that the response of the ocean mixed layer

  3. The Titan Haze Simulation experiment: laboratory simulation of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, E.; Contreras, C. S.; Ricketts, C. L.; Salama, F.

    2012-04-01

    In Titan’s atmosphere, a complex organic chemistry between its two main constituents, N2 and CH4, leads to the production of heavy molecules and subsequently to solid organic aerosols. Several instruments onboard Cassini have detected neutral, positively and negatively charged particles and heavy molecules in the ionosphere of Titan[1,2]. In particular, the presence of benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C6H5CH3)[3], which are critical precursors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, suggests that PAHs might play a role in the production of Titan’s aerosols. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment has been developed at NASA Ames’ Cosmic Simulation facility (COSmIC) to study the chemical pathways that link the simple precursor molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry (C2H2, C2H4, HCN…) to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (or PANHs) as precursors to the production of solid aerosols. In the THS experiment, Titan’s atmospheric chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic jet expansion. With this unique design, the gas mixture is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma discharge. Different gas mixtures containing the first products of Titan’s N2-CH4 chemistry but also much heavier molecules like PAHs or PANHs can be injected to study specific chemical reactions. The products of the chemistry are detected and studied using two complementary techniques: Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy[4] and Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry[5]. Thin tholin deposits are also produced in the THS experiment and can be analyzed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). We will present the results of ongoing mass spectrometry studies on the THS experiment using different gas mixtures: N2-CH4, N2-C2H2, N2-C2H4, N2-C2H6, N2-C6H6, and similar mixtures with an N2-CH4 (90:10) mixture instead of pure N2, to study specific pathways

  4. Radiation induced currents in parallel plate ionization chambers: measurement and Monte Carlo simulation for megavoltage photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Seuntjens, Jan P; Verhaegen, Frank; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2006-09-01

    Polarity effects in ionization chambers are caused by a radiation induced current, also known as Compton current, which arises as a charge imbalance due to charge deposition in electrodes of ionization chambers. We used a phantom-embedded extrapolation chamber (PEEC) for measurements of Compton current in megavoltage photon and electron beams. Electron contamination of photon beams and photon contamination of electron beams have a negligible effect on the measured Compton current. To allow for a theoretical understanding of the Compton current produced in the PEEC effect we carried out Monte Carlo calculations with a modified user code, the COMPTON/ EGSnrc. The Monte Carlo calculated COMPTON currents agree well with measured data for both photon and electron beams; the calculated polarity correction factors, on the other hand, do not agree with measurement results. The conclusions reached for the PEEC can be extended to parallel-plate ionization chambers in general.

  5. The accommodation coefficient of water molecules on ice – cirrus cloud studies at the AIDA simulation chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Skrotzki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cirrus clouds and their impact on the Earth's radiative budget are subjects of current research. The processes governing the growth of cirrus ice particles are central to the radiative properties of cirrus clouds. At temperatures relevant to cirrus clouds, the growth of ice crystals smaller than a few microns in size is strongly influenced by the accommodation coefficient of water molecules on ice, αice, making this parameter relevant for cirrus cloud modeling. However, the experimentally determined magnitude of αice for cirrus temperatures is afflicted with uncertainties of almost three orders of magnitude, and values for αice derived from cirrus cloud data lack significance so far. This has motivated dedicated experiments at the cloud chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere to determine αice in the cirrus-relevant temperature interval between 190 K and 235 K under realistic cirrus ice particle growth conditions. The experimental data sets have been evaluated independently with two model approaches: the first relying on the newly developed model SIGMA (Simple Ice Growth Model for determining Alpha, the second one on an established model, ACPIM (Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interaction Model. Within both approaches a careful uncertainty analysis of the obtained αice values has been carried out for each AIDA experiment. The results show no significant dependence of αice on temperature between 190 K and 235 K. In addition, we find no evidence for a dependence of αice on ice particle size or on water vapor supersaturation for ice particles smaller than 20 μm and supersaturations of up to 70%. The temperature-averaged and combined result from both models is αice = 0.7−0.5+0.3, which implies that αice may only exert a minor impact on cirrus clouds and their characteristics when compared to the assumption of αice =1. Impact on prior calculations of cirrus cloud properties, e.g., in climate models, with

  6. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Proportional multi-wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle. Proportional wire chambers allow a much quicker reading than the optical or magnetoscriptive readout wire chambers.

  7. Space simulation chambers for complete satellites: High vacuum and extreme temperatures challenges; Camaras de simulacion espacial para satelites completos: los retos de alto vacio y temperaturas extremas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galan, M.; Cazador, M.

    2010-07-01

    During any satellite development phase, many operational factors can only be experimentally determined by testing under the most extreme environmental conditions that will be encountered in its life. Simulating the different temperatures, thermal loads and vacuum conditions allows analyzing the suitability of new materials, components and systems for these extreme conditions. In a space project, thermal vacuum testing reaches 70% of the total testing costs. They are the most similar conditions to the real ones that will be encountered in the outer space.In this article, the function of both the thermal and vacuum subsystems are explained and analyzed.Thermal control units are the most fundamental part in a space simulation chamber; they must cover the required extreme temperature range with the required heating and cooling speed. The vacuum subsystem must allow reaching the required operating pressure within the specified time, handling significant degassing loads both from the satellite and the large exposed surfaces inside the chamber. (Author) 6 refs.

  8. Simulation of fog influence on laser beam distribution in atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasinek, Vladimir; Latal, Jan; Koudelka, Petr; Vitasek, Jan; Witas, Karel; Hejduk, Stanislav

    2012-10-01

    Optical fibreless data networks P2P offer fast data transmissions with big transmittance from 1- 10 Gbps on a distance of 1- 6 km. Perfections of such networks are especially flexibility, rapid creation of communications. Sensitivity to atmospheric influences, necessity of light on sight belongs to disadvantages. Transmission through atmosphere be characterized by non-stationarity, inhomogeneity, the influences have random character. It means immediately that it is possible only with difficulty to project conclusions concerning to the measurement on one line upon fiberless line in another position. Contribution tackles a question of forming of the artificial hazy atmospheres, finding the statistical parameters of artificially created foggy atmospheres that could be reproduced to real environment. This work describes created laboratory apparatus powered with fog generator, heat source and ventilating fans, which allow in a controlled way to change the optical transmission inside the bounded space. Laser diode radiation at wavelength of 850 nm is transmitted into created space like this which is scanned with optical power meter after passing of artificially created turbulent vaporous environment. Changes in intensity of the passed lights are captured; the mean value and maximum deviation from the mean value are computed. In this way it is possible to change the reached specific attenuation in dB/km. Owing to turbulences it happens to deviations from the mean value, these abnormalities are characterized by the distribution function that describes the size of turbulences in time. By the help of ergodic theorem then it is possible to deduce that the distribution function of the foggy turbulences gained at continuous time evaluation has same history like the distribution function gained behind the same conditions in the setup in other times. It holds as well that these distribution functions are the same for variety of points in experimental space, provided there are

  9. Numerical simulation of chemical processes in atmospheric plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ouyang Jian-Ming; Guo Wei; Wang Long; Shao Fu-Qiu

    2004-01-01

    A model is built to study chemical processes in atmospheric plasmas at low altitude (high pressure) and at high altitude (low pressure). The plasma lifetime and the temporal evolution of the main charged species are presented.The electron number density does not strictly obey the exponential damping law in a long period. The heavy charged species are dominant at low altitude in comparison with the light species at high altitude. Some species of small amount in natural air play an important role in the processes.

  10. Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transport as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleckler, P. J.; Randall, D. A.; Boer, G.; Colman, R.; Dix, M.; Galin, V.; Helfand, M.; Kiehl, J.; Kitoh, A.; Lau, W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ocean surface net energy flux simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models constrained by realistically-varying sea surface temperatures and sea ice as part of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project. In general, the simulated energy fluxes are within the very large observational uncertainties. However, the annual mean oceanic meridional heat transport that would be required to balance the simulated surface fluxes is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean heat transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions. It is suggested that improved treatment of cloud radiative effects should help in the development of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models.

  11. Remembrance of phases past: An autoregressive method for generating realistic atmospheres in simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinath, Srikar; Poyneer, Lisa A.; Rudy, Alexander R.; Ammons, S. M.

    2014-08-01

    The advent of expensive, large-aperture telescopes and complex adaptive optics (AO) systems has strengthened the need for detailed simulation of such systems from the top of the atmosphere to control algorithms. The credibility of any simulation is underpinned by the quality of the atmosphere model used for introducing phase variations into the incident photons. Hitherto, simulations which incorporate wind layers have relied upon phase screen generation methods that tax the computation and memory capacities of the platforms on which they run. This places limits on parameters of a simulation, such as exposure time or resolution, thus compromising its utility. As aperture sizes and fields of view increase the problem will only get worse. We present an autoregressive method for evolving atmospheric phase that is efficient in its use of computation resources and allows for variability in the power contained in frozen flow or stochastic components of the atmosphere. Users have the flexibility of generating atmosphere datacubes in advance of runs where memory constraints allow to save on computation time or of computing the phase at each time step for long exposure times. Preliminary tests of model atmospheres generated using this method show power spectral density and rms phase in accordance with established metrics for Kolmogorov models.

  12. Computer simulations of comet- and asteroidlike bodies passing through the Venusian atmosphere: Preliminary results on atmospheric and ground shock effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, D.; Hatfield, D.; Hassig, P.; Rosenblatt, M.; Soderblom, L.; Dejong, E.

    1992-01-01

    We have completed computer simulations that model shock effects in the venusian atmosphere caused during the passage of two cometlike bodies 100 m and 1000 m in diameter and an asteroidlike body 10 km in diameter. Our objective is to examine hypervelocity-generated shock effects in the venusian atmosphere for bodies of different types and sizes in order to understand the following: (1) their deceleration and depth of penetration through the atmosphere; and (2) the onset of possible ground-surface shock effects such as splotches, craters, and ejecta formations. The three bodies were chosen to include both a range of general conditions applicable to Venus as well as three specific cases of current interest. These calculations use a new multiphase computer code (DICE-MAZ) designed by California Research & Technology for shock-dynamics simulations in complex environments. The code was tested and calibrated in large-scale explosion, cratering, and ejecta research. It treats a wide range of different multiphase conditions, including material types (vapor, melt, solid), particle-size distributions, and shock-induced dynamic changes in velocities, pressures, temperatures (internal energies), densities, and other related parameters, all of which were recorded in our calculations.

  13. Simulation of the imaging quality of ground-based telescopes affected by atmospheric disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yubin; Kou, Songfeng; Gu, Bozhong

    2014-08-01

    Ground-based telescope imaging model is developed in this paper, the relationship between the atmospheric disturbances and the ground-based telescope image quality is studied. Simulation of the wave-front distortions caused by atmospheric turbulences has long been an important method in the study of the propagation of light through the atmosphere. The phase of the starlight wave-front is changed over time, but in an appropriate short exposure time, the atmospheric disturbances can be considered as "frozen". In accordance with Kolmogorov turbulence theory, simulating atmospheric disturbances of image model based on the phase screen distorted by atmospheric turbulences is achieved by the fast Fourier transform (FFT). Geiger mode avalanche photodiode array (APD arrays) model is used for atmospheric wave-front detection, the image is achieved by inversion method of photon counting after the target starlight goes through phase screens and ground-based telescopes. Ground-based telescope imaging model is established in this paper can accurately achieve the relationship between the quality of telescope imaging and monolayer or multilayer atmosphere disturbances, and it is great significance for the wave-front detection and optical correction in a Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics system (MCAO).

  14. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Huang, Tseng-Te; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Chen, Yen-Fu; Wu, Shu-Wei; Nievaart, Sander; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary 60Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the 60Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations reached 7

  15. Simulation of nonstationary phenomena in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Frants, O. B.; Nekhoroshev, V. O.; Suslov, A. I.; Kas'yanov, V. S.; Shemyakin, I. A.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Nonstationary processes in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge manifest themselves in spontaneous transitions from the normal glow discharge into a spark. In the experiments, both so-called completed transitions in which a highly conductive constricted channel arises and incomplete transitions accompanied by the formation of a diffuse channel are observed. A model of the positive column of a discharge in air is elaborated that allows one to interpret specific features of the discharge both in the stationary stage and during its transition into a spark and makes it possible to calculate the characteristic oscillatory current waveforms for completed transitions into a spark and aperiodic ones for incomplete transitions. The calculated parameters of the positive column in the glow discharge mode agree well with experiment. Data on the densities of the most abundant species generated in the discharge (such as atomic oxygen, metastable nitrogen molecules, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and negative oxygen ions) are presented.

  16. Puff models for simulation of fugitive radioactive emissions in atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Camila P. da, E-mail: camila.costa@ufpel.edu.b [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Matematica. Dept. de Matematica e Estatistica; Pereira, Ledina L., E-mail: ledinalentz@yahoo.com.b [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UNESC), Criciuma, SC (Brazil); Vilhena, Marco T., E-mail: vilhena@pq.cnpq.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Tirabassi, Tiziano, E-mail: t.tirabassi@isac.cnr.i [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (CNR/ISAC), Bologna (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    A puff model for the dispersion of material from fugitive radioactive emissions is presented. For vertical diffusion the model is based on general techniques for solving time dependent advection-diffusion equation: the ADMM (Advection Diffusion Multilayer Method) and GILTT (Generalized Integral Laplace Transform Technique) techniques. The first one is an analytical solution based on a discretization of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in sub-layers where the advection-diffusion equation is solved by the Laplace transform technique. The solution is given in integral form. The second one is a well-known hybrid method that had solved a wide class of direct and inverse problems mainly in the area of Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics and the solution is given in series form. Comparisons between values predicted by the models against experimental ground-level concentrations are shown. (author)

  17. Simulating the VUV photochemistry of the upper atmosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigrine, Sarah; Carrasco, Nathalie; Vettier, Ludovic; Chitarra, Olivia; Cernogora, Guy

    2016-10-01

    The Cassini mission around Titan revealed that the interaction between the N2 and CH4 molecules and the solar VUV radiation leads to a complex chemistry above an altitude of 800km with the detection of heavy organic molecules like benzene (C6H6). This is consistent with an initiation of the aerosols in Titan's upper atmosphere. The presence of those molecules makes Titan a natural laboratory to witness and understand prebiotic-like chemistry but despite all the data collected, all the possible photochemical processes in such a hydrocarbon-nitrogen-rich environment are not precisely understood.This is why Titan's atmospheric chemistry experiments are of high interest, especially those focusing on the photochemistry as most of the Titan-like experiments are based on N2-CH4 plasma techniques. In order to reproduce this VUV photochemistry of N2 and CH4, we designed a photochemical reactor named APSIS which is to be coupled window-less with a VUV photon source as N2 needs wavelengths shorter than 100 nm in order to be dissociated. Those wavelengths are available at synchrotron beamlines but are challenging to obtain with common laboratory discharge lamps. At LATMOS, we developed a table-top VUV window-less source using noble gases for the micro-wave discharge. We started with Neon, as it has two resonance lines at 73.6 and 74.3 nm which allow us to dissociate and/or ionize both CH4 and N2.We will present here our first experimental results obtained with APSIS coupled with this VUV source. A range of different pressures below 1 mbar is tested, in parallel to different methane ratio. Moreover, other wavelengths are injected by adding some other noble gases in the MO discharge (He, Kr, Xe, Ar). We will review the mass spectra obtained in those different conditions and then discuss them regarding the Cassini data and other previous laboratory photochemical studies.

  18. Isolation of bacteria from Siberian permafrost capable of growing under simulated Mars atmospheric pressure and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Wayne; Gilichinsky, David; Schuerger, Andrew; Mironov, Vasiliy; Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Kerney, Krystal; Krivushin, Kirill; Oliveira, Rafael; Waters, Samantha

    A central goal of Astrobiology is to explore the limits at which life can occur and to search for life and habitable locations outside Earth. Mars is currently an active target in the search for life due to its relative proximity and similarity to Earth, coupled with increasing evidence pointing to the past and present existence of liquid water at the surface and near subsurface [1]. Exchange of rocky impact ejecta between Mars and Earth has been known for at least two decades [2], and evidence has accumulated supporting the hypothesis that living microorganisms embedded in rocks could survive the transfer process [3]. Understanding the ability of terrestrial microbes to grow in the near-surface martian environment is of prime importance both for life detection and for protection of Mars from forward contamination by human or robotic exploration [4]. The surface environment of Mars presents formidable challenges to life, such as: harsh solar radiation; a scarcity of liquid water and nutrients; extreme low temperatures; and a low-pressure, CO2-dominated anoxic atmosphere [5]. Our recent work has concentrated on investigating the possibility that prokaryotes from Earth could survive and proliferate in the Mars environment. Our experiments have involved environmental chambers that can simulate Mars atmospheric conditions of low pressure (P; 0.7 kPa), temperature (T; 0˚C), and a CO2-dominated anoxic atmosphere (A), called here collectively low-PTA conditions. Because much of the water on present-day Mars exists in a permanently frozen state mixed with mineral matrix, terrestrial permafrosts are considered to be analogs of the martian environment [6]. We therefore screened Siberian permafrost soils for microbes capable of growing under low-PTA conditions. Using this approach we reported the isolation of 6 Carnobacterium spp. isolates from Siberian permafrost that were capable of low-PTA growth [7]. One of these isolates has been characterized in detail and proposed as

  19. Comparative measurements of ambient atmospheric concentrations of ice nucleating particles using multiple immersion freezing methods and a continuous flow diffusion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMott, Paul J.; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Petters, Markus D.; Bertram, Allan K.; Tobo, Yutaka; Mason, Ryan H.; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; McCluskey, Christina S.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Schill, Gregory P.; Boose, Yvonne; Rauker, Anne Marie; Miller, Anna J.; Zaragoza, Jake; Rocci, Katherine; Rothfuss, Nicholas E.; Taylor, Hans P.; Hader, John D.; Chou, Cedric; Huffman, J. Alex; Pöschl, Ulrich; Prenni, Anthony J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2017-09-01

    A number of new measurement methods for ice nucleating particles (INPs) have been introduced in recent years, and it is important to address how these methods compare. Laboratory comparisons of instruments sampling major INP types are common, but few comparisons have occurred for ambient aerosol measurements exploring the utility, consistency and complementarity of different methods to cover the large dynamic range of INP concentrations that exists in the atmosphere. In this study, we assess the comparability of four offline immersion freezing measurement methods (Colorado State University ice spectrometer, IS; North Carolina State University cold stage, CS; National Institute for Polar Research Cryogenic Refrigerator Applied to Freezing Test, CRAFT; University of British Columbia micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor-droplet freezing technique, MOUDI-DFT) and an online method (continuous flow diffusion chamber, CFDC) used in a manner deemed to promote/maximize immersion freezing, for the detection of INPs in ambient aerosols at different locations and in different sampling scenarios. We also investigated the comparability of different aerosol collection methods used with offline immersion freezing instruments. Excellent agreement between all methods could be obtained for several cases of co-sampling with perfect temporal overlap. Even for sampling periods that were not fully equivalent, the deviations between atmospheric INP number concentrations measured with different methods were mostly less than 1 order of magnitude. In some cases, however, the deviations were larger and not explicable without sampling and measurement artifacts. Overall, the immersion freezing methods seem to effectively capture INPs that activate as single particles in the modestly supercooled temperature regime (> -20 °C), although more comparisons are needed in this temperature regime that is difficult to access with online methods. Relative to the CFDC method, three immersion freezing

  20. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  1. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber.Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  2. Instrument intercomparison of glyoxal, methyl glyoxal and NO2 under simulated atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalman, R.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Ball, S. M.; Borrás, E.; Daniels, M. J. S.; Goodall, I. C. A.; Henry, S. B.; Karl, T.; Keutsch, F. N.; Kim, S.; Mak, J.; Monks, P. S.; Muñoz, A.; Orlando, J.; Peppe, S.; Rickard, A. R.; Ródenas, M.; Sánchez, P.; Seco, R.; Su, L.; Tyndall, G.; Vázquez, M.; Vera, T.; Waxman, E.; Volkamer, R.

    2015-04-01

    The α-dicarbonyl compounds glyoxal (CHOCHO) and methyl glyoxal (CH3C(O)CHO) are produced in the atmosphere by the oxidation of hydrocarbons and emitted directly from pyrogenic sources. Measurements of ambient concentrations inform about the rate of hydrocarbon oxidation, oxidative capacity, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We present results from a comprehensive instrument comparison effort at two simulation chamber facilities in the US and Europe that included nine instruments, and seven different measurement techniques: broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS), cavity-enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (CE-DOAS), white-cell DOAS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, two separate instruments), laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP), solid-phase micro extraction (SPME), and proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS, two separate instruments; for methyl glyoxal only because no significant response was observed for glyoxal). Experiments at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) compare three independent sources of calibration as a function of temperature (293-330 K). Calibrations from absorption cross-section spectra at UV-visible and IR wavelengths are found to agree within 2% for glyoxal, and 4% for methyl glyoxal at all temperatures; further calibrations based on ion-molecule rate constant calculations agreed within 5% for methyl glyoxal at all temperatures. At the European Photoreactor (EUPHORE) all measurements are calibrated from the same UV-visible spectra (either directly or indirectly), thus minimizing potential systematic bias. We find excellent linearity under idealized conditions (pure glyoxal or methyl glyoxal, R2 > 0.96), and in complex gas mixtures characteristic of dry photochemical smog systems (o-xylene/NOx and isoprene/NOx, R2 > 0.95; R2 ∼ 0.65 for offline SPME measurements of methyl glyoxal). The correlations are more variable in humid ambient air mixtures (RH

  3. Instrument inter-comparison of glyoxal, methyl glyoxal and NO2 under simulated atmospheric conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thalman

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The α-dicarbonyl compounds glyoxal (CHOCHO and methyl glyoxal (CH3C(OCHO are produced in the atmosphere by the oxidation of hydrocarbons, and emitted directly from pyrogenic sources. Measurements of ambient concentrations inform about the rate of hydrocarbon oxidation, oxidative capacity, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation. We present results from a comprehensive instrument comparison effort at 2 simulation chamber facilities in the US and Europe that included 9 instruments, and 7 different measurement techniques: Broadband Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (BBCEAS, Cavity Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS, White-cell DOAS, Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR, two separate instruments, Laser Induced Phosphoresence (LIP, Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME, and Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS, two separate instruments; only methyl glyoxal as no significant response was observed for glyoxal. Experiments at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR compare 3 independent sources of calibration as a function of temperature (293 K to 330 K. Calibrations from absorption cross-section spectra at UV-visible and IR wavelengths are found to agree within 2% for glyoxal, and 4% for methyl glyoxal at all temperatures; further calibrations based on ion-molecule rate constant calculations agreed within 5% for methyl glyoxal at all temperatures. At the EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE all measurements are calibrated from the same UV-visible spectra (either directly or indirectly, thus minimizing potential systematic bias. We find excellent linearity under idealized conditions (pure glyoxal or methyl glyoxal, R2 > 0.96, and in complex gas mixtures characteristic of dry photochemical smog systems (o-xylene/NOx and isoprene/NOx, R2 > 0.95; R2 ~ 0.65 for offline SPME measurements of methyl glyoxal. The correlations are more variable in humid ambient air mixtures (RH > 45% for

  4. Instrument inter-comparison of glyoxal, methyl glyoxal and NO2 under simulated atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalman, R.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Ball, S. M.; Borrás, E.; Daniels, M. J. S.; Goodall, I. C. A.; Henry, S. B.; Karl, T.; Keutsch, F. N.; Kim, S.; Mak, J.; Monks, P. S.; Muñoz, A.; Orlando, J.; Peppe, S.; Rickard, A. R.; Ródenas, M.; Sánchez, P.; Seco, R.; Su, L.; Tyndall, G.; Vázquez, M.; Vera, T.; Waxman, E.; Volkamer, R.

    2014-08-01

    The α-dicarbonyl compounds glyoxal (CHOCHO) and methyl glyoxal (CH3C(O)CHO) are produced in the atmosphere by the oxidation of hydrocarbons, and emitted directly from pyrogenic sources. Measurements of ambient concentrations inform about the rate of hydrocarbon oxidation, oxidative capacity, and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. We present results from a comprehensive instrument comparison effort at 2 simulation chamber facilities in the US and Europe that included 9 instruments, and 7 different measurement techniques: Broadband Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (BBCEAS), Cavity Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS), White-cell DOAS, Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR, two separate instruments), Laser Induced Phosphoresence (LIP), Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME), and Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS, two separate instruments; only methyl glyoxal as no significant response was observed for glyoxal). Experiments at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) compare 3 independent sources of calibration as a function of temperature (293 K to 330 K). Calibrations from absorption cross-section spectra at UV-visible and IR wavelengths are found to agree within 2% for glyoxal, and 4% for methyl glyoxal at all temperatures; further calibrations based on ion-molecule rate constant calculations agreed within 5% for methyl glyoxal at all temperatures. At the EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE) all measurements are calibrated from the same UV-visible spectra (either directly or indirectly), thus minimizing potential systematic bias. We find excellent linearity under idealized conditions (pure glyoxal or methyl glyoxal, R2 > 0.96), and in complex gas mixtures characteristic of dry photochemical smog systems (o-xylene/NOx and isoprene/NOx, R2 > 0.95; R2 ~ 0.65 for offline SPME measurements of methyl glyoxal). The correlations are more variable in humid ambient air mixtures (RH > 45%) for methyl

  5. Investigation of correction factors for non-reference conditions in ion chamber photon dosimetry with Monte-Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wulff, Joerg [Klinik fuer Strahlendiagnostik, Medizinisches Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany); Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS), Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg (Germany); Heverhagen, Johannes T. [Klinik fuer Strahlendiagnostik, Medizinisches Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Philipps Univ. Marburg (Germany); Karle, Heiko [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radioonkologie sowie Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsmedizin der Johannes Gutenberg-Univ., Mainz (Germany); Zink, Klemens [Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS), Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Current dosimetry protocols require geometrical reference conditions for the determination of absorbed dose in external radiotherapy. Whenever these geometrical conditions cannot be maintained the application of additional corrections becomes necessary, in principle. The current DIN6800-2 protocol includes a corresponding factor k{sub NR}, but numerical values are lacking and no definite information about the magnitude of this correction is available yet. This study presents Monte-Carlo based calculations within the 6 MV-X photon field of a linear accelerator for a common used ion chamber (PTW31010) employing the EGSnrc code system. The linear accelerator model was matched to measurements, showing good agreement and is used as a realistic source. The individual perturbation correction factors as well as the resulting correction factor k{sub NR} were calculated as a function of depth for three field sizes, as a function of central axis distance for the largest field and within the build-up region. The behaviour of the ion chamber was further investigated for an idealized hypothetical field boundary. Within the field of the linear accelerator where charged particle equilibrium is achieved the factor k{sub NR} was generally below {proportional_to}0.5%. In the build-up region a depth dependent correction of up to 2% was calculated when positioning the chamber according to DIN6800-2. Minimizing the depth dependence of the corrections in the build-up region lead to a slightly different positioning of the ion chamber as currently recommended. In regions of the hypothetical field boundary with missing charged particle equilibrium and high dose gradients, the ion chamber response changed by up to {proportional_to}40%, caused by the comparatively large volume (0.125 cm{sup 3}) of the investigated chamber. (orig.)

  6. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1986-01-01

    Two wire chambers made originally for the R807 Experiment at CERN's Intersecting Storage Rings. In 1986 they were used for the PS 201 experiment (Obelix Experiment) at LEAR, the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. The group of researchers from Turin, using the chambers at that time, changed the acquisition system using for the first time 8 bit (10 bit non linear) analog to digital conversion for incoming signals from the chambers. The acquisition system was controlled by 54 CPU and 80 digital signal processors. The power required for all the electronics was 40 kW. For the period, this system was one of the most powerful on-line apparatus in the world. The Obelix Experiment was closed in 1996. To find more about how a wire chamber works, see the description for object CERN-OBJ-DE-038.

  7. A conceptual framework for using Doppler radar acquired atmospheric data for flight simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W.

    1983-01-01

    A concept is presented which can permit turbulence simulation in the vicinity of microbursts. The method involves a large data base, but should be fast enough for use with flight simulators. The model permits any pilot to simulate any flight maneuver in any aircraft. The model simulates a wind field with three-component mean winds and three-component turbulent gusts, and gust variation over the body of an aircraft so that all aerodynamic loads and moments can be calculated. The time and space variation of mean winds and turbulent intensities associated with a particular atmospheric phenomenon such as a microburst is used in the model. In fact, Doppler radar data such as provided by JAWS is uniquely suited for use with the proposed model. The concept is completely general and is not restricted to microburst studies. Reentry and flight in terrestrial or planetary atmospheres could be realistically simulated if supporting data of sufficient resolution were available.

  8. Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model Simulations of Precipitation in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Stephen D.; Mohr, Karen I.

    2015-01-01

    The meridional extent and complex orography of the South American continent contributes to a wide diversity of climate regimes ranging from hyper-arid deserts to tropical rainforests to sub-polar highland regions. In addition, South American meteorology and climate are also made further complicated by ENSO, a powerful coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon. Modelling studies in this region have typically resorted to either atmospheric mesoscale or atmosphere-ocean coupled global climate models. The latter offers full physics and high spatial resolution, but it is computationally inefficient typically lack an interactive ocean, whereas the former offers high computational efficiency and ocean-atmosphere coupling, but it lacks adequate spatial and temporal resolution to adequate resolve the complex orography and explicitly simulate precipitation. Explicit simulation of precipitation is vital in the Central Andes where rainfall rates are light (0.5-5 mm hr-1), there is strong seasonality, and most precipitation is associated with weak mesoscale-organized convection. Recent increases in both computational power and model development have led to the advent of coupled ocean-atmosphere mesoscale models for both weather and climate study applications. These modelling systems, while computationally expensive, include two-way ocean-atmosphere coupling, high resolution, and explicit simulation of precipitation. In this study, we use the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST), a fully-coupled mesoscale atmosphere-ocean modeling system. Previous work has shown COAWST to reasonably simulate the entire 2003-2004 wet season (Dec-Feb) as validated against both satellite and model analysis data when ECMWF interim analysis data were used for boundary conditions on a 27-9-km grid configuration (Outer grid extent: 60.4S to 17.7N and 118.6W to 17.4W).

  9. Simulation of Atmospheric-Entry Capsules in the Subsonic Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murman, Scott M.; Childs, Robert E.; Garcia, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of Computational Fluid Dynamics predictions of subsonic capsule aerodynamics is examined by comparison against recent NASA wind-tunnel data at high-Reynolds-number flight conditions. Several aspects of numerical and physical modeling are considered, including inviscid numerical scheme, mesh adaptation, rough-wall modeling, rotation and curvature corrections for eddy-viscosity models, and Detached-Eddy Simulations of the unsteady wake. All of these are considered in isolation against relevant data where possible. The results indicate that an improved predictive capability is developed by considering physics-based approaches and validating the results against flight-relevant experimental data.

  10. Fluid mechanics simulation of fog formation associated with polluted atmosphere produced by energy related fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that large quantities of atmospheric aerosols with composition SO4(-2), NO3(-1), and NH4(+1) have been detected in highly industrialized areas. Most aerosol products come from energy-related fuel combustion. Fluid mechanics simulation of both microphysical and macrophysical processes is considered in studying the time dependent evolution of the saturation spectra of condensation nuclei associated with polluted and clean atmospheres during the time periods of advection fog formation. The results demonstrate that the condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere provide more favorable conditions than condensation nuclei associated with a clean atmosphere to produce dense advection fog, and that attaining a certain degree of supersaturation is not necessarily required for the formation of advection fog having condensation nuclei associated with a polluted atmosphere.

  11. Current status and challenges in optical turbulence simulations in various layers of the Earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Nunalee, Christopher G.; Basu, Sukanta; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we present a brief review on the existing approaches for optical turbulence estimation in various layers of the Earth's atmosphere. The advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are also discussed. An alternative approach, based on mesoscale modeling with parameterized turbulence, is proposed and tested for the simulation of refractive index structure parameter (C2n ) in the atmospheric boundary layer. The impacts of a few atmospheric flow phenomena (e.g., low-level jets, island wake vortices, gravity waves) on optical turbulence are discussed. Consideration of diverse geographic settings (e.g., flat terrain, coastal region, ocean islands) makes this study distinct.

  12. Optical and Hygroscopic Studies of Aerosols In Simulated Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenkopf, Christa A.

    2011-08-01

    Basic characteristics of the early Earth climate, the only known environment in the Universe in which life has been known to emerge and thrive, remain a mystery. In particular, little is understood about the Earth's atmosphere 2.8 billion years ago. From climate models and laboratory studies, it is postulated that an organic haze, much like that found on Saturn's largest moon Titan, covered the early Earth. This haze, generated from photolysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), may have had profound climatic consequences. Climate models of the early Earth that include this haze have had to rely upon optical properties of a Titan laboratory analog. Titan haze, though thought to be similar, is formed from a different combination of precursor gases and by different energy sources than early Earth haze. This thesis examines the direct and indirect radiative effects of aerosol on early Earth climate by studying the optical and hygroscopic properties of a laboratory analog. A Titan analog is studied for comparison and to better understand spacecraft-retrieved haze chemical and optical properties from Titan. The properties of the laboratory analogs, generated in a flowing reactor cell with a continuum ultraviolet (UV) light source, were primarily measured using cavity ringdown aerosol extinction spectroscopy and UV-visible (UV-Vis) transmission spectroscopy. We find that the optical properties of our early Earth analog are significantly different than those of the Titan analog from Khare et al. (1984). In both the UV and visible, when modeled as fractals, particles with the optical properties of the early Earth analog have approximately 30% larger extinction efficiencies than particles with Khare et al. (1984) values. This result implies our early Earth haze analog would provide a more efficient UV shield and have a stronger antigreenhouse effect than the Khare et al. (1984) Titan analog. Our Titan analog has significantly smaller imaginary refractive index values

  13. The Titan Haze Simulation experiment on COSmIC: Probing Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Ricketts, Claire L.; Salama, Farid

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment is to contribute to a better understanding of aerosol formation in Titan's atmosphere through the study of the chemical formation pathways that link the simpler gas phase molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry, to the more complex gas phase precursors of aerosols; and more specifically, to investigate the role of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PANHs), among other hydrocarbons, in this process. In the THS experiment developed at the NASA Ames Cosmic simulation facility (COSmIC), Titan's atmospheric chemistry is simulated by a pulsed plasma jet expansion at temperature conditions (∼150 K) close to those found in Titan's atmosphere in regions where aerosols are formed. In addition, because of the very short residence time of the gas in the plasma discharge, only the initial steps of the chemistry occur, making the COSmIC/THS a unique tool to study the first and intermediate (when adding heavier precursors to the initial N2-CH4 mixture) steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature as shown in the study presented here. We further illustrate the potential of COSmIC/THS for the simulation of Titan's atmospheric chemistry by presenting very promising results from a preliminary comparison of the laboratory data to data from the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer-Ion Beam Spectrometer (CAPS-IBS) instrument.

  14. Technology of planetary extreme environment simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, M. E.; Apodaca, L. E.; Hall, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    Four test chamber systems were devleoped to simulate the extreme atmospheric environs of Venus and Jupiter, in order to assure satisfactory performance of scientific entry probes and their experiments.

  15. A simple atmospheric boundary layer model applied to large eddy simulations of wind turbine wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2014-01-01

    boundary type technique where volume forces are used to introduce wind shear and atmospheric turbulence. The application of the model for wake studies is demonstrated by combining it with the actuator line method, and predictions are compared with field measurements. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.......A simple model for including the influence of the atmospheric boundary layer in connection with large eddy simulations of wind turbine wakes is presented and validated by comparing computed results with measurements as well as with direct numerical simulations. The model is based on an immersed...

  16. Formulation of and numerical studies with the Dutch Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulation (DALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Heus

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The current version of the Dutch Atmospheric Large-Eddy Simulation (DALES model is presented. DALES is a large-eddy simulation model designed for process studies of the atmospheric boundary layer, including convective and stable boundary layers as well as cloudy boundary layers. In addition, DALES can be used for studies of more specific cases, such as flow over sloping or heterogeneous terrain, and dispersion of inert and chemically active species. This paper contains an extensive description of the physical and numerical formulation of the code, and gives an overview of its applications and accomplishments in recent years.

  17. Evaluation of a regional climate model for atmospheric simulation over Arctic river basins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yan; CHEN Shang; HUA Feng; WEI Helin; D. H. BROMWICH

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation on a regional climate model was made with five-month atmospheric simulations over the Arctic river basins. The simulations were performed with a modified mesoscale model, Polar MM5 coupled to the NCAR Land Surface Model (LSM) to illustrate the skill of the coupled model (Polar MM5+LSM) in simulating atmospheric circulation over the Arctic river basins. Near-surface and upper-air observations were used to verify the simulations. Sensitivity studies between the Polar MM5 and Polar MMS+LSM simulations revealed that the coupled model could improve the forecast skill for surface variables at some sites. In addition, the extended evaluations of the coupled model simulations on the North American Arctic domain during December 15, 2002 to May 15, 2003 were carded out. The time series plots and statistics of the observations and Polar MM5+LSM simulations at six stations for near-surface and vertical profiles at 850 hPa and 500 hPa were analyzed. The model was found capable of reproducing the observed atmospheric behavior in both magnitude and variability, especially for temperature and near-surface wind direction.

  18. New Approaches to Quantifying Transport Model Error in Atmospheric CO2 Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, L.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Nielsen, J. E.; Collatz, G. J.; Gregg, W. W.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, much progress has been made in observing CO2 distributions from space. However, the use of these observations to infer source/sink distributions in inversion studies continues to be complicated by difficulty in quantifying atmospheric transport model errors. We will present results from several different experiments designed to quantify different aspects of transport error using the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM). In the first set of experiments, an ensemble of simulations is constructed using perturbations to parameters in the model s moist physics and turbulence parameterizations that control sub-grid scale transport of trace gases. Analysis of the ensemble spread and scales of temporal and spatial variability among the simulations allows insight into how parameterized, small-scale transport processes influence simulated CO2 distributions. In the second set of experiments, atmospheric tracers representing model error are constructed using observation minus analysis statistics from NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). The goal of these simulations is to understand how errors in large scale dynamics are distributed, and how they propagate in space and time, affecting trace gas distributions. These simulations will also be compared to results from NASA's Carbon Monitoring System Flux Pilot Project that quantified the impact of uncertainty in satellite constrained CO2 flux estimates on atmospheric mixing ratios to assess the major factors governing uncertainty in global and regional trace gas distributions.

  19. Background Simulation of a Fission Fragment Chamber in the Experiment of 209^Bi(e, e'K^+)209^hPb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋玉收; 刘辉兰; 席印印; 颜强; 胡碧涛

    2012-01-01

    An experiment for measuring the hyperon-related fission rate was carried out with the reaction 209^Bi(e, e'K^+)209^hPb at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory (Jlab). In the experiment, the performance of the fission fragment detector (FFD) was dramaticlly crashed by the background particles in comparison with that during the test without beam. The scattering of the high intensity (500 nA) primary electrons was the dominant cause. Using the GEANT4 toolkit, this report simulates the experimental situation of the target chamber in which the FFD was located. The simulation results indicate that the background particles were dominantly (~ electrons, and protons and alpha particles were the important heavy background particles. The performance of the multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPCs) depends not only on the background-particle intensity but also the current density, which was also given by the simulation code. Furthermore, the measures to suppress the background particles were also investigated with the simulation code.

  20. Simulating the coupling between atmosphere ocean processes and the planktonic ecosystem during SERIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, N.; Denman, K.; McFarlane, N.; Solheim, L.

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a 1-D atmosphere-ocean-biogeochemical model to investigate the coupling between atmosphere-ocean exchanges and the planktonic ecosystem during the Subarctic Ecosystem Response to Iron Enrichment Study (SERIES) in 2002. The atmospheric Single Column Model (SCM) is based on the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis (CCCma) Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM). The ocean component employs the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM). A seven-component ecosystem model is embedded in GOTM, which includes nitrogen, organic and inorganic carbon, silica and oxygen cycling. We use observations from SERIES combined with atmospheric reanalysis data to initiate and force the coupled physical model. We found that atmospheric temperatures and humidities are higher and the stratification more stable if nudged to National Centre of Environmental Prediction (NCEP) rather than to European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 40-yr reanalysis data. Doubling the vertical resolution in the atmosphere improved the representation of mixing and the thermal structure, affecting cloudiness and radiative fluxes at the ocean surface as well as planetary boundary layer heights and gas dispersion in the lower atmosphere. From observed ocean-surface dimethyl sulphide (DMS) concentrations (outside the patch) we simulated DMS dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer by applying a first-order loss term, with turnover times ranging from 1 to 4 days. During SERIES, shallow boundary-layer heights that occurred when DMS production was highest prevented dispersion into the atmosphere beyond several 100 m. Finally, successive model runs with iron fertilization starting on June 25, July 10 and 25 showed that the general nature of the response to iron enrichment at OSP (SERIES) is robust, but the strength as well as length of the response depend strongly on short-term atmospheric conditions (wind and radiative fluxes).

  1. Dataset of Atmospheric Environment Publication in 2016, Source emission and model evaluation of formaldehyde from composite and solid wood furniture in a full-scale chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data presented in this data file is a product of a journal publication. The dataset contains formaldehyde air concentrations in the emission test chamber and...

  2. Simulating the escaping atmospheres of hot gas planets in the solar neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Salz, M; Schneider, P C; Schmitt, J H M M

    2016-01-01

    Absorption of high-energy radiation in planetary thermospheres is believed to lead to the formation of planetary winds. The resulting mass-loss rates can affect the evolution, particularly of small gas planets. We present 1D, spherically symmetric hydrodynamic simulations of the escaping atmospheres of 18 hot gas planets in the solar neighborhood. Our sample only includes strongly irradiated planets, whose expanded atmospheres may be detectable via transit spectroscopy. The simulations were performed with the PLUTO-CLOUDY interface, which couples a detailed photoionization and plasma simulation code with a general MHD code. We study the thermospheric escape and derive improved estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our simulations reproduce the temperature-pressure profile measured via sodium D absorption in HD 189733 b, but show unexplained differences in the case of HD 209458 b. In contrast to general assumptions, we find that the gravitationally more tightly bound thermospheres of massive and compact...

  3. Simulations of the Solar Wind Interaction with the Atmosphere/Ionosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledvina, Stephen; Brecht, Stephen H.; Bougher, Stephen W.

    2016-10-01

    The latest results of high resolution 3-D hybrid particle code simulations of the solar wind interacting with the atmosphere/ionosphere of Venus will be presented. The research is focused on understanding the how the solar wind interaction with Venus results in the subsequent ionospheric losses. In addition, the simulations focus on structures caused by the interaction particularly on the pole of the planet where the convection electric field points. A variety of simulation results will be presented each with varying solar wind parameters. The hybrid particle code HALFSHEL contains a variety of physical and chemical models which will also be discussed. These include a chemistry package that produces the ionosphere on grid resolution of 10 km altitude, atmospheric densities and dynamics from the VTGCM code and the Hall and Pedersen conductivities associated with plasma neutral collisions. The specific simulations to be presented trace solar wind protons, and ionospheric O+ and O2+.

  4. The THS experiment: Simulating Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature (200 K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen T.; Beauchamp, Jack L.; Salama, Farid

    2016-10-01

    In the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, Titan's atmospheric chemistry is simulated by plasma discharge in the stream of a supersonic expansion, i.e. at low Titan-like temperature (150 K). Here, we present complementary gas and solid phase analyses of four N2-CH4-based gas mixtures that demonstrate the unique capability of the THS to monitor the chemical growth evolution in order to better understand Titan's chemistry and the origin of aerosol formation.

  5. Simulation of low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Lorant, Christophe; Descamps, Pierre; De Wilde, Juray; 1st BeLux workshop on “Coating, Materials, surfaces and Interfaces

    2014-01-01

    The simulation of low-temperature, atmospheric-pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactors is challenging due to the coupling of the fluid dynamics, the chemical reactions and the electric field and the stiffness of the resulting mathematical system. The model equations and the rigorous model reduction to reduce the stiffness are addressed in this paper. Considering pure nitrogen plasma, simulations with two configurations are discussed.

  6. An Updated Coupled Model for Land-Atmosphere Interaction. Part Ⅰ: Simulations of Physical Processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Hongling; WANG Zaizhi; JI Jinjun; WU Guoxiong

    2008-01-01

    A new two-way land-atmosphere interaction model (R42_AVIM) is fulfilled by coupling the spectral at- mospheric model (SAMIL_R42L9) developed at the State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmo- spheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sci- ences (LASG/IAP/CAS) with the land surface model, Atmosphere-Vegetation-Interaction-Model (AVIM). In this coupled model, physical and biological components of AVIM are both included. Climate base state and land surface physical fluxes simulated by R42_AVIM are analyzed and compared with the results of R42_SSIB [which is coupled by SAMIL_R42L9 and Simplified Simple Biosphere (SSIB) models]. The results show the performance of the new model is closer to the observations. It can basically guarantee that the land surface energy budget is balanced, and can simulate June-July-August (JJA) and December-January- February (DJF) land surface air temperature, sensible heat flux, latent heat flux, precipitation, sea level pressure and other variables reasonably well. Compared with R42_SSIB, there are obvious improvements in the JJA simulations of surface air temperature and surface fluxes. Thus, this land-atmosphere coupled model will offer a good experiment platform for land-atmosphere interaction research.

  7. Modelling and simulation of double chamber microbial fuel cell. Cell voltage, power density and temperature variation with process parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, Ravi; Mondal, Prasenjit; Chand, Shri [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttaranchal (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In the present paper steady state models of a double chamber glucose glutamic acid microbial fuel cell (GGA-MFC) under continuous operation have been developed and solved using Matlab 2007 software. The experimental data reported in a recent literature has been used for the validation of the models. The present models give prediction on the cell voltage and cell power density with 19-44% errors, which is less (up to 20%) than the errors on the prediction of cell voltage made in some recent literature for the same MFC where the effects of the difference in pH and ionic conductivity between anodic and cathodic solutions on cell voltage were not incorporated in model equations. It also describes the changes in anodic and cathodic chamber temperature due to the increase in substrate concentration and cell current density. Temperature profile across the membrane thickness has also been studied. (orig.)

  8. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  9. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in ISR (Intersecting Storage Ring) split field magnet experiment. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  10. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  11. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  12. Development of an Accurate Urban Modeling System Using CAD/GIS Data for Atmosphere Environmental Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomosato Takada; Kazuo Kashiyama

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an urban modeling system using CAD/GIS data for atmosphere environ- mental simulation, such as wind flow and contaminant spread in urban area. The CAD data is used for the shape modeling for the high-storied buildings and civil structures with complicated shape since the data for that is not included in the 3D-GIS data accurately. The unstructured mesh based on the tetrahedron element is employed in order to express the urban structures with complicated shape accurately. It is difficult to un- derstand the quality of shape model and mesh by the conventional visualization technique. In this paper, the stereoscopic visualization using virtual reality (VR) technology is employed for the vedfication of the quality of shape model and mesh. The present system is applied to the atmosphere environmental simulation in ur- ban area and is shown to be an useful planning and design tool to investigate the atmosphere environmental problem.

  13. Numerical Simulations of Magnetoacoustic-Gravity Waves in the Solar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Murawski, K; McLaughlin, J A; Oliver, R

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the excitation of magnetoacoustic-gravity waves generated from localized pulses in the gas pressure as well as in vertical component of velocity. These pulses are initially launched at the top of the solar photosphere that is permeated by a weak magnetic field. We investigate three different configurations of the background magnetic field lines: horizontal, vertical and oblique to the gravitational force. We numerically model magnetoacoustic-gravity waves by implementing a realistic (VAL-C) model of solar temperature. We solve two-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations numerically with the use of the FLASH code to simulate the dynamics of the lower solar atmosphere. The initial pulses result in shocks at higher altitudes. Our numerical simulations reveal that a small-amplitude initial pulse can produce magnetoacoustic-gravity waves, which are later reflected from the transition region due to the large temperature gradient. The atmospheric cavities in the lower solar atmosphere are foun...

  14. A method for simulating the atmospheric entry of long-range ballistic missiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, A J , Jr

    1958-01-01

    It is demonstrated with the aid of similitude arguments that a model launched from a hypervelocity gun upstream through a special supersonic nozzle should experience aerodynamic heating and resulting thermal stresses like those encountered by a long-range ballistic missile entering the earth's atmosphere. This demonstration hinges on the requirements that model and missile be geometrically similar and made of the same material, and that they have the same flight speed and Reynolds number (based on conditions just outside the boundary layer) at corresponding points in their trajectories. The hypervelocity gun provides the model with the required initial speed, while the nozzle scales the atmosphere, in terms of density variation, to provide the model with speeds and Reynolds numbers over its entire trajectory. Since both the motion and aerodynamic heating of a missile tend to be simulated in the model tests, this combination of hypervelocity gun and supersonic nozzle is termed an atmosphere entry simulator.

  15. Simulation of rarefied gas flows in atmospheric pressure interfaces for mass spectrometry systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Sandilya; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    The understanding of the gas dynamics of the atmospheric pressure interface is very important for the development of mass spectrometry systems with high sensitivity. While the gas flows at high pressure (>1 Torr) and low pressure (pressure stage (1 to 10(-3) Torr) remains challenging. In this study, we used the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DMSC) method to develop the gas dynamic simulations for the continuous and discontinuous atmospheric pressure interfaces (API), with different focuses on the ion transfer by gas flows through a skimmer or directly from the atmospheric pressure to a vacuum stage, respectively. The impacts by the skimmer location in the continuous API and the temporal evolvement of the gas flow with a discontinuous API were characterized, which provide a solid base for the instrument design and performance improvement.

  16. Computing the total atmospheric refraction for real-time optical imaging sensor simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Richard F.

    2015-05-01

    Fast and accurate computation of light path deviation due to atmospheric refraction is an important requirement for real-time simulation of optical imaging sensor systems. A large body of existing literature covers various methods for application of Snell's Law to the light path ray tracing problem. This paper provides a discussion of the adaptation to real time simulation of atmospheric refraction ray tracing techniques used in mid-1980's LOWTRAN releases. The refraction ray trace algorithm published in a LOWTRAN-6 technical report by Kneizys (et. al.) has been coded in MATLAB for development, and in C-language for simulation use. To this published algorithm we have added tuning parameters for variable path segment lengths, and extensions for Earth grazing and exoatmospheric "near Earth" ray paths. Model atmosphere properties used to exercise the refraction algorithm were obtained from tables published in another LOWTRAN-6 related report. The LOWTRAN-6 based refraction model is applicable to atmospheric propagation at wavelengths in the IR and visible bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. It has been used during the past two years by engineers at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) in support of several advanced imaging sensor simulations. Recently, a faster (but sufficiently accurate) method using Gauss-Chebyshev Quadrature integration for evaluating the refraction integral was adopted.

  17. Simulation and prototyping of 2 m long resistive plate chambers for detection of fast neutrons and multi-neutron event identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elekes, Z., E-mail: z.elekes@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Aumann, T. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Bemmerer, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Boretzky, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Caesar, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Cowan, T.C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Hehner, J.; Heil, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Kempe, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Rossi, D. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Röder, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Simon, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Sobiella, M.; Stach, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Reinhardt, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Wagner, A.; Yakorev, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Zilges, A. [Universität zu Köln, Köln (Germany); Zuber, K. [Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-02-11

    Resistive plate chamber (RPC) prototypes of 2 m length were simulated and built. The experimental tests using a 31 MeV electron beam, discussed in details, showed an efficiency higher than 90% and an excellent time resolution of around σ=100ps. Furthermore, comprehensive simulations were performed by GEANT4 toolkit in order to study the possible use of these RPCs for fast neutron (200 MeV–1 GeV) detection and multi-neutron event identification. The validation of simulation parameters was carried out via a comparison to experimental data. A possible setup for invariant mass spectroscopy of multi-neutron emission is presented and the characteristics are discussed. The results show that the setup has a high detection efficiency. Its capability of determining the momentum of the outgoing neutrons and reconstructing the relative energy between the fragments from nuclear reactions is demonstrated for different scenarios.

  18. The spectroscopic search for the trace aerosols in the planetary atmospheres - the results of numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecka, Maria I.

    2010-05-01

    The passive remote spectrometric methods are important in examinations the atmospheres of planets. The radiance spectra inform us about values of thermodynamical parameters and composition of the atmospheres and surfaces. The spectral technology can be useful in detection of the trace aerosols like biological substances (if present) in the environments of the planets. We discuss here some of the aspects related to the spectroscopic search for the aerosols and dust in planetary atmospheres. Possibility of detection and identifications of biological aerosols with a passive InfraRed spectrometer in an open-air environment is discussed. We present numerically simulated, based on radiative transfer theory, spectroscopic observations of the Earth atmosphere. Laboratory measurements of transmittance of various kinds of aerosols, pollens and bacterias were used in modeling.

  19. Superrotation planetary atmospheres: Mechanical analogy, angular momentum budget and simulation of the spin up process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, H. G.; Harris, I.; Conrath, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Superrotation rates observed in planetary atmospheres are analyzed based on the concept of a thermally driven zonally symmetric circulation. Specifically, how this superrotation is produced and maintained against the tendency for friction to oppose differential motions between the atmosphere and the underlying planet is addressed. The time evolution of a fluid leading from corotation under uniform heating to superrotation under globally nonuniform heating is simulated using a three dimensional zonally symmetric spectral model and Laplace transformation. The increased tendency toward geostrophy combined with the increase of surface pressure toward the poles (due to meridional mass transport), induces the atmosphere to subrotate temporarily at lower altitudes. The resulting viscous shear near the surface thus permits angular momentum to flow from the planet into the atmosphere where it propagates upwards and, combined with the change in moment of inertia, produces large superrotation rates at higher viscosities.

  20. Trends in Mesospheric Dynamics and Chemistry: Simulations With a Model of the Entire Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, G. P.

    2005-05-01

    The cooling resulting from infrared CO2 radiative transfer is a major contribution to the energy budget of the middle atmosphere and thermosphere. The rapid increase of the atmospheric CO2 concentration resulting from anthropogenic emissions is therefore expected to lead, in general, to a substantial cooling in this height range. This can potentially be counteracted by heating due to absorption of near infrared radiation by CO2. Changes in ozone as a consequence of increasing methane and water vapor may also have an impact on the energy budget as dynamical changes caused by increased tropospheric temperatures. By means of numerical simulations with a general circulation and chemistry model of the entire atmosphere we will address the following questions: 1.) Can state-of-the-art atmospheric modeling explain the mesospheric temperature trends observed during the last decades? 2.)Which part of the temperature changes resulting from an increase of atmospheric CO2 is caused by local changes in the radiative budget and which part is influenced by remote dynamical effects? The model used is the newly developed Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere (HAMMONIA) that resolves the atmosphere from the Earth's surface up to about 250 km altitude, and is based on the 3-D dynamics from the ECHAM5 general circulation model and the chemistry scheme from MOZART-3. Results from different time slice experiment representative of years 1970 and 2000, and for a doubling of CO2 will be presented.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Chun [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan County, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tseng-Te, E-mail: huangtt@iner.gov.tw [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan County, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yuan-Hao [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wei-Lin [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Fu [Atomic Energy Council, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Wu, Shu-Wei [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Nievaart, Sander [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Petten (Netherlands); Jiang, Shiang-Huei [Dept. of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary {sup 60}Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations

  2. Calculation of 18F, 99mTc, 111In and 123I calibration factor using the penelope ionization chamber simulation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiot, M N

    2004-01-01

    A new method using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE for ionization chamber simulation has already been successfully used for calculating calibration factors needed for the measurements of radionuclides with photon emission (2003, Appl. Radiat. Isot., to be published). This work has been continued at (Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel) in order to calculate the calibration factors for radionuclides with short half-lives used in medical services. Activity measurements of 18F, 99mTc,111In and 123I using the calculated calibration factors were obtained with standard uncertainties equal to 0.6% for 18F, 99mTc and 1.5% for 111In and 123I.

  3. Cloud and Radiation Processes Simulated by a Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fang; DING Yihui; XU Ying

    2007-01-01

    Using NCC/IAP T63 coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM), two 20-yr integrations were processed, and their ability to simulate cloud and radiation was analysed in detail. The results show that the model can simulate the basic distribution of cloud cover, and however, obvious differences still exist compared with ISCCP satellite data and ERA reanalysis data. The simulated cloud cover is less in general, especially the abnormal low values in some regions of ocean. By improving the cloud cover scheme,simulated cloud cover in the eastern Pacific and Atlantic, summer hemisphere's oceans from subtropical to mid-latitude is considerably improved. But in the tropical Indian Ocean and West Pacific the cloud cover difference is still evident, mainly due to the deficiency of high cloud simulation in these regions resulting from deep cumulus convection. In terms of the analysis on radiation and cloud radiative forcing, we find that simulation on long wave radiation is better than short wave radiation. The simulation error of short wave radiation is caused mostly by the simulation difference in short wave radiative forcing, sea ice, and snow cover, and also by not involving aerosol's effect. The simulation error of long wave radiation is mainly resulting from deficiency in simulating cloud cover and underlying surface temperature. Corresponding to improvement of cloud cover, the simulated radiation (especially short wave radiation) in eastern oceans,summer hemisphere's oceans from subtropical to mid-latitude is remarkably improved. This also bring sobvious improvement to net radiation in these regions.

  4. Non-equilibrium helium ionization in an MHD simulation of the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The ionization state of the gas in the dynamic solar chromosphere can depart strongly from the instantaneous statistical equilibrium commonly assumed in numerical modeling. We improve on earlier simulations of the solar atmosphere that only included non-equilbrium hydrogen ionization by performing a 2D radiation-magneto-hydrodynamics simulation featuring non-equilibrium ionization of both hydrogen and helium. The simulation includes the effect of hydrogen Lyman-$\\alpha$ and the EUV radiation from the corona on the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. Details on code implementation are given. We obtain helium ion fractions that are far from their equilibrium values. Comparison with models with LTE ionization shows that non-equilibrium helium ionization leads to higher temperatures in wave fronts and lower temperatures in the gas between shocks. Assuming LTE ionization results in a thermostat-like behaviour with matter accumulating around the temperatures where the LTE ionization fractions change rapidly. ...

  5. Pick-up Ion Sputtering of Mars' Atmosphere: Analysis of MAVEN Data and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Hayley N.; Leclercq, Ludivine; Johnson, Robert E.; Curry, Shannon; Elrod, Meredith K.; Luhmann, Janet; Leblanc, Francois

    2016-10-01

    One of the ways hot oxygen escapes the exosphere of Mars is through sputtering caused by the precipitation of, primarily, O+ pickup ions. This process is thought to have been particularly important early in martian history, as it is correlated with increased solar activity (Luhmann 1992). With ion precipitation data from the MAVEN mission for a variety of solar conditions (Leblanc 2015), we can potentially see the effect of atmospheric sputtering. To determine if this process is apparent in MAVEN data, we first model the thermosphere and exosphere with an O and CO2 Direct Simulation Monte Carlo model. We then introduce a heat flux representative of the energy deposited by pickup ions for a variety solar conditions and look for the resulting signatures in the in situ neutral and ion atmospheric data from the NGIMS instrument available on the PDS. Preliminary simulations and data analysis are suggestive. Analysis of the simulations and the data analysis will be presented.

  6. Intercomparison of Martian Lower Atmosphere Simulated Using Different Planetary Boundary Layer Parameterization Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Murali; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Dwyer Cianciolo, Alicia; Smith, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    We use the mesoscale modeling capability of Mars Weather Research and Forecasting (MarsWRF) model to study the sensitivity of the simulated Martian lower atmosphere to differences in the parameterization of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Characterization of the Martian atmosphere and realistic representation of processes such as mixing of tracers like dust depend on how well the model reproduces the evolution of the PBL structure. MarsWRF is based on the NCAR WRF model and it retains some of the PBL schemes available in the earth version. Published studies have examined the performance of different PBL schemes in NCAR WRF with the help of observations. Currently such assessments are not feasible for Martian atmospheric models due to lack of observations. It is of interest though to study the sensitivity of the model to PBL parameterization. Typically, for standard Martian atmospheric simulations, we have used the Medium Range Forecast (MRF) PBL scheme, which considers a correction term to the vertical gradients to incorporate nonlocal effects. For this study, we have also used two other parameterizations, a non-local closure scheme called Yonsei University (YSU) PBL scheme and a turbulent kinetic energy closure scheme called Mellor- Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) PBL scheme. We will present intercomparisons of the near surface temperature profiles, boundary layer heights, and wind obtained from the different simulations. We plan to use available temperature observations from Mini TES instrument onboard the rovers Spirit and Opportunity in evaluating the model results.

  7. WRF Model Simulations of Terrain-Driven Atmospheric Eddies in Marine Stratocumulus Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, B. M.; Herbster, C. G.; Mosher, F. R.

    2014-12-01

    It is not unusual to observe atmospheric eddies in satellite imagery of the marine stratus and stratocumulus clouds that characterize the summertime weather of the California coastal region and near-shore oceanic environment. The winds of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) over the ocean interact with the high terrain of prominent headlands and islands to create order-10 km scale areas of swirling air that can contain a cloud-free eye, 180-degree wind reversals at the surface over a period of minutes, and may be associated with mixing and turbulence between the high-humidity air of the MABL and the much warmer and drier inversion layer air above. However, synoptic and even subsynoptic surface weather measurements, and the synoptic upper-air observing network are inadequate, or in some cases, completely unable, to detect and characterize the formation, movement, and even the existence of the eddies. They can literally slip between land-based surface observation locations, or stay over the near-shore ocean environment where there may be no surface meteorological measurements. This study presents Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model simulations of these small-scale, terrain-driven, atmospheric features in the MABL from cases detected in GOES satellite imagery. The purpose is to use model output to diagnose the formation mechanisms, sources of vorticity, and the air flow in and around the eddies. Satellite imagery is compared to simulated atmospheric variables to validate features generated within the model atmosphere, and model output is employed as a surrogate atmosphere to better understand the atmospheric characteristics of the eddies. Model air parcel trajectories are estimated to trace the movement and sources of the air contained in and around these often-observed, but seldom-measured features.

  8. Neural network simulation of the atmospheric point spread function for the adjacency effect research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoshan; Wang, Haidong; Li, Ligang; Yang, Zhen; Meng, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Adjacency effect could be regarded as the convolution of the atmospheric point spread function (PSF) and the surface leaving radiance. Monte Carlo is a common method to simulate the atmospheric PSF. But it can't obtain analytic expression and the meaningful results can be only acquired by statistical analysis of millions of data. A backward Monte Carlo algorithm was employed to simulate photon emitting and propagating in the atmosphere under different conditions. The PSF was determined by recording the photon-receiving numbers in fixed bin at different position. A multilayer feed-forward neural network with a single hidden layer was designed to learn the relationship between the PSF's and the input condition parameters. The neural network used the back-propagation learning rule for training. Its input parameters involved atmosphere condition, spectrum range, observing geometry. The outputs of the network were photon-receiving numbers in the corresponding bin. Because the output units were too many to be allowed by neural network, the large network was divided into a collection of smaller ones. These small networks could be ran simultaneously on many workstations and/or PCs to speed up the training. It is important to note that the simulated PSF's by Monte Carlo technique in non-nadir viewing angles are more complicated than that in nadir conditions which brings difficulties in the design of the neural network. The results obtained show that the neural network approach could be very useful to compute the atmospheric PSF based on the simulated data generated by Monte Carlo method.

  9. Modeling and simulation of atmosphere interference signal based on FTIR spectroscopy technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yugui; Li, Qiang; Yu, Zhengyang; Liu, Zhengmin

    2016-09-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy technique, featured with large frequency range and high spectral resolution, is becoming the research focus in spectrum analysis area, and is spreading in atmosphere detection applications in the aerospace field. In this paper, based on FTIR spectroscopy technique, the principle of atmosphere interference signal generation is deduced in theory, and also its mathematical model and simulation are carried out. Finally, the intrinsic characteristics of the interference signal in time domain and frequency domain, which give a theoretical foundation to the performance parameter design of electrical signal processing, are analyzed.

  10. Setting up a liquid crystal phase screen to simulate atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Michael K.; Seward, Anthony J.; Vorontsov, Mikhail A.; Rha, Jungtae; Jimenez, Ray

    2000-11-01

    Phase screens are often used to simulate atmospheric turbulence in systems designed to test adaptive optics techniques. This paper presents the design and implementation of a dynamic phase screen using a simple and inexpensive twisted nematic liquid crystal display taken from a video projector and placed in a pupil plane. The details of the optical system layout, the system alignment procedure, and the operating parameters of the liquid crystal display are discussed. Examples of turbulence (having strength and statistics similar to measured values of atmospheric turbulence in a variety of scenarios) are written to the phase screen, and the effects of the turbulence on image quality are measured and presented.

  11. Organic synthesis in a simulated Jovian atmosphere. III - Synthesis of aminonitriles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molton, P. M.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1974-01-01

    The products from spark and semicorona discharges through mixtures simulating the Jovian atmosphere were analyzed by gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. When the reaction was performed at -80 C, 3-ethylaminopropionitrile and a number of higher homologs were formed. On the other hand, at +20 C, higher molecular-weight material appeared which yielded aminonitrile-derived fragments on mass spectrometry. Although the spectra were not identical, there were notable similarities between these and the mass spectra of some compounds present in the Murray and Orgeuil meteorites. Aminonitriles may occur as minor constituents of the Jovian atmosphere and perhaps by cyclization may produce pyrimidines.

  12. Organic synthesis in a simulated Jovian atmosphere. III - Synthesis of aminonitriles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molton, P. M.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1974-01-01

    The products from spark and semicorona discharges through mixtures simulating the Jovian atmosphere were analyzed by gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry. When the reaction was performed at -80 C, 3-ethylaminopropionitrile and a number of higher homologs were formed. On the other hand, at +20 C, higher molecular-weight material appeared which yielded aminonitrile-derived fragments on mass spectrometry. Although the spectra were not identical, there were notable similarities between these and the mass spectra of some compounds present in the Murray and Orgeuil meteorites. Aminonitriles may occur as minor constituents of the Jovian atmosphere and perhaps by cyclization may produce pyrimidines.

  13. Acute effects of a large bolide impact simulated by a global atmospheric circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Starley L.; Crutzen, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The goal is to use a global three-dimensional atmospheric circulation model developed for studies of atmospheric effects of nuclear war to examine the time evolution of atmospheric effects from a large bolide impact. The model allows for dust and NOx injection, atmospheric transport by winds, removal by precipitation, radiative transfer effects, stratospheric ozone chemistry, and nitric acid formation and deposition on a simulated Earth having realistic geography. Researchers assume a modest 2 km-diameter impactor of the type that could have formed the 32 km-diameter impact structure found near Manson, Iowa and dated at roughly 66 Ma. Such an impact would have created on the order of 5 x 10 to the 10th power metric tons of atmospheric dust (about 0.01 g cm(-2) if spread globally) and 1 x 10 to the 37th power molecules of NO, or two orders of magnitude more stratospheric NO than might be produced in a large nuclear war. Researchers ignore potential injections of CO2 and wildfire smoke, and assume the direct heating of the atmosphere by impact ejecta on a regional scale is not large compared to absorption of solar energy by dust. Researchers assume an impact site at 45 N in the interior of present day North America.

  14. Transient Climate Simulation of DMS in the Marine Ocean - Atmosphere System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloster, S.; Feichter, J.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Six, K.; Stier, P.; Roeckner, E.

    2005-12-01

    Dimethylsulphide (DMS) is thought to be the major biogenic component of the global atmospheric sulphur burden. Phytoplankton produces dimethylsulphoniopropionate, which via enzymatic cleavage forms DMS in the seawater. Through sea-air exchange oceanic DMS enters the atmosphere. DMS in the atmosphere is oxidized to sulphate aerosols, which may impact climate directly through light scattering or indirectly through their role as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby affecting the cloud albedo. It has been postulated that the Earth's climate is partly regulated by variation in DMS emissions through this DMS-CCN-albedo feedback. A reduced version of the "Hamburg Earth System Model" is used to study the feedback of DMS on climate in a transient climate simulation running from 1860 to 2100. The model includes a scheme of the DMS cycle in the ocean linked to the explicit simulation of plankton dynamics in the marine biogeochemistry model (MPI-OM/HAMOCC5). The DMS emissions are passed interactively to the atmosphere model (ECHAM5). The atmosphere model is extended by the microphysical aerosol model (HAM), which predicts the size distribution, the composition and mixing state of the aerosol components sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea salt and dust. These parameters are necessary for an inclusion of the radiative perturbations caused by aerosols in the radiation scheme of the atmospheric model. The transient evolution of black carbon, organic carbon and sulfur dioxide emissions are prescribed assuming for the future the IPCC SRES A1B scenario. DMS, dust and sea salt emissions are calculated interactively. Iron contained in dust deposited onto the ocean surface serves as a micronutrient for phytoplankton in the ocean and therefore influences the DMS production in the ocean. Phytoplankton growth is simulated to be light and temperature dependent. The simulated global warming between 1860 and 2100 affects the marine ecosystem and alters the DMS sea surface

  15. Numerical Simulation of 3—D Temperature Distribution of the Flame Tube of the Combustion Chamber with Air Film COoling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChangHaiping; HuangTaiping; 等

    1996-01-01

    The wall temperature distribution of the flame tube of the combustion chamber is strongly affected by the combustion,radiation and flow.The interaction of these influential factors froms a coupling system.In this paper,a new method,which is different from the previous methods,has been developed for calcuating the temperature distribution of the flame tube wall together with the flow field inside and outside the flame tube,In the calculation.the combustion,heat radiation,cooling air film and injection stream mixing inside the flame tube as well as the secondary air flowing outside the flame tube have been simulated.The calculation,in this paper,uses the SIMPLE algorithm,the κ-εturbulence model and the auto-adjustable damping method .By using this method ,the 3-D temperature distribution of the floame tube wall of the combustion chamber of an aeroengine has been simulated successfully.The calculation results are compared to the experimetal data.The error of wall temperature is less than 10%.

  16. Large eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flows and application to pollen dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamecki, Marcelo

    This work presents a framework for simulating pollen dispersal by wind based on Large Eddy Simulation. Important phenomena such as pollen emission by plants and ground deposition are modeled through the boundary condition. An expression for the vertical equilibrium concentration profile of pollen particles, including the effect of the canopy on the eddy diffusivity as well as corrections for atmospheric stability, is proposed for this purpose. This expression is validated against measurements of vertical concentration profiles of corn pollen above a corn field. The numerical discretization of the evolution equations follows a new approach in which different discretization schemes are used for the velocity and concentration fields. A new interpolation scheme is proposed to couple the two discretizations. The numerical model is validated against previously published experiments of point-source releases of glass beads and pollen grains in the atmospheric boundary layer. The numerical model is used together with experimental data of pollen emission and downwind deposition from a natural field obtained near Washington DC in the summer of 2006. The combined analysis of experimental and numerical data elucidates the emission, transport, and deposition processes in considerable detail. In particular, the relative fractions of pollen deposited inside the source field and airborne at the edge of the field can be quantified. Investigations based on experimental data and direct numerical simulation of the effects of the local structure of the flow on subgrid scale models for simulations of the atmospheric boundary layer are also presented.

  17. Development of a Wind Plant Large-Eddy Simulation with Measurement-Driven Atmospheric Inflow: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quon, Eliot; Churchfield, Matthew; Cheung, Lawrence; Kern, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    This paper details the development of an aeroelastic wind plant model with large-eddy simulation (LES). The chosen LES solver is the Simulator for Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) based on the OpenFOAM framework, coupled to NREL's comprehensive aeroelastic analysis tool, FAST. An atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) precursor simulation was constructed based on assessments of meteorological tower, lidar, and radar data over a 3-hour window. This precursor was tuned to the specific atmospheric conditions that occurred both prior to and during the measurement campaign, enabling capture of a night-to-day transition in the turbulent ABL. In the absence of height-varying temperature measurements, spatially averaged radar data were sufficient to characterize the atmospheric stability of the wind plant in terms of the shear profile, and near-ground temperature sensors provided a reasonable estimate of the ground heating rate describing the morning transition. A full aeroelastic simulation was then performed for a subset of turbines within the wind plant, driven by the precursor. Analysis of two turbines within the array, one directly waked by the other, demonstrated good agreement with measured time-averaged loads.

  18. Digital simulation of a communication link for Pioneer Saturn Uranus atmospheric entry probe, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    A digital simulation study is presented for a candidate modulator/demodulator design in an atmospheric scintillation environment with Doppler, Doppler rate, and signal attenuation typical of the conditions of an outer planet atmospheric probe. The simulation results indicate that the mean channel error rate with and without scintillation are similar to theoretical characterizations of the link. The simulation gives information for calculating other channel statistics and generates a quantized symbol stream on magnetic tape from which error correction decoding is analyzed. Results from the magnetic tape data analyses are also included. The receiver and bit synchronizer are modeled in the simulation at the level of hardware component parameters rather than at the loop equation level and individual hardware parameters are identified. The atmospheric scintillation amplitude and phase are modeled independently. Normal and log normal amplitude processes are studied. In each case the scintillations are low pass filtered. The receiver performance is given for a range of signal to noise ratios with and without the effects of scintillation. The performance is reviewed for critical reciever parameter variations.

  19. Development of a Wind Plant Large-Eddy Simulation with Measurement-Driven Atmospheric Inflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quon, Eliot W.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Cheung, Lawrence; Kern, Stefan

    2017-01-09

    This paper details the development of an aeroelastic wind plant model with large-eddy simulation (LES). The chosen LES solver is the Simulator for Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) based on the OpenFOAM framework, coupled to NREL's comprehensive aeroelastic analysis tool, FAST. An atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) precursor simulation was constructed based on assessments of meteorological tower, lidar, and radar data over a 3-hour window. This precursor was tuned to the specific atmospheric conditions that occurred both prior to and during the measurement campaign, enabling capture of a night-to-day transition in the turbulent ABL. In the absence of height-varying temperature measurements, spatially averaged radar data were sufficient to characterize the atmospheric stability of the wind plant in terms of the shear profile, and near-ground temperature sensors provided a reasonable estimate of the ground heating rate describing the morning transition. A full aeroelastic simulation was then performed for a subset of turbines within the wind plant, driven by the precursor. Analysis of two turbines within the array, one directly waked by the other, demonstrated good agreement with measured time-averaged loads.

  20. Large Eddy Simulation of Aircraft Wake Vortices in a Homogeneous Atmospheric Turbulence: Vortex Decay and Descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jongil; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Proctor, Fred H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of ambient turbulence on decay and descent of aircraft wake vortices are studied using a validated, three-dimensional: large-eddy simulation model. Numerical simulations are performed in order to isolate the effect of ambient turbulence on the wake vortex decay rate within a neutrally-stratified atmosphere. Simulations are conducted for a range of turbulence intensities, by injecting wake vortex pairs into an approximately homogeneous and isotropic turbulence field. The decay rate of the vortex circulation increases clearly with increasing ambient turbulence level, which is consistent with field observations. Based on the results from the numerical simulations, simple decay models are proposed as functions of dimensionless ambient turbulence intensity (eta) and dimensionless time (T) for the circulation averaged over a range of radial distances. With good agreement with the numerical results, a Gaussian type of vortex decay model is proposed for weak turbulence: while an exponential type of Tortex decay model can be applied for strong turbulence. A relationship for the vortex descent based on above vortex decay model is also proposed. Although the proposed models are based on simulations assuming neutral stratification, the model predictions are compared to Lidar vortex measurements observed during stable, neutral, and unstable atmospheric conditions. In the neutral and unstable atmosphere, the model predictions appear to be in reasonable agreement with the observational data, while in the stably-stratified atmosphere, they largely underestimate the observed circulation decay with consistent overestimation of the observed vortex descent. The underestimation of vortex decay during stably-stratified conditions suggests that stratification has an important influence on vortex decay when ambient levels of turbulence are weak.

  1. Hydrostatic Simulation of Earth's Atmospheric Gas Using Multi-particle Collision Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattisahusiwa, Asis; Purqon, Acep; Viridi, Sparisoma

    2016-01-01

    Multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) is a mesoscopic simulation method to simulate fluid particle-like flows. MPCD has been widely used to simulate various problems in condensed matter. In this study, hydrostatic behavior of gas in the Earth's atmospheric layer is simulated by using MPCD method. The simulation is carried out by assuming the system under ideal state and is affected only by gravitational force. Gas particles are homogeneous and placed in 2D box. Interaction of the particles with the box is applied through implementation of boundary conditions (BC). Periodic BC is applied on the left and the right side, specular reflection on the top side, while bounce-back on the bottom side. Simulation program is executed in Arch Linux and running in notebook with processor Intel i5 @2700 MHz with 10 GB DDR3 RAM. The results show behaviors of the particles obey kinetic theory for ideal gas when gravitational acceleration value is proportional to the particle mass. Density distribution as a function of altitude also meets atmosphere's hydrostatic theory.

  2. Atmosphere-only GCM (ACCESS1.0) simulations with prescribed land surface temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerley, Duncan; Dommenget, Dietmar

    2016-06-01

    General circulation models (GCMs) are valuable tools for understanding how the global ocean-atmosphere-land surface system interacts and are routinely evaluated relative to observational data sets. Conversely, observational data sets can also be used to constrain GCMs in order to identify systematic errors in their simulated climates. One such example is to prescribe sea surface temperatures (SSTs) such that 70 % of the Earth's surface temperature field is observationally constrained (known as an Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project, AMIP, simulation). Nevertheless, in such simulations, land surface temperatures are typically allowed to vary freely, and therefore any errors that develop over the land may affect the global circulation. In this study therefore, a method for prescribing the land surface temperatures within a GCM (the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator, ACCESS) is presented. Simulations with this prescribed land surface temperature model produce a mean climate state that is comparable to a simulation with freely varying land temperatures; for example, the diurnal cycle of tropical convection is maintained. The model is then developed further to incorporate a selection of "proof of concept" sensitivity experiments where the land surface temperatures are changed globally and regionally. The resulting changes to the global circulation in these sensitivity experiments are found to be consistent with other idealized model experiments described in the wider scientific literature. Finally, a list of other potential applications is described at the end of the study to highlight the usefulness of such a model to the scientific community.

  3. Simulation Tool for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators at Atmospheric and Sub-Atmospheric Pressures: SBIR Phase I Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhanskii, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    This report is the final report of a SBIR Phase I project. It is identical to the final report submitted, after some proprietary information of administrative nature has been removed. The development of a numerical simulation tool for dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator is reported. The objectives of the project were to analyze and predict DBD operation at wide range of ambient gas pressures. It overcomes the limitations of traditional DBD codes which are limited to low-speed applications and have weak prediction capabilities. The software tool allows DBD actuator analysis and prediction for subsonic to hypersonic flow regime. The simulation tool is based on the VORPAL code developed by Tech-X Corporation. VORPAL's capability of modeling DBD plasma actuator at low pressures (0.1 to 10 torr) using kinetic plasma modeling approach, and at moderate to atmospheric pressures (1 to 10 atm) using hydrodynamic plasma modeling approach, were demonstrated. In addition, results of experiments with pulsed+bias DBD configuration that were performed for validation purposes are reported.

  4. Exploring Biases of Atmospheric Retrievals in Simulated JWST Transmission Spectra of Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Rocchetto, M; Venot, O; Lagage, P -O; Tinetti, G

    2016-01-01

    With a scheduled launch in October 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to revolutionise the field of atmospheric characterization of exoplanets. The broad wavelength coverage and high sensitivity of its instruments will allow us to extract far more information from exoplanet spectra than what has been possible with current observations. In this paper, we investigate whether current retrieval methods will still be valid in the era of JWST, exploring common approximations used when retrieving transmission spectra of hot Jupiters. To assess biases, we use 1D photochemical models to simulate typical hot Jupiter cloud-free atmospheres and generate synthetic observations for a range of carbon-to-oxygen ratios. Then, we retrieve these spectra using TauREx, a Bayesian retrieval tool, using two methodologies: one assuming an isothermal atmosphere, and one assuming a parametrized temperature profile. Both methods assume constant-with-altitude abundances. We found that the isothermal approximation bi...

  5. Numerical simulation research on sodium laser beacon imagings through the atmosphere turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyuan; Qian, Xianmei; Zhang, Suimeng; Zhao, Minfu; Cui, Chaolong; Huang, Honghua

    2016-01-01

    Based on the relative intensity distributions of Sodium Laser Beacon (SLB) and analysis of the on-axis imaging of incoherent light, considering the effects of atmospheric turbulence and the changes of telescope receiving diameter on the short-exposure SLB imagings on the focal plane, imagings of an extended source SLB are simulated under the three atmospheric turbulence models. Results indicate that sharpness and peak strehl ratio of SLB imagings increase but sharpness radius decrease with the decrease of atmosphere turbulence strengths. Moreover, the changes of telescope diameter from 3.0m to 1.5m cause the decrease of sharpness and peak strehl ratio but the increase of sharpness radius.

  6. Consistent simulations of substellar atmospheres and non-equilibrium dust-cloud formation

    CERN Document Server

    Helling, Christiane; Woitke, Peter; Hauschildt, Peter H

    2008-01-01

    We aim to understand cloud formation in substellar objects. We combined the non-equilibrium, stationary cloud model of Helling, Woitke & Thi (2008; seed formation, growth, evaporation, gravitational settling, element conservation) with the general-purpose model atmosphere code PHOENIX (radiative transfer, hydrostatic equilibrium, mixing length theory, chemical equilibrium) in order to consistently calculate cloud formation and radiative transfer with their feedback on convection and gas phase depletion. We calculate the complete 1D model atmosphere structure and the chemical details of the cloud layers. The DRIFT-PHOENIX models enable the first stellar atmosphere simulation that is based on the actual cloud formation process. The resulting (T,p) profiles differ considerably from the previous limiting PHOENIX cases DUSTY and COND. A tentative comparison with observations demonstrates that the determination of effective temperatures based on simple cloud models has to be applied with care. Based on our new ...

  7. Simulations of fusion chamber dynamics and first wall response in a Z-pinch driven fusion–fission hybrid power reactor (Z-FFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, J.M., E-mail: qjm06@sina.com [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Wang, Z., E-mail: wangz_es@caep.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Chu, Y.Y., E-mail: chuyanyun@caep.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Li, Z.H., E-mail: lee_march@sina.com [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Z-FFR utilizes DT neutrons to drive a sub-critical fission blanket to produce energy. • A metal shell and Ar gas are employed in the fusion chamber for shock mitigation. • Massive materials can effectively mitigate the thermal heats on the chamber wall. • The W-coated Zr-alloy first wall exhibits good viability as a long-lived component. - Abstract: In a Z-pinch driven fusion–fission hybrid power reactor (Z-FFR), the fusion target will produce enormous energy of ∼1.5 GJ per pulse at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. Almost 20% of the fusion energy yield, approximately 300 MJ, is released in forms of pulsed X-rays. To prevent the first wall from fatal damages by the intense X-rays, a thin spherical metal shell and rare Ar buffer gas are introduced to mitigate the transient X-ray bursts. Radiation hydrodynamics in the fusion chamber were investigated by MULTI-1D simulations, and the corresponding thermal and mechanical loads on the first wall were also obtained. The simulations indicated that by optimizing the design parameters of the metal shell and Ar buffer gas, peak power flux of the thermal heats on the first wall could be mitigated to less than 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2} within a time scale of several milliseconds, while peak overpressures of the mechanical loads varying from 0.6 to 0.7 MPa. In addition, the thermomechanical response in a W–coated Zr-alloy first wall was performed by FWDR1D calculations using the derived thermal and mechanical loads as inputs. The temperature and stress fields were analyzed, and the corresponding elastic strains were conducted for primary lifetime estimations by using the Coffin–Manson relationships of both W and Zr-alloy. It was shown that the maximum temperature rises and stresses in the first wall were less than 50 K and 130 MPa respectively, and lifetime of the first wall would be in excess of 10{sup 9} cycles. The chamber exhibits good viability as a long-lived component to sustain the Z-FFR conceptual

  8. Simulation of submillimetre atmospheric spectra for characterising potential ground-based remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Emma C.; Withington, Stafford; Newnham, David A.; Wadhams, Peter; Jones, Anna E.; Clancy, Robin

    2016-11-01

    The submillimetre is an understudied region of the Earth's atmospheric electromagnetic spectrum. Prior technological gaps and relatively high opacity due to the prevalence of rotational water vapour lines at these wavelengths have slowed progress from a ground-based remote sensing perspective; however, emerging superconducting detector technologies in the fields of astronomy offer the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. A site study, with a focus on the polar regions, is performed to assess theoretical feasibility by simulating the downwelling (zenith angle = 0°) clear-sky submillimetre spectrum from 30 mm (10 GHz) to 150 µm (2000 GHz) at six locations under annual mean, summer, winter, daytime, night-time and low-humidity conditions. Vertical profiles of temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified. Signal strengths, centre frequencies, bandwidths, estimated minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures are determined for all cases. HOBr, HBr and HO2 produce brightness temperature peaks in the mK to µK range, whereas the N2O peaks are in the K range. The optimal submillimetre remote sensing lines for the four species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad wavelength range. The techniques presented here provide a framework that can be applied to additional species of interest and taken forward to simulate retrievals and guide the

  9. Effectiveness of an inlet flow turbulence control device to simulate flight noise fan in an anechoic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R. P.; Wazyniak, J. A.; Shaw, L. M.; Mackinnon, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A hemispherical inlet flow control device was tested on a 50.8 cm. (20-inch) diameter fan stage in the NASA-Lewis anechoic chamber. The control device used honeycomb and wire mesh to reduce turbulence intensities entering the fan. Far field acoustic power level results show about a 5 db reduction in blade passing tone and about 10 dB reduction in multiple pure tone sound power at 90% design fan speed with the inlet device in place. Hot film cross probes were inserted in the inlet to obtain data for two components of the turbulence at 65 and 90% design fan speed. Without the flow control device, the axial intensities were below 1.0%, while the circumferential intensities were almost twice this value. The inflow control device significantly reduced the circumferential turbulence intensities and also reduced the axial length scale.

  10. Effectiveness of an inlet flow turbulence control device to simulate flight fan noise in an anechoic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, R. P.; Wazyniak, J. A.; Shaw, L. M.; Mackinnon, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A hemispherical inlet flow control device was tested on a 50.8 cm. (20-inch) diameter fan stage in the NASA-Lewis Anechoic Chamber. The control device used honeycomb and wire mesh to reduce turbulence intensities entering the fan. Far field acoustic power level results showed about a 5 dB reduction in blade passing tone and about 10 dB reduction in multiple pure tone sound power at 90% design fan speed with the inlet device in place. Hot film cross probes were inserted in the inlet to obtain data for two components of the turbulence at 65 and 90% design fan speed. Without the flow control device the axial intensities were below 1.0%, while the circumferential intensities were almost twice this value. The inflow control device significantly reduced the circumferential turbulence intensities and also reduced the axial length scale.

  11. Atmospheric effects on Quaternary polarization encoding for free space communication, laboratory simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Soorat, Ram

    2015-01-01

    We have simulated atmospheric effects such as fog and smoke in laboratory environment to simulate depolarisation due to atmospheric effects during a free space optical communi- cation. This has been used to study noise in two components of quaternary encoding for polarization shift keying. Individual components of a Quaternary encoding, such as vertical and horizontal as well as 45$^\\circ$ and 135$^\\circ$ , are tested separately and indicates that the depo- larization effects are different for these two situation. However, due to a differential method used to extract information bits, the protocol shows extremely low bit error rates. The information obtained is useful during deployment of a fully functional Quaternary encoded PolSK scheme in free space.

  12. Numerical simulations of multi-shell plasma twisters in the solar atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Murawski, K; Musielak, Z E; Dwivedi, B N

    2015-01-01

    We perform numerical simulations of impulsively generated Alfv\\'en waves in an isolated photospheric flux tube, and explore the propagation of these waves along such magnetic structure that extends from the photosphere, where these waves are triggered, to the solar corona, and analyze resulting magnetic shells. Our model of the solar atmosphere is constructed by adopting the temperature distribution based on the semi-empirical model and specifying the curved magnetic field lines that constitute the magnetic flux tube which is rooted in the solar photosphere. The evolution of the solar atmosphere is described by 3D, ideal magnetohydrodynamic equations that are numerically solved by the FLASH code. Our numerical simulations reveal, based on the physical properties of the multi-shell magnetic twisters and the amount of energy and momentum associated with them, that these multi-shell magnetic twisters may be responsible for the observed heating of the lower solar corona and for the formation of solar wind. Moreov...

  13. GCM simulations of Titan's middle and lower atmosphere and comparison to observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lora, Juan M; Russell, Joellen L

    2014-01-01

    Simulation results are presented from a new general circulation model (GCM) of Titan, the Titan Atmospheric Model (TAM), which couples the Flexible Modeling System (FMS) spectral dynamical core to a suite of external/sub-grid-scale physics. These include a new non-gray radiative transfer module that takes advantage of recent data from Cassini-Huygens, large-scale condensation and quasi-equilibrium moist convection schemes, a surface model with "bucket" hydrology, and boundary layer turbulent diffusion. The model produces a realistic temperature structure from the surface to the lower mesosphere, including a stratopause, as well as satisfactory superrotation. The latter is shown to depend on the dynamical core's ability to build up angular momentum from surface torques. Simulated latitudinal temperature contrasts are adequate, compared to observations, and polar temperature anomalies agree with observations. In the lower atmosphere, the insolation distribution is shown to strongly impact turbulent fluxes, and ...

  14. Radiative transfer with scattering for domain-decomposed 3D MHD simulations of cool stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Hayek, W; Carlsson, M; Trampedach, R; Collet, R; Gudiksen, B V; Hansteen, V H; Leenaarts, J

    2010-01-01

    We present the implementation of a radiative transfer solver with coherent scattering in the new BIFROST code for radiative magneto-hydrodynamical (MHD) simulations of stellar surface convection. The code is fully parallelized using MPI domain decomposition, which allows for large grid sizes and improved resolution of hydrodynamical structures. We apply the code to simulate the surface granulation in a solar-type star, ignoring magnetic fields, and investigate the importance of coherent scattering for the atmospheric structure. A scattering term is added to the radiative transfer equation, requiring an iterative computation of the radiation field. We use a short-characteristics-based Gauss-Seidel acceleration scheme to compute radiative flux divergences for the energy equation. The effects of coherent scattering are tested by comparing the temperature stratification of three 3D time-dependent hydrodynamical atmosphere models of a solar-type star: without scattering, with continuum scattering only, and with bo...

  15. Simulated effect of calcification feedback on atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Cao, Long

    2016-01-01

    Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 reduces pH and saturation state of calcium carbonate materials of seawater, which could reduce the calcification rate of some marine organisms, triggering a negative feedback on the growth of atmospheric CO2. We quantify the effect of this CO2-calcification feedback by conducting a series of Earth system model simulations that incorporate different parameterization schemes describing the dependence of calcification rate on saturation state of CaCO3. In a scenario with SRES A2 CO2 emission until 2100 and zero emission afterwards, by year 3500, in the simulation without CO2-calcification feedback, model projects an accumulated ocean CO2 uptake of 1462 PgC, atmospheric CO2 of 612 ppm, and surface pH of 7.9. Inclusion of CO2-calcification feedback increases ocean CO2 uptake by 9 to 285 PgC, reduces atmospheric CO2 by 4 to 70 ppm, and mitigates the reduction in surface pH by 0.003 to 0.06, depending on the form of parameterization scheme used. It is also found that the effect of CO2-calcification feedback on ocean carbon uptake is comparable and could be much larger than the effect from CO2-induced warming. Our results highlight the potentially important role CO2-calcification feedback plays in ocean carbon cycle and projections of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. PMID:26838480

  16. Simulated effect of calcification feedback on atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Cao, Long

    2016-02-01

    Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 reduces pH and saturation state of calcium carbonate materials of seawater, which could reduce the calcification rate of some marine organisms, triggering a negative feedback on the growth of atmospheric CO2. We quantify the effect of this CO2-calcification feedback by conducting a series of Earth system model simulations that incorporate different parameterization schemes describing the dependence of calcification rate on saturation state of CaCO3. In a scenario with SRES A2 CO2 emission until 2100 and zero emission afterwards, by year 3500, in the simulation without CO2-calcification feedback, model projects an accumulated ocean CO2 uptake of 1462 PgC, atmospheric CO2 of 612 ppm, and surface pH of 7.9. Inclusion of CO2-calcification feedback increases ocean CO2 uptake by 9 to 285 PgC, reduces atmospheric CO2 by 4 to 70 ppm, and mitigates the reduction in surface pH by 0.003 to 0.06, depending on the form of parameterization scheme used. It is also found that the effect of CO2-calcification feedback on ocean carbon uptake is comparable and could be much larger than the effect from CO2-induced warming. Our results highlight the potentially important role CO2-calcification feedback plays in ocean carbon cycle and projections of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  17. Simulation of the Mg(Ar) ionization chamber currents by different Monte Carlo codes in benchmark gamma fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Chun [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yuan-Hao, E-mail: yhl.taiwan@gmail.com [Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Center, Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu City 30013, Taiwan (China); Nievaart, Sander [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Petten (Netherlands); Chen, Yen-Fu [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Wu, Shu-Wei; Chou, Wen-Tsae [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Shiang-Huei [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-01

    High energy photon (over 10 MeV) and neutron beams adopted in radiobiology and radiotherapy always produce mixed neutron/gamma-ray fields. The Mg(Ar) ionization chambers are commonly applied to determine the gamma-ray dose because of its neutron insensitive characteristic. Nowadays, many perturbation corrections for accurate dose estimation and lots of treatment planning systems are based on Monte Carlo technique. The Monte Carlo codes EGSnrc, FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP5, and MCNPX were used to evaluate energy dependent response functions of the Exradin M2 Mg(Ar) ionization chamber to a parallel photon beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV. For the sake of validation, measurements were carefully performed in well-defined (a) primary M-100 X-ray calibration field, (b) primary {sup 60}Co calibration beam, (c) 6-MV, and (d) 10-MV therapeutic beams in hospital. At energy region below 100 keV, MCNP5 and MCNPX both had lower responses than other codes. For energies above 1 MeV, the MCNP ITS-mode greatly resembled other three codes and the differences were within 5%. Comparing to the measured currents, MCNP5 and MCNPX using ITS-mode had perfect agreement with the {sup 60}Co, and 10-MV beams. But at X-ray energy region, the derivations reached 17%. This work shows us a better insight into the performance of different Monte Carlo codes in photon-electron transport calculation. Regarding the application of the mixed field dosimetry like BNCT, MCNP with ITS-mode is recognized as the most suitable tool by this work.

  18. Simulation of a long term atmospheric corrosion process on plain and weathering steels

    OpenAIRE

    Bolivar, F.; Morales, A.; Arroyave, C.

    2003-01-01

    Information on weathering steel behaviour and its rust products characteristics after decades of atmospheric exposure are scarce. On the other side, generally accepted laboratory tests for the assessment of its corrosion resistance have not been developed yet. Consequently, simulating corrosion in the laboratory during long periods of time is attractive for the interesting and complete information obtainable from them. In the present work, AISI-SAE 1008 and ASTM-588 B steel samples have been ...

  19. Operational simulation of continental water masses consistent with atmospheric and oceanic data.

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Dill; Walter, C.;  

    2008-01-01

    Operational global mass transport data of the atmosphere and the oceans are widely used for studies of earth rotation excitation and gravity field simulations and are essential for GRACE dealising purposes, too. Seasonal and short periodic variations are also caused by continental water mass redistributions. In order to account for the continental hydrology processes as well and to close the global water cycle, continental water mass storage fields and fluxes are needed in the same operationa...

  20. An analytical model for radioactive pollutant release simulation in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weymar, Guilherme J.; Vilhena, Marco T.; Bodmann, Bardo E.J., E-mail: guicefetrs@gmail.com, E-mail: mtmbvilhena@gmail.com, E-mail: bejbodmann@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Buske, Daniela; Quadros, Regis, E-mail: danielabuske@gmail.com, E-mail: quadros99@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), Capao do Leao, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Matematica

    2013-07-01

    Simulations of emission of radioactive substances in the atmosphere from the Brazilian nuclear power plant Angra 1 are a necessary tool for control and elaboration of emergency plans as a preventive action for possible accidents. In the present work we present an analytical solution for radioactive pollutant dispersion in the atmosphere, solving the time-dependent three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation. The experiment here used as a reference in the simulations consisted of the controlled releases of radioactive tritiated water vapor from the meteorological tower close to the power plant at Itaorna Beach. The wind profile was determined using experimental meteorological data and the micrometeorological parameters were calculated from empirical equations obtained in the literature. We report on a novel analytical formulation for the concentration of products of a radioactive chain released in the atmospheric boundary layer and solve the set of coupled equations for each chain radionuclide by the GILTT solution, assuming the decay of all progenitors radionuclide for each equation as source term. Further we report on numerical simulations, as an explicit but fictitious example and consider three radionuclides in the radioactive chain of Uranium 235. (author)

  1. Experimental and Simulation-Based Investigation of Polycentric Motion of an Inherent Compliant Pneumatic Bending Actuator with Skewed Rotary Elastic Chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Wilkening

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To offer a functionality that could not be found in traditional rigid robots, compliant actuators are in development worldwide for a variety of applications and especially for human–robot interaction. Pneumatic bending actuators are a special kind of such actuators. Due to the absence of fixed mechanical axes and their soft behavior, these actuators generally possess a polycentric motion ability. This can be very useful to provide an implicit self-alignment to human joint axes in exoskeleton-like rehabilitation devices. As a possible realization, a novel bending actuator (BA was developed using patented pneumatic skewed rotary elastic chambers (sREC. To analyze the actuator self-alignment properties, knowledge about the motion of this bending actuator type, the so-called skewed rotary elastic chambers bending actuator (sRECBA, is of high interest and this paper presents experimental and simulation-based kinematic investigations. First, to describe actuator motion, the finite helical axes (FHA of basic actuator elements are determined using a three-dimensional (3D camera system. Afterwards, a simplified two-dimensional (2D kinematic simulation model based on a four-bar linkage was developed and the motion was compared to the experimental data by calculating the instantaneous center of rotation (ICR. The equivalent kinematic model of the sRECBA was realized using a series of four-bar linkages and the resulting ICR was analyzed in simulation. Finally, the FHA of the sRECBA were determined and analyzed for three different specific motions. The results show that the actuator’s FHA adapt to different motions performed and it can be assumed that implicit self-alignment to the polycentric motion of the human joint axis will be provided.

  2. Engineering verification of the biomass production chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M., III; Sager, J. C.; Jones, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for life support systems, both biological and physical-chemical, for long-term human attended space missions are under serious study throughout NASA. The KSC 'breadboard' project has focused on biomass production using higher plants for atmospheric regeneration and food production in a special biomass production chamber. This chamber is designed to provide information on food crop growth rate, contaminants in the chamber that alter plant growth requirements for atmospheric regeneration, carbon dioxide consumption, oxygen production, and water utilization. The shape and size, mass, and energy requirements in relation to the overall integrity of the biomass production chamber are under constant study.

  3. Large Eddy Simulation and Field Experiments of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamecki, M.; Meneveau, C.; Parlange, M. B.; van Hout, R.

    2006-12-01

    Dispersion of airborne pollen by the wind has been a subject of interest for botanists and allergists for a long time. More recently, the development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and subsequent contamination of natural plant populations has brought even more interest to this field. A critical question is how far from the source field pollen grains will be advected. Clearly the answer depends on the aerodynamic properties of the pollen, geometrical properties of the field, topography, local vegetation, wind conditions, atmospheric stability, etc. As a consequence, field experiments are well suited to provide some information on pollen transport mechanisms but are limited to specific field and weather conditions. Numerical simulations do not have this drawback and can be a useful tool to study pollen dispersal in a variety of configurations. It is well known that the dispersion of particles in turbulent fields is strongly affected by the large scale coherent structures. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is a technique that allows us to study the typical distances reached by pollen grains and, at the same time, resolve the larger coherent structures present in the atmospheric boundary layer. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using LES. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of extreme importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. In both cases we make use of the theoretical profile for suspended particles derived by Kind (1992). Field experiments were performed to study the applicability of the theoretical profile to pollen grains and the results are encouraging. Airborne concentrations as well as ground deposition from the simulations are compared to experimental data to validate the

  4. Atmospheric mercury simulation using the CMAQ model: formulation description and analysis of wet deposition results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, O. Russell; Brehme, Katherine A.

    The community multiscale air quality (CMAQ) modeling system has been adapted to simulate the emission, transport, transformation and deposition of atmospheric mercury (Hg) in three distinct forms: elemental Hg gas, reactive gaseous Hg, and particulate Hg. Emissions of Hg are currently defined from information published in the Environmental Protection Agency's Mercury Study Report to Congress. The atmospheric transport of these three forms of Hg is simulated in the same manner as for all other substances simulated by the CMAQ model to date. Transformations of Hg are simulated with four new chemical reactions within the standard CMAQ gaseous chemistry framework and a highly modified cloud chemistry mechanism which includes a compound-specific speciation for oxidized forms of Hg, seven new aqueous-phase Hg reactions, six aqueous Hg chemical equilibria, and a two-way mechanism for the sorption of dissolved oxidized Hg to elemental carbon particles. The CMAQ Hg model simulates the partitioning of reactive gaseous Hg between air and cloud water based on the Henry's constant for mercuric chloride. Henry's equilibrium is assumed for elemental Hg also. Particulate Hg is assumed to be incorporated into the aqueous medium during cloud nucleation. Wet and dry deposition is simulated for each of the three forms of Hg. Wet deposition rate is calculated based on precipitation information from the CMAQ meteorological processor and the physicochemical Hg speciation in the cloud chemistry mechanism. Dry deposition rate is calculated based on dry deposition velocity and air concentration information for each of the three forms of Hg. The horizontal modeling domain covers the central and eastern United States and adjacent southern Canada. An analysis of simulated Hg wet deposition versus weekly observations is performed. The results are described for two evaluation periods: 4 April-2 May 1995, and 20 June-18 July 1995.

  5. Simulation of atmospheric carbon dioxide variability with a global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Koyama

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the advantages of using a coupled atmospheric-tracer transport model, comprising a global Eulerian model and a global Lagrangian particle dispersion model, for reproducibility of tracer gas variation affected by near field around observation sites. The ability to resolve variability in atmospheric composition on an hourly time scale and a spatial scale of several kilometers would be beneficial for analyzing data from continuous ground-based monitoring and upcoming space-based observations. The coupled model yields increased horizontal resolution of transport and fluxes, and has been tested in regional-scale studies of atmospheric chemistry. By applying the Lagrangian component to the global domain, we extend this approach to the global scale, thereby enabling global inverse modeling and data assimilation. To validate the coupled model, we compare model-simulated CO2 concentrations with continuous observations at two sites operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA and one site operated by National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan. As the purpose of this study is limited to demonstration of the new modeling approach, we select a small subset of 3 sites to highlight use of the model in various geographical areas. To explore the capability of the coupled model in simulating synoptic-scale meteorological phenomena, we calculate the correlation coefficients and variance ratios between deseasonalized model-simulated and observed CO2 concentrations. Compared with the Eulerian model alone, the coupled model yields improved agreement between modeled and observed CO2 concentrations.

  6. Impact of Urban Surface Roughness Length Parameterization Scheme on Urban Atmospheric Environment Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meichun Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the impact of urban surface roughness length z0 parameterization scheme on the atmospheric environment simulation over Beijing has been investigated through two sets of numerical experiments using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with the Urban Canopy Model. For the control experiment (CTL, the urban surface z0 parameterization scheme used in UCM is the model default one. For another experiment (EXP, a newly developed urban surface z0 parameterization scheme is adopted, which takes into account the comprehensive effects of urban morphology. The comparison of the two sets of simulation results shows that all the roughness parameters computed from the EXP run are larger than those in the CTL run. The increased roughness parameters in the EXP run result in strengthened drag and blocking effects exerted by buildings, which lead to enhanced friction velocity, weakened wind speed in daytime, and boosted turbulent kinetic energy after sunset. Thermal variables (sensible heat flux and temperature are much less sensitive to z0 variations. In contrast with the CTL run, the EXP run reasonably simulates the observed nocturnal low-level jet. Besides, the EXP run-simulated land surface-atmosphere momentum and heat exchanges are also in better agreement with the observation.

  7. Fourier analysis of Solar atmospheric numerical simulations accelerated with GPUs (CUDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marur, A.

    2015-12-01

    Solar dynamics from the convection zone creates a variety of waves that may propagate through the solar atmosphere. These waves are important in facilitating the energy transfer between the sun's surface and the corona as well as propagating energy throughout the solar system. How and where these waves are dissipated remains an open question. Advanced 3D numerical simulations have furthered our understanding of the processes involved. Fourier transforms to understand the nature of the waves by finding the frequency and wavelength of these waves through the simulated atmosphere, as well as the nature of their propagation and where they get dissipated. In order to analyze the different waves produced by the aforementioned simulations and models, Fast Fourier Transform algorithms will be applied. Since the processing of the multitude of different layers of the simulations (of the order of several 100^3 grid points) would be time intensive and inefficient on a CPU, CUDA, a computing architecture that harnesses the power of the GPU, will be used to accelerate the calculations.

  8. Simulation-Based Analysis of Reentry Dynamics for the Sharp Atmospheric Entry Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillier, Clemens Emmanuel

    1998-01-01

    This thesis describes the analysis of the reentry dynamics of a high-performance lifting atmospheric entry vehicle through numerical simulation tools. The vehicle, named SHARP, is currently being developed by the Thermal Protection Materials and Systems branch of NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. The goal of this project is to provide insight into trajectory tradeoffs and vehicle dynamics using simulation tools that are powerful, flexible, user-friendly and inexpensive. Implemented Using MATLAB and SIMULINK, these tools are developed with an eye towards further use in the conceptual design of the SHARP vehicle's trajectory and flight control systems. A trajectory simulator is used to quantify the entry capabilities of the vehicle subject to various operational constraints. Using an aerodynamic database computed by NASA and a model of the earth, the simulator generates the vehicle trajectory in three-dimensional space based on aerodynamic angle inputs. Requirements for entry along the SHARP aerothermal performance constraint are evaluated for different control strategies. Effect of vehicle mass on entry parameters is investigated, and the cross range capability of the vehicle is evaluated. Trajectory results are presented and interpreted. A six degree of freedom simulator builds on the trajectory simulator and provides attitude simulation for future entry controls development. A Newtonian aerodynamic model including control surfaces and a mass model are developed. A visualization tool for interpreting simulation results is described. Control surfaces are roughly sized. A simple controller is developed to fly the vehicle along its aerothermal performance constraint using aerodynamic flaps for control. This end-to-end demonstration proves the suitability of the 6-DOF simulator for future flight control system development. Finally, issues surrounding real-time simulation with hardware in the loop are discussed.

  9. Venus atmosphere simulated by a high-resolution general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko

    2016-07-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) for Venus on the basis of AFES (AGCM For the Earth Simulator) have been developed (e.g., Sugimoto et al., 2014a) and a very high-resolution simulation is performed. The highest resolution of the model is T319L120; 960 times 480 horizontal grids (grid intervals are about 40 km) with 120 vertical layers (layer intervals are about 1 km). In the model, the atmosphere is dry and forced by the solar heating with the diurnal and semi-diurnal components. The infrared radiative process is simplified by adopting Newtonian cooling approximation. The temperature is relaxed to a prescribed horizontally uniform temperature distribution, in which a layer with almost neutral static stability observed in the Venus atmosphere presents. A fast zonal wind in a solid-body rotation is given as the initial state. Starting from this idealized superrotation, the model atmosphere reaches a quasi-equilibrium state within 1 Earth year and this state is stably maintained for more than 10 Earth years. The zonal-mean zonal flow with weak midlatitude jets has almost constant velocity of 120 m/s in latitudes between 45°S and 45°N at the cloud top levels, which agrees very well with observations. In the cloud layer, baroclinic waves develop continuously at midlatitudes and generate Rossby-type waves at the cloud top (Sugimoto et al., 2014b). At the polar region, warm polar vortex zonally surrounded by a cold latitude band (cold collar) is well reproduced (Ando et al., 2016). As for horizontal kinetic energy spectra, divergent component is broadly (k>10) larger than rotational component compared with that on Earth (Kashimura et al., in preparation). Finally, recent results for thermal tides and small-scale waves will be shown in the presentation. Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014a), Baroclinic modes in the Venus atmosphere simulated by GCM, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Vol. 119, p1950-1968. Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014b), Waves in a Venus general

  10. Large eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer over wind farms using a prescribed boundary layer approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of flow in a wind farm is studied in neutral as well as thermally stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). An approach has been practiced to simulate the flow in a fully developed wind farm boundary layer. The approach is based on the Immersed Boundary Method (IBM......) and involves implementation of an arbitrary prescribed initial boundary layer (See [1]). A prescribed initial boundary layer profile is enforced through the computational domain using body forces to maintain a desired flow field. The body forces are then stored and applied on the domain through the simulation...... and the boundary layer shape will be modified due to the interaction of the turbine wakes and buoyancy contributions. The implemented method is capable of capturing the most important features of wakes of wind farms [1] while having the advantage of resolving the wall layer with a coarser grid than typically...

  11. Large Eddy Simulation of Pollen Transport in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamecki, Marcelo; Meneveau, Charles; Parlange, Marc B.

    2007-11-01

    The development of genetically modified crops and questions about cross-pollination and contamination of natural plant populations enhanced the importance of understanding wind dispersion of airborne pollen. The main objective of this work is to simulate the dispersal of pollen grains in the atmospheric surface layer using large eddy simulation. Pollen concentrations are simulated by an advection-diffusion equation including gravitational settling. Of great importance is the specification of the bottom boundary conditions characterizing the pollen source over the canopy and the deposition process everywhere else. The velocity field is discretized using a pseudospectral approach. However the application of the same discretization scheme to the pollen equation generates unphysical solutions (i.e. negative concentrations). The finite-volume bounded scheme SMART is used for the pollen equation. A conservative interpolation scheme to determine the velocity field on the finite volume surfaces was developed. The implementation is validated against field experiments of point source and area field releases of pollen.

  12. Simulating carbon exchange using a regional atmospheric model coupled to an advanced land-surface model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. W. Ter Maat

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a case study to investigate what the main controlling factors are that determine atmospheric carbon dioxide content for a region in the centre of The Netherlands. We use the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS, coupled with a land surface scheme simulating carbon, heat and momentum fluxes (SWAPS-C, and including also submodels for urban and marine fluxes, which in principle should include the dominant mechanisms and should be able to capture the relevant dynamics of the system. To validate the model, observations are used that were taken during an intensive observational campaign in central Netherlands in summer 2002. These include flux-tower observations and aircraft observations of vertical profiles and spatial fluxes of various variables.

    The simulations performed with the coupled regional model (RAMS-SWAPS-C are in good qualitative agreement with the observations. The station validation of the model demonstrates that the incoming shortwave radiation and surface fluxes of water and CO2 are well simulated. The comparison against aircraft data shows that the regional meteorology (i.e. wind, temperature is captured well by the model. Comparing spatially explicitly simulated fluxes with aircraft observed fluxes we conclude that in general latent heat fluxes are underestimated by the model compared to the observations but that the latter exhibit large variability within all flights. Sensitivity experiments demonstrate the relevance of the urban emissions of carbon dioxide for the carbon balance in this particular region. The same tests also show the relation between uncertainties in surface fluxes and those in atmospheric concentrations.

  13. Simulation of airbag impact on eyes with different axial lengths after transsclerally fixated posterior chamber intraocular lens by using finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jane Huang,1 Eiichi Uchio,1 Satoru Goto2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, 2Nihon ESI KK Technical Division, Tokyo, Japan Purpose: To determine the biomechanical response of an impacting airbag on eyes with different axial lengths with transsclerally fixated posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL.Materials and methods: Simulations in a model human eye were performed with a computer using a finite element analysis program created by Nihon, ESI Group. The airbag was set to be deployed at five different velocities and to impact on eyes with three different axial lengths. These eyes were set to have transsclerally fixated PC IOL by a 10-0 polypropylene possessing a tensile force limit of 0.16 N according to the United States Pharmacopeia XXII.Results: The corneoscleral opening was observed at a speed of 40 m/second or more in all model eyes. Eyes with the longest axial length of 25.85 mm had the greatest extent of deformity at any given impact velocity. The impact force exceeded the tensile force of 10-0 polypropylene at an impact velocity of 60 m/second in all eyes, causing breakage of the suture. Conclusion: Eyes with transsclerally fixated PC IOL could rupture from airbag impact at high velocities. Eyes with long axial lengths experienced a greater deformity upon airbag impact due to a thinner eye wall. Further basic research on the biomechanical response for assessing eye injuries could help in developing a better airbag and in the further understanding of ocular traumas. Keywords: airbag, ocular trauma, computer simulation, transsclerally fixated posterior chamber intraocular lens, finite element analysis

  14. New planetary atmosphere simulations: application to the organic aerosols of Titan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, P; Cosia, D; Gazeau, M C; Raulin, F

    1997-01-01

    The atmosphere of Titan partly consists of hazes and aerosol particles. Experimental simulation is one of the powerful approaches to study the processes which yield these particles, and their chemical composition. It provides laboratory analogues, sometimes called tholins. Development and optimization of experimental tools were undertaken in order to perform chemical and physical analyses of analogues under conditions free from contamination. A "Titan aerosol generator" was developed in the frame of the Cassini-Huygens mission, in order to produce Titan's aerosol analogues within conditions closer to those of the titanian atmosphere: cold plasma simulation system, low pressure and low temperature. The direct current (DC) glow discharge is produced by applying a DC voltage between two conductive electrodes inserted into the gas mixture-model of the studied atmosphere- at low pressure. A high-impedance power supply is used to provide the electrical field. All the system is installed in a glove box, which protect samples from any contamination. Finally the research program expected with this new material is presented.

  15. Implementation of a Phase Only Spatial Light Modulator as an Atmospheric Turbulence Simulator at 1550 nm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Font

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling and simulating atmospheric turbulence in a controlled environment have been a focus of interest for scientists for decades. The development of new technologies allows scientists to perform this task in a more realistic and controlled environment and provides powerful tools for the study and better understanding of the propagation of light through a nonstatic medium such as the atmosphere. Free space laser communications (FSLC and studies in light propagation through the atmosphere are areas which constantly benefit from breakthroughs in technology and in the development of realistic atmospheric turbulence simulators, in particular (Santiago et al. 2011. In this paper, we present the results from the implementation of a phase only spatial light modulator (SLM as an atmospheric turbulence simulator for light propagation in the short-wave infrared (SWIR regime. Specifically, we demonstrate its efficacy for its use in an FSLC system, at a wavelength of 1550 nm.

  16. Hydrostatic Simulation of Earth's Atmospheric Gas Using Multi-particle Collision Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pattisahusiwa, Asis; Virid, Sparisoma

    2015-01-01

    Multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) is a mesoscopic simulation method to simulate fluid particle-like flows. MPCD has been widely used to simulate various problems in condensed matter. In this study, hydrostatic behavior of gas in the Earth's atmospheric layer is simulated by using MPCD method. The simulation is carried out by assuming the system under ideal state and is affected only by gravitational force. Gas particles are homogeneous and placed in 2D box. Interaction of the particles with the box is applied through implementation of boundary conditions (BC). Periodic BC is applied on the left and the right side, specular reflection on the top side, while bounce-back on the bottom side. Simulation program is executed in Arch Linux and running in notebook with processor Intel i5 @2700 MHz with 10 GB DDR3 RAM. The results show behaviors of the particles obey kinetic theory for ideal gas when gravitational acceleration value is proportional to the particle mass. Density distribution as a function of alti...

  17. Simulation of atmospheric aerosols in East Asia using modeling system RAMS-CMAQ: Model evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The modeling system RAMS-CMAQ is applied in this paper to East Asia to simulate the temporo-spatial concentration distributions of atmospheric aerosols. For evaluating its performances, modeled concentrations of aerosols such as sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon and organic carbon were compared with observations obtained in East Asia on board of two aircrafts in the springtime of 2001. The comparison showed generally good agreement, and, in particular, that the modeling system captured most of the important observed features, including vertical gradients of the aerosols of the Asian outflow over the western Pacific. The evaluation results provide us with much confidence for further use of the modeling system to investigate the transport and transformation processes of atmospheric aerosols over East Asia and to assess their impacts on the Earth's radiation budget.

  18. Coupled Atmosphere-Fire Simulations of Fireflux: Impacts of Model Resolution on Model Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanski, Adam K; Jenkins, M A; Mandel, J; Beezley, J D

    2011-01-01

    The ability to forecast grass fire spread could be of a great importance for agencies making decisions about prescribed burns. However, the usefulness of the models used for fire-spread predictions is limited by the time required for completing the coupled atmosphere-fire simulations. In this study we analyze the sensitivity of a coupled model with respect to the vertical resolution of the atmospheric grid and the resolution of fire mesh that both affect computational performance of the model. Based on the observations of the plume properties recorded during the FireFlux experiment (Clements et al., 2007), we try to establish the optimal model configuration that provides realistic results for the least computational expense.

  19. Spatially resolved simulation of a radio frequency driven micro atmospheric pressure plasma jet and its effluent

    CERN Document Server

    Hemke, Torben; Gebhardt, Markus; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Radio frequency driven plasma jets are frequently employed as efficient plasma sources for surface modification and other processes at atmospheric pressure. The \\textit{radio-frequency driven micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet} ($\\mu$APPJ) is a particular variant of that concept whose geometry allows direct optical access. In this work, the characteristics of a $\\mu$APPJ operated with a helium-oxygen mixture and its interaction with a helium environment are studied by numerical simulation. The density and temperature of the electrons, as well as the concentration of all reactive species are studied both in the jet itself and in its effluent. It is found that the effluent is essentially free of charge carriers but contains a substantial amount of activated oxygen (O, O$_3$ and O$_2(^1\\Delta)$).

  20. Simulation of variability in atmospheric carbon dioxide using a global coupled Eulerian – Lagrangian transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Koyama

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the advantages of using a coupled atmospheric-tracer transport model, comprising a global Eulerian model and a global Lagrangian particle dispersion model, to improve the reproducibility of tracer-gas variations affected by the near-field surface emissions and transport around observation sites. The ability to resolve variability in atmospheric composition on an hourly time-scale and a spatial scale of several kilometers would be beneficial for analyzing data from continuous ground-based monitoring and from upcoming space-based observations. The coupled model yields an increase in the horizontal resolution of transport and fluxes, and has been tested in regional-scale studies of atmospheric chemistry. By applying the Lagrangian component to the global domain, we extend this approach to the global scale, thereby enabling computationally efficient global inverse modeling and data assimilation. To validate the coupled model, we compare model-simulated CO2 concentrations with continuous observations at three sites: two operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USA, and one operated by the National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan. As the goal of this study is limited to introducing the new modeling approach, we selected a transport simulation at these three sites to demonstrate how the model may perform at various geographical areas. The coupled model provides improved agreement between modeled and observed CO2 concentrations in comparison to the Eulerian model. In an area where variability in CO2 concentration is dominated by a fossil fuel signal, the correlation coefficient between modeled and observed concentrations increases by between 0.05 to 0.1 from the original values of 0.5–0.6 achieved with the Eulerian model.

  1. Projected changes in atmospheric river events in Arizona as simulated by global and regional climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Erick R.; Dominguez, Francina

    2016-09-01

    Inland-penetrating atmospheric rivers (ARs) affect the United States Southwest and significantly contribute to cool season precipitation. In this study, we examine the results from an ensemble of dynamically downscaled simulations from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) and their driving general circulation models (GCMs) in order to determine statistically significant changes in the intensity of the cool season ARs impacting Arizona and the associated precipitation. Future greenhouse gas emissions follow the A2 emission scenario from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report simulations. We find that there is a consistent and clear intensification of the AR-related water vapor transport in both the global and regional simulations which reflects the increase in water vapor content due to warmer atmospheric temperatures, according to the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship. However, the response of AR-related precipitation intensity to increased moisture flux and column-integrated water vapor is weak and no significant changes are projected either by the GCMs or the NARCCAP models. This lack of robust precipitation variations can be explained in part by the absence of meaningful changes in both the large-scale water vapor flux convergence and the maximum positive relative vorticity in the GCMs. Additionally, some global models show a robust decrease in relative humidity which may also be responsible for the projected precipitation patterns.

  2. Dynamic dose assessment by Large Eddy Simulation of the near-range atmospheric dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervecken, Lieven; Camps, Johan; Meyers, Johan

    2015-03-01

    In order to improve the simulation of the near-range atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides, computational fluid dynamics is becoming increasingly popular. In the current study, Large-Eddy Simulation is used to examine the time-evolution of the turbulent dispersion of radioactive gases in the atmospheric boundary layer, and it is coupled to a gamma dose rate model that is based on the point-kernel method with buildup factors. In this way, the variability of radiological dose rate from cloud shine due to instantaneous turbulent mixing processes can be evaluated. The steady release in an open field of (41)Ar and (133)Xe for 4 different release heights is studied, thus covering radionuclides that decay with a high-energy gamma and a low-energy gamma, respectively. Based on these simulations, the variability of dose rates at ground level for different averaging times in the dose measurements is analyzed. It is observed that turbulent variability in the wind field can lead to dose estimates that are underestimated by up to a factor of four when conventional long-term measurements are used to estimate the dose from short-term exposures.

  3. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF ATMOSPHERIC METHANE TRENDS OVER THE LAST 150 YEARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张仁健; 王明星

    2001-01-01

    A global two-dimensional chemistry model is developed to study long-term trends of CH4 since industrial revolution. The sources of CH4, CO and NOx are parameterized as functions of latitude and time.With two long-term emission scenarios, long-term trends of CH4 are simulated. The results have a good agreement with observation from ice cores. The modeled CH4 increased from 760 ppbv in 1840 to 1611.9 ppbv in 1991, while the modeled number concentration of tropospheric OH decreased from 7.17 × 105cm-3 in 1840 to 5.79 × 105cm-3 in 1991. The increase of atmospheric CH4 can be explained by the increase of emission of CH4 and build-up because of decrease of OH radicals that remove CH4 from the atmosphere.The model is also used to simulate the distribution of CH4. Comparisons between the model results and observations show that the model can simulate both latitudinal distribution and seasonal variation of CH4 well.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of the local concentration and structure in multicomponent aerosol nanoparticles under atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadima, Katerina S; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G; Pandis, Spyros N

    2017-06-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the local structure and local concentration in atmospheric nanoparticles consisting of an organic compound (cis-pinonic acid or n-C30H62), sulfate and ammonium ions, and water. Simulations in the isothermal-isobaric (NPT) statistical ensemble under atmospheric conditions with a prespecified number of molecules of the abovementioned compounds led to the formation of a nanoparticle. Calculations of the density profiles of all the chemical species in the nanoparticle, the corresponding radial pair distribution functions, and their mobility inside the nanoparticle revealed strong interactions developing between sulfate and ammonium ions. However, sulfate and ammonium ions prefer to populate the central part of the nanoparticle under the simulated conditions, whereas organic molecules like to reside at its outer surface. Sulfate and ammonium ions were practically immobile; in contrast, the organic molecules exhibited appreciable mobility at the outer surface of the nanoparticle. When the organic compound was a normal alkane (e.g. n-C30H62), a well-organized (crystalline-like) phase was rapidly formed at the free surface of the nanoparticle and remained separate from the rest of the species.

  5. THE SIMULATION OF FINE SCALE NOCTURNAL BOUNDARY LAYER MOTIONS WITH A MESO-SCALE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werth, D.; Kurzeja, R.; Parker, M.

    2009-04-02

    A field project over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement-Clouds and Radiation Testbed (ARM-CART) site during a period of several nights in September, 2007 was conducted to explore the evolution of the low-level jet (LLJ). Data was collected from a tower and a sodar and analyzed for turbulent behavior. To study the full range of nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) behavior, the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) was used to simulate the ARM-CART NBL field experiment and validated against the data collected from the site. This model was run at high resolution, and is ideal for calculating the interactions among the various motions within the boundary layer and their influence on the surface. The model reproduces adequately the synoptic situation and the formation and dissolution cycles of the low-level jet, although it suffers from insufficient cloud production and excessive nocturnal cooling. The authors suggest that observed heat flux data may further improve the realism of the simulations both in the cloud formation and in the jet characteristics. In a higher resolution simulation, the NBL experiences motion on a range of timescales as revealed by a wavelet analysis, and these are affected by the presence of the LLJ. The model can therefore be used to provide information on activity throughout the depth of the NBL.

  6. NON-EQUILIBRIUM HELIUM IONIZATION IN AN MHD SIMULATION OF THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Carlsson, Mats [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Leenaarts, Jorrit, E-mail: thomas.golding@astro.uio.no, E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no, E-mail: jorrit.leenaarts@astro.su.se [Institute for Solar Physics, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-02-01

    The ionization state of the gas in the dynamic solar chromosphere can depart strongly from the instantaneous statistical equilibrium commonly assumed in numerical modeling. We improve on earlier simulations of the solar atmosphere that only included non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization by performing a 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulation featuring non-equilibrium ionization of both hydrogen and helium. The simulation includes the effect of hydrogen Lyα and the EUV radiation from the corona on the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. Details on code implementation are given. We obtain helium ion fractions that are far from their equilibrium values. Comparison with models with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) ionization shows that non-equilibrium helium ionization leads to higher temperatures in wavefronts and lower temperatures in the gas between shocks. Assuming LTE ionization results in a thermostat-like behavior with matter accumulating around the temperatures where the LTE ionization fractions change rapidly. Comparison of DEM curves computed from our models shows that non-equilibrium ionization leads to more radiating material in the temperature range 11–18 kK, compared to models with LTE helium ionization. We conclude that non-equilibrium helium ionization is important for the dynamics and thermal structure of the upper chromosphere and transition region. It might also help resolve the problem that intensities of chromospheric lines computed from current models are smaller than those observed.

  7. A test of sensitivity to convective transport in a global atmospheric CO2 simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, H.; Kawa, S. R.; Chin, M.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z.; Rasch, P.; Wu, S.

    2006-11-01

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO2 distributions. Global CO2 in the year 2000 is simulated using the CTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA's Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO2 by adopting the same CO2 emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et al. (convective transport scheme denoted as Conv1). Conv1 approximates the convective transport by using the bulk convective mass fluxes to redistribute trace gases. The alternate approximation, Conv2, partitions fluxes into updraft and downdraft, as well as into entrainment and detrainment, and has potential to yield a more realistic simulation of vertical redistribution through deep convection. Replacing Conv1 by Conv2 results in an overestimate of CO2 over biospheric sink regions. The largest discrepancies result in a CO2 difference of about 7.8 ppm in the July NH boreal forest, which is about 30% of the CO2 seasonality for that area. These differences are compared to those produced by emission scenario variations constrained by the framework of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to account for possible land use change and residual terrestrial CO2 sink. It is shown that the overestimated CO2 driven by Conv2 can be offset by introducing these supplemental emissions.

  8. Testing an hydrogen streamer chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    A 2x10 cm gap streamer chamber, 35x55 cm2 in surface, was built and tested at CERN. Good tracks of cosmic rays were obtained up to atmospheric pressure, see F. Rohrbach et al, CERN-LAL (Orsay) Collaboration, Nucl. Instr. Methods 141 (1977) 229. Michel Cathenoz stand on the center.

  9. Simulation of the Galactic Cosmic Rays interaction with Saturn's atmosphere and rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, Anna; Roussos, Elias; Dandouras, Iannis; Krupp, Norbert

    In 2004 Cassini spacecraft during the orbital insertion measured by the Ion and Neutron Camera significant fluxes of the energetic neutral atoms (ENA) coming from the area between the D-ring and the Saturn’s atmosphere, what brought up the idea of the possible existence of the innermost radiation belt in this narrow gap. In the present study we estimate the possible sources for this radiation belt, assuming the two main processes: the double charge exchange of the ENAs, coming from the middle magnetosphere, what can bring the keV ions to the region of our interest, and the interaction of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) with the Saturn’s atmosphere and rings, which due to CRAND process can produce the keV-MeV ions or electrons in the region. Both of these possible sources are possible to evaluate using the charged particle tracer, which we developed in our group. It works in different modes (Newton-Lorentz full equation of motion, guiding center or bounce averaged approximations), and allows use of different magnetic field models (from simple dipole magnetic field till complex realistic magnetic field model like Khurana model of Saturn’s magnetosphere) for both forward and backward tracing simulations. This charged particle tracer was validated using the comparison of the simulation results and observations during several flybys of Cassini by icy moons of Saturn. Through the backward-tracing of GCRs around the planet we evaluate how the ring shadow filters the GCR spectrum that hits the Saturn’s atmosphere and how non-dipolar effects change the Strömer cutoff rigidities of GCRs, especially for the high-latitude atmosphere that maps magnetically in the outer magnetosphere. Also we estimate the production of secondaries (and from the multiple impacts of these secondaries on the rings or atmosphere as well) and evaluate the energy spectrum of neutrons, the decay of which leads to the production of final CRAND elements in the inner Saturnian radiation belts

  10. A coupled atmosphere and multi-layer land surface model for improving heavy rainfall simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haggag

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A multi-layer land surface model (SOLVEG is dynamically coupled to the non-hydrostatic atmospheric model (MM5 in order to represent better spatial variations and changes in land surface characteristics compared with the land surface parameterization schemes included in the MM5. In this coupling, calculations of the atmosphere and land surface models are carried out as independent tasks of different processors; a model coupler controls these calculations and data exchanges among models using Message Passing Interface (MPI. This coupled model is applied to the record-breaking heavy rain events occurred in Kyushu Island, the southernmost of Japan's main islands, from 20 July to 25 July in 2006. The test computations are conducted by using both the developed coupled model and the original land surface parameterization of MM5. The result of these computations shows that SOLVEG reproduce higher ground temperature than land surface parameterization schemes in the MM5. This result indicates the feedback of land surface processes between MM5 and SOLVEG plays an important role in the computation. The most pronounced difference is in the rainfall simulation that shows the importance of coupling SOLVEG and MM5. The coupled model accurately reproduces the heavy rainfall events observed in Kyushu Island compared to the original MM5 from both the spatial and temporal point of view. This paper clearly shows that realistic simulation of rainfall event strongly depends on land-surface processes interacting with cloud development that depends on surface heat and moisture fluxes, which in turn are mainly determined by land surface vegetation and soil moisture storage. Soil temperature/moisture changes significantly affect the localized precipitation and modest improvement in the land surface representation can enhance the heavy rain simulation. MM5-SOLVEG coupling shows a clear image of land surface-atmosphere interactions and the dynamic feedback on

  11. High Resolution Simulations of Future Climate in West Africa Using a Variable-Resolution Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, J. O.; Engelbrecht, F.; Vezhapparambu, S.

    2013-12-01

    In previous work demonstrated the application of a var¬iable-resolution global atmospheric model, the conformal-cubic atmospheric model (CCAM), across a wide range of spatial and time scales to investigate the ability of the model to provide realistic simulations of present-day climate and plausible projections of future climate change over sub-Saharan Africa. By applying the model in stretched-grid mode the versatility of the model dynamics, numerical formulation and physical parameterizations to function across a range of length scales over the region of interest, was also explored. We primarily used CCAM to illustrate the capability of the model to function as a flexible downscaling tool at the climate-change time scale. Here we report on additional long term climate projection studies performed by downscaling at much higher resolutions (8 Km) over an area that stretches from just south of Sahara desert to the southern coast of the Niger Delta and into the Gulf of Guinea. To perform these simulations, CCAM was provided with synoptic-scale forcing of atmospheric circulation from 2.5 deg resolution NCEP reanalysis at 6-hourly interval and SSTs from NCEP reanalysis data uses as lower boundary forcing. CCAM 60 Km resolution downscaled to 8 Km (Schmidt factor 24.75) then 8 Km resolution simulation downscaled to 1 Km (Schmidt factor 200) over an area approximately 50 Km x 50 Km in the southern Lake Chad Basin (LCB). Our intent in conducting these high resolution model runs was to obtain a deeper understanding of linkages between the projected future climate and the hydrological processes that control the surface water regime in this part of sub-Saharan Africa.

  12. Formation of Complex Amino Acid Precursors in Simulated Primitive Atmosphere and Their Alteration under Simulated Submarine Hydrothermal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kensei; Kurihara, Hironari; Hirako, Tomoaki; Obayashi, Yumiko; Kaneko, Takeo; Takano, Yoshinori; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka

    Since late 1970's a great number of submarine hydrothermal systems (SHSs) has been dis-covered, and they are considered possible sites of chemical evolution and generation of life on the Earth since their discovery in late 1970s. A number of experiments simulating the con-ditions of SHSs were conducted, and abiotic production and polymerization of amino acids were reported. Free amino acids were frequently used as starting materials to examine possible organic reactions in the simulation experiments. In our early studies, not free amino acids but complex amino acids precursors with large molecular weights were formed abiotically from simulated primitive Earth atmosphere (a mixture of CO, N2 and H2 O) (Takano et al., 2004). Such complex organics (hereafter referred as to CNWs) should have been delivered to SHSs in Primitive Ocean, where they were subjected to further alteration. We examined possible alteration of the complex organics in high-temperature high-pressure environments by the su-percritical water flow reactor (SCWFR) (Islam et al.. 2003) and an autoclave. CNWs were quite hydrophilic compounds whose molecular weights were ca. 3000. After heating 573 K for 2 min in the SCWFR, aggregates of organics were formed, which were separated from aque-ous solution with a Nucleopore filter (pore size: 200 nm). We propose the following scenario of chemical evolution: (1) Complex organics including amino acid precursors were formed in primitive atmosphere and/or extraterrestrial environments, (ii) they were delivered to primor-dial SHSs, (iii) hydrothermal alteration occurred in SHSs to give organic aggregates, (iv) quite primitive molecular systems with subtle biological functions were generated in the competition among such aggregates. References: Islam, Md. N., Kaneko, T., and Kobayashi, K (2003). Reactions of Amino Acids with a Newly ConstructedSupercritical Water Flow Reactor Simulating Submarine Hydrothermal Systems. Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn., 76, 1171. Takano, Y

  13. A 1000-year simulation with the IPSL ocean-atmosphere coupled model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Conil

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A 1000-year climate simulation is run with the ocean-atmosphere coupled model developed at the Institute Pierre- Simon Laplace (IPSL, Paris. No flux adjustment is used. The drift of the model is analyzed in terms of the seasurface temperature and deep ocean temperature. When the model's own equilibrium is reached, it is found that the Antarctic bottom water production experiences large-amplitude variation, oscillating between strong and weak episodes. This can yield oceanic temperature variation in the Southern Hemisphere and for the global mean.

  14. Evaluation of Vapor Pressure Estimation Methods for Use in Simulating the Dynamic of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Komkoua Mbienda

    2013-01-01

    Lee and Kesler (LK, and Ambrose-Walton (AW methods for estimating vapor pressures ( are tested against experimental data for a set of volatile organic compounds (VOC. required to determine gas-particle partitioning of such organic compounds is used as a parameter for simulating the dynamic of atmospheric aerosols. Here, we use the structure-property relationships of VOC to estimate . The accuracy of each of the aforementioned methods is also assessed for each class of compounds (hydrocarbons, monofunctionalized, difunctionalized, and tri- and more functionalized volatile organic species. It is found that the best method for each VOC depends on its functionality.

  15. Sensitivity of simulated wintertime Arctic atmosphere to vertical resolution in the ARPEGE/IFS model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrkjedal, Oeyvind [University of Bergen, Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Geophysical Institute, Bergen (Norway); Kjeller Vindteknikk, PO-Box 122, Kjeller (Norway); Esau, Igor [University of Bergen, Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, Bergen (Norway); Kvamstoe, Nils G. [University of Bergen, Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen (Norway); University of Bergen, Geophysical Institute, Bergen (Norway)

    2008-06-15

    The current state-of-the-art general circulation models, including several of those used by the IPCC, show considerable biases in the simulated present day high-latitude climate compared to observations and reanalysis data. These biases are most pronounced during the winter season. We here employ ideal vertical profiles of temperature and wind from turbulence-resolving simulations to perform a priori studies of the first-order eddy-viscosity closure scheme employed in the ARPEGE/IFS model. This reveals that the coarse vertical resolution (31 layers) of the model cannot be expected to realistically resolve the Arctic stable boundary layer. The curvature of the Arctic inversion and thus also the vertical turbulent-exchange processes cannot be reproduced by the coarse vertical mesh employed. To investigate how turbulent vertical exchange processes in the Arctic boundary layer are represented by the model parameterization, a simulation with high vertical resolution (90 layers in total) in the lower troposphere is performed. Results from the model simulations are validated against data from the ERA-40 reanalysis. The dependence of the surface air temperature on surface winds, surface energy fluxes, free atmosphere stability and boundary layer height is investigated. The coarse-resolution run reveals considerable biases in these parameters, and in their physical relations to surface air temperature. In the simulation with fine vertical resolution, these biases are clearly reduced. The physical relation between governing parameters for the vertical turbulent-exchange processes improves in comparison with ERA-40 data. (orig.)

  16. The groundwater-land-surface-atmosphere connection: soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, R M; Chow, F K; Kollet, S J

    2007-02-02

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can represent spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-hour period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  17. Numerical simulation of reacting and non-reacting flow in a combustion chamber; Numerisk simulering av reagerande och icke-reagerande stroemning i en braennkammare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, A.; Revstedt, J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this work has been to do a preliminary study of how well numerical calculations with different turbulence models can predict the flow and temperature fields of a strongly swirling and combusting flow in an experimental combustion chamber and to see which parameters in the mathematical model are the most important. The combustion chamber on which we have done the calculations is called Validation Rig II and was designed by Volvo Aero Corporation. The main part of the study has been carried out on a non-reacting flow but some work has also been done on reacting flow. In most cases it has not been meaningful to compare the calculations with the measurements because they differ quite a lot from each other. For the non-reacting case the following investigations have been made: * How the solution differs for different turbulence models, * The solutions sensitivity to inlet boundary conditions, * How different types of leakage disturb the flow, and * The difference in results between two different CFD-codes, the commercial code CFDS-Flow3D and a code developed at the department of fluid mechanics. For the reacting cases we have studied the influence of: * one or two reaction steps, * the effects of a change in reaction rate, * the influence of thermal radiation, and * the effects of changing the boundary conditions for temperature on the walls. The results from these calculations show that the inlet turbulence intensity has very little effect on the values of the turbulent quantities as well as the velocity profiles at the outlet. Changing the turbulence model or the outlet boundary conditions gives some change in velocity profiles at the outlet but only marginal effects on the swirl number. 21 refs, 54 figs, 19 tabs

  18. Dimethyl sulfide in the summertime Arctic atmosphere: measurements and source sensitivity simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungall, Emma L.; Croft, Betty; Lizotte, Martine; Thomas, Jennie L.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Levasseur, Maurice; Martin, Randall V.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Liggio, John; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2016-06-01

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) plays a major role in the global sulfur cycle. In addition, its atmospheric oxidation products contribute to the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles, thereby influencing cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) populations and thus cloud formation. The pristine summertime Arctic atmosphere is strongly influenced by DMS. However, atmospheric DMS mixing ratios have only rarely been measured in the summertime Arctic. During July-August, 2014, we conducted the first high time resolution (10 Hz) DMS mixing ratio measurements for the eastern Canadian Archipelago and Baffin Bay as one component of the Network on Climate and Aerosols: Addressing Key Uncertainties in Remote Canadian Environments (NETCARE). DMS mixing ratios ranged from below the detection limit of 4 to 1155 pptv (median 186 pptv) during the 21-day shipboard campaign. A transfer velocity parameterization from the literature coupled with coincident atmospheric and seawater DMS measurements yielded air-sea DMS flux estimates ranging from 0.02 to 12 µmol m-2 d-1. Air-mass trajectory analysis using FLEXPART-WRF and sensitivity simulations with the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model indicated that local sources (Lancaster Sound and Baffin Bay) were the dominant contributors to the DMS measured along the 21-day ship track, with episodic transport from the Hudson Bay System. After adjusting GEOS-Chem oceanic DMS values in the region to match measurements, GEOS-Chem reproduced the major features of the measured time series but was biased low overall (2-1006 pptv, median 72 pptv), although within the range of uncertainty of the seawater DMS source. However, during some 1-2 day periods the model underpredicted the measurements by more than an order of magnitude. Sensitivity tests indicated that non-marine sources (lakes, biomass burning, melt ponds, and coastal tundra) could make additional episodic contributions to atmospheric DMS in the study region, although local marine sources of

  19. Simulation of the Interaction of X-rays with a Gas in an Ionization Chamber by the Monte Carlo Method; Simulacion Monte Carlo de la Interaccion de Rays X con el Gas de una Camara de Ionizacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau Carles, A.; Garcia Gomez-Tejedor, G.

    2001-07-01

    The final objective of any ionization chamber is the measurement of the energy amount or radiation dose absorbed by the gas into the chamber. The final value depends on the composition of the gas, its density and temperature, the ionization chamber geometry, and type and intensity of the radiation. We describe a Monte Carlo simulation method, which allows one to compute the dose absorbed by the gas for a X-ray beam. Verification of model has been carried out by simulating the attenuation of standard X-ray radiation through the half value layers established in the ISO 4037 report, while assuming a Weibull type energy distribution for the incident photons. (Author) 6 refs.

  20. Heat Transport Simulation for Atmospheric-Pressure High-Density Microgap Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akihiro; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi

    2006-02-01

    Atmospheric-pressure cw high-density plasma can be produced in a microgap between two knife-edge electrodes by microwave excitation. A possible application of such a plasma is as an excimer light source and for this purpose the gas temperature in the plasma is a particularly important parameter. In this paper we report a fluid dynamic simulation of heat transport in the microgap plasma and compare the results with previously studied experimental gas temperature characteristics (e.g., dependence on the microwave power and the forced gas flow rate). The simulation explains reasonably well the experimental results when the effect of local gas density change on the gas heating process is taken into consideration. Discussion is given that the existence of thermally driven convection in the microgap plasma indicated in a preliminary report is incorrect.

  1. SU-E-T-35: An Investigation of the Accuracy of Cervical IMRT Dose Distribution Using 2D/3D Ionization Chamber Arrays System and Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Yang, J; Liu, H [Cangzhou People' s Hospital, Cangzhou, Hebei (China); Liu, D [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to compare the verification results of three solutions (2D/3D ionization chamber arrays measurement and Monte Carlo simulation), the results will help make a clinical decision as how to do our cervical IMRT verification. Methods: Seven cervical cases were planned with Pinnacle 8.0m to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. The plans were recalculated in the Matrixx and Delta4 phantom with the accurate plans parameters. The plans were also recalculated by Monte Carlo using leaf sequences and MUs for individual plans of every patient, Matrixx and Delta4 phantom. All plans of Matrixx and Delta4 phantom were delivered and measured. The dose distribution of iso slice, dose profiles, gamma maps of every beam were used to evaluate the agreement. Dose-volume histograms were also compared. Results: The dose distribution of iso slice and dose profiles from Pinnacle calculation were in agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation, Matrixx and Delta4 measurement. A 95.2%/91.3% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Pinnacle distributions within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. A 96.4%/95.6% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation within 2mm/2% gamma criteria, almost 100% gamma pass ratio within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. The DVH plot have slightly differences between Pinnacle and Delta4 measurement as well as Pinnacle and Monte Carlo simulation, but have excellent agreement between Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation. Conclusion: It was shown that Matrixx/Delta4 and Monte Carlo simulation can be used very efficiently to verify cervical IMRT delivery. In terms of Gamma value the pass ratio of Matrixx was little higher, however, Delta4 showed more problem fields. The primary advantage of Delta4 is the fact it can measure true 3D dosimetry while Monte Carlo can simulate in patients CT images but not in phantom.

  2. A New Ensemble of Perturbed-Input-Parameter Simulations by the Community Atmosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covey, C; Brandon, S; Bremer, P T; Domyancis, D; Garaizar, X; Johannesson, G; Klein, R; Klein, S A; Lucas, D D; Tannahill, J; Zhang, Y

    2011-10-27

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) is a fundamental challenge in the numerical simulation of Earth's weather and climate, and other complex systems. It entails much more than attaching defensible error bars to predictions: in particular it includes assessing low-probability but high-consequence events. To achieve these goals with models containing a large number of uncertain input parameters, structural uncertainties, etc., raw computational power is needed. An automated, self-adapting search of the possible model configurations is also useful. Our UQ initiative at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has produced the most extensive set to date of simulations from the US Community Atmosphere Model. We are examining output from about 3,000 twelve-year climate simulations generated with a specialized UQ software framework, and assessing the model's accuracy as a function of 21 to 28 uncertain input parameter values. Most of the input parameters we vary are related to the boundary layer, clouds, and other sub-grid scale processes. Our simulations prescribe surface boundary conditions (sea surface temperatures and sea ice amounts) to match recent observations. Fully searching this 21+ dimensional space is impossible, but sensitivity and ranking algorithms can identify input parameters having relatively little effect on a variety of output fields, either individually or in nonlinear combination. Bayesian statistical constraints, employing a variety of climate observations as metrics, also seem promising. Observational constraints will be important in the next step of our project, which will compute sea surface temperatures and sea ice interactively, and will study climate change due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  3. Microbial ice nucleators scavenged from the atmosphere during simulated rain events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Regina; Powers, Craig; Failor, Kevin; Monteil, Caroline L.; Vinatzer, Boris A.; Schmale, David G.

    2017-08-01

    Rain and snow collected at ground level have been found to contain biological ice nucleators. These ice nucleators have been proposed to have originated in clouds, where they may have participated in the formation of precipitation via ice phase nucleation. We conducted a series of field experiments to test the hypothesis that at least some of the microbial ice nucleators (prokaryotes and eukaryotes) present in rain may not originate in clouds but instead be scavenged from the lower atmosphere by rainfall. Thirty-three simulated rain events were conducted over four months off the side of the Smart Road Bridge in Blacksburg, VA, USA. In each event, sterile water was dispensed over the side of the bridge and recovered in sterile containers in an open fallow agricultural field below (a distance of ∼55 m). Microbes scavenged from the simulated rain events were cultured and their ice nucleation activity was examined. Putative microbial ice nucleators were cultured from 94% (31/33) of the simulated rain events, and represented 1.5% (121/8331) of the total colonies assayed. Putative ice nucleators were subjected to additional droplet freezing assays, and those confirmed through these repeated assays represented 0.4% (34/8331) of the total. Mean CFUs scavenged by simulated rain ranged from 2 to 267 CFUs/mL. Scavenged ice nucleators belong to a number of taxa including the bacterial genera Pseudomonas, Pantoea, and Xanthomonas, and the fungal genera Fusarium, Humicola, and Mortierella. An ice-nucleating strain of the fungal genus Penicillium was also recovered from a volumetric air sampler at the study site. This work expands our knowledge of the scavenging properties of rainfall, and suggests that at least some ice nucleators in natural precipitation events may have been scrubbed from the atmosphere during rainfall, and thus are not likely to be involved in precipitation.

  4. Simulating Atmospheric Free-Space Optical Propagation; Part II: Haze, Fog, and Low Clouds Attenuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Maha

    2002-12-01

    One of the biggest challenges facing Free-Space Optics deployment is proper understanding of optical signal propagation in different atmospheric conditions. In an earlier study by the author (30), attenuation by rain was analyzed and successfully modeled for infrared signal transmission. In this paper, we focus on attenuation due to scattering by haze, fog and low clouds droplets using the original Mie Scattering theory. Relying on published experimental results on infrared propagation, electromagnetic waves scattering by spherical droplet, atmospheric physics and thermodynamics, UlmTech developed a computer-based platform, Simulight, which simulates infrared signal (750 nm-12 μm) propagation in haze, fog, low clouds, rain and clear weather. Optical signals are scattered by fog droplets during transmission in the forward direction preventing the receiver from detecting the minimum required power. Weather databases describe foggy conditions by measuring the visibility parameter, which is, in general, defined as the maximum distance that the visible 550 nm signal can travel while distinguishing between the target object and its background at 2% contrast. Extrapolating optical signal attenuations beyond 550 nm using only visibility is not as straightforward as stated by the Kruse equation which is unfortunately widely used. We conclude that it is essential to understand atmospheric droplet sizes and their distributions based on measured attenuations to effectively estimate infrared attenuation. We focus on three types of popular fogs: Evolving, Stable and Selective.

  5. Simulation of cold atmospheric plasma component composition and particle densities in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsanov, Gennady; Chirtsov, Alexander; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy

    2015-11-01

    Recently discharges in air at atmospheric pressure were the subject of numerous studies. Of particular interest are the cold streams of air plasma, which contains large amounts of chemically active species. It is their action can be decisive in the interaction with living tissues. Therefore, in addition to its physical properties, it is important to know the component composition and particle densities. The goal was to develop a numerical model of atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge in air with the definition of the component composition of plasma. To achieve this goal the task was divided into two sub-tasks, in the first simulated microdischarge atmospheric pressure in air using a simplified set of plasma chemical reactions in order to obtain the basic characteristics of the discharge, which are the initial approximations in the problem of the calculation of the densities with detailed plasma chemistry, including 53 spices and over 600 chemical reactions. As a result of the model was created, which can be adapted for calculating the component composition of plasma of various sources. Calculate the density of particles in the glow microdischarges and dynamics of their change in time.

  6. Numerical Simulations of an atmospheric pressure discharge using a two dimensional fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad M.; Turner, Miles M.

    2008-10-01

    We present numerical simulations of a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge using a two-dimensional fluid model with symmetric boundary conditions in pure helium and He-N2 gases at atmospheric pressure. The periodic stationary pattern of electrons and molecular helium ions density is shown at different times during one breakdown pulse for the pure helium gas. The temporal behavior of the helium metastables and excimers species density is examined and their influences on the discharge characteristics are exhibited for an APD. The atmospheric pressure discharge modes (APGD and APTD) are affected with small N2 impurities and the discharge mode structures are described under different operating conditions. The uniform and filamentary behavior of the discharge is controlled with the variable relative permittivity of the dielectric barrier material. The influence of nitrogen impurities plays a major role for the production of the filaments in the after glow phase of He-N2 discharge and the filaments are clearly observed with the increased recombination coefficient of nitrogen ions. The creation and annihilation mechanism of filaments is described with the production and destruction of nitrogen ions at different applied voltages and driving frequencies for a complete cycle. The results of the fluid model are validated by comparison with the experimental atmospheric pressure discharge results in He-N2 plasma discharge.

  7. Intercomparison of present and future climates simulated by coupled ocean-atmosphere GCMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covey, C; AchutaRao, K M; Lambert, S J

    2000-09-06

    We present an overview of results from the most recent phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP). This phase of CMIP has archived output from both unforced (''control run'') and perturbed (1% per year increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide) simulations by 15 modern coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models. The models are about equally divided between those employing and those not employing ad hoc flux corrections at the ocean-atmosphere interface. The new generation of non-flux-connected control runs are nearly as stable and agree with observations nearly as well as the flux-corrected models. This development represents significant progress in the state of the art of climate modeling since the Second (1995) Scientific Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC; see Gates et al. 1996). From the increasing-CO{sub 2} runs, we find that differences between different models, while substantial, are not as great as would be expected from earlier assessments that relied on equilibrium climate sensitivity.

  8. Laboratory analogues simulating Titan's atmospheric aerosols: Compared chemical compositions of grains and thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Jomard, François; Vigneron, Jackie; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Cernogora, Guy

    2016-09-01

    Two sorts of solid organic samples can be produced in laboratory experiments simulating Titan's atmospheric reactivity: grains in the volume and thin films on the reactor walls. We expect that grains are more representative of Titan's atmospheric aerosols, but films are used to provide optical indices for radiative models of Titan's atmosphere. The aim of the present study is to address if these two sorts of analogues are chemically equivalent or not, when produced in the same N2-CH4 plasma discharge. The chemical compositions of both these materials are measured by using elemental analysis, XPS analysis and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The main parameter probed is the CH4/N2 ratio to explore various possible chemical regimes. We find that films are homogeneous but significantly less rich in nitrogen and hydrogen than grains produced in the same experimental conditions. This surprising difference in their chemical compositions could be explained by the efficient etching occurring on the films, which stay in the discharge during the whole plasma duration, whereas the grains are ejected after a few minutes. The higher nitrogen content in the grains possibly involves a higher optical absorption than the one measured on the films, with a possible impact on Titan's radiative models.

  9. 柴油机燃烧过程的数值模拟及燃烧室改进%Numerical simulation for combustion process of diesel engine and improvement of combustion chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘剑锋; 卢青波; 王谦; 万彦辉; 张梦云

    2012-01-01

    为了改善柴油机燃烧室内混合气的形成状态和燃烧质量,对改装DLH1105型直喷柴油机缸内喷雾和燃烧过程进行了动态数值模拟,并在压缩比不变的情况下设计了3种不同结构的燃烧室,分别为敞口型、直口型和缩口型.通过STAR-CD软件对3种结构的燃烧室进行了三维数值模拟,获得了柴油机的缸内流场、燃油质量分数分布和温度场.结果表明:模拟出的缸内喷雾和燃烧过程与可视化试验的结果吻合,计算模拟的方法可靠;缩口型燃烧室有较强的挤流强度,较长的涡流持续期,使混合气质量和燃烧性能优于直口燃烧室和敞口燃烧室,缸内压力和平均温度最高,Soot生成量最少,同时NO的生成量最大.%In order to improve the mixture formation and combustion quality in combustion chamber of DLH1105 diesel engine, the cylinder spray and combustion process were numerically simulated. Three combustion chambers of open combustion chamber, toroidal combustion chamber and reentrant combustion chamber were designed at constant compression ratio. 3-D numerical simulation of the three type combustion chambers were achieved by STAR-CD software to obtain flow field, distribution of fuel mass fraction and temperature field in the diesel engine cylinder. The simulation result shows that cylinder spray and combustion process are consistent with those of visualized experiment, which means that the method of computational simulation is reliable. Reentrant combustion chamber has strong squish with long swirl period, which results in better mixture gas and combustion performance than those of toroidal combustion chamber and open combustion chamber. The pressure and temperature in reentrant combustion cylinder are high with low shoot formation and high NO amount.

  10. A comprehensive numerical simulation of Io’s sublimation-driven atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Andrew C.; Gratiy, Sergey L.; Goldstein, David B.; Moore, Chris H.; Varghese, Philip L.; Trafton, Laurence M.; Levin, Deborah A.; Stewart, Bénédicte

    2010-05-01

    Io's sublimation-driven atmosphere is modeled using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. These rarefied gas dynamics simulations improve upon earlier models by using a three-dimensional domain encompassing the entire planet computed in parallel. The effects of plasma heating, planetary rotation, inhomogeneous surface frost, molecular residence time of SO 2 on the exposed (non-volatile) rocky surface, and surface temperature distribution are investigated. Circumplanetary flow is predicted to develop from the warm dayside toward the cooler nightside. Io's rotation leads to a highly asymmetric frost surface temperature distribution (due to the frost's high thermal inertia) which results in circumplanetary flow that is not axi-symmetric about the subsolar point. The non-equilibrium thermal structure of the atmosphere, specifically vibrational and rotational temperatures, is also examined. Plasma heating is found to significantly inflate the atmosphere on both the dayside and nightside. The plasma energy flux causes high temperatures at high altitudes but plasma energy depletion through the dense gas column above the warmest frost permits gas temperatures cooler than the surface at low altitudes. A frost map (Douté, S., Schmitt, B., Lopes-Gautier, R., Carlson, R., Soderblom, L., Shirley, J., and the Galileo NIMS Team [2001]. Icarus 149, 107-132) is used to control the sublimated flux of SO 2 which can result in inhomogeneous column densities that vary by nearly a factor of four for the same surface temperature. A short residence time for SO 2 molecules on the "rock" component is found to smooth lateral atmospheric inhomogeneities caused by variations in the surface frost distribution, creating an atmosphere that looks nearly identical to one with uniform frost coverage. A longer residence time is found to agree better with mid-infrared observations (Spencer, J.R., Lellouch, E., Richter, M.J., López-Valverde, M.A., Jessup, K.L, Greathouse, T.K., Flaud, J

  11. Large-Eddy Simulations of Wind Turbine Wakes Subject to Different Atmospheric Stabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchfield, M.; Lundquist, J. K.; Lee, S.; Clifton, A.

    2014-12-01

    As a byproduct of energy extraction, wind turbines create a low-speed, turbulent wake that propagate downwind. When wind turbines are situated in a group, as in a wind plant, the interactions of these wakes with other turbines are important because wake effects decrease the efficiency of the wind plant, and they increase mechanical loads on individual turbines. Wakes propagate downstream differently depending on the inflow conditions, and these conditions are heavily dominated by atmospheric stability. For example, we know that wakes are more persistent in stable conditions than in unstable conditions. Also, stable conditions often have significant wind veer which skews wakes laterally. Different levels of turbulence intensity are associated with different atmospheric stability levels, and turbulence intensity acts to diffuse wakes and to cause wake meandering. Wake physics are complex, and to understand them better, a high-resolution representation of the flow is necessary. Measurements are difficult with current sensing equipment because of the sheer size of wakes and the unsteady atmospheric environment in which they are found. Numerical simulations complement measurements and provide a high-resolution representation of the entire three-dimensional, unsteady flow field. In this work, we use large-eddy simulation (LES), the highest fidelity type of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) feasible for high-Reynolds-number wake flow. LES directly resolves the larger, energy-containing turbulent scales and models the effects of the subgrid scales that the computational mesh cannot resolve. Our solver is based on the OpenFOAM open-source CFD toolbox. Turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines. Here, we present our LES of the wake behind a modern 1.5 MW turbine subject to different inflow atmospheric stability. We will present results of wakes subject to stable (strongly and weakly stable), neutral, and unstable conditions. We are particularly interested in how

  12. Study of diffuse cosmic and atmospheric gamma radiation using a spark chamber in the energy range 4 MeV--100 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavigne, J.M.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Agrinier, B.; Bonfand, E.; Parlier, B.; Rao, K.R.

    1982-10-15

    The Agathe Balloon experiment performed by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (C.E.A.) of Saclay and the Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements (C.E.S.R.) of Toulouse was launched in 1976 November and 1977 February in Brazil during a campaign organized by the Centre National d'Etudes Spatials (C.N.E.S.) and the Instituto de Pesquisas Espacias (I.N.P.E.). The total atmospheric and cosmic ..gamma..-ray flux for various energy ranges was found using flux measurements during the balloon's ascent. In each case, it was possible to deduce the flux values of the diffuse and atmospheric components.

  13. Simulation of comprehensive chemistry and atmospheric methane lifetime in the LGM with EMAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, Sergey; Steil, Benedikt

    2017-04-01

    Past records of atmospheric methane (CH4) abundance/isotope composition may provide a substantial insight on C exchanges in the Earth System (ES). When simulated in the climate models, CH4 helps to identify climate parameters transitions via triggering of its different (natural) sources, with a proviso that its sinks are adequately represented in the model. The latter are still a matter of large uncertainty in the studies focussing on the interpretation of CH4 evolution throughout Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), judging the conferred span of tropospheric CH4 lifetime (λ) of 3-16 yr [1-4]. In this study, we attempt to: (i) deliver the most adequate estimate of the LGM atmospheric sink of CH4 in the EMAC AC-GCM [5] equipped with the comprehensive representation of atmospheric chemistry [6], (ii) reveal the ES and CH4 emission parameters that are most influential for λ and (iii) based on these findings, suggest a parameterisation for λ that may be consistently used in climate models. In pursuing (i) we have tuned the EMAC model for simulating LGM atmospheric chemistry state, including careful revisiting of the trace gases emissions from the biosphere, biomass burning/lightning source, etc. The latter affect the key simulated component bound with λ, viz. the abundance and distribution of the hydroxyl radicals (OH) which, upon reacting with CH4, constitute its main tropospheric sink. Our preliminary findings suggest that OH is buffered in the atmosphere in a similar fashion to preindustrial climate, which in line with the recent studies employing comprehensive chemistry mechanisms (e.g., [3]). The analysis in (ii) suggests that tropospheric λ values may be qualitatively described as a convolution of values typical for zonal domain with high and low photolytic recycling rates (i.e. tropics and extra-tropics), as in the latter a dependence of the zonal average λ value on the CH4 emission strength exists. We further use the extensive diagnostic in EMAC to infer the

  14. The Atmospheric piston simulator as an integral part of the calibration unit of LINC - NIRVANA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follert, R.; Herbst, T. M.; Bizenberger, P.; DeBonis, F.

    2010-07-01

    The atmospheric piston simulator is an integral part of the calibration unit of LINC-NIRVANA, the Fizeau interferometric imager for the Large Binocular Telescope. The calibration unit will be necessary to align and set up the different opto - mechanical subsystems of the instrument. It will assist in (1) the alignment of the optics via reference fibers; (2) establishing zero optical path difference using a balanced fiber splitter; (3) flat fielding of the detectors with an integrating sphere; (4) correction of the non-common path aberrations using a fiber-based phase diversity source; and (5) calibration of the adaptive optics with a rotating reference fiber plate. Substantial testing and verification of the fringe tracker under as realistic as possible conditions in the lab is desirable, since the performance of the fringe tracker will ultimately determine the high angular resolution imaging capability of LINC-NIRVANA as a whole. We are therefore also constructing an atmospheric piston simulator working in the J and H photometric bands. As with many of the other calibration unit sub-systems, our design concept is mainly fiber based. Opto - electronic phase modulators will be used to introduce the piston sequences. The control system of the piston modulators will allow for easy implementation of different vibration power spectra. This will enable us to test and demonstrate the capabilities of the fringe tracker under realistic conditions.

  15. MPAS Atmospheric Boundary Layer Simulation under Selected Stability Conditions: Evaluation Using the SWIFT Datasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotamarthi, V. Rao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feng, Yan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-12

    Modeling the transition from mesoscale to microscale is necessary in order to model different processes that affect a wind farm and to develop forecasting tools that operate at the farm scale. The mesoscale-to-microscale coupling (MMC) project is an A2e (Atmosphere-toelectrons) coordinated activity for developing modeling capabilities at the wind farm scale. By moving the focus of the research from a single wind turbine to the collection of turbines that comprise a wind farm, A2e extends the range of spatial and timescales that need representation in a model from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers and timescales from a few seconds to days (Bokharaie et al. 2016). In the atmosphere, these scales are represented by mesoscale-tomicroscale models. The modeling available at these scales has differed in its representation of various physical processes. The MMC group is responsible for evaluating existing models at these scales and recommending a set of options for coupling the mesoscale and microscale with the best-performing models. The group was organized in 2015 and will explore options for coupling strategies with real-world test problems in fiscal year (FY) 2017. The model of choice for this exercise is WRF (Weather Research Forecasting) for mesoscale and WRF-LES (Large Eddy Simulation) for microscale simulations. The MPAS (Model Prediction Across Scales) variable mesh model that can be continuously refined; it has dynamic core and physics options adopted from WRF, which offer an alternative platform for modeling the mesoscale.

  16. Simulation of the propagation and reignition of atmospheric pressure air discharges behind a dielectric plane obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechereau, Francois; Jansky, Jaroslav; Bourdon, Anne

    2012-10-01

    In recent years, experimental studies on flue gas treatment have demonstrated the efficiency of plasma assisted catalysis for the treatment of a wide range of pollutants at a low energetic cost. In plasma reactors, usual catalyst supports are pellets, monoliths or porous media, and then atmospheric pressure discharges have to interact with many obstacles and to propagate in microcavities and pores. As a first step to better understand atmospheric pressure discharge dynamics in these complex geometries, in this work, we have carried out numerical simulations using a 2D-axisymmetric fluid model for a point-to-plane discharge with a dielectric plane obstacle placed in the path of the discharge. First, we have simulated the discharge ignition at the point electrode, its propagation in the gap and its impact and expansion on the dielectric plane. Depending on the applied voltage, the dielectric plane geometry and permittivity, we have identified conditions for the reignition of a second discharge behind the plane obstacle. These conditions will be discussed and compared with recent experimental results on the same configuration.

  17. Overestimation of soil CO2 fluxes from closed chamber measurements at low atmospheric turbulence biases the diurnal pattern and the annual soil respiration budget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brændholt, Andreas; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Ibrom, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    including all data and it decreased with an increasing u⋆ filter threshold. Our results show that Rs was overestimated at low atmospheric turbulence throughout the year and that this overestimation considerably biased the diurnal pattern of Rs and led to an overestimation of the annual Rs budget. Thus we...... for correct estimation of annual Rs budgets. Acknowledgements: This study was funded by the free Danish Ministry for Research, Innovation and higher Education, the free Danish Research Council (DFF - 1323-00182)....

  18. Simulation Study About the Influence of Atmospheric Stratification on Lightning Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Dong; ZHANG Yijun; LU Weitao; MA Ming; MENG Qingi

    2008-01-01

    A 2D model about charging and discharging processes in thundercloud is used to simulate three differential atmospheric stratifications resulting in discrepant thunderstorm processes in Beijing region. The dynamic and microphysical processes in thunderstorm and their influence on lightning activities are also discussed.The results indicate that ascending velocity and water vapor axe the most important factors to influence lightning activities. At the same time, they affect each other and are together controlled by atmospheric stratification. The magnitude of the ascending velocity determines the intensity of storm and the time when the thunderstorm matured. The thunderstorm with strong updrafts can reach a large height in a short time. Strong persistent updrafts and sufficient water vapor which help to generate more ice phase hydrometeors that directly influence charging and discharging process will prolong the mature stage of the thunderstorm and thereby enhance lightning activities. Though the big density of ice phase hydrometeors can be formed, it is difficult to sustain a long time in the condition of strong updrafts and scant water vapor. Under the condition of weak updrafts and suffcient water vapor in the whole levels, it is easy to form warm cloud process in which the ice phase process and lightning activities are weak. The favorable stratification conditions for strong lightning activities are the sufficient vapor in the lower atmosphere,moderate humidity in the mid troposphere, big instability energy and some suitable convective inhibition.Through calculating some atmospheric instability parameters, it is indicated that convective instability index smaller than -10℃ (negative means instable), convective available potential energy larger than 1000 J kg-1,convective inhibition larger than 40 J kg-1, the 700-hPa potential equivalent temperature larger than 340 K and the 35%-85% humidity in the mid troposphere (700-400 hPa) are the advantageous conditions

  19. Exploring Biases of Atmospheric Retrievals in Simulated JWST Transmission Spectra of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchetto, M.; Waldmann, I. P.; Venot, O.; Lagage, P.-O.; Tinetti, G.

    2016-12-01

    With a scheduled launch in 2018 October, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is expected to revolutionize the field of atmospheric characterization of exoplanets. The broad wavelength coverage and high sensitivity of its instruments will allow us to extract far more information from exoplanet spectra than what has been possible with current observations. In this paper, we investigate whether current retrieval methods will still be valid in the era of JWST, exploring common approximations used when retrieving transmission spectra of hot Jupiters. To assess biases, we use 1D photochemical models to simulate typical hot Jupiter cloud-free atmospheres and generate synthetic observations for a range of carbon-to-oxygen ratios. Then, we retrieve these spectra using TauREx, a Bayesian retrieval tool, using two methodologies: one assuming an isothermal atmosphere, and one assuming a parameterized temperature profile. Both methods assume constant-with-altitude abundances. We found that the isothermal approximation biases the retrieved parameters considerably, overestimating the abundances by about one order of magnitude. The retrieved abundances using the parameterized profile are usually within 1σ of the true state, and we found the retrieved uncertainties to be generally larger compared to the isothermal approximation. Interestingly, we found that by using the parameterized temperature profile we could place tight constraints on the temperature structure. This opens the possibility of characterizing the temperature profile of the terminator region of hot Jupiters. Lastly, we found that assuming a constant-with-altitude mixing ratio profile is a good approximation for most of the atmospheres under study.

  20. Combining Abundance/Temperature Retrieval with 3D Atmospheric Circulation Simulations of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Kevin

    2011-09-01

    The atmospheres of hot Jupiters are three-dimensional, non-linear entities and understanding them requires the construction of a hierarchy of models of varying sophistication. Since previous work has either focused on the atmospheric dynamics or implemented multi-band radiative transfer, a reasonable approach is to combine the treatment of 3D dynamics with dual-band radiative transfer, where the assumption is that the stellar irradiation and re-emitted radiation from the exoplanet are at distinct wavelengths. I report on the successful implementation of such a setup and demonstrate how it can be used to compute self-consistent temperature-pressure profiles on both the day and night sides of a hot Jupiter, as well as zonal-wind profiles, circulation cell patterns and the angular/temporal offset of the hotspot from the substellar point. In particular, the hotspot offset should aid us in distinguishing between different types of hot Jupiter atmospheres. Together with N. Madhusudhan, we combine the dual-band simulation technique with the abundance/temperature retrieval method of Madhusudhan & Seager, by empirically constraining a range of values for the broad-band opacities which are consistent with the current observations. The advantage of our novel method is that the range of opacities used improves with time as the observations get better. The ability to thoroughly, efficiently and systematically explore the interplay between atmospheric dynamics, radiation and synthetic spectra is an important step forward, as it prepares us for the theoretical interpretation of exoplanetary spectra which will be obtained by future space-based missions such as JWST and EChO. I acknowledge generous support from the Zwicky Prize Fellowship and the Star and Planet Formation Group (PI: Michael Meyer) at ETH Zurich.

  1. Comparison of CO2 fluxes estimated using atmospheric and oceanic inversions, and role of fluxes and their interannual variability in simulating atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, P. K.; Mikaloff Fletcher, S. E.; Ishijima, K.; Maksyutov, S.; Nakazawa, T.

    2006-07-01

    We use a time-dependent inverse (TDI) model to estimate regional sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 from 64 and then 22 regions based on atmospheric CO2 observations at 87 stations. The air-sea fluxes from the 64-region atmospheric-CO2 inversion are compared with fluxes from an analogous ocean inversion that uses ocean interior observations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and other tracers and an ocean general circulation model (OGCM). We find that, unlike previous atmospheric inversions, our flux estimates in the southern hemisphere are generally in good agreement with the results from the ocean inversion, which gives us added confidence in our flux estimates. In addition, a forward tracer transport model (TTM) is used to simulate the observed CO2 concentrations using (1) estimates of fossil fuel emissions and a priori estimates of the terrestrial and oceanic fluxes of CO2, and (2) two sets of TDI model corrected fluxes. The TTM simulations of TDI model corrected fluxes show improvements in fitting the observed interannual variability in growth rates and seasonal cycles in atmospheric CO2. Our analysis suggests that the use of interannually varying (IAV) meteorology and a larger observational network have helped to capture the regional representation and interannual variabilities in CO2 fluxes realistically.

  2. An assessment of CSIRO Conformal Cubic Atmospheric Model simulations over Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevakaran, A.; McGregor, J. L.; Katzfey, J.; Hoffmann, P.; Suppiah, R.; Sonnadara, D. U. J.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we present an assessment of the Conformal Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM) 50 km simulations forced by the sea surface temperature and sea ice concentration of six global climate models (GCMs) (ACCESS1-0, CCSM4, GFDL-CM3, NorESM, MPI-ESM and CNRM-CM5) from the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) over South Asia, centred on Sri Lanka. The model simulations were compared with the data provided by the Asian Precipitation Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration towards Evaluation of Water Resource (APHRODITE) project and ERA-Interim from the European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) over a broad region centred on Sri Lanka. This broad region includes South Asia and northern Indian Ocean. Statistical measures such as pattern correlations, mean biases and root mean square errors were calculated separately for the four seasons. Results based on statistical tests indicate that the current CCAM simulations capture the spatial patterns of 10 m wind speed, mean sea level pressure, temperature and rainfall over a broad region over South Asia fairly well. The annual cycles of temperature and rainfall were also compared against observations over the northern and southern regions of Sri Lanka by taking the field average of each model and the observed data. The characteristics of the observed annual variations of rainfall and temperature over the smaller domains are not very well captured by the CCAM simulations. There are differences in the magnitudes of the temperature and rainfall in the six member CCAM simulations. Comparatively, the two CCAM simulations CNRM-CM5 and GFDL-CM3 show slightly better agreement over the Sri Lankan region.

  3. Using a Modified Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Scheme (MSPAS) to Simulate the Interaction between Land Surface Processes and Atmospheric Boundary Layer in Semi-Arid Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘树华; 乐旭; 胡非; 刘辉志

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses a Modified Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Scheme (MSPAS) to study the interaction between land surface and atmospheric boundary layer processes. The scheme is composed of two main parts:atmospheric boundary layer processes and land surface processes. Compared with SiB and BATS, which are famous for their detailed parameterizations of physical variables, this simplified model is more convenient and saves much more computation time. Though simple, the feasibility of the model is well proved in this paper. The numerical simulation results from MSPAS show good agreement with reality. The scheme is used to obtain reasonable simulations for diurnal variations of heat balance, potential temperature of boundary layer, and wind field, and spatial distributions of temperature, specific humidity, vertical velocity,turbulence kinetic energy, and turbulence exchange coefficient over desert and oasis. In addition, MSPAS is used to simulate the interaction between desert and oasis at night, and again it obtains reasonable results.This indicates that MSPAS can be used to study the interaction between land surface processes and the atmospheric boundary layer over various underlying surfaces and can be extended for regional climate and numerical weather prediction study.

  4. Doriot Climatic Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Doriot Climatic Chambers are two, 60-feet long, 11-feet high, 15-feet wide chambers that are owned and operated by NSRDEC. The Doriot Climatic Chambers are among...

  5. Diffusion and thermal escape of CH4 and H2 from Titan's upper atmosphere: Direct Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, O. J.; Tenishev, V.; Combi, M. R.; Nagy, A. F.; Johnson, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    We expand on our previous studies using a similar Direct Monte Carlo Simulation (DSMC) technique to examine the role of thermal conduction and escape in Titan's upper atmosphere for comparison to Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) densities for N2, CH4 and H2 for the T43 encounter. Recent studies have shown the INMS N2 density measurements in Titan's upper atmosphere are indicative of a highly variable thermal structure, however the energy sources and sinks to the atmosphere that result in the large gradients remain unclear (e.g., Snowden et al., 2013a, b). In our previous study (Tucker et al., 2013) we showed that H2 escape from Titan's upper atmosphere adiabatically cools both N2 and CH4 resulting in density profiles that mimic outward flow. Furthermore, we found from steady state calculations that, over the range of temperatures suggested for Titan's upper atmosphere, the H2 densities in our simulations separated from background atmosphere at altitudes lower than in the Cassini data. In this study we include heating in the simulation domain and we model both CH4 and H2 in the background N2 atmosphere. At a lower boundary of the simulation domain, well below the exobase, we will use the INMS density data and a temperature obtained from published results (e.g., Snowden et al., 2013b, Westlake et al., 2011). In the simulation domain we will use typical energy deposition rates suggested for solar UV and precipitating ions from Saturn's magnetosphere into the upper atmosphere (e.g., Johnson et al., 2009), as well as, the heating rates suggested to reproduce the T43 temperature profile in Snowden et al, (2013b). For comparison the heating rates will be used for both steady state and temporal, over 1 Titan day, calculations. Support for this work was provided by grant NNH12ZDA001N-OPR from the NASA ROSES Outer Planets Research Program. Johnson, R.E., 2009. Titan from Cassini Huygens. Mass Loss Processes in Titan's Upper Atmosphere. Springer, New York (Chapter

  6. A test of sensitivity to convective transport in a global atmospheric CO{sub 2} simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, H. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States). UMBC Goddard Earth Science and Technology Center; Kawa, S.R.; Chin, M.; Pawson, S.; Zhu, Z. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Rasch, P. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Wu, S. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Two approximations to convective transport have been implemented in an offline chemistry transport model (CTM) to explore the impact on calculated atmospheric CO{sub 2} distributions. Global CO{sub 2} in the year 2000 is simulated using the CTM driven by assimilated meteorological fields from the NASA's Goddard Earth Observation System Data Assimilation System, Version 4 (GEOS-4). The model simulates atmospheric CO{sub 2} by adopting the same CO{sub 2} emission inventory and dynamical modules as described in Kawa et al. (convective transport scheme denoted as Conv1). Conv1 approximates the convective transport by using the bulk convective mass fluxes to redistribute trace gases. The alternate approximation, Conv2, partitions fluxes into updraft and downdraft, as well as into entrainment and detrainment, and has potential to yield a more realistic simulation of vertical redistribution through deep convection.Replacing Conv1 by Conv2 results in an overestimate of CO{sub 2} over biospheric sink regions. The largest discrepancies result in a CO{sub 2} difference of about 7.8 ppm in the July NH boreal forest, which is about 30% of the CO{sub 2} seasonality for that area. These differences are compared to those produced by emission scenario variations constrained by the framework of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to account for possible land use change and residual terrestrial CO{sub 2} sink. It is shown that the overestimated CO{sub 2} driven by Conv2 can be offset by introducing these supplemental emissions.

  7. Investigating Titan's Atmospheric Chemistry at Low Temperature with the Titan Haze Simulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, E. M.; Salama, F.

    2012-12-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, possesses a dense atmosphere (1.5 bar at the surface) composed mainly of N2 and CH4. The solar radiation and electron bombardment from Saturn's magnetosphere induces a complex organic chemistry between these two constituents leading to the production of more complex molecules and subsequently to solid aerosols. These aerosols in suspension in the atmosphere form the haze layers giving Titan its characteristic orange color. Since 2004, the instruments onboard the Cassini orbiter have produced large amounts of observational data, unraveling a chemistry much more complex than what was first expected, particularly in Titan's upper atmosphere. Neutral, positively and negatively charged heavy molecules have been detected in the ionosphere of Titan, including benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C6H5CH3). The presence of these critical precursors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds suggests that PAHs might play a role in the production of Titan's aerosols. The aim of the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC facility, is to study the chemical pathways that link the simple molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (PANHs) as precursors to the production of solid aerosols. In the THS experiment, Titan's atmospheric chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas mixture is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma discharge. Due to the short residence time of the gas in the plasma discharge, the THS experiment can be used to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan's chemistry by injecting different gas mixtures in the plasma. The products of the chemistry are detected and studied using two complementary techniques: Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy and Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry. Thin tholin deposits are also produced

  8. Atmospheric response to a realistic coastal polynya in Terra Nova Bay (Antarctica) simulated by ETA model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, S.; Casini, G.; Parmiggiani, F.

    2009-04-01

    Coastal polynyas are areas of open water (and/or very thin ice) which form adjacent to coasts or blocking feature in polar regions during the wintertime, when the sea water is expected to be ice covered. They are thought to be maintained by strong offshore winds blowing over these area and/or by ocean currents. Sea ice is removed as it forms and drifted offshore. In polynya areas a direct contact is established between the relatively warm sea water and the cold, dry atmosphere. As a consequence, the physical characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer change. The work presented here concerns a real polynya event in the region of Terra Nova Bay (TNB), Antarctica, where a recurring coastal polynya occurs nearby the Italian Antarctic Base. The aim is the study of atmospheric response to the presence of a open water area of realistic size by three-dimensional numerical simulations. Atmospheric numerical modelling is a fundamental tool for the study of air - polynya interactions in the remote polar regions, where observational data are difficult. The numerical model used for the simulations is a recent version of ETA model (Mesinger et al., 2006), with the addition of a piecewise linear advection for the wind field. ECMWF and NCEP data provided the initial and boundary conditions. A previous version of the model had already been successfully used in the Antarctic area (De Carolis et al, 2006, Casini and Morelli, 2007). As a first step to analyze the polynya event, numerical simulation was performed for the period from 12 to 17 July 2006 in order to study the development of the katabatic wind (Morelli and Casini, 2008; Morelli, 2008). Daily satellite images, concerning the period, display that a sea ice free area formed on 15 and 16 July, reaching its maximum extension of about 4000 km2 on 16 July (Morelli et al.,2007). In order to gain insight on the atmospheric response to open water area within a sea ice field, ETA model runs were carried out from 15 to 17 July

  9. Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber comprises a power anechoic chamber and one transverse electromagnetic cell for characterizing radiofrequency (RF) responses of...

  10. Simulating the global atmospheric black carbon cycle: a revisit to the contribution of aircraft emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hendricks

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The black carbon (BC burden of the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UTLS is investigated with the general circulation model (GCM ECHAM4. The special focus is the contribution of aircraft emissions to the UTLS BC loading. Previous studies on the role of aircraft emissions in the global BC cycle either neglect BC sources located at the Earth's surface or simplify the BC cycle by assuming pre-defined BC residence times. Here, the global BC cycle including emissions, transport, and removal is explicitly simulated. The BC emissions considered include surface sources as well as BC from aviation. This enables a consistent calculation of the relative contribution of aviation to the global atmospheric BC cycle. As a further extension to the previous studies, the aviation-induced perturbation of the UTLS BC particle number concentration is investigated. Several sensitivity studies were performed to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the model predictions. The simulated UTLS BC concentrations are compared to in-situ observations. The simulations suggest that the large-scale contribution of aviation to the UTLS BC mass budget typically amounts to only a few percent, even in the most frequented flight regions. The aviation impact far away from these regions is negligible. The simulated aircraft contributions to the UTLS BC particle number concentration are much larger compared to the corresponding mass perturbations. The simulations suggest that aviation can cause large-scale increases in the UTLS BC particle number concentration of more than 30% in regions highly frequented by aircraft. The relative effect shows a pronounced annual variation with the largest relative aviation impact occurring during winter.

  11. Simulating the global atmospheric black carbon cycle: a revisit to the contribution of aircraft emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hendricks

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The black carbon (BC burden of the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UTLS is investigated with the general circulation model (GCM ECHAM4. The special focus is the contribution of aircraft emissions to the UTLS BC loading. Previous studies on the role of aircraft emissions in the global BC cycle either neglect BC sources located at the Earth's surface or simplify the BC cycle by assuming pre-defined BC residence times. Here, the global BC cycle including emissions, transport, and removal is explicitly simulated. The BC emissions considered include surface sources as well as BC from aviation. This enables a consistent calculation of the relative contribution of aviation to the global atmospheric BC cycle. As a further extension to the previous studies, the aviation-induced perturbation of the UTLS BC particle number concentration is investigated. The uncertainties associated with the model predictions are evaluated by means of several sensitivity studies. Especially, the sensitivity of the results to different assumptions on the BC hygroscopic properties is analysed. The simulated UTLS BC concentrations are compared to in-situ observations. The simulations suggest that the large-scale contribution of aviation to the UTLS BC mass budget typically amounts to only a few percent, even in the most frequented flight regions. The aviation impact far away from these regions is negligible. The simulated aircraft contributions to the UTLS BC particle number concentration are much larger compared to the corresponding mass perturbations. The simulations suggest that aviation can cause large-scale increases in the UTLS BC particle number concentration of more than 30% in regions highly frequented by aircraft. The relative effect shows a pronounced annual variation with the largest relative aviation impact occurring during winter.

  12. Atmospheric winter conditions 2007/08 over the Arctic Ocean based on NP-35 data and regional model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mielke

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric measurements on the drifting Arctic sea ice station "North Pole-35" crossing the Eastern part of the Arctic Ocean during winter 2007/2008 have been compared with regional atmospheric HIRHAM model simulations. The observed near-surface temperature, mean sea level pressure and the vertical temperature, wind and humidity profiles are satisfactorily reproduced by the model. The strongest temperature differences between observations and the simulations occur near the surface due to an overestimated vertical mixing of heat in the stable Arctic boundary layer (ABL. The observations show very strong temperature inversions near the surface, whereas the simulated inversions occur frequently between the surface and 415 m at too high levels. The simulations are not able to reproduce the observed inversion strength. The regional model underestimates the wind speeds and the sharp vertical wind gradients. The strength of internal atmospheric dynamics on the temporal development of atmospheric surface variables and vertical profiles of temperature, wind and relative humidity has been examined. Although the HIRHAM model systematically overestimates relative humidity and produces too high long-wave downward radiation during winter, two different atmospheric circulation states, which are connected to higher or lower pressure systems over the Eastern part of the Arctic Ocean, are simulated in agreement with the NP-35 observations. Sensitivity studies with reduced vertical mixing of heat in the stable ABL have been carried out. A slower increase in the stability functions with decreasing Richardson number under stable stratification has an impact on the horizontal and vertical atmospheric structure. Changes in synoptical cyclones on time scales from 1–3 days over the North Atlantic cyclone path are generated, which influences the atmospheric baroclinic and planetary waves on time scales up to 20 days over the Arctic Ocean basin. The use of increased

  13. The THS Experiment: Simulating Titans Atmospheric Chemistry at Low Temperature (200K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen; Beauchamp, Jack L.; Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar Sanchez; Bejaoui, Salma; Foing, Bernard; Pascale, Ehrenfreund

    2015-01-01

    In Titan's atmosphere, composed mainly of N2 (95-98%) and CH4 (2-5%), a complex chemistry occurs at low temperature, and leads to the production of heavy organic molecules and subsequently solid aerosols. Here, we used the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, an experimental setup developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC simulation facility to study Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is cooled to Titan-like temperature ( approximately 150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma discharge (approximately 200K). Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of heavier precursors present as trace elements on Titan, in order to monitor the evolution of the chemical growth. Both the gas- and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed using a combination of complementary in situ and ex situ diagnostics. A recent mass spectrometry[1] study of the gas phase has demonstrated that the THS is a unique tool to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at Titan-like temperature. In particular, the mass spectra obtained in a N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 mixture are relevant for comparison to Cassini's CAPS-IBS instrument. The results of a complementary study of the solid phase are consistent with the chemical growth evolution observed in the gas phase. Grains and aggregates form in the gas phase and can be jet deposited on various substrates for ex situ analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy images show that more complex mixtures produce larger aggregates. A mass spectrometry analysis of the solid phase has detected the presence of aminoacetonitrile, a precursor of glycine, in the THS aerosols. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements also show the presence of imine

  14. The THS: Simulating Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen T.; Beauchamp, Jack L.; Salama, Farid

    2015-08-01

    In Titan’s atmosphere, composed mainly of N2 (95-98%) and CH4 (2-5%), a complex chemistry occurs at low temperature, and leads to the production of heavy organic molecules and subsequently solid aerosols. Here, we used the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, an experimental setup developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC simulation facility to study Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma discharge (~200K). Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of heavier precursors present as trace elements on Titan, in order to monitor the evolution of the chemical growth. Both the gas- and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed using a combination of complementary in situ and ex situ diagnostics.A recent mass spectrometry study of the gas phase has demonstrated that the THS is a unique tool to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at Titan-like temperature. In particular, the mass spectra obtained in a N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 mixture are relevant for comparison to Cassini’s CAPS-IBS instrument. The results of a complementary study of the solid phase are consistent with the chemical growth evolution observed in the gas phase. Grains and aggregates form in the gas phase and can be jet deposited on various substrates for ex situ analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy images show that more complex mixtures produce larger aggregates. A DART mass spectrometry analysis of the solid phase has detected the presence of aminoacetonitrile, a precursor of glycine, in the THS aerosols. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements also show the presence of imine and nitrile

  15. Testing FSO WDM communication system in simulation software optiwave OptiSystem in different atmospheric environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderka, Ales; Hajek, Lukas; Bednarek, Lukas; Latal, Jan; Vitasek, Jan; Hejduk, Stanislav; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    In this article the author's team deals with using Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) for Free Space Optical (FSO) Communications. In FSO communication occurs due to the influence of atmospheric effect (attenuation, and fluctuation of the received power signal, influence turbulence) and the WDM channel suffers from interchannel crosstalk. There is considered only the one direction. The behavior FSO link was tested for one or eight channels. Here we will be dealing with modulation schemes OOK (On-Off keying), QAM (Quadrature Amplitude Modulation) and Subcarrier Intensity Modulation (SIM) based on a BPSK (Binary Phase Shift Keying). Simulation software OptiSystem 14 was used for tasting. For simulation some parameters were set according to real FSO link such as the datarate 1.25 Gbps, link range 1.4 km. Simulated FSO link used wavelength of 1550 nm with 0.8 nm spacing. There is obtained the influence of crosstalk and modulation format for the BER, depending on the amount of turbulence in the propagation medium.

  16. Dynamic Mesh CFD Simulations of Orion Parachute Pendulum Motion During Atmospheric Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstrom, Logan D.; Schwing, Alan M.; Robinson, Stephen K.

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the usage of computational fluid dynamics to study the effects of pendulum motion dynamics of the NASAs Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle parachute system on the stability of the vehicles atmospheric entry and decent. Significant computational fluid dynamics testing has already been performed at NASAs Johnson Space Center, but this study sought to investigate the effect of bulk motion of the parachute, such as pitching, on the induced aerodynamic forces. Simulations were performed with a moving grid geometry oscillating according to the parameters observed in flight tests. As with the previous simulations, OVERFLOW computational fluid dynamics tool is used with the assumption of rigid, non-permeable geometry. Comparison to parachute wind tunnel tests is included for a preliminary validation of the dynamic mesh model. Results show qualitative differences in the flow fields of the static and dynamic simulations and quantitative differences in the induced aerodynamic forces, suggesting that dynamic mesh modeling of the parachute pendulum motion may uncover additional dynamic effects.

  17. Towards Direct Simulation of Future Tropical Cyclone Statistics in a High-Resolution Global Atmospheric Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Wehner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a set of high-resolution global atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM simulations focusing on the model's ability to represent tropical storms and their statistics. We find that the model produces storms of hurricane strength with realistic dynamical features. We also find that tropical storm statistics are reasonable, both globally and in the north Atlantic, when compared to recent observations. The sensitivity of simulated tropical storm statistics to increases in sea surface temperature (SST is also investigated, revealing that a credible late 21st century SST increase produced increases in simulated tropical storm numbers and intensities in all ocean basins. While this paper supports previous high-resolution model and theoretical findings that the frequency of very intense storms will increase in a warmer climate, it differs notably from previous medium and high-resolution model studies that show a global reduction in total tropical storm frequency. However, we are quick to point out that this particular model finding remains speculative due to a lack of radiative forcing changes in our time-slice experiments as well as a focus on the Northern hemisphere tropical storm seasons.

  18. 镁合金压室模拟工艺参数优化%Optimization of Simulation Process Parameters for Magnesium Alloy Casting Chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘正; 霍成鹏; 毛萍莉; 周乐

    2011-01-01

    Casting defects are usually caused by unsuitable choosing of slow injection speed of the cold chamber in die casting process, except the defects caused by solidification shrinkage. Based on the theoretical analysis of the slow injection process for magnesium alloy steering column bracket and the optimization of computer-assisted simulation, it is concluded that the injection rate, with an acceleration of 0.6 m/s2 and an injection speed of 0.4 m/s, is more reasonable. This injection rate contributes to the reduction of production cycle and improvement of the production efficiency.%压铸件产生的缺陷除了在凝固收缩的过程中容易出现,在冷室压铸机压射时,慢压射选取速度不当也是造成铸件缺陷的一个重要原因.通过对镁合金转向管柱支架的慢压射过程进行理论分析和计算机模拟辅助优化,得出加速度为0.6 m/s2、慢压射速度为0.4 m/s情况下,压射速度较为合理.能缩短生产周期,提高效率.

  19. Morphological features and variations of temperature in the upper thermosphere simulated by a whole atmosphere GCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fujiwara

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to illustrate morphological features and variations of temperature in the upper thermosphere, we performed numerical simulations with a whole atmosphere general circulation model (GCM for the solar minimum and geomagnetically quiet conditions in March, June, September, and December. In previous GCMs, tidal effects were imposed at the lower boundaries assuming dominant diurnal and semi-diurnal tidal modes. Since the GCM used in the present study covers all the atmospheric regions, the atmospheric tides with various modes are generated within the GCM. The global temperature distributions obtained from the GCM are in agreement with ones obtained from NRLMSISE-00. In addition, the GCM also represents localised temperature structures which are superimposed on the global day-night distributions. These localised structures, which vary from hour to hour, would be observed as variations with periods of about 2–3 h at a single site. The amplitudes of the 2–3 h variations are significant at high-latitude, while the amplitudes are small at low-latitude. The diurnal temperature variation is more clearly identified at low-latitude than at high-latitude. When we assume the same high-latitude convection electric field in each month, the temperature calculated in the polar cap region shows diurnal variation more clearly in winter than in summer. The midnight temperature maximum (MTM, which is one of the typical low-latitude temperature structures, is also seen in the GCM results. The MTMs in the GCM results show significant day-to-day variation with amplitudes of several 10s to about 150 K. The wind convergence and stream of warm air are found around the MTM. The GCM also represent the meridional wind reversals and/or abatements which are caused due to local time variations of airflow pattern in the low-latitude region.

  20. MADE-IN: a new aerosol microphysics submodel for global simulation of potential atmospheric ice nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Aquila

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC and mineral dust are among the dominant atmospheric ice nuclei, i.e. aerosol particles that can initiate heterogeneous nucleation of ice crystals. When released, most BC and dust particles are externally mixed with other aerosol compounds. Through coagulation with particles containing soluble material and condensation of gases, externally mixed particles may obtain a coating and be transferred into an internal mixture. The mixing state of BC and dust aerosol particles influences their radiative and hygroscopic properties, as well as their ability of building ice crystals.

    We introduce the new aerosol microphysics submodel MADE-IN, implemented within the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry global model (EMAC. MADE-IN is able to track separately mass and number concentrations of BC and dust particles in their different mixing states, as well as particles free of BC and dust. MADE-IN describes these three classes of particles through a superposition of seven log-normally distributed modes, and predicts the evolution of their size distribution and chemical composition. Six out of the seven modes are mutually interacting, allowing for the transfer of mass and number among them. Separate modes for the different mixing states of BC and dust particles in EMAC/MADE-IN allow for explicit simulations of the relevant aging processes, i.e. condensation, coagulation and cloud processing. EMAC/MADE-IN has been evaluated with surface and airborne measurements and performs well both in the planetary boundary layer and in the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere. Such a model represents a highly appropriate tool for the study of the concentration and composition of potential atmospheric ice nuclei.

  1. Observed and simulated global distribution and budget of atmospheric C2-C5 alkanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelieveld

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The primary sources and atmospheric chemistry of C2-C5 alkanes were incorporated into the atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC. Model output is compared with new observations from the NOAA/ESRL GMD Cooperative Air Sampling Network. Based on the global coverage of the data, two different anthropogenic emission datasets for C4-C5 alkanes, widely used in the modelling community, are evaluated. We show that the model reproduces the main atmospheric features of the C2-C5 alkanes (e.g., seasonality. While the simulated values for ethane and propane are within a 20% range of the measurements, larger deviations are found for the other tracers. According to the analysis, an oceanic source of butanes and pentanes larger than the current estimates would be necessary to match the observations at some coastal stations. Finally the effect of C2-C5 alkanes on the concentration of acetone and acetaldehyde are assessed. Their chemical sources are largely controlled by the reaction with OH, while the reactions with NO3 and Cl contribute only to a little extent. The total amount of acetone produced by propane, i-butane and i-pentane oxidation is 11.2 Tg/yr, 4.3 Tg/yr, and 5.8 Tg/yr, respectively. Moreover, 18.1, 3.1, 3.4, 1.4 and 4.8 Tg/yr of acetaldehyde are formed by the oxidation of ethane, propane, n-butane, n-pentane and i-pentane, respectively.

  2. “World avoided” simulations with the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rolando R.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Marsh, Daniel R.

    2012-12-01

    We use the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, coupled to a deep ocean model, to investigate the impact of continued growth of halogenated ozone depleting substances (ODS) in the absence of the Montreal Protocol. We confirm the previously reported result that the growth of ODS leads to a global collapse of the ozone layer in mid-21st century, with column amounts falling to 100 DU or less at all latitudes. We also show that heterogeneous activation of chlorine in the lower stratosphere hastens this collapse but is not essential to produce it. The growth of ODS, which are also greenhouse gases, produces a radiative forcing of 4 W m-2by 2070, nearly equal that of the non-ODS greenhouse gases CO2, CH4, and N2O in the RCP4.5 scenario of IPCC. This leads to surface warming of over 2 K in the tropics, 6 K in the Arctic, and close to 4 K in Antarctica in 2070 compared to the beginning of the century. We explore the reversibility of these impacts following complete cessation of ODS emissions in the mid-2050s. We find that impacts are reversed on various time scales, depending on the atmospheric lifetime of the ODS that cause them. Thus ozone in the lower stratosphere in the tropics and subtropics recovers very quickly because the ODS that release chlorine and bromine there (e.g., methyl chloroform and methyl bromide) have short atmospheric lifetimes and are removed within a few years. On the other hand, ozone depletion in the polar caps and global radiative forcing depend on longer-lived ODS, such that much of these impacts persist through the end of our simulations in 2070.

  3. Simulating the impacts of large scale insect- and disease-driven tree mortality on atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, J.; Heald, C. L.; Silva, S. J.; Martin, R.

    2015-12-01

    Land-use and land-cover change (LUC) is an important driver of global change through the alteration of local energy, moisture, and carbon exchanges. LUC can also directly impact the emission and deposition of important reactive trace gases, altering the oxidative chemistry of the atmosphere and subsequently air quality and climate. Large-scale tree mortality as a result of insects and disease may therefore have unexplored feedbacks on atmospheric chemistry. Between 2013 and 2027, over 80 million acres of treed land in the United States is predicted to experience basal area mortality rates exceeding 25%. We harmonized the description of land cover across the relevant surface-atmosphere exchange processes in the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to facilitate LUC simulations, and used this adapted model to test the impact of projected tree mortality according to the 2012 USDA National Insect and Disease Risk Assessment. Nation-wide biogenic VOC emissions were reduced by 5%, with local impacts approaching 50% in some regions. By themselves, these emission reductions resulted in lower surface-level O3 mixing ratios, but this was counteracted by decreases in the O3 deposition velocity (by up to 10%) due to the reduction in vegetation density. Organic aerosol mass concentrations were also significantly affected across the United States, decreasing by 5-10% across the eastern U.S. and the northwest, with local impacts exceeding 25% in some regions. We discuss the general impacts on air quality in clean and polluted regions of the US, and point to developments needed for a more robust understanding of land cover change feedbacks.

  4. A New Code SORD for Simulation of Polarized Light Scattering in the Earth Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkin, Sergey; Lyapustin, Alexei; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Holben, Brent

    2016-01-01

    We report a new publicly available radiative transfer (RT) code for numerical simulation of polarized light scattering in plane-parallel atmosphere of the Earth. Using 44 benchmark tests, we prove high accuracy of the new RT code, SORD (Successive ORDers of scattering). We describe capabilities of SORD and show run time for each test on two different machines. At present, SORD is supposed to work as part of the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) inversion algorithm. For natural integration with the AERONET software, SORD is coded in Fortran 90/95. The code is available by email request from the corresponding (first) author or from ftp://climate1.gsfc.nasa.gov/skorkin/SORD/.

  5. Numerical Simulation of the Self-Heating Effect Induced by Electron Beam Plasma in Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓永锋; 谭畅; 韩先伟; 谭永华

    2012-01-01

    For exploiting advantages of electron beam air plasma in some unusual applications, a Monte Carlo (MC) model coupled with heat transfer model is established to simulate the characteristics of electron beam air plasma by considering the self-heating effect. Based on the model, the electron beam induced temperature field and the related plasma properties are investigated. The results indicate that a nonuniform temperature field is formed in the electron beam plasma region and the average temperature is of the order of 600 K. Moreover, much larger volume pear-shaped electron beam plasma is produced in hot state rather than in cold state. The beam ranges can, with beam energies of 75 keV and 80 keV, exceed 1.0 m and 1.2 m in air at pressure of 100 torr, respectively. Finally, a well verified formula is obtained for calculating the range of high energy electron beam in atmosphere.

  6. A numerical simulation of nonlinear propagation of gravity wave packet in three-dimension compressible atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Shaoping(吴少平); YI; Fan(易帆)

    2002-01-01

    By using FICE scheme, a numerical simulation of nonlinear propagation of gravity wave packet in three-dimension compressible atmosphere is presented. The whole nonlinear propagation process of the gravity wave packet is shown; the basic characteristics of nonlinear propagation and the influence of the ambient winds on the propagation are analyzed. The results show that FICE scheme can be extended in three-dimension by which the calculation is steady and kept for a long time; the increase of wave amplitude is faster than the exponential increase according to the linear gravity theory; nonlinear propagation makes the horizontal perturbation velocity increase greatly which can lead to enhancement of the local ambient winds; the propagation path and the propagation velocity of energy are different from the results expected by the linear gravity waves theory, the nonlinearity causes the change in propagation characteristics of gravity wave; the ambient winds alter the propagation path and group velocity of gravity wave.

  7. Simulation of sulfide buildup in wastewater and atmosphere of sewer networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, A H; Yongsiri, C; Hvitved-Jacobsen, T; Vollertsen, J

    2005-01-01

    A model concept for prediction of sulfide buildup in sewer networks is presented. The model concept is an extension to--and a further development of--the WATS model (Wastewater Aerobic-anaerobic Transformations in Sewers), which has been developed by Hvitved-Jacobsen and co-workers at Aalborg University. In addition to the sulfur cycle, the WATS model simulates changes in dissolved oxygen and carbon fractions of different biodegradability. The sulfur cycle was introduced via six processes: 1. sulfide production taking place in the biofilm covering the permanently wetted sewer walls; 2. biological sulfide oxidation in the permanently wetted biofilm; 3. chemical and biological sulfide oxidation in the water phase; 4. sulfide precipitation with metals present in the wastewater; 5. emission of hydrogen sulfide to the sewer atmosphere and 6. adsorption and oxidation of hydrogen sulfide on the moist sewer walls where concrete corrosion may take place.

  8. Numerical Simulations of Optical Turbulence Using an Advanced Atmospheric Prediction Model: Implications for Adaptive Optics Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliss, R.

    2014-09-01

    Optical turbulence (OT) acts to distort light in the atmosphere, degrading imagery from astronomical telescopes and reducing the data quality of optical imaging and communication links. Some of the degradation due to turbulence can be corrected by adaptive optics. However, the severity of optical turbulence, and thus the amount of correction required, is largely dependent upon the turbulence at the location of interest. Therefore, it is vital to understand the climatology of optical turbulence at such locations. In many cases, it is impractical and expensive to setup instrumentation to characterize the climatology of OT, so numerical simulations become a less expensive and convenient alternative. The strength of OT is characterized by the refractive index structure function Cn2, which in turn is used to calculate atmospheric seeing parameters. While attempts have been made to characterize Cn2 using empirical models, Cn2 can be calculated more directly from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) simulations using pressure, temperature, thermal stability, vertical wind shear, turbulent Prandtl number, and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). In this work we use the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) NWP model to generate Cn2 climatologies in the planetary boundary layer and free atmosphere, allowing for both point-to-point and ground-to-space seeing estimates of the Fried Coherence length (ro) and other seeing parameters. Simulations are performed using a multi-node linux cluster using the Intel chip architecture. The WRF model is configured to run at 1km horizontal resolution and centered on the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) of the Big Island. The vertical resolution varies from 25 meters in the boundary layer to 500 meters in the stratosphere. The model top is 20 km. The Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) TKE scheme has been modified to diagnose the turbulent Prandtl number as a function of the Richardson number, following observations by Kondo and others. This modification

  9. "Flat-Fish" Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    The picture shows a "Flat-Fish" vacuum chamber being prepared in the ISR workshop for testing prior to installation in the Split Field Magnet (SFM) at intersection I4. The two shells of each part were hydroformed from 0.15 mm thick inconel 718 sheet (with end parts in inconel 600 for easier manual welding to the arms) and welded toghether with two strips which were attached by means of thin stainless steel sheets to the Split Field Magnet poles in order to take the vertical component of the atmospheric pressure force. This was the thinnest vacuum chamber ever made for the ISR. Inconel material was chosen for its high elastic modulus and strenght at chamber bake-out temperature. In this picture the thin sheets transferring the vertical component of the atmosferic pressure force are attached to a support frame for testing. See also 7712182, 7712179.

  10. Corrosion behavior on aluminum alloy LY12 in simulated atmospheric corrosion process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhen-yao; MA Teng; HAN Wei; YU Guo-cai

    2007-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of typical high-strength aluminum alloy LY12 was studied by accelerated corrosion tests of cyclic wet-dry-immersion containing media of NaHSO3 and NaCl to simulate the corrosion process in different atmosphere environment, and the corrosion mechanism was also discussed. The main experimental techniques include mass loss, morphological check, analysis of corrosion products and electrochemical measurement. The result shows that the mass loss of LY12, with or without cladding, has linear relationship with test time in the three kinds of chemical media, 0.02 mol/L NaHSO3, 0.006 mol/L NaCl and 0.02 mol/L NaHSO3+0.006 mol/L NaCl, respectively. A layer of cladding on high-strength aluminum alloy can raise evidently the resistance of atmospheric corrosion. Cl- can promote pitting generation on the oxide film of LY12 when HOS3- exists, LY12 can react much intensely with HOS3- derived from anions.

  11. Laboratory Simulations of Local Winds in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer via Image Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Moroni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the atmospheric boundary layer, under high pressure conditions and negligible geostrophic winds, problems associated with pollution are the most critical. In this situation local winds play a major role in the evaluation of the atmospheric dynamics at small scales and in dispersion processes. These winds originate as a result of nonuniform heating of the soil, either when it is homogeneous or in discontinuous terrain in the presence of sea and/or slopes. Depending on the source of the thermal gradient, local winds are classified into convective boundary layer, sea and land breezes, urban heat islands, and slope currents. Local winds have been analyzed by (i simple analytical models; (ii numerical models; (iii field measurements; (iv laboratory measurements through which it is impossible to completely create the necessary similarities, but the parameters that determine the phenomenon can be controlled and each single wind can be separately analyzed. The present paper presents a summary of laboratory simulations of local winds neglecting synoptic winds and the effects of Coriolis force. Image analysis techniques appear suitable to fully describe both the individual phenomenon and the superposition of more than one local wind. Results do agree with other laboratory studies and numerical experiments.

  12. Observing system simulation experiments for the laser atmospheric wind sounder using global spectral model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohaly, Gregg; Krishnamurti, T. N.

    1991-01-01

    Fundamental to improving the understanding of the total Earth system are increased and improved observations. In the coming decade several spaceborne instrumented platforms will be constructed and implemented. These platforms will, in large, be housing the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) instrument suite. One of the proposed instruments is a wind profiling system which is currently referred to as the Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS). This instrument will use a CO2 Doppler lidar wind profiler to give wind measurements with a vertical and horizontal resolution which has yet to be seen globally. The LAWS instrument is now a candidate for launch on a NASA EOS-B platform and is fundamental to increasing our understanding of Earth system science. The LAWS data sets will form an integral component of the temporally continuous data base needed for research of the coupled climate systems. This instrument's observations will aid in giving an improved description of the atmospheric circulation, including the transports of energy, momentum, moisture, trace gases, and aerosols. Also, the wind data will be assimilated and used as the initial state for many global forecast models at various operational centers. Results of system simulation experiments are discussed, and future experiments are described.

  13. 3D cut-cell modelling for high-resolution atmospheric simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Yamazaki, H; Nikiforakis, N

    2015-01-01

    With the recent, rapid development of computer technology, the resolution of atmospheric numerical models has increased substantially. As a result, steep gradients in mountainous terrain are now being resolved in high-resolution models. This results in large truncation errors in those models using terrain-following coordinates. In this study, a new 3D Cartesian coordinate non-hydrostatic atmospheric model is developed. A cut-cell representation of topography based on finite-volume discretization is combined with a cell-merging approach, in which small cut-cells are merged with neighboring cells either vertically or horizontally. In addition, a block-structured mesh-refinement technique achieves a variable resolution on the model grid with the finest resolution occurring close to the terrain surface. The model successfully reproduces a flow over a 3D bell-shaped hill that shows a good agreement with the flow predicted by the linear theory. The ability of the model to simulate flows over steep terrain is demons...

  14. Forests, Water, and the Atmosphere in Northern California: Insights from Sap-Flow Data Analysis and Numerical Atmospheric Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Percy Anne

    Evapotranspiration cools the land surface by consuming a large fraction of the net radiative energy at the surface. In forested regions, trees actively control the rate of transpiration by modulating stomatal conductance in response to environmental conditions, and species with different stomatal dynamics can affect the atmosphere in distinct ways. Using principal component analysis (PCA) and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) parameter estimation with direct, tree-level measurements of water use, we show that Douglas-firs ( Pseudotsuga menziesii), a common evergreen needleleaf tree species in the Northern California Coast Range, decrease their transpiration sharply in the summer dry season in response to a dry root zone; and in contrast, broadleaf evergreen tree species, especially Pacific madrones (Arbutus menziesii), transpire maximally in the summer dry season because their transpiration is much less sensitive to a dry root zone and increases continually in response to increasing atmospheric evaporative demand. We scale up these tree-level observations to construct a bottom-up estimate of regional transpiration, and we use these regional estimates along with atmospheric models, one simple and one comprehensive, to quantify the potential impact of species transpiration differences on regional summertime climate. The atmospheric models suggest that these species differences in transpiration could affect the well-mixed atmospheric boundary layer temperature and humidity by 1-1.5 degrees C and 1 g/kg, respectively, and near-surface temperature and humidity by 1.5-2.5 degrees C and 2-3 g/kg, respectively. We further investigate the sensitivity of California climate to evapotranspiration by estimating the sensitivity of wind energy forecasts at a California wind farm to regional-scale perturbations in soil moisture using a regional atmospheric model. These tests show that forecasts at this particular farm are most sensitive to soil moisture in the Central Valley, and

  15. On the Structure and Adjustment of Inversion-Capped Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flows: Large-Eddy Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Kelly, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    A range of large-eddy simulations, with differing free atmosphere stratification and zero or slightly positive surface heat flux, is investigated to improve understanding of the neutral and near-neutral, inversion-capped, horizontally homogeneous, barotropic atmospheric boundary layer with emphasis...... on the upper region. We find that an adjustment time of at least 16 h is needed for the simulated flow to reach a quasi-steady state. The boundary layer continues to grow, but at a slow rate that changes little after 8 h of simulation time. A common feature of the neutral simulations is the development...... of a super-geostrophic jet near the top of the boundary layer. The analytical wind-shear models included do not account for such a jet, and the best agreement with simulated wind shear is seen in cases with weak stratification above the boundary layer. Increasing the surface heat flux decreases the magnitude...

  16. Chemistry Simulations using the MERRA-2 Reanalysis with the GMI CTM and Replay in Support of the Atmospheric Composition Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Luke D.; Strahan, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Simulations using reanalysis meteorological fields have long been used to understand the causes of atmospheric composition change in the recent past. Using the new MERRA-2 reanalysis, we are conducting chemistry simulations to create products covering 1980-2016 for the atmospheric composition community. These simulations use the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical mechanism in two different models: the GMI Chemical Transport Model (CTM) and the GEOS-5 model in Replay mode. Replay mode means an integration of the GEOS-5 general circulation model that is incrementally adjusted each time step toward the MERRA-2 reanalysis. The GMI CTM is a 1 deg x 1.25 deg simulation and the MERRA-2 GMI Replay simulation uses the native MERRA-2 grid of approximately 1/2 deg horizontal resolution on the cubed sphere. A specialized set of transport diagnostics is included in both runs to better understand trace gas transport and its variability in the recent past.

  17. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchfield, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    This presentation describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver so that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with some preliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simple set of hills.

  18. Simulating thermo-mechanical interaction between a xenon gas-filled chamber and tungsten first-wall armor for the LIFE reactor design using the BUCKY 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heltemes, T A; Prochaska, A E; Moses, G A, E-mail: taheltemes@wisc.ed [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The BUCKY 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code has been used to simulate the dynamic thermo-mechanical interaction between a xenon gas-filled chamber and tungsten first-wall armor with an indirect-drive laser fusion target for the LIFE reactor design. Two classes of simulations were performed: (1) short-time (0-2 ms) simulations to fully capture the hydrodynamic effects of the introduction of the LIFE indirect-drive target x-ray and ion threat spectra and (2) long-time (2-70 ms) simulations starting with quiescent chamber conditions characteristic of those at 2 ms to estimate xenon plasma cooling between target implosions at 13 Hz. The short-time simulation results reported are: (1) the plasma hydrodynamics of the xenon in the chamber, (2) dynamic overpressure on the tungsten armor, and (3) time-dependent temperatures in the tungsten armor. The ramifications of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) vs. non-LTE opacity models are also addressed.

  19. 2D fluid simulations of discharges at atmospheric pressure in reactive gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Since a few years, low-temperature atmospheric pressure discharges have received a considerable interest as they efficiently produce many reactive chemical species at a low energy cost. This potential is of great interest for a wide range of applications as plasma assisted combustion or biomedical applications. Then, in current simulations of atmospheric pressure discharges, there is the need to take into account detailed kinetic schemes. It is interesting to note that in some conditions, the kinetics of the discharge may play a role on the discharge dynamics itself. To illustrate this, we consider the case of the propagation of He-N2 discharges in long capillary tubes, studied for the development of medical devices for endoscopic applications. Simulation results put forward that the discharge dynamics and structure depend on the amount of N2 in the He-N2 mixture. In particular, as the amount of N2 admixture increases, the discharge propagation velocity in the tube increases, reaches a maximum for about 0 . 1 % of N2 and then decreases, in agreement with experiments. For applications as plasma assisted combustion with nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, there is the need to handle the very different timescales of the nanosecond discharge with the much longer (micro to millisecond) timescales of combustion processes. This is challenging from a computational point of view. It is also important to better understand the coupling of the plasma induced chemistry and the gas heating. To illustrate this, we present the simulation of the flame ignition in lean mixtures by a nanosecond pulsed discharge between two point electrodes. In particular, among the different discharge regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, a ``spark'' regime has been put forward in the experiments, with an ultra-fast local heating of the gas. For other discharge regimes, the gas heating is much weaker. We have simulated the nanosecond spark regime and have observed shock waves

  20. Simulation of atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs) during polar springtime using the MECCA box model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z.-Q.; Sander, R.; Pöschl, U.; Slemr, F.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs) during polar springtime are closely correlated with bromine-catalyzed tropospheric ozone depletion events (ODEs). To study gas- and aqueous-phase reaction kinetics and speciation of mercury during AMDEs, we have included mercury chemistry into the box model MECCA (Module Efficiently Calculating the Chemistry of the Atmosphere), which enables dynamic simulation of bromine activation and ODEs. We found that the reaction of Hg with Br atoms dominates the loss of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM). To explain the experimentally observed synchronous depletion of GEM and O3, the reaction rate of Hg+BrO has to be much lower than that of Hg+Br. The synchronicity is best reproduced with rate coefficients at the lower limit of the literature values for both reactions, i.e. kHg+Br≍3×10-13 and kHg+BrO≤1×10-15 cm3 molecule-1 s-1, respectively. Throughout the simulated AMDEs, \\chem{BrHgOBr} was the most abundant reactive mercury species, both in the gas phase and in the aqueous phase. The aqueous-phase concentrations of BrHgOBr, HgBr2, and HgCl2 were several orders of magnitude larger than that of Hg(SO3)22-. Considering chlorine chemistry outside depletion events (i.e. without bromine activation), the concentration of total divalent mercury in sea-salt aerosol particles (mostly HgCl42-) was much higher than in dilute aqueous droplets (mostly Hg(SO3)22-), and did not exhibit a diurnal cycle (no correlation with HO2 radicals).

  1. Test of an undulated vacuum chamber for the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This picture shows mechanical tests of an undulated vacuum chamber for downstream arms of ISR intersections. This chamber, made of 0.3 mm thick inconel, had inner dimensions of 150 mm by 50 mm. The deflection under vacuum is measured by dial gauges. On the left one sees the large vessel where vacuum chambers were tested at pressures above atmospheric pressure.

  2. The effect of CO{sub 2} on the corrosion rate in simulated combustion atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekipaeae, Martti [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1601, FIN-02044 VTT, Espoo (Finland); Sroda, Szymon [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of the study is to improve the understanding of the corrosion mechanism in biomass and waste combustion processes. Laboratory, pilot and full scale testing of materials are performed. The obtained results are discussed, e.g., with reference to thermodynamic modelling calculations. The laboratory experiments in JRC Plant Simulation Test Laboratory are focused mainly on common ferritic and austenitic steels (X10, X20, 2.25Cr1Mo, AC66, Sanicro28, Esshette 1250 etc), which are used as superheater steel tube materials in such applications. The main aim of this part of the project is to understand the effect of deposition as well as the CO{sub 2} or/and CO/CO{sub 2} content in combustion atmospheres on corrosion rate and mechanism of studied materials. Laboratory tests include the thermogravimetric studies using Cahn thermo-balances and long exposure tests in horizontal/autoclave multi-sample furnaces. Post experimental analyses are made using SEM/EDS + XRD techniques and optical microscopy. The experiments are carried out at isothermal temperature - 535 deg. C in various simulated combustion atmospheres (22%H{sub 2}O + 5%O{sub 2} + xCO{sub 2} + N{sub 2}) with different CO{sub 2} content vary from 0 to 25 vol. % for the samples without deposit and with filter/cyclone ash deposition (long exposure tests). In this stage, following conclusions can be made: - Corrosion rate, for the alloys with and without the deposit, increase with increasing CO{sub 2} content, especially for the ferritic steels; - Corrosion rate for samples with the deposit increase significantly and in this case the internal oxidation of the studied samples was observed; - Thermodynamic model calculations performed resulted, a.o., to the following propositions still of preliminary nature; - Various carbides of metallic alloying elements become less stable at oxide scale-metallic alloy phase boundary with increasing partial pressure of carbon dioxide; - Carbides and oxides of various alloying

  3. Natural Exposure versus Chamber Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    Mangrove Environment, Then, F., and Dement, Wi. A., USATTC Report S21031, October 198? 14 0. --- .: . . .... .. • . . . . TABLE 6. BREAVING STRENGTH OF...37.5 >20 36.5 .023 >20 * * * MEAN 37.5 >20 36.3 .024 >20 35.4 .014 >20 * D.. ring the final three months, data were taken with the HP 4261 LCR meter which...and other fungi, lichens, dust, leaf particles, insect parts, * pollen, flowers and seeds from trees and other jungle plants and droppinqs from birds

  4. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of a direct current air corona discharge under atmospheric pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xing-Hua; He Wei; Yang Fan; Wang Hong-Yu; Liao Rui-Jin; Xiao Han-Guang

    2012-01-01

    Air corona discharge is one of the critical problems associated with high-voltage equipment.Investigating the corona mechanism plays a key role in enhancing the electrical insulation performance.An improved self-consistent multi-component two-dimensional plasma hybrid model is presented for the simulation of a direct current atmospheric pressure corona discharge in air.The model is based on plasma hydrodynamic and chemical models,and includes 12 species and 26 reactions.In addition,the photoionization effect is introduced into the model.The simulation on a bar-plate electrode configuration with an inter-electrode gap of 5.0 mm is carried out.The discharge voltage-current characteristics and the current density distribution predicted by the hybrid model agree with the experimental measurements.In addition,the dynamics of volume charged species generation,discharge current waveform,current density distribution at an electrode,charge density,electron temperature,and electric field variations are investigated in detail based on the model.The results indicate that the model can contribute valuable insights into the physics of an air plasma discharge.

  5. Progress in Modeling Global Atmospheric CO2 Fluxes and Transport: Results from Simulations with Diurnal Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collatz, G. James; Kawa, R.

    2007-01-01

    Progress in better determining CO2 sources and sinks will almost certainly rely on utilization of more extensive and intensive CO2 and related observations including those from satellite remote sensing. Use of advanced data requires improved modeling and analysis capability. Under NASA Carbon Cycle Science support we seek to develop and integrate improved formulations for 1) atmospheric transport, 2) terrestrial uptake and release, 3) biomass and 4) fossil fuel burning, and 5) observational data analysis including inverse calculations. The transport modeling is based on meteorological data assimilation analysis from the Goddard Modeling and Assimilation Office. Use of assimilated met data enables model comparison to CO2 and other observations across a wide range of scales of variability. In this presentation we focus on the short end of the temporal variability spectrum: hourly to synoptic to seasonal. Using CO2 fluxes at varying temporal resolution from the SIB 2 and CASA biosphere models, we examine the model's ability to simulate CO2 variability in comparison to observations at different times, locations, and altitudes. We find that the model can resolve much of the variability in the observations, although there are limits imposed by vertical resolution of boundary layer processes. The influence of key process representations is inferred. The high degree of fidelity in these simulations leads us to anticipate incorporation of realtime, highly resolved observations into a multiscale carbon cycle analysis system that will begin to bridge the gap between top-down and bottom-up flux estimation, which is a primary focus of NACP.

  6. Simulation of radio-frequency atmospheric pressure glow discharge in γ mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shang Wan-Li; Wang De-Zhen; Michael G. Kong

    2007-01-01

    The existence of two different discharge modes has been verified in an rf (radio-frequency) atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD) by Shi [J. Appl. Phys. 97, 023306 (2005)]. In the first mode, referred to as α mode, the discharge current density is relatively low and the bulk plasma electrons acquire the energy due to the sheath expansion.In the second mode, termed γ mode, the discharge current density is relatively high, the secondary electrons emitted by cathode under ion bombardment in the cathode sheath region play an important role in sustaining the discharge. In this paper, a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model for rf APGDs is used to simulate the discharge mechanisms in the γmode in helium discharge between two parallel metallic planar electrodes. The results show that as the applied voltage increases, the discharge current becomes greater and the plasma density correspondingly increases, consequentially the discharge transits from the c mode into the γ mode. The high collisionality of the APGD plasma results in significant drop of discharge potential across the sheath region, and the electron Joule heating and the electron collisional energy loss reach their maxima in the region. The validity of the simulation is checked with the available experimental and numerical data.

  7. 基于 ElecNet 的凸度仪电离室电场分布模拟%Simulation of Electric Field Distribution in Ionization Chamber of Profile Gauge Based on ElecNet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝朋飞; 吴志芳; 王振涛; 沈毅雄

    2014-01-01

    凸度仪对探测器响应时间有很高的要求,对于高压充气电离室探测器,电离室内电场分布是决定其响应时间的一个重要因素。本文通过有限元电场模拟软件ElecNet对凸度仪电离室内部的电场分布进行了仿真,根据仿真结果从理论上分析了高压充气电离室电场分布对其输出波形信号的影响,解释了出现“拖尾”现象的机理,为凸度仪电离室的设计和改进提供了指导。%There are high requirements to the time response of detector in profile gauge . For the high gas-pressurized ionization chamber detector ,the electric field distribution in chamber is one of the important factors to determine its response time .The electric field distribution in the ionization chamber was simulated using the electric field simula-tion software ElecNet which was based on finite element analysis methods .Influence of the electric field distribution in ionization chamber on its output waveform signal was analyzed typically ,the mechanism of trailing signal was also explained according to the simulation results .The research results provid guidance for the design and improvement of ionization chamber in profile gauge .

  8. Premar-2: a Monte Carlo code for radiative transport simulation in atmospheric environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna, (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    The peculiarities of the PREMAR-2 code, aimed at radiation transport Monte Carlo simulation in atmospheric environments in the infrared-ultraviolet frequency range, are described. With respect to the previously developed PREMAR code, besides plane multilayers, spherical multilayers and finite sequences of vertical layers, each one with its own atmospheric behaviour, are foreseen in the new code, together with the refraction phenomenon, so that long range, highly slanted paths can now be more faithfully taken into account. A zenithal angular dependence of the albedo coefficient has moreover been introduced. Lidar systems, with spatially independent source and telescope, are allowed again to be simulated, and, in this latest version of the code, sensitivity analyses to be performed. According to this last feasibility, consequences on radiation transport of small perturbations in physical components of the atmospheric environment may be analyze and the related effects on searched results estimated. The availability of a library of physical data (reaction coefficients, phase functions and refraction indexes) is required by the code, providing the essential features of the environment of interest needed of the Monte Carlo simulation. Variance reducing techniques have been enhanced in the Premar-2 code, by introducing, for instance, a local forced collision technique, especially apt to be used in Lidar system simulations. Encouraging comparisons between code and experimental results carried out at the Brasimone Centre of ENEA, have so far been obtained, even if further checks of the code are to be performed. [Italian] Nel presente rapporto vengono descritte le principali caratteristiche del codice di calcolo PREMAR-2, che esegue la simulazione Montecarlo del trasporto della radiazione elettromagnetica nell'atmosfera, nell'intervallo di frequenza che va dall'infrarosso all'ultravioletto. Rispetto al codice PREMAR precedentemente sviluppato, il codice

  9. Simulation of atmospheric krypton-85 transport to assess the detectability of clandestine nuclear reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Jens Ole

    2010-02-02

    The radioactive noble gas krypton-85 is released into the atmosphere during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel or irradiated breeding targets. This is a necessary step for plutonium separation. Therefore the {sup 85}Kr signature of reprocessing could possibly be used for the detection of undeclared nuclear facilities producing nuclear weaponusable material. The {sup 85}Kr content of the atmosphere has grown over the last decades as the emissions from military and civilian nuclear industry could not be compensated by the decay with a half-life of 10.76 years. In this study, the global {sup 85}Kr background distribution due to emissions of known reprocessing facilities for the period from 1971 until 2006 was simulated using the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 applying the newest available annual emission data. The convective tracer transport scheme and the operator splitting for the physical calculations in the model were modified in order to guarantee physically correct results for tracer point sources, in particular non negative concentrations. An on-line routine controlling the {sup 85}Kr -budget in the model enforced exact mass conservation. The results of the simulation were evaluated by extensive comparison with measurements performed by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection with very good agreement at most observation sites except those in the direct vicinity of {sup 85}Kr sources. Of particular interest for the {sup 85}Kr detection potential was the variability of {sup 85}Kr background concentrations which was evaluated for the first time in a global model. In addition, the interhemispheric transport as simulated by ECHAM5 was analyzed using a two-box model providing a mean exchange time of τ {sub ex} = 10.5 months. The analysis of τ{sub ex} over simulated 35 years indicates that in years with strong South Asian or African Monsoon the interhemispheric transport is faster during the monsoon season. A correlation analysis of

  10. Simulation of polar atmospheric microwave and sub-millimetre spectra for characterizing potential new ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnham, David; Turner, Emma; Ford, George; Pumphrey, Hugh; Withington, Stafford

    2016-04-01

    Advanced detector technologies from the fields of astronomy and telecommunications are offering the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. Adoption of these technologies in ground-based passive microwave and sub-millimetre radiometry could allow new measurements of chemical species and winds in the polar middle atmosphere for verifying meteorological data-sets and atmospheric models. A site study to assess the feasibility of new polar observations is performed by simulating the downwelling clear-sky submillimetre spectrum over 10-2000 GHz (30 mm to 150 microns) at two Arctic and two Antarctic locations under different seasonal and diurnal conditions. Vertical profiles for temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis, and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr), hydrogen bromide (HBr), perhydroxyl radical (HO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified and minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures estimated. The optimal lines for all species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad frequency range. We also demonstrate the feasibility of measuring horizontal wind profiles above Halley station, Antarctica with time resolution as high as 0.5hr using simulated spectroradiometric observations of Doppler-shifted ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) lines in the 230-250 GHz region. The techniques presented provide a framework that can be applied to the retrieval of additional atmospheric parameters and be taken forward to simulate and guide the design of future microwave and sub

  11. Improving the inter-hemispheric gradient of total column atmospheric CO2 and CH4 in simulations with the ECMWF semi-Lagrangian atmospheric global model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agusti-Panareda, Anna; Diamantakis, Michail; Bayona, Victor; Klappenbach, Friedrich; Butz, Andre

    2017-01-01

    It is a widely established fact that standard semi-Lagrangian advection schemes are highly efficient numerical techniques for simulating the transport of atmospheric tracers. However, as they are not formally mass conserving, it is essential to use some method for restoring mass conservation in long time range forecasts. A common approach is to use global mass fixers. This is the case of the semi-Lagrangian advection scheme in the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS) model used by the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF).Mass fixers are algorithms with substantial differences in complexity and sophistication but in general of low computational cost. This paper shows the positive impact mass fixers have on the inter-hemispheric gradient of total atmospheric column-averaged CO2 and CH4, a crucial feature of their spatial distribution. Two algorithms are compared: the simple "proportional" and the more complex Bermejo-Conde schemes. The former is widely used by several Earth system climate models as well the CAMS global forecasts and analysis of atmospheric composition, while the latter has been recently implemented in IFS. Comparisons against total column observations demonstrate that the proportional mass fixer is shown to be suitable for the low-resolution simulations, but for the high-resolution simulations the Bermejo-Conde scheme clearly gives better results. These results have potential repercussions for climate Earth system models using proportional mass fixers as their resolution increases. It also emphasises the importance of benchmarking the tracer mass fixers with the inter-hemispheric gradient of long-lived greenhouse gases using observations.

  12. A simulated Linear Mixture Model to Improve Classification Accuracy of Satellite Data Utilizing Degradation of Atmospheric Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WIDAD Elmahboub

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Researchers in remote sensing have attempted to increase the accuracy of land cover information extracted from remotely sensed imagery. Factors that influence the supervised and unsupervised classification accuracy are the presence of atmospheric effect and mixed pixel information. A linear mixture simulated model experiment is generated to simulate real world data with known end member spectral sets and class cover proportions (CCP. The CCP were initially generated by a random number generator and normalized to make the sum of the class proportions equal to 1.0 using MATLAB program. Random noise was intentionally added to pixel values using different combinations of noise levels to simulate a real world data set. The atmospheric scattering error is computed for each pixel value for three generated images with SPOT data. Accuracy can either be classified or misclassified. Results portrayed great improvement in classified accuracy, for example, in image 1, misclassified pixels due to atmospheric noise is 41 %. Subsequent to the degradation of atmospheric effect, the misclassified pixels were reduced to 4 %. We can conclude that accuracy of classification can be improved by degradation of atmospheric noise.

  13. A simulated Linear Mixture Model to Improve Classification Accuracy of Satellite Data Utilizing Degradation of Atmospheric Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WIDAD Elmahboub

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Researchers in remote sensing have attempted to increase the accuracy of land cover information extracted from remotely sensed imagery. Factors that influence the supervised and unsupervised classification accuracy are the presence of atmospheric effect and mixed pixel information. A linear mixture simulated model experiment is generated to simulate real world data with known end member spectral sets and class cover proportions (CCP. The CCP were initially generated by a random number generator and normalized to make the sum of the class proportions equal to 1.0 using MATLAB program. Random noise was intentionally added to pixel values using different combinations of noise levels to simulate a real world data set. The atmospheric scattering error is computed for each pixel value for three generated images with SPOT data. Accuracy can either be classified or misclassified. Results portrayed great improvement in classified accuracy, for example, in image 1, misclassified pixels due to atmospheric noise is 41 %. Subsequent to the degradation of atmospheric effect, the misclassified pixels were reduced to 4 %. We can conclude that accuracy of classification can be improved by degradation of atmospheric noise.

  14. ISSARS Aerosol Database : an Incorporation of Atmospheric Particles into a Universal Tool to Simulate Remote Sensing Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    The Instrument Simulator Suite for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (ISSARS) entered its third and final year of development with an overall goal of providing a unified tool to simulate active and passive space borne atmospheric remote sensing instruments. These simulations focus on the atmosphere ranging from UV to microwaves. ISSARS handles all assumptions and uses various models on scattering and microphysics to fill the gaps left unspecified by the atmospheric models to create each instrument's measurements. This will help benefit mission design and reduce mission cost, create efficient implementation of multi-instrument/platform Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE), and improve existing models as well as new advanced models in development. In this effort, various aerosol particles are incorporated into the system, and a simulation of input wavelength and spectral refractive indices related to each spherical test particle(s) generate its scattering properties and phase functions. These atmospheric particles being integrated into the system comprise the ones observed by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer(MISR) and by the Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager(MSPI). In addition, a complex scattering database generated by Prof. Ping Yang (Texas A&M) is also incorporated into this aerosol database. Future development with a radiative transfer code will generate a series of results that can be validated with results obtained by the MISR and MSPI instruments; nevertheless, test cases are simulated to determine the validity of various plugin libraries used to determine or gather the scattering properties of particles studied by MISR and MSPI, or within the Single-scattering properties of tri-axial ellipsoidal mineral dust particles database created by Prof. Ping Yang.

  15. A multi-layer land surface energy budget model for implicit coupling with global atmospheric simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ryder

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In Earth system modelling, a description of the energy budget of the vegetated surface layer is fundamental as it determines the meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer and as such contributes to the atmospheric conditions and its circulation. The energy budget in most Earth system models has long been based on a "big-leaf approach", with averaging schemes that represent in-canopy processes. Such models have difficulties in reproducing consistently the energy balance in field observations. We here outline a newly developed numerical model for energy budget simulation, as a component of the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems – CANopy. This new model implements techniques from single-site canopy models in a practical way. It includes representation of in-canopy transport, a multilayer longwave radiation budget, height-specific calculation of aerodynamic and stomatal conductance, and interaction with the bare soil flux within the canopy space. Significantly, it avoids iterations over the height of tha canopy and so maintains implicit coupling to the atmospheric model LMDz. As a first test, the model is evaluated against data from both an intensive measurement campaign and longer term eddy covariance measurements for the intensively studied Eucalyptus stand at Tumbarumba, Australia. The model performs well in replicating both diurnal and annual cycles of fluxes, as well as the gradients of sensible heat fluxes. However, the model overestimates sensible heat flux against an underestimate of the radiation budget. Improved performance is expected through the implementation of a more detailed calculation of stand albedo and a more up-to-date stomatal conductance calculation.

  16. Dosimetry for electron Intra-Operative RadioTherapy: Comparison of output factors obtained through alanine/EPR pellets, ionization chamber and Monte Carlo-GEANT4 simulations for IORT mobile dedicate accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Longo, Anna; Russo, Giorgio; Casarino, Carlo; Candiano, Giuliana; Gallo, Salvatore; Carlino, Antonio; Brai, Maria

    2015-09-01

    In this work a comparison between the response of alanine and Markus ionization chamber was carried out for measurements of the output factors (OF) of electron beams produced by a linear accelerator used for Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). Output factors (OF) for conventional high-energy electron beams are normally measured using ionization chamber according to international dosimetry protocols. However, the electron beams used in IORT have characteristics of dose per pulse, energy spectrum and angular distribution quite different from beams usually used in external radiotherapy, so the direct application of international dosimetry protocols may introduce additional uncertainties in dosimetric determinations. The high dose per pulse could lead to an inaccuracy in dose measurements with ionization chamber, due to overestimation of ks recombination factor. Furthermore, the electron fields obtained with IORT-dedicated applicators have a wider energy spectrum and a wider angular distribution than the conventional fields, due to the presence of electrons scattered by the applicator's wall. For this reason, a dosimetry system should be characterized by a minimum dependence from the beam energy and from angle of incidence of electrons. This become particularly critical for small and bevelled applicators. All of these reasons lead to investigate the use of detectors different from the ionization chamber for measuring the OFs. Furthermore, the complete characterization of the radiation field could be accomplished also by the use of Monte Carlo simulations which allows to obtain detailed information on dose distributions. In this work we compare the output factors obtained by means of alanine dosimeters and Markus ionization chamber. The comparison is completed by the Monte Carlo calculations of OFs determined through the use of the Geant4 application "iort _ therapy" . The results are characterized by a good agreement of response of alanine pellets and Markus

  17. Simulated nutrient dissolution of Asian aerosols in various atmospheric waters: Potential links to marine primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyan; Bi, Yanfeng; Zhang, Guosen; Liu, Sumei; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Zhaomeng; Ren, Jingling; Zhang, Guiling

    2017-09-01

    To probe the bioavailability and environmental mobility of aerosol nutrient elements (N, P, Si) in atmospheric water (rainwater, cloud and fog droplets), ten total suspended particulate (TSP) samples were collected at Fulong Mountain, Qingdao from prevailing air mass trajectory sources during four seasons. Then, a high time-resolution leaching experiment with simulated non-acidic atmospheric water (non-AAW, Milli-Q water, pH 5.5) and subsequently acidic atmospheric water (AAW, hydrochloric acid solution, pH 2) was performed. We found that regardless of the season or source, a monotonous decreasing pattern was observed in the dissolution of N, P and Si compounds in aerosols reacted with non-AAW, and the accumulated dissolved curves of P and Si fit a first-order kinetic model. No additional NO3- + NO2- dissolved out, while a small amount of NH4+ in Asian dust (AD) samples was released in AAW. The similar dissolution behaviour of P and Si from non-AAW to AAW can be explained by the Transition State Theory. The sources of aerosols related to various minerals were the natural reasons that affected the amounts of bioavailable phosphorus and silicon in aerosols (i.e., solubility), which can be explained by the dissolution rate constant of P and Si in non-AAW with lower values in mineral aerosols. The acid/particle ratio and particle/liquid ratio also have a large effect on the solubility of P and Si, which was implied by Pearson correlation analysis. Acid processing of aerosols may have great significance for marine areas with limited P and Si and post-acidification release increases of 1.1-10-fold for phosphorus and 1.2-29-fold for silicon. The decreasing mole ratio of P and Si in AAW indicates the possibility of shifting from a Si-limit to a P-limit in aerosols in the ocean, which promotes the growth of diatoms prior to other algal species.

  18. Accuracy of the electron transport in mcnp5 and its suitability for ionization chamber response simulations: A comparison with the egsnrc and penelope codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivunoro, Hanna; Siiskonen, Teemu; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Hippelaeinen, Eero; Savolainen, Sauli [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki University (Finland) and Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FI-00029 HUS (Finland); STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. Box 14, FI-00881 Helsinki (Finland); VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki University (Finland); HUS Medical Imaging Centre, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FI-00029 HUS (Finland)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, accuracy of the mcnp5 code in the electron transport calculations and its suitability for ionization chamber (IC) response simulations in photon beams are studied in comparison to egsnrc and penelope codes. Methods: The electron transport is studied by comparing the depth dose distributions in a water phantom subdivided into thin layers using incident energies (0.05, 0.1, 1, and 10 MeV) for the broad parallel electron beams. The IC response simulations are studied in water phantom in three dosimetric gas materials (air, argon, and methane based tissue equivalent gas) for photon beams ({sup 60}Co source, 6 MV linear medical accelerator, and mono-energetic 2 MeV photon source). Two optional electron transport models of mcnp5 are evaluated: the ITS-based electron energy indexing (mcnp5{sub ITS}) and the new detailed electron energy-loss straggling logic (mcnp5{sub new}). The electron substep length (ESTEP parameter) dependency in mcnp5 is investigated as well. Results: For the electron beam studies, large discrepancies (>3%) are observed between the mcnp5 dose distributions and the reference codes at 1 MeV and lower energies. The discrepancy is especially notable for 0.1 and 0.05 MeV electron beams. The boundary crossing artifacts, which are well known for the mcnp5{sub ITS}, are observed for the mcnp5{sub new} only at 0.1 and 0.05 MeV beam energies. If the excessive boundary crossing is eliminated by using single scoring cells, the mcnp5{sub ITS} provides dose distributions that agree better with the reference codes than mcnp5{sub new}. The mcnp5 dose estimates for the gas cavity agree within 1% with the reference codes, if the mcnp5{sub ITS} is applied or electron substep length is set adequately for the gas in the cavity using the mcnp5{sub new}. The mcnp5{sub new} results are found highly dependent on the chosen electron substep length and might lead up to 15% underestimation of the absorbed dose. Conclusions: Since the mcnp5 electron

  19. Large eddy simulation of flow in a street canyon with tree planting under various atmospheric instability conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this work, a large eddy simulation (LES) model, which includes momentum and heat source (or sink) inside the tree planting layer, is proposed for the simulation of flow in a street canyon with tree planting. Vegetation canopy layer simulation shows that this model can be used to simulate the velocity distribution and temperature variation inside the canopy layer. Effects of atmospheric instability on flow and pollutant distribution in a street canyon with tree planting of an aspect ratio of 0.5 are studied. Results show that compared with the canyon with no tree planting (or the exposed street canyon), the canyon with tree planting shows a reduced wind circulation and pollutant exchange rate (PER) at the top layer of the street canyon, which induces the increase in the pollutant concentrations near road surface, leeward wall and windward wall. When street canyon atmosphere is under a strongly unstable condition, wind velocity decreases while pollutant concentration is increased in the areas near the street canyon top, road surface, leeward and windward walls, compared with the wind velocity in the street canyon with the neutral stratification. When street canyon atmosphere is under a weakly unstable condition, wind velocity weakens near the street canyon top and windward wall, but strengthens near the road surface and leeward wall, and pollutant concentration is decreased near the leeward and windward walls and is increased between the two rows of trees. When the street canyon atmosphere is under an unstable condition, PER is lower than that under the neutral stratification.

  20. TransCom model simulations of hourly atmospheric CO2: Experimental overview and diurnal cycle results for 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, R. M.; Peters, W.; RöDenbeck, C.; Aulagnier, C.; Baker, I.; Bergmann, D. J.; Bousquet, P.; Brandt, J.; Bruhwiler, L.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Christensen, J. H.; Delage, F.; Denning, A. S.; Fan, S.; Geels, C.; Houweling, S.; Imasu, R.; Karstens, U.; Kawa, S. R.; Kleist, J.; Krol, M. C.; Lin, S.-J.; Lokupitiya, R.; Maki, T.; Maksyutov, S.; Niwa, Y.; Onishi, R.; Parazoo, N.; Patra, P. K.; Pieterse, G.; Rivier, L.; Satoh, M.; Serrar, S.; Taguchi, S.; Takigawa, M.; Vautard, R.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Zhu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    A forward atmospheric transport modeling experiment has been coordinated by the TransCom group to investigate synoptic and diurnal variations in CO2. Model simulations were run for biospheric, fossil, and air-sea exchange of CO2 and for SF6 and radon for 2000-2003. Twenty-five models or model varian