WorldWideScience

Sample records for atmosphere simulation chamber

  1. A new plant chamber facility PLUS coupled to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-11-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been build and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees are mixed with synthetic air and are transferred to the SAPHIR chamber where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important enviromental parameters (e.g. temperature, PAR, soil RH etc.) are well-controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leafes of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to FEP Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces only to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 LED panels which have an emission strength up to 800 μmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOC) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light and temperature dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus Ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus Ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental set up and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  2. A new plant chamber facility, PLUS, coupled to the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2016-03-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been built and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow-through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees is mixed with synthetic air and transferred to the SAPHIR chamber, where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important environmental parameters (e.g., temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), soil relative humidity (RH)) are well controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leaves of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to only fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 light-emitting diode (LED) panels, which have an emission strength up to 800 µmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light- and temperature- dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental setup and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  3. Mutagenicity in Salmonella of a Simulated Urban-Smog Atmosphere Generated Using a Mobile Reaction Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA Mobile Reaction Chamber (MRC) is a 24-foot trailer containing a 14.3-m3 Teflon lined photochemical chamber used to generate simulated urban atmospheres. Photochemistry in the MRC is catalyzed by 120 fluorescent bulbs evenly mixed with black light bulbs and UV bulbs (300 &...

  4. Characterisation of the photolytic HONO-source in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Rohrer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available HONO formation has been proposed as an important OH radical source in simulation chambers for more than two decades. Besides the heterogeneous HONO formation by the dark reaction of NO2 and adsorbed water, a photolytic source has been proposed to explain the elevated reactivity in simulation chamber experiments. However, the mechanism of the photolytic process is not well understood so far. As expected, production of HONO and NOx was also observed inside the new atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR under solar irradiation. This photolytic HONO and NOx formation was studied with a sensitive HONO instrument under reproducible controlled conditions at atmospheric concentrations of other trace gases. It is shown that the photolytic HONO source in the SAPHIR chamber is not caused by NO2 reactions and that it is the only direct NOy source under illuminated conditions. In addition, the photolysis of nitrate which was recently postulated for the observed photolytic HONO formation on snow, ground, and glass surfaces, can be excluded in the chamber. A photolytic HONO source at the surface of the chamber is proposed which is strongly dependent on humidity, on light intensity, and on temperature. An empirical function describes these dependencies and reproduces the observed HONO formation rates to within 10%. It is shown that the photolysis of HONO represents the dominant radical source in the SAPHIR chamber for typical tropospheric O3/H2O concentrations. For these conditions, the HONO concentrations inside SAPHIR are similar to recent observations in ambient air.

  5. The atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR: a tool for the investigation of photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauers, T.; Bohn, B.; Johnen, F.-J.; Rohrer, R.; Rodriguez Bares, S.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2003-04-01

    On the campus of the Forschungszentrum Jülich we constructed SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) which was accomplished in fall 2001. The chamber consists of a 280-m^3 double-wall Teflon bag of cylindrical shape that is held by a steel frame. Typically 75% of the outside actinic flux (290~nm~--~420~nm) is available inside the chamber. A louvre system allows switching between full sun light and dark within 40 s giving the opportunity to study relaxation processes of the photo chemical system. The SAPHIR chamber is equipped with a comprehensive set of sensitive instruments including the measurements of OH, HO_2, CO, hydrocarbons, aldehydes, nitrogen-oxides and solar radiation. Moreover, the modular concept of SAPHIR allows fast and flexible integration of new instruments and techniques. In this paper we will show the unique and new features of the SAPHIR chamber, namely the clean air supply and high purity water vapor supply providing a wide range of trace gas concentrations being accessible through the experiments. We will also present examples from the first year of SAPHIR experiment showing the scope of application from high quality instrument inter-comparison and kinetic studies to the simulation of complex mixtures of trace gases at ambient concentrations.

  6. Comparison of OH reactivity measurements in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Novelli, Anna; Rolletter, Michael; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Pfannerstill, Eva Y.; Kessel, Stephan; Edtbauer, Achim; Williams, Jonathan; Michoud, Vincent; Dusanter, Sebastien; Locoge, Nadine; Zannoni, Nora; Gros, Valerie; Truong, Francois; Sarda-Esteve, Roland; Cryer, Danny R.; Brumby, Charlotte A.; Whalley, Lisa K.; Stone, Daniel; Seakins, Paul W.; Heard, Dwayne E.; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Blocquet, Marion; Coudert, Sebastien; Batut, Sebastien; Fittschen, Christa; Thames, Alexander B.; Brune, William H.; Ernest, Cheryl; Harder, Hartwig; Muller, Jennifer B. A.; Elste, Thomas; Kubistin, Dagmar; Andres, Stefanie; Bohn, Birger; Hohaus, Thorsten; Holland, Frank; Li, Xin; Rohrer, Franz; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Yu, Zhujun; Zou, Qi; Wahner, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radical reactivity (kOH) has been measured for 18 years with different measurement techniques. In order to compare the performances of instruments deployed in the field, two campaigns were conducted performing experiments in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich in October 2015 and April 2016. Chemical conditions were chosen either to be representative of the atmosphere or to test potential limitations of instruments. All types of instruments that are currently used for atmospheric measurements were used in one of the two campaigns. The results of these campaigns demonstrate that OH reactivity can be accurately measured for a wide range of atmospherically relevant chemical conditions (e.g. water vapour, nitrogen oxides, various organic compounds) by all instruments. The precision of the measurements (limit of detection CRM) has a higher limit of detection of 2 s-1 at a time resolution of 10 to 15 min. The performances of the instruments were systematically tested by stepwise increasing, for example, the concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), water vapour or nitric oxide (NO). In further experiments, mixtures of organic reactants were injected into the chamber to simulate urban and forested environments. Overall, the results show that the instruments are capable of measuring OH reactivity in the presence of CO, alkanes, alkenes and aromatic compounds. The transmission efficiency in Teflon inlet lines could have introduced systematic errors in measurements for low-volatile organic compounds in some instruments. CRM instruments exhibited a larger scatter in the data compared to the other instruments. The largest differences to reference measurements or to calculated reactivity were observed by CRM instruments in the presence of terpenes and oxygenated organic compounds (mixing ratio of OH reactants were up to 10 ppbv). In some of these experiments, only a small fraction of the reactivity is detected. The accuracy of CRM

  7. Comparison of OH Reactivity Instruments in the Atmosphere Simulation Chamber SAPHIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H.; Novelli, A.; Rolletter, M.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Pfannerstill, E.; Edtbauer, A.; Kessel, S.; Williams, J.; Michoud, V.; Dusanter, S.; Locoge, N.; Zannoni, N.; Gros, V.; Truong, F.; Sarda Esteve, R.; Cryer, D. R.; Brumby, C.; Whalley, L.; Stone, D. J.; Seakins, P. W.; Heard, D. E.; Schoemaecker, C.; Blocquet, M.; Fittschen, C. M.; Thames, A. B.; Coudert, S.; Brune, W. H.; Batut, S.; Tatum Ernest, C.; Harder, H.; Elste, T.; Bohn, B.; Hohaus, T.; Holland, F.; Muller, J. B. A.; Li, X.; Rohrer, F.; Kubistin, D.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tillmann, R.; Andres, S.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Zou, Q.; Wahner, A.

    2017-12-01

    Two campaigns were conducted performing experiments in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich in October 2015 and April 2016 to compare hydroxyl (OH) radical reactivity (kOH) measurements. Chemical conditions were chosen either to be representative of the atmosphere or to test potential limitations of instruments. The results of these campaigns demonstrate that OH reactivity can be accurately measured for a wide range of atmospherically relevant chemical conditions (e.g. water vapor, nitrogen oxides, various organic compounds) by all instruments. The precision of the measurements is higher for instruments directly detecting hydroxyl radicals (OH), whereas the indirect Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) has a higher limit of detection of 2s-1 at a time resolution of 10 to 15 min. The performances of the instruments were systematically tested by stepwise increasing, for example, the concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), water vapor or nitric oxide (NO). In further experiments, mixtures of organic reactants were injected in the chamber to simulate urban and forested environments. Overall, the results show that instruments are capable of measuring OH reactivity in the presence of CO, alkanes, alkenes and aromatic compounds. The transmission efficiency in Teflon inlet lines could have introduced systematic errors in measurements for low-volatile organic compounds in some instruments. CRM instruments exhibited a larger scatter in the data compared to the other instruments. The largest differences to the reference were observed by CRM instruments in the presence of terpenes and oxygenated organic compounds. In some of these experiments, only a small fraction of the reactivity is detected. The accuracy of CRM measurements is most likely limited by the corrections that need to be applied in order to account for known effects of, for example, deviations from pseudo-first order conditions, nitrogen oxides or water vapor on the measurement

  8. [Smog chamber simulation of ozone formation from atmospheric photooxidation of propane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-hua; Mo, Chuang-rong; Xu, Yong-fu; Jia, Long

    2012-08-01

    Atmospheric photochemical reactions of propane and NO, were simulated with a self-made smog chamber. The effects of relative humidity (RH) and [C3H8]0/[NOx]0 ratio on ozone formation were studied. The results showed that both the maximum ozone concentration and the maximum value of incremental reactivity (IRmax) of propane decreased linearly with increasing RH. Under lower RH conditions, the occurrence time of peak ozone concentration was about 22 h after the beginning of reaction, and IRmax varied from 0.0231 to 0.0391, while under higher RH conditions the occurrence time of peak ozone concentration was 16 h, and IRmax ranged from 0.0172 to 0.0320. During the 20 h of reaction, within the first 12 h RH did not significantly affect the yield of acetone, whereas after 12 h the lower RH condition could lead to relatively greater amount of acetone. During the first 4-20 h of experiments, acetone concentrations ranged from 153 x 10(-9) to 364 x 10(-9) at 17% RH and from 167 x 10(-9) to 302 x 10(-9) at 62% RH, respectively. Maximum ozone concentrations decreased with increasing [C3H8]0/[NOx]0 ratio and a better negative linear relationship between them was obtained under the lower RH conditions. The smog chamber data and the results from simulation of the C3H8-NOx reactions using the sub-mechanism of MCM were compared, and a significant deviation was found between these two results.

  9. Criteria for controlled atmosphere chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.N.

    1980-03-01

    The criteria for design, construction, and operation of controlled atmosphere chambers intended for service at ORNL are presented. Classification of chambers, materials for construction, design criteria, design, controlled atmosphere chamber systems, and operating procedures are presented. ORNL Safety Manual Procedure 2.1; ORNL Health Physics Procedure Manual Appendix A-7; and Design of Viewing Windows are included in 3 appendices

  10. Comparison of OH reactivity measurements in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fuchs

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyl (OH radical reactivity (kOH has been measured for 18 years with different measurement techniques. In order to compare the performances of instruments deployed in the field, two campaigns were conducted performing experiments in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich in October 2015 and April 2016. Chemical conditions were chosen either to be representative of the atmosphere or to test potential limitations of instruments. All types of instruments that are currently used for atmospheric measurements were used in one of the two campaigns. The results of these campaigns demonstrate that OH reactivity can be accurately measured for a wide range of atmospherically relevant chemical conditions (e.g. water vapour, nitrogen oxides, various organic compounds by all instruments. The precision of the measurements (limit of detection  < 1 s−1 at a time resolution of 30 s to a few minutes is higher for instruments directly detecting hydroxyl radicals, whereas the indirect comparative reactivity method (CRM has a higher limit of detection of 2 s−1 at a time resolution of 10 to 15 min. The performances of the instruments were systematically tested by stepwise increasing, for example, the concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO, water vapour or nitric oxide (NO. In further experiments, mixtures of organic reactants were injected into the chamber to simulate urban and forested environments. Overall, the results show that the instruments are capable of measuring OH reactivity in the presence of CO, alkanes, alkenes and aromatic compounds. The transmission efficiency in Teflon inlet lines could have introduced systematic errors in measurements for low-volatile organic compounds in some instruments. CRM instruments exhibited a larger scatter in the data compared to the other instruments. The largest differences to reference measurements or to calculated reactivity were observed by CRM instruments in

  11. Intercomparison of NO3 radical detection instruments in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-P. Dorn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The detection of atmospheric NO3 radicals is still challenging owing to its low mixing ratios (≈ 1 to 300 pptv in the troposphere. While long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS has been a well-established NO3 detection approach for over 25 yr, newly sensitive techniques have been developed in the past decade. This publication outlines the results of the first comprehensive intercomparison of seven instruments developed for the spectroscopic detection of tropospheric NO3. Four instruments were based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, two utilised open-path cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS, and one applied "classical" long-path DOAS. The intercomparison campaign "NO3Comp" was held at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich (Germany in June 2007. Twelve experiments were performed in the well-mixed chamber for variable concentrations of NO3, N2O5, NO2, hydrocarbons, and water vapour, in the absence and in the presence of inorganic or organic aerosol. The overall precision of the cavity instruments varied between 0.5 and 5 pptv for integration times of 1 s to 5 min; that of the DOAS instrument was 9 pptv for an acquisition time of 1 min. The NO3 data of all instruments correlated excellently with the NOAA-CRDS instrument, which was selected as the common reference because of its superb sensitivity, high time resolution, and most comprehensive data coverage. The median of the coefficient of determination (r2 over all experiments of the campaign (60 correlations is r2 = 0.981 (quartile 1 (Q1: 0.949; quartile 3 (Q3: 0.994; min/max: 0.540/0.999. The linear regression analysis of the campaign data set yielded very small intercepts (median: 1.1 pptv; Q1/Q3: −1.1/2.6 pptv; min/max: −14.1/28.0 pptv, and the slopes of the regression lines were close to unity (median: 1.01; Q1/Q3: 0.92/1.10; min/max: 0.72/1.36. The deviation of individual regression slopes from unity was always within the combined

  12. Superconducting-Magnet-Based Faraday Rotation Spectrometer for Real Time in Situ Measurement of OH Radicals at 106 Molecule/cm3 Level in an Atmospheric Simulation Chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weixiong; Fang, Bo; Lin, Xiaoxiao; Gai, Yanbo; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Wenge; Chen, Zhiyou; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Weidong

    2018-03-20

    Atmospheric simulation chambers play vital roles in the validation of chemical mechanisms and act as a bridge between field measurements and modeling. Chambers operating at atmospheric levels of OH radicals (10 6 -10 7 molecule/cm 3 ) can significantly enhance the possibility for investigating the discrepancies between the observation and model predications. However, few chambers can directly detect chamber OH radicals at ambient levels. In this paper, we report on the first combination of a superconducting magnet with midinfrared Faraday rotation spectroscopy (FRS) for real time in situ measurement of the OH concentration in an atmospheric simulation chamber. With the use of a multipass enhanced FRS, a detection limit of 3.2 × 10 6 OH/cm 3 (2σ, 4 s) was achieved with an absorption path length of 108 m. The developed FRS system provided a unique, self-calibrated analytical instrument for in situ direct measurement of chamber OH concentration.

  13. Design of a new multi-phase experimental simulation chamber for atmospheric photosmog, aerosol and cloud chemistry research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new simulation chamber has been built at the Interuniversitary Laboratory of Atmospheric Systems (LISA. The CESAM chamber (French acronym for Experimental Multiphasic Atmospheric Simulation Chamber is designed to allow research in multiphase atmospheric (photo- chemistry which involves both gas phase and condensed phase processes including aerosol and cloud chemistry. CESAM has the potential to carry out variable temperature and pressure experiments under a very realistic artificial solar irradiation. It consists of a 4.2 m3 stainless steel vessel equipped with three high pressure xenon arc lamps which provides a controlled and steady environment. Initial characterization results, all carried out at 290–297 K under dry conditions, concerning lighting homogeneity, mixing efficiency, ozone lifetime, radical sources, NOy wall reactivity, particle loss rates, background PM, aerosol formation and cloud generation are given. Photolysis frequencies of NO2 and O3 related to chamber radiation system were found equal to (4.2 × 10−3 s−1 for JNO2 and (1.4 × 10−5 s−1 for JO1D which is comparable to the solar radiation in the boundary layer. An auxiliary mechanism describing NOy wall reactions has been developed. Its inclusion in the Master Chemical Mechanism allowed us to adequately model the results of experiments on the photo-oxidation of propene-NOx-Air mixtures. Aerosol yields for the α-pinene + O3 system chosen as a reference were determined and found in good agreement with previous studies. Particle lifetime in the chamber ranges from 10 h to 4 days depending on particle size distribution which indicates that the chamber can provide high quality data on aerosol aging processes and their effects. Being evacuable, it is possible to generate in this new chamber

  14. Simulated reaction of formaldehyde and ambient atmospheric particulate matter using a chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yueyue Chen; Jia Liu; Jing Shang; Tong Zhu

    2017-01-01

    The reaction of HCHO with Beijing winter's real ambient particulate matter (PM) inside a 3.3 m3 Teflon Chamber was conducted in this study.NO2,O3 and H2O gases were removed from the ambient aerosol before entering into the chamber.The decays of HCHO were monitored (acetylacetone spectrophotometry method) during the reactions at different PM number concentrations (Na) and relative humidities (RHs),and the formed particulate formate was detected by IC and XPS techniques.The results showed that when RH was 10%-15%,the decay rate of HCHO in the chamber was higher with the existence of PM from relatively clean days (with number concentration (Na) < 200,000 particle/L,0.35-22.5 μm) compared to dirty days (Na > 200,000 particle/L,0.35-22.5 μm).When RH increased to 30%-45%,PM can hardly have significant influences on the decay of HCHO.The formations of formate on the reacted PM were consistent with the HCHO decay rates at different ambient PM Na and RH conditions.This is a first study related to the "real" ambient PM reacted with HCHO and suggested that in the clean and low RH days,PM could be an effective medium for the conversion of HCHO to formate.

  15. Intercomparison of measurements of NO2 concentrations in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR during the NO3Comp campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Fuchs

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available NO2 concentrations were measured by various instruments during the NO3Comp campaign at the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany, in June 2007. Analytical methods included photolytic conversion with chemiluminescence (PC-CLD, broadband cavity ring-down spectroscopy (BBCRDS, pulsed cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS, incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBB\\-CEAS, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF. All broadband absorption spectrometers were optimized for the detection of the main target species of the campaign, NO3, but were also capable of detecting NO2 simultaneously with reduced sensitivity. NO2 mixing ratios in the chamber were within a range characteristic of polluted, urban conditions, with a maximum mixing ratio of approximately 75 ppbv. The overall agreement between measurements of all instruments was excellent. Linear fits of the combined data sets resulted in slopes that differ from unity only within the stated uncertainty of each instrument. Possible interferences from species such as water vapor and ozone were negligible under the experimental conditions.

  16. Space plasma simulation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Scientific results of experiments and tests of instruments performed with the Space Plasma Simulation Chamber and its facility are reviewed in the following six categories. 1. Tests of instruments on board rockets, satellites and balloons. 2. Plasma wave experiments. 3. Measurements of plasma particles. 4. Optical measurements. 5. Plasma production. 6. Space plasms simulations. This facility has been managed under Laboratory Space Plasma Comittee since 1969 and used by scientists in cooperative programs with universities and institutes all over country. A list of publications is attached. (author)

  17. Multiphase composition changes and reactive oxygen species formation during limonene oxidation in the new Cambridge Atmospheric Simulation Chamber (CASC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallimore, Peter J.; Mahon, Brendan M.; Wragg, Francis P. H.; Fuller, Stephen J.; Giorio, Chiara; Kourtchev, Ivan; Kalberer, Markus

    2017-08-01

    The chemical composition of organic aerosols influences their impacts on human health and the climate system. Aerosol formation from gas-to-particle conversion and in-particle reaction was studied for the oxidation of limonene in a new facility, the Cambridge Atmospheric Simulation Chamber (CASC). Health-relevant oxidising organic species produced during secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation were quantified in real time using an Online Particle-bound Reactive Oxygen Species Instrument (OPROSI). Two categories of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were identified based on time series analysis: a short-lived component produced during precursor ozonolysis with a lifetime of the order of minutes, and a stable component that was long-lived on the experiment timescale (˜ 4 h). Individual organic species were monitored continuously over this time using Extractive Electrospray Ionisation (EESI) Mass Spectrometry (MS) for the particle phase and Proton Transfer Reaction (PTR) MS for the gas phase. Many first-generation oxidation products are unsaturated, and we observed multiphase aging via further ozonolysis reactions. Volatile products such as C9H14O (limonaketone) and C10H16O2 (limonaldehyde) were observed in the gas phase early in the experiment, before reacting again with ozone. Loss of C10H16O4 (7-hydroxy limononic acid) from the particle phase was surprisingly slow. A combination of reduced C = C reactivity and viscous particle formation (relative to other SOA systems) may explain this, and both scenarios were tested in the Pretty Good Aerosol Model (PG-AM). A range of characterisation measurements were also carried out to benchmark the chamber against existing facilities. This work demonstrates the utility of CASC, particularly for understanding the reactivity and health-relevant properties of organic aerosols using novel, highly time-resolved techniques.

  18. Simulation of chamber experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.G.

    1981-01-01

    The description of the system of computer simulation of experiments conducted by means of track detectors with film data output is given. Considered is the principle of organization of computer model of the chamber experiment comprising the following stages: generation of events, generation of measurements, ge-- neration of scanning results, generation of distorbions, generated data calibration, filtration, events reconstruction, kinematic identification, total results tape formation, analysis of the results. Generation programs are formed as special RAM-files, where the RAM-file is the text of the program written in FORTRAN and divided into structural elements. All the programs are a ''part of the ''Hydra'' system. The system possibilities are considered on the base of the CDSC-6500 computer. The five-beam event generation, creation data structure for identification and calculation by the kinematic program take about 1s of CDC-6500 computer time [ru

  19. Investigation of the oxidation of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) by OH radicals in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Albrecht, Sascha; Acir, Ismail-Hakki; Bohn, Birger; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Gkatzelis, Georgios I.; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Kaminski, Martin; Keutsch, Frank N.; Novelli, Anna; Reimer, David; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Vereecken, Luc; Wegener, Robert; Zaytsev, Alexander; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2018-06-01

    The photooxidation of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) was investigated in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR for conditions at which organic peroxy radicals (RO2) mainly reacted with NO (high NO case) and for conditions at which other reaction channels could compete (low NO case). Measurements of trace gas concentrations were compared to calculated concentration time series applying the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM version 3.3.1). Product yields of methylglyoxal and glycolaldehyde were determined from measurements. For the high NO case, the methylglyoxal yield was (19 ± 3) % and the glycolaldehyde yield was (65 ± 14) %, consistent with recent literature studies. For the low NO case, the methylglyoxal yield reduced to (5 ± 2) % because other RO2 reaction channels that do not form methylglyoxal became important. Consistent with literature data, the glycolaldehyde yield of (37 ± 9) % determined in the experiment was not reduced as much as implemented in the MCM, suggesting additional reaction channels producing glycolaldehyde. At the same time, direct quantification of OH radicals in the experiments shows the need for an enhanced OH radical production at low NO conditions similar to previous studies investigating the oxidation of the parent VOC isoprene and methacrolein, the second major oxidation product of isoprene. For MVK the model-measurement discrepancy was up to a factor of 2. Product yields and OH observations were consistent with assumptions of additional RO2 plus HO2 reaction channels as proposed in literature for the major RO2 species formed from the reaction of MVK with OH. However, this study shows that also HO2 radical concentrations are underestimated by the model, suggesting that additional OH is not directly produced from RO2 radical reactions, but indirectly via increased HO2. Quantum chemical calculations show that HO2 could be produced from a fast 1,4-H shift of the second most important MVK derived RO2 species (reaction rate constant 0

  20. Investigation of OH Radical Regeneration from Isoprene Oxidation Across Different NOx Regimes in the Atmosphere Simulation Chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, A.; Bohn, B.; Dorn, H. P.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Kaminski, M.; Yu, Z.; Li, X.; Tillmann, R.; Wegener, R.; Fuchs, H.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Wahner, A.

    2017-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is the dominant daytime oxidant in the troposphere. It starts the degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOC) originating from both anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. Hence, it is a crucial trace species in model simulations as it has a large impact on many reactive trace gases. Many field campaigns performed in isoprene dominated environment in low NOx conditions have shown large discrepancies between the measured and the modelled OH radical concentrations. These results have contributed to the discovery of new regeneration paths for OH radicals from isoprene-OH second generation products with maximum efficiency at low NO. The current chemical models (e.g. MCM 3.3.1) include this novel chemistry allowing for an investigation of the validity of the OH regeneration at different chemical conditions. Over 11 experiments focusing on the OH oxidation of isoprene were performed at the SAPHIR chamber in the Forschungszentrum Jülich. Measurements of VOCs, NOx, O3, HONO were performed together with the measurement of OH radicals (by both LIF-FAGE and DOAS) and OH reactivity. Within the simulation chamber, the NO mixing ratio was varied between 0.05 to 2 ppbv allowing the investigation of both the "new" regeneration path for OH radicals and the well-known NO+HO2 mechanism. A comparison with the MCM 3.3.1 that includes the upgraded LIM1 mechanism showed very good agreement (within 10%) for the OH data at all concentrations of NOx investigated. Comparison with different models, without LIM1 and with updated rates for the OH regeneration, will be presented together with a detailed analysis of the impact of this study on results from previous field campaigns.

  1. High-accuracy and high-sensitivity spectroscopic measurement of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) in an atmospheric simulation chamber using a quantum cascade laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Lauraguais, Amélie; Semenov, Vladimir; Coeur, Cecile; Cassez, Andy; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Chen, Weidong

    2017-12-04

    A spectroscopic instrument based on a mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) was developed for high-accuracy measurements of dinitrogen pentoxide (N 2 O 5 ) at the ppbv-level. A specific concentration retrieval algorithm was developed to remove, from the broadband absorption spectrum of N 2 O 5 , both etalon fringes resulting from the EC-QCL intrinsic structure and spectral interference lines of H 2 O vapour absorption, which led to a significant improvement in measurement accuracy and detection sensitivity (by a factor of 10), compared to using a traditional algorithm for gas concentration retrieval. The developed EC-QCL-based N 2 O 5 sensing platform was evaluated by real-time tracking N 2 O 5 concentration in its most important nocturnal tropospheric chemical reaction of NO 3 + NO 2 ↔ N 2 O 5 in an atmospheric simulation chamber. Based on an optical absorption path-length of L eff = 70 m, a minimum detection limit of 15 ppbv was achieved with a 25 s integration time and it was down to 3 ppbv in 400 s. The equilibrium rate constant K eq involved in the above chemical reaction was determined with direct concentration measurements using the developed EC-QCL sensing platform, which was in good agreement with the theoretical value deduced from a referenced empirical formula under well controlled experimental conditions. The present work demonstrates the potential and the unique advantage of the use of a modern external cavity quantum cascade laser for applications in direct quantitative measurement of broadband absorption of key molecular species involved in chemical kinetic and climate-change related tropospheric chemistry.

  2. MAN-IN-SIMULANT TEST (MIST) CHAMBER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The MIST chamber uses methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) vapor as a simulant for HD agent to conduct system level evaluations of chemical protective ensembles....

  3. Is Climate Simulation in Growth Chambers Necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Z.M. Wang; K.H. Johnsen; M.J. Lechowicz

    1999-01-01

    In the expression of their genetic potential as phenotypes, trees respond to environmental cues such as photoperiod, temperature and soil and atmospheric water. However, growth chamber experiments often utilize simple and standard environmental conditions that might not provide these important environmental signals. We conducted a study to compare seedling growth in...

  4. Method of controlling weld chamber purge and cover gas atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, D.

    1992-01-01

    A method of controlling the gas atmosphere in a welding chamber includes detecting the absence of a fuel rod from the welding chamber and, in response thereto, initiating the supplying of a flow of argon gas to the chamber to purge air therefrom. Further, the method includes detecting the entry of a fuel rod in the welding chamber and, in response thereto, terminating the supplying of the flow of argon gas to the chamber and initiating the supplying of a flow of helium gas to the chamber to purge argon gas therefrom and displace the argon gas in the chamber. Also, the method includes detecting the withdrawal of the fuel rod from the welding chamber and, in response thereto, terminating the supplying of the flow of helium gas to the chamber and initiating the supplying of argon to the chamber to purge the air therefrom. The method also includes detecting the initiation of a weld cycle and, in response thereto, momentarily supplying a flow of argon gas to the welding electrode tip for initiating the welding arc. (Author)

  5. Simulated Field Trials Using an Indoor Aerosol Test Chamber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Semler, D. D; Roth, A. P; Semler, K. A; Nolan, P. M

    2004-01-01

    .... In this method, the aerosol chamber control software manipulates circulation fan speeds, chamber vacuum and agent spray times to produce a simulated dynamic cloud within the aerosol test chamber...

  6. Simulated Field Trials Using An Indoor Aerosol Test Chamber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Semler, D. D; Roth, A. P; Semler, K. A; Nolan, P. M

    2004-01-01

    .... In this method, the aerosol chamber control software manipulates circulation fan speeds, chamber vacuum and agent spray times to produce a simulated dynamic cloud within the aerosol test chamber...

  7. Improved climatic chamber for desiccation simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozada Catalina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The climatic chamber at the Universidad de Los Andes was improved for modeling desiccation in soil layers. This chamber allows the measurement of different environmental variables. In this research, evaporation tests were conducted in water imposing boundary conditions for drying, and then these tests were performed in a soil layer. The soil was prepared from a slurry state and was drying controlling the temperature, the infrared radiation, the wind velocity, and the relative humidity. In the first part of this paper, a description of the climatic chamber, operation ranges and theoretical work principles of the climatic chamber are presented. Then, the second part shows the results for desiccation in water and soil. The desiccation tests performed with the climatic chamber allow simulating all environmental conditions accurately during drying coupling the effect of all environmental variables. As a result, the evaporation rate increases with infrared radiation in soil and water. The rate at the beginning of the desiccation tests in clays is the same as in water. However, this evaporation rate decreases as the soil becomes desiccated.

  8. Blast from pressurized carbon dioxide released into a vented atmospheric chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, P. M.; Gaathaug, A. V.; Bjerketvedt, D.; Vaagsaether, K.

    2018-03-01

    This study describes the blast from pressurized carbon dioxide (CO2) released from a high-pressure reservoir into an openly vented atmospheric chamber. Small-scale experiments with pure vapor and liquid/vapor mixtures were conducted and compared with simulations. A motivation was to investigate the effects of vent size and liquid content on the peak overpressure and impulse response in the atmospheric chamber. The comparison of vapor-phase CO2 test results with simulations showed good agreement. This numerical code described single-phase gas dynamics inside a closed chamber, but did not model any phase transitions. Hence, the simulations described a vapor-only test into an unvented chamber. Nevertheless, the simulations reproduced the incident shock wave, the shock reflections, and the jet release inside the atmospheric chamber. The rapid phase transition did not contribute to the initial shock strength in the current test geometry. The evaporation rate was too low to contribute to the measured peak overpressure that was in the range of 15-20 kPa. The simulation results produced a calculated peak overpressure of 12 kPa. The liquid tests showed a significantly higher impulse compared to tests with pure vapor. Reducing the vent opening from 0.1 to 0.01 m2 resulted in a slightly higher impulse calculated at 100 ms. The influence of the vent area on the calculated impulse was significant in the vapor-phase tests, but not so clear in the liquid/vapor mixture tests.

  9. Simulation of the CMS Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Hadjiiska, R; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Dimitrov, A; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Garcia, G; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; Ocampo, A; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Verwilligen, P; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Aleksandrov, A; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Shopova, M; Sultanov, G; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Xue, Z; Ge, Y; Li, Q; Qian, S; Avila, C; Chaparro, L F; Gomez, J P; Moreno, B Gomez; Oliveros, A F Osorio; Sanabria, J C; Assran, Y; Sharma, A; Abbrescia, M; Colaleo, A; Pugliese, G; Loddo, F; Calabria, C; Maggi, M; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Piccolo, D; Carrillo, C; Iorio, O; Buontempo, S; Paolucci, P; Vitulo, P; Berzano, U; Gabusi, M; Kang, M; Lee, K S; Park, S K; Shin, S; Kim, M S; Seo, H; Goh, J; Choi, Y; Shoaib, M

    2013-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) muon subsystem contributes significantly to the formation of the trigger decision and reconstruction of the muon trajectory parameters. Simulation of the RPC response is a crucial part of the entire CMS Monte Carlo software and directly influences the final physical results. An algorithm based on the parametrization of RPC efficiency, noise, cluster size and timing for every strip has been developed. Experimental data obtained from cosmic and proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV have been used for determination of the parameters. A dedicated validation procedure has been developed. A good agreement between the simulated and experimental data has been achieved.

  10. Planetary Simulation Chambers bring Mars to laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateo-Marti, E.

    2016-07-01

    Although space missions provide fundamental and unique knowledge for planetary exploration, they are always costly and extremely time-consuming. Due to the obvious technical and economical limitations of in-situ planetary exploration, laboratory simulations are among the most feasible research options for making advances in planetary exploration. Therefore, laboratory simulations of planetary environments are a necessary and complementary option to expensive space missions. Simulation chambers are economical, more versatile, and allow for a higher number of experiments than space missions. Laboratory-based facilities are able to mimic the conditions found in the atmospheres and on the surfaces of a majority of planetary objects. Number of relevant applications in Mars planetary exploration will be described in order to provide an understanding about the potential and flexibility of planetary simulation chambers systems: mainly, stability and presence of certain minerals on Mars surface; and microorganisms potential habitability under planetary environmental conditions would be studied. Therefore, simulation chambers will be a promising tools and necessary platform to design future planetary space mission and to validate in-situ measurements from orbital or rover observations. (Author)

  11. Design of viewing windows for controlled-atmosphere chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, J.N.

    1980-03-01

    A guide to the design of safe viewing windows is presented. Design criteria, the properties of materials, the problems of structural design in unreliable materials such as glass, the mathematics of reliability and redundance, and problems associated with testing windows are discussed, and formulas are presented for the design of windows. Criteria adopted at ORNL for controlled-atmosphere chambers are presented, a program for surveying and upgrading the safety of existing facilities is described, and the results of this program are reported

  12. A Facility for Long-Term Mars Simulation Experiments: The Mars Environmental Simulation Chamber (MESCH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lars Liengaard; Merrison, Jonathan; Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Mikkelsen, Karina Aarup; Kristoffersen, Tommy; Nørnberg, Per; Lomstein, Bente Aagaard; Finster, Kai

    2008-06-01

    We describe the design, construction, and pilot operation of a Mars simulation facility comprised of a cryogenic environmental chamber, an atmospheric gas analyzer, and a xenon/mercury discharge source for UV generation. The Mars Environmental Simulation Chamber (MESCH) consists of a double-walled cylindrical chamber. The double wall provides a cooling mantle through which liquid N2 can be circulated. A load-lock system that consists of a small pressure-exchange chamber, which can be evacuated, allows for the exchange of samples without changing the chamber environment. Fitted within the MESCH is a carousel, which holds up to 10 steel sample tubes. Rotation of the carousel is controlled by an external motor. Each sample in the carousel can be placed at any desired position. Environmental data, such as temperature, pressure, and UV exposure time, are computer logged and used in automated feedback mechanisms, enabling a wide variety of experiments that include time series. Tests of the simulation facility have successfully demonstrated its ability to produce temperature cycles and maintain low temperature (down to -140°C), low atmospheric pressure (5 10 mbar), and a gas composition like that of Mars during long-term experiments.

  13. Laser Welding Test Results with Gas Atmospheres in Welding Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Hong, Jin-Tae; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Heo, Sung-Ho; Jang, Seo-Yun; Yang, Tae-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The weld beads of specimens welded under identical conditions in the helium and argon gas were cleaner, more regular, and steadier than those in a vacuum. The penetration depth of the FZ in the vacuum was much deeper than those in the helium and argon gas. To measure the irradiation properties of nuclear fuel in a test reactor, a nuclear fuel test rod instrumented with various sensors must be fabricated with assembly processes. A laser welding system to assemble the nuclear fuel test rod was designed and fabricated to develop various welding technologies of the fuel test rods to joint between a cladding tube and end-caps. It is an air-cooling optical fiber type and its emission modes are a continuous (CW) mode of which the laser generates continuous emission, and pulse (QCW) mode in which the laser internally generates sequences of pulses. We considered the system welding a sample in a chamber that can weld a specimen in a vacuum and inert gas atmosphere, and the chamber was installed on the working plate of the laser welding system. In the chamber, the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a cladding tube and an end-cap.

  14. Planetary Atmosphere and Surfaces Chamber (PASC: A Platform to Address Various Challenges in Astrobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Mateo-Marti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of planetary environments of astrobiological interest has become a major challenge. Because of the obvious technical and economical limitations on in situ planetary exploration, laboratory simulations are one of the most feasible research options to make advances both in planetary science and in developing a consistent description of the origin of life. With this objective in mind, we applied vacuum technology to the design of versatile vacuum chambers devoted to the simulation of planetary atmospheres’ conditions. These vacuum chambers are able to simulate atmospheres and surface temperatures representative of the majority of planetary objects, and they are especially appropriate for studying the physical, chemical and biological changes induced in a particular sample by in situ irradiation or physical parameters in a controlled environment. Vacuum chambers are a promising potential tool in several scientific and technological fields, such as engineering, chemistry, geology and biology. They also offer the possibility of discriminating between the effects of individual physical parameters and selected combinations thereof. The implementation of our vacuum chambers in combination with analytical techniques was specifically developed to make feasible the in situ physico-chemical characterization of samples. Many wide-ranging applications in astrobiology are detailed herein to provide an understanding of the potential and flexibility of these experimental systems. Instruments and engineering technology for space applications could take advantage of our environment-simulation chambers for sensor calibration. Our systems also provide the opportunity to gain a greater understanding of the chemical reactivity of molecules on surfaces under different environments, thereby leading to a greater understanding of interface processes in prebiotic chemical reactions and facilitating studies of UV photostability and photochemistry on surfaces

  15. Atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Hans W.; Selwyn, Gary S.

    2001-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber is described. The apparatus is useful for decontaminating sensitive equipment and materials, such as electronics, optics and national treasures, which have been contaminated with chemical and/or biological warfare agents, such as anthrax, mustard blistering agent, VX nerve gas, and the like. There is currently no acceptable procedure for decontaminating such equipment. The apparatus may also be used for sterilization in the medical and food industries. Items to be decontaminated or sterilized are supported inside the chamber. Reactive gases containing atomic and metastable oxygen species are generated by an atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge in a He/O.sub.2 mixture and directed into the region of these items resulting in chemical reaction between the reactive species and organic substances. This reaction typically kills and/or neutralizes the contamination without damaging most equipment and materials. The plasma gases are recirculated through a closed-loop system to minimize the loss of helium and the possibility of escape of aerosolized harmful substances.

  16. Carbon wire chamber at sub-atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, G., E-mail: charlesg@ipno.in2p3.fr; Audouin, L., E-mail: audouin@ipno.in2p3.fr; Bettane, J.; Dupre, R.; Genolini, B.; Hammoudi, N.; Imre, M.; Le Ven, V.; Maroni, A.; Mathon, B.; Nguyen Trung, T.; Rauly, E.

    2017-05-21

    Present in many experiments, wire and drift chambers have been used in a large variety of shapes and configurations during the last decades. Nevertheless, their readout elements has not evolved much: tungsten, sometimes gold-plated or aluminum, wires. By taking advantage of the developments in the manufacture of conducting carbon fiber, we could obtain interesting improvements for wire detectors. In this article, we present recent tests and simulations using carbon fibers to readout signal in place of traditional tungsten wires. Unlike metallic wires, their low weight guaranties a reduced quantity of material in the active area.

  17. Accurate computer simulation of a drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killian, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    A general purpose program for drift chamber studies is described. First the capacitance matrix is calculated using a Green's function technique. The matrix is used in a linear-least-squares fit to choose optimal operating voltages. Next the electric field is computed, and given knowledge of gas parameters and magnetic field environment, a family of electron trajectories is determined. These are finally used to make drift distance vs time curves which may be used directly by a track reconstruction program. Results are compared with data obtained from the cylindrical chamber in the Axial Field Magnet experiment at the CERN ISR

  18. Accurate computer simulation of a drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Killian, T J

    1980-01-01

    The author describes a general purpose program for drift chamber studies. First the capacitance matrix is calculated using a Green's function technique. The matrix is used in a linear-least-squares fit to choose optimal operating voltages. Next the electric field is computed, and given knowledge of gas parameters and magnetic field environment, a family of electron trajectories is determined. These are finally used to make drift distance vs time curves which may be used directly by a track reconstruction program. The results are compared with data obtained from the cylindrical chamber in the Axial Field Magnet experiment at the CERN ISR. (1 refs).

  19. The resistive plate chambers for CMS and their simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbrescia, M. E-mail: marcello.abbrescia@ba.infn.it; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Altieri, S.; Belli, G.; Bruno, G.; Guida, R.; Merlo, M.; Ratti, S.P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P

    2001-09-21

    In this paper some results obtained by the CMS Resistive Plate Chamber collaboration during its five years long period of research and development are reported. The importance of the simulation in the design of the Resistive Plate Chambers for CMS is stressed.

  20. Simulation of the heat transfer around the ATLAS muon chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    This 2D simulation recently carried out on the ATLAS muon chambers by a small team of CERN engineers specialises in the numerical computation of fluid dynamics, in other words the flow of fluids and heat.

  1. Tracking simulation and wire chamber requirements for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.; Niczyporuk, B.B.; Palounek, A.P.T.

    1988-11-01

    Limitations placed on wire chambers by radiation damage and rate requirements in the SSC environment are reviewed. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems which meet these requirements are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. 16 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Oxidation of a new Biogenic VOC: Chamber Studies of the Atmospheric Chemistry of Methyl Chavicol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, William; Alam, Mohammed; Adbul Raheem, Modinah; Rickard, Andrew; Hamilton, Jacqui; Pereira, Kelly; Camredon, Marie; Munoz, Amalia; Vazquez, Monica; Vera, Teresa; Rodenas, Mila

    2013-04-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leads to formation of ozone and SOA, with consequences for air quality, health, crop yields, atmospheric chemistry and radiative transfer. Recent observations have identified Methyl Chavicol ("MC": Estragole; 1-allyl-4-methoxybenzene, C10H12O) as a major BVOC above pine forests in the USA, and oil palm plantations in Malaysian Borneo. Palm oil cultivation, and hence MC emissions, may be expected to increase with societal food and bio fuel demand. We present the results of a series of simulation chamber experiments to assess the atmospheric fate of MC. Experiments were performed in the EUPHORE facility, monitoring stable product species, radical intermediates, and aerosol production and composition. We determine rate constants for reaction of MC with OH and O3, and ozonolysis radical yields. Stable product measurements (FTIR, PTRMS, GC-SPME) are used to determine the yields of stable products formed from OH- and O3- initiated oxidation, and to develop an understanding of the initial stages of the MC degradation chemistry. A surrogate mechanism approach is used to simulate MC degradation within the MCM, evaluated in terms of ozone production measured in the chamber experiments, and applied to quantify the role of MC in the real atmosphere.

  3. Development of a quality assured calibration method for the PSI radon chamber reference atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuler, C.; Butterweck-Dempewolf, G.; Vezzu, G.

    1997-01-01

    Radon detectors and measuring instruments are calibrated at the PSI Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Concentration Measurements by exposing them to a calibrated radon reference atmosphere in the PSI radon chamber. A sophisticated and quality assured calibration technique was developed which guarantees the traceability of this radon chamber reference atmosphere to standards of internationally acknowledged primary laboratories. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs

  4. A steady-state continuous flow chamber for the study of daytime and nighttime chemistry under atmospherically relevant NO levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Ortega, John; Huang, Yuanlong; Shertz, Stephen; Tyndall, Geoffrey S.; Orlando, John J.

    2018-05-01

    Experiments performed in laboratory chambers have contributed significantly to the understanding of the fundamental kinetics and mechanisms of the chemical reactions occurring in the atmosphere. Two chemical regimes, classified as high-NO vs. zero-NO conditions, have been extensively studied in previous chamber experiments. Results derived from these two chemical scenarios are widely parameterized in chemical transport models to represent key atmospheric processes in urban and pristine environments. As the anthropogenic NOx emissions in the United States have decreased remarkably in the past few decades, the classic high-NO and zero-NO conditions are no longer applicable to many regions that are constantly impacted by both polluted and background air masses. We present here the development and characterization of the NCAR Atmospheric Simulation Chamber, which is operated in steady-state continuous flow mode for the study of atmospheric chemistry under intermediate NO conditions. This particular chemical regime is characterized by constant sub-ppb levels of NO and can be created in the chamber by precise control of the inflow NO concentration and the ratio of chamber mixing to residence timescales. Over the range of conditions achievable in the chamber, the lifetime of peroxy radicals (RO2), a key intermediate from the atmospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), can be extended to several minutes, and a diverse array of reaction pathways, including unimolecular pathways and bimolecular reactions with NO and HO2, can thus be explored. Characterization experiments under photolytic and dark conditions were performed and, in conjunction with model predictions, provide a basis for interpretation of prevailing atmospheric processes in environments with intertwined biogenic and anthropogenic activities. We demonstrate the proof of concept of the steady-state continuous flow chamber operation through measurements of major first-generation products

  5. A steady-state continuous flow chamber for the study of daytime and nighttime chemistry under atmospherically relevant NO levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Experiments performed in laboratory chambers have contributed significantly to the understanding of the fundamental kinetics and mechanisms of the chemical reactions occurring in the atmosphere. Two chemical regimes, classified as high-NO vs. zero-NO conditions, have been extensively studied in previous chamber experiments. Results derived from these two chemical scenarios are widely parameterized in chemical transport models to represent key atmospheric processes in urban and pristine environments. As the anthropogenic NOx emissions in the United States have decreased remarkably in the past few decades, the classic high-NO and zero-NO conditions are no longer applicable to many regions that are constantly impacted by both polluted and background air masses. We present here the development and characterization of the NCAR Atmospheric Simulation Chamber, which is operated in steady-state continuous flow mode for the study of atmospheric chemistry under intermediate NO conditions. This particular chemical regime is characterized by constant sub-ppb levels of NO and can be created in the chamber by precise control of the inflow NO concentration and the ratio of chamber mixing to residence timescales. Over the range of conditions achievable in the chamber, the lifetime of peroxy radicals (RO2, a key intermediate from the atmospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, can be extended to several minutes, and a diverse array of reaction pathways, including unimolecular pathways and bimolecular reactions with NO and HO2, can thus be explored. Characterization experiments under photolytic and dark conditions were performed and, in conjunction with model predictions, provide a basis for interpretation of prevailing atmospheric processes in environments with intertwined biogenic and anthropogenic activities. We demonstrate the proof of concept of the steady-state continuous flow chamber operation through measurements of major first

  6. Model for Simulation Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtang Petersen, Erik

    1976-01-01

    A method that produces realistic simulations of atmospheric turbulence is developed and analyzed. The procedure makes use of a generalized spectral analysis, often called a proper orthogonal decomposition or the Karhunen-Loève expansion. A set of criteria, emphasizing a realistic appearance...... eigenfunctions and estimates of the distributions of the corresponding expansion coefficients. The simulation method utilizes the eigenfunction expansion procedure to produce preliminary time histories of the three velocity components simultaneously. As a final step, a spectral shaping procedure is then applied....... The method is unique in modeling the three velocity components simultaneously, and it is found that important cross-statistical features are reasonably well-behaved. It is concluded that the model provides a practical, operational simulator of atmospheric turbulence....

  7. Simulation of Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion-Fusion Drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    The heavy-ion fusion (HIF) community recently developed a power-plant design that meets the various requirements of accelerators, final focus, chamber transport, and targets. The point design is intended to minimize physics risk and is certainly not optimal for the cost of electricity. Recent chamber-transport simulations, however, indicate that changes in the beam ion species, the convergence angle, and the emittance might allow more-economical designs

  8. SIMULATION OF CHAMBER TRANSPORT FOR HEAVY-ION FUSION DRIVERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W M; Callahan, D A; Tabak, M; Yu, S S; Peterson, P F; Rose, D V; Welch, D R

    2004-01-01

    The heavy-ion fusion (HIF) community recently developed a power-plant design that meets the various requirements of accelerators, final focus, chamber transport, and targets. The point design is intended to minimize physics risk and is certainly not optimal for the cost of electricity. Recent chamber-transport simulations, however, indicate that changes in the beam ion species, the convergence angle, and the emittance might allow more-economical designs

  9. Drift Chambers Simulations in BM@N Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorišin Ján

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drift chambers constitute an important part of the tracking system of the BM@N experiment designed to study the production of baryonic matter at the Nuclotron energies. GEANT programming package is employed to investigate the drift chamber response to particles produced in relativistic nuclear collisions of C+C nuclei, which are simulated by the UrQMD and LAQGSM Monte Carlo generators. These simulations are combined with the first BM@N experimental data to estimate particle track coordinates and their errors.

  10. Mimicking Mars: A vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobrado, J. M., E-mail: sobradovj@inta.es; Martín-Soler, J. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Martín-Gago, J. A. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-15

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10{sup −6} mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  11. Mimicking Mars: a vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrado, J M; Martín-Soler, J; Martín-Gago, J A

    2014-03-01

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10(-6) mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  12. Aging of plumes from emission sources based on chamber simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Deng, W.; Fang, Z.; Bernard, F.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, J.; Mellouki, A.; George, C.

    2017-12-01

    Study on atmospheric aging of plumes from emission sources is essential to understand their contribution to both secondary and primary pollutants occurring in the ambient air. Here we directly introduced vehicle exhaust, biomass burning plume, industrial solvents and cooking plumes into a smog chamber with 30 m3 fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film reactor housed in a temperature-controlled enclosure, for characterizing primarily emitted air pollutants and for investigating secondarily formed products during photo-oxidation. Moreover, we also initiated study on the formation of secondary aerosols when gasoline vehicle exhaust is mixed with typical coal combustion pollutant SO2 or typical agricultural-related pollutant NH3. Formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from typical solvent toluene was also investigated in ambient air matrix in comparison with purified air matrix. Main findings include: 1) Except for exhaust from idling gasoline vehicles, traditional precursor volatile organic compounds could only explain a very small fraction of SOA formed from vehicle exhaust, biomass burning or cooking plumes, suggesting knowledge gap in SOA precursors; 2) There is the need to re-think vehicle emission standards with a combined primary and/or secondary contribution of vehicle exhaust to PM2.5 or other secondary pollutants such as ozone; 3) When mixed with SO2, the gasoline vehicle exhaust revealed an increase of SOA production factor by 60-200% and meanwhile SO2 oxidation rates increased about a factor of 2.7; when the aged gasoline vehicle exhaust were mixing with NH3, both particle number and mass concentrations were increasing explosively. These phenomenons implied the complex interaction during aging of co-existing source emissions. 4) For typical combination of "tolune+SO2+NOx", when compared to chamber simulation with purified air as matrix, both SOA formation and SO2 oxidation were greatly enhanced under ambient air matrix, and the enhancement

  13. Nuclear signal simulation applied to gas ionizing chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, Romain; Dumazert, Jonathan [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, (France)

    2015-07-01

    Particle transport codes used in detector simulation allow the calculation of the energy deposited by charged particles produced following an interaction. The pulses temporal shaping is more and more used in nuclear measurement into pulse shape analysis techniques. A model is proposed in this paper to simulate the pulse temporal shaping and the associated noise level thanks to the output track file PTRAC provides by Monte-Carlo particle transport codes. The model has been dedicated to ion chambers and more especially for High Pressure Xenon chambers HPXe where the pulse shape analysis can resolve some issues regarding with this technology as the ballistic deficit phenomenon. The model is fully described and an example is presented as a validation of such full detector simulation. (authors)

  14. Pulse shape simulation for drift chambers with long drift paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed Monte Carlo program for the simulation of drift chamber pulse shapes is described. It has been applied to the case of a jet chamber with drift paths up to 24 cm. Results on pulse shapes and corresponding spatial and double hit resolution are discussed and compared to recent measurements of the OPAL central detector jet chamber full size prototype and to measurements of a small 20-wire prototype, which was designed to study the pulse shapes generated by tracks in a magnetic field. Simulated pulse shapes and spatial resolutions agree well with the experimental data. Clustering, saturation and wire crosstalk are shown to be necessary ingredients in the simulation. A deterioration in resolution due to the influence of crosstalk signals is correctly reproduced, as well as the cancellation of this effect by a hardwired first and second neighbour crosstalk compensation. The simulation correctly describes the asymmetry in spatial resolution observed for tracks with positive or negative inclination against the wire plane when a magnetic field is present. The effect of saturation on double hit resolution is found to be small. The magnetic field is predicted to improve the double hit resolution. (orig.)

  15. Pulse shape simulation for drift chambers with long drift paths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, H J

    1987-09-15

    A detailed Monte Carlo program for the simulation of drift chamber pulse shapes is described. It has been applied to the case of a jet chamber with drift paths up to 24 cm. Results on pulse shapes and corresponding spatial and double hit resolution are discussed and compared to recent measurements of the OPAL central detector jet chamber full size prototype and to measurements of a small 20-wire prototype, which was designed to study the pulse shapes generated by tracks in a magnetic field. Simulated pulse shapes and spatial resolutions agree well with the experimental data. Clustering, saturation and wire crosstalk are shown to be necessary ingredients in the simulation. A deterioration in resolution due to the influence of crosstalk signals is correctly reproduced, as well as the cancellation of this effect by a hardwired first and second neighbour crosstalk compensation. The simulation correctly describes the asymmetry in spatial resolution observed for tracks with positive or negative inclination against the wire plane when a magnetic field is present. The effect of saturation on double hit resolution is found to be small. The magnetic field is predicted to improve the double hit resolution.

  16. Interferences of commercial NO2 instruments in the urban atmosphere and in a smog chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kleffmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable measurements of atmospheric trace gases are necessary for both, a better understanding of the chemical processes occurring in the atmosphere, and for the validation of model predictions. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2 is a toxic gas and is thus a regulated air pollutant. Besides, it is of major importance for the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere and plays a pivotal role in the formation of ozone and acid precipitation. Detection of NO2 is a difficult task since many of the different commercial techniques used are affected by interferences. The chemiluminescence instruments that are used for indirect NO2 detection in monitoring networks and smog chambers use either molybdenum or photolytic converters and are affected by either positive (NOy or negative interferences (radical formation in the photolytic converter. Erroneous conclusions on NO2 can be drawn if these interferences are not taken into consideration. In the present study, NO2 measurements in the urban atmosphere, in a road traffic tunnel and in a smog-chamber using different commercial techniques, i.e. chemiluminescence instruments with molybdenum or photolytic converters, a Luminol based instrument and a new NO2-LOPAP, were compared with spectroscopic techniques, i.e. DOAS and FTIR. Interferences of the different instruments observed during atmospheric measurements were partly characterised in more detail in the smog chamber experiments. Whereas all the commercial instruments showed strong interferences, excellent agreement was obtained between a new NO2-LOPAP instrument and the FTIR technique for the measurements performed in the smog chamber.

  17. Comparative Toxicity of Simulated Smog Atmospheres in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of complex regional multipollutant mixtures on disease expression in susceptible populations are dependent on multiple exposure and susceptibility factors. Differing profiles of ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and particulate matter (PM), which are key components of smog, and other hazardous pollutants may develop as a result of regional-specific geographic and urban environment characteristics. We investigated the pulmonary effects of two smog mixtures with different compositions in a mouse model of allergic airway disease to determine which source profile had the greatest impact on pulmonary endpoints. A hydrocarbon mixture was combined with NO gas in the presence of UV light in a controlled setting. Simulated smog atmosphere 1 (SSA-1) consisted of concentrations of 1070 µg/m3 secondary organic aerosol (SOA), 0.104 ppm O3, and 0.252 ppm NO2. SSA-2 consisted of a starting concentration of 53 µg/m3 SOA, 0.376 ppm O3, and 0.617 ppm NO2. An increased aerosol concentration was noted in the exposure chamber. Healthy and house dust mite (HDM)-sensitized (allergic) female BALB/cJ mice were exposed 4 hr/day for 1 or 5 days to either smog mixture or clean air. Two days after HDM challenge, airway mechanics were tested in anesthetized ventilated mice. Following methacholine aerosol challenge, increased airway resistance and elastance and a decrease in lung compliance were consistently observed in air- and smog-exposed HDM-allergic groups compared with non-a

  18. Thermal System Upgrade of the Space Environment Simulation Test Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Ashok B.

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the refurbishing and upgrade of the thermal system for the existing thermal vacuum test facility, the Space Environment Simulator, at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The chamber is the largest such facility at the center. This upgrade is the third phase of the long range upgrade of the chamber that has been underway for last few years. The first phase dealt with its vacuum system, the second phase involved the GHe subsystem. The paper describes the considerations of design philosophy options for the thermal system; approaches taken and methodology applied, in the evaluation of the remaining "life" in the chamber shrouds and related equipment by conducting special tests and studies; feasibility and extent of automation, using computer interfaces and Programmable Logic Controllers in the control system and finally, matching the old components to the new ones into an integrated, highly reliable and cost effective thermal system for the facility. This is a multi-year project just started and the paper deals mainly with the plans and approaches to implement the project successfully within schedule and costs.

  19. Simulation of Resistive Plate Chamber sensitivity to neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altieri, S. E-mail: saverio.altieri@pv.infn.it; Belli, G.; Bruno, G.; Merlo, M.; Ratti, S.P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Abbrescia, M.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F

    2001-04-01

    The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) sensitivity to neutrons has been simulated using GEANT code with MICAP and FLUKA interfaces. The calculations have been performed as a function of the neutrons energy in the range 0.02 eV-1 GeV. To evaluate the response of the detector in the LHC background environment, the neutron energy spectrum expected in the CMS muon barrel has been taken into account; a hit rate due to neutrons of about 0.6 Hz cm{sup -2} has been estimated for a 250x250 cm{sup 2} RPC in the RB1 station.

  20. Simulation of pulverized coal fired boiler: reaction chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, C.P.; Lansarin, M.A.; Secchi, A.R.; Mendes, T.F. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica. Grupo de Modelagem, Simulacao, Controle e Otimizacao de Processos)]. E-mail: {cperdomo, marla, arge, talita}@enq.ufrgs.br

    2005-06-15

    This work is part of a joint project to built a computational tool for power plant simulation, dealing specifically with the reaction chamber (place of the boiler where the fuel is burned). In order to describe the conversion of chemical energy to thermal energy, an one dimensional pseudo-homogeneous mathematical model, with variable physical properties, and based on mass and energy balances, was developed. The equations were implemented in the gPROMS simulator and the model parameters were estimated using the module gEST of this software, with experimental data from a large-scale coal-fired utility boiler and kinetic data from the open literature. The results showed that the model predicts the composition of the outlet combustion gas satisfactorily. (author)

  1. Exchange of organic solvents between the atmosphere and grass--the use of open top chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnie, J; Cape, J N; Mackie, N; Leith, I D

    2002-02-21

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are of increasing environmental significance as a result of continually increasing volumes of traffic on European roads. An open-top chamber fumigation system has been devised to investigate how these contaminants transfer between the atmosphere and the ground, and how they partition between and within air-plant-soil systems. Variation in chamber temperature, solar radiation in the chamber and chamber flow rate were identified as factors that affected final air concentrations. These were assessed and quantified for all individual chambers used--effectively characterising each chamber. The real-life VOC concentrations generated were stable and readily reproducible. Grass exposed to benzene, toluene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane and tetrachloroethene, respectively, equilibrated in response to a change in air concentration within hours. The rate of equilibration in exposed grass in all cases was independent of air temperature. 1,1,1-Trichloroethane and tetrachloroethene appear to be biologically inert demonstrating a simple physico-chemical approach to equilibrium, however, benzene and toluene do not appear independent of plant metabolic activity. Aqueous solubility can account for all of the toluene and benzene in the fumigated plant material.

  2. Survival and ice nucleation activity of bacteria as aerosols in a cloud simulation chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, P.; Joly, M.; Schaupp, C.; Attard, E.; Möhler, O.; Morris, C. E.; Brunet, Y.; Delort, A.-M.

    2015-06-01

    The residence time of bacterial cells in the atmosphere is predictable by numerical models. However, estimations of their aerial dispersion as living entities are limited by a lack of information concerning survival rates and behavior in relation to atmospheric water. Here we investigate the viability and ice nucleation (IN) activity of typical atmospheric ice nucleation active bacteria (Pseudomonas syringae and P. fluorescens) when airborne in a cloud simulation chamber (AIDA, Karlsruhe, Germany). Cell suspensions were sprayed into the chamber and aerosol samples were collected by impingement at designated times over a total duration of up to 18 h, and at some occasions after dissipation of a cloud formed by depressurization. Aerosol concentration was monitored simultaneously by online instruments. The cultivability of airborne cells decreased exponentially over time with a half-life time of 250 ± 30 min (about 3.5 to 4.5 h). In contrast, IN activity remained unchanged for several hours after aerosolization, demonstrating that IN activity was maintained after cell death. Interestingly, the relative abundance of IN active cells still airborne in the chamber was strongly decreased after cloud formation and dissipation. This illustrates the preferential precipitation of IN active cells by wet processes. Our results indicate that from 106 cells aerosolized from a surface, one would survive the average duration of its atmospheric journey estimated at 3.4 days. Statistically, this corresponds to the emission of 1 cell that achieves dissemination every ~ 33 min m-2 of cultivated crops fields, a strong source of airborne bacteria. Based on the observed survival rates, depending on wind speed, the trajectory endpoint could be situated several hundreds to thousands of kilometers from the emission source. These results should improve the representation of the aerial dissemination of bacteria in numeric models.

  3. Two Simulated-Smog Atmospheres with Different Chemical Compositions Produce Contrasting Mutagenicity in Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are criteria pollutants used to evaluate air quality. Using a 14.3-m3 Teflon-lined smog chamber with 120 UV bulbs to simulate solar radiation, we generated 2 simulated-smog atmospheres (SSA-1 & SSA-2) with differ...

  4. Semi-automated operation of Mars Climate Simulation chamber - MCSC modelled for biological experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasashvili, M. V.; Sabashvili, Sh. A.; Tsereteli, S. L.; Aleksidze, N. D.; Dalakishvili, O.

    2017-10-01

    The Mars Climate Simulation Chamber (MCSC) (GEO PAT 12 522/01) is designed for the investigation of the possible past and present habitability of Mars, as well as for the solution of practical tasks necessary for the colonization and Terraformation of the Planet. There are specific tasks such as the experimental investigation of the biological parameters that allow many terrestrial organisms to adapt to the imitated Martian conditions: chemistry of the ground, atmosphere, temperature, radiation, etc. MCSC is set for the simulation of the conduction of various biological experiments, as well as the selection of extremophile microorganisms for the possible Settlement, Ecopoesis and/or Terraformation purposes and investigation of their physiological functions. For long-term purposes, it is possible to cultivate genetically modified organisms (e.g., plants) adapted to the Martian conditions for future Martian agriculture to sustain human Mars missions and permanent settlements. The size of the chamber allows preliminary testing of the functionality of space-station mini-models and personal protection devices such as space-suits, covering and building materials and other structures. The reliability of the experimental biotechnological materials can also be tested over a period of years. Complex and thorough research has been performed to acquire the most appropriate technical tools for the accurate engineering of the MCSC and precious programmed simulation of Martian environmental conditions. This paper describes the construction and technical details of the equipment of the MCSC, which allows its semi-automated, long-term operation.

  5. Whole Atmosphere Simulation of Anthropogenic Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Stanley C.; Liu, Han-Li; Marsh, Daniel R.; McInerney, Joseph M.; Qian, Liying; Vitt, Francis M.

    2018-02-01

    We simulated anthropogenic global change through the entire atmosphere, including the thermosphere and ionosphere, using the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model-eXtended. The basic result was that even as the lower atmosphere gradually warms, the upper atmosphere rapidly cools. The simulations employed constant low solar activity conditions, to remove the effects of variable solar and geomagnetic activity. Global mean annual mean temperature increased at a rate of +0.2 K/decade at the surface and +0.4 K/decade in the upper troposphere but decreased by about -1 K/decade in the stratosphere-mesosphere and -2.8 K/decade in the thermosphere. Near the mesopause, temperature decreases were small compared to the interannual variation, so trends in that region are uncertain. Results were similar to previous modeling confined to specific atmospheric levels and compared favorably with available measurements. These simulations demonstrate the ability of a single comprehensive numerical model to characterize global change throughout the atmosphere.

  6. Understand ATLAS NSW Thin Gap Chamber from Garfield Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J; Diehl, E; Feng, H; Guan, L; Mikenberg, G; Smakhtin, V; Yu, J M; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zhao, Z

    2014-01-01

    The LHC will be upgraded in several phases with the goal of obtaining an instantaneous lumi- nosity of 5-7 x 10^34 cm-2s-s at the center of mass energy of 14 TeV and integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1. In order to profit from the high luminosity and high energy runs of the LHC, the ATLAS collaboration plans to upgrade the present endcap small wheel muon spectrometer to im- prove the muon triggering as well as precision tracking. The proposed New Small Wheel (nSW) will be composed of two four-layer Micromegas detectors (MM) detector sandwiched between two four-layer small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) quadruplets, where MM for precision tracking and sTGC for Level-1 triggering. In this paper, we focus on the Garfield [ 1 ] simulation of the sTGC detector to understand its timing performance and charge production. We also stud- ied the sTGC timing under different magnetic fields and high voltages. These studies provide important guide lines for the sTGC detector and electronics development.

  7. Development, test, and simulation of an influence drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippert, C.

    1992-07-01

    The experiment PS185 measuring the reaction anti pp → anti YY with strangeness S = 1 hyperons is a unique tool to study the process of anti ss quark pair creation. The so far measured anti ΛΛ and anti ΛΣ 0 channels have stimulated a lot of theoretical work and will be complemented by the charged Σ-channels anti Σ + Σ + and anti Σ - Σ - . Therefore, the PS185 apparatus has to be extended by a microvertex-detector with good spatial resolution and high rate capability. Last years in Juelich such a detector, the Induction Drift Chamber, was developed. A wire plane consists of alternating potential wires (20 μm) and anodes (7μm) asymmetrically positioned between two cathode foils defining one independent chamber. The good track resolution (≤ 25 μm) for perpendicular tracks even for high rates (≥ 10 6 events/(sec x mm 2 )) is achieved by evaluate the induced signals of the potential wires, which measure the azimuthal avalanche position with respect to the anodes. An expression is derived to describe the principles of the induced signals so that the simulation of the IDC is in good agreement with the experimental data. One central point is the derivation of an algorithm for inclined tracks. To overcome limits in the spatial resolution which arise from the fluctuation of ionisation loss, a Flash-ADC read out was used, which also gives the possibility to digitalize the track inside one plane. For the 400 channels in two FADC-Crates a real time data acquisition system with interrupt processing was developed on a VME-processor so that an event rate ≥ 100 Hz by an event length ≥ 1 kByte could be reached. The mechanical construction of the IDC allows a stack of independent planes to be built with a height of 3.5 mm for each. Results of two test runs measuring the spatial resolution are reported. (orig.) [de

  8. Modelling Contribution of Biogenic VOCs to New Particle Formation in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, L.; Boy, M.; Mogensen, D.; Mentel, T. F.; Kleist, E.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tillman, R.; Kulmala, M. T.; Dal Maso, M.

    2012-12-01

    Biogenic VOCs are substantially emitted from vegetation to atmosphere. The oxidation of BVOCs by OH, O3, and NO3 in air generating less volatile compounds may lead to the formation and growth of secondary organic aerosol, and thus presents a link to the vegetation, aerosol, and climate interaction system (Kulmala et al, 2004). Studies including field observations, laboratory experiments and modelling have improved our understanding on the connection between BVOCs and new particle formation mechanism in some extent (see e.g. Tunved et al., 2006; Mentel et al., 2009). Nevertheless, the exact formation process still remains uncertain, especially from the perspective of BVOC contributions. The purpose of this work is using the MALTE aerosol dynamics and air chemistry box model to investigate aerosol formation from reactions of direct tree emitted VOCs in the presence of ozone, UV light and artificial solar light in an atmospheric simulation chamber. This model employs up to date air chemical reactions, especially the VOC chemistry, which may potentially allow us to estimate the contribution of BVOCs to secondary aerosol formation, and further to quantify the influence of terpenes to the formation rate of new particles. Experiments were conducted in the plant chamber facility at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany (Jülich Plant Aerosol Atmosphere Chamber, JPAC). The detail regarding to the chamber facility has been written elsewhere (Mentel et al., 2009). During the experiments, sulphuric acid was measured by CIMS. VOC mixing ratios were measured by two GC-MS systems and PTR-MS. An Airmodus Particle size magnifier coupled with a TSI CPC and a PH-CPC were used to count the total particle number concentrations with a detection limit close to the expected size of formation of fresh nanoCN. A SMPS measured the particle size distribution. Several other parameters including ozone, CO2, NO, Temperature, RH, and flow rates were also measured. MALTE is a modular model to predict

  9. Backscattered radiation into a transmission ionization chamber: Measurement and Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizumi, Maira T.; Yoriyaz, Helio; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2010-01-01

    Backscattered radiation (BSR) from field-defining collimators can affect the response of a monitor chamber in X-radiation fields. This contribution must be considered since this kind of chamber is used to monitor the equipment response. In this work, the dependence of a transmission ionization chamber response on the aperture diameter of the collimators was studied experimentally and using a Monte Carlo (MC) technique. According to the results, the BSR increases the chamber response of over 4.0% in the case of a totally closed collimator and 50 kV energy beam, using both techniques. The results from Monte Carlo simulation confirm the validity of the simulated geometry.

  10. Two Simulated-Smog Atmospheres with Different Chemical Compositions Produce Contrasting Mutagenicity in Salmonella**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) are criteria pollutants used to evaluate air quality. Using EPA’s Mobile Reaction Chamber (MRC), we generated 2 simulated-smog atmospheres (SSA-1 & SSA-2) with different concentrations of these criteria pol...

  11. An experimental chamber simulating the equilibrium between radon and its daughters in mine air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanski, T.; Chruscielewski, W.; Orzechowski, W.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental chamber simulating the equilibrium between radon and its daughters in uranium mine air is described. The apparatus is useful for testing track detectors, air samplers, masks and filters and for determining occupational exposures. Increasing the humidity of the chamber air and increasing the amounts of aerosol injected both increase the values of the equilibrium factor, F. The equilibrium in the chamber air decreases after the aerosol injection but by using controlled pulse injections it was shown that the stability of F could be maintained inside the chamber for 4 hours. Results are also given for the structure of the equilibrium between radon and its daughters Qsub(i)/Q 0 in the chamber air as a function of the chamber air factor F and also for the potential α-energy of unattached products in relation to the total α-potential energy of radon daughter products in the chamber air as a function of factor F. (U.K.)

  12. Hypobaric chamber for the study of oral health problems in a simulated spacecraft environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    A hypobaric chamber was constructed to house two marmo-sets simultaneously in a space-simulated environment for periods of 14, 28 and 56 days which coincided with the anticipated Skylab missions. This report details the fabrication, operation, and performance of the chamber and very briefly reviews the scientific data from nine chamber trials involving 18 animals. The possible application of this model system to studies unrelated to oral health or space missions is discussed.

  13. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope system with an open sample chamber: Configuration and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Ogawa, Koji; Kitamura, Shinich; Konyuba, Yuji; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    An atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) with an open sample chamber and optical microscope (OM) is described and recent developments are reported. In this ClairScope system, the base of the open sample dish is sealed to the top of the inverted SEM column, allowing the liquid-immersed sample to be observed by OM from above and by SEM from below. The optical axes of the two microscopes are aligned, ensuring that the same sample areas are imaged to realize quasi-simultaneous correlative microscopy in solution. For example, the cathodoluminescence of ZnO particles was directly demonstrated. The improved system has (i) a fully motorized sample stage, (ii) a column protection system in the case of accidental window breakage, and (iii) an OM/SEM operation system controlled by a graphical user interface. The open sample chamber allows the external administration of reagents during sample observation. We monitored the influence of added NaCl on the random motion of silica particles in liquid. Further, using fluorescence as a transfection marker, the effect of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Varp on Tyrp1 trafficking in melanocytes was examined. A temperature-regulated titanium ASEM dish allowed the dynamic observation of colloidal silver nanoparticles as they were heated to 240 °C and sintered. - Highlights: • Atmospheric SEM (ASEM) allows observation of samples in liquid or gas. • Open sample chamber allows in situ monitoring of evaporation and sintering processes. • in situ monitoring of processes during reagent administration is also accomplished. • Protection system for film breakage is developed for ASEM. • Usability of ASEM has been improved significantly including GUI control

  14. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope system with an open sample chamber: Configuration and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi, E-mail: hinishiy@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Koizumi, Mitsuru, E-mail: koizumi@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Technics Ltd., 2-6-38 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0021 (Japan); Ogawa, Koji, E-mail: kogawa@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Technics Ltd., 2-6-38 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-0021 (Japan); Kitamura, Shinich, E-mail: kitamura@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Konyuba, Yuji, E-mail: ykonyuub@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: watanabeyoshiy@pref.yamagata.jp [Yamagata Research Institute of Technology, 2-2-1, Matsuei, Yamagata 990-2473 (Japan); Ohbayashi, Norihiko, E-mail: n.ohbayashi@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Fukuda, Mitsunori, E-mail: nori@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Membrane Trafficking Mechanisms, Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aobayama, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo, E-mail: msuga@jeol.co.jp [JEOL Ltd., 3-1-2, Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-4, Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    An atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) with an open sample chamber and optical microscope (OM) is described and recent developments are reported. In this ClairScope system, the base of the open sample dish is sealed to the top of the inverted SEM column, allowing the liquid-immersed sample to be observed by OM from above and by SEM from below. The optical axes of the two microscopes are aligned, ensuring that the same sample areas are imaged to realize quasi-simultaneous correlative microscopy in solution. For example, the cathodoluminescence of ZnO particles was directly demonstrated. The improved system has (i) a fully motorized sample stage, (ii) a column protection system in the case of accidental window breakage, and (iii) an OM/SEM operation system controlled by a graphical user interface. The open sample chamber allows the external administration of reagents during sample observation. We monitored the influence of added NaCl on the random motion of silica particles in liquid. Further, using fluorescence as a transfection marker, the effect of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Varp on Tyrp1 trafficking in melanocytes was examined. A temperature-regulated titanium ASEM dish allowed the dynamic observation of colloidal silver nanoparticles as they were heated to 240 °C and sintered. - Highlights: • Atmospheric SEM (ASEM) allows observation of samples in liquid or gas. • Open sample chamber allows in situ monitoring of evaporation and sintering processes. • in situ monitoring of processes during reagent administration is also accomplished. • Protection system for film breakage is developed for ASEM. • Usability of ASEM has been improved significantly including GUI control.

  15. Effects of atmospheric composition on respiratory behavior, weight loss, and appearance of Camembert-type cheeses during chamber ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picque, D; Leclercq-Perlat, M-N; Corrieu, G

    2006-08-01

    Respiratory activity, weight loss, and appearance of Camembert-type cheeses were studied during chamber ripening in relation to atmospheric composition. Cheese ripening was carried out in chambers under continuously renewed, periodically renewed, or nonrenewed gaseous atmospheres or under a CO(2) concentration kept constant at either 2 or 6% throughout the chamber-ripening process. It was found that overall atmospheric composition, and especially CO(2) concentration, of the ripening chamber affected respiratory activity. When CO(2) was maintained at either 2 or 6%, O(2) consumption and CO(2) production (and their kinetics) were higher compared with ripening trials carried out without regulating CO(2) concentration over time. Global weight loss was maximal under continuously renewed atmospheric conditions. In this case, the airflow increased exchanges between cheeses and the atmosphere. The ratio between water evaporation and CO(2) release also depended on atmospheric composition, especially CO(2) concentration. The thickening of the creamy underrind increased more quickly when CO(2) was present in the chamber from the beginning of the ripening process. However, CO(2) concentrations higher than 2% negatively influenced the appearance of the cheeses.

  16. Wire chamber requirements and tracking simulation studies for tracking systems at the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.; Niczyporuk, B.B.; Palounek, A.P.T.

    1989-02-01

    Limitations placed on wire chambers by radiation damage and rate requirements in the SSC environment are reviewed. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems which meet these requirements are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. Such computer simulation studies are necessary to determine the feasibility of wire chamber tracking systems for complex events in a high-rate environment such as the SSC. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  17. More realistic simulation of the response of an ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torii, T.; Nozaki, T.; Ando, H.

    1994-01-01

    In order to study the consequence of geometrical modeling of a finger tip ionization chamber and the difference of the calculated results using two Monte Carlo codes EGS4 and ITS3.0, the energy responses of an ionization chamber have been calculated. In the EGS4 calculation, it has been developed a versatile user code PRESTA-CG to calculate the response of radiation detectors with more complicated geometrical design by the combinatorial geometry (CG) method. This paper presents comparisons of the energy responses between these codes. (author)

  18. Simulation studies on a prototype ionization chamber for measurement of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, J.; Oliveira, C.; Carvalho, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The Metrological Laboratory of lonizing Radiation and Radioactivity (LMRIR) of Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN) has designed and constructed a prototype ionization chamber for direct measurement of the personal dose equivalent, H p (10), similar to the developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and now commercialized by PTW. Tests already performed had shown that the behaviour of this chamber is very close to the PTB chamber, namely the energy dependence for the x-ray radiation qualities of the ISO 4037-1 narrow series N-30, N-40, N-60, N-80, N-100 and N-120 and also for gamma radiation of 137 Cs and 60 Co. However, the results obtained also show a high dependence on the energy for some incident radiation angles and a low magnitude of the electrical response of the ionization chamber. In order to try to optimize the performance of the chamber, namely to decrease the energy dependence and to improve the magnitude of the electrical response of the ionization chamber, the LMRIR initiated numerical simulation of this ionization chamber using a Monte-Carlo method for simulation of radiation transport using, in a first step, the MCNPX code. So, simulation studies of some physical parameters are been performed in order to optimize the response of the ionization chamber, namely the diameter of the central electrode of the ionization chamber, the thickness of the front wall of the ionization chamber, among others. Preliminary results show that probably the actual geometry of the ionization chamber is not yet the optimized configuration. The simulation study will carry on in order to find the optimum geometry. (author)

  19. Study of the collecting electrode material of an extrapolation chamber by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedovato, Uly Pita; Santos, William S.; Perini, Ana Paula; Belinato, Walmir

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the influence of different materials of the collecting electrode on the response of an extrapolation ionization chamber, was evaluated. This ionization chamber was simulated with the MCNP-4C Monte Carlo code and the spectrum of a standard diagnostic radiology beam (RQR5) was utilized. The different results are due to interactions of photons with different materials of the collecting electrode contributing with different values of energy deposited in the sensitive volume of the ionization chamber, which depends on the atomic number of the evaluated materials. The material that presented the least influence was graphite, the original constituent of the ionization chamber. (author)

  20. Numerical model simulation of atmospheric coolant plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, P.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of humid atmospheric coolants on the atmosphere is simulated by means of a three-dimensional numerical model. The atmosphere is defined by its natural vertical profiles of horizontal velocity, temperature, pressure and relative humidity. Effluent discharge is characterised by its vertical velocity and the temperature of air satured with water vapour. The subject of investigation is the area in the vicinity of the point of discharge, with due allowance for the wake effect of the tower and buildings and, where application, wind veer with altitude. The model equations express the conservation relationships for mometum, energy, total mass and water mass, for an incompressible fluid behaving in accordance with the Boussinesq assumptions. Condensation is represented by a simple thermodynamic model, and turbulent fluxes are simulated by introduction of turbulent viscosity and diffusivity data based on in-situ and experimental water model measurements. The three-dimensional problem expressed in terms of the primitive variables (u, v, w, p) is governed by an elliptic equation system which is solved numerically by application of an explicit time-marching algorithm in order to predict the steady-flow velocity distribution, temperature, water vapour concentration and the liquid-water concentration defining the visible plume. Windstill conditions are simulated by a program processing the elliptic equations in an axisymmetrical revolution coordinate system. The calculated visible plumes are compared with plumes observed on site with a view to validate the models [fr

  1. Progresses in the simulation of Resistive Plate Chambers in avalanche mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbrescia, M.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Altieri, S.; Bruno, G.; Gianini, G.; Ratti, S.P.; Viola, L.; Vitulo, P

    1999-08-01

    New results about the simulation of Resistive Plate Chambers are reported; particular emphasis is put in the understanding of charge spectra in regions where deviations from the pure avalanche mode of operation can be present.

  2. The simulation of resistive plate chambers in avalanche mode: charge spectra and efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbrescia, M. E-mail: Marcello.abbrescia@ba.infn.it; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Altieri, S.; Bruno, G.; Gianini, G.; Ratti, S.P.; Viola, L.; Vitulo, P

    1999-07-21

    A model to simulate the avalanche formation process and the induced signal in a Resistive Plate Chamber is presented. A first investigation of the effects of various parameters on the performance of this detector is reported. (author)

  3. Laboratory Simulations on Haze Formation in Cool Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Horst, Sarah; Lewis, Nikole; Yu, Xinting; McGuiggan, Patricia; Moses, Julianne I.

    2017-10-01

    The Kepler mission has shown that the most abundant types of planets are super-Earths and mini-Neptunes among ~3500 confirmed exoplanets, and these types of exoplanets are expected to exhibit a wide variety of atmospheric compositions. Recent transit spectra have demonstrated that clouds and/or hazes could play a significant role in these planetary atmospheres (Deming et al. 2013, Knutson et al. 2014, Kreidberg et al. 2014, Pont, et al. 2013). However, very little laboratory work has been done to understand the formation of haze over a broad range of atmospheric compositions. Here we conducted a series of laboratory simulations to investigate haze formation in a range of planetary atmospheres using our newly built Planetary HAZE Research (PHAZER) chamber (He et al. 2017). We ran experimental simulations for nine different atmospheres: three temperatures (300 K, 400 K, and 600 K) and three metallicities (100, 1000, and 10000 times solar metallicity) using AC glow discharge as an energy source to irradiate gas mixtures. We found that haze particles are formed in all nine experiments, but the haze production rates are dramatically different for different cases. We investigated the particle sizes of the haze particles deposited on quartz discs using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM images show that the particle size varies from 30 nm to 200 nm. The haze particles are more uniform for 100x solar metallicity experiments (30 nm to 40 nm) while the particles sizes for 1000x and 10000x solar metallicity experiments have wider distributions (30 nm to 200 nm). The particle size affects the scattering of light, and thus the temperature structure of planetary atmospheres. The haze production rates and particle size distributions obtained here can serve as critical inputs to atmospheric physical and chemical tools to understand the exoplanetary atmospheres and help guide future TESS and JWST observations of super-Earths and mini-Neptunes.Ref:Deming, D., et al. 2013, Ap

  4. Simulation and measurements of the response of an air ionisation chamber exposed to a mixed high-energy radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincke, H.; Forkel-Wirth, D.; Perrin, D.; Theis, C.

    2005-01-01

    CERN's radiation protection group operates a network of simple and robust ionisation chambers that are installed inside CERN's accelerator tunnels. These ionisation chambers are used for the remote reading of ambient dose rate equivalents inside the machines during beam-off periods. This Radiation Protection Monitor for dose rates due to Induced Radioactivity ('PMI', trade name: PTW, Type 34031) is a non-confined air ionisation plastic chamber which is operated under atmospheric pressure. Besides its current field of operation it is planned to extend the use of this detector in the Large Hadron Collider to measure radiation under beam operation conditions to obtain an indication of the machine performance. Until now, studies of the PMI detector have been limited to the response to photons. In order to evaluate its response to other radiation components, this chamber type was tested at CERF, the high-energy reference field facility at CERN. Six PMI detectors were installed around a copper target being irradiated by a mixed hadron beam with a momentum of 120 GeV c -1 . Each of the chosen detector positions was defined by a different radiation field, varying in type and energy of the incident particles. For all positions, detailed measurements and FLUKA simulations of the detector response were performed. This paper presents the promising comparison between the measurements and simulations and analyses the influence of the different particle types on the resulting detector response. (authors)

  5. SIMUL - a program for the simulation of interactions in the streamer chamber RISK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friebel, W.; Gajewski, J.; Halm, I.

    1976-08-01

    A program for the simulation of interactions in the streamer chamber RISK is described. This program allows first investigations and tests for planning and preparing experiments. In the program the trajectories of all particles taking part in the interaction are computed. Selected points are projected onto film planes serving as measurement points for the use in the geometrical reconstruction. The program is used for testing a geometry program. But it also seems to be very helpful in investigating counter and trigger constellations and in the calculation of counting rates and trigger effectivities. (author)

  6. CFD simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer: wall function problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blocken, B.J.E.; Stathopoulos, T.; Carmeliet, J.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow are essential for a wide variety of atmospheric studies including pollutant dispersion and deposition. The accuracy of such simulations can be seriously compromised when wall-function roughness

  7. Fission chamber simulator for data acquisition performance tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyunin, A.V.; Vorobev, V.A.; Obudovsky, S.Yu.; Kaschuck, Yu.A.; Shvikin, S.A.

    2013-06-01

    Divertor neutron flux monitor (DNFM) is a diagnostic system to be used for measurement of the total neutron yield and fusion power in the experimental fusion tokamak-reactor ITER. The diagnostic consists of the 18 fission chambers (FC), front-end electronics and data acquisition system to process, collect and archive data. The system should provide neutron flux measurements in dynamic range 7 orders of magnitude with a time resolution 1 ms and an error less 10%. (authors)

  8. Measurement and simulation of the drift pulses and resolution in the micro-jet chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Va'vra, J.

    1983-01-01

    We have tested a prototype of a micro-jet chamber, using both a nitrogen laser and a 10GeV electron beam. The achieved resolution in the particle beam was sigma = 18μm for a lmm impact parameter and 22μm when averaging over the entire beam profile. The experimental results were compared to a Monte Carlo program which simulates the pulse shapes and resolution in drift chambers of any geometry. The main emphasis in our simulation analysis was to study various strategies for drift chambers in order to achieve the best possible timing resolution

  9. Cleaning and air conditioning device for atmosphere in thermonuclear reactor chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Seiji.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention removes tritium efficiently and attains ventilation and conditioning of a great amount of air flow. That is, there are disposed a humidity separator, a filter, a heater, a catalyst filled layer, a water jetting type humidifying heat insulation cooler and a cooler in this order from an inlet side (upstream) of contaminated room atmospheric gases. The catalyst filled layer, etc. are incorporated integrally into the ventilation air conditioning facility for ventilating air in the chamber of the thermonuclear reactor, to clean a tritium atmosphere at the same time. Accordingly, the device is made compact as a whole. A limit for the air flow rate owing to the use of the conventional catalyst tower and adsorbing tower is eliminated. Then a ventilating air conditioning for a great flow rate can be attained. Tritium is removed by cooling and dehumidification without using any adsorbent. Accordingly, an adsorbing tower is no more necessary and conventional regeneration operation is not required. As a result, space for installation is reduced, the system is simplified and the cost for construction and facility can be reduced. (I.S.)

  10. Computational algorithms for simulations in atmospheric optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konyaev, P A; Lukin, V P

    2016-04-20

    A computer simulation technique for atmospheric and adaptive optics based on parallel programing is discussed. A parallel propagation algorithm is designed and a modified spectral-phase method for computer generation of 2D time-variant random fields is developed. Temporal power spectra of Laguerre-Gaussian beam fluctuations are considered as an example to illustrate the applications discussed. Implementation of the proposed algorithms using Intel MKL and IPP libraries and NVIDIA CUDA technology is shown to be very fast and accurate. The hardware system for the computer simulation is an off-the-shelf desktop with an Intel Core i7-4790K CPU operating at a turbo-speed frequency up to 5 GHz and an NVIDIA GeForce GTX-960 graphics accelerator with 1024 1.5 GHz processors.

  11. Contamination Control Assessment of the World's Largest Space Environment Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Aaron; Henry, Michael W.; Grisnik, Stanley P.; Sinclair, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    The Space Power Facility s thermal vacuum test chamber is the largest chamber in the world capable of providing an environment for space simulation. To improve performance and meet stringent requirements of a wide customer base, significant modifications were made to the vacuum chamber. These include major changes to the vacuum system and numerous enhancements to the chamber s unique polar crane, with a goal of providing high cleanliness levels. The significance of these changes and modifications are discussed in this paper. In addition, the composition and arrangement of the pumping system and its impact on molecular back-streaming are discussed in detail. Molecular contamination measurements obtained with a TQCM and witness wafers during two recent integrated system tests of the chamber are presented and discussed. Finally, a concluding remarks section is presented.

  12. Re-entry simulation chamber for thermo-mechanical characterisation of space materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Volker

    2003-09-01

    During re-entry, materials and components are subject to very high thermal and mechanical loads. Any failure may cause loss of mission. Therefore, materials and components have to be tested under most rigid conditions to verify the suitability of the material and to verify the design of the components. The Re-Entry Simulation Chamber (RESiC) at ARC Seibersdorf research (ARCS) allows simulating the high thermal loads as well as complex mechanical load profiles that may occur during a re-entry; additionally, the influence of chemical reactions of materials with gaseous components of the atmosphere can be studied. The high vacuum chamber (better than 1×10-6 mbar) has a diameter of 650 mm and allows a sample height of 500 mm, or 1000 mm with extension flange. The gas dosing system is designed to emulate the increasing atmospheric pressure during the re-entry trajectory of a vehicle. Heating is performed by a 30 kW induction generator that allows a sufficiently rapid heating of larger components; electrically conductive materials such as metals or carbon fibre reinforced ceramics are directly heated, while for electrical insulators, susceptor plates or tubes will be employed. The uniaxial servo-hydraulic testing machine has a maximum load of 70 kN, either static or with a frequency of up to 70 Hz, with any given load profile (sinus, rectangular, triangular, ...). Strain measurements will be done by non-contacting laser speckle system for maximum flexibility and minimum instrumentation time effort (currently under application testing), or by strain gauges. All relevant process parameters are controlled and recorded by microcomputer. The highly sophisticated control software allows a convenient and reliable multi-channel data acquisition, e.g. temperatures at various positions of the test piece, pressure, loads, strains, and any other test data according to customer specifications; the data format is suitable for any further data processing. During the set-up and

  13. Study of the replacement correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry by Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lilie

    In ionization chamber radiation dosimetry, the introduction of the ion chamber into medium will unavoidably distort the radiation field near the chamber because the chamber cavity material (air) is different from the medium. A replacement correction factor, Prepl was introduced in order to correct the chamber readings to give an accurate radiation dose in the medium without the presence of the chamber. Generally it is very hard to measure the values of Prepl since they are intertwined with the chamber wall effect. In addition, the P repl values always come together with the stopping-power ratio of the two media involved. This makes the problem of determining the P repl values even more complicated. Monte Carlo simulation is an ideal method to investigate the replacement correction factors. In this study, four different methods of calculating the values of Prepl by Monte Carlo simulation are discussed. Two of the methods are designated as 'direct' methods in the sense that the evaluation of the stopping-power ratio is not necessary. The systematic uncertainties of the two direct methods are estimated to be about 0.1-0.2% which comes from the ambiguous definition of the energy cutoff Delta used in the Spencer-Attix cavity theory. The two direct methods are used to calculate the values of P repl for both plane-parallel chambers and cylindrical thimble chambers in either electron beams or photon beams. The calculation results are compared to measurements. For electron beams, good agreements are obtained. For thimble chambers in photon beams, significant discrepancies are observed between calculations and measurements. The experiments are thus investigated and the procedures are simulated by the Monte Carlo method. It is found that the interpretation of the measured data as the replacement correction factors in dosimetry protocols are not correct. In applying the calculation to the BIPM graphite chamber in a 60Co beam, the calculated values of P repl differ from those

  14. Numerical Simulation of a Dual-Chamber Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezhi Ning

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The performance of a dual-chamber Oscillating Water Column (OWC Wave Energy Converter (WEC is considered in the present study. The device has two sub-chambers with a shared orifice. A two-dimensional (2D fully nonlinear numerical wave flume based on the potential-flow theory and the time-domain higher-order boundary element method (HOBEM is applied for the simulation. The incident waves are generated by using the immerged sources and the air-fluid coupling influence is considered with a simplified pneumatic model. In the present study, the variation of the surface elevation and the water column volume in the two sub-chambers are investigated. The effects of the chamber geometry (i.e., the draft and breadth of two chambers on the surface elevation and the air pressure in the chamber are investigated, respectively. It is demonstrated that the surface elevations in the two sub-chambers are strongly dependent on the wave conditions. The larger the wavelength, the more synchronous motion of the two water columns in the two sub-chambers, thus, the lager the variation of the water column volume.

  15. Study of an extrapolation chamber in a standard diagnostic radiology beam by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedovato, Uly Pita; Silva, Rayre Janaina Vieira; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Santos, William S.; Perini, Ana Paula; Belinato, Walmir

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we studied the influence of the components of an extrapolation ionization chamber in its response. This study was undertaken using the MCNP-5 Monte Carlo code, and the standard diagnostic radiology quality for direct beams (RQR5). Using tally F6 and 2.1 x 10"9 simulated histories, the results showed that the chamber design and material not alter significantly the energy deposited in its sensitive volume. The collecting electrode and support board were the components with more influence on the chamber response. (author)

  16. Chamber-transport simulation results for heavy-ion fusion drivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W M; Callahan, D A; Tabak, M; Yu, S S; Peterson, P F; Rose, D V; Welch, D R

    2004-01-01

    The heavy-ion fusion (HIF) community recently developed a power-plant design that meets the various requirements of accelerators, final focus, chamber transport, and targets. The point design is intended to minimize physics risk and is certainly not optimal for the cost of electricity. Recent chamber-transport simulations, however, indicate that changes in the beam ion species, the convergence angle, and the emittance might allow more-economical designs

  17. Digital simulation of an enrichment process for solutions by means of an advection-diffusion chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artucio, G.; Suarez, R.; Uruguay Catholic University)

    1995-01-01

    An ab-initio digital simulation of the space-time dynamics of the concentration field of a solute in an advection-diffusion chamber is done. Some questions related to the digital simulation of the concentration field using the analytical solution obtained in a previous paper are discussed

  18. Method and apparatus for simulating atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO{sub 2}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-06-20

    A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth`s surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO{sub 2} and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO{sub 2} and moisture. 8 figs.

  19. Modelling the contribution of biogenic VOCs to new particle formation in the Jülich plant atmosphere chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, L.; Dal Maso, M.; Mogensen, D.; Roldin, P.; Rusanen, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Mentel, T. F.; Wildt, J.; Kleist, E.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tillmann, R.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Boy, M.

    2014-11-01

    We used the MALTE-BOX model including near-explicit air chemistry and detailed aerosol dynamics to study the mechanisms of observed new particle formation events in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber. The modelled and measured H2SO4 (sulfuric acid) concentrations agreed within a factor of two. The modelled total monoterpene concentration was in line with PTR-MS observations, and we provided the distributions of individual isomers of terpenes, when no measurements were available. The aerosol dynamic results supported the hypothesis that H2SO4 is one of the critical compounds in the nucleation process. However, compared to kinetic H2SO4 nucleation, nucleation involving OH oxidation products of monoterpenes showed a better agreement with the measurements, with R2 up to 0.97 between modelled and measured total particle number concentrations. The nucleation coefficient for kinetic H2SO4 nucleation was 2.1 × 10-11 cm3 s-1, while the organic nucleation coefficient was 9.0 × 10-14 cm3 s-1. We classified the VOC oxidation products into two sub-groups including extremely low-volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). These ELVOCs and SVOCs contributed approximately equally to the particle volume production, whereas only ELVOCs made the smallest particles to grow in size. The model simulations revealed that the chamber walls constitute a major net sink of SVOCs on the first experiment day. However, the net wall SVOC uptake was gradually reduced because of SVOC desorption during the following days. Thus, in order to capture the observed temporal evolution of the particle number size distribution, the model needs to consider reversible gas-wall partitioning.

  20. Numerical simulations of homogeneous freezing processes in the aerosol chamber AIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Haag

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The homogeneous freezing of supercooled H2SO4/H2O aerosols in an aerosol chamber is investigated with a microphysical box model using the activity parameterization of the nucleation rate by Koop et al. (2000. The simulations are constrained by measurements of pressure, temperature, total water mixing ratio, and the initial aerosol size distribution, described in a companion paper Möhler et al. (2003. Model results are compared to measurements conducted in the temperature range between 194 and 235 K, with cooling rates in the range between 0.5 and 2.6 K min-1, and at air pressures between 170 and 1000 hPa. The simulations focus on the time history of relative humidity with respect to ice, aerosol size distribution, partitioning of water between gas and particle phase, onset times of freezing, freezing threshold relative humidities, aerosol chemical composition at the onset of freezing, and the number of nucleated ice crystals. The latter four parameters can be inferred from the experiments, the former three aid in interpreting the measurements. Sensitivity studies are carried out to address the relative importance of uncertainties of basic quantities such as temperature, total H2O mixing ratio, aerosol size spectrum, and deposition coefficient of H2O molecules on ice. The ability of the numerical simulations to provide detailed explanations of the observations greatly increases confidence in attempts to model this process under real atmospheric conditions, for instance with regard to the formation of cirrus clouds or polar stratospheric ice clouds, provided that accurate temperature and humidity measurements are available.

  1. WE-G-BRA-06: Calibrating an Ionisation Chamber: Gaining Experience Using a Dosimetry 'flight Simulator'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavis, A; Saunderson, J; Ward, J

    2012-06-01

    Recently there has been great interest in the use of simulation training, with the view to enhance safety within radiotherapy practice. We have developed a Virtual Environment for Radiotherapy Training (VERT) which facilitates this, including the simulation of a number of 'Physics practices'. One such process is the calibration of an ionisation chamber for use in Linac photon beams. The VERT system was used to provide a life sized 3D virtual environment within which we were able to simulate the calibration of a departmental chamber for 6MV and 15 MV beams following the UK 1990 Code of Practice. The characteristics of the beams are fixed parameters in the simulation, whereas default (Absorbed dose to water) correction factors of the chambers are configurable thereby dictating their response in the virtual x-ray beam. When the simulation is started, a random, realistic temperature and pressure is assigned to the bunker. Measurement and chamber positional errors are assigned to the chambers. A virtual water phantom was placed on the Linac couch and irradiated through the side using a 10 × 10 field. With a chamber at the appropriate depths and irradiated iso-centrically, the Quality Indices (QI) of the beams were obtained. The two chambers were 'inter-compared', allowing the departmental chamber calibration factor to be calculated from that of the reference chamber. For the virtual 6/15 MV beams, the QI were found to be 0.668/ 0.761 and the inter-comparison ratios 0.4408/ 0.4402 respectively. The departmental chamber calibration factors were calculated; applying these and appropriate environmental corrections allowed the output of the Linac to be confirmed. We have shown how a virtual training environment can be used to demonstrate practical processes and reinforce learning. The UK CoP was used here, however any relevant protocol could be demonstrated. Two of the authors (Beavis and Ward) are Founders of Vertual Ltd, a spin-out company created to commercialise the

  2. Microbiological and biochemical aspects of Camembert-type cheeses depend on atmospheric composition in the ripening chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq-Perlat, M-N; Picque, D; Riahi, H; Corrieu, G

    2006-08-01

    Camembert-type cheeses were prepared from pasteurized milk seeded with Kluyveromyces lactis, Geotrichum candidum, Penicillium camemberti, and Brevibacterium aurantiacum. Microorganism growth and biochemical dynamics were studied in relation to ripening chamber CO(2) atmospheric composition using 31 descriptors based on kinetic data. The chamber ripening was carried out under 5 different controlled atmospheres: continuously renewed atmosphere, periodically renewed atmosphere, no renewed atmosphere, and 2 for which CO(2) was either 2% or 6%. All microorganism dynamics depended on CO(2) level. Kluyveromyces lactis was not sensitive to CO(2) during its growth phases, but its death did depend on it. An increase of CO(2) led to a significant improvement in G. candidum. Penicillium camemberti mycelium development was enhanced by 2% CO(2). The equilibrium between P. camemberti and G. candidum populations was disrupted in favor of the yeast when CO(2) was higher than 4%. Growth of B. aurantiacum depended more on O(2) than on CO(2). Two ripening progressions were observed in relation to the presence of CO(2) at the beginning of ripening: in the presence of CO(2), the ripening was fast-slow, and in the absence of CO(2), it was slow-fast. The underrind was too runny if CO(2) was equal to or higher than 6%. The nitrogen substrate progressions were slightly related to ripening chamber CO(2) and O(2) levels. During chamber ripening, the best atmospheric condition to produce an optimum between microorganism growth, biochemical dynamics, and cheese appearance was a constant CO(2) level close to 2%.

  3. About the cold ions in ionospheric plasma simulation chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soubeyran, A.; Levy, L.; Sarrail, D.; Coggiola, E.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical formulation of the cold ions density is established, which exhibit the influence of the main facility parameters. This expression is succesfully applied to explain experimental results. A numerical simulation is developed which authorized a better comprehension of the migration and collection of cold ions in the near-wake of a satellite mock-up [fr

  4. Simulation of muon transport through the aragats spark chamber calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asatiani, T.L.; Ter-Antonyan, S.V.

    1981-01-01

    The algorithm is presented of the program on simulation of muon transport through Aragats spark calorimeter. Statistic test method with account of fluctuations and angular distributions of cascade showers is used. The program is worked out on the Fortran algorithm language for EVM BESM-6 and is calibrated by experimental data of Aragats complex installation [ru

  5. A novel approach to predict the stability limits of combustion chambers with large eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritz, B.; Magagnato, F.; Gabi, M.

    2010-06-01

    Lean premixed combustion, which allows for reducing the production of thermal NOx, is prone to combustion instabilities. There is an extensive research to develop a reduced physical model, which allows — without time-consuming measurements — to calculate the resonance characteristics of a combustion system consisting of Helmholtz resonator type components (burner plenum, combustion chamber). For the formulation of this model numerical investigations by means of compressible Large Eddy Simulation (LES) were carried out. In these investigations the flow in the combustion chamber is isotherm, non-reacting and excited with a sinusoidal mass flow rate. Firstly a combustion chamber as a single resonator subsequently a coupled system of a burner plenum and a combustion chamber were investigated. In this paper the results of additional investigations of the single resonator are presented. The flow in the combustion chamber was investigated without excitation at the inlet. It was detected, that the mass flow rate at the outlet cross section is pulsating once the flow in the chamber is turbulent. The fast Fourier transform of the signal showed that the dominant mode is at the resonance frequency of the combustion chamber. This result sheds light on a very important source of self-excited combustion instabilities. Furthermore the LES can provide not only the damping ratio for the analytical model but the eigenfrequency of the resonator also.

  6. Application of PSpice circuit simulator in development of resistive plate chamber detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yaping; Cai Xu

    2008-01-01

    An electrical model was presented for resistive plate chamber (RPC) detector. The readout signals of RPC detector were studied with PSpice simulation based on the model. The simulation results show a good agreement with real data and authoritative data. Physical performance of RPC detector can be predicted by the PSpice simulation, so this is an efficient means to optimize RPC detector's research and development. (authors)

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic simulations of hot jupiter upper atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trammell, George B.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Arras, Phil, E-mail: gbt8f@virginia.edu, E-mail: zl4h@virginia.edu, E-mail: arras@virginia.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    Two-dimensional simulations of hot Jupiter upper atmospheres including the planet's magnetic field are presented. The goal is to explore magnetic effects on the layer of the atmosphere that is ionized and heated by stellar EUV radiation, and the imprint of these effects on the Lyα transmission spectrum. The simulations are axisymmetric, isothermal, and include both rotation and azimuth-averaged stellar tides. Mass density is converted to atomic hydrogen density through the assumption of ionization equilibrium. The three-zone structure—polar dead zone (DZ), mid-latitude wind zone (WZ), and equatorial DZ—found in previous analytic calculations is confirmed. For a magnetic field comparable to that of Jupiter, the equatorial DZ, which is confined by the magnetic field and corotates with the planet, contributes at least half of the transit signal. For even stronger fields, the gas escaping in the mid-latitude WZ is found to have a smaller contribution to the transit depth than the equatorial DZ. Transmission spectra computed from the simulations are compared to Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and Advanced Camera for Surveys data for HD 209458b and HD 189733b, and the range of model parameters consistent with the data is found. The central result of this paper is that the transit depth increases strongly with magnetic field strength when the hydrogen ionization layer is magnetically dominated, for dipole magnetic field B {sub 0} ≳ 10 G. Hence transit depth is sensitive to magnetic field strength, in addition to standard quantities such as the ratio of thermal to gravitational binding energies. Another effect of the magnetic field is that the planet loses angular momentum orders of magnitude faster than in the non-magnetic case, because the magnetic field greatly increases the lever arm for wind braking of the planet's rotation. Spin-down timescales for magnetized models of HD 209458b that agree with the observed transit depth

  8. Laboratory and Cloud Chamber Studies of Formation Processes and Properties of Atmospheric Ice Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, T.; Abdelmonem, A.; Benz, S.; Brinkmann, M.; Möhler, O.; Rzesanke, D.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Wagner, R.

    2009-04-01

    The formation of ice in tropospheric clouds controls the evolution of precipitation and thereby influences climate and weather via a complex network of dynamical and microphysical processes. At higher altitudes, ice particles in cirrus clouds or contrails modify the radiative energy budget by direct interaction with the shortwave and longwave radiation. In order to improve the parameterisation of the complex microphysical and dynamical processes leading to and controlling the evolution of tropospheric ice, laboratory experiments are performed at the IMK Karlsruhe both on a single particle level and in the aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA. Single particle experiments in electrodynamic levitation lend themselves to the study of the interaction between cloud droplets and aerosol particles under extremely well characterized and static conditions in order to obtain microphysical parameters as freezing nucleation rates for homogeneous and heterogeneous ice formation. They also allow the observation of the freezing dynamics and of secondary ice formation and multiplication processes under controlled conditions and with very high spatial and temporal resolution. The inherent droplet charge in these experiments can be varied over a wide range in order to assess the influence of the electrical state of the cloud on its microphysics. In the AIDA chamber on the other hand, these processes are observable under the realistic dynamic conditions of an expanding and cooling cloud- parcel with interacting particles and are probed simultaneously by a comprehensive set of analytical instruments. By this means, microphysical processes can be studied in their complex interplay with dynamical processes as for example coagulation or particle evaporation and growth via the Bergeron - Findeisen process. Shortwave scattering and longwave absorption properties of the nucleating and growing ice crystals are probed by in situ polarised laser light scattering measurements and infrared extinction

  9. A Preliminary Study on Time Projection Chamber Simulation for Fission Cross Section Measurements with Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Woon; Lee, Youngouk; Kim, Jae Cheon

    2014-01-01

    We present the details of the TPC simulation with Geant4 and show the results. TPC can provide more information than a fission chamber in that it is possible to distinguish different particle types. Simulations are conducted for uranium and plutonium targets with 20MeV neutrons. The simulation results are compared with the reference and show reasonable results. This is the first phase of study for realizing a TPC in the NFS at RAON, and we have more work to do, such as applying an electric field, signal processing in the simulation, and manufacturing of a TPC. The standard in fission cross section measurement is a fission chamber. It is basically just two parallel plates separated by a few centimeters of gas. A power supply connected to the plates sets up a moderate electric field. The target is deposited onto one of the plates. When fission occurs, the fragments ionize the gas, and the electric field causes the produced electrons to drift to the opposite plate, which records the total energy deposited in the chamber. A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is a gas ionization detector similar to a fission chamber. However, it can measure the charged particle trajectories in the active volume in three dimensions by adding several readouts on the pad plane (fission chamber has only one readout one a pad plane). The specific ionization for each particle track enables the TPC to distinguish different particle types. A TPC will be used for fission cross section measurements in the Neutron Science Facility (NSF) at RAON. As a preliminary study, we present details of TPC simulation with Geant4 and discuss the results

  10. High resolution real time capable combustion chamber simulation; Zeitlich hochaufloesende echtzeitfaehige Brennraumsimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piewek, J. [Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The article describes a zero-dimensional model for the real time capable combustion chamber pressure calculation with analogue pressure sensor output. The closed-loop-operation of an Engine Control Unit is shown at the hardware-in-the-loop-simulator (HiL simulator) for a 4-cylinder common rail diesel engine. The presentation of the model focuses on the simulation of the load variation which does not depend on the injection system and thus the simulated heat release rate. Particular attention is paid to the simulation and the resulting test possibilities regarding to full-variable valve gears. It is shown that black box models consisting in the HiL mean value model for the aspirated gas mass, the exhaust gas temperature after the outlet valve and the mean indicated pressure can be replaced by calculations from the high-resolution combustion chamber model. (orig.)

  11. Developments in numerical simulation of IFE target and chamber physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velarde, G.; Minguez, E.; Alonso, E.; Gil, J.M.; Malerba, L.; Marian, J.; Martel, P.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Munoz, R.; Ogando, F.; Perlado, J.M.; Piera, M.; Reyes, S.; Rubiano, J.G.; Sanz, J.; Sauvan, P.; Velarde, M.; Velarde, P.

    2000-01-01

    The work presented outlines the global frame given at the Institute of Nuclear Fusion (DENIM) for having an integral perspective of the different research areas with the development of Inertial Fusion for energy generation. The coupling of a new radiation transport (RT) solver with an existing multi-material fluid dynamics code using Adaptive Mesh Refinement (ARM) is presented in Section 2, including improvements and additional information about the solver precision. In Section 3, new developments in the atomic physics codes under target conditions, to determine populations, opacity data and emissivities have been performed. Exotic and innovative ideas about Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), as catalytic fuels and Z-pinches have been explored, and they are explained in Section 4. Numerical simulations demonstrate important reductions in the tritium inventory. Section 5 is devoted to safety and environment of the IFE. Uncertainties analysis in activation calculations have been included in the ACAB activation code, and also calculations on pulse activation in IFE reactors and on the activation of target debris in NIF are presented. A comparison of the accidental releases of tritium from some IFE reactors computed using MACCS2 code is explained. Finally, Section 6 contains the research on the basic mechanisms of neutron damage in SiC (low-activation material) and FeCu alloy using the DENIM/LLNL molecular dynamics code MDCASK. (authors)

  12. Climate and atmosphere simulator for experiments on ecological systems in changing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdier, Bruno; Jouanneau, Isabelle; Simonnet, Benoit; Rabin, Christian; Van Dooren, Tom J M; Delpierre, Nicolas; Clobert, Jean; Abbadie, Luc; Ferrière, Régis; Le Galliard, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Grand challenges in global change research and environmental science raise the need for replicated experiments on ecosystems subjected to controlled changes in multiple environmental factors. We designed and developed the Ecolab as a variable climate and atmosphere simulator for multifactor experimentation on natural or artificial ecosystems. The Ecolab integrates atmosphere conditioning technology optimized for accuracy and reliability. The centerpiece is a highly contained, 13-m(3) chamber to host communities of aquatic and terrestrial species and control climate (temperature, humidity, rainfall, irradiance) and atmosphere conditions (O2 and CO2 concentrations). Temperature in the atmosphere and in the water or soil column can be controlled independently of each other. All climatic and atmospheric variables can be programmed to follow dynamical trajectories and simulate gradual as well as step changes. We demonstrate the Ecolab's capacity to simulate a broad range of atmospheric and climatic conditions, their diurnal and seasonal variations, and to support the growth of a model terrestrial plant in two contrasting climate scenarios. The adaptability of the Ecolab design makes it possible to study interactions between variable climate-atmosphere factors and biotic disturbances. Developed as an open-access, multichamber platform, this equipment is available to the international scientific community for exploring interactions and feedbacks between ecological and climate systems.

  13. [Studies of ozone formation potentials for benzene and ethylbenzene using a smog chamber and model simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Long; Xu, Yong-Fu

    2014-02-01

    Ozone formation potentials from irradiations of benzene-NO(x) and ethylbenzene-NO(x) systems under the conditions of different VOC/NO(x) ratios and RH were investigated using a characterized chamber and model simulation. The repeatability of the smog chamber experiment shows that for two sets of ethylbenzene-NO(x) irradiations with similar initial concentrations and reaction conditions, such as temperature, relative humidity and relative light intensity, the largest difference in O3 between two experiments is only 4% during the whole experimental run. On the basis of smog chamber experiments, ozone formation of photo-oxidation of benzene and ethylbenzene was simulated in terms of the master chemical mechanism (MCM). The peak ozone values for benzene and ethylbenzene simulated by MCM are higher than the chamber data, and the difference between the MCM-simulated results and chamber data increases with increasing RH. Under the conditions of sunlight irradiations, with benzene and ethylbenzene concentrations being in the range of (10-50) x 10(-9) and NO(x) concentrations in the range of (10-100) x 10(-9), the 6 h ozone contributions of benzene and ethylbenzene were obtained to be (3.1-33) x 10(-9) and (2.6-122) x 10(-9), whereas the peak O3 contributions of benzene and ethylbenzene were (3.5-54) x 10(-9) and (3.8-164) x 10(-9), respectively. The MCM-simulated maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) values for benzene and ethylbenzene were 0.25/C and 0.97/C (per carbon), respectively. The maximum ozone reactivity (MOR) values for these two species were obtained to be 0.73/C and 1.03/C, respectively. The MOR value of benzene from MCM is much higher than that obtained by carter from SAPRC, indicating that SAPRC may underestimate the ozone formation potential of benzene.

  14. Measurements and Simulations of Ionization Chamber Signals in Mixed Radiation Fields for the LHC BLM System

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Ferioli, G; Holzer, EB; Stockner, M

    2006-01-01

    The LHC beam loss monitoring (BLM) system must prevent the super conducting magnets from quenching and protect the machine components from damage. The main monitor type is an ionization chamber. About 4000 of them will be installed around the ring. The lost beam particles initiate hadronic showers through the magnets, which are measured by the monitors installed outside of the cryostat around each quadrupole magnet. They probe the far transverse tail of the hadronic shower. The specification for the BLM system includes a factor of two absolute precision on the prediction of the quench levels. To reach this accuracy a number of simulations are being combined to calibrate the monitor signals. To validate the monitor calibration the simulations are compared with test measurements. This paper will focus on the simulated prediction of the development of the hadronic shower tails and the signal response of ionization chambers to various particle types and energies. Test measurements have been performed at CERN and ...

  15. On the use of plant emitted volatile organic compounds for atmospheric chemistry simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Hohaus, T.; Yu, Z.; Tillmann, R.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Wegener, R.; Novelli, A.; Fuchs, H.; Wahner, A.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) contribute to about 90% of the emitted VOC globally with isoprene being one of the most abundant BVOC (Guenther 2002). Intensive efforts in studying and understanding the impact of BVOC on atmospheric chemistry were undertaken in the recent years. However many uncertainties remain, e.g. field studies have shown that in wooded areas measured OH reactivity can often not be explained by measured BVOC and their oxidation products (e.g. Noelscher et al. 2012). This discrepancy may be explained by either a lack of understanding of BVOC sources or insufficient understanding of BVOC oxidation mechanisms. Plants emit a complex VOC mixture containing likely many compounds which have not yet been measured or identified (Goldstein and Galbally 2007). A lack of understanding BVOC sources limits bottom-up estimates of secondary products of BVOC oxidation such as SOA. Similarly, the widespread oversimplification of atmospheric chemistry in simulation experiments, using single compound or simple BVOC mixtures to study atmospheric chemistry processes limit our ability to assess air quality and climate impacts of BVOC. We will present applications of the new extension PLUS (PLant chamber Unit for Simulation) to our atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. PLUS is used to produce representative BVOC mixtures from direct plant emissions. We will report on the performance and characterization of the newly developed chamber. As an exemplary application, trees typical of a Boreal forest environment were used to compare OH reactivity as directly measured by LIF to the OH reactivity calculated from BVOC measured by GC-MS and PTRMS. The comparison was performed for both, primary emissions of trees without any influence of oxidizing agents and using different oxidation schemes. For the monoterpene emitters investigated here, we show that discrepancies between measured and calculated total OH reactivity increase with increasing degree of oxidation

  16. Note: The design of thin gap chamber simulation signal source based on field programmable gate array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Kun; Wang, Xu; Li, Feng; Jin, Ge; Lu, Houbing; Liang, Futian

    2015-01-01

    The Thin Gap Chamber (TGC) is an important part of ATLAS detector and LHC accelerator. Targeting the feature of the output signal of TGC detector, we have designed a simulation signal source. The core of the design is based on field programmable gate array, randomly outputting 256-channel simulation signals. The signal is generated by true random number generator. The source of randomness originates from the timing jitter in ring oscillators. The experimental results show that the random number is uniform in histogram, and the whole system has high reliability

  17. Simulated annealing algorithm for solving chambering student-case assignment problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Saadiah; Abdul-Rahman, Syariza

    2015-12-01

    The problem related to project assignment problem is one of popular practical problem that appear nowadays. The challenge of solving the problem raise whenever the complexity related to preferences, the existence of real-world constraints and problem size increased. This study focuses on solving a chambering student-case assignment problem by using a simulated annealing algorithm where this problem is classified under project assignment problem. The project assignment problem is considered as hard combinatorial optimization problem and solving it using a metaheuristic approach is an advantage because it could return a good solution in a reasonable time. The problem of assigning chambering students to cases has never been addressed in the literature before. For the proposed problem, it is essential for law graduates to peruse in chambers before they are qualified to become legal counselor. Thus, assigning the chambering students to cases is a critically needed especially when involving many preferences. Hence, this study presents a preliminary study of the proposed project assignment problem. The objective of the study is to minimize the total completion time for all students in solving the given cases. This study employed a minimum cost greedy heuristic in order to construct a feasible initial solution. The search then is preceded with a simulated annealing algorithm for further improvement of solution quality. The analysis of the obtained result has shown that the proposed simulated annealing algorithm has greatly improved the solution constructed by the minimum cost greedy heuristic. Hence, this research has demonstrated the advantages of solving project assignment problem by using metaheuristic techniques.

  18. Simulations of intense heavy ion beams propagating through a gaseous fusion target chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Oliver, B.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Clark, R.E.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.

    2002-01-01

    In heavy-ion inertial confinement fusion (HIF), an ion beam is transported several meters through the reactor chamber to the target. This standoff distance mitigates damage to the accelerator from the target explosion. For the high perveance beams and millimeter-scale targets under consideration, the transport method is largely determined by the degree of ion charge and current neutralization in the chamber. This neutralization becomes increasingly difficult as the beam interacts with the ambient chamber environment and strips to higher charge states. Nearly complete neutralization permits neutralized-ballistic transport (main-line HIF transport method), where the ion beam enters the chamber at roughly 3-cm radius and focuses onto the target. In the backup pinched-transport schemes, the beam is first focused outside the chamber before propagating at small radius to the target. With nearly complete charge neutralization, the large beam divergence is contained by a strong magnetic field resulting from roughly 50-kA net current. In assisted-pinched transport, a preformed discharge channel provides the net current and the discharge plasma provides nearly complete charge and current neutralization of the beam. In self-pinched transport, the residual net current results solely from the beam-driven breakdown of the ambient gas. Using hybrid particle-in-cell simulation codes, the behavior of HIF driver-scale beams in these three transport modes is examined. Simulations of neutralized ballistic transport, at a few-mTorr flibe pressure, show excellent neutralization given a preformed or photoionized (from the heated target) plasma. Two- and three-dimensional simulations of assisted-pinch transport in roughly 1-Torr Xe show the importance of attaining >1-μs magnetic diffusion time to limit self-field effects and achieve good transport efficiency. For Xe gas pressures ranging from 10-150 mTorr, calculations predict a robust self-magnetic force sufficient for self

  19. New Particle Formation in an Urban Atmosphere: The Role of Various Ingredients Investigated in the CLOUD Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltensperger, U.; Xiao, M.; Hoyle, C.; Dada, L.; Garmash, O.; Stolzenburg, D.; Molteni, U.; Lehtipalo, K.; El-Haddad, I.; Dommen, J.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play an important role on climate via aerosol-radiation interaction and aerosol-cloud interaction. The latter is strongly influenced by new particle formation (NPF). The physical and chemical mechanisms behind the NPF process are still under investigation. Great advancements were made in resolving chemical and physical mechanisms of NPF with a series of experiments conducted at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber facility at CERN (Geneva, Switzerland), including binary nucleation of sulfuric acid - water, ternary nucleation of sulfuric acid - water with ammonia or dimethylamine as well as oxidation products (highly oxygenated molecules, HOMs) from biogenic precursors with and without the presence of sulfuric acid. Here, we investigate possible NPF mechanisms in urban atmospheres, where large populations are exposed to high aerosol concentrations; these mechanisms are still missing and are urgently needed. Urban atmospheres are highly polluted with high concentrations of SO2, ammonia, NOx and volatile organic vapors from anthropogenic activity as well as with high particle concentrations, which provide a high condensation sink for condensable gases. Aromatic hydrocarbons from industrial activities, traffic and residential combustion are present at high concentrations and contribute significantly to photochemical smog in the urban environment.The experiments were conducted at the CLOUD chamber facility during the CLOUD11 campaign in fall 2016. Three aromatic hydrocarbons were selected: toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene (1,2,4-TMB) and naphthalene (NPT). Experiments were also conducted with mixtures of the three aromatic hydrocarbons to better represent the urban atmosphere. All the experiments were conducted in the presence of sulfuric acid concentrations with or without the addition of ammonia and NOx. New particle formation rates and early growth rates derived for each precursor and their mixture, together with sulfuric acid and

  20. Chamber simulation of photooxidation of dimethyl sulfide and isoprene in the presence of NOx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available To improve the model prediction for the formation of H2SO4 and methanesulfonic acid (MSA, aerosol-phase reactions of gaseous dimethyl sulfide (DMS oxidation products [e.g., dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO] in aerosol have been included in the DMS kinetic model with the recently reported gas-phase reactions and their rate constants. To determine the rate constants of aerosol-phase reactions of both DMSO and its major gaseous products [e.g., dimethyl sulfone (DMSO2 and methanesulfinic acid (MSIA], DMSO was photooxidized in the presence of NOx using a 2 m3 Teflon film chamber. The rate constants tested in the DMSO kinetic mechanisms were then incorporated into the DMS photooxidation mechanism. The model simulation using the newly constructed DMS oxidation mechanims was compared to chamber data obtained from the phototoxiation of DMS in the presence of NOx. Within 120-min simulation, the predicted concentrations of MSA increase by 200–400% and those of H2SO4, by 50–200% due to aerosol-phase chemistry. This was well substantiated with experimental data. To study the effect of coexisting volatile organic compounds, the photooxidation of DMS in the presence of isoprene and NOx has been simulated using the newly constructed DMS kinetic model integrated with the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM for isoprene oxidation, and compared to chamber data. With the high concentrations of DMS (250 ppb and isoprene (560–2248 ppb, both the model simulation and experimental data showed an increase in the yields of MSA and H2SO4 as the isoprene concentration increased.

  1. Effects of ambient temperature and water vapor on chamber pressure and oxygen level during low atmospheric pressure stunning of poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Paul H; Pritchard, David G

    2017-08-01

    The characteristics of the vacuum used in a low atmospheric pressure stunning system to stun (render unconscious) poultry prior to slaughter are described. A vacuum chamber is pumped by a wet screw compressor. The vacuum pressure is reduced from ambient atmospheric pressure to an absolute vacuum pressure of ∼250 Torr (∼33 kPa) in ∼67 sec with the vacuum gate valve fully open. At ∼250 Torr, the sliding gate valve is partially closed to reduce effective pumping speed, resulting in a slower rate of decreasing pressure. Ambient temperature affects air density and water vapor pressure and thereby oxygen levels and the time at the minimum total pressure of ∼160 Torr (∼21 kPa) is varied from ∼120 to ∼220 sec to ensure an effective stun within the 280 seconds of each cycle. The reduction in total pressure results in a gradual reduction of oxygen partial pressure that was measured by a solid-state electrochemical oxygen sensor. The reduced oxygen pressure leads to hypoxia, which is recognized as a humane method of stunning poultry. The system maintains an oxygen concentration of air always reduces the oxygen concentrations to a value lower than in dry air. The partial pressure of water and oxygen were found to depend on the pump down parameters due to the formation of fog in the chamber and desorption of water from the birds and the walls of the vacuum chamber. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  2. Simulation of containment atmosphere stratification experiment using local instantaneous description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babic, M.; Kljenak, I.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment on mixing and stratification in the atmosphere of a nuclear power plant containment at accident conditions was simulated with the CFD code CFX4.4. The original experiment was performed in the TOSQAN experimental facility. Simulated nonhomogeneous temperature, species concentration and velocity fields are compared to experimental results. (author)

  3. Overestimation of closed-chamber soil CO2 effluxes at low atmospheric turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brændholt, Andreas; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Ibrom, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Soil respiration (R-s) is an important component of ecosystem carbon balance, and accurate quantification of the diurnal and seasonal variation of R-s is crucial for a correct interpretation of the response of R-s to biotic and abiotic factors, as well as for estimating annual soil CO2 efflux rates...... be eliminated if proper mixing of air is ensured, and indeed the use of fans removed the overestimation of R-s rates during low u(*). Artificial turbulent air mixing may thus provide a method to overcome the problems of using closed-chamber gas-exchange measurement techniques during naturally occurring low...

  4. A Controlled-Environment Chamber for Atmospheric Chemistry Studies Using FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    necessary and identify by block number) FELD GROUP SUB-GROUP i >Chamber, controlled environment; long-path cell ; 07 04 FT-IR; Hydrazine decay...modification doubles the useable path length of the original multipass cell described by White (Reference 8). The pattern of images formed on the nesting...system is shown in Figure 13. 24 z C C02, Ibm, El4 944 C3 ta) caC E-4- 252 14 $4 41) 41) 0. 0 04 04 4 41) ~0 to 0.0 V-4 (A q14 0~ 1% 4-r4 $4 0 u P416 4 4

  5. Assessment of the Simulated Molecular Composition with the GECKO-A Modeling Tool Using Chamber Observations for α-Pinene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Isaacman-VanWertz, G. A.; Karam, C.; Valorso, R.; Madronich, S.; Kroll, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    Gas phase oxidation of VOC is a gradual process leading to the formation of multifunctional organic compounds, i.e., typically species with higher oxidation state, high water solubility and low volatility. These species contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) viamultiphase processes involving a myriad of organic species that evolve through thousands of reactions and gas/particle mass exchanges. Explicit chemical mechanisms reflect the understanding of these multigenerational oxidation steps. These mechanisms rely directly on elementary reactions to describe the chemical evolution and track the identity of organic carbon through various phases down to ultimate oxidation products. The development, assessment and improvement of such explicit schemes is a key issue, as major uncertainties remain on the chemical pathways involved during atmospheric oxidation of organic matter. An array of mass spectrometric techniques (CIMS, PTRMS, AMS) was recently used to track the composition of organic species during α-pinene oxidation in the MIT environmental chamber, providing an experimental database to evaluate and improve explicit mechanisms. In this study, the GECKO-A tool (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) is used to generate fully explicit oxidation schemes for α-pinene multiphase oxidation simulating the MIT experiment. The ability of the GECKO-A chemical scheme to explain the organic molecular composition in the gas and the condensed phases is explored. First results of this model/observation comparison at the molecular level will be presented.

  6. Accurate simulation of ionisation chamber response with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sempau, Josep; Andreo, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Ionisation chambers (IC) are routinely used in hospitals for the dosimetry of the photon and electron beams used for radiotherapy treatments. The determination of absorbed dose to water from the absorbed dose to the air filling the cavity requires the introduction of stopping power ratios and perturbation factors, which account for the disturbance caused by the presence of the chamber. Although this may seem a problem readily amenable to Monte Carlo simulation, the fact is that the accurate determination of IC response has been, for various decades, one of the most important challenges of the simulation of electromagnetic showers. The main difficulty stems from the use of condensed history techniques for electron and positron transport. This approach, which involves grouping a large number of interactions into a single artificial event, is known to produce the so-called interface effects when particles travel across surfaces separating different media. These effects can be sizeable when the electron step length is not negligible compared to the size of the region being crossed, as it is the case with the cavity of an IC. The artefact, which becomes apparent when the chamber response shows a marked dependence on the adopted step size, can be palliated with the use of sophisticated electron transport algorithms. These topics are discussed in the context of the transport model implemented in the PENELOPE code. The degree of violation of the Fano theorem for a simple, planar geometry, is used as a measure of the stability of the algorithm with respect to variations of the electron step length, thus assessing the 'quality' of its condensed history scheme. It is shown that, with a suitable choice of transport parameters, PENELOPE simulates IC response with an accuracy of the order of 0.1%.

  7. Accurate simulation of ionization chamber response with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sempau, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Full text. Ionization chambers (IC) are routinely used in hospitals for the dosimetry of the photon and electron beams used for radiotherapy treatments. The determination of absorbed dose to water from the absorbed dose to the air filling the cavity requires the introduction of stopping power ratios and perturbation factors, which account for the disturbance caused by the presence of the chamber. Although this may seem a problem readily amenable to Monte Carlo simulation, the fact is that the accurate determination of IC response has been, during the last 20 years, one of the most important challenges of the simulation of electromagnetic showers. The main difficulty stems from the use of condensed history techniques for electron and positron transport. This approach, which involves grouping a large number of interactions into a single artificial event, is known to produce the so-called interface effects when particles travel across surfaces separating different media. These effects are extremely important when the electron step length is not negligible compared to the size of the region being crossed, as it is the case with the cavity of an IC. The artifact, which becomes apparent when the chamber response shows a marked dependence on the adopted step size, can be palliated with the use of sophisticated electron transport algorithms. These topics will be discussed in the context of the transport model implemented in the Penelope code. The degree of violation of the Fano theorem for a simple, planar geometry, will be used as a measure of the stability of the algorithm with respect to variations of the electron step length, thus assessing the 'quality' of its condensed history scheme. It will be shown that, with a suitable choice of transport parameters, Penelope can simulate IC response with an accuracy of the order of 0.1%. (author)

  8. Numerical simulation of performance of heavy ion inertial confinement fusion target with ellipsoidal chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basin, A.A.; Vatulin, V.V.; Vakhlamova, L.L.; Vinokurov, P.A.; Dement'ev, Yu.A.; Eliseev, G.M.; Ermolovich, V.F.; Morenko, L.Z.; Morenko, A.I.; Remizov, G.N.; Romanov, Yu.A.; Ryabikina, N.A.; Skrypnik, S.I.; Skidan, G.I.; Tikhomirov, B.P.; Shagaliev, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    To solve the design problem of an inertial thermonuclear fusion facility requires the united efforts of scientists in various countries. In the field of heavy ion fusion a collaboration between scientists in Germany and Russia is under successful development. VNIIEF possesses advanced software for numerical simulation of the processes in thermonuclear target operation. This paper describes a target design suggested and being studied by scientists of Frankfurt University and GSI which is based on 2D non-stationary calculation of the X-ray energy transport and capsule compression. The target consists of a spherical capsule with DT fuel and an ellipsoidal chamber containment. The ion beam energy is released in two fixed converters located on the chamber axis symmetricall with respect to the capsule. The X-ray field is formed on the capsule surface with a set of special shields. The basic aim of our research is to estimate the effect of gas dynamic expansion of the chamber walls, shields and capsule on the target operation. To increase the reliability of the obtained results and the assessment of probable errors in predicting radiation field parameters and the capsule state, the calculations were accomplished in a kinetic arrangement with various techniques. (orig.)

  9. A space simulation test chamber development for the investigation of radiometric properties of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enlow, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and preliminary utilization of a thermal vacuum space simulation facility are discussed. The facility was required to perform studies on the thermal radiation properties of materials. A test chamber was designed to provide high pumping speed, low pressure, a low photon level radiation background (via high emissivity, coated, finned cryopanels), internal heat sources for rapid warmup, and rotary and linear motion of the irradiated materials specimen. The radiation detection system consists of two wideband infrared photoconductive detectors, their cryogenic coolers, a cryogenic-cooled blackbody source, and a cryogenic-cooled optical radiation modulator.

  10. Technical Note: A numerical test-bed for detailed ice nucleation studies in the AIDA cloud simulation chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Cotton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere aerosol and cloud chamber of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe can be used to test the ice forming ability of aerosols. The AIDA chamber is extensively instrumented including pressure, temperature and humidity sensors, and optical particle counters. Expansion cooling using mechanical pumps leads to ice supersaturation conditions and possible ice formation. In order to describe the evolving chamber conditions during an expansion, a parcel model was modified to account for diabatic heat and moisture interactions with the chamber walls. Model results are shown for a series of expansions where the initial chamber temperature ranged from −20°C to −60°C and which used desert dust as ice forming nuclei. During each expansion, the initial formation of ice particles was clearly observed. For the colder expansions there were two clear ice nucleation episodes. In order to test the ability of the model to represent the changing chamber conditions and to give confidence in the observations of chamber temperature and humidity, and ice particle concentration and mean size, ice particles were simply added as a function of time so as to reproduce the observations of ice crystal concentration. The time interval and chamber conditions over which ice nucleation occurs is therefore accurately known, and enables the model to be used as a test bed for different representations of ice formation.

  11. SMOG-CHAMBER TOXICOLOGY BETTER ESTIMATES THE TRUE TOXIC POTENTIAL OF ATMOSPHERIC MIXTURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemistry of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) have been studied for many years, yet little is known about how these chemicals, once interacted with urban atmospheres, affect healthy and susceptible individuals. The toxic potential of these very reactive compounds once they int...

  12. Considerations for Conducting Plant Research in Open Atmosphere Chambers on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond; Hummerick, Mary; Graham, Thomas; Dixit, Anirudha; Massa, Gioia

    The access to spaceflight and now the International Space Station has provided plant researchers a laboratory that is in continuous freefall (near weightlessness). As veteran spaceflight investigators know too well, research in space is difficult to conduct and the experiments are often confounded by secondary events. An example of this is the distribution of water and gases in rooting systems in µ-gravity. Since the water does not settle to the ”bottom” of the rooting media in space, there can be poor distribution and movement of water and oxygen, which in turn can stress the plants. This also creates challenges for conducting ground controls where the logical approach is to use the same volume of water as in space. But under 1-g, the water does settle to the bottom of the root zone, which leaves less in the upper profile of the rooting medium. In addition, some chambers such as the Russian Svet (on Mir), Lada (ISS), and NASA’s Veggie chamber were or are open to the cabin air. This simplifies the hardware development and allows the use of cabin air for cooling and supplying CO2 to the plants. Yet it also exposes the plants to the cabin air, which could have very high CO2 levels (e.g., 3000 to 6000 ppm), low humidity, and trace contaminants that might be below the limits for human concerns but could still affect plants. A known effect of these “super-elevated” CO2 levels on many dicot species is increased transpiration due to elevated stomatal conductance, both during the light and the dark cycles. Examples of these secondary effects will be discussed, along with potential approaches for conducting adequate ground controls.

  13. Midday stomatal closure in Mediterranean type sclerophylls under simulated habitat conditions in an environmental chamber : II. Effect of the complex of leaf temperature and air humidity on gas exchange of Arbutus unedo and Quercus ilex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenhunen, J D; Lange, O L; Braun, M

    1981-08-01

    Shrubs of the Mediterranean sclerophyllous species Arbutus unedo and Quercus ilex were studied under simulated habitat conditions in an environmental chamber. Temperature, humidity, and light intensity were altered stepwise to simulate diurnal changes in conditions similar to those measured in an evergreen macchia in Sobreda, Portugal. Leaves were enclosed in cuvettes which reproduced the growth chamber climate and which allowed measurement of gas exchange. Increasing atmospheric stress in the form of higher temperature and lower humidity on successive days gradually results in midday depression of transpiration rate and net photosynthesis rate of leaves due to midday stomatal closure.

  14. Formation of amino acids and nucleotide bases in a Titan atmosphere simulation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörst, S M; Yelle, R V; Buch, A; Carrasco, N; Cernogora, G; Dutuit, O; Quirico, E; Sciamma-O'Brien, E; Smith, M A; Somogyi, A; Szopa, C; Thissen, R; Vuitton, V

    2012-09-01

    The discovery of large (>100 u) molecules in Titan's upper atmosphere has heightened astrobiological interest in this unique satellite. In particular, complex organic aerosols produced in atmospheres containing C, N, O, and H, like that of Titan, could be a source of prebiotic molecules. In this work, aerosols produced in a Titan atmosphere simulation experiment with enhanced CO (N(2)/CH(4)/CO gas mixtures of 96.2%/2.0%/1.8% and 93.2%/5.0%/1.8%) were found to contain 18 molecules with molecular formulae that correspond to biological amino acids and nucleotide bases. Very high-resolution mass spectrometry of isotopically labeled samples confirmed that C(4)H(5)N(3)O, C(4)H(4)N(2)O(2), C(5)H(6)N(2)O(2), C(5)H(5)N(5), and C(6)H(9)N(3)O(2) are produced by chemistry in the simulation chamber. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses of the non-isotopic samples confirmed the presence of cytosine (C(4)H(5)N(3)O), uracil (C(5)H(4)N(2)O(2)), thymine (C(5)H(6)N(2)O(2)), guanine (C(5)H(5)N(5)O), glycine (C(2)H(5)NO(2)), and alanine (C(3)H(7)NO(2)). Adenine (C(5)H(5)N(5)) was detected by GC-MS in isotopically labeled samples. The remaining prebiotic molecules were detected in unlabeled samples only and may have been affected by contamination in the chamber. These results demonstrate that prebiotic molecules can be formed by the high-energy chemistry similar to that which occurs in planetary upper atmospheres and therefore identifies a new source of prebiotic material, potentially increasing the range of planets where life could begin.

  15. Large-eddy simulation of atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The present report describes the development and validation of a turbulence model designed for atmospheric flows based on the concept of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The background for the work is the high Reynolds number k - #epsilon# model, which has been implemented on a finite-volume code...... turbulence model is able to handle both engineering and atmospheric flows and can be run in both RANS or LES mode. For LES simulations a time-dependent wind field that accurately represents the turbulent structures of a wind environment must be prescribed at the computational inlet. A method is implemented...... where the turbulent wind field from a separate LES simulation can be used as inflow. To avoid numerical dissipation of turbulence special care is paid to the numerical method, e.g. the turbulence model is calibrated with the specific numerical scheme used. This is done by simulating decaying isotropic...

  16. The System of the Calibration for Visibility Measurement Instrument Under the Atmospheric Aerosol Simulation Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Visibility is one of the most important parameters for meteorological observation and numerical weather prediction (NWP.It is also an important factor in everyday life, mainly for surface and air traffic especially in the Aeronautical Meteorology. The visibility decides the taking off and landing of aircraft. If the airport visibility is lower than requirement for aircraft taking off stipulated by International Civil Aviation Administration, then the aircraft must be parked at the airport. So the accurate measurement of visibility is very important. Nowadays, many devices can be measured the visibility or meteorological optical range (MOR such as Scatterometers, Transmissometers and visibility lidar. But there is not effective way to verify the accuracy of these devices expect the artificial visual method. We have developed a visibility testing system that can be calibration and verification these devices. The system consists of laser transmitter, optical chopper, phase-locking amplifier, the moving optic receiving system, signal detection and data acquisition system, atmospheric aerosol simulation chamber. All of them were placed in the atmosphere aerosol simulation chamber with uniform aerosol concentration. The Continuous wave laser, wavelength 550nm, has been transmitted into the collimation system then the laser beam expanded into 40mm diameter for compressing the laser divergence angle before modulated by optical chopper. The expanding beam transmitting in the atmosphere aerosol cabin received by the optic receiving system moving in the 50m length precision guide with 100mm optical aperture. The data of laser signal has been acquired by phase-locking amplifier every 5 meter range. So the 10 data points can be detected in the 50 meters guide once. The slope of the fitting curve can be obtained by linear fitting these data using the least square method. The laser extinction coefficient was calculated from the slope using the Koschmieder

  17. Steady 3D Numerical Simulation of the Evaporator and Compensation Chamber of a Loop Heat Pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Nedayvozov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of a steady three-dimensional numerical simulation of a flat evaporator and compensation chamber (CC of a loop heat pipe (LHP and describes a procedure of the thermal state calculation of the evaporator and the compensation chamber.The LHP is an efficient heat transfer device operating on the principle of evaporation-condensation cycle. It is successfully used in space technology and also to cool the heat-stressed components of electronic devices and computer equipment. The authors carried out a numerical study of the influence of the condensate pipeline length, immersed in water, on the thermal state of the evaporator and the compensation chamber.  The paper shows the influence of the mass forces field on the calculation results. Presents all the numerical studies carried out by the authors for a brass flat evaporator with a thermal load of 80 W. Water is used as a LHP heat-transfer fluid. Fields of temperature, pressure and velocity are presented for each design option.Based on the calculation results, the authors came to the following conclusions:Influence of the mass forces field for the LHP of this type is significant and leads to arising water vortex flow in the condensate pipeline and CC, thereby mixing and equalizing the water temperature in the CC and in the porous element, reducing the maximum temperature of the porous element;The increasing section length of the condensate pipeline in the CC leads to increasing velocity of the heat-transfer fluid in the CC and in the porous element, decreasing mixing zone of the condensate in the CC, and increasing temperature non-uniformity of the porous element.

  18. Dynamics and Chemistry in Jovian Atmospheres: 2D Hydrodynamical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordwell, B. R.; Brown, B. P.; Oishi, J.

    2016-12-01

    A key component of our understanding of the formation and evolution of planetary systems is chemical composition. Problematically, however, in the atmospheres of cooler gas giants, dynamics on the same timescale as chemical reactions pull molecular abundances out of thermochemical equilibrium. These disequilibrium abundances are treated using what is known as the "quench" approximation, based upon the mixing length theory of convection. The validity of this approximation is questionable, though, as the atmospheres of gas giants encompass two distinct dynamic regimes: convective and radiative. To resolve this issue, we conduct 2D hydrodynamical simulations using the state-of-the-art pseudospectral simulation framework Dedalus. In these simulations, we solve the fully compressible equations of fluid motion in a local slab geometry that mimics the structure of a planetary atmosphere (convective zone underlying a radiative zone). Through the inclusion of passive tracers, we explore the transport properties of both regimes, and assess the validity of the classical eddy diffusion parameterization. With the addition of active tracers, we examine the interactions between dynamical and chemical processes, and generate prescriptions for the observational community. By providing insight into mixing and feedback mechanisms in Jovian atmospheres, this research lays a solid foundation for future global simulations and the construction of physically-sound models for current and future observations.

  19. Swirling Combustor Energy Converter: H2/Air Simulations of Separated Chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Minotti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This work reports results related to the “EU-FP7-HRC-Power” project aiming at developing micro-meso hybrid sources of power. One of the goals of the project is to achieve surface temperatures up to more than 1000 K, with a ∆T ≤ 100 K, in order to be compatible with a thermal/electrical conversion by thermo-photovoltaic cells. The authors investigate how to reach that goal adopting swirling chambers integrated in a thermally-conductive and emitting element. The converter consists of a small parallelepiped brick inside two separated swirling meso-combustion chambers, which heat up the parallelepiped, emitting material by the combustion of H2 and air at ambient pressure. The overall dimension is of the order of cm. Nine combustion simulations have been carried out assuming detailed chemistry, several length/diameter ratios (Z/D = 3, 5 and 11 and equivalence ratios (0.4, 0.7 and 1; all are at 400 W of injected chemical power. Among the most important results are the converter surfaces temperatures, the heat loads, provided to the environment, and the chemical efficiency. The high chemical efficiency, h > 99.9%, is due to the relatively long average gas residence time coupled with the fairly good mixing due to the swirl motion and the impinging air/fuel jets that provide heat and radicals to the flame.

  20. GCM simulations of cold dry Snowball Earth atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, A.; Held, I.; Marotzke, J.

    2009-12-01

    We use the full-physics atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 to investigate cold and virtually dry Snowball Earth atmospheres. These result from specifying sea ice as the surface boundary condition everywhere, corresponding to a frozen aquaplanet, while keeping total solar irradiance at its present-day value of 1365 Wm-2 and setting atmospheric carbon dioxide to 300 ppmv. Here, we present four simulations corresponding to the four possible combinations of enabled or disabled diurnal and seasonal cycles. The aim of this study is twofold. First, we focus on the zonal-mean circulation of Snowball Earth atmospheres, which, due to missing moisture, might constitute an ideal though yet unexplored testbed for theories of atmospheric dynamics. Second, we investigate tropical surface temperatures with an emphasis on the impact of the diurnal and seasonal cycles. This will indicate whether the presence of the diurnal or seasonal cycle would facilitate or anticipate the escape from Snowball Earth conditions when total solar irradiance or atmospheric CO2 levels were increased. The dynamics of the tropical circulation in Snowball Earth atmospheres differs substantially from that in the modern atmosphere. The analysis of the mean zonal momentum budget reveals that the mean flow meridional advection of absolute vorticity is primarily balanced by vertical diffusion of zonal momentum. The contribution of eddies is found to be even smaller than the contribution of mean flow vertical advection of zonal momentum, the latter being usually neglected in theories for the Hadley circulation, at least in its upper tropospheric branch. Suppressing vertical diffusion of horizontal momentum above 850 hPa leads to a stronger Hadley circulation. This behaviour cannot be understood from axisymmetric models of the atmosphere, nor idealized atmospheric general circulation models, which both predict a weakening of the Hadley circulation when the vertical viscosity is decreased globally. We

  1. Atmospherical simulations of the OMEGA/MEX observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorri, R.; Drossart, P.; Combes, M.; Encrenaz, T.; Fouchet, T.; Forget, F.; Bibring, J. P.; Ignatiev, N.; Moroz, V.; OMEGA Team

    The modelization of the atmospheric contribution in the martian spectrum is an important step for the OMEGA data analysis.A full line by line radiative transfer calculation is made for the gas absorption; the dust opacity component, in a first approximation, is calculated as an optically thin additive component.Due to the large number of parameters needed in the calculations, the building of a huge data base to be interpolated is not envisageable, for each observed OMEGA spectrum with calculation for all the involved parameters (atmospheric pressure, water abundance, CO abundance, dust opacity and geometric angles of observation). The simulation of the observations allows us to fix all the orbital parameters and leave the unknown parameters as the only variables.Starting from the predictions of the current meteorological models of Mars we build a smaller data base corresponding on each observation. We present here a first order simulation, which consists in retrieving atmospheric contribution from the solar reflected component as a multiplicative (for gas absorption) and an additive component (for suspended dust contribution); although a fully consistent approach will require to include surface and atmosphere contributions together in synthetic calculations, this approach is sufficient for retrieving mineralogic information cleaned from atmospheric absorption at first order.First comparison to OMEGA spectra will be presented, with first order retrieval of CO2 pressure, CO and H2O abundance, and dust opacity.

  2. Glove box chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, M.E.; Cox, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    An environmental chamber is described which enables an operator's hands to have direct access within the chamber without compromising a special atmosphere within such chamber. A pair of sleeves of a flexible material are sealed to the chamber around associated access apertures and project outwardly from such chamber. Each aperture is closed by a door which is openable from within the sleeve associated therewith so that upon an operator inserting his hand and arm through the sleeve, the operator can open the door to have access to the interior of the chamber. A container which is selectively separable from the remainder of the chamber is also provided to allow objects to be transferred from the chamber without such objects having to pass through the ambient atmosphere. An antechamber permitting objects to be passed directly into the chamber from the ambient atmosphere is included. (auth)

  3. Towards Adaptive Grids for Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooft, J. Antoon; Popinet, Stéphane; van Heerwaarden, Chiel C.; van der Linden, Steven J. A.; de Roode, Stephan R.; van de Wiel, Bas J. H.

    2018-02-01

    We present a proof-of-concept for the adaptive mesh refinement method applied to atmospheric boundary-layer simulations. Such a method may form an attractive alternative to static grids for studies on atmospheric flows that have a high degree of scale separation in space and/or time. Examples include the diurnal cycle and a convective boundary layer capped by a strong inversion. For such cases, large-eddy simulations using regular grids often have to rely on a subgrid-scale closure for the most challenging regions in the spatial and/or temporal domain. Here we analyze a flow configuration that describes the growth and subsequent decay of a convective boundary layer using direct numerical simulation (DNS). We validate the obtained results and benchmark the performance of the adaptive solver against two runs using fixed regular grids. It appears that the adaptive-mesh algorithm is able to coarsen and refine the grid dynamically whilst maintaining an accurate solution. In particular, during the initial growth of the convective boundary layer a high resolution is required compared to the subsequent stage of decaying turbulence. More specifically, the number of grid cells varies by two orders of magnitude over the course of the simulation. For this specific DNS case, the adaptive solver was not yet more efficient than the more traditional solver that is dedicated to these types of flows. However, the overall analysis shows that the method has a clear potential for numerical investigations of the most challenging atmospheric cases.

  4. Simulation studies for a high resolution time projection chamber at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muennich, A.

    2007-03-26

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is planned to be the next large accelerator. The ILC will be able to perform high precision measurements only possible at the clean environment of electron positron collisions. In order to reach this high accuracy, the requirements for the detector performance are challenging. Several detector concepts are currently under study. The understanding of the detector and its performance will be crucial to extract the desired physics results from the data. To optimise the detector design, simulation studies are needed. Simulation packages like GEANT4 allow to model the detector geometry and simulate the energy deposit in the different materials. However, the detector response taking into account the transportation of the produced charge to the readout devices and the effects ofthe readout electronics cannot be described in detail. These processes in the detector will change the measured position of the energy deposit relative to the point of origin. The determination of this detector response is the task of detailed simulation studies, which have to be carried out for each subdetector. A high resolution Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with gas amplification based on micro pattern gas detectors, is one of the options for the main tracking system at the ILC. In the present thesis a detailed simulation tool to study the performance of a TPC was developed. Its goal is to find the optimal settings to reach an excellent momentum and spatial resolution. After an introduction to the present status of particle physics and the ILC project with special focus on the TPC as central tracker, the simulation framework is presented. The basic simulation methods and implemented processes are introduced. Within this stand-alone simulation framework each electron produced by primary ionisation is transferred through the gas volume and amplified using Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). The output format of the simulation is identical to the raw data from a

  5. Coupling atmospheric and ocean wave models for storm simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting

    the atmosphere must, by conservation, result in the generation of the surface waves and currents. The physics-based methods are sensitive to the choice of wind-input source function (Sin), parameterization of high-frequency wave spectra tail, and numerical cut-off frequencies. Unfortunately, literature survey......This thesis studies the wind-wave interactions through the coupling between the atmospheric model and ocean surface wave models. Special attention is put on storm simulations in the North Sea for wind energy applications in the coastal zones. The two aspects, namely storm conditions and coastal...... shows that in most wind-wave coupling systems, either the Sin in the wave model is different from the one used for the momentum flux estimation in the atmospheric model, or the methods are too sensitive to the parameterization of high-frequency spectra tail and numerical cut-off frequencies. To confront...

  6. Numerical simulations of mixing conditions and aerosol dynamics in the CERN CLOUD chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Voigtländer, J; Rondo, L; Kürten, A; Stratmann, F

    2012-01-01

    To study the effect of galactic cosmic rays on aerosols and clouds, the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) project was established. Experiments are carried out at a 26.1 m3 tank at CERN (Switzerland). In the experiments, the effect of ionizing radiation on H2SO4 particle formation and growth is investigated. To evaluate the experimental configuration, the experiment was simulated using a coupled multidimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) – particle model. In the model the coupled fields of gas/vapor species, temperature, flow velocity and particle properties were computed to investigate mixing state and mixing times of the CLOUD tank's contents. Simulation results show that a 1-fan configuration, as used in first experiments, may not be sufficient to ensure a homogeneously mixed chamber. To mix the tank properly, two fans and sufficiently high fan speeds are necessary. The 1/e response times for instantaneous changes of wall temperature and saturation ratio were found to be in the order of fe...

  7. Numerical simulation of the circulation of the atmosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourdin, F.; Levan, P.; Talagrand, O.; Courtin, Regis; Gautier, Daniel; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1992-01-01

    A three dimensional General Circulation Model (GCM) of Titan's atmosphere is described. Initial results obtained with an economical two dimensional (2D) axisymmetric version of the model presented a strong superrotation in the upper stratosphere. Because of this result, a more general numerical study of superrotation was started with a somewhat different version of the GCM. It appears that for a slowly rotating planet which strongly absorbs solar radiation, circulation is dominated by global equator to pole Hadley circulation and strong superrotation. The theoretical study of this superrotation is discussed. It is also shown that 2D simulations systemically lead to instabilities which make 2D models poorly adapted to numerical simulation of Titan's (or Venus) atmosphere.

  8. Optical intensity scintillation in the simulated atmospherical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Lukas; Latal, Jan; Vanderka, Ales; Vitasek, Jan; Bojko, Marian; Bednarek, Lukas; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    There are several parameters of the atmospheric environment which have an effect on the optical wireless connection. Effects like fog, snow or rain are ones of the effects which appears tendentiously and which are bound by season, geographic location, etc. One of the effects that appear with various intensity for the whole time is airflow. The airflow changes the local refractive index of the air and areas with lower or higher refractive index form. The light going through these areas refracts and due to the optical intensity scintillates on the detector of the receiver. The airflow forms on the basis of two effects in the atmosphere. The first is wind cut and flowing over barriers. The other is thermal flow when warm air rises to the higher layers of the atmosphere. The heart of this article is creation such an environment that will form airflow and the refractive index will scintillate. For the experiment, we used special laboratory box with high-speed ventilators and heating units to simulate atmospheric turbulence. We monitor the impact of ventilator arrangement and air temperature on the scintillation of the gas laser with wavelength 633 nm/15 mW. In the experiment, there is watched the difference in behavior between real measurement and flow simulation with the same peripheral conditions of the airflow in the area of 500 x 500 cm.

  9. Simulation of the Interaction of X-rays with a Gas in an Ionization Chamber by the Monte Carlo Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Carles, A.; Garcia Gomez-Tejedor, G.

    2001-01-01

    The final objective of any ionization chamber is the measurement of the energy amount or radiation dose absorbed by the gas into the chamber. The final value depends on the composition of the gas, its density and temperature, the ionization chamber geometry, and type and intensity of the radiation. We describe a Monte Carlo simulation method, which allows one to compute the dose absorbed by the gas for a X-ray beam. Verification of model has been carried out by simulating the attenuation of standard X-ray radiation through the half value layers established in the ISO 4037 report, while assuming a Weibull type energy distribution for the incident photons. (Author) 6 refs

  10. Computer simulations of the atmospheric composition climate of Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadzhev, G.; Ganev, K.; Syrkov, D.; Prodanova, M.; Georgieva, I.; Georgiev, G.

    2015-07-01

    Some extensive numerical simulations of the atmospheric composition fields in Bulgaria have been recently performed. The US EPA Model-3 system was chosen as a modelling tool. As the NCEP Global Analysis Data with 1 degree resolution was used as meteorological background, the MM5 and CMAQ nesting capabilities were applied for downscaling the simulations to a 3 km resolution over Bulgaria. The TNO emission inventory was used as emission input. Special pre-processing procedures are created for introducing temporal profiles and speciation of the emissions. The biogenic emissions of VOC are estimated by the model SMOKE. The simulations were carried out for years 2000-2007. The numerical experiments have been carried out for different emission scenarios, which makes it possible the contribution of emissions from different source categories to be evaluated. The Models-3 “Integrated Process Rate Analysis” option is applied to discriminate the role of different dynamic and chemical processes for the air pollution formation. The obtained ensemble of numerical simulation results is extensive enough to allow statistical treatment – calculating not only the mean concentrations and different source categories contribution mean fields, but also standard deviations, skewness, etc. with their dominant temporal modes (seasonal and/or diurnal variations). Thus some basic facts about the atmospheric composition climate of Bulgaria can be retrieved from the simulation ensemble. (Author)

  11. Computer simulations of the atmospheric composition climate of Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadzhev, G.; Ganev, K.; Syrakov, D.; Prodanova, M.; Georgieva, I.; Georgiev, G.

    2015-07-01

    Some extensive numerical simulations of the atmospheric composition fields in Bulgaria have been recently performed. The US EPA Model-3 system was chosen as a modelling tool. As the NCEP Global Analysis Data with 1 degree resolution was used as meteorological background, the MM5 and CMAQ nesting capabilities were applied for downscaling the simulations to a 3 km resolution over Bulgaria. The TNO emission inventory was used as emission input. Special pre-processing procedures are created for introducing temporal profiles and speciation of the emissions. The biogenic emissions of VOC are estimated by the model SMOKE. The simulations were carried out for years 2000-2007. The numerical experiments have been carried out for different emission scenarios, which makes it possible the contribution of emissions from different source categories to be evaluated. The Models-3 Integrated Process Rate Analysis option is applied to discriminate the role of different dynamic and chemical processes for the air pollution formation. The obtained ensemble of numerical simulation results is extensive enough to allow statistical treatment calculating not only the mean concentrations and different source categories contribution mean fields, but also standard deviations, skewness, etc. with their dominant temporal modes (seasonal and/or diurnal variations). Thus some basic facts about the atmospheric composition climate of Bulgaria can be retrieved from the simulation ensemble. (Author)

  12. Large-eddy simulation of atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechmann, A.

    2006-11-15

    The present report describes the development and validation of a turbulence model designed for atmospheric flows based on the concept of Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The background for the work is the high Reynolds number k - epsilon model, which has been implemented on a finite-volume code of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS). The k - epsilon model is traditionally used for RANS computations, but is here developed to also enable LES. LES is able to provide detailed descriptions of a wide range of engineering flows at low Reynolds numbers. For atmospheric flows, however, the high Reynolds numbers and the rough surface of the earth provide difficulties normally not compatible with LES. Since these issues are most severe near the surface they are addressed by handling the near surface region with RANS and only use LES above this region. Using this method, the developed turbulence model is able to handle both engineering and atmospheric flows and can be run in both RANS or LES mode. For LES simulations a time-dependent wind field that accurately represents the turbulent structures of a wind environment must be prescribed at the computational inlet. A method is implemented where the turbulent wind field from a separate LES simulation can be used as inflow. To avoid numerical dissipation of turbulence special care is paid to the numerical method, e.g. the turbulence model is calibrated with the specific numerical scheme used. This is done by simulating decaying isotropic and homogeneous turbulence. Three atmospheric test cases are investigated in order to validate the behavior of the presented turbulence model. Simulation of the neutral atmospheric boundary layer, illustrates the turbulence model ability to generate and maintain the turbulent structures responsible for boundary layer transport processes. Velocity and turbulence profiles are in good agreement with measurements. Simulation of the flow over the Askervein hill is also

  13. Time-dependent simulations of disk-embedded planetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stökl, A.; Dorfi, E. A.

    2014-03-01

    At the early stages of evolution of planetary systems, young Earth-like planets still embedded in the protoplanetary disk accumulate disk gas gravitationally into planetary atmospheres. The established way to study such atmospheres are hydrostatic models, even though in many cases the assumption of stationarity is unlikely to be fulfilled. Furthermore, such models rely on the specification of a planetary luminosity, attributed to a continuous, highly uncertain accretion of planetesimals onto the surface of the solid core. We present for the first time time-dependent, dynamic simulations of the accretion of nebula gas into an atmosphere around a proto-planet and the evolution of such embedded atmospheres while integrating the thermal energy budget of the solid core. The spherical symmetric models computed with the TAPIR-Code (short for The adaptive, implicit RHD-Code) range from the surface of the rocky core up to the Hill radius where the surrounding protoplanetary disk provides the boundary conditions. The TAPIR-Code includes the hydrodynamics equations, gray radiative transport and convective energy transport. The results indicate that diskembedded planetary atmospheres evolve along comparatively simple outlines and in particular settle, dependent on the mass of the solid core, at characteristic surface temperatures and planetary luminosities, quite independent on numerical parameters and initial conditions. For sufficiently massive cores, this evolution ultimately also leads to runaway accretion and the formation of a gas planet.

  14. Simulation study of the photon quality correction factors of ionization chambers for FiR 1 epithermal neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivunoro, H.; Uusi-Simola, J.; Savolainen, S.; Kotiluoto, P.; Auterinen, I.; Kosunen, A.

    2006-01-01

    At FiR 1 BNCT facility in Finland, neutron-insensitive Mg(Ar) ionization chambers are used for photon dose measurements in an epithermal neutron beam. Previously, photon sensitivity factors for the chamber for the measurements in a water phantom in FiR 1 beam have been determined experimentally from measurements in 60 Co gamma and in a 6 MV clinical accelerator photon beams. However, the response of the ionization chamber in a water phantom depends on energy spectrum and angle of the photons and the secondary electrons created inside the phantom and may differ depending on type of the irradiation source (accelerator vs. an epithermal neutron beam). Also, the experimental sensitivity factor does not take into account the possible perturbations in the photon production in phantom caused by the ionization chamber materials. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the photon quality correction factors (k Qγ ) for the Mg(Ar) chamber at the FiR 1 beam through computer simulations. In this study, the k Qγ factors have been determined for Mg(Ar) chamber from Monte Carlo calculations of absorbed photon dose at two depths in a water phantom using MCNP code. The k qγ factors obtained with this method are compared to the sensitivity factors determined with measurements in an accelerator photon beam and to the k Qγ factors published previously. (author)

  15. Characterization and Simulation of a New Design Parallel-Plate Ionization Chamber for CT Dosimetry at Calibration Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, Ana P.; Neves, Lucio P.; Maia, Ana F.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, a new extended-length parallel-plate ionization chamber was tested in the standard radiation qualities for computed tomography established according to the half-value layers defined at the IEC 61267 standard, at the Calibration Laboratory of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN). The experimental characterization was made following the IEC 61674 standard recommendations. The experimental results obtained with the ionization chamber studied in this work were compared to those obtained with a commercial pencil ionization chamber, showing a good agreement. With the use of the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code, simulations were undertaken to evaluate the influence of the cables, insulator, PMMA body, collecting electrode, guard ring, screws, as well as different materials and geometrical arrangements, on the energy deposited on the ionization chamber sensitive volume. The maximum influence observed was 13.3% for the collecting electrode, and regarding the use of different materials and design, the substitutions showed that the original project presented the most suitable configuration. The experimental and simulated results obtained in this work show that this ionization chamber has appropriate characteristics to be used at calibration laboratories, for dosimetry in standard computed tomography and diagnostic radiology quality beams.

  16. Combustion Chamber Fluid Dynamics and Hypergolic Gel Propellant Chemistry Simulations for Selectable Thrust Rocket Engines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nusca, Michael J; Chen, Chiung-Chu; McQuaid, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    .... Computational fluid dynamics is employed to model the chemically reacting flow within a system's combustion chamber, and computational chemistry is employed to characterize propellant physical and reactive properties...

  17. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE ATMOSPHERE OF HD 209458b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, T. M.; Showman, A. P., E-mail: tami@lpl.arizona.edu, E-mail: showman@lpl.arizona.edu [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    We present the first three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the atmosphere of HD 209458b which self-consistently include reduction of winds due to the Lorentz force and Ohmic heating. We find overall wind structures similar to that seen in previous models of hot Jupiter atmospheres, with strong equatorial jets and meridional flows poleward near the day side and equatorward near the night side. Inclusion of magnetic fields slows those winds and leads to Ohmic dissipation. We find wind slowing ranging from 10%-40% for reasonable field strengths. We find Ohmic dissipation rates ∼10{sup 17} W at 100 bar, orders of magnitude too small to explain the inflated radius of this planet. Faster wind speeds, not achievable in these anelastic calculations, may be able to increase this value somewhat, but likely will not be able to close the gap necessary to explain the inflated radius. We demonstrate that the discrepancy between the simulations presented here and previous models is due to inadequate treatment of magnetic field geometry and evolution. Induced poloidal fields become much larger than those imposed, highlighting the need for a self-consistent MHD treatment of these hot atmospheres.

  18. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE ATMOSPHERE OF HD 209458b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, T. M.; Showman, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the atmosphere of HD 209458b which self-consistently include reduction of winds due to the Lorentz force and Ohmic heating. We find overall wind structures similar to that seen in previous models of hot Jupiter atmospheres, with strong equatorial jets and meridional flows poleward near the day side and equatorward near the night side. Inclusion of magnetic fields slows those winds and leads to Ohmic dissipation. We find wind slowing ranging from 10%-40% for reasonable field strengths. We find Ohmic dissipation rates ∼10 17  W at 100 bar, orders of magnitude too small to explain the inflated radius of this planet. Faster wind speeds, not achievable in these anelastic calculations, may be able to increase this value somewhat, but likely will not be able to close the gap necessary to explain the inflated radius. We demonstrate that the discrepancy between the simulations presented here and previous models is due to inadequate treatment of magnetic field geometry and evolution. Induced poloidal fields become much larger than those imposed, highlighting the need for a self-consistent MHD treatment of these hot atmospheres

  19. Large Atmospheric Computation on the Earth Simulator: The LACES Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Desgagné

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Large Atmospheric Computation on the Earth Simulator (LACES project is a joint initiative between Canadian and Japanese meteorological services and academic institutions that focuses on the high resolution simulation of Hurricane Earl (1998. The unique aspect of this effort is the extent of the computational domain, which covers all of North America and Europe with a grid spacing of 1 km. The Canadian Mesoscale Compressible Community (MC2 model is shown to parallelize effectively on the Japanese Earth Simulator (ES supercomputer; however, even using the extensive computing resources of the ES Center (ESC, the full simulation for the majority of Hurricane Earl's lifecycle takes over eight days to perform and produces over 5.2 TB of raw data. Preliminary diagnostics show that the results of the LACES simulation for the tropical stage of Hurricane Earl's lifecycle compare well with available observations for the storm. Further studies involving advanced diagnostics have commenced, taking advantage of the uniquely large spatial extent of the high resolution LACES simulation to investigate multiscale interactions in the hurricane and its environment. It is hoped that these studies will enhance our understanding of processes occurring within the hurricane and between the hurricane and its planetary-scale environment.

  20. Modelization and numerical simulation of atmospheric aerosols dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debry, Edouard

    2004-01-01

    Chemical-transport models are now able to describe in a realistic way gaseous pollutants behavior in the atmosphere. Nevertheless atmospheric pollution also exists as a fine suspended particles, called aerosols which interact with gaseous phase, solar radiation, and have their own dynamic behavior. The goal of this thesis is the modelization and numerical simulation of the General Dynamic Equation of aerosols (GDE). Part I deals with some theoretical aspects of aerosol modelization. Part II is dedicated to the building of one size resolved aerosol model (SIREAM). In part III we perform the reduction of this model in order to use it in dispersion models as POLAIR3D. Several modelization issues are still opened: organic aerosol matter, externally mixed aerosols, coupling with turbulent mixing, and nano-particles. (author) [fr

  1. Calculation and simulation of atmospheric refraction effects in maritime environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Denis, Jr.; Gardenal, Lionel; Lahaie, P.; Forand, J. Luc

    2001-01-01

    Near the sea surface, atmospheric refraction and turbulence affect both IR transmission and image quality. This produces an impact on both the detection and classification/identification of targets. With the financial participation of the U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR), Canada's Defence Research Establishment Valcartier (DREV) is developing PRIME (Propagation Resources In the Maritime Environment), a computer model aimed at describing the overall atmospheric effects on IR imagery systems in the marine surface layer. PRIME can be used as a complement to MODTRAN to compute the effective transmittance in the marine surface layer, taking into account the lens effects caused by refraction. It also provides information on image degradation caused by both refraction and turbulence. This paper reviews the refraction phenomena that take place in the surface layer and discusses their effects on target detection and identification. We then show how PRIME can benefit detection studies and image degradation simulations.

  2. A Coupled Atmospheric and Wave Modeling System for Storm Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo; Bolanos, R.

    2015-01-01

    to parametrize z0. The results are validated through QuikScat data and point measurements from an open ocean site Ekosk and a coastal, relatively shallow water site Horns Rev. It is found that the modeling system captures in general better strong wind and strong wave characteristics for open ocean condition than......This study aims at improving the simulation of wind and waves during storms in connection with wind turbine design and operations in coastal areas. For this particular purpose, we investigated the Coupled-Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System which couples the Weather...... resolution ranging from 25km to 2km. Meanwhile, the atmospheric forcing data of dierent spatial resolution, with one about 100km (FNL) and the other about 38km (CFSR) are both used. In addition, bathymatry data of diferent resolutions (1arc-minute and 30arc-seconds) are used. We used three approaches...

  3. Vector Monte Carlo simulations on atmospheric scattering of polarization qubits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Lu, Pengfei; Yu, Zhongyuan; Yan, Lei; Chen, Zhihui; Yang, Chuanghua; Luo, Xiao

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a vector Monte Carlo (MC) method is proposed to study the influence of atmospheric scattering on polarization qubits for satellite-based quantum communication. The vector MC method utilizes a transmittance method to solve the photon free path for an inhomogeneous atmosphere and random number sampling to determine whether the type of scattering is aerosol scattering or molecule scattering. Simulations are performed for downlink and uplink. The degrees and the rotations of polarization are qualitatively and quantitatively obtained, which agree well with the measured results in the previous experiments. The results show that polarization qubits are well preserved in the downlink and uplink, while the number of received single photons is less than half of the total transmitted single photons for both links. Moreover, our vector MC method can be applied for the scattering of polarized light in other inhomogeneous random media.

  4. N2O and CO production by electric discharge - Atmospheric implications. [Venus atmosphere simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, J. S.; Howell, W. E.; Hughes, R. E.; Chameides, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    Enhanced levels of N2O and CO were measured in tropospheric air samples exposed to a 17,500-J laboratory discharge. These enhanced levels correspond to an N2O production rate of about 4 trillion molecules/J and a CO production rate of about 10 to the 14th molecules/J. The CO measurements suggest that the primary region of chemical production in the discharge is the shocked air surrounding the lightning channel, as opposed to the slower-cooling inner core. Additional experiments in a simulated Venus atmosphere (CO2 - 95%, N2 - 5%, at one atmosphere) indicate an enhancement of CO from less than 0.1 ppm prior to the laboratory discharge to more than 2000 ppm after the discharge. Comparison with theoretical calculations appears to confirm the ability of a shock-wave/thermochemical model to predict the rate of production of trace species by an electrical discharge.

  5. MESYST, Simulation of 3-D Tracer Dispersion in Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastrangelo, V.; Mehilli, I.

    2000-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: Mesyst code is used for the simulation of 3D tracer dispersion in atmosphere. Three packages are part of this system: Cre-topo: prepares the terrain data for the Mesyst. Noabl: code calculates three- dimensional free divergence wind fields over complex terrain. Pas: Computing of tracer concentrations and depositions on a given domain. 2 - Method of solution: NOABL - Line Over Relaxation + Special adaptation of Gauss procedure. PAS - Monte Carlo Method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Computations: Mesh size: variable from some meters to some hundreds meters Mesh number: variable depending on available real data (some hundreds points on each directions)

  6. Spectral- and size-resolved mass absorption efficiency of mineral dust aerosols in the shortwave spectrum: a simulation chamber study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Caponi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new laboratory measurements of the mass absorption efficiency (MAE between 375 and 850 nm for 12 individual samples of mineral dust from different source areas worldwide and in two size classes: PM10. 6 (mass fraction of particles of aerodynamic diameter lower than 10.6 µm and PM2. 5 (mass fraction of particles of aerodynamic diameter lower than 2.5 µm. The experiments were performed in the CESAM simulation chamber using mineral dust generated from natural parent soils and included optical and gravimetric analyses. The results show that the MAE values are lower for the PM10. 6 mass fraction (range 37–135  ×  10−3 m2 g−1 at 375 nm than for the PM2. 5 (range 95–711  ×  10−3 m2 g−1 at 375 nm and decrease with increasing wavelength as λ−AAE, where the Ångström absorption exponent (AAE averages between 3.3 and 3.5, regardless of size. The size independence of AAE suggests that, for a given size distribution, the dust composition did not vary with size for this set of samples. Because of its high atmospheric concentration, light absorption by mineral dust can be competitive with black and brown carbon even during atmospheric transport over heavy polluted regions, when dust concentrations are significantly lower than at emission. The AAE values of mineral dust are higher than for black carbon (∼ 1 but in the same range as light-absorbing organic (brown carbon. As a result, depending on the environment, there can be some ambiguity in apportioning the aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD based on spectral dependence, which is relevant to the development of remote sensing of light-absorbing aerosols and their assimilation in climate models. We suggest that the sample-to-sample variability in our dataset of MAE values is related to regional differences in the mineralogical composition of the parent soils. Particularly in the PM2. 5 fraction, we found a strong

  7. Spectral- and size-resolved mass absorption efficiency of mineral dust aerosols in the shortwave spectrum: a simulation chamber study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caponi, Lorenzo; Formenti, Paola; Massabó, Dario; Di Biagio, Claudia; Cazaunau, Mathieu; Pangui, Edouard; Chevaillier, Servanne; Landrot, Gautier; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Kandler, Konrad; Piketh, Stuart; Saeed, Thuraya; Seibert, Dave; Williams, Earle; Balkanski, Yves; Prati, Paolo; Doussin, Jean-François

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents new laboratory measurements of the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) between 375 and 850 nm for 12 individual samples of mineral dust from different source areas worldwide and in two size classes: PM10. 6 (mass fraction of particles of aerodynamic diameter lower than 10.6 µm) and PM2. 5 (mass fraction of particles of aerodynamic diameter lower than 2.5 µm). The experiments were performed in the CESAM simulation chamber using mineral dust generated from natural parent soils and included optical and gravimetric analyses. The results show that the MAE values are lower for the PM10. 6 mass fraction (range 37-135 × 10-3 m2 g-1 at 375 nm) than for the PM2. 5 (range 95-711 × 10-3 m2 g-1 at 375 nm) and decrease with increasing wavelength as λ-AAE, where the Ångström absorption exponent (AAE) averages between 3.3 and 3.5, regardless of size. The size independence of AAE suggests that, for a given size distribution, the dust composition did not vary with size for this set of samples. Because of its high atmospheric concentration, light absorption by mineral dust can be competitive with black and brown carbon even during atmospheric transport over heavy polluted regions, when dust concentrations are significantly lower than at emission. The AAE values of mineral dust are higher than for black carbon (˜ 1) but in the same range as light-absorbing organic (brown) carbon. As a result, depending on the environment, there can be some ambiguity in apportioning the aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) based on spectral dependence, which is relevant to the development of remote sensing of light-absorbing aerosols and their assimilation in climate models. We suggest that the sample-to-sample variability in our dataset of MAE values is related to regional differences in the mineralogical composition of the parent soils. Particularly in the PM2. 5 fraction, we found a strong linear correlation between the dust light-absorption properties and elemental

  8. Simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer for Wind Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Nikola

    Energy production from wind is an increasingly important component of overall global power generation, and will likely continue to gain an even greater share of electricity production as world governments attempt to mitigate climate change and wind energy production costs decrease. Wind energy generation depends on wind speed, which is greatly influenced by local and synoptic environmental forcings. Synoptic forcing, such as a cold frontal passage, exists on a large spatial scale while local forcing manifests itself on a much smaller scale and could result from topographic effects or land-surface heat fluxes. Synoptic forcing, if strong enough, may suppress the effects of generally weaker local forcing. At the even smaller scale of a wind farm, upstream turbines generate wakes that decrease the wind speed and increase the atmospheric turbulence at the downwind turbines, thereby reducing power production and increasing fatigue loading that may damage turbine components, respectively. Simulation of atmospheric processes that span a considerable range of spatial and temporal scales is essential to improve wind energy forecasting, wind turbine siting, turbine maintenance scheduling, and wind turbine design. Mesoscale atmospheric models predict atmospheric conditions using observed data, for a wide range of meteorological applications across scales from thousands of kilometers to hundreds of meters. Mesoscale models include parameterizations for the major atmospheric physical processes that modulate wind speed and turbulence dynamics, such as cloud evolution and surface-atmosphere interactions. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used in this dissertation to investigate the effects of model parameters on wind energy forecasting. WRF is used for case study simulations at two West Coast North American wind farms, one with simple and one with complex terrain, during both synoptically and locally-driven weather events. The model's performance with different

  9. Evaluation of transport ventilators at mild simulated altitude: a bench study in a hypobaric chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussen, Salah; Coulange, Mathieu; Fournier, Marc; Gainnier, Marc; Michelet, Pierre; Micoli, Christophe; Negrel, Lionel

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies on ventilators used for air transport showed significant effects of altitude, in particular with regard to accuracy of the tidal volume (VT) and breathing frequency. The aim of the study was to evaluate transport ventilators under hypobaric conditions. We conducted a bench study of 6 transport ventilators in a Comex hypobaric chamber to simulate mild altitude (1,500 m [4,920 feet] and 2,500 m [8,200 feet]). The ventilators were connected to a test lung to evaluate their accuracy: (1) to deliver a set VT under normal resistance and compliance conditions at F(IO2) = 0.6 and 1, (2) to establish a set PEEP (0, 5, 10, and 15 cm H2O), and (3) to establish a set inspiratory pressure in pressure controlled mode, (4) at a F(IO2) setting, and (5) and at a frequency setting. Four ventilators kept an average relative error in VT of ventilator was affected by the altitude only at F(IO2) = 1. The Osiris 3 ventilator had > 40% error even at 1,500 m. We found no change in frequency as a function of altitude for any ventilators studied. No clinically important differences were found between all altitudes with the PEEP or inspiratory pressure setting. Although F(IO2) was affected by altitude, the average error did not exceed 11%, and it is unclear whether this fact is an experimental artifact. We have shown that most of the new transport ventilators tested require no setting adjustment at moderate altitude and are as safe at altitude as at sea level under normal respiratory conditions. Older technologies still deliver more volume with altitude in volumetric mode.

  10. Simulation of the saturation curve of the ionization chamber in overlapping pulsed radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Se Hwan; Kim, Yong Kyun; Kim, Han Soo; Kang, Sang Mook; Ha, Jang Ho

    2006-01-01

    Procedures for determination of collection efficiency in ionization chambers have been studied by numerous investigators. If the theoretical approach for air-filled ionization chambers exposed to continuous radiation is considered, the result in the near-saturation region is a linear relationship between ) (1/I(V) vs 1/V 2 , where I(V) is the current measured with the ionization chamber at a given polarization voltage V . For pulsed radiation beams, Boag developed a model and the resulted in a linear relationship between ) (1/I(V) and 1/V when the collection efficiency, f , is larger than 0.9. The assumption of the linear relationship of ) (1/I(V) with 1/V or 1/V 2 in the near-saturation region makes the determination of the saturation current simple, since the linear relationship may be determined with only two measured data points. The above discussion of the collection efficiency of the ionization chamber exposed to the pulsed radiation is valid only if each pulse is cleared before the next one occurs. The transit times of the ions in the chamber must be shorter than the time interval between the radiation pulses. Most of the previous works concerning the characteristics of the saturation curve of an ionization chamber in the pulsed beam were done for the case where the transit times of the ions were shorter than the interval between the radiation pulses. However, the experimental data for the intermediate case, where the ion transit time was comparable to the interval between the radiation pulses or the ion transit time was slightly longer than the interval between the radiation pulses, were rare. The saturation curves of the ionization chambers in the pulsed radiation were measured with the pulse beamed electron accelerator at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), where the ion transit times in the ionization chambers were longer than the time interval between the radiation pulses. We used two ionization chambers: one was a commercial thimble

  11. Novel Experimental Simulations of the Atmospheric Injection of Meteoric Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez Martín, J. C.; Bones, D. L.; Carrillo-Sánchez, J. D.; James, A. D.; Plane, J. M. C. [School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, Woodhouse Lane, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M. [Meteorites, Minor Bodies and Planetary Science Group, Institute of Space Sciences (CSIC-IEEC). Campus UAB, C/Can Magrans s/n, E-08193 Cerdanyola del Vallés (Barcelona) (Spain); Fegley, B. Jr., E-mail: J.M.C.Plane@leeds.ac.uk [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-02-20

    A newly developed laboratory, Meteoric Ablation Simulator (MASI), is used to test model predictions of the atmospheric ablation of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) with experimental Na, Fe, and Ca vaporization profiles. MASI is the first laboratory setup capable of performing time-resolved atmospheric ablation simulations, by means of precision resistive heating and atomic laser-induced fluorescence detection. Experiments using meteoritic IDP analogues show that at least three mineral phases (Na-rich plagioclase, metal sulfide, and Mg-rich silicate) are required to explain the observed appearance temperatures of the vaporized elements. Low melting temperatures of Na-rich plagioclase and metal sulfide, compared to silicate grains, preclude equilibration of all the elemental constituents in a single melt. The phase-change process of distinct mineral components determines the way in which Na and Fe evaporate. Ca evaporation is dependent on particle size and on the initial composition of the molten silicate. Measured vaporized fractions of Na, Fe, and Ca as a function of particle size and speed confirm differential ablation (i.e., the most volatile elements such as Na ablate first, followed by the main constituents Fe, Mg, and Si, and finally the most refractory elements such as Ca). The Chemical Ablation Model (CABMOD) provides a reasonable approximation to this effect based on chemical fractionation of a molten silicate in thermodynamic equilibrium, even though the compositional and geometric description of IDPs is simplistic. Improvements in the model are required in order to better reproduce the specific shape of the elemental ablation profiles.

  12. Development of regional meteorological and atmospheric diffusion simulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Ryuji; Iwashige, Kengo; Kasano, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    Regional atmospheric diffusion online network (RADON) with atmospheric diffusion analysis code (ADAC) : a simulation program of diffusion of radioactive materials, volcanic ash, pollen, NOx and SOx was developed. This system can be executed in personal computer (PC) and note PC on Windows. Emission data consists of online, offline and default data. It uses the meteorology data sources such as meteorological forecasting mesh data, automated meteorological data acquisition system (AMeDAS) data, meteorological observation data in site and municipality observation data. The meteorological forecasting mesh data shows forecasting value of temperature, wind speed, wind direction and humidity in about two days. The nuclear environmental monitoring center retains the online data (meteorological data, emission source data, monitoring station data) in its PC server and can run forecasting or repeating calculation using these data and store and print out the calculation results. About 30 emission materials can be calculated simultaneously. This system can simulate a series of weather from the past and real time to the future. (S.Y.)

  13. Noble Gas Surface Flux Simulations And Atmospheric Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, Charles R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sun, Yunwei [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simpson, Matthew D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-30

    Signatures from underground nuclear explosions or UNEs are strongly influenced by the containment regime surrounding them. The degree of gas leakage from the detonation cavity to the surface obviously affects the magnitude of surface fluxes of radioxenon that might be detected during the course of a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty On-Site Inspection. In turn, the magnitude of surface fluxes will influence the downwind detectability of the radioxenon atmospheric signature from the event. Less obvious is the influence that leakage rates have on the evolution of radioxenon isotopes in the cavity or the downwind radioisotopic measurements that might be made. The objective of this letter report is to summarize our attempt to better understand how containment conditions affect both the detection and interpretation of radioxenon signatures obtained from sampling at the ground surface near an event as well as at greater distances in the atmosphere. In the discussion that follows, we make no attempt to consider other sources of radioactive noble gases such as natural backgrounds or atmospheric contamination and, for simplicity, only focus on detonation-produced radioxenon gases. Summarizing our simulations, they show that the decay of radioxenon isotopes (e.g., Xe-133, Xe-131m, Xe-133m and Xe-135) and their migration to the surface following a UNE means that the possibility of detecting these gases exists within a window of opportunity. In some cases, seeps or venting of detonation gases may allow significant quantities to reach the surface and be released into the atmosphere immediately following a UNE. In other release scenarios – the ones we consider here – hours to days may be required for gases to reach the surface at detectable levels. These release models are most likely more characteristic of “fully contained” events that lack prompt venting, but which still leak gas slowly across the surface for periods of months.

  14. Laboratory simulation of atmospheric turbulence induced optical wavefront distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Travis Shane

    1999-11-01

    Many creative approaches have been taken in the past for simulating the effect that atmospheric turbulence has on optical beams. Most of the experimental architectures have been complicated and consisted of many optical elements as well as moving components. These techniques have shown a modicum of success; however, they are not completely controllable or predictable. A benchtop technique for experimentally producing one important effect that atmospheric turbulence has on optical beams (phase distortion) is presented here. The system is completely controllable and predictable while accurately representing the statistical nature of the problem. Previous experimentation in optical processing through turbulent media has demonstrated that optical wavefront distortions can be produced via spatial light modulating (SLM) devices, and most turbulence models and experimental results indicate that turbulence can be represented as a phase fluctuation. The amplitude distributions in the resulting far field are primarily due to propagation of the phase. Operating a liquid crystal television (LCTV) in the ``phase- mostly'' mode, a phase fluctuation type model for turbulence is utilized in the present investigation, and a real-time experiment for demonstrating the effects was constructed. For an optical system to simulate optical wavefront distortions due to atmospheric turbulence, the following are required: (1)An optical element that modulates the phasefront of an optical beam (2)A model and a technique for generating spatially correlated turbulence simulating distributions (3)Hardware and software for displaying and manipulating the information addressing the optical phase modulation device The LCTV is ideal for this application. When operated in the ``phase-mostly'' mode some LCTVs can modulate the phasefront of an optical beam by as much as 2π and an algorithm for generating spatially correlated phase screens can be constructed via mathematical modeling software such as

  15. CFD simulation of neutral ABL flows; Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaodong Zhang

    2009-04-15

    This work is to evaluate the CFD prediction of Atmospheric Boundary Layer flow field over different terrains employing Fluent 6.3 software. How accurate the simulation could achieve depend on following aspects: viscous model, wall functions, agreement of CFD model with inlet wind velocity profile and top boundary condition. Fluent employ wall function roughness modifications based on data from experiments with sand grain roughened pipes and channels, describe wall adjacent zone with Roughness Height (Ks) instead of Roughness Length (z{sub 0}). In a CFD simulation of ABL flow, the mean wind velocity profile is generally described with either a logarithmic equation by the presence of aerodynamic roughness length z{sub 0} or an exponential equation by the presence of exponent. As indicated by some former researchers, the disagreement between wall function model and ABL velocity profile description will result in some undesirable gradient along flow direction. There are some methods to improve the simulation model in literatures, some of them are discussed in this report, but none of those remedial methods are perfect to eliminate the streamwise gradients in mean wind speed and turbulence, as EllipSys3D could do. In this paper, a new near wall treatment function is designed, which, in some degree, can correct the horizontal gradients problem. Based on the corrected model constants and near wall treatment function, a simulation of Askervein Hill is carried out. The wind condition is neutrally stratified ABL and the measurements are best documented until now. Comparison with measured data shows that the CFD model can well predict the velocity field and relative turbulence kinetic energy field. Furthermore, a series of artificial complex terrains are designed, and some of the main simulation results are reported. (au)

  16. Global simulation of aromatic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Perez, David; Taraborrelli, Domenico; Pozzer, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Among the large number of chemical compounds in the atmosphere, the organic group plays a key role in the tropospheric chemistry. Specifically the subgroup called aromatics is of great interest. Aromatics are the predominant trace gases in urban areas due to high emissions, primarily by vehicle exhausts and fuel evaporation. They are also present in areas where biofuel is used (i.e residential wood burning). Emissions of aromatic compounds are a substantial fraction of the total emissions of the volatile organic compounds (VOC). Impact of aromatics on human health is very important, as they do not only contribute to the ozone formation in the urban environment, but they are also highly toxic themselves, especially in the case of benzene which is able to trigger a range of illness under long exposure, and of nitro-phenols which cause detrimental for humans and vegetation even at very low concentrations. The aim of this work is to assess the atmospheric impacts of aromatic compounds on the global scale. The main goals are: lifetime and budget estimation, mixing ratios distribution, net effect on ozone production and OH loss for the most emitted aromatic compounds (benzene, toluene, xylenes, ethylbenzene, styrene and trimethylbenzenes). For this purpose, we use the numerical chemistry and climate simulation ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model to build the global atmospheric budget for the most emitted and predominant aromatic compounds in the atmosphere. A set of emissions was prepared in order to include biomass burning, vegetation and anthropogenic sources of aromatics into the model. A chemical mechanism based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) was developed to describe the chemical oxidation in the gas phase of these aromatic compounds. MCM have been reduced in terms of number of chemical equation and species in order to make it affordable in a 3D model. Additionally other features have been added, for instance the production of HONO via ortho

  17. Simulating the 3-D Structure of Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. M.; Waite, H.; Westlake, J.; Magee, B.

    2009-05-01

    We present results from the 3-D Titan Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (Bell et al [2009], PSS, in review). We show comparisons between simulated N2, CH4, and H2 density fields and the in-situ data from the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS). We describe the temperature and wind fields consistent with these density calculations. Variations with local time, longitude, and latitude will be addressed. Potential plasma heating sources can be estimated using the 1-D model of De La Haye et al [2007, 2008] and the impacts on the thermosphere of Titan can be assessed in a global sense in Titan-GITM. Lastly, we will place these findings within the context of recent work in modeling the 2-D structure of Titan's upper atmosphere (Mueller-Wodarg et al [2008]).

  18. Filter Media Tests Under Simulated Martian Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.

    2016-01-01

    Human exploration of Mars will require the optimal utilization of planetary resources. One of its abundant resources is the Martian atmosphere that can be harvested through filtration and chemical processes that purify and separate it into its gaseous and elemental constituents. Effective filtration needs to be part of the suite of resource utilization technologies. A unique testing platform is being used which provides the relevant operational and instrumental capabilities to test articles under the proper simulated Martian conditions. A series of tests were conducted to assess the performance of filter media. Light sheet imaging of the particle flow provided a means of detecting and quantifying particle concentrations to determine capturing efficiencies. The media's efficiency was also evaluated by gravimetric means through a by-layer filter media configuration. These tests will help to establish techniques and methods for measuring capturing efficiency and arrestance of conventional fibrous filter media. This paper will describe initial test results on different filter media.

  19. Multiscale eddy simulation for moist atmospheric convection: Preliminary investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stechmann, Samuel N., E-mail: stechmann@wisc.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

    2014-08-15

    A multiscale computational framework is designed for simulating atmospheric convection and clouds. In this multiscale framework, large eddy simulation (LES) is used to model the coarse scales of 100 m and larger, and a stochastic, one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is used to represent the fine scales of 100 m and smaller. Coupled and evolving together, these two components provide a multiscale eddy simulation (MES). Through its fine-scale turbulence and moist thermodynamics, MES allows coarse grid cells to be partially cloudy and to encompass cloudy–clear air mixing on scales down to 1 m; in contrast, in typical LES such fine-scale processes are not represented or are parameterized using bulk deterministic closures. To illustrate MES and investigate its multiscale dynamics, a shallow cumulus cloud field is simulated. The fine-scale variability is seen to take a plausible form, with partially cloudy grid cells prominent near cloud edges and cloud top. From earlier theoretical work, this mixing of cloudy and clear air is believed to have an important impact on buoyancy. However, contrary to expectations based on earlier theoretical studies, the mean statistics of the bulk cloud field are essentially the same in MES and LES; possible reasons for this are discussed, including possible limitations in the present formulation of MES. One difference between LES and MES is seen in the coarse-scale turbulent kinetic energy, which appears to grow slowly in time due to incoherent stochastic fluctuations in the buoyancy. This and other considerations suggest the need for some type of spatial and/or temporal filtering to attenuate undersampling of the stochastic fine-scale processes.

  20. Multiscale eddy simulation for moist atmospheric convection: Preliminary investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stechmann, Samuel N.

    2014-01-01

    A multiscale computational framework is designed for simulating atmospheric convection and clouds. In this multiscale framework, large eddy simulation (LES) is used to model the coarse scales of 100 m and larger, and a stochastic, one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model is used to represent the fine scales of 100 m and smaller. Coupled and evolving together, these two components provide a multiscale eddy simulation (MES). Through its fine-scale turbulence and moist thermodynamics, MES allows coarse grid cells to be partially cloudy and to encompass cloudy–clear air mixing on scales down to 1 m; in contrast, in typical LES such fine-scale processes are not represented or are parameterized using bulk deterministic closures. To illustrate MES and investigate its multiscale dynamics, a shallow cumulus cloud field is simulated. The fine-scale variability is seen to take a plausible form, with partially cloudy grid cells prominent near cloud edges and cloud top. From earlier theoretical work, this mixing of cloudy and clear air is believed to have an important impact on buoyancy. However, contrary to expectations based on earlier theoretical studies, the mean statistics of the bulk cloud field are essentially the same in MES and LES; possible reasons for this are discussed, including possible limitations in the present formulation of MES. One difference between LES and MES is seen in the coarse-scale turbulent kinetic energy, which appears to grow slowly in time due to incoherent stochastic fluctuations in the buoyancy. This and other considerations suggest the need for some type of spatial and/or temporal filtering to attenuate undersampling of the stochastic fine-scale processes

  1. Performance investigation of the pulse and Campbelling modes of a fission chamber using a Poisson pulse train simulation code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elter, Zs. [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation, Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Division of Nuclear Engineering, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Jammes, C., E-mail: christian.jammes@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation, Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Pázsit, I. [Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, Division of Nuclear Engineering, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Pál, L. [Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest 114, POB 49 (Hungary); Filliatre, P. [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation, Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-02-21

    The detectors of the neutron flux monitoring system of the foreseen French GEN-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) will be high temperature fission chambers placed in the reactor vessel in the vicinity of the core. The operation of a fission chamber over a wide-range neutron flux will be feasible provided that the overlap of the applicability of its pulse and Campbelling operational modes is ensured. This paper addresses the question of the linearity of these two modes and it also presents our recent efforts to develop a specific code for the simulation of fission chamber pulse trains. Our developed simulation code is described and its overall verification is shown. An extensive quantitative investigation was performed to explore the applicability limits of these two standard modes. It was found that for short pulses the overlap between the pulse and Campbelling modes can be guaranteed if the standard deviation of the background noise is not higher than 5% of the pulse amplitude. It was also shown that the Campbelling mode is sensitive to parasitic noise, while the performance of the pulse mode is affected by the stochastic amplitude distributions.

  2. FULL-SCALE CHAMBER INVESTIGATION AND SIMULATION OF AIR FRESHENER EMISSIONS IN THE PRESENCE OF OZONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses results of tests, conducted in the EPA large chamber facility, determining emissions and chemical degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from one electrical plug-in type pine-scented air freshener in the presence of ozone supplied by a device markete...

  3. Atmospheric Retrievals from Exoplanet Observations and Simulations with BART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Joseph

    the planet has uniform composition and the same temperature profile everywhere. We do not know this assumption's impact. While Spitzer and HST have few exoplanet observing modes, JWST will have over 20. Given the signal challenges and the complexity of retrieval, modeling the observations and data analysis is the best way to optimize an observing plan. Our project solves all of these problems. Using only open-source codes, with tools available to the community for their immediate application in JWST and HST proposals and analyses, we will produce a faithful simulator of 2D spectral and photometric frames from each JWST exoplanet mode (WFC3 spatial scan mode works already), including jitter and intrapixel effects. We will extract and calibrate data, analyzing them with BART. Given planetary input spectra for terrestrial, super-Earth, Neptune, and Jupiterclass planets, and a variety of stellar spectra, we will determine the best combination of observations to recover each atmosphere, and the limits where low SNR or spectral coverage produce deceptive results. To facilitate these analyses, we will adapt an existing cloud model to BART, add condensate code now being written to its thermochemical model, include scattering, add a 3D atmosphere module (for dayside occultation mapping and the 1D vs. 3D question), and improve performance and documentation, among other improvements. We will host a web site and community discussions online and at conferences about retrieval issues. We will develop validation tests for radiative-transfer and BART-style retrieval codes, and provide examples to validate others' codes. We will engage the retrieval community in data challenges. We will provide web-enabled tools to specify planets easily for modeling. We will make all of these tools, tests, and comparisons available online so everyone can use them to maximize NASA's investment in high-end observing capabilities to characterize exoplanets.

  4. Double chamber ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uman, M.F.; Winnard, J.R.; Winters, H.F.

    1978-01-01

    The ion source is comprised of two discharge chambers one of which is provided with a filament and an aperture leading into the other chamber which in turn has an extraction orifice. A low voltage arc discharge is operated in an inert gas atmosphere in the filament chamber while an arc of higher voltage is operated in the second ionization chamber which contains a vapor which will give the desired dopant ion species. The entire source is immersed in an axial magnetic field parallel to a line connecting the filament, the aperture between the two chambers and the extraction orifice. (author)

  5. Simulation of Martian surface-atmosphere interaction in a space-simulator: Technical considerations and feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehlmann, D.; Kochan, H.

    1992-01-01

    The Space Simulator of the German Aerospace Research Establishment at Cologne, formerly used for testing satellites, is now, since 1987, the central unit within the research sub-program 'Comet-Simulation' (KOSI). The KOSI team has investigated physical processes relevant to comets and their surfaces. As a byproduct we gained experience in sample-handling under simulated space conditions. In broadening the scope of the research activities of the DLR Institute of Space Simulation an extension to 'Laboratory-Planetology' is planned. Following the KOSI-experiments a Mars Surface-Simulation with realistic minerals and surface soil in a suited environment (temperature, pressure, and CO2-atmosphere) is foreseen as the next step. Here, our main interest is centered on thermophysical properties of the Martian surface and energy transport (and related gas transport) through the surface. These laboratory simulation activities can be related to space missions as typical pre-mission and during-the-mission support of the experiments design and operations (simulation in parallel). Post mission experiments for confirmation and interpretation of results are of great value. The physical dimensions of the Space Simulator (cylinder of about 2.5 m diameter and 5 m length) allows for testing and qualification of experimental hardware under realistic Martian conditions.

  6. Weather regimes in past climate atmospheric general circulation model simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kageyama, M.; Ramstein, G. [CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Lab. des Sci. du Climat et de l' Environnement; D' Andrea, F.; Vautard, R. [Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique, Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris (France); Valdes, P.J. [Department of Meteorology, University of Reading (United Kingdom)

    1999-10-01

    We investigate the climates of the present-day, inception of the last glaciation (115000 y ago) and last glacial maximum (21000 y ago) in the extratropical north Atlantic and Europe, as simulated by the laboratoire de Meteorologie dynamique atmospheric general circulation model. We use these simulations to investigate the low-frequency variability of the model in different climates. The aim is to evaluate whether changes in the intraseasonal variability, which we characterize using weather regimes, can help describe the impact of different boundary conditions on climate and give a better understanding of climate change processes. Weather regimes are defined as the most recurrent patterns in the 500 hPa geopotential height, using a clustering algorithm method. The regimes found in the climate simulations of the present-day and inception of the last glaciation are similar in their number and their structure. It is the regimes' populations which are found to be different for these climates, with an increase of the model's blocked regime and a decrease in the zonal regime at the inception of the last glaciation. This description reinforces the conclusions from a study of the differences between the climatological averages of the different runs and confirms the northeastward shift to the tail of the Atlantic storm-track, which would favour more precipitation over the site of growth of the Fennoscandian ice-sheet. On the other hand, the last glacial maximum results over this sector are not found to be classifiable, showing that the change in boundary conditions can be responsible for severe changes in the weather regime and low-frequency dynamics. The LGM Atlantic low-frequency variability appears to be dominated by a large-scale retrogressing wave with a period 40 to 50 days. (orig.)

  7. Performance and simulation of a double-gap resistive plate chamber in the avalanche mode

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn Sung Hwan; Hong Byung Sik; Hong Seong Jong; Ito, M; Kang, T I; Kim, B I; Kim, J H; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee Hyup Woo; Lee, K B; Lee Kyong Sei; Lee Seok Jae; Lim, J K; Moon, D H; Nam, S K; Park, S; Park, W J; Rhee June Tak; Ryu, M S; Sim Kwang Souk

    2004-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the time and the charge signals of a prototype double-gap resistive plate chamber for the endcap region of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The chamber was built with relatively low-resistivity bakelite. The time and the charge results demonstrate that the high- voltage plateau, which satisfies various CMS requirements for the efficiency, the noise cluster rate, the fraction of the large signal, and the streamer probability, can be extended at least up to 400 V with the present design. In addition, a simple avalanche multiplication model is studied in detail. The model can reproduce the experimental charge spectra reasonably well. The charge information enables us to estimate the effective Townsend coefficient in avalanche-mode operation.

  8. Simulations in the Analysis of Experimental Data Measured by BM@N Drift Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorišin, Ján

    2018-02-01

    The drift chambers (DCH's) are an important part of the tracking system of the BM@N experiment designed to study the production of baryonic matter at the Nuclotron energies. The method of particle hit and track reconstruction in the drift chambers has been already proposed and tested on the BM@N deuteron beam data. In this study the DCH's are first locally and globally aligned, and subsequently the consistency of the track reconstruction chain is tested by two methods. The first one is based on the backward extrapolation of the DCH reconstructed deuteron beam to a position where its deflection in the BM@N magnetic field begins. The second method reconstructs the deuteron beam momentum through its deflection angle. Both methods confirm correctness of the track reconstruction algorithm.

  9. Pre-launch simulation experiment of microwave-ionosphere nonlinear interaction rocket experiment in the space plasma chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, N. (Kobe University, Kobe, Japan); Tsutsui, M. (Kyoto University, Uji, Japan); Matsumoto, H. (Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan)

    1980-09-01

    A pre-flight test experiment of a microwave-ionosphere nonlinear interaction rocket experiment (MINIX) has been carried out in a space plasma simulation chamber. Though the first rocket experiment ended up in failure because of a high voltage trouble, interesting results are observed in the pre-flight experiment. A significant microwave heating of plasma up to 300% temperature increase is observed. Strong excitations of plasma waves by the transmitted microwaves in the VLF and HF range are observed as well. These microwave effects may have to be taken into account in solar power satellite projects in the future.

  10. Response of the rhizosphere prokaryotic community of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration in open-top chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szoboszlay, Márton; Näther, Astrid; Mitterbauer, Esther; Bender, Jürgen; Weigel, Hans-Joachim; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2017-08-01

    The effect of elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentration [CO 2 ] on the diversity and composition of the prokaryotic community inhabiting the rhizosphere of winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) was investigated in a field experiment, using open-top chambers. Rhizosphere samples were collected at anthesis (flowering stage) from six chambers with ambient [CO 2 ] (approximately 400 ppm) and six chambers with elevated [CO 2 ] (700 ppm). The V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene was PCR-amplified from the extracted DNA and sequenced on an Illumina MiSeq instrument. Above-ground plant biomass was not affected by elevated [CO 2 ] at anthesis, but plants exposed to elevated [CO 2 ] had significantly higher grain yield. The composition of the rhizosphere prokaryotic communities was very similar under ambient and elevated [CO 2 ]. The dominant taxa were Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, Alpha-, Gamma-, and Betaproteobacteria. Elevated [CO 2 ] resulted in lower prokaryotic diversity in the rhizosphere, but did not cause a significant difference in community structure. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Bacillus subtilis spore survival and expression of germination-induced bioluminescence after prolonged incubation under simulated Mars atmospheric pressure and composition: implications for planetary protection and lithopanspermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Wayne L.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial endospores in the genus Bacillus are considered good models for studying interplanetary transfer of microbes by natural or human processes. Although spore survival during transfer itself has been the subject of considerable study, the fate of spores in extraterrestrial environments has received less attention. In this report we subjected spores of a strain of Bacillus subtilis, containing luciferase resulting from expression of an sspB-luxAB gene fusion, to simulated martian atmospheric pressure (7-18 mbar) and composition (100% CO(2)) for up to 19 days in a Mars simulation chamber. We report here that survival was similar between spores exposed to Earth conditions and spores exposed up to 19 days to simulated martian conditions. However, germination-induced bioluminescence was lower in spores exposed to simulated martian atmosphere, which suggests sublethal impairment of some endogenous spore germination processes.

  12. A comparative study of accelerated tests to simulate atmospheric corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis, Sergio Luiz de

    2000-01-01

    In this study, specimens coated with five organic coating systems were exposed to accelerated tests for periods up to 2000 hours, and also to weathering for two years and six months. The accelerated tests consisted of the salt spray test, according to ASTM B-117; Prohesion (ASTM G 85-98 annex 5A); Prohesion combined with cyclic exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation; 'Prohchuva' a test described by ASTM G 85-98 using a salt spray with composition that simulated the acid rain of Sao Paulo, but one thousand times more concentrated, and 'Prohchuva' combined with cyclic exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation. The coated specimens were exposed with and without incision to expose the substrate. The onset and progress of corrosion at and of the exposed metallic surface, besides coating degradation, were followed by visual observation, and photographs were taken. The coating systems were classified according to the extent of corrosion protection given to the substrate, using a method based on ASTM standards D-610, D-714, D-1654 and D-3359. The rankings of the coatings obtained from accelerated tests and weathering were compared and contrasted with classification of the same systems obtained from literature, for specimens exposed to an industrial atmosphere. Coating degradation was strongly dependent on the test, and could be attributed to differences in test conditions. The best correlation between accelerated test and weathering was found for the test Prohesion alternated with cycles of exposure to UV-A radiation and condensation. (author)

  13. Seasonal changes in the atmospheric heat balance simulated by the GISS general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, P. H.; Chow, S.; Helfand, H. M.; Quirk, W. J.; Somerville, R. C. J.

    1975-01-01

    Tests of the ability of numerical general circulation models to simulate the atmosphere have focussed so far on simulations of the January climatology. These models generally present boundary conditions such as sea surface temperature, but this does not prevent testing their ability to simulate seasonal changes in atmospheric processes that accompany presented seasonal changes in boundary conditions. Experiments to simulate changes in the zonally averaged heat balance are discussed since many simplified models of climatic processes are based solely on this balance.

  14. Simulations in the Analysis of Experimental Data Measured by BM@N Drift Chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorišin Ján

    2018-01-01

    The method of particle hit and track reconstruction in the drift chambers has been already proposed and tested on the BM@N deuteron beam data. In this study the DCH’s are first locally and globally aligned, and subsequently the consistency of the track reconstruction chain is tested by two methods. The first one is based on the backward extrapolation of the DCH reconstructed deuteron beam to a position where its deflection in the BM@N magnetic field begins. The second method reconstructs the deuteron beam momentum through its deflection angle. Both methods confirm correctness of the track reconstruction algorithm.

  15. Numerical simulation of thermal-hydraulic processes in the riser chamber of installation for clinker production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borsuk Grzegorz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinker burning process has a decisive influence on energy consumption and the cost of cement production. A new problem is to use the process of decarbonization of alternative fuels from waste. These issues are particularly important in the introduction of a two-stage combustion of fuel in a rotary kiln without the typical reactor-decarbonizator. This work presents results of numerical studies on thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the riser chamber, which will be designed to burn fuel in the system where combustion air is supplied separately from the clinker cooler. The mathematical model is based on a combination of two methods of motion description: Euler description for the gas phase and Lagrange description for particles. Heat transfer between particles of raw material and gas was added to the numerical calculations. The main aim of the research was finding the correct fractional distribution of particles. For assumed particle distribution on the first stage of work, authors noted that all particles were carried away by the upper outlet to the preheater tower, what is not corresponding to the results of experimental studies. The obtained results of calculations can be the basis for further optimization of the design and operating conditions in the riser chamber with the implementation of the system.

  16. Comprehensive Fuel Spray Modeling and Impacts on Chamber Acoustics in Combustion Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    performed at atmospheric pressure with and without a co-flow of air around the fuel injector. The fuel flow rate is measured across a cavitating venturi...addition to the 4L mode at 1425 Hz, the other distinct frequencies observed are 3000, 6000 and 9500 Hz. Hydrodynamic instability (or the so- called

  17. [Effects of elevated ozone on Pinus armandii growth: a simulation study with open-top chamber].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Fu; Liu, Chen; He, Xing-Yuan; Ruan, Ya-Nan; Xu, Sheng; Chen, Zhen-Ju; Peng, Jun-Jie; Li, Teng

    2013-10-01

    By using open-top chamber (OTC) and the techniques of dendrochronology, this paper studied the growth of Pinus armandii under elevated ozone, and explored the evolution dynamics and adaptation mechanisms of typical forest ecosystems to ozone enrichment. Elevated ozone inhibited the stem growth of P. armandii significantly, with the annual growth of the stem length and diameter reduced by 35.0% and 12.9%, respectively. The annual growth of tree-ring width and the annual ring cells number decreased by 11.5% and 54.1%, respectively, but no significant change was observed in the diameter of tracheid. At regional scale, the fluctuation of ozone concentration showed significant correlation with the variation of local vegetation growth (NDVI).

  18. Atmospheric families with SEγ > 100 TeV detected in nuclear emulsion and lead chambers exposed at Chacaltaya Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, R.H.C.

    1980-03-01

    Hadromic interactions from cosmic radiation with observed energy greater than 100TeV, using a high statistics, are analyzed. Only hadronic interactions in the atmosphere are considered, using a method in which the height of the interactions is implicitly taking into account. The data belong to the Brazil-Japan Collaboration. (L.C.) [pt

  19. Hybrid Simulation of the Interaction of Europa's Atmosphere with the Jovian Plasma: Multiprocessor Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dols, V. J.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.; Cassidy, T. A.; Crary, F. J.

    2014-12-01

    We model the interaction of Europa's tenuous atmosphere with the plasma of Jupiter's torus with an improved version of our hybrid plasma code. In a hybrid plasma code, the ions are treated as kinetic Macro-particles moving under the Lorentz force and the electrons as a fluid leading to a generalized formulation of Ohm's law. In this version, the spatial simulation domain is decomposed in 2 directions and is non-uniform in the plasma convection direction. The code is run on a multi-processor supercomputer that offers 16416 cores and 2GB Ram per core. This new version allows us to tap into the large memory of the supercomputer and simulate the full interaction volume (Reuropa=1561km) with a high spatial resolution (50km). Compared to Io, Europa's atmosphere is about 100 times more tenuous, the ambient magnetic field is weaker and the density of incident plasma is lower. Consequently, the electrodynamic interaction is also weaker and substantial fluxes of thermal torus ions might reach and sputter the icy surface. Molecular O2 is the dominant atmospheric product of this surface sputtering. Observations of oxygen UV emissions (specifically the ratio of OI 1356A / 1304A emissions) are roughly consistent with an atmosphere that is composed predominantely of O2 with a small amount of atomic O. Galileo observations along flybys close to Europa have revealed the existence of induced currents in a conducting ocean under the icy crust. They also showed that, from flyby to flyby, the plasma interaction is very variable. Asymmetries of the plasma density and temperature in the wake of Europa were also observed and still elude a clear explanation. Galileo mag data also detected ion cyclotron waves, which is an indication of heavy ion pickup close to the moon. We prescribe an O2 atmosphere with a vertical density column consistent with UV observations and model the plasma properties along several Galileo flybys of the moon. We compare our results with the magnetometer

  20. Calibration simulation. A calibration Monte-Carlo program for the OPAL jet chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biebel, O.

    1989-12-01

    A calibration Monte Carlo program has been developed as a tool to investigate the interdependence of track reconstruction and calibration constants. Three categories of calibration effects have been considered: The precise knowledge of sense wire positions, necessary to reconstruct the particle trajectories in the jet chamber. Included are the staggering and the sag of the sense wires as well as tilts and rotations of their support structures. The various contributions to the measured drift time, with special emphasis on the aberration due to the track angle and the presence of a transverse magnetic field. A very precise knowledge of the drift velocity and the Lorentz angle of the drift paths with respect to the drift field is also required. The effects degrading particle identification via energy loss dE/dx. Impurities of the gas mixture and saturation effects depending on the track angle as well as the influence of the pulse shaping-electronics have been studied. These effects have been parametrised with coefficients corresponding to the calibration constants required for track reconstruction. Excellent agreement with the input data has been achieved when determining calibration constants from Monte Carlo data generated with these parametrisations. (orig.) [de

  1. Simulation of atmospheric oxidation capacity in Houston, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air quality model simulations are performed and evaluated for Houston using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. The simulations use two different emissions estimates: the EPA 2005 National Emissions Inventory (NEI) and the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality ...

  2. Intercomparison of oceanic and atmospheric forced and coupled mesoscale simulations. Part I: Surface fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josse, P.; Caniaux, G.; Giordani, H.; Planton, S.

    1999-04-01

    A mesoscale non-hydrostatic atmospheric model has been coupled with a mesoscale oceanic model. The case study is a four-day simulation of a strong storm event observed during the SEMAPHORE experiment over a 500 × 500 km2 domain. This domain encompasses a thermohaline front associated with the Azores current. In order to analyze the effect of mesoscale coupling, three simulations are compared: the first one with the atmospheric model forced by realistic sea surface temperature analyses; the second one with the ocean model forced by atmospheric fields, derived from weather forecast re-analyses; the third one with the models being coupled. For these three simulations the surface fluxes were computed with the same bulk parametrization. All three simulations succeed well in representing the main oceanic or atmospheric features observed during the storm. Comparison of surface fields with in situ observations reveals that the winds of the fine mesh atmospheric model are more realistic than those of the weather forecast re-analyses. The low-level winds simulated with the atmospheric model in the forced and coupled simulations are appreciably stronger than the re-analyzed winds. They also generate stronger fluxes. The coupled simulation has the strongest surface heat fluxes: the difference in the net heat budget with the oceanic forced simulation reaches on average 50 Wm-2 over the simulation period. Sea surface-temperature cooling is too weak in both simulations, but is improved in the coupled run and matches better the cooling observed with drifters. The spatial distributions of sea surface-temperature cooling and surface fluxes are strongly inhomogeneous over the simulation domain. The amplitude of the flux variation is maximum in the coupled run. Moreover the weak correlation between the cooling and heat flux patterns indicates that the surface fluxes are not responsible for the whole cooling and suggests that the response of the ocean mixed layer to the atmosphere is

  3. The triple oxygen isotope composition of phytoliths as a proxy of continental atmospheric humidity: insights from climate chamber and climate transect calibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alexandre

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Continental atmospheric relative humidity (RH is a key climate parameter. Combined with atmospheric temperature, it allows us to estimate the concentration of atmospheric water vapor, which is one of the main components of the global water cycle and the most important gas contributing to the natural greenhouse effect. However, there is a lack of proxies suitable for reconstructing, in a quantitative way, past changes of continental atmospheric humidity. This reduces the possibility of making model–data comparisons necessary for the implementation of climate models. Over the past 10 years, analytical developments have enabled a few laboratories to reach sufficient precision for measuring the triple oxygen isotopes, expressed by the 17O-excess (17O-excess  =  ln (δ17O + 1 – 0.528  ×  ln (δ18O + 1, in water, water vapor and minerals. The 17O-excess represents an alternative to deuterium-excess for investigating relative humidity conditions that prevail during water evaporation. Phytoliths are micrometric amorphous silica particles that form continuously in living plants. Phytolith morphological assemblages from soils and sediments are commonly used as past vegetation and hydrous stress indicators. In the present study, we examine whether changes in atmospheric RH imprint the 17O-excess of phytoliths in a measurable way and whether this imprint offers a potential for reconstructing past RH. For that purpose, we first monitored the 17O-excess evolution of soil water, grass leaf water and grass phytoliths in response to changes in RH (from 40 to 100 % in a growth chamber experiment where transpiration reached a steady state. Decreasing RH from 80 to 40 % decreases the 17O-excess of phytoliths by 4.1 per meg/% as a result of kinetic fractionation of the leaf water subject to evaporation. In order to model with accuracy the triple oxygen isotope fractionation in play in plant water and in phytoliths we recommend direct and

  4. The Xenon Test Chamber Q-SUN® for testing realistic tolerances of fungi exposed to simulated full spectrum solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Luciana P; Araújo, Claudinéia A S; Pupin, Breno; Ferreira, Paulo C; Braga, Gilberto Ú L; Rangel, Drauzio E N

    2018-06-01

    The low survival of insect-pathogenic fungi when used for insect control in agriculture is mainly due to the deleterious effects of ultraviolet radiation and heat from solar irradiation. In this study, conidia of 15 species of entomopathogenic fungi were exposed to simulated full-spectrum solar radiation emitted by a Xenon Test Chamber Q-SUN XE-3-HC 340S (Q-LAB ® Corporation, Westlake, OH, USA), which very closely simulates full-spectrum solar radiation. A dendrogram obtained from cluster analyses, based on lethal time 50 % and 90 % calculated by Probit analyses, separated the fungi into three clusters: cluster 3 contains species with highest tolerance to simulated full-spectrum solar radiation, included Metarhizium acridum, Cladosporium herbarum, and Trichothecium roseum with LT 50  > 200 min irradiation. Cluster 2 contains eight species with moderate UV tolerance: Aschersonia aleyrodis, Isaria fumosorosea, Mariannaea pruinosa, Metarhizium anisopliae, Metarhizium brunneum, Metarhizium robertsii, Simplicillium lanosoniveum, and Torrubiella homopterorum with LT 50 between 120 and 150 min irradiation. The four species in cluster 1 had the lowest UV tolerance: Lecanicillium aphanocladii, Beauveria bassiana, Tolypocladium cylindrosporum, and Tolypocladium inflatum with LT 50  solar radiation before. We conclude that the equipment provided an excellent tool for testing realistic tolerances of fungi to full-spectrum solar radiation of microbial agents for insect biological control in agriculture. Copyright © 2018 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular size evolution of oligomers in organic aerosols collected in urban atmospheres and generated in a smog chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberer, Markus; Sax, Mirjam; Samburova, Vera

    2006-10-01

    Only a minor fraction of the total organic aerosol mass can be resolved on a molecular level. High molecular weight compounds in organic aerosols have recently gained much attention because this class of compound potentially explains a major fraction of the unexplained organic aerosol mass. These compounds have been identified with different mass spectrometric methods, and compounds with molecular masses up to 1000 Da are found in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from aromatic and terpene precursors in smog chamber experiments. Here, we apply matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to SOA particles from two biogenic precursors, alpha-pinene and isoprene. Similar oligomer patterns are found in these two SOA systems, but also in SOA from trimethylbenzene, an anthropogenic SOA precursor. However, different maxima molecular sizes were measured for these three SOA systems. While oligomers in alpha-pinene and isoprene have sizes mostly below 600-700 Da, they grow up to about 1000 Da in trimethylbenzene-SOA. The final molecular size of the oligomers is reached early during the particle aging process, whereas other particle properties related to aging, such as the overall acid concentration or the oligomer concentration, increase continuously over a much longer time scale. This kinetic behavior of the oligomer molecular size growth can be explained by a chain growth kinetic regime. Similar oligomer mass patterns were measured in aqueous extracts of ambient aerosol samples (measured with the same technique). Distinct differences between summer and winter were observed. In summer a few single mass peaks were measured with much higher intensity than in winter, pointing to a possible difference in the formation processes of these compounds in winter and summer.

  6. Exobiological implications of dust aggregation in planetary atmospheres: An experiment for the gas-grain simulation facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, J. L.; Schwartz, D. E.; Marshall, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    The Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) will provide a microgravity environment where undesirable environmental effects are reduced, and thus, experiments involving interactions between small particles and grains can be more suitably performed. Slated for flight aboard the Shuttle in 1992, the ESA glovebox will serve as a scientific and technological testbed for GGSF exobiology experiments as well as generating some basic scientific data. Initial glovebox experiments will test a method of generating a stable, mono-dispersed cloud of fine particles using a vibrating sprinkler system. In the absence of gravity and atmospheric turbulence, it will be possible to determine the influence of interparticle forces in controlling the rate and mode of aggregation. The experimental chamber can be purged of suspended matter to enable multiple repetitions of the experiments. Of particular interest will be the number of particles per unit volume of the chamber, because it is suspected that aggregation will occur extremely rapidly if the number exceeds a critical value. All aggregation events will be recorded on high-resolution video film. Changes in the experimental procedure as a result of surprise events will be accompanied by real-time interaction with the mission specialist during the Shuttle flight.

  7. SU-E-T-242: Monte Carlo Simulations Used to Test the Perturbation of a Reference Ion Chamber Prototype Used for Small Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez Quino, L; Calvo, O; Huerta, C; DeWeese, M [Midsouth Radation Physics, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the perturbation due to the use of a novel Reference Ion Chamber designed to measure small field dosimetry (KermaX Plus C by IBA). Methods: Using the Phase-space files for TrueBeam photon beams available by Varian in IAEA-compliant format for 6 and 15 MV. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc to investigate the perturbation introduced by a reference chamber into the PDDs and profiles measured in water tank. Field sizes ranging from 1×1, 2×2,3×3, 5×5 cm2 were simulated for both energies with and without a 0.5 mm foil of Aluminum which is equivalent to the attenuation equivalent of the reference chamber specifications in a water phantom of 30×30×30 cm3 and a pixel resolution of 2 mm. The PDDs, profiles, and gamma analysis of the simulations were performed as well as a energy spectrum analysis of the phase-space files generated during the simulation. Results: Examination of the energy spectrum analysis performed shown a very small increment of the energy spectrum at the build-up region but no difference is appreciated after dmax. The PDD, profiles and gamma analysis had shown a very good agreement among the simulations with and without the Al foil, with a gamma analysis with a criterion of 2% and 2mm resulting in 99.9% of the points passing this criterion. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential benefits of using the KermaX Plus C as reference chamber in the measurement of PDD and Profiles for small fields since the perturbation due to in the presence of the chamber the perturbation is minimal and the chamber can be considered transparent to the photon beam.

  8. Developement of proportional chamber detectors and simulations to measure charm hadrons in antiproton-proton annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, A.

    2005-07-01

    The present thesis describes the results of the simulation and the design of the tracking system of the anti PANDA detector together with the study of the physics efficiency of the complete system. The central tracking system of the proposed anti PANDA at FAIR/Darmstadt was studied by Monte-Carlo simulations. From this a spatial resolution of 20 μm for the micro-vertex detector (MVD) resulted. A new, more realistic design of the MVD was established on the base of the simulation results, in order to reach a better balance between the physical and technical requirements. It was shown that a momentum resolution of 0.4% can be reached with the straw-tube tracker (SST). The chosen gas mixture of Ar+10% CO 2 combines the measured good spatial resolution of ∝120 μm with a drift time of less than 100 ns, which is necessary in order to process the high hit rates. With a straw-tube prototype it was shown that is is possible, to determine the z coordinate from the measurement od the signal charge on both ends of the tube. A resolution of 8.9 mm or of 0.6% of the tube length was reached. Basing on these measurements a new design of the SST without a stereo-angle between single layers was proposed. The study of the only very unprecisely known charmonium spectrum above the d anti d threshold is one of the most important aspects of the anti PANDA physics program. In order to check, whether the anti PANDA detector fulfils the physical requirements the reactions: anti pp→ψ(3770)toD anti D and anti pp→ψ(4040)→D *+ D *- were studied as benchmark processes. A resolution of the invariant mass of 10 and of 16 MeV/c were demonstrated for the ψ(3770) respectively the ψ(4040). It was furthermore shown that the necessary background suppression by the factor 10 10 is reached. The widths of the states D * sJ (2317) + and D sJ (2460) + can be measured with a precission of better than 100 keV because of the excellent beam quality of the HESR storage ring. The reconstruction

  9. Transient simulation of chamber flowfield in a rod-and-tube configuration solid rocket motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, J.T.; Stowe, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Currently, DRDC Valcartier of the Canadian Department of National Defence is designing a prototype rod-and-tube configuration solid propellant rocket motor that will propel a hypersonic velocity missile. This configuration will incorporate a very low port-to-throat area ratio, which in turn results in very high velocity propellant gas traveling across burning propellant surfaces, particularly near the nozzle end of the rocket. This causes an augmentation in the propellant burning rate. While numerical and lumped parameter models are available to design and analyze solid propellant rocket motors and nozzles, many of them provide solutions based on the assumption of quasi-steady flow. Due to the high pressure, high velocity and highly transient nature of the flows expected in the motor under design, it is believed that a CFD simulation will better model the time-dependent phenomena that occur during the functioning of a motor of this type. This simulation couples the fluid dynamics and heat transfer of the gas flowfield within the rocket port to the nozzle and the regression rate of the propellant. By incorporating the regression of the propellant surfaces into the model, the information provided by the resulting time-accurate solution will enable a much improved understanding of the flow phenomena within this rod-and-tube grain motor and a better prediction of the internal ballistics of the motor, which in turn will help in the design of both the motor and the nozzle. (author)

  10. Transient simulation of chamber flowfield in a rod-and-tube configuration solid rocket motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, J.T. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: jrweaver@storm.ca; Stowe, R.A. [Defence R and D Canada - Valcartier, Val-Belair, Quebec (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Currently, DRDC Valcartier of the Canadian Department of National Defence is designing a prototype rod-and-tube configuration solid propellant rocket motor that will propel a hypersonic velocity missile. This configuration will incorporate a very low port-to-throat area ratio, which in turn results in very high velocity propellant gas traveling across burning propellant surfaces, particularly near the nozzle end of the rocket. This causes an augmentation in the propellant burning rate. While numerical and lumped parameter models are available to design and analyze solid propellant rocket motors and nozzles, many of them provide solutions based on the assumption of quasi-steady flow. Due to the high pressure, high velocity and highly transient nature of the flows expected in the motor under design, it is believed that a CFD simulation will better model the time-dependent phenomena that occur during the functioning of a motor of this type. This simulation couples the fluid dynamics and heat transfer of the gas flowfield within the rocket port to the nozzle and the regression rate of the propellant. By incorporating the regression of the propellant surfaces into the model, the information provided by the resulting time-accurate solution will enable a much improved understanding of the flow phenomena within this rod-and-tube grain motor and a better prediction of the internal ballistics of the motor, which in turn will help in the design of both the motor and the nozzle. (author)

  11. SU-F-T-362: Quantification and Modelling of the Ionization Chamber Simulation Effective Points On Monaco Treatment Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R; Bai, W [The Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Because of statistical noise in Monte Carlo dose calculations, effective point doses may not be accurate. Volume spheres are useful for evaluating dose in Monte Carlo plans, which have an inherent statistical uncertainty.We use a user-defined sphere volume instead of a point, take sphere sampling around effective point make the dose statistics to decrease the stochastic errors. Methods: Direct dose measurements were made using a 0.125cc Semiflex ion chamber (IC) 31010 isocentrically placed in the center of a homogeneous Cylindric sliced RW3 phantom (PTW, Germany).In the scanned CT phantom series the sensitive volume length of the IC (6.5mm) were delineated and defined the isocenter as the simulation effective points. All beams were simulated in Monaco in accordance to the measured model. In our simulation using 2mm voxels calculation grid spacing and choose calculate dose to medium and request the relative standard deviation ≤0.5%. Taking three different assigned IC over densities (air electron density(ED) as 0.01g/cm3 default CT scanned ED and Esophageal lumen ED 0.21g/cm3) were tested at different sampling sphere radius (2.5, 2, 1.5 and 1 mm) statistics dose were compared with the measured does. Results: The results show that in the Monaco TPS for the IC using Esophageal lumen ED 0.21g/cm3 and sampling sphere radius 1.5mm the statistical value is the best accordance with the measured value, the absolute average percentage deviation is 0.49%. And when the IC using air electron density(ED) as 0.01g/cm3 and default CT scanned EDthe recommented statistical sampling sphere radius is 2.5mm, the percentage deviation are 0.61% and 0.70%, respectivly. Conclusion: In Monaco treatment planning system for the ionization chamber 31010 recommend air cavity using ED 0.21g/cm3 and sampling 1.5mm sphere volume instead of a point dose to decrease the stochastic errors. Funding Support No.C201505006.

  12. Modeling and simulation of critical parameters of the first chamber of the dimuon arm spectrometer of the Alice experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guez, D.

    2003-10-01

    The Alice experiment that is dedicated to the study of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions, will take place in the future large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN. The dimuon arm spectrometer of the Alice experiment is devoted to the search of a new signature of the existence of the quark gluon plasma (QGP). The first chapter is dedicated to the physics notions linked to the study of QGP, a few signatures are proposed for the detection of QGP, particularly the signature concerning the production rate of quarkonium. The second chapter deals with particle detection involved in Alice experiment, the dimuon arm spectrometer is a detector dedicated to the track reconstruction of muons issued from the decay of heavy mesons from J/Ψ and Υ families. The third and the fourth chapters present the studies made to integrate a reliable model of the dimuon arm in the global simulation code of Alice (Aliroot). The fifth chapter presents the software TB 2 that has been developed within the framework of this thesis in order to check and control the output data when the detector is tested with a real particle beam. The sixth chapter presents the results of the tests that have been performed with a 7 GeV/c pion beam. These tests have shown that the electronic noise is coherent with the specifications of Alice experiment. A factor 1,8 between the highest and the weakest values of the gain has been measured in the chamber. The detection efficiency of the chamber has been estimated to 99% in the different cases studied. (A.C.)

  13. Simulation of atmospheric dispersion of radioactivity from the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, R.; Sullivan, T.J.; Gudiksen, P.H.

    1989-07-01

    Measurements of airborne radioactivity over Europe, Japan, and the United States indicated that the release from the Chernobyl reactor accident in the Soviet Union on April 26, 1986 contained a wide spectrum of fission up to heights of 7 km or more within a few days after the initial explosion. This high-altitude presence of radioactivity would in part be attributable to atmospheric dynamics factors other than the thermal energy released in the initial explosion. Indications were that two types of releases had taken place -- an initial powerful explosion followed by days of a less energetic reactor fire. The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) utilized three-dimensional atmospheric dispersion models to determine the characteristics of the source term (release) and the evolution of the spatial distributions of the airborne radioactivity as it was transported over Europe and subsequently over the northern hemisphere. This paper describes the ARAC involvement and the results of the hemispheric model calculations which graphically depict the extensive dispersal of radioactivity. 1 fig

  14. Intercomparison of oceanic and atmospheric forced and coupled mesoscale simulations Part I: Surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Josse

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available A mesoscale non-hydrostatic atmospheric model has been coupled with a mesoscale oceanic model. The case study is a four-day simulation of a strong storm event observed during the SEMAPHORE experiment over a 500 × 500 km2 domain. This domain encompasses a thermohaline front associated with the Azores current. In order to analyze the effect of mesoscale coupling, three simulations are compared: the first one with the atmospheric model forced by realistic sea surface temperature analyses; the second one with the ocean model forced by atmospheric fields, derived from weather forecast re-analyses; the third one with the models being coupled. For these three simulations the surface fluxes were computed with the same bulk parametrization. All three simulations succeed well in representing the main oceanic or atmospheric features observed during the storm. Comparison of surface fields with in situ observations reveals that the winds of the fine mesh atmospheric model are more realistic than those of the weather forecast re-analyses. The low-level winds simulated with the atmospheric model in the forced and coupled simulations are appreciably stronger than the re-analyzed winds. They also generate stronger fluxes. The coupled simulation has the strongest surface heat fluxes: the difference in the net heat budget with the oceanic forced simulation reaches on average 50 Wm-2 over the simulation period. Sea surface-temperature cooling is too weak in both simulations, but is improved in the coupled run and matches better the cooling observed with drifters. The spatial distributions of sea surface-temperature cooling and surface fluxes are strongly inhomogeneous over the simulation domain. The amplitude of the flux variation is maximum in the coupled run. Moreover the weak correlation between the cooling and heat flux patterns indicates that the surface fluxes are not responsible for the whole cooling and suggests that the response of the ocean mixed layer

  15. Intercomparison of oceanic and atmospheric forced and coupled mesoscale simulations Part I: Surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Giordani

    Full Text Available A mesoscale non-hydrostatic atmospheric model has been coupled with a mesoscale oceanic model. The case study is a four-day simulation of a strong storm event observed during the SEMAPHORE experiment over a 500 × 500 km2 domain. This domain encompasses a thermohaline front associated with the Azores current. In order to analyze the effect of mesoscale coupling, three simulations are compared: the first one with the atmospheric model forced by realistic sea surface temperature analyses; the second one with the ocean model forced by atmospheric fields, derived from weather forecast re-analyses; the third one with the models being coupled. For these three simulations the surface fluxes were computed with the same bulk parametrization. All three simulations succeed well in representing the main oceanic or atmospheric features observed during the storm. Comparison of surface fields with in situ observations reveals that the winds of the fine mesh atmospheric model are more realistic than those of the weather forecast re-analyses. The low-level winds simulated with the atmospheric model in the forced and coupled simulations are appreciably stronger than the re-analyzed winds. They also generate stronger fluxes. The coupled simulation has the strongest surface heat fluxes: the difference in the net heat budget with the oceanic forced simulation reaches on average 50 Wm-2 over the simulation period. Sea surface-temperature cooling is too weak in both simulations, but is improved in the coupled run and matches better the cooling observed with drifters. The spatial distributions of sea surface-temperature cooling and surface fluxes are strongly inhomogeneous over the simulation domain. The amplitude of the flux variation is maximum in the coupled run. Moreover the weak correlation between the cooling and heat flux patterns indicates that the surface fluxes are not responsible for the whole cooling and suggests that the response of the ocean mixed layer

  16. Simulation of a 5MW wind turbine in an atmospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meister, Konrad; Lutz, Thorsten; Krämer, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    This article presents detached eddy simulation (DES) results of a 5MW wind turbine in an unsteady atmospheric boundary layer. The evaluation performed in this article focuses on turbine blade loads as well as on the influence of atmospheric turbulence and tower on blade loads. Therefore, the turbulence transport of the atmospheric boundary layer to the turbine position is analyzed. To determine the influence of atmospheric turbulence on wind turbines the blade load spectrum is evaluated and compared to wind turbine simulation results with uniform inflow. Moreover, the influences of different frequency regimes and the tower on the blade loads are discussed. Finally, the normal force coefficient spectrum is analyzed at three different radial positions and the influence of tower and atmospheric turbulence is shown

  17. Enhancement of precision and accuracy by Monte-Carlo simulation of a well-type pressurized ionization chamber used in radionuclide metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryeziu, D.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to test and validate the Monte-Carlo (MC) ionization chamber simulation method in calculating the activity of radioactive solutions. This is required when no or not sufficient experimental calibration figures are available as well as to improve the accuracy of activity measurements for other radionuclides. Well-type or 4π γ ISOCAL IV ionization chambers (IC) are widely used in many national standard laboratories around the world. As secondary standard measuring systems these radionuclide calibrators serve to maintain measurement consistency checks and to ensure the quality of standards disseminated to users for a wide range of radionuclide where many of them are with special interest in nuclear medicine as well as in different applications on radionuclide metrology. For the studied radionuclides the calibration figures (efficiencies) and their respective volume correction factors are determined by using the PENELOPE MC computer code system. The ISOCAL IV IC filled with nitrogen gas at approximately 1 MPa is simulated. The simulated models of the chamber are designed by means of reduced quadric equation and applying the appropriate mathematical transformations. The simulations are done for various container geometries of the standard solution which take forms of: i) sealed Jena glass 5 ml PTB standard ampoule, ii) 10 ml (P6) vial and iii) 10 R Schott Type 1+ vial. Simulation of the ISOCAL IV IC is explained. The effect of density variation of the nitrogen filling gas on the sensitivity of the chamber is investigated. The code is also used to examine the effects of using lead and copper shields as well as to evaluate the sensitivity of the chamber to electrons and positrons. Validation of the Monte-Carlo simulation method has been proved by comparing the Monte-Carlo simulation calculated and experimental calibration figures available from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) England which are deduced from the absolute activity

  18. Electron beam injection and associated phenomena as observed in a large space simulation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beghin, C.; Arnal, Y.; Delahaye, J.Y.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter describes an experiment whose main purpose was to perform a simulation under conditions where the ambient neutral and ionized gas, magnetic field strength and lay-out of the different packages were as close as possible to those anticipated for the First Spacelab Flight (FSLP) mission. Phenomena Induced by Charged Particle Beams (PICPAB) are planned to be investigated during the FSLP using a Euopean payload. The PICPAB experiment consists of two accelerators of electron and ion beams and associated diagnostic instruments including wave receivers, thermal plasma probes and return current particle energy-analyzers. The main results of the test with the electron beam are reported. Topics considered include the experimental configuration; a transverse dc electric field in the absence of background plasma; a transverse dc electric field in the background plasma; ambient plasma response; a high-frequency electric field; return current characteristics; and collector vs. plasma behavior. The complexity of the beam-plasma-collector-gun system is shown where nonlinear processes are generated in several consecutive steps. It is concluded that under the peculiar conditions described (with the beam propagation distance shorter than the first node focalization length and nearly zero pitch-angle injection, neutral gas pressure ranging from less to 10 -6 up to 10 -4 torr), the beam plasma discharge was never triggered

  19. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma O'Brien, Ella; Foing, Bernard; Pascale, Ehrenfreund

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates a plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examined.

  20. Technical Note: A minimally invasive experimental system for pCO2 manipulation in plankton cultures using passive gas exchange (atmospheric carbon control simulator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Brooke A.; Olson, M. Brady; Wuori, Tristen

    2017-05-01

    As research into the biotic effects of ocean acidification has increased, the methods for simulating these environmental changes in the laboratory have multiplied. Here we describe the atmospheric carbon control simulator (ACCS) for the maintenance of plankton under controlled pCO2 conditions, designed for species sensitive to the physical disturbance introduced by the bubbling of cultures and for studies involving trophic interaction. The system consists of gas mixing and equilibration components coupled with large-volume atmospheric simulation chambers. These chambers allow gas exchange to counteract the changes in carbonate chemistry induced by the metabolic activity of the organisms. The system is relatively low cost, very flexible, and when used in conjunction with semi-continuous culture methods, it increases the density of organisms kept under realistic conditions, increases the allowable time interval between dilutions, and/or decreases the metabolically driven change in carbonate chemistry during these intervals. It accommodates a large number of culture vessels, which facilitate multi-trophic level studies and allow the tracking of variable responses within and across plankton populations to ocean acidification. It also includes components that increase the reliability of gas mixing systems using mass flow controllers.

  1. Chamber transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2001-01-01

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system

  2. The Mobile Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  3. Geant4 simulation of ion chambers response to 60Co spectrum of LNMRI/IRD Shepherd 81-14D Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz Filho, P. P.; Da Silva, C. N. M.

    2018-03-01

    The National Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory of the Radioprotection and Dosimetry Institute (LNMRI / IRD) has recently acquired a Shepherd 81-14D Radiator. In this work we simulate, using Geant4, the behavior with the inverse square law radiation for 3 models of PTW spherical chambers used in radioprotection, a relevant information to planning the measurements. We did the corrections for the attenuation and scattering in the air for each distance, where we used the 60Co spectrum simulated previously.

  4. USING 14 C METHODOLOGY IN SMOG CHAMBER RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smog chambers are large enclosures (~ 10-200 m3) that are used to perform laboratory simulations of atmospheric reactions. By dealing with simple systems in which the number of reactants is limited and the conditions are strictly controlled, insights on how reactions ...

  5. Ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilbert, P.H.

    1975-01-01

    The invention concerns ionization chambers with particular reference to air-equivalent ionization chambers. In order to ensure that similar chambers have similar sensitivities and responses the surface of the chamber bounding the active volume carries a conducting material, which may be a colloidal graphite, arranged in the form of lines so that the area of the conducting material occupies only a small proportion of the area of said surface. (U.S.)

  6. Test chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    A test chamber for measuring electromagnetic radiation emitted by an apparatus to be tested or for exposing an apparatus to be tested to an electromagnetic radiation field. The test chamber includes a reverberation chamber made of a conductive tent fabric. To create a statistically uniform field in

  7. Transboundary radioactive and chemical pollution simulation using an atmospheric/marine predicting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telenta, B.; Antic, D.

    2001-01-01

    The atmospheric models can be used to simulate the transport of contaminants in typical accidental cases and for realistic meteorological conditions. Some numerical models for weather forecast can be used for near to real simulations of propagation of radioactive nuclides or classical chemical pollutants to the atmosphere. The various meteorological parameters are taken into account and various meteorological conditions, even complex ones, can be analyzed. The models can be used for very well assessment of the airborne pollution from energy sources and industrial installations, for comparative studies and for safety analysis. This report describes an proposal for a project of the transboundary pollution simulation, that can be used for the East Mediterranean Region. The project is based on the numerical models developed in the in simulating of the Chernobyl accident and similar hypothetical cases. The study is based on an atmospheric models developed in Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Insular Coastal Dynamics (ICoD), Foundation for International Studies, Valeta, Malta

  8. An Ideal Gas Law Simulator for Atmospheric Gas Molecules ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ideal gas law which is the equation of state of a hypothetical ideal gas that allows us to gain useful insights into the behavior of most real gases at low densities was utilized in this work to conceptualize, design and develop the ideal gas law simulator in a 3 dimensional space using Microsoft Visual Studio, Microsoft ...

  9. Electric discharge synthesis of HCN in simulated Jovian atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stribling, Roscoe; Miller, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    Corona discharge is presently considered as a possible source of the HCN detected in the Jovian atmosphere at 2.2 x 10 to the -7th moles/sq cm column density, for the cases of gas mixtures containing H2, CH4, and NH3, with H2/CH4 ratios from 4.4 to 1585. A 3:1 ratio of corona discharge to lightning energy similar to that of the earth is applied to Jupiter. Depending on the lightning energy available on Jupiter and the eddy diffusion coefficients in the synthesis region, HCN column densities generated by corona discharge could account for about 10 percent of the HCN observed.

  10. Puff models for simulation of fugitive radioactive emissions in atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Camila P. da, E-mail: camila.costa@ufpel.edu.b [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Matematica. Dept. de Matematica e Estatistica; Pereira, Ledina L., E-mail: ledinalentz@yahoo.com.b [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense (UNESC), Criciuma, SC (Brazil); Vilhena, Marco T., E-mail: vilhena@pq.cnpq.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Tirabassi, Tiziano, E-mail: t.tirabassi@isac.cnr.i [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (CNR/ISAC), Bologna (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    A puff model for the dispersion of material from fugitive radioactive emissions is presented. For vertical diffusion the model is based on general techniques for solving time dependent advection-diffusion equation: the ADMM (Advection Diffusion Multilayer Method) and GILTT (Generalized Integral Laplace Transform Technique) techniques. The first one is an analytical solution based on a discretization of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in sub-layers where the advection-diffusion equation is solved by the Laplace transform technique. The solution is given in integral form. The second one is a well-known hybrid method that had solved a wide class of direct and inverse problems mainly in the area of Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics and the solution is given in series form. Comparisons between values predicted by the models against experimental ground-level concentrations are shown. (author)

  11. Puff models for simulation of fugitive radioactive emissions in atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Camila P. da; Vilhena, Marco T.

    2009-01-01

    A puff model for the dispersion of material from fugitive radioactive emissions is presented. For vertical diffusion the model is based on general techniques for solving time dependent advection-diffusion equation: the ADMM (Advection Diffusion Multilayer Method) and GILTT (Generalized Integral Laplace Transform Technique) techniques. The first one is an analytical solution based on a discretization of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in sub-layers where the advection-diffusion equation is solved by the Laplace transform technique. The solution is given in integral form. The second one is a well-known hybrid method that had solved a wide class of direct and inverse problems mainly in the area of Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics and the solution is given in series form. Comparisons between values predicted by the models against experimental ground-level concentrations are shown. (author)

  12. Simulation of nonstationary phenomena in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Frants, O. B.; Nekhoroshev, V. O.; Suslov, A. I.; Kas'yanov, V. S.; Shemyakin, I. A.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Nonstationary processes in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge manifest themselves in spontaneous transitions from the normal glow discharge into a spark. In the experiments, both so-called completed transitions in which a highly conductive constricted channel arises and incomplete transitions accompanied by the formation of a diffuse channel are observed. A model of the positive column of a discharge in air is elaborated that allows one to interpret specific features of the discharge both in the stationary stage and during its transition into a spark and makes it possible to calculate the characteristic oscillatory current waveforms for completed transitions into a spark and aperiodic ones for incomplete transitions. The calculated parameters of the positive column in the glow discharge mode agree well with experiment. Data on the densities of the most abundant species generated in the discharge (such as atomic oxygen, metastable nitrogen molecules, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and negative oxygen ions) are presented.

  13. Simulation of nonstationary phenomena in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolev, Yu. D.; Frants, O. B.; Nekhoroshev, V. O.; Suslov, A. I.; Kas’yanov, V. S.; Shemyakin, I. A.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Nonstationary processes in atmospheric-pressure glow discharge manifest themselves in spontaneous transitions from the normal glow discharge into a spark. In the experiments, both so-called completed transitions in which a highly conductive constricted channel arises and incomplete transitions accompanied by the formation of a diffuse channel are observed. A model of the positive column of a discharge in air is elaborated that allows one to interpret specific features of the discharge both in the stationary stage and during its transition into a spark and makes it possible to calculate the characteristic oscillatory current waveforms for completed transitions into a spark and aperiodic ones for incomplete transitions. The calculated parameters of the positive column in the glow discharge mode agree well with experiment. Data on the densities of the most abundant species generated in the discharge (such as atomic oxygen, metastable nitrogen molecules, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and negative oxygen ions) are presented.

  14. Simulations of the general circulation of the Martian atmosphere. I - Polar processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, James B.; Haberle, Robert M.; Schaeffer, James; Lee, Hilda

    1990-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the Martian atmosphere general circulation are carried out for 50 simulated days, using a three-dimensional model, based on the primitive equations of meteorology, which incorporated the radiative effects of atmospheric dust on solar and thermal radiation. A large number of numerical experiments were conducted for alternative choices of seasonal date and dust optical depth. It was found that, as the dust content of the winter polar region increased, the rate of atmospheric CO2 condensation increased sharply. It is shown that the strong seasonal variation in the atmospheric dust content observed might cause a number of hemispheric asymmetries. These asymmetries include the greater prevalence of polar hoods in the northern polar region during winter, the lower albedo of the northern polar cap during spring, and the total dissipation of the northern CO2 ice cap during the warmer seasons.

  15. A conceptual framework for using Doppler radar acquired atmospheric data for flight simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W.

    1983-01-01

    A concept is presented which can permit turbulence simulation in the vicinity of microbursts. The method involves a large data base, but should be fast enough for use with flight simulators. The model permits any pilot to simulate any flight maneuver in any aircraft. The model simulates a wind field with three-component mean winds and three-component turbulent gusts, and gust variation over the body of an aircraft so that all aerodynamic loads and moments can be calculated. The time and space variation of mean winds and turbulent intensities associated with a particular atmospheric phenomenon such as a microburst is used in the model. In fact, Doppler radar data such as provided by JAWS is uniquely suited for use with the proposed model. The concept is completely general and is not restricted to microburst studies. Reentry and flight in terrestrial or planetary atmospheres could be realistically simulated if supporting data of sufficient resolution were available.

  16. Simulating Storm Surge Impacts with a Coupled Atmosphere-Inundation Model with Varying Meteorological Forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra N. Ramos Valle

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Storm surge events have the potential to cause devastating damage to coastal communities. The magnitude of their impacts highlights the need for increased accuracy and real-time forecasting and predictability of storm surge. In this study, we assess two meteorological forcing configurations to hindcast the storm surge of Hurricane Sandy, and ultimately support the improvement of storm surge forecasts. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model is coupled to the ADvanced CIRCulation Model (ADCIRC to determine water elevations. We perform four coupled simulations and compare storm surge estimates resulting from the use of a parametric vortex model and a full-physics atmospheric model. One simulation is forced with track-based meteorological data calculated from WRF, while three simulations are forced with the full wind and pressure field outputs from WRF simulations of varying resolutions. Experiments were compared to an ADCIRC simulation forced by National Hurricane Center best track data, as well as to station observations. Our results indicated that given accurate meteorological best track data, a parametric vortex model can accurately forecast maximum water elevations, improving upon the use of a full-physics coupled atmospheric-surge model. In the absence of a best track, atmospheric forcing in the form of full wind and pressure field from a high-resolution atmospheric model simulation prove reliable for storm surge forecasting.

  17. Measuring the spectral emissivity of thermal protection materials during atmospheric reentry simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marble, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Hypersonic spacecraft reentering the earth's atmosphere encounter extreme heat due to atmospheric friction. Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials shield the craft from this searing heat, which can reach temperatures of 2900 F. Various thermophysical and optical properties of TPS materials are tested at the Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility, which has the capability to simulate critical environmental conditions associated with entry into the earth's atmosphere. Emissivity is an optical property that determines how well a material will reradiate incident heat back into the atmosphere upon reentry, thus protecting the spacecraft from the intense frictional heat. This report describes a method of measuring TPS emissivities using the SR5000 Scanning Spectroradiometer, and includes system characteristics, sample data, and operational procedures developed for arc-jet applications.

  18. ENSO Simulation in CGCMs and the Associated Errors in Atmospheric Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AchutaRao, K.; Sperber, K.R.

    2000-01-01

    Tropical Pacific variability, and specifically the simulation of ENSO in coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models (CGCMs) has previously been assessed in many studies (McCreary and Anderson[1991], Neelin et al.[1992], Mechoso et al.[1995], Latif et al.[2000], and Davey et al.[2000]). These studies have concentrated on SST variations in the tropical Pacific, and discussions of the atmospheric response have been limited to east-west movements of the convergence zone. In this paper we discuss the large-scale atmospheric response to simulated ENSO events. Control simulations from 17 global CGCMs from CMIP (Meehl et al.[2000]) are studied. The web site http:// www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/cmip/modeldoc provides documentation of the configurations of the models

  19. Simulating atmospheric turbulence using a phase-only spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burger, L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available is zero and the outer scale is infinity. These assumptions lead to a well-defined distribution for the randomness in the refractive index of the atmosphere, which can be applied in the laboratory, giving a good approximation for a real atmosphere.1.... There are two basic aims: first, to expound on the steps required to actually simulate atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory, and second, to point out some of the limitations in using spatial light modula- Research Articles South African Journal of Science...

  20. Monte Carlo and discrete-ordinate simulations of irradiances in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerstad, Karl Idar; Stamnes, Jakob J; Hamre, Børge; Lotsberg, Jon K; Yan, Banghua; Stamnes, Knut

    2003-05-20

    We compare Monte Carlo (MC) and discrete-ordinate radiative-transfer (DISORT) simulations of irradiances in a one-dimensional coupled atmosphere-ocean (CAO) system consisting of horizontal plane-parallel layers. The two models have precisely the same physical basis, including coupling between the atmosphere and the ocean, and we use precisely the same atmospheric and oceanic input parameters for both codes. For a plane atmosphere-ocean interface we find agreement between irradiances obtained with the two codes to within 1%, both in the atmosphere and the ocean. Our tests cover case 1 water, scattering by density fluctuations both in the atmosphere and in the ocean, and scattering by particulate matter represented by a one-parameter Henyey-Greenstein (HG) scattering phase function. The CAO-MC code has an advantage over the CAO-DISORT code in that it can handle surface waves on the atmosphere-ocean interface, but the CAO-DISORT code is computationally much faster. Therefore we use CAO-MC simulations to study the influence of ocean surface waves and propose a way to correct the results of the CAO-DISORT code so as to obtain fast and accurate underwater irradiances in the presence of surface waves.

  1. Simulation of Wind turbines in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    as well as turbulent inflow condition. For generating turbulent inflow, a model is used in which a turbulent plane is introduced in the domain and convected in each time step, using Taylor's frozen hypothesis. The results of different simulations are analysed and compared in terms of mean values...... the computational costs scale rapidly with Reynolds number and domain size[1]. An approach to overcome these deficiencies is to use a wall modeling near the walls and then use a coarser grid at the first grid level above the ground. This could be performed by using simplified Navier-Stokes equations in the boundary...... condition is used in the bottom, a symmetry boundary on the top and periodic boundaries on the sides as well as inlet and outlet boundaries. For the temperature, a fixed value of 285 K is applied from the ground up to a height of 1 km and the temperature increases linearly with the rate of 3.5 degrees per...

  2. Evaluation of one-dimensional and two-dimensional volatility basis sets in simulating the aging of secondary organic aerosol with smog-chamber experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Donahue, Neil M; Chuang, Wayne; Hildebrandt Ruiz, Lea; Ng, Nga L; Wang, Yangjun; Hao, Jiming

    2015-02-17

    We evaluate the one-dimensional volatility basis set (1D-VBS) and two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) in simulating the aging of SOA derived from toluene and α-pinene against smog-chamber experiments. If we simulate the first-generation products with empirical chamber fits and the subsequent aging chemistry with a 1D-VBS or a 2D-VBS, the models mostly overestimate the SOA concentrations in the toluene oxidation experiments. This is because the empirical chamber fits include both first-generation oxidation and aging; simulating aging in addition to this results in double counting of the initial aging effects. If the first-generation oxidation is treated explicitly, the base-case 2D-VBS underestimates the SOA concentrations and O:C increase of the toluene oxidation experiments; it generally underestimates the SOA concentrations and overestimates the O:C increase of the α-pinene experiments. With the first-generation oxidation treated explicitly, we could modify the 2D-VBS configuration individually for toluene and α-pinene to achieve good model-measurement agreement. However, we are unable to simulate the oxidation of both toluene and α-pinene with the same 2D-VBS configuration. We suggest that future models should implement parallel layers for anthropogenic (aromatic) and biogenic precursors, and that more modeling studies and laboratory research be done to optimize the "best-guess" parameters for each layer.

  3. A simple atmospheric boundary layer model applied to large eddy simulations of wind turbine wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2014-01-01

    A simple model for including the influence of the atmospheric boundary layer in connection with large eddy simulations of wind turbine wakes is presented and validated by comparing computed results with measurements as well as with direct numerical simulations. The model is based on an immersed...... boundary type technique where volume forces are used to introduce wind shear and atmospheric turbulence. The application of the model for wake studies is demonstrated by combining it with the actuator line method, and predictions are compared with field measurements. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  4. Whistler wave propagation in the antenna near and far fields in the Naval Research Laboratory Space Physics Simulation Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwell, David D.; Walker, David N.; Amatucci, William E.

    2010-01-01

    In previous papers, early whistler propagation measurements were presented [W. E. Amatucci et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 33, 637 (2005)] as well as antenna impedance measurements [D. D. Blackwell et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 092106 (2007)] performed in the Naval Research Laboratory Space Physics Simulation Chamber (SPSC). Since that time there have been major upgrades in the experimental capabilities of the laboratory in the form of improvement of both the plasma source and antennas. This has allowed access to plasma parameter space that was previously unattainable, and has resulted in measurements that provide a significantly clearer picture of whistler propagation in the laboratory environment. This paper presents some of the first whistler experimental results from the upgraded SPSC. Whereas previously measurements were limited to measuring the cyclotron resonance cutoff and elliptical polarization indicative of the whistler mode, now it is possible to experimentally plot the dispersion relation itself. The waves are driven and detected using balanced dipole and loop antennas connected to a network analyzer, which measures the amplitude and phase of the wave in two dimensions (r and z). In addition the frequency of the signals is also swept over a range of several hundreds of megahertz, providing a comprehensive picture of the near and far field antenna radiation patterns over a variety of plasma conditions. The magnetic field is varied from a few gauss to 200 G, with the density variable over at least 3 decades from 10 7 to 10 10 cm -3 . The waves are shown to lie on the dispersion surface for whistler waves, with observation of resonance cones in agreement with theoretical predictions. The waves are also observed to propagate without loss of amplitude at higher power, a result in agreement with previous experiments and the notion of ducted whistlers.

  5. Review of straw chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, W.H.

    1990-03-01

    This is a review of straw chambers used in the HRS, MAC, Mark III, CLEO, AMY, and TPC e + e - experiments. The straws are 6--8 mm in diameter, operate at 1--4 atmospheres and obtain resolutions of 45--100 microns. The designs and constructions are summarized and possible improvements discussed

  6. Simulation of a Large Wildfire in a Coupled Fire-Atmosphere Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Filippi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The Aullene fire devastated more than 3000 ha of Mediterranean maquis and pine forest in July 2009. The simulation of combustion processes, as well as atmospheric dynamics represents a challenge for such scenarios because of the various involved scales, from the scale of the individual flames to the larger regional scale. A coupled approach between the Meso-NH (Meso-scale Non-Hydrostatic atmospheric model running in LES (Large Eddy Simulation mode and the ForeFire fire spread model is proposed for predicting fine- to large-scale effects of this extreme wildfire, showing that such simulation is possible in a reasonable time using current supercomputers. The coupling involves the surface wind to drive the fire, while heat from combustion and water vapor fluxes are injected into the atmosphere at each atmospheric time step. To be representative of the phenomenon, a sub-meter resolution was used for the simulation of the fire front, while atmospheric simulations were performed with nested grids from 2400-m to 50-m resolution. Simulations were run with or without feedback from the fire to the atmospheric model, or without coupling from the atmosphere to the fire. In the two-way mode, the burnt area was reproduced with a good degree of realism at the local scale, where an acceleration in the valley wind and over sloping terrain pushed the fire line to locations in accordance with fire passing point observations. At the regional scale, the simulated fire plume compares well with the satellite image. The study explores the strong fire-atmosphere interactions leading to intense convective updrafts extending above the boundary layer, significant downdrafts behind the fire line in the upper plume, and horizontal wind speeds feeding strong inflow into the base of the convective updrafts. The fire-induced dynamics is induced by strong near-surface sensible heat fluxes reaching maximum values of 240 kW m − 2 . The dynamical production of turbulent kinetic

  7. Using sensitivity derivatives for design and parameter estimation in an atmospheric plasma discharge simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Kyle J.; Anderson, W. Kyle

    2010-01-01

    The problem of applying sensitivity analysis to a one-dimensional atmospheric radio frequency plasma discharge simulation is considered. A fluid simulation is used to model an atmospheric pressure radio frequency helium discharge with a small nitrogen impurity. Sensitivity derivatives are computed for the peak electron density with respect to physical inputs to the simulation. These derivatives are verified using several different methods to compute sensitivity derivatives. It is then demonstrated how sensitivity derivatives can be used within a design cycle to change these physical inputs so as to increase the peak electron density. It is also shown how sensitivity analysis can be used in conjunction with experimental data to obtain better estimates for rate and transport parameters. Finally, it is described how sensitivity analysis could be used to compute an upper bound on the uncertainty for results from a simulation.

  8. Ussing Chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Wortelboer, H.; Verhoeckx, K.

    2015-01-01

    The Ussing chamber system is named after the Danish zoologist Hans Ussing, who invented the device in the 1950s to measure the short-circuit current as an indicator of net ion transport taking place across frog skin (Ussing and Zerahn, Acta Physiol Scand 23:110-127, 1951). Ussing chambers are

  9. Simulation of preindustrial atmospheric methane to constrain the global source strength of natural wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, S; Dentener, F; Lelieveld, J

    2000-01-01

    Previous attempts to quantify the global source strength of CH4 from natural wetlands have resulted in a range of 90-260 TE(CH4) yr(-1). This relatively uncertain estimate significantly limits our understanding of atmospheric methane. In this study we reduce this uncertainty by simulating

  10. Wind Energy-Related Atmospheric Boundary Layer Large-Eddy Simulation Using OpenFOAM: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchfield, M.J.; Vijayakumar, G.; Brasseur, J.G.; Moriarty, P.J.

    2010-08-01

    This paper develops and evaluates the performance of a large-eddy simulation (LES) solver in computing the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat terrain under a variety of stability conditions, ranging from shear driven (neutral stratification) to moderately convective (unstable stratification).

  11. Application of numerical environment system to regional atmospheric radioactivity transport simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazawa, H.; Ohkura, T.; Iida, T.; Chino, M.; Nagai, H.

    2003-01-01

    Main functions of the Numerical Environment System (NES), as a part of the Information Technology Based Laboratory (ITBL) project implemented by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, became available for test use purposes although the development of the system is still underway. This system consists of numerical models of meteorology and atmospheric dispersion, database necessary for model simulations, post- and pre-processors such as data conversion and visualization, and a suite of system software which provide the users with system functions through a web page access. The system utilizes calculation servers such as vector- and scalar-parallel processors for numerical model execution, a EWS which serves as a hub of the system. This system provides users in the field of nuclear emergency preparedness and atmospheric environment with easy-to-use functions of atmospheric dispersion simulations including input meteorological data preparation and visualization of simulation results. The performance of numerical models in the system was examined with observation data of long-range transported radon-222. The models in the system reproduced quite well temporal variations in the observed radon-222 concentrations in air which were caused by changes in the meteorological field in the synoptic scale. By applying the NES models in combination with the idea of backward-in-time atmospheric dispersion simulation, seasonal shift of source areas of radon-222 in the eastern Asian regions affecting the concentrations in Japan was quantitatively illustrated. (authors)

  12. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Proportional multi-wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle. Proportional wire chambers allow a much quicker reading than the optical or magnetoscriptive readout wire chambers.

  13. Atmospheric models in the numerical simulation system (SPEEDI-MP) for environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Haruyasu; Terada, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    As a nuclear emergency response system, numerical models to predict the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides have been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Evolving these models by incorporating new schemes for physical processes and up-to-date computational technologies, a numerical simulation system, which consists of dynamical models and material transport models for the atmospheric, terrestrial, and oceanic environments, has been constructed to apply for various environmental studies. In this system, the combination of a non-hydrostatic atmospheric dynamic model and Lagrangian particle dispersion model is used for the emergency response system. The utilization of detailed meteorological field by the atmospheric model improves the model performance for diffusion and deposition calculations. It also calculates a large area domain with coarse resolution and local area domain with high resolution simultaneously. The performance of new model system was evaluated using measurements of surface deposition of 137 Cs over Europe during the Chernobyl accident. (author)

  14. Simulation of atmospheric CO2 over Europe and western Siberia using the regional scale model REMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevillard, A.; Ciais, P.; Lafont, S.

    2002-01-01

    The spatial distribution and the temporal variability of atmospheric CO 2 over Europe and western Siberia are investigated using the regional atmospheric model, REMO. The model, of typical horizontal resolution 50 km, is part of a nested modelling framework that has been established as a concerted action during the EUROSIBERIAN CARBONFLUX project. In REMO, the transport of CO 2 is simulated together with climate variables, which offers the possibility of calculating at each time step the land atmosphere CO 2 fluxes as driven by the modelled meteorology. The uptake of CO 2 by photosynthesis is calculated using a light use efficiency formulation, where the absorbed photosynthetically active solar radiation is inferred from satellite measurements. The release of CO 2 from plant and soil respiration is driven by the simulated climate and assumed to be in equilibrium with photosynthesis over the course of one year. Fossil CO 2 emissions and air-sea fluxes within the model domain are prescribed, whereas the influence of sources outside the model domain is computed from as a boundary condition CO 2 fields determined a global transport model. The modelling results are compared against pointwise eddy covariance fluxes, and against atmospheric CO 2 records. We show that a necessary condition to simulate realistically the variability of atmospheric CO 2 over continental Europe is to account for the diurnal cycle of biospheric exchange. Overall, for the study period of July 1998, REMO realistically simulates the short-term variability of fluxes and of atmospheric mixing ratios. However, the mean CO 2 gradients from western Europe to western Siberia are not correctly reproduced. This latter deficiency points out the key role of boundary conditions in a limited-area model, as well as the need for using more realistic geographic mean patterns of biospheric carbon fluxes

  15. Influence of atmospheric stability on wind-turbine wakes: A large-eddy simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation is combined with a turbine model to investigate the influence of atmospheric stability on wind-turbine wakes. In the simulations, subgrid-scale turbulent fluxes are parameterized using tuning-free Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic models. These models optimize the local value of the model coefficients based on the dynamics of the resolved scales. The turbine-induced forces are parameterized with an actuator-disk model with rotation. In this technique, blade-element theory is used to calculate the lift and drag forces acting on the blades. Emphasis is placed on the structure and characteristics of wind-turbine wakes in the cases where the incident flows to the turbine have the same mean velocity at the hub height but different stability conditions. The simulation results show that atmospheric stability has a significant effect on the spatial distribution of the mean velocity deficit and turbulent fluxes in the wake region. In particular, the magnitude of the velocity deficit increases with increasing stability in the atmosphere. In addition, the locations of the maximum turbulence intensity and turbulent stresses are closer to the turbine in convective boundary layer compared with neutral and stable ones. Detailed analysis of the resolved turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget inside the wake reveals also that the thermal stratification of the incoming wind considerably affects the magnitude and spatial distribution of the turbulent production, transport term and dissipation rate (transfer of energy to the subgrid scales). It is also shown that the near-wake region can be extended to a farther distance downstream in stable condition compared with neutral and unstable counterparts. In order to isolate the effect of atmospheric stability, additional simulations of neutrally-stratified atmospheric boundary layers are performed with the same turbulence intensity at hub height as convective and stable ones. The results show that the

  16. Geant4 simulation of ion chambers response to {sup 60}Co spectrum of LNMRI/IRD Shepherd 81-14D Radiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz Filho, P.P.; Silva, C.N.M. da, E-mail: queiroz@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The National Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory of the Radioprotection and Dosimetry Institute (LNMRI / IRD) has recently acquired a Shepherd 81-14D Radiator. In this work we simulate, using Geant4, the behavior with the inverse square law radiation of the distance for 3 models of PTW spherical chambers used in radioprotection, a relevant information to planning the measurements. We did the corrections for the attenuation and scattering in the air for each distance, where we used the {sup 60}Co spectrum simulated previously. (author)

  17. Drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yosuke

    1977-01-01

    Drift chamber is becoming an important detector in high energy physics as a precision and fast position detector because of its high spatial resolution and count-rate. The basic principle is that it utilizes the drift at constant speed of electrons ionized along the tracks of charged particles towards the anode wire in the nearly uniform electric field. The method of measuring drift time includes the analog and digital ones. This report describes about the construction of and the application of electric field to the drift chamber, mathematical analysis on the electric field and equipotential curve, derivation of spatial resolution and the factor for its determination, and selection of gas to be used. The performance test of the chamber was carried out using a small test chamber, the collimated β source of Sr-90, and 500 MeV/C electron beam from the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron in the Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. Most chambers to date adopted one dimensional read-out, but it is very advantageous if the two dimensional read-out is feasible with one chamber when the resolution in that direction is low. The typical methods of delay line and charge division for two dimensional read-out are described. The development of digital read-out system is underway, which can process the signal of a large scale drift chamber at high speed. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Numerical simulation of atmospheric dispersion in the vicinity of the Rocky Flats plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossert, J.E.; Poulos, G.S.

    1993-01-01

    The Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program sponsored a field experiment in the winter of 1991 near Rocky Flats, Colorado. Both meteorological and tracer dispersion measurements were taken. These two data sets provided an opportunity to investigate the influence of terrain-generated, radiatively-driven flows on the dispersion of the tracer. In this study, we use the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to simulate meteorological conditions and tracer dispersion on the case night of 4--5 February 1991. The simulations were developed to examine the influence of nocturnal drainage flow from various topography regimes on the dispersion of tracer from the Rocky Flats plant. The simulation described herein demonstrates the extent to which Rocky Mountain drainage winds influence the flow at the mountain/plain interface for a particular case night, and shows the potential importance of canyon drainage on dispersion from the Rocky Flats area

  19. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  20. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber.Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  1. Numerical simulations of atmospheric dispersion of iodine-131 by different models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ádám Leelőssy

    Full Text Available Nowadays, several dispersion models are available to simulate the transport processes of air pollutants and toxic substances including radionuclides in the atmosphere. Reliability of atmospheric transport models has been demonstrated in several recent cases from local to global scale; however, very few actual emission data are available to evaluate model results in real-life cases. In this study, the atmospheric dispersion of 131I emitted to the atmosphere during an industrial process was simulated with different models, namely the WRF-Chem Eulerian online coupled model and the HYSPLIT and the RAPTOR Lagrangian models. Although only limited data of 131I detections has been available, the accuracy of modeled plume direction could be evaluated in complex late autumn weather situations. For the studied cases, the general reliability of models has been demonstrated. However, serious uncertainties arise related to low level inversions, above all in case of an emission event on 4 November 2011, when an important wind shear caused a significant difference between simulated and real transport directions. Results underline the importance of prudent interpretation of dispersion model results and the identification of weather conditions with a potential to cause large model errors.

  2. Intercomparison of Martian Lower Atmosphere Simulated Using Different Planetary Boundary Layer Parameterization Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Murali; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Dwyer Cianciolo, Alicia; Smith, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    We use the mesoscale modeling capability of Mars Weather Research and Forecasting (MarsWRF) model to study the sensitivity of the simulated Martian lower atmosphere to differences in the parameterization of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). Characterization of the Martian atmosphere and realistic representation of processes such as mixing of tracers like dust depend on how well the model reproduces the evolution of the PBL structure. MarsWRF is based on the NCAR WRF model and it retains some of the PBL schemes available in the earth version. Published studies have examined the performance of different PBL schemes in NCAR WRF with the help of observations. Currently such assessments are not feasible for Martian atmospheric models due to lack of observations. It is of interest though to study the sensitivity of the model to PBL parameterization. Typically, for standard Martian atmospheric simulations, we have used the Medium Range Forecast (MRF) PBL scheme, which considers a correction term to the vertical gradients to incorporate nonlocal effects. For this study, we have also used two other parameterizations, a non-local closure scheme called Yonsei University (YSU) PBL scheme and a turbulent kinetic energy closure scheme called Mellor- Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) PBL scheme. We will present intercomparisons of the near surface temperature profiles, boundary layer heights, and wind obtained from the different simulations. We plan to use available temperature observations from Mini TES instrument onboard the rovers Spirit and Opportunity in evaluating the model results.

  3. Dataset of Atmospheric Environment Publication in 2016, Source emission and model evaluation of formaldehyde from composite and solid wood furniture in a full-scale chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data presented in this data file is a product of a journal publication. The dataset contains formaldehyde air concentrations in the emission test chamber and...

  4. The Magma Chamber Simulator: Modeling the Impact of Wall Rock Composition on Mafic Magmas during Assimilation-Fractional Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, J. B.; Spera, F. J.; Bohrson, W. A.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Although stoichiometric titration is often used to model the process of concurrent Assimilation and Fractional Crystallization (AFC) within a compositionally evolving magma body, a more complete treatment of the problem involves simultaneous and self-consistent determination of stable phase relationships and separately evolving temperatures of both Magma (M) and Wall Rock (WR) that interact as a composite M-WR system. Here we present results of M-WR systems undergoing AFC forward modeled with the Magma Chamber Simulator (MCS), which uses the phase modeling capabilities of MELTS (Ghiorso & Sack 1995) as the thermodynamic basis. Simulations begin with one of a variety of mafic magmas (e.g. HAB, MORB, AOB) intruding a set mass of Wall Rock (e.g. lherzolite, gabbro, diorite, granite, metapelite), and heat is exchanged as the M-WR system proceeds towards thermal equilibrium. Depending on initial conditions, the early part of the evolution can involve closed system FC while the WR heats up. The WR behaves as a closed system until it is heated beyond the solidus to critical limit for melt fraction extraction (fc), ranging between 0.08 and 0.12 depending on WR characteristics including composition and, rheology and stress field. Once fc is exceeded, a portion of the anatectic liquid is assimilated into the Magma. The MCS simultaneously calculates mass and composition of the mineral assemblage (Magma cumulates and WR residue) and melt (anatectic and Magma) at each T along the equilibration trajectory. Sensible and latent heat lost or gained plus mass gained by the Magma are accounted for by the MCS via governing Energy Constrained- Recharge Assimilation Fractional Crystallization (EC-RAFC) equations. In a comparison of two representative MCS results, consider a granitic WR intruded by HAB melt (51 wt. % SiO2) at liquidus T in shallow crust (0.1 GPa) with a WR/M ratio of 1.25, fc of 0.1 and a QFM oxygen buffer. In the first example, the WR begins at a temperature of 100o

  5. Ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    An improved ionization chamber type X-ray detector comprises a heavy gas at high pressure disposed between an anode and a cathode. An open grid structure is placed next to the anode and is maintained at a voltage intermediate between the cathode and anode potentials. The electric field which is produced by positive ions drifting towards the cathode is thus shielded from the anode. Current measuring circuits connected to the anode are, therefore, responsive only to electron current flow within the chamber and the recovery time of the chamber is shortened. The grid structure also serves to shield the anode from electrical currents which might otherwise be induced by mechanical vibrations in the ionization chamber structure

  6. Ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boag, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Although a variety of solid-state and chemical methods for measuring radiation dose have been developed in recent decades and calorimetry can now provide an absolute standard of reference, ionization dosimetry retains its position as the most widely used, most convenient, and, in most situations, most accurate method of measuring either exposure or absorbed dose. The ionization chamber itself is the central element in this system of dosimetry. In this chapter the principles governing the construction and operation of ionization chambers of various types are examined. Since the ionization chambers now in general use are nearly all of commercial manufacture, the emphasis is on operating characteristics and interpretation of measurements rather than on details of construction, although some knowledge of the latter is often required when applying necessary corrections to the measured quantities. Examples are given of the construction of typical chambers designed for particular purposes, and the methods of calibrating them are discussed

  7. Activity measurements of radioactive solutions by liquid scintillation counting and pressurized ionization chambers and Monte Carlo simulations of source-detector systems for metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiot, Marie-Noelle

    2013-01-01

    The research works 'Activity measurements of radioactive solutions by liquid scintillation and pressurized ionization chambers and Monte Carlo simulations of source-detector systems' was presented for the graduation: 'Habilitation a diriger des recherches'. The common thread of both themes liquid scintillation counting and pressurized ionization chambers lies in the improvement of the techniques of radionuclide activity measurement. Metrology of ionization radiation intervenes in numerous domains, in the research, in the industry including the environment and the health, which are subjects of constant concern for the world population these last years. In this big variety of applications answers a large number of radionuclides of diverse disintegration scheme and under varied physical forms. The presented works realized within the National Laboratory Henri Becquerel have for objective to assure detector calibration traceability and to improve the methods of activity measurements within the framework of research projects and development. The improvement of the primary and secondary activity measurement methods consists in perfecting the accuracy of the measurements in particular by a better knowledge of the parameters influencing the detector yield. The works of development dealing with liquid scintillation counting concern mainly the study of the response of liquid scintillators to low energy electrons as well as their linear absorption coefficients using synchrotron radiation. The research works on pressurized ionization chambers consist of the study of their response to photons and electrons by experimental measurements compared to the simulation of the source-detector system using Monte Carlo codes. Besides, the design of a new type of ionization chamber with variable pressure is presented. This new project was developed to guarantee the precision of the amount of activity injected into the patient within the framework of diagnosis examination

  8. Premar-2: a Monte Carlo code for radiative transport simulation in atmospheric environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupini, E.

    1999-01-01

    The peculiarities of the PREMAR-2 code, aimed at radiation transport Monte Carlo simulation in atmospheric environments in the infrared-ultraviolet frequency range, are described. With respect to the previously developed PREMAR code, besides plane multilayers, spherical multilayers and finite sequences of vertical layers, each one with its own atmospheric behaviour, are foreseen in the new code, together with the refraction phenomenon, so that long range, highly slanted paths can now be more faithfully taken into account. A zenithal angular dependence of the albedo coefficient has moreover been introduced. Lidar systems, with spatially independent source and telescope, are allowed again to be simulated, and, in this latest version of the code, sensitivity analyses to be performed. According to this last feasibility, consequences on radiation transport of small perturbations in physical components of the atmospheric environment may be analyze and the related effects on searched results estimated. The availability of a library of physical data (reaction coefficients, phase functions and refraction indexes) is required by the code, providing the essential features of the environment of interest needed of the Monte Carlo simulation. Variance reducing techniques have been enhanced in the Premar-2 code, by introducing, for instance, a local forced collision technique, especially apt to be used in Lidar system simulations. Encouraging comparisons between code and experimental results carried out at the Brasimone Centre of ENEA, have so far been obtained, even if further checks of the code are to be performed [it

  9. The Premar Code for the Monte Carlo Simulation of Radiation Transport In the Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupini, E.; Borgia, M.G.; Premuda, M.

    1997-03-01

    The Montecarlo code PREMAR is described, which allows the user to simulate the radiation transport in the atmosphere, in the ultraviolet-infrared frequency interval. A plan multilayer geometry is at present foreseen by the code, witch albedo possibility at the lower boundary surface. For a given monochromatic point source, the main quantities computed by the code are the absorption spatial distributions of aerosol and molecules, together with the related atmospheric transmittances. Moreover, simulation of of Lidar experiments are foreseen by the code, the source and telescope fields of view being assigned. To build-up the appropriate probability distributions, an input data library is assumed to be read by the code. For this purpose the radiance-transmittance LOWTRAN-7 code has been conveniently adapted as a source of the library so as to exploit the richness of information of the code for a large variety of atmospheric simulations. Results of applications of the PREMAR code are finally presented, with special reference to simulations of Lidar system and radiometer experiments carried out at the Brasimone ENEA Centre by the Environment Department

  10. Comparison of three ice cloud optical schemes in climate simulations with community atmospheric model version 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenjie; Peng, Yiran; Wang, Bin; Yi, Bingqi; Lin, Yanluan; Li, Jiangnan

    2018-05-01

    A newly implemented Baum-Yang scheme for simulating ice cloud optical properties is compared with existing schemes (Mitchell and Fu schemes) in a standalone radiative transfer model and in the global climate model (GCM) Community Atmospheric Model Version 5 (CAM5). This study systematically analyzes the effect of different ice cloud optical schemes on global radiation and climate by a series of simulations with a simplified standalone radiative transfer model, atmospheric GCM CAM5, and a comprehensive coupled climate model. Results from the standalone radiative model show that Baum-Yang scheme yields generally weaker effects of ice cloud on temperature profiles both in shortwave and longwave spectrum. CAM5 simulations indicate that Baum-Yang scheme in place of Mitchell/Fu scheme tends to cool the upper atmosphere and strengthen the thermodynamic instability in low- and mid-latitudes, which could intensify the Hadley circulation and dehydrate the subtropics. When CAM5 is coupled with a slab ocean model to include simplified air-sea interaction, reduced downward longwave flux to surface in Baum-Yang scheme mitigates ice-albedo feedback in the Arctic as well as water vapor and cloud feedbacks in low- and mid-latitudes, resulting in an overall temperature decrease by 3.0/1.4 °C globally compared with Mitchell/Fu schemes. Radiative effect and climate feedback of the three ice cloud optical schemes documented in this study can be referred for future improvements on ice cloud simulation in CAM5.

  11. Development of a Wind Plant Large-Eddy Simulation with Measurement-Driven Atmospheric Inflow: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quon, Eliot; Churchfield, Matthew; Cheung, Lawrence; Kern, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    This paper details the development of an aeroelastic wind plant model with large-eddy simulation (LES). The chosen LES solver is the Simulator for Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) based on the OpenFOAM framework, coupled to NREL's comprehensive aeroelastic analysis tool, FAST. An atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) precursor simulation was constructed based on assessments of meteorological tower, lidar, and radar data over a 3-hour window. This precursor was tuned to the specific atmospheric conditions that occurred both prior to and during the measurement campaign, enabling capture of a night-to-day transition in the turbulent ABL. In the absence of height-varying temperature measurements, spatially averaged radar data were sufficient to characterize the atmospheric stability of the wind plant in terms of the shear profile, and near-ground temperature sensors provided a reasonable estimate of the ground heating rate describing the morning transition. A full aeroelastic simulation was then performed for a subset of turbines within the wind plant, driven by the precursor. Analysis of two turbines within the array, one directly waked by the other, demonstrated good agreement with measured time-averaged loads.

  12. Development of a Wind Plant Large-Eddy Simulation with Measurement-Driven Atmospheric Inflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quon, Eliot W.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Cheung, Lawrence; Kern, Stefan

    2017-01-09

    This paper details the development of an aeroelastic wind plant model with large-eddy simulation (LES). The chosen LES solver is the Simulator for Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) based on the OpenFOAM framework, coupled to NREL's comprehensive aeroelastic analysis tool, FAST. An atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) precursor simulation was constructed based on assessments of meteorological tower, lidar, and radar data over a 3-hour window. This precursor was tuned to the specific atmospheric conditions that occurred both prior to and during the measurement campaign, enabling capture of a night-to-day transition in the turbulent ABL. In the absence of height-varying temperature measurements, spatially averaged radar data were sufficient to characterize the atmospheric stability of the wind plant in terms of the shear profile, and near-ground temperature sensors provided a reasonable estimate of the ground heating rate describing the morning transition. A full aeroelastic simulation was then performed for a subset of turbines within the wind plant, driven by the precursor. Analysis of two turbines within the array, one directly waked by the other, demonstrated good agreement with measured time-averaged loads.

  13. A random walk model to simulate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jun; Huang, Liuxing; Niu, Shengli; Xie, Honggang; Kuang, Feihong

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide in large-medium scale, a numerical simulation method based on random walk model for radionuclide atmospheric dispersion was established in the paper. The route of radionuclide migration and concentration distribution of radionuclide can be calculated out by using the method with the real-time or historical meteorological fields. In the simulation, a plume of radionuclide is treated as a lot of particles independent of each other. The particles move randomly by the fluctuations of turbulence, and disperse, so as to enlarge the volume of the plume and dilute the concentration of radionuclide. The dispersion of the plume over time is described by the variance of the particles. Through statistical analysis, the relationships between variance of the particles and radionuclide dispersion characteristics can be derived. The main mechanisms considered in the physical model are: (1) advection of radionuclide by mean air motion, (2) mixing of radionuclide by atmospheric turbulence, (3) dry and wet deposition, (4) disintegration. A code named RADES was developed according the method. And then, the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX) in 1994 is simulated by the RADES and FLEXPART codes, the simulation results of the concentration distribution of tracer are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Digital simulation of a communication link for Pioneer Saturn Uranus atmospheric entry probe, part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinrichs, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    A digital simulation study is presented for a candidate modulator/demodulator design in an atmospheric scintillation environment with Doppler, Doppler rate, and signal attenuation typical of the conditions of an outer planet atmospheric probe. The simulation results indicate that the mean channel error rate with and without scintillation are similar to theoretical characterizations of the link. The simulation gives information for calculating other channel statistics and generates a quantized symbol stream on magnetic tape from which error correction decoding is analyzed. Results from the magnetic tape data analyses are also included. The receiver and bit synchronizer are modeled in the simulation at the level of hardware component parameters rather than at the loop equation level and individual hardware parameters are identified. The atmospheric scintillation amplitude and phase are modeled independently. Normal and log normal amplitude processes are studied. In each case the scintillations are low pass filtered. The receiver performance is given for a range of signal to noise ratios with and without the effects of scintillation. The performance is reviewed for critical reciever parameter variations.

  15. Simulation Tool for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators at Atmospheric and Sub-Atmospheric Pressures: SBIR Phase I Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhanskii, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    This report is the final report of a SBIR Phase I project. It is identical to the final report submitted, after some proprietary information of administrative nature has been removed. The development of a numerical simulation tool for dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuator is reported. The objectives of the project were to analyze and predict DBD operation at wide range of ambient gas pressures. It overcomes the limitations of traditional DBD codes which are limited to low-speed applications and have weak prediction capabilities. The software tool allows DBD actuator analysis and prediction for subsonic to hypersonic flow regime. The simulation tool is based on the VORPAL code developed by Tech-X Corporation. VORPAL's capability of modeling DBD plasma actuator at low pressures (0.1 to 10 torr) using kinetic plasma modeling approach, and at moderate to atmospheric pressures (1 to 10 atm) using hydrodynamic plasma modeling approach, were demonstrated. In addition, results of experiments with pulsed+bias DBD configuration that were performed for validation purposes are reported.

  16. Efficacy of passive sampler collection for atmospheric NO2 isotopes under simulated environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Justin G; Yu, Zhongjie; Elliott, Emily M

    2017-07-30

    Nitrogen oxides or NO x (NO x = NO + NO 2 ) play an important role in air quality, atmospheric chemistry, and climate. The isotopic compositions of anthropogenic and natural NO 2 sources are wide-ranging, and they can be used to constrain sources of ambient NO 2 and associated atmospheric deposition of nitrogen compounds. While passive sample collection of NO 2 isotopes has been used in field studies to determine NO x source influences on atmospheric deposition, this approach has not been evaluated for accuracy or precision under different environmental conditions. The efficacy of NO 2 passive sampler collection for NO 2 isotopes was evaluated under varied temperature and relative humidity (RH) conditions in a dynamic flux chamber. The precision and accuracy of the filter NO 2 collection as nitrite (NO 2 - ) for isotopic analysis were determined using a reference NO 2 gas tank and through inter-calibration with a modified EPA Method 7. The bacterial denitrifer method was used to convert 20 μM of collected NO 2 - or nitrate (NO 3 - ) into N 2 O and was carried out on an Isoprime continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. δ 15 N-NO 2 values determined from passive NO 2 collection, in conditions of 11-34 °C, 1-78% RH, have an overall accuracy and precision of ±2.1 ‰, and individual run precision of ±0.6 ‰. δ 18 O-NO 2 values obtained from passive NO 2 sampler collection, under the same conditions, have an overall precision of ± 1.3 ‰. Suitable conditions for passive sampler collection of NO 2 isotopes are in environments ranging from 11 to 34 °C and 1 to 78% RH. The passive NO 2 isotope measurement technique provides an accurate method to determine variations in atmospheric δ 15 N-NO 2 values and a precise method for determining atmospheric δ 18 O-NO 2 values. The ability to measure NO 2 isotopes over spatial gradients at the same temporal resolution provides a unique perspective on the extent and seasonality of fluctuations in atmospheric NO 2

  17. Atmospheric Dispersion Simulation for Level 3 PSA at Ulchin Nuclear Site using a PUFF model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Han, Seok-Jung; Jeong, Hyojoon; Jang, Seung-Cheol [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Air dispersion prediction is a key in the level 3 PSA to predict radiation releases into the environment for preparing an effective strategy for an evacuation as a basis of the emergency preparedness. To predict the atmospheric dispersion accurately, the specific conditions of the radiation release location should be considered. There are various level 3 PSA tools and MACSS2 is one of the widely used level 3 PSA tools in many countries including Korea. Due to the characteristics of environmental conditions in Korea, it should be demonstrated that environmental conditions of Korea nuclear sites can be appropriately illustrated by the tool. In Korea, because all nuclear power plants are located on coasts, sea and land breezes might be a significant factor. The objectives of this work is to simulate the atmospheric dispersion for Ulchin nuclear site in Korea using a PUFF model and to generate the data which can be used for the comparison with that of PLUME model. A nuclear site has own atmospheric dispersion characteristics. Especially in Korea, nuclear sites are located at coasts and it is expected that see and land breeze effects are relatively high. In this work, the atmospheric dispersion at Ulchin nuclear site was simulated to evaluate the effect of see and land breezes in four seasons. In the simulation results, it was observed that the wind direction change with time has a large effect on atmospheric dispersion. If the result of a PLUME model is more conservative than most severe case of a PUFF model, then the PLUME model could be used for Korea nuclear sites in terms of safety assessment.

  18. Simulation of submillimetre atmospheric spectra for characterising potential ground-based remote sensing observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Turner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The submillimetre is an understudied region of the Earth's atmospheric electromagnetic spectrum. Prior technological gaps and relatively high opacity due to the prevalence of rotational water vapour lines at these wavelengths have slowed progress from a ground-based remote sensing perspective; however, emerging superconducting detector technologies in the fields of astronomy offer the potential to address key atmospheric science challenges with new instrumental methods. A site study, with a focus on the polar regions, is performed to assess theoretical feasibility by simulating the downwelling (zenith angle = 0° clear-sky submillimetre spectrum from 30 mm (10 GHz to 150 µm (2000 GHz at six locations under annual mean, summer, winter, daytime, night-time and low-humidity conditions. Vertical profiles of temperature, pressure and 28 atmospheric gases are constructed by combining radiosonde, meteorological reanalysis and atmospheric chemistry model data. The sensitivity of the simulated spectra to the choice of water vapour continuum model and spectroscopic line database is explored. For the atmospheric trace species hypobromous acid (HOBr, hydrogen bromide (HBr, perhydroxyl radical (HO2 and nitrous oxide (N2O the emission lines producing the largest change in brightness temperature are identified. Signal strengths, centre frequencies, bandwidths, estimated minimum integration times and maximum receiver noise temperatures are determined for all cases. HOBr, HBr and HO2 produce brightness temperature peaks in the mK to µK range, whereas the N2O peaks are in the K range. The optimal submillimetre remote sensing lines for the four species are shown to vary significantly between location and scenario, strengthening the case for future hyperspectral instruments that measure over a broad wavelength range. The techniques presented here provide a framework that can be applied to additional species of interest and taken forward to simulate

  19. The influence of atmospheric grid resolution in a climate model-forced ice sheet simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofverstrom, Marcus; Liakka, Johan

    2018-04-01

    Coupled climate-ice sheet simulations have been growing in popularity in recent years. Experiments of this type are however challenging as ice sheets evolve over multi-millennial timescales, which is beyond the practical integration limit of most Earth system models. A common method to increase model throughput is to trade resolution for computational efficiency (compromise accuracy for speed). Here we analyze how the resolution of an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) influences the simulation quality in a stand-alone ice sheet model. Four identical AGCM simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) were run at different horizontal resolutions: T85 (1.4°), T42 (2.8°), T31 (3.8°), and T21 (5.6°). These simulations were subsequently used as forcing of an ice sheet model. While the T85 climate forcing reproduces the LGM ice sheets to a high accuracy, the intermediate resolution cases (T42 and T31) fail to build the Eurasian ice sheet. The T21 case fails in both Eurasia and North America. Sensitivity experiments using different surface mass balance parameterizations improve the simulations of the Eurasian ice sheet in the T42 case, but the compromise is a substantial ice buildup in Siberia. The T31 and T21 cases do not improve in the same way in Eurasia, though the latter simulates the continent-wide Laurentide ice sheet in North America. The difficulty to reproduce the LGM ice sheets in the T21 case is in broad agreement with previous studies using low-resolution atmospheric models, and is caused by a substantial deterioration of the model climate between the T31 and T21 resolutions. It is speculated that this deficiency may demonstrate a fundamental problem with using low-resolution atmospheric models in these types of experiments.

  20. Interaction of oxides of nitrogen and aromatic hydrocarbons under simulated atmospheric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obrien, R.J.; Green, P.J.; Doty, R.A.; Vanderzanden, J.W.; Easton, R.R.; Irwin, R.P.

    1979-01-01

    The reactions of nitrogen oxides with aromatic hydrocarbons under simulated atmospheric conditions are investigated. Gaseous reaction products formed when toluene is irradiated under simulated atmospheric conditions in the presence of nitrogen oxides were analyzed by gas chromatography. Reaction products detected include acetylene, water, acetaldehyde, acetone, toluene, benzaldehyde, ortho-, meta- and para-cresol, benzyl nitrate and meta- and para-nitrotoluene. Reaction mechanisms yielding the various products are illustrated. The assumption that all the nitrogen oxides observed to be lost from the reaction products can be accounted for by nitric acid formation in the absence of ozone formation is verified by a model in which the hydroxyl radical is assumed to be the only means of removing toluene. Under conditions in which ozone is formed, nitrogen oxide loss is accounted for by ozone formation in addition to nitric acid formation

  1. Simulated effect of calcification feedback on atmospheric CO2 and ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; Cao, Long

    2016-01-01

    Ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 reduces pH and saturation state of calcium carbonate materials of seawater, which could reduce the calcification rate of some marine organisms, triggering a negative feedback on the growth of atmospheric CO2. We quantify the effect of this CO2-calcification feedback by conducting a series of Earth system model simulations that incorporate different parameterization schemes describing the dependence of calcification rate on saturation state of CaCO3. In a scenario with SRES A2 CO2 emission until 2100 and zero emission afterwards, by year 3500, in the simulation without CO2-calcification feedback, model projects an accumulated ocean CO2 uptake of 1462 PgC, atmospheric CO2 of 612 ppm, and surface pH of 7.9. Inclusion of CO2-calcification feedback increases ocean CO2 uptake by 9 to 285 PgC, reduces atmospheric CO2 by 4 to 70 ppm, and mitigates the reduction in surface pH by 0.003 to 0.06, depending on the form of parameterization scheme used. It is also found that the effect of CO2-calcification feedback on ocean carbon uptake is comparable and could be much larger than the effect from CO2-induced warming. Our results highlight the potentially important role CO2-calcification feedback plays in ocean carbon cycle and projections of future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. PMID:26838480

  2. Predominant nonlinear atmospheric response to meridional shift of the Gulf Stream path from the WRF atmospheric model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, H.; Kwon, Y. O.; Joyce, T. M.

    2016-02-01

    A remarkably strong nonlinear behavior of the atmospheric circulation response to North Atlantic SST anomalies (SSTA) is revealed from a set of large-ensemble, high-resolution, and hemispheric-scale Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations. The model is forced with the SSTA associated with meridional shift of the Gulf Stream (GS) path, constructed from a lag regression of the winter SST on a GS Index from observation. Analysis of the systematic set of experiments with SSTAs of varied amplitudes and switched signs representing various GS-shift scenarios provides unique insights into mechanism for emergence and evolution of transient and equilibrium response of atmospheric circulation to extratropical SSTA. Results show that, independent of sign of the SSTA, the equilibrium response is characterized by an anomalous trough over the North Atlantic Ocean and the Western Europe concurrent with enhanced storm track, increased rainfall, and reduced blocking days. To the north of the anomalous low, an anomalous ridge emerges over the Greenland, Iceland, and Norwegian Seas accompanied by weakened storm track, reduced rainfall and increased blocking days. This nonlinear component of the total response dominates the weak and oppositely signed linear response that is directly forced by the SSTA, yielding an anomalous ridge (trough) downstream of the warm (cold) SSTA. The amplitude of the linear response is proportional to that of the SSTA, but this is masked by the overwhelmingly strong nonlinear behavior showing no clear correspondence to the SSTA amplitude. The nonlinear pattern emerges 3-4 weeks after the model initialization in November and reaches its first peak amplitude in December/January. It appears that altered baroclinic wave activity due to the GS SSTA in November lead to low-frequency height responses in December/January through transient eddy vorticity flux convergence.

  3. Simulation and prototyping of 2 m long resistive plate chambers for detection of fast neutrons and multi-neutron event identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elekes, Z., E-mail: z.elekes@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Aumann, T. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Bemmerer, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Boretzky, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Caesar, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Cowan, T.C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Hehner, J.; Heil, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Kempe, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Rossi, D. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Röder, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Simon, H. [GSI Helmholtzzentrumfür Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Sobiella, M.; Stach, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Reinhardt, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Wagner, A.; Yakorev, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Zilges, A. [Universität zu Köln, Köln (Germany); Zuber, K. [Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-02-11

    Resistive plate chamber (RPC) prototypes of 2 m length were simulated and built. The experimental tests using a 31 MeV electron beam, discussed in details, showed an efficiency higher than 90% and an excellent time resolution of around σ=100ps. Furthermore, comprehensive simulations were performed by GEANT4 toolkit in order to study the possible use of these RPCs for fast neutron (200 MeV–1 GeV) detection and multi-neutron event identification. The validation of simulation parameters was carried out via a comparison to experimental data. A possible setup for invariant mass spectroscopy of multi-neutron emission is presented and the characteristics are discussed. The results show that the setup has a high detection efficiency. Its capability of determining the momentum of the outgoing neutrons and reconstructing the relative energy between the fragments from nuclear reactions is demonstrated for different scenarios.

  4. Large-eddy simulation of stratified atmospheric flows with the CFD code Code-Saturne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dall'Ozzo, Cedric

    2013-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) of the physical processes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) remains a complex subject. LES models have difficulties to capture the evolution of the turbulence in different conditions of stratification. Consequently, LES of the whole diurnal cycle of the ABL including convective situations in daytime and stable situations in the nighttime is seldom documented. The simulation of the stable atmospheric boundary layer which is characterized by small eddies and by weak and sporadic turbulence is especially difficult. Therefore The LES ability to well reproduce real meteorological conditions, particularly in stable situations, is studied with the CFD code developed by EDF R and D, Code-Saturne. The first study consist in validate LES on a quasi-steady state convective case with homogeneous terrain. The influence of the sub-grid-scale models (Smagorinsky model, Germano-Lilly model, Wong-Lilly model and Wall-Adapting Local Eddy-viscosity model) and the sensitivity to the parametrization method on the mean fields, flux and variances are discussed. In a second study, the diurnal cycle of the ABL during Wangara experiment is simulated. The deviation from the measurement is weak during the day, so this work is focused on the difficulties met during the night to simulate the stable atmospheric boundary layer. The impact of the different sub-grid-scale models and the sensitivity to the Smagorinsky constant are been analysed. By coupling radiative forcing with LES, the consequences of infra-red and solar radiation on the nocturnal low level jet and on thermal gradient, close to the surface, are exposed. More, enhancement of the domain resolution to the turbulence intensity and the strong atmospheric stability during the Wangara experiment are analysed. Finally, a study of the numerical oscillations inherent to Code-Saturne is realized in order to decrease their effects. (author) [fr

  5. Simulation of semi-artificial interaction events of cosmic radiation in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, L.C.A.

    1986-01-01

    A simulation of artifitial A-jets was performed, using the data of observed C-jets, aiming to study the atmospheric interactions. A comparative study on artifitial A-jets with observed A-jets, considering initially, only one interaction and then, introducing the possibility of successive interactions, is presented. A process denominated ''descascatizacao'' for one interaction stage is evaluated. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. Atmospheric dispersion simulations of volcanic gas from Miyake Island by SPEEDI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Haruyasu; Furuno, Akiko; Terada, Hiroaki; Umeyama, Nobuaki; Yamazawa, Hiromi; Chino, Masamichi

    2001-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is advancing the study for prediction of material circulation in the environment to cope with environmental pollution, based on SPEEDI (System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information) and WSPEEDI (Worldwide version of SPEEDI), which are originally developed aiming at real-time prediction of atmospheric dispersion of radioactive substances accidentally released from nuclear facility. As a part of this study, dispersion simulation of volcanic gas erupted from Miyake Island is put into practice. After the stench incident at the west Kanto District on 28 August 2000 caused by volcanic gas from Miyake Island, the following simulations dealing with atmospheric dispersion of volcanic gas from Miyake Island have been carried out. (1) Retrospective simulation to analyze examine the mechanism of the transport of high concentration volcanic gas to the west Kanto District on 28 August and to estimate the release amount of volcanic gas. (2) Retrospective simulation to analyze the mechanism of the transport of volcanic gas to Tokai and Kansai districts in a case of stench incident on 13 September. (3) Automated real-time simulation from the acquisition of meteorological data to the output of figures for operational prediction of the transport of volcanic gas to Tokai and Kanto districts. This report describes the details of these studies. (author)

  7. Differences in rain rate intensities between TRMM observations and community atmosphere model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Bowman, Kenneth P.; Jackson, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Precipitation related latent heating is important in driving the atmospheric general circulation and in generating intraseasonal to decadal atmospheric variability. Our ability to project future climate change, especially trends in costly precipitation extremes, hinges upon whether coupled GCMs capture processes that affect precipitation characteristics. Our study compares the tropical-subtropical precipitation characteristics of simulations by the NCAR CAM3.1 atmospheric GCM and observations derived from the NASA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. Despite a fairly good simulation of the annual mean rain rate, CAM rains about 10-50% more often than the real world and fails to capture heavy rainfall associated with deep convective systems over subtropical South America and U.S. Southern Plains. When it rains, there is a likelihood of 0.96-1.0 that it rains lightly in the model, compared to values of 0.84-1.0 in TRMM data. On the other hand, the likelihood of the occurrence of moderate to heavy rainfall is an order of magnitude higher in observations (0.12-0.2) than that in the model (model compensates for the lack of heavy precipitation through raining more frequently within the light rain category, which leads to an annual rainfall amount close to what is observed. CAM captures the qualitative change of rain rate PDF from a "dry" oceanic to a "wet" oceanic region, but it fails to simulate the change of precipitation characteristics from an oceanic region to a land region where thunderstorm rainfall dominates.

  8. Compiled records of carbon isotopes in atmospheric CO2 for historical simulations in CMIP6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Graven

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The isotopic composition of carbon (Δ14C and δ13C in atmospheric CO2 and in oceanic and terrestrial carbon reservoirs is influenced by anthropogenic emissions and by natural carbon exchanges, which can respond to and drive changes in climate. Simulations of 14C and 13C in the ocean and terrestrial components of Earth system models (ESMs present opportunities for model evaluation and for investigation of carbon cycling, including anthropogenic CO2 emissions and uptake. The use of carbon isotopes in novel evaluation of the ESMs' component ocean and terrestrial biosphere models and in new analyses of historical changes may improve predictions of future changes in the carbon cycle and climate system. We compile existing data to produce records of Δ14C and δ13C in atmospheric CO2 for the historical period 1850–2015. The primary motivation for this compilation is to provide the atmospheric boundary condition for historical simulations in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 6 (CMIP6 for models simulating carbon isotopes in the ocean or terrestrial biosphere. The data may also be useful for other carbon cycle modelling activities.

  9. An analytical model for radioactive pollutant release simulation in the atmospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weymar, Guilherme J.; Vilhena, Marco T.; Bodmann, Bardo E.J.; Buske, Daniela; Quadros, Regis

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of emission of radioactive substances in the atmosphere from the Brazilian nuclear power plant Angra 1 are a necessary tool for control and elaboration of emergency plans as a preventive action for possible accidents. In the present work we present an analytical solution for radioactive pollutant dispersion in the atmosphere, solving the time-dependent three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation. The experiment here used as a reference in the simulations consisted of the controlled releases of radioactive tritiated water vapor from the meteorological tower close to the power plant at Itaorna Beach. The wind profile was determined using experimental meteorological data and the micrometeorological parameters were calculated from empirical equations obtained in the literature. We report on a novel analytical formulation for the concentration of products of a radioactive chain released in the atmospheric boundary layer and solve the set of coupled equations for each chain radionuclide by the GILTT solution, assuming the decay of all progenitors radionuclide for each equation as source term. Further we report on numerical simulations, as an explicit but fictitious example and consider three radionuclides in the radioactive chain of Uranium 235. (author)

  10. Compiled records of carbon isotopes in atmospheric CO2 for historical simulations in CMIP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graven, Heather; Allison, Colin E.; Etheridge, David M.; Hammer, Samuel; Keeling, Ralph F.; Levin, Ingeborg; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Rubino, Mauro; Tans, Pieter P.; Trudinger, Cathy M.; Vaughn, Bruce H.; White, James W. C.

    2017-12-01

    The isotopic composition of carbon (Δ14C and δ13C) in atmospheric CO2 and in oceanic and terrestrial carbon reservoirs is influenced by anthropogenic emissions and by natural carbon exchanges, which can respond to and drive changes in climate. Simulations of 14C and 13C in the ocean and terrestrial components of Earth system models (ESMs) present opportunities for model evaluation and for investigation of carbon cycling, including anthropogenic CO2 emissions and uptake. The use of carbon isotopes in novel evaluation of the ESMs' component ocean and terrestrial biosphere models and in new analyses of historical changes may improve predictions of future changes in the carbon cycle and climate system. We compile existing data to produce records of Δ14C and δ13C in atmospheric CO2 for the historical period 1850-2015. The primary motivation for this compilation is to provide the atmospheric boundary condition for historical simulations in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 6 (CMIP6) for models simulating carbon isotopes in the ocean or terrestrial biosphere. The data may also be useful for other carbon cycle modelling activities.

  11. An analytical model for radioactive pollutant release simulation in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weymar, Guilherme J.; Vilhena, Marco T.; Bodmann, Bardo E.J., E-mail: guicefetrs@gmail.com, E-mail: mtmbvilhena@gmail.com, E-mail: bejbodmann@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Buske, Daniela; Quadros, Regis, E-mail: danielabuske@gmail.com, E-mail: quadros99@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), Capao do Leao, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Modelagem Matematica

    2013-07-01

    Simulations of emission of radioactive substances in the atmosphere from the Brazilian nuclear power plant Angra 1 are a necessary tool for control and elaboration of emergency plans as a preventive action for possible accidents. In the present work we present an analytical solution for radioactive pollutant dispersion in the atmosphere, solving the time-dependent three-dimensional advection-diffusion equation. The experiment here used as a reference in the simulations consisted of the controlled releases of radioactive tritiated water vapor from the meteorological tower close to the power plant at Itaorna Beach. The wind profile was determined using experimental meteorological data and the micrometeorological parameters were calculated from empirical equations obtained in the literature. We report on a novel analytical formulation for the concentration of products of a radioactive chain released in the atmospheric boundary layer and solve the set of coupled equations for each chain radionuclide by the GILTT solution, assuming the decay of all progenitors radionuclide for each equation as source term. Further we report on numerical simulations, as an explicit but fictitious example and consider three radionuclides in the radioactive chain of Uranium 235. (author)

  12. The responses of Petunia to simulated pollutants in chamber conditions and its uses as bioindicator of pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguntimehin, I. I.; Kondo, H.; Sakugawa, H. H.

    2010-12-01

    petunia showed reduced aperture in the ‘O’ treatment compared with other treatments. The histochemical analysis confirmed a relatively higher H2O2 deposition and dead cell portions in the ‘O’ containing treatment than others. These results strongly suggest that the Petunia plant is sensitive to the simulated atmospheric pollutants that can be threatening to the plant health status, therefore, it can be used as a bioindicator.

  13. Study of irradiation of flash lightning type in a Titan simulated atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa C, J.G. De la

    2001-01-01

    Titan is the greatest satellite of the Saturn planet and the unique moon of the Solar System which presents a dense atmosphere constituted by nitrogen, methane and traces of hydrocarbons and nitriles. Constantly it is bombarded by different energy sources which interacting with the atmosphere cause countless of chemical reactions which have giving origin to the synthesis of organic molecules from its formation since 4.5 thousand millions of years ago. The electric activity was not detected in the satellite when the space probe Voyager I had its nearest match with Titan in November 1980, however, due to the presence of methane clouds rain and of convective activity in the troposphere of the satellite, it is thought in the possible existence of electrical activity in this. In this work it is studied the production of gaseous compounds generated by irradiations type flash lightning in the Titan simulated atmosphere constituted by nitrogen and methane. The lightning are imitated by laser induced plasma (LIP) with similar physical properties to the naturals produced in the Earth. The separation and identification of the organic compounds generated by simulated lightning s were carried out by attached methods of analysis such as the Gas chromatography, Infrared spectroscopy with Fourier transform (FTIR-S) and Mass spectroscopy (MS). The compounds which were identified are: hydrocarbons and nitriles, some of them already have been identified in Titan as well as the hydrogen cyanide (HCN), acetylene, etilene and cyanoacetylene. Moreover we studied the influence that different parameters of irradiation have in the production of organic molecules generated submitting to discharges type lightning the simulated atmosphere of Titan. It was realized an estimation of the available energy in the satellite which could be vanished as discharges type lightning. By means of a model based on conditions of thermodynamic equilibria it was calculated the temperature to which are freeze

  14. Report from Workshop on VOCs in diving chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosbie, A.; Simpson, M.

    2000-05-01

    This report of the 'Setting the Standards' workshop on the problems of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in diving in offshore operations, sponsored jointly by the UK Health and Safety Executive Offshore Safety Division and the Stolt Rockwater Joint Venture, gives details of the papers presented covering the chemical contamination of diver's atmosphere, sampling protocols and methods, analytical procedures used for VOCs in hyperbaric chambers, and contamination in buildings. The setting of exposure limits in the UK, the derivation of threshold limiting values (TVLs), the selection of Tenax tubes for atmospheric sampling, organic contaminant monitoring, and NASA's approach to contamination in the space environment are examined, and dealing with contamination problems in a submarine atmosphere, and the simulation of a condensate spillage in a diving bell are discussed. Guidelines for the measurement of VOCs in hyperbaric chambers are given in the appendices

  15. Cloud Chamber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gfader, Verina

    Cloud Chamber takes its roots in a performance project, titled The Guests 做东, devised by Verina Gfader for the 11th Shanghai Biennale, ‘Why Not Ask Again: Arguments, Counter-arguments, and Stories’. Departing from the inclusion of the biennale audience to write a future folk tale, Cloud Chamber......: fiction and translation and translation through time; post literacy; world picturing-world typing; and cartographic entanglements and expressions of subjectivity; through the lens a social imaginary of worlding or cosmological quest. Art at its core? Contributions by Nikos Papastergiadis, Rebecca Carson...

  16. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  17. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  18. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  19. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in ISR (Intersecting Storage Ring) split field magnet experiment. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  20. Atmosphere Re-Entry Simulation Using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Pellicani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypersonic re-entry vehicles aerothermodynamic investigations provide fundamental information to other important disciplines like materials and structures, assisting the development of thermal protection systems (TPS efficient and with a low weight. In the transitional flow regime, where thermal and chemical equilibrium is almost absent, a new numerical method for such studies has been introduced, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC numerical technique. The acceptance and applicability of the DSMC method have increased significantly in the 50 years since its invention thanks to the increase in computer speed and to the parallel computing. Anyway, further verification and validation efforts are needed to lead to its greater acceptance. In this study, the Monte Carlo simulator OpenFOAM and Sparta have been studied and benchmarked against numerical and theoretical data for inert and chemically reactive flows and the same will be done against experimental data in the near future. The results show the validity of the data found with the DSMC. The best setting of the fundamental parameters used by a DSMC simulator are presented for each software and they are compared with the guidelines deriving from the theory behind the Monte Carlo method. In particular, the number of particles per cell was found to be the most relevant parameter to achieve valid and optimized results. It is shown how a simulation with a mean value of one particle per cell gives sufficiently good results with very low computational resources. This achievement aims to reconsider the correct investigation method in the transitional regime where both the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC and the computational fluid-dynamics (CFD can work, but with a different computational effort.

  1. Uncertainty analysis of atmospheric deposition simulation of radiocesium and radioiodine from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morino, Yu; Ohara, Toshimasa; Yumimoto, Keiya

    2014-05-01

    Chemical transport models (CTM) played key roles in understanding the atmospheric behaviors and deposition patterns of radioactive materials emitted from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) after the nuclear accident that accompanied the great Tohoku earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011. In this study, we assessed uncertainties of atmospheric simulation by comparing observed and simulated deposition of radiocesium (137Cs) and radioiodine (131I). Airborne monitoring survey data were used to assess the model performance of 137Cs deposition patterns. We found that simulation using emissions estimated with a regional-scale (~500 km) CTM better reproduced the observed 137Cs deposition pattern in eastern Japan than simulation using emissions estimated with local-scale (~50 km) or global-scale CTM. In addition, we estimated the emission amount of 137Cs from FDNPP by combining a CTM, a priori source term, and observed deposition data. This is the first use of airborne survey data of 137Cs deposition (more than 16,000 data points) as the observational constraints in inverse modeling. The model simulation driven by a posteriori source term achieved better agreements with 137Cs depositions measured by aircraft survey and at in-situ stations over eastern Japan. Wet deposition module was also evaluated. Simulation using a process-based wet deposition module reproduced the observations well, whereas simulation using scavenging coefficients showed large uncertainties associated with empirical parameters. The best-available simulation reproduced the observed 137Cs deposition rates in high-deposition areas (≥10 kBq m-2) within one order of magnitude. Recently, 131I deposition map was released and helped to evaluate model performance of 131I deposition patterns. Observed 131I/137Cs deposition ratio is higher in areas southwest of FDNPP than northwest of FDNPP, and this behavior was roughly reproduced by a CTM if we assume that released 131I is more in gas phase

  2. Atmospheric blocking in the Climate SPHINX simulations: the role of orography and resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davini, Paolo; Corti, Susanna; D'Andrea, Fabio; Riviere, Gwendal; von Hardenberg, Jost

    2017-04-01

    The representation of atmospheric blocking in numerical simulations, especially over the Euro-Atlantic region, still represents a main concern for the climate modelling community. We here discuss the Northern Hemisphere winter atmospheric blocking representation in a set of 30-year simulations which has been performed in the framework of the PRACE project "Climate SPHINX". Simulations were run using the EC-Earth Global Climate Model with several ensemble members at 5 different horizontal resolutions (ranging from 125 km to 16 km). Results show that the negative bias in blocking frequency over Europe becomes negligible at resolutions of about 40 km and finer. However, the blocking duration is still underestimated by 1-2 days, suggesting that the correct blocking frequencies are achieved with an overestimation of the number of blocking onsets. The reasons leading to such improvements are then discussed, highlighting the role of orography in shaping the Atlantic jet stream: at higher resolution the jet is weaker and less penetrating over Europe, favoring the breaking of synoptic Rossby waves over the Atlantic stationary ridge and thus increasing the simulated blocking frequency.

  3. Fourier analysis of Solar atmospheric numerical simulations accelerated with GPUs (CUDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marur, A.

    2015-12-01

    Solar dynamics from the convection zone creates a variety of waves that may propagate through the solar atmosphere. These waves are important in facilitating the energy transfer between the sun's surface and the corona as well as propagating energy throughout the solar system. How and where these waves are dissipated remains an open question. Advanced 3D numerical simulations have furthered our understanding of the processes involved. Fourier transforms to understand the nature of the waves by finding the frequency and wavelength of these waves through the simulated atmosphere, as well as the nature of their propagation and where they get dissipated. In order to analyze the different waves produced by the aforementioned simulations and models, Fast Fourier Transform algorithms will be applied. Since the processing of the multitude of different layers of the simulations (of the order of several 100^3 grid points) would be time intensive and inefficient on a CPU, CUDA, a computing architecture that harnesses the power of the GPU, will be used to accelerate the calculations.

  4. Modeling and simulation of combustion chamber and propellant dynamics and issues in active control of combustion instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isella, Giorgio Carlo

    A method for a comprehensive approach to analysis of the dynamics of an actively controlled combustion chamber, with detailed analysis of the combustion models for the case of a solid rocket propellant, is presented here. The objective is to model the system as interconnected blocks describing the dynamics of the chamber, combustion and control. The analytical framework for the analysis of the dynamics of a combustion chamber is based on spatial averaging, as introduced by Culick. Combustion dynamics are analyzed for the case of a solid propellant. Quasi-steady theory is extended to include the dynamics of the gas-phase and also of a surface layer. The models are constructed so that they produce a combustion response function for the solid propellant that can be immediately introduced in the our analytical framework. The principal objective mechanisms responsible for the large sensitivity, observed experimentally, of propellant response to small variations. We show that velocity coupling, and not pressure coupling, has the potential to be the mechanism responsible for that high sensitivity. We also discuss the effect of particulate modeling on the global dynamics of the chamber and revisit the interpretation of the intrinsic stability limit for burning of solid propellants. Active control is also considered. Particular attention is devoted to the effect of time delay (between sensing and actuation); several methods to compensate for it are discussed, with numerical examples based on the approximate analysis produced by our framework. Experimental results are presented for the case of a Dump Combustor. The combustor exhibits an unstable burning mode, defined through the measurement of the pressure trace and shadowgraph imaging. The transition between stable and unstable modes of operation is characterized by the presence of hysteresis, also observed in other experimental works, and hence not a special characteristic of this combustor. Control is introduced in the

  5. Transient response simulation of gas separation membrane module for an atmosphere detritiation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Takahiko; Tanaka, Masahiro; Munakata, Kenzo; Yamamoto, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Transient response of a gas separation membrane module for the atmosphere detritiation system was numerically simulated with a mass transfer model. The module contains thousands of hollow fiber type polyimide membranes. The simulation model took into account permeation of water vapor through the dense layer of the membrane, diffusive transfer through the porous support layer and adsorption/desorption of water vapor into the matrix of the porous layer. The slow responses of the water vapor concentration in the retentate and the permeation rate were well reproduced by the present simulation, and transient changes in a follow fiber membrane were investigated in detail. The inventory and the mean residence time of water vapor at 303 K were estimated for the commercial membrane module (UMS-B2, Ube industries, Ltd.) as 5.7 × 10 −3 mol and 380 s, respectively.

  6. Large eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer over wind farms using a prescribed boundary layer approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of flow in a wind farm is studied in neutral as well as thermally stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). An approach has been practiced to simulate the flow in a fully developed wind farm boundary layer. The approach is based on the Immersed Boundary Method (IBM......) and involves implementation of an arbitrary prescribed initial boundary layer (See [1]). A prescribed initial boundary layer profile is enforced through the computational domain using body forces to maintain a desired flow field. The body forces are then stored and applied on the domain through the simulation...... and the boundary layer shape will be modified due to the interaction of the turbine wakes and buoyancy contributions. The implemented method is capable of capturing the most important features of wakes of wind farms [1] while having the advantage of resolving the wall layer with a coarser grid than typically...

  7. ARTS, the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator - version 2.2, the planetary toolbox edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Stefan A.; Mendrok, Jana; Eriksson, Patrick; Perrin, Agnès; Larsson, Richard; Lemke, Oliver

    2018-04-01

    This article describes the latest stable release (version 2.2) of the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator (ARTS), a public domain software for radiative transfer simulations in the thermal spectral range (microwave to infrared). The main feature of this release is a planetary toolbox that allows simulations for the planets Venus, Mars, and Jupiter, in addition to Earth. This required considerable model adaptations, most notably in the area of gaseous absorption calculations. Other new features are also described, notably radio link budgets (including the effect of Faraday rotation that changes the polarization state) and the treatment of Zeeman splitting for oxygen spectral lines. The latter is relevant, for example, for the various operational microwave satellite temperature sensors of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) family.

  8. Simulating carbon exchange using a regional atmospheric model coupled to an advanced land-surface model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. W. Ter Maat

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a case study to investigate what the main controlling factors are that determine atmospheric carbon dioxide content for a region in the centre of The Netherlands. We use the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS, coupled with a land surface scheme simulating carbon, heat and momentum fluxes (SWAPS-C, and including also submodels for urban and marine fluxes, which in principle should include the dominant mechanisms and should be able to capture the relevant dynamics of the system. To validate the model, observations are used that were taken during an intensive observational campaign in central Netherlands in summer 2002. These include flux-tower observations and aircraft observations of vertical profiles and spatial fluxes of various variables.

    The simulations performed with the coupled regional model (RAMS-SWAPS-C are in good qualitative agreement with the observations. The station validation of the model demonstrates that the incoming shortwave radiation and surface fluxes of water and CO2 are well simulated. The comparison against aircraft data shows that the regional meteorology (i.e. wind, temperature is captured well by the model. Comparing spatially explicitly simulated fluxes with aircraft observed fluxes we conclude that in general latent heat fluxes are underestimated by the model compared to the observations but that the latter exhibit large variability within all flights. Sensitivity experiments demonstrate the relevance of the urban emissions of carbon dioxide for the carbon balance in this particular region. The same tests also show the relation between uncertainties in surface fluxes and those in atmospheric concentrations.

  9. Simulating forest productivity and surface-atmosphere carbon exchange in the BOREAS study region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, J.S.; Thornton, P.E.; White, M.A.; Running, S.W. [Montana Univ., Missoula, MT (United States). School of Forestry

    1997-12-31

    Studies have shown that the boreal forest region is in danger of experiencing significant warming and drying in response to increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and other greenhouse gases. Since the boreal forest region contains 16-24 per cent of the world`s soil carbon, warming in this region could result in a rapid, large-scale displacement and redistribution of boreal forest, enhanced release of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, and an intensification of global warming. A study was conducted in which a process-based, general ecosystem model (BIOME-BGC) was used to simulate daily gross primary production, maintenance and heterotrophic respiration, net primary production and net ecosystem carbon exchange of boreal aspen, jack pine and black spruce. The objective was to integrate point measurements across multiple spatial and temporal scales using process level models of the boreal forest water, energy and biogeochemical cycles. Climate characteristics that control simulated carbon fluxes were also studied. Results showed that trees with large daily evapotranspiration rates and those situated on sandy soils with low water holding capacities were especially vulnerable to increased temperature and drought conditions. Trees subject to frequent water stress during the growing season, particularly older trees that exhibit low photosynthetic and high respiration rates, were on the margin between being annual net sources or sinks for atmospheric carbon. 71 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  10. Simulating the performance of adaptive optics techniques on FSO communications through the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Noelia; Rodríguez Ramos, Luis Fernando; Sodnik, Zoran

    2017-08-01

    The Optical Ground Station (OGS), installed in the Teide Observatory since 1995, was built as part of ESA efforts in the research field of satellite optical communications to test laser telecommunication terminals on board of satellites in Low Earth Orbit and Geostationary Orbit. As far as one side of the link is settled on the Earth, the laser beam (either on the uplink or on the downlink) has to bear with the atmospheric turbulence. Within the framework of designing an Adaptive Optics system to improve the performance of the Free-Space Optical Communications at the OGS, turbulence conditions regarding uplink and downlink have been simulated within the OOMAO (Object-Oriented Matlab Adaptive Optics) Toolbox as well as the possible utilization of a Laser Guide Star to measure the wavefront in this context. Simulations have been carried out by reducing available atmospheric profiles regarding both night-time and day-time measurements and by having into account possible seasonal changes. An AO proposal to reduce atmospheric aberrations and, therefore, ameliorate FSO links performance is presented and analysed in this paper

  11. Kinetic energy spectra, vertical resolution and dissipation in high-resolution atmospheric simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skamarock, W. C.

    2017-12-01

    We have performed week-long full-physics simulations with the MPAS global model at 15 km cell spacing using vertical mesh spacings of 800, 400, 200 and 100 meters in the mid-troposphere through the mid-stratosphere. We find that the horizontal kinetic energy spectra in the upper troposphere and stratosphere does not converge with increasing vertical resolution until we reach 200 meter level spacing. Examination of the solutions indicates that significant inertia-gravity waves are not vertically resolved at the lower vertical resolutions. Diagnostics from the simulations indicate that the primary kinetic energy dissipation results from the vertical mixing within the PBL parameterization and from the gravity-wave drag parameterization, with smaller but significant contributions from damping in the vertical transport scheme and from the horizontal filters in the dynamical core. Most of the kinetic energy dissipation in the free atmosphere occurs within breaking mid-latitude baroclinic waves. We will briefly review these results and their implications for atmospheric model configuration and for atmospheric dynamics, specifically that related to the dynamics associated with the mesoscale kinetic energy spectrum.

  12. Atmospheric dynamics and habitability range in Earth-like aquaplanets obliquity simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowajewski, Priscilla; Rojas, M.; Rojo, P.; Kimeswenger, S.

    2018-05-01

    We present the evolution of the atmospheric variables that affect planetary climate by increasing the obliquity by using a general circulation model (PlaSim) coupled to a slab ocean with mixed layer flux correction. We increase the obliquity between 30° and 90° in 16 aquaplanets with liquid sea surface and perform the simulation allowing the sea ice cover formation to be a consequence of its atmospheric dynamics. Insolation is maintained constant in each experiment, but changing the obliquity affects the radiation budget and the large scale circulation. Earth-like atmospheric dynamics is observed for planets with obliquity under 54°. Above this value, the latitudinal temperature gradient is reversed giving place to a new regime of jet streams, affecting the shape of Hadley and Ferrel cells and changing the position of the InterTropical Convergence Zone. As humidity and high temperatures determine Earth's habitability, we introduce the wet bulb temperature as an atmospheric index of habitability for Earth-like aquaplanets with above freezing temperatures. The aquaplanets are habitable all year round at all latitudes for values under 54°; above this value habitability decreases toward the poles due to high temperatures.

  13. Atmospheric effects of nuclar war aerosols in general circulation model simulations: Influence of smoke optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.L.; Ramaswamy, V.; Covey, C.

    1987-01-01

    A global atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) is modified to include radiative transfer parameterizations for the absorption and scattering of solar radiation and the absorption of thermal infrared (IR) radiation by smoke aerosols. The solar scattering modifications include a parameterization for diagnosing smoke optical properties as a function of the time- and space-dependent smoke particle radii. The aerosol IR modifications allow for both the ''grey'' absorber approximation and a broadband approximation that resolves the aerosol absorption in four spectral intervals. We examine the sensitivity of some GCM-simulated atmospheric and climatic effects to the optical properties and radiative transfer parameterizations used in studies of massive injections of smoke. Specifically, we test the model response to solar scattering versus nonscattering smoke, variations in prescribed smoke single scattering albedo and IR specific absorption, and interactive versus fixed smoke optical properties. Hypothetical nuclear war created smoke scenarios assume the July injection of 60 or 180 Tg of smoke over portions of the mid-latitude land areas of the northern hemisphere. Atmospheric transport and scavenging of the smoke are included. Nonscattering smoke cases produce roughly 40 Wm/sup -2/ more Earth-atmosphere solar irradiance absorption over the northern hemisphere, when compared to scattering smoke cases having equivalent specific absorption efficiencies. Varying the elemental carbon content of smoke over a plausible range produces a 4 0 --6 0 C change in average mid-latitude land surface temperature, and a variation of about 0.1 in zonally averaged planetary albedo in the northern hemisphere

  14. Simulating carbon exchange using a regional atmospheric model coupled to an advanced land-surface model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ter Maat, H.W.; Hutjes, R.W.A.; Miglietta, F.; Gioli, B.; Bosveld, F.C.; Vermeulen, A.T.; Fritsch, H.

    2010-08-01

    This paper is a case study to investigate what the main controlling factors are that determine atmospheric carbon dioxide content for a region in the centre of The Netherlands. We use the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS), coupled with a land surface scheme simulating carbon, heat and momentum fluxes (SWAPS-C), and including also submodels for urban and marine fluxes, which in principle should include the dominant mechanisms and should be able to capture the relevant dynamics of the system. To validate the model, observations are used that were taken during an intensive observational campaign in central Netherlands in summer 2002. These include flux-tower observations and aircraft observations of vertical profiles and spatial fluxes of various variables.

  15. A mathematical model, algorithm, and package of programs for simulation and prompt estimation of the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, V.I.; Yatsko, S.N.

    1995-01-01

    A mathematical model and a package of programs are presented for simulating the atmospheric turbulent diffusion of contaminating impurities from land based and other sources. Test calculations and investigations of the effect of various factors are carried out

  16. Using atmospheric CO2 data to assess a simplified carbon-climate simulation for the 20th century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Rachel M.; Kowalczyk, Eva A.; Wangs, Ying-Ping

    2006-01-01

    The CSIRO biosphere model has been coupled to an atmosphere model and a simulation has been performed for the 20th century. Both biosphere and atmosphere are forced with global CO 2 concentration and the atmosphere is also forced with prescribed sea surface temperatures. The simulation follows the C4MIP Phase 1 protocol. We assess the model simulation using atmospheric CO 2 data. Mauna Loa growth rate is well simulated from 1980 but overestimated before that time. The interannual variations in growth rate are reasonably reproduced. Seasonal cycles are underestimated in northern mid-latitudes and are out of phase in the southern hemisphere. The north-south gradient of annual mean CO 2 is substantially overestimated due to a northern hemisphere net biosphere source and a southern tropical sink. Diurnal cycles at three northern hemisphere locations are larger than observed in many months, most likely due to larger respiration than observed

  17. Consolidation and atmospheric drying of fine oil sand tailings : Comparison of blind simulations and field scale results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardon, P.J.; Yao, Y.; van Paassen, L.A.; van Tol, A.F.; Sego, D.C.; Wilson, G.W.; Beier, N.A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison between blind predictions of field tests of atmospheric drying of mature fine tailings (MFT) presented in IOSTC 2014 and field results. The numerical simulation of the consolidation and atmospheric drying of selfweight consolidating fine material is challenging and

  18. Simulating the Holocene climate evolution at northern high latitudes using a coupled atmosphere-sea ice-ocean-vegetation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renssen, H.; Goosse, H.; Fichefet, T.; Brovkin, V.; Driesschaert, E.; Wolk, F.

    2005-01-01

    The response of the climate at high northern latitudes to slowly changing external forcings was studied in a 9,000-year long simulation with the coupled atmosphere-sea ice-ocean-vegetation model ECBilt-CLIO-VECODE. Only long-term changes in insolation and atmospheric CO

  19. Simulations of Atmospheric Krypton-85 to Assess the Detectability of Clandestine Nuclear Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, O.; Ahlswede, J.; Annewandter, R.; Kalinowski, M.B.; Rast, S.; Schluenzen, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    The results of this study were achieved in the project 'Simulation of Atmospheric Noble Gas Concentrations to Assess Sampling Procedures for the Detection of Clandestine Nuclear Reprocessing' (IAEA GER 1643) in the joint programme of IAEA and Federal Government of Germany. In the first year of the project the detectability of additional krypton-85 sources was investigated using atmospheric transport modelling. Krypton-85 is released into the air during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel rods. Therefore the krypton-85 signature can possibly be used for the detection of undeclared plutonium separation. First, the global krypton-85 background produced by known reprocessing facilities from 1971 until 2006 was simulated with the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 using annual emission data. The model results were evaluated by extensive comparison with measurements performed by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection. Of particular interest for an assessment of the detectability of unknown sources is the background variability. The variability of concentrations is very high over central Europe, where the large reprocessing plants La Hague and Sellafield are located, and it is very low on the Southern Hemisphere, where no nuclear reprocessing takes place. The analysis of concentration time series on various time scales allows partly a distinction between fluctuations caused by the variability of the sources from variations due to atmospheric dynamics. Furthermore the detection sensitivity to a set of arbitrarily specified source locations is analysed with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model. This, in combination with the location specific background variability, is giving first benchmarks on the capability of using krypton-85 for IAEA Safeguards based on the Additional Protocols foreseeing environmental sampling. (author)

  20. NON-EQUILIBRIUM HELIUM IONIZATION IN AN MHD SIMULATION OF THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golding, Thomas Peter; Carlsson, Mats; Leenaarts, Jorrit

    2016-01-01

    The ionization state of the gas in the dynamic solar chromosphere can depart strongly from the instantaneous statistical equilibrium commonly assumed in numerical modeling. We improve on earlier simulations of the solar atmosphere that only included non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization by performing a 2D radiation-magnetohydrodynamics simulation featuring non-equilibrium ionization of both hydrogen and helium. The simulation includes the effect of hydrogen Lyα and the EUV radiation from the corona on the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. Details on code implementation are given. We obtain helium ion fractions that are far from their equilibrium values. Comparison with models with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) ionization shows that non-equilibrium helium ionization leads to higher temperatures in wavefronts and lower temperatures in the gas between shocks. Assuming LTE ionization results in a thermostat-like behavior with matter accumulating around the temperatures where the LTE ionization fractions change rapidly. Comparison of DEM curves computed from our models shows that non-equilibrium ionization leads to more radiating material in the temperature range 11–18 kK, compared to models with LTE helium ionization. We conclude that non-equilibrium helium ionization is important for the dynamics and thermal structure of the upper chromosphere and transition region. It might also help resolve the problem that intensities of chromospheric lines computed from current models are smaller than those observed

  1. Simulations of atmospheric methane for Cape Grim, Tasmania, to constrain southeastern Australian methane emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. M. Loh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study uses two climate models and six scenarios of prescribed methane emissions to compare modelled and observed atmospheric methane between 1994 and 2007, for Cape Grim, Australia (40.7° S, 144.7° E. The model simulations follow the TransCom-CH4 protocol and use the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS and the CSIRO Conformal-Cubic Atmospheric Model (CCAM. Radon is also simulated and used to reduce the impact of transport differences between the models and observations. Comparisons are made for air samples that have traversed the Australian continent. All six emission scenarios give modelled concentrations that are broadly consistent with those observed. There are three notable mismatches, however. Firstly, scenarios that incorporate interannually varying biomass burning emissions produce anomalously high methane concentrations at Cape Grim at times of large fire events in southeastern Australia, most likely due to the fire methane emissions being unrealistically input into the lowest model level. Secondly, scenarios with wetland methane emissions in the austral winter overestimate methane concentrations at Cape Grim during wintertime while scenarios without winter wetland emissions perform better. Finally, all scenarios fail to represent a~methane source in austral spring implied by the observations. It is possible that the timing of wetland emissions in the scenarios is incorrect with recent satellite measurements suggesting an austral spring (September–October–November, rather than winter, maximum for wetland emissions.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of the local concentration and structure in multicomponent aerosol nanoparticles under atmospheric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadima, Katerina S; Mavrantzas, Vlasis G; Pandis, Spyros N

    2017-06-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the local structure and local concentration in atmospheric nanoparticles consisting of an organic compound (cis-pinonic acid or n-C 30 H 62 ), sulfate and ammonium ions, and water. Simulations in the isothermal-isobaric (NPT) statistical ensemble under atmospheric conditions with a prespecified number of molecules of the abovementioned compounds led to the formation of a nanoparticle. Calculations of the density profiles of all the chemical species in the nanoparticle, the corresponding radial pair distribution functions, and their mobility inside the nanoparticle revealed strong interactions developing between sulfate and ammonium ions. However, sulfate and ammonium ions prefer to populate the central part of the nanoparticle under the simulated conditions, whereas organic molecules like to reside at its outer surface. Sulfate and ammonium ions were practically immobile; in contrast, the organic molecules exhibited appreciable mobility at the outer surface of the nanoparticle. When the organic compound was a normal alkane (e.g. n-C 30 H 62 ), a well-organized (crystalline-like) phase was rapidly formed at the free surface of the nanoparticle and remained separate from the rest of the species.

  3. Stratospheric temperatures and tracer transport in a nudged 4-year middle atmosphere GCM simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aalst, M. K.; Lelieveld, J.; Steil, B.; Brühl, C.; Jöckel, P.; Giorgetta, M. A.; Roelofs, G.-J.

    2005-02-01

    We have performed a 4-year simulation with the Middle Atmosphere General Circulation Model MAECHAM5/MESSy, while slightly nudging the model's meteorology in the free troposphere (below 113 hPa) towards ECMWF analyses. We show that the nudging 5 technique, which leaves the middle atmosphere almost entirely free, enables comparisons with synoptic observations. The model successfully reproduces many specific features of the interannual variability, including details of the Antarctic vortex structure. In the Arctic, the model captures general features of the interannual variability, but falls short in reproducing the timing of sudden stratospheric warmings. A 10 detailed comparison of the nudged model simulations with ECMWF data shows that the model simulates realistic stratospheric temperature distributions and variabilities, including the temperature minima in the Antarctic vortex. Some small (a few K) model biases were also identified, including a summer cold bias at both poles, and a general cold bias in the lower stratosphere, most pronounced in midlatitudes. A comparison 15 of tracer distributions with HALOE observations shows that the model successfully reproduces specific aspects of the instantaneous circulation. The main tracer transport deficiencies occur in the polar lowermost stratosphere. These are related to the tropopause altitude as well as the tracer advection scheme and model resolution. The additional nudging of equatorial zonal winds, forcing the quasi-biennial oscillation, sig20 nificantly improves stratospheric temperatures and tracer distributions.

  4. Simulations of fusion chamber dynamics and first wall response in a Z-pinch driven fusion–fission hybrid power reactor (Z-FFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, J.M., E-mail: qjm06@sina.com [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Wang, Z., E-mail: wangz_es@caep.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Chu, Y.Y., E-mail: chuyanyun@caep.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Li, Z.H., E-mail: lee_march@sina.com [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Z-FFR utilizes DT neutrons to drive a sub-critical fission blanket to produce energy. • A metal shell and Ar gas are employed in the fusion chamber for shock mitigation. • Massive materials can effectively mitigate the thermal heats on the chamber wall. • The W-coated Zr-alloy first wall exhibits good viability as a long-lived component. - Abstract: In a Z-pinch driven fusion–fission hybrid power reactor (Z-FFR), the fusion target will produce enormous energy of ∼1.5 GJ per pulse at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. Almost 20% of the fusion energy yield, approximately 300 MJ, is released in forms of pulsed X-rays. To prevent the first wall from fatal damages by the intense X-rays, a thin spherical metal shell and rare Ar buffer gas are introduced to mitigate the transient X-ray bursts. Radiation hydrodynamics in the fusion chamber were investigated by MULTI-1D simulations, and the corresponding thermal and mechanical loads on the first wall were also obtained. The simulations indicated that by optimizing the design parameters of the metal shell and Ar buffer gas, peak power flux of the thermal heats on the first wall could be mitigated to less than 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2} within a time scale of several milliseconds, while peak overpressures of the mechanical loads varying from 0.6 to 0.7 MPa. In addition, the thermomechanical response in a W–coated Zr-alloy first wall was performed by FWDR1D calculations using the derived thermal and mechanical loads as inputs. The temperature and stress fields were analyzed, and the corresponding elastic strains were conducted for primary lifetime estimations by using the Coffin–Manson relationships of both W and Zr-alloy. It was shown that the maximum temperature rises and stresses in the first wall were less than 50 K and 130 MPa respectively, and lifetime of the first wall would be in excess of 10{sup 9} cycles. The chamber exhibits good viability as a long-lived component to sustain the Z-FFR conceptual

  5. Simulating forest productivity and surface-atmosphere carbon exchange in the BOREAS study region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, John S.; Thornton, Peter E.; White, Mike A.; Running, Steven W.

    1997-01-01

    A process-based, general ecosystem model (BIOME-BGC) was used to simulate daily gross primary production, maintenance and heterotrophic respiration, net primary production and net ecosystem carbon exchange of boreal aspen, jack pine and black spruce stands. Model simulations of daily net carbon exchange of the ecosystem (NEE) explained 51.7% (SE = 1.32 g C m(-2) day(-1)) of the variance in daily NEE derived from stand eddy flux measurements of CO(2) during 1994. Differences between measured and simulated results were attributed to several factors including difficulties associated with measuring nighttime CO(2) fluxes and model assumptions of site homogeneity. However, comparisons between simulations and field data improved markedly at coarser time-scales. Model simulations explained 66.1% (SE = 0.97 g C m(-2) day(-1)) of the variance in measured NEE when 5-day means of daily results were compared. Annual simulations of aboveground net primary production ranged from 0.6-2.4 Mg C ha(-1) year(-1) and were concurrent with results derived from tree increment core measurements and allometric equations. Model simulations showed that all of the sites were net sinks (0.1-4.1 Mg C ha(-1) year(-1)) of atmospheric carbon for 1994. Older conifer stands showed narrow margins between uptake of carbon by net photosynthesis and carbon release through respiration. Younger stands were more productive than older stands, primarily because of lower maintenance respiration costs. However, all sites appeared to be less productive than temperate forests. Productivity simulations were strongly linked to stand morphology and site conditions. Old jack pine and aspen stands showed decreased productivity in response to simulated low soil water contents near the end of the 1994 growing season. Compared with the aspen stand, the jack pine stand appeared better adapted to conserve soil water through lower daily evapotranspiration losses but also exhibited a narrower margin between daily net

  6. Local Cloudiness Development Forecast Based on Simulation of Solid Phase Formation Processes in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barodka, Siarhei; Kliutko, Yauhenia; Krasouski, Alexander; Papko, Iryna; Svetashev, Alexander; Turishev, Leonid

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays numerical simulation of thundercloud formation processes is of great interest as an actual problem from the practical point of view. Thunderclouds significantly affect airplane flights, and mesoscale weather forecast has much to contribute to facilitate the aviation forecast procedures. An accurate forecast can certainly help to avoid aviation accidents due to weather conditions. The present study focuses on modelling of the convective clouds development and thunder clouds detection on the basis of mesoscale atmospheric processes simulation, aiming at significantly improving the aeronautical forecast. In the analysis, the primary weather radar information has been used to be further adapted for mesoscale forecast systems. Two types of domains have been selected for modelling: an internal one (with radius of 8 km), and an external one (with radius of 300 km). The internal domain has been directly applied to study the local clouds development, and the external domain data has been treated as initial and final conditions for cloud cover formation. The domain height has been chosen according to the civil aviation forecast data (i.e. not exceeding 14 km). Simulations of weather conditions and local clouds development have been made within selected domains with the WRF modelling system. In several cases, thunderclouds are detected within the convective clouds. To specify the given category of clouds, we employ a simulation technique of solid phase formation processes in the atmosphere. Based on modelling results, we construct vertical profiles indicating the amount of solid phase in the atmosphere. Furthermore, we obtain profiles demonstrating the amount of ice particles and large particles (hailstones). While simulating the processes of solid phase formation, we investigate vertical and horizontal air flows. Consequently, we attempt to separate the total amount of solid phase into categories of small ice particles, large ice particles and hailstones. Also, we

  7. High Resolution Simulations of Future Climate in West Africa Using a Variable-Resolution Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, J. O.; Engelbrecht, F.; Vezhapparambu, S.

    2013-12-01

    In previous work demonstrated the application of a var¬iable-resolution global atmospheric model, the conformal-cubic atmospheric model (CCAM), across a wide range of spatial and time scales to investigate the ability of the model to provide realistic simulations of present-day climate and plausible projections of future climate change over sub-Saharan Africa. By applying the model in stretched-grid mode the versatility of the model dynamics, numerical formulation and physical parameterizations to function across a range of length scales over the region of interest, was also explored. We primarily used CCAM to illustrate the capability of the model to function as a flexible downscaling tool at the climate-change time scale. Here we report on additional long term climate projection studies performed by downscaling at much higher resolutions (8 Km) over an area that stretches from just south of Sahara desert to the southern coast of the Niger Delta and into the Gulf of Guinea. To perform these simulations, CCAM was provided with synoptic-scale forcing of atmospheric circulation from 2.5 deg resolution NCEP reanalysis at 6-hourly interval and SSTs from NCEP reanalysis data uses as lower boundary forcing. CCAM 60 Km resolution downscaled to 8 Km (Schmidt factor 24.75) then 8 Km resolution simulation downscaled to 1 Km (Schmidt factor 200) over an area approximately 50 Km x 50 Km in the southern Lake Chad Basin (LCB). Our intent in conducting these high resolution model runs was to obtain a deeper understanding of linkages between the projected future climate and the hydrological processes that control the surface water regime in this part of sub-Saharan Africa.

  8. Convective transport in ATM simulations and its relation to the atmospheric stability conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, Jolanta

    2017-04-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is a global system of monitoring stations, using four complementary technologies: seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Data from all stations, belonging to IMS, are collected and transmitted to the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna, Austria. The radionuclide network comprises 80 stations, of which more than 60 are certified. The aim of radionuclide stations is a global monitoring of radioactive aerosols and radioactive noble gases, in particular xenon isotopes, supported by the atmospheric transport modeling (ATM). One of the important noble gases, monitored on a daily basis, is radioxenon. It can be produced either during a nuclear explosion with a high fission yield, and thus be considered as an important tracer to prove the nuclear character of an explosion, or be emitted from nuclear power plants (NPPs) or from isotope production facilities (IPFs). To investigate the transport of xenon emissions, the Provisional Technical Secretariat (PTS) operates an Atmospheric Transport Modelling (ATM) system based on the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model FLEXPART. To address the question whether including the convective transport in ATM simulations will change the results significantly, the differences between the outputs with the convective transport turned off and turned on, were computed and further investigated taking into account the atmospheric stability conditions. For that purpose series of 14 days forward simulations, with convective transport and without it, released daily in the period January 2011 to February 2012, were analysed. The release point was at the ANSTO facility in Australia. The unique opportunity of having access to both daily emission values for ANSTO as well as measured Xe-133 activity concentration (AC) values at the IMS stations, gave a chance to validate the simulations.

  9. Evaluation of Vapor Pressure Estimation Methods for Use in Simulating the Dynamic of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Komkoua Mbienda

    2013-01-01

    Lee and Kesler (LK, and Ambrose-Walton (AW methods for estimating vapor pressures ( are tested against experimental data for a set of volatile organic compounds (VOC. required to determine gas-particle partitioning of such organic compounds is used as a parameter for simulating the dynamic of atmospheric aerosols. Here, we use the structure-property relationships of VOC to estimate . The accuracy of each of the aforementioned methods is also assessed for each class of compounds (hydrocarbons, monofunctionalized, difunctionalized, and tri- and more functionalized volatile organic species. It is found that the best method for each VOC depends on its functionality.

  10. Assessing the Uncertainty of Tropical Cyclone Simulations in NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Reed

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the impact of the initial-data, parameter and structural model uncertainty on the simulation of a tropical cyclone-like vortex in the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM. An analytic technique is used to initialize the model with an idealized weak vortex that develops into a tropical cyclone over ten simulation days. A total of 78 ensemble simulations are performed at horizontal grid spacings of 1.0°, 0.5° and 0.25° using two recently released versions of the model, CAM 4 and CAM 5. The ensemble members represent simulations with random small-amplitude perturbations of the initial conditions, small shifts in the longitudinal position of the initial vortex and runs with slightly altered model parameters. The main distinction between CAM 4 and CAM 5 lies within the physical parameterization suite, and the simulations with both CAM versions at the varying resolutions assess the structural model uncertainty. At all resolutions storms are produced with many tropical cyclone-like characteristics. The CAM 5 simulations exhibit more intense storms than CAM 4 by day 10 at the 0.5° and 0.25° grid spacings, while the CAM 4 storm at 1.0° is stronger. There are also distinct differences in the shapes and vertical profiles of the storms in the two variants of CAM. The ensemble members show no distinction between the initial-data and parameter uncertainty simulations. At day 10 they produce ensemble root-mean-square deviations from an unperturbed control simulation on the order of 1--5 m s-1 for the maximum low-level wind speed and 2--10 hPa for the minimum surface pressure. However, there are large differences between the two CAM versions at identical horizontal resolutions. It suggests that the structural uncertainty is more dominant than the initial-data and parameter uncertainties in this study. The uncertainty among the ensemble members is assessed and quantified.

  11. Experimental and Simulation-Based Investigation of Polycentric Motion of an Inherent Compliant Pneumatic Bending Actuator with Skewed Rotary Elastic Chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Wilkening

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To offer a functionality that could not be found in traditional rigid robots, compliant actuators are in development worldwide for a variety of applications and especially for human–robot interaction. Pneumatic bending actuators are a special kind of such actuators. Due to the absence of fixed mechanical axes and their soft behavior, these actuators generally possess a polycentric motion ability. This can be very useful to provide an implicit self-alignment to human joint axes in exoskeleton-like rehabilitation devices. As a possible realization, a novel bending actuator (BA was developed using patented pneumatic skewed rotary elastic chambers (sREC. To analyze the actuator self-alignment properties, knowledge about the motion of this bending actuator type, the so-called skewed rotary elastic chambers bending actuator (sRECBA, is of high interest and this paper presents experimental and simulation-based kinematic investigations. First, to describe actuator motion, the finite helical axes (FHA of basic actuator elements are determined using a three-dimensional (3D camera system. Afterwards, a simplified two-dimensional (2D kinematic simulation model based on a four-bar linkage was developed and the motion was compared to the experimental data by calculating the instantaneous center of rotation (ICR. The equivalent kinematic model of the sRECBA was realized using a series of four-bar linkages and the resulting ICR was analyzed in simulation. Finally, the FHA of the sRECBA were determined and analyzed for three different specific motions. The results show that the actuator’s FHA adapt to different motions performed and it can be assumed that implicit self-alignment to the polycentric motion of the human joint axis will be provided.

  12. Simulation of the energy response of the I.S.O.C.A.L. IV pressurised re-entrant well type ionization chamber using the Penelope Monte-Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryeziu, D.; Tschurlovits, M.; Kreuziger, M.; Maringer, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    In radiation metrology, pressurized ionization chambers are essential tools in secondary standard laboratories as relative calibration instruments.Calculations of the calibration figures for different radionuclides are very important parameters for radioactivity measurements. The calibration figures for the I.S.O.C.A.L. IV pressurized re-entrant ionization chamber (also called well-type ionisation chamber) are calculated here using the P.E.N.E.L.O.P.E.-2003 Monte-Carlo Code. In order to test and validate the Monte Carlo simulation, calculated and experimental calibration figures are compared. The task of this work was to calculate the activity of a radioactive solution when no experimental calibration figures are available as well as to improve the accuracy of activity measurements. The chamber is filled with nitrogen gas at 1 MPa pressure. The simulated models of the chamber are designed by means of reduced quadric equation applying the appropriate transformations including: a rotation defined through the Euler angles, an expansion along the directions of the axes and a translation defined by the components of the displacement vector t. The simulated geometries are defined for the cases:without shielding; lead shielding and lead and copper shielding. The effect of density variations of the nitrogen gas on the sensitivity of such ionization chambers has been investigated. The Penelope Monte-Carlo code is also used to examine the effects of using lead and copper shields. The sensitivity to electrons is evaluated as well. (authors)

  13. NASA's GMAO Atmospheric Motion Vectors Simulator: Description and Application to the MISTiC Winds Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, David; McCarty, Will; Errico, Ron; Prive, Nikki

    2018-01-01

    An atmospheric wind vectors (AMVs) simulator was developed by NASA's GMAO to simulate observations from future satellite constellation concepts. The synthetic AMVs can then be used in OSSEs to estimate and quantify the potential added value of new observations to the present Earth observing system and, ultimately, the expected impact on the current weather forecasting skill. The GMAO AMV simulator is a tunable and flexible computer code that is able to simulate AMVs expected to be derived from different instruments and satellite orbit configurations. As a case study and example of the usefulness of this tool, the GMAO AMV simulator was used to simulate AMVs envisioned to be provided by the MISTiC Winds, a NASA mission concept consisting of a constellation of satellites equipped with infrared spectral midwave spectrometers, expected to provide high spatial and temporal resolution temperature and humidity soundings of the troposphere that can be used to derive AMVs from the tracking of clouds and water vapor features. The GMAO AMV simulator identifies trackable clouds and water vapor features in the G5NR and employs a probabilistic function to draw a subset of the identified trackable features. Before the simulator is applied to the MISTiC Winds concept, the simulator was calibrated to yield realistic observations counts and spatial distributions and validated considering as a proxy instrument to the MISTiC Winds the Himawari-8 Advanced Imager (AHI). The simulated AHI AMVs showed a close match with the real AHI AMVs in terms of observation counts and spatial distributions, showing that the GMAO AMVs simulator synthesizes AMVs observations with enough quality and realism to produce a response from the DAS equivalent to the one produced with real observations. When applied to the MISTiC Winds scanning points, it can be expected that the MISTiC Winds will be able to collect approximately 60,000 wind observations every 6 hours, if considering a constellation composed of

  14. A New Ensemble of Perturbed-Input-Parameter Simulations by the Community Atmosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covey, C; Brandon, S; Bremer, P T; Domyancis, D; Garaizar, X; Johannesson, G; Klein, R; Klein, S A; Lucas, D D; Tannahill, J; Zhang, Y

    2011-10-27

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) is a fundamental challenge in the numerical simulation of Earth's weather and climate, and other complex systems. It entails much more than attaching defensible error bars to predictions: in particular it includes assessing low-probability but high-consequence events. To achieve these goals with models containing a large number of uncertain input parameters, structural uncertainties, etc., raw computational power is needed. An automated, self-adapting search of the possible model configurations is also useful. Our UQ initiative at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has produced the most extensive set to date of simulations from the US Community Atmosphere Model. We are examining output from about 3,000 twelve-year climate simulations generated with a specialized UQ software framework, and assessing the model's accuracy as a function of 21 to 28 uncertain input parameter values. Most of the input parameters we vary are related to the boundary layer, clouds, and other sub-grid scale processes. Our simulations prescribe surface boundary conditions (sea surface temperatures and sea ice amounts) to match recent observations. Fully searching this 21+ dimensional space is impossible, but sensitivity and ranking algorithms can identify input parameters having relatively little effect on a variety of output fields, either individually or in nonlinear combination. Bayesian statistical constraints, employing a variety of climate observations as metrics, also seem promising. Observational constraints will be important in the next step of our project, which will compute sea surface temperatures and sea ice interactively, and will study climate change due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  15. Simulation of comprehensive chemistry and atmospheric methane lifetime in the LGM with EMAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, Sergey; Steil, Benedikt

    2017-04-01

    Past records of atmospheric methane (CH4) abundance/isotope composition may provide a substantial insight on C exchanges in the Earth System (ES). When simulated in the climate models, CH4 helps to identify climate parameters transitions via triggering of its different (natural) sources, with a proviso that its sinks are adequately represented in the model. The latter are still a matter of large uncertainty in the studies focussing on the interpretation of CH4 evolution throughout Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), judging the conferred span of tropospheric CH4 lifetime (λ) of 3-16 yr [1-4]. In this study, we attempt to: (i) deliver the most adequate estimate of the LGM atmospheric sink of CH4 in the EMAC AC-GCM [5] equipped with the comprehensive representation of atmospheric chemistry [6], (ii) reveal the ES and CH4 emission parameters that are most influential for λ and (iii) based on these findings, suggest a parameterisation for λ that may be consistently used in climate models. In pursuing (i) we have tuned the EMAC model for simulating LGM atmospheric chemistry state, including careful revisiting of the trace gases emissions from the biosphere, biomass burning/lightning source, etc. The latter affect the key simulated component bound with λ, viz. the abundance and distribution of the hydroxyl radicals (OH) which, upon reacting with CH4, constitute its main tropospheric sink. Our preliminary findings suggest that OH is buffered in the atmosphere in a similar fashion to preindustrial climate, which in line with the recent studies employing comprehensive chemistry mechanisms (e.g., [3]). The analysis in (ii) suggests that tropospheric λ values may be qualitatively described as a convolution of values typical for zonal domain with high and low photolytic recycling rates (i.e. tropics and extra-tropics), as in the latter a dependence of the zonal average λ value on the CH4 emission strength exists. We further use the extensive diagnostic in EMAC to infer the

  16. MPAS Atmospheric Boundary Layer Simulation under Selected Stability Conditions: Evaluation Using the SWIFT Datasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotamarthi, V. Rao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feng, Yan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-12

    Modeling the transition from mesoscale to microscale is necessary in order to model different processes that affect a wind farm and to develop forecasting tools that operate at the farm scale. The mesoscale-to-microscale coupling (MMC) project is an A2e (Atmosphere-toelectrons) coordinated activity for developing modeling capabilities at the wind farm scale. By moving the focus of the research from a single wind turbine to the collection of turbines that comprise a wind farm, A2e extends the range of spatial and timescales that need representation in a model from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers and timescales from a few seconds to days (Bokharaie et al. 2016). In the atmosphere, these scales are represented by mesoscale-tomicroscale models. The modeling available at these scales has differed in its representation of various physical processes. The MMC group is responsible for evaluating existing models at these scales and recommending a set of options for coupling the mesoscale and microscale with the best-performing models. The group was organized in 2015 and will explore options for coupling strategies with real-world test problems in fiscal year (FY) 2017. The model of choice for this exercise is WRF (Weather Research Forecasting) for mesoscale and WRF-LES (Large Eddy Simulation) for microscale simulations. The MPAS (Model Prediction Across Scales) variable mesh model that can be continuously refined; it has dynamic core and physics options adopted from WRF, which offer an alternative platform for modeling the mesoscale.

  17. Numerical simulation for production of O and N radicals in an atmospheric-pressure streamer discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komuro, Atsushi; Ono, Ryo; Oda, Tetsuji

    2012-01-01

    A streamer discharge model is developed to analyse the characteristics of a pulsed positive streamer discharge in point-to-plane electrodes filled with oxygen-nitrogen mixed gas at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. In this paper we study the mechanisms of O and N radical production in an atmospheric-pressure streamer discharge. To confirm the validity of the simulation model, the discharge emission of light and the discharge current are compared with experimental data at several voltages in gas mixtures with 2-20% oxygen concentrations. The calculated streak picture and the axial distribution of streamer luminous intensity are in good agreement with our previous experimental results. After demonstrating the reliability of the model, we performed a numerical study on radical production by the streamer discharge. The experimentally obtained axial distributions of oxygen radical production in O 2 (20%)/N 2 and nitrogen radical production in O 2 (2%)/N 2 are successfully reproduced in our simulation. For the production of nitrogen radicals, two-step dissociation through the vibrationally excited states is predominant. (paper)

  18. Well-balanced compressible cut-cell simulation of atmospheric flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, R; Bates, K R; Nikiforakis, N

    2009-11-28

    Cut-cell meshes present an attractive alternative to terrain-following coordinates for the representation of topography within atmospheric flow simulations, particularly in regions of steep topographic gradients. In this paper, we present an explicit two-dimensional method for the numerical solution on such meshes of atmospheric flow equations including gravitational sources. This method is fully conservative and allows for time steps determined by the regular grid spacing, avoiding potential stability issues due to arbitrarily small boundary cells. We believe that the scheme is unique in that it is developed within a dimensionally split framework, in which each coordinate direction in the flow is solved independently at each time step. Other notable features of the scheme are: (i) its conceptual and practical simplicity, (ii) its flexibility with regard to the one-dimensional flux approximation scheme employed, and (iii) the well-balancing of the gravitational sources allowing for stable simulation of near-hydrostatic flows. The presented method is applied to a selection of test problems including buoyant bubble rise interacting with geometry and lee-wave generation due to topography.

  19. Numerical simulation of small-scale mixing processes in the upper ocean and atmospheric boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druzhinin, O; Troitskaya, Yu; Zilitinkevich, S

    2016-01-01

    The processes of turbulent mixing and momentum and heat exchange occur in the upper ocean at depths up to several dozens of meters and in the atmospheric boundary layer within interval of millimeters to dozens of meters and can not be resolved by known large- scale climate models. Thus small-scale processes need to be parameterized with respect to large scale fields. This parameterization involves the so-called bulk coefficients which relate turbulent fluxes with large-scale fields gradients. The bulk coefficients are dependent on the properties of the small-scale mixing processes which are affected by the upper-ocean stratification and characteristics of surface and internal waves. These dependencies are not well understood at present and need to be clarified. We employ Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) as a research tool which resolves all relevant flow scales and does not require closure assumptions typical of Large-Eddy and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (LES and RANS). Thus DNS provides a solid ground for correct parameterization of small-scale mixing processes and also can be used for improving LES and RANS closure models. In particular, we discuss the problems of the interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves propagating in the pycnocline in the upper ocean as well as the impact of surface waves on the properties of atmospheric boundary layer over wavy water surface. (paper)

  20. Impact of atmospheric model resolution on simulation of ENSO feedback processes: a coupled model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lijuan; Chen, Lin; Rong, Xinyao; Su, Jingzhi; Wang, Lu; Li, Tim; Yu, Yongqiang

    2018-03-01

    This study examines El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-related air-sea feedback processes in a coupled general circulation model (CGCM) to gauge model errors and pin down their sources in ENSO simulation. Three horizontal resolutions of the atmospheric component (T42, T63 and T106) of the CGCM are used to investigate how the simulated ENSO behaviors are affected by the resolution. We find that air-sea feedback processes in the three experiments mainly differ in terms of both thermodynamic and dynamic feedbacks. We also find that these processes are simulated more reasonably in the highest resolution version than in the other two lower resolution versions. The difference in the thermodynamic feedback arises from the difference in the shortwave-radiation (SW) feedback. Due to the severely (mildly) excessive cold tongue in the lower (higher) resolution version, the SW feedback is severely (mildly) underestimated. The main difference in the dynamic feedback processes lies in the thermocline feedback and the zonal-advection feedback, both of which are caused by the difference in the anomalous thermocline response to anomalous zonal wind stress. The difference in representing the anomalous thermocline response is attributed to the difference in meridional structure of zonal wind stress anomaly in the three simulations, which is linked to meridional resolution.

  1. EXPLORING BIASES OF ATMOSPHERIC RETRIEVALS IN SIMULATED JWST TRANSMISSION SPECTRA OF HOT JUPITERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocchetto, M.; Waldmann, I. P.; Tinetti, G.; Venot, O.; Lagage, P.-O.

    2016-01-01

    With a scheduled launch in 2018 October, the James Webb Space Telescope ( JWST ) is expected to revolutionize the field of atmospheric characterization of exoplanets. The broad wavelength coverage and high sensitivity of its instruments will allow us to extract far more information from exoplanet spectra than what has been possible with current observations. In this paper, we investigate whether current retrieval methods will still be valid in the era of JWST , exploring common approximations used when retrieving transmission spectra of hot Jupiters. To assess biases, we use 1D photochemical models to simulate typical hot Jupiter cloud-free atmospheres and generate synthetic observations for a range of carbon-to-oxygen ratios. Then, we retrieve these spectra using TauREx, a Bayesian retrieval tool, using two methodologies: one assuming an isothermal atmosphere, and one assuming a parameterized temperature profile. Both methods assume constant-with-altitude abundances. We found that the isothermal approximation biases the retrieved parameters considerably, overestimating the abundances by about one order of magnitude. The retrieved abundances using the parameterized profile are usually within 1 σ of the true state, and we found the retrieved uncertainties to be generally larger compared to the isothermal approximation. Interestingly, we found that by using the parameterized temperature profile we could place tight constraints on the temperature structure. This opens the possibility of characterizing the temperature profile of the terminator region of hot Jupiters. Lastly, we found that assuming a constant-with-altitude mixing ratio profile is a good approximation for most of the atmospheres under study.

  2. EXPLORING BIASES OF ATMOSPHERIC RETRIEVALS IN SIMULATED JWST TRANSMISSION SPECTRA OF HOT JUPITERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocchetto, M.; Waldmann, I. P.; Tinetti, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E6BT London (United Kingdom); Venot, O. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lagage, P.-O., E-mail: m.rocchetto@ucl.ac.uk [Irfu, CEA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-9119 Gif-sur Yvette (France)

    2016-12-10

    With a scheduled launch in 2018 October, the James Webb Space Telescope ( JWST ) is expected to revolutionize the field of atmospheric characterization of exoplanets. The broad wavelength coverage and high sensitivity of its instruments will allow us to extract far more information from exoplanet spectra than what has been possible with current observations. In this paper, we investigate whether current retrieval methods will still be valid in the era of JWST , exploring common approximations used when retrieving transmission spectra of hot Jupiters. To assess biases, we use 1D photochemical models to simulate typical hot Jupiter cloud-free atmospheres and generate synthetic observations for a range of carbon-to-oxygen ratios. Then, we retrieve these spectra using TauREx, a Bayesian retrieval tool, using two methodologies: one assuming an isothermal atmosphere, and one assuming a parameterized temperature profile. Both methods assume constant-with-altitude abundances. We found that the isothermal approximation biases the retrieved parameters considerably, overestimating the abundances by about one order of magnitude. The retrieved abundances using the parameterized profile are usually within 1 σ of the true state, and we found the retrieved uncertainties to be generally larger compared to the isothermal approximation. Interestingly, we found that by using the parameterized temperature profile we could place tight constraints on the temperature structure. This opens the possibility of characterizing the temperature profile of the terminator region of hot Jupiters. Lastly, we found that assuming a constant-with-altitude mixing ratio profile is a good approximation for most of the atmospheres under study.

  3. Deactivation of Escherichia coli in a post-discharge chamber coupled to an atmospheric pressure multi-electrode DBD plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Ruiz, V H; López-Callejas, R; De la Piedad Beneitez, A; Peña-Eguiluz, R; Mercado-Cabrera, A; Muñoz-Castro, A E; Barocio, S R; Valencia-Alvarado, R; Rodríguez-Méndez, B G

    2012-01-01

    Experimental results from applying a room pressure RF multi-electrode DBD plasma source to the inhibition of the population growth of Gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) within a post-discharge reactor are reported. The sample to be treated is deposited in the post-discharge chamber at about 50 mm from the plasma source outlet. Thus, the active species generated by the source are conveyed toward the chamber by the working gas flow. The plasma characterization included the measurement of the axial temperature at different distances from the reactor outlet by means of a K-type thermocouple. The resulting 294 K to 322 K temperature interval corresponded to distances between 10 mm to 1 mm respectively. As the material under treatment is placed further away, any thermal damage of the sample by the plasma is prevented. The measurement and optimization of the ozone O 3 concentration has also been carried out, provided that this is an active specie with particularly high germicide power. The effectiveness treatment of the E. coli bacteria growth inhibition by the proposed plasma source reached 99% when a 10 3 CFU/mL concentration on an agar plate had been exposed during ten minutes.

  4. Non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization in 2D simulations of the solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaarts, J.; Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V.; Rutten, R. J.

    2007-10-01

    Context: The ionization of hydrogen in the solar chromosphere and transition region does not obey LTE or instantaneous statistical equilibrium because the timescale is long compared with important hydrodynamical timescales, especially of magneto-acoustic shocks. Since the pressure, temperature, and electron density depend sensitively on hydrogen ionization, numerical simulation of the solar atmosphere requires non-equilibrium treatment of all pertinent hydrogen transitions. The same holds for any diagnostic application employing hydrogen lines. Aims: To demonstrate the importance and to quantify the effects of non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization, both on the dynamical structure of the solar atmosphere and on hydrogen line formation, in particular Hα. Methods: We implement an algorithm to compute non-equilibrium hydrogen ionization and its coupling into the MHD equations within an existing radiation MHD code, and perform a two-dimensional simulation of the solar atmosphere from the convection zone to the corona. Results: Analysis of the simulation results and comparison to a companion simulation assuming LTE shows that: a) non-equilibrium computation delivers much smaller variations of the chromospheric hydrogen ionization than for LTE. The ionization is smaller within shocks but subsequently remains high in the cool intershock phases. As a result, the chromospheric temperature variations are much larger than for LTE because in non-equilibrium, hydrogen ionization is a less effective internal energy buffer. The actual shock temperatures are therefore higher and the intershock temperatures lower. b) The chromospheric populations of the hydrogen n = 2 level, which governs the opacity of Hα, are coupled to the ion populations. They are set by the high temperature in shocks and subsequently remain high in the cool intershock phases. c) The temperature structure and the hydrogen level populations differ much between the chromosphere above photospheric magnetic elements

  5. The Titan Sky Simulator ™ - Testing Prototype Balloons in Conditions Approximating those in Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nott, Julian

    This paper will describe practical work flying prototype balloons in the "The Titan Sky Simulator TM " in conditions approximating those found in Titan's atmosphere. Saturn's moon, Titan, is attracting intense scientific interest. This has led to wide interest in exploring it with Aerobots, balloons or airships. Their function would be similar to the Rovers exploring Mars, but instead of moving laboriously across the rough terrain on wheels, they would float freely from location to location. To design any balloon or airship it is essential to know the temperature of the lifting gas as this influences the volume of the gas, which in turn influences the lift. To determine this temperature it is necessary to know how heat is transferred between the craft and its surroundings. Heat transfer for existing balloons is well understood. However, Titan conditions are utterly different from those in which balloons have ever been flown, so heat transfer rates cannot currently be calculated. In particular, thermal radiation accounts for most heat transfer for existing balloons but over Titan heat transfer will be dominated by convection. To be able to make these fundamental calculations, it is necessary to get fundamental experimental data. This is being obtained by flying balloons in a Simulator filled with nitrogen gas at very low temperature, about 95° K / minus 180° C, typical of Titan's temperatures. Because the gas in the Simulator is so cold, operating at atmospheric pressure the density is close to that of Titan's atmosphere. "The Titan Sky Simulator TM " has an open interior approximately 4.5 meter tall and 2.5 meters square. It has already been operated at 95° K/-180° C. By the time of the Conference it is fully expected to have data to present from actual balloons flying at this temperature. Perhaps the most important purpose of this testing is to validate numerical [computational fluid dynamics] models being developed by Tim Colonius of Caltech. These numerical

  6. Simulation of airbag impact on eyes with different axial lengths after transsclerally fixated posterior chamber intraocular lens by using finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jane Huang,1 Eiichi Uchio,1 Satoru Goto2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Fukuoka, 2Nihon ESI KK Technical Division, Tokyo, Japan Purpose: To determine the biomechanical response of an impacting airbag on eyes with different axial lengths with transsclerally fixated posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL.Materials and methods: Simulations in a model human eye were performed with a computer using a finite element analysis program created by Nihon, ESI Group. The airbag was set to be deployed at five different velocities and to impact on eyes with three different axial lengths. These eyes were set to have transsclerally fixated PC IOL by a 10-0 polypropylene possessing a tensile force limit of 0.16 N according to the United States Pharmacopeia XXII.Results: The corneoscleral opening was observed at a speed of 40 m/second or more in all model eyes. Eyes with the longest axial length of 25.85 mm had the greatest extent of deformity at any given impact velocity. The impact force exceeded the tensile force of 10-0 polypropylene at an impact velocity of 60 m/second in all eyes, causing breakage of the suture. Conclusion: Eyes with transsclerally fixated PC IOL could rupture from airbag impact at high velocities. Eyes with long axial lengths experienced a greater deformity upon airbag impact due to a thinner eye wall. Further basic research on the biomechanical response for assessing eye injuries could help in developing a better airbag and in the further understanding of ocular traumas. Keywords: airbag, ocular trauma, computer simulation, transsclerally fixated posterior chamber intraocular lens, finite element analysis

  7. Flow Characteristics of Multi-circular Jet Plate in Premix Chamber of Air-Assist Atomizer for Burner System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirnordin Shahrin Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow characteristics of multi-circular jet (MCJ plate in the premix chamber of an atomizer were investigated using Computational Fluid Dynamics. Multiphase volume of fluid behavior inside the chamber was determined via steady simulations. The Eulerian–Eulerian two-fluid approach was used for execution mixing of diesel fuel and air. Spray simulation using the discrete phase with injection was generated from the nozzle hole into the ambient atmosphere. The behavior of three MCJ plates in the premix chamber was studied numerically. Results illustrated that plate open area, Ae, influenced the turbulence inside the chamber. MCJ 3, which had the lowest open area, generated the highest flow velocity and turbulence kinetic energy compared with MCJ 1 and 2. The MCJ plates could increase the turbulence in the premix chamber and contribute to the combustion efficiency.

  8. Eastern equatorial Pacific sea surface temperature annual cycle in the Kiel climate model: simulation benefits from enhancing atmospheric resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengel, C.; Latif, M.; Park, W.; Harlaß, J.; Bayr, T.

    2018-05-01

    A long-standing difficulty of climate models is to capture the annual cycle (AC) of eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) sea surface temperature (SST). In this study, we first examine the EEP SST AC in a set of integrations of the coupled Kiel Climate Model, in which only atmosphere model resolution differs. When employing coarse horizontal and vertical atmospheric resolution, significant biases in the EEP SST AC are observed. These are reflected in an erroneous timing of the cold tongue's onset and termination as well as in an underestimation of the boreal spring warming amplitude. A large portion of these biases are linked to a wrong simulation of zonal surface winds, which can be traced back to precipitation biases on both sides of the equator and an erroneous low-level atmospheric circulation over land. Part of the SST biases also is related to shortwave radiation biases related to cloud cover biases. Both wind and cloud cover biases are inherent to the atmospheric component, as shown by companion uncoupled atmosphere model integrations forced by observed SSTs. Enhancing atmosphere model resolution, horizontal and vertical, markedly reduces zonal wind and cloud cover biases in coupled as well as uncoupled mode and generally improves simulation of the EEP SST AC. Enhanced atmospheric resolution reduces convection biases and improves simulation of surface winds over land. Analysis of a subset of models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) reveals that in these models, very similar mechanisms are at work in driving EEP SST AC biases.

  9. Extinction effects of atmospheric compositions on return signals of space-based lidar from numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lilin; Wang, Fu; Min, Min; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Jianping; Yu, Xiao; Chen, Binglong; Zhao, Yiming; Wang, Lidong

    2018-05-01

    The atmospheric composition induced extinction effect on return signals of space-based lidar remains incomprehensively understood, especially around 355 nm and 2051 nm channels. Here we simulated the extinction effects of atmospheric gases (e.g., H2O, CO2, and O3) and six types of aerosols (clean continental, clean marine, dust, polluted continental, polluted dust, and smoke) on return signals of space-based lidar system at 355 nm, 532 nm, 1064 nm, and 2051 nm channels, based on a robust lidar return signal simulator in combination with radiative transfer model (LBLRTM). Results show significant Rayleigh (molecular) scattering effects in the return signals at 355 nm and 532 nm channels, which markedly decays with increases in wavelength. The spectral transmittance of CO2 is nearly 0, yet the transmittance of H2O is approximately 100% at 2051 nm, which verifies this 2051 nm channel is suitable for CO2 retrieval. The spectral transmittance also reveals another possible window for CO2 and H2O detection at 2051.6 nm, since their transmittance both near 0.5. Moreover the corresponding Doppler return signals at 2051.6 nm channel can be used to retrieve wind field. Thus we suggest 2051 nm channel may better be centered at 2051.6 nm. Using the threshold for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of return signals, the detection ranges for three representative distribution scenarios for the six types of aerosols at four typical lidar channels are determined. The results clearly show that high SNR values can be seen ubiquitously in the atmosphere ranging from the height of aerosol layer top to 25 km at 355 nm, and can been found at 2051.6 nm in the lower troposphere that highly depends on aerosol distribution scenario in the vertical. This indicates that the Doppler space-based lidar system with a double-channel joint detection mode is able to retrieve atmospheric wind field or profile from 0 to 25 km.

  10. Effect of temperature and humidity on post-gel shrinkage, cusp deformation, bond strength and shrinkage stress - Construction of a chamber to simulate the oral environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicalho, Aline Aredes; de Souza, Silas Júnior Boaventura; de Rosatto, Camila Maria Peres; Tantbirojn, Daranee; Versluis, Antheunis; Soares, Carlos José

    2015-12-01

    Evaluate the effect of environment on post-gel shrinkage (Shr), cuspal strains (CS), microtensile bond strength (μTBS), elastic modulus (E) and shrinkage stress in molars with large class II restorations. Sixty human molars received standardized Class II mesio-oclusal-distal cavity preparations. Restorations were made with two composites (CHA, Charisma Diamond, Heraus Kulzer and IPS Empress Direct, Ivoclar-Vivadent) using three environment conditions (22°C/50% humidity, 37°C/50% humidity and 37°C/90% humidity) simulated in custom developed chamber. Shr was measured using the strain gauge technique (n=10). CS was measured using strain gauges. Half of the teeth (n=5) were used to assess the elastic modulus (E) and Knoop hardness (KHN) at different depths using microhardness indentation. The other half (n=5) was used to measure the μTBS. The composites and environment conditions were simulated in a two-dimensional finite element analysis of a tooth restoration. Polymerization shrinkage was modeled using Shr data. The Shr, CS, μTBS, KHN and E data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (significance level: 0.05). Both composites had similar Shr, CS, μTBS and shrinkage stress. CHA had higher elastic modulus than IPS. Increasing temperature and humidity significantly increased Shr, CS and shrinkage stress. μTBS were similar for groups with lower humidity, irrespective of temperature, and higher with higher humidity. E and KHN were constant through the depth for CHA. E and KHN values were affected by environment only for IPS, mainly deeper in the cavity. Shrinkage stress at dentin/composite interface had high inverse correlation with μTBS. Shrinkage stress in enamel had high correlation with CS. Increasing temperature and humidity caused higher post-gel shrinkage and cusp deformation with higher shrinkage stresses in the tooth structure and tooth/restoration interface for both composites tested. The chamber developed for simulating the

  11. Numerical Simulation of Ion Transport in a Nano-Electrospray Ion Source at Atmospheric Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Bajic, Steve; John, Benzi; Emerson, David R.

    2018-03-01

    Understanding ion transport properties from the ion source to the mass spectrometer (MS) is essential for optimizing device performance. Numerical simulation helps in understanding of ion transport properties and, furthermore, facilitates instrument design. In contrast to previously reported numerical studies, ion transport simulations in a continuous injection mode whilst considering realistic space-charge effects have been carried out. The flow field was solved using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, and a particle-in-cell (PIC) method was applied to solve a time-dependent electric field with local charge density. A series of ion transport simulations were carried out at different cone gas flow rates, ion source currents, and capillary voltages. A force evaluation analysis reveals that the electric force, the drag force, and the Brownian force are the three dominant forces acting on the ions. Both the experimental and simulation results indicate that cone gas flow rates of ≤250 slph (standard liter per hour) are important for high ion transmission efficiency, as higher cone gas flow rates reduce the ion signal significantly. The simulation results also show that the ion transmission efficiency reduces exponentially with an increased ion source current. Additionally, the ion loss due to space-charge effects has been found to be predominant at a higher ion source current, a lower capillary voltage, and a stronger cone gas counterflow. The interaction of the ion driving force, ion opposing force, and ion dispersion is discussed to illustrate ion transport mechanism in the ion source at atmospheric pressure. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Dynamic Mesh CFD Simulations of Orion Parachute Pendulum Motion During Atmospheric Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstrom, Logan D.; Schwing, Alan M.; Robinson, Stephen K.

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the usage of computational fluid dynamics to study the effects of pendulum motion dynamics of the NASAs Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle parachute system on the stability of the vehicles atmospheric entry and decent. Significant computational fluid dynamics testing has already been performed at NASAs Johnson Space Center, but this study sought to investigate the effect of bulk motion of the parachute, such as pitching, on the induced aerodynamic forces. Simulations were performed with a moving grid geometry oscillating according to the parameters observed in flight tests. As with the previous simulations, OVERFLOW computational fluid dynamics tool is used with the assumption of rigid, non-permeable geometry. Comparison to parachute wind tunnel tests is included for a preliminary validation of the dynamic mesh model. Results show qualitative differences in the flow fields of the static and dynamic simulations and quantitative differences in the induced aerodynamic forces, suggesting that dynamic mesh modeling of the parachute pendulum motion may uncover additional dynamic effects.

  13. Simulations of future climate with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stendel, M.; Schmith, T.; Hesselbjerg Christensen, J.

    2001-01-01

    A coupled atmosphere/ocean general circulation model to study the time-dependent climate response to changing concentrations of greenhouse gases, chlorofluorocarbons and aerosols according to the new IPCC SRES scenarios A2 and B2 has been used. The results of these experiments are compared to an unforced 300-year control experiment. The changes in the last three decades of the scenario simulations (2071-2100) are furthermore compared to the simulation of present-day climate (1961-1990). In accordance with previous experiments we find that greenhouse warming is reduced when aerosol effects are considered. Sulfur emissions, however, are lower than in the IS92a scenario. Consequently, the greenhouse warming effect, which leads to a bigger temperature increase than in the GSDIO experiment can outweigh the aerosol cooling effect. The result shows that there still are serious difficulties and uncertainties in this type of model simulation. Those are partially due to oversimplifications in the model, concerning the radiative properties of aerosols in particular, and therefore the indirect aerosol effect. Another inherent problem, however, is the uncertainty in the scenarios themselves. This is the case for short-lived substances with an inhomogeneous spatial and temporal distribution, such as aerosols. Therefore, on a decadal horizon, changes in the emissions of those substance can exert a significant effect on anthropogenic climate change. (LN)

  14. Atmospheric Simulations Using OGCM-Assimilation SST: Influence of the Wintertime Japan Sea on Monthly Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Yamamoto Naoki Hirose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature data for the Japan Sea obtained from ocean data assimilation modeling is applied to atmospheric simulations of monthly precipitation for January 2005. Because the volume of flow of the Tsushima Warm Current was large during the winter season, the sea surface temperature (SST and coastal precipitation were higher in comparison with those in 2003. In order to evaluate influence of SST on monthly precipitation, we use surface temperatures of the Japan Sea in 2003 and 2005 for comparative simulations of precipitation for January 2005. The precipitation in experiment C (using cool SST data in 2003 is smaller than that in experiment W (using warm SST data in 2005 in a large part of the sea area, since the small evaporation results from the low SST over the upstream area of northwesterly winter monsoon. In the domain of 33.67 - 45.82°N and 125.89 - 142.9°E, the averaged evaporation and precipitation in experiment C are 10% and 13% smaller than those in experiment W, respectively. About half of the difference between the precipitations observed for January 2003 and 2005 in a heavy snow area is equal to the difference between the two simulations. Our results show that the mesoscale SST difference between 2003 and 2005 is related to the local difference of monthly precipitation.

  15. Simulated atmospheric disperison of radioactive material released in an urban area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akins, R.E.; Church, H.W.; Tierney, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    A combination of Gaussian plume and particle-in-cell techniques is used to simulate the atmospheric transport and dispersion of a puff release of radioactive material. The release is caused by an accident that is assumed to occur during the shipment of the radioactive material through central New York City. The simulation provides estimates of volumetric and surface concentrations of the dispersed material that are used to predict radiation doses incurred by the City's population in the event of an accidental release. In the simulation, the release point is arbitrary and the material is assumed to be either a gas or fine particles. The Gaussian plume model follows cloud concentrations from the release time until times when transport over distances up to 500 m has been achieved. The released cloud may stabilize at street level or above the mean buildings height; at a street intersection or in the middle of the block. The possibility of the formation of multiple clouds, owing to circumstances of wind flow direction and street geometry, is allowed

  16. Simulation models: a current indispensable tool in studies of the continuous water-soil-plant - atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Seijas, Teresa; Gonzalez, Felicita; Cid, G.; Osorio, Maria de los A.; Ruiz, Maria Elena

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This work assesses the current use of simulation models as a tool useful and indispensable for the advancement in the research and study of the processes related to the continuous water-soil - plant-atmosphere. In recent years they have reported in the literature many jobs where these modeling tools are used as a support to the decision-making process of companies or organizations in the agricultural sphere and in Special for the design of optimal management of irrigation and fertilization strategies of the crops. Summarizes some of the latest applications reported with respect to the use of water transfers and solutes, such simulation models mainly to nitrate leaching and groundwater contamination problems. On the other hand also summarizes important applications of simulation models of growth of cultivation for the prediction of effects on the performance of different conditions of water stress, and finally some other applications on the management of the different irrigation technologies as kingpins, superfiail irrigation and drip irrigation. Refer also the main work carried out in Cuba. (author)

  17. Testing FSO WDM communication system in simulation software optiwave OptiSystem in different atmospheric environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderka, Ales; Hajek, Lukas; Bednarek, Lukas; Latal, Jan; Vitasek, Jan; Hejduk, Stanislav; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    In this article the author's team deals with using Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) for Free Space Optical (FSO) Communications. In FSO communication occurs due to the influence of atmospheric effect (attenuation, and fluctuation of the received power signal, influence turbulence) and the WDM channel suffers from interchannel crosstalk. There is considered only the one direction. The behavior FSO link was tested for one or eight channels. Here we will be dealing with modulation schemes OOK (On-Off keying), QAM (Quadrature Amplitude Modulation) and Subcarrier Intensity Modulation (SIM) based on a BPSK (Binary Phase Shift Keying). Simulation software OptiSystem 14 was used for tasting. For simulation some parameters were set according to real FSO link such as the datarate 1.25 Gbps, link range 1.4 km. Simulated FSO link used wavelength of 1550 nm with 0.8 nm spacing. There is obtained the influence of crosstalk and modulation format for the BER, depending on the amount of turbulence in the propagation medium.

  18. Numerical simulation of reacting and non-reacting flow in a combustion chamber; Numerisk simulering av reagerande och icke-reagerande stroemning i en braennkammare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, A.; Revstedt, J.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this work has been to do a preliminary study of how well numerical calculations with different turbulence models can predict the flow and temperature fields of a strongly swirling and combusting flow in an experimental combustion chamber and to see which parameters in the mathematical model are the most important. The combustion chamber on which we have done the calculations is called Validation Rig II and was designed by Volvo Aero Corporation. The main part of the study has been carried out on a non-reacting flow but some work has also been done on reacting flow. In most cases it has not been meaningful to compare the calculations with the measurements because they differ quite a lot from each other. For the non-reacting case the following investigations have been made: * How the solution differs for different turbulence models, * The solutions sensitivity to inlet boundary conditions, * How different types of leakage disturb the flow, and * The difference in results between two different CFD-codes, the commercial code CFDS-Flow3D and a code developed at the department of fluid mechanics. For the reacting cases we have studied the influence of: * one or two reaction steps, * the effects of a change in reaction rate, * the influence of thermal radiation, and * the effects of changing the boundary conditions for temperature on the walls. The results from these calculations show that the inlet turbulence intensity has very little effect on the values of the turbulent quantities as well as the velocity profiles at the outlet. Changing the turbulence model or the outlet boundary conditions gives some change in velocity profiles at the outlet but only marginal effects on the swirl number. 21 refs, 54 figs, 19 tabs

  19. Testing an hydrogen streamer chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    A 2x10 cm gap streamer chamber, 35x55 cm2 in surface, was built and tested at CERN. Good tracks of cosmic rays were obtained up to atmospheric pressure, see F. Rohrbach et al, CERN-LAL (Orsay) Collaboration, Nucl. Instr. Methods 141 (1977) 229. Michel Cathenoz stand on the center.

  20. Simulated solar cycle effects on the middle atmosphere: WACCM3 Versus WACCM4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, E. D.; Randall, C. E.; Harvey, V. L.; Marsh, D. R.

    2015-06-01

    The Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model version 4 (WACCM4) is used to quantify solar cycle impacts, including both irradiance and particle precipitation, on the middle atmosphere. Results are compared to previous work using WACCM version 3 (WACCM3) to estimate the sensitivity of simulated solar cycle effects to model modifications. The residual circulation in WACCM4 is stronger than in WACCM3, leading to larger solar cycle effects from energetic particle precipitation; this impacts polar stratospheric odd nitrogen and ozone, as well as polar mesospheric temperatures. The cold pole problem, which is present in both versions, is exacerbated in WACCM4, leading to more ozone loss in the Antarctic stratosphere. Relative to WACCM3, a westerly shift in the WACCM4 zonal winds in the tropical stratosphere and mesosphere, and a strengthening and poleward shift of the Antarctic polar night jet, are attributed to inclusion of the QBO and changes in the gravity wave parameterization in WACCM4. Solar cycle effects in WACCM3 and WACCM4 are qualitatively similar. However, the EPP-induced increase from solar minimum to solar maximum in polar stratospheric NOy is about twice as large in WACCM4 as in WACCM3; correspondingly, maximum increases in polar O3 loss from solar min to solar max are more than twice as large in WACCM4. This does not cause large differences in the WACCM3 versus WACCM4 solar cycle responses in temperature and wind. Overall, these results provide a framework for future studies using WACCM to analyze the impacts of the solar cycle on the middle atmosphere.

  1. Numerical simulation and variational data assimilation for atmospheric dispersion of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quelo, Denis

    2004-01-01

    This work has led to the development of a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model Polair3D which simulates photochemistry. Model-to-data comparison of ozone and nitrogen oxides measurements over Lille in 1998 has proven its reliability at regional scale. 4 D-var data assimilation has been implemented. It relies on the adjoint model of Polair3D obtained through automatic differentiation. An application of inverse modelling of emissions over Lille with real measurements has been performed. It has proven that the inversion of temporal parameters of nitrogen oxides emissions leads to a significant improvement of forecasts. The so-called second-order sensitivity allows to study the sensitivity of the inversion with respect to the data assimilation system itself by computing its conditioning. This is illustrated by two test cases: short-range dispersion of radionuclides and gas-phase atmospheric chemistry characterized by a wide range of timescales. (author) [fr

  2. Numerical simulation and variational data assimilation for atmospheric dispersion of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quelo, D.

    2004-12-01

    This work has led to the development of a three-dimensional chemistry-transport model Polair3D which simulates photochemistry. Model-to-data comparison of ozone and nitrogen oxides measurements over the city of Lille in 1998 has proven its reliability at regional scale. 4-dimensional-variational data assimilation has been implemented. It relies on the adjoint model of Polair3D obtained through automatic differentiation. An application of inverse modelling of emissions over Lille city with real measurements has been performed. It has proven that the inversion of temporal parameters of nitrogen oxides emissions leads to a significant improvement of forecasts. The so-called second-order sensitivity allows the study of the sensitivity of the inversion with respect to the data assimilation system itself by computing its conditioning. This is illustrated by two test cases: short-range dispersion of radionuclides and gas-phase atmospheric chemistry characterized by a wide range of timescales. (author)

  3. A New Code SORD for Simulation of Polarized Light Scattering in the Earth Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkin, Sergey; Lyapustin, Alexei; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Holben, Brent

    2016-01-01

    We report a new publicly available radiative transfer (RT) code for numerical simulation of polarized light scattering in plane-parallel atmosphere of the Earth. Using 44 benchmark tests, we prove high accuracy of the new RT code, SORD (Successive ORDers of scattering). We describe capabilities of SORD and show run time for each test on two different machines. At present, SORD is supposed to work as part of the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) inversion algorithm. For natural integration with the AERONET software, SORD is coded in Fortran 90/95. The code is available by email request from the corresponding (first) author or from ftp://climate1.gsfc.nasa.gov/skorkin/SORD/.

  4. A numerical simulation of 129I in the atmosphere emitted from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizawa, Masato; Suzuki, Takashi; Nagai, Haruyasu; Togawa, Orihiko

    2010-01-01

    A global chemical transport model, MOZART-4, is applied to investigate the behavior of 129 I emitted from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in Europe (Sellafield in the UK and La Hague in France). The result of numerical simulation for more than fifty-year period from the 1950s is validated by comparison with measurements of 129 I around the world and analyzed to clarify the characteristic of the distributions of concentration and deposition of 129 I. The modeled concentrations of 129 I in precipitation in Europe and the United States and inventories in the seawater around Japan and the Gulf of Mexico are in the same order as measurements. the emitted 129 I to the atmosphere is distributed all over the Northern Hemisphere due mainly to the prevailing westerlies and can be an important source of supply of artificial 129 I for the seawater remote from the point source such as a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. (author)

  5. Assessing Uncertainty in Deep Learning Techniques that Identify Atmospheric Rivers in Climate Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, A.; Mudigonda, M.; Kim, S. K.; Kashinath, K.; Kahou, S.; Michalski, V.; Williams, D. N.; Liu, Y.; Prabhat, M.; Loring, B.; O'Brien, T. A.; Collins, W. D.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) can be the difference between CA facing drought or hurricane-level storms. ARs are a form of extreme weather defined as long, narrow columns of moisture which transport water vapor outside the tropics. When they make landfall, they release the vapor as rain or snow. Convolutional neural networks (CNNs), a machine learning technique that uses filters to recognize features, are the leading computer vision mechanism for classifying multichannel images. CNNs have been proven to be effective in identifying extreme weather events in climate simulation output (Liu et. al. 2016, ABDA'16, http://bit.ly/2hlrFNV). Here, we compare three different CNN architectures, tuned with different hyperparameters and training schemes. We compare two-layer, three-layer, four-layer, and sixteen-layer CNNs' ability to recognize ARs in Community Atmospheric Model version 5 output, and we explore the ability of data augmentation and pre-trained models to increase the accuracy of the classifier. Because pre-training the model with regular images (i.e. benches, stoves, and dogs) yielded the highest accuracy rate, this strategy, also known as transfer learning, may be vital in future scientific CNNs, which likely will not have access to a large labelled training dataset. By choosing the most effective CNN architecture, climate scientists can build an accurate historical database of ARs, which can be used to develop a predictive understanding of these phenomena.

  6. Atmospheric fluxes and energy spectra of positive and negative muons from Monte-Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vulpescu, B.; Brancus, I.M.; Badea, A.F.; Duma, M.; Bozdog, H.; Petru, M.; Rebel, H.; Weintz, J.; Mathes, H.J.; Haungs, A.; Roth, M.

    1999-01-01

    Cosmic ray muons observed with detectors placed at the ground level originate from the decay of mesons produced by interactions of high energy cosmic ray primaries with air nuclei, mainly due to the decay of charged pions and kaons, processes which lead also to the production of atmospheric neutrinos. Prompted by recent accurate measurements of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons, the flux and energy spectra of positive and negative muons have been studied on the basis of Monte-Carlo simulations (CORSIKA) of the EAS development, using the GHEISHA and VENUS model as generators. The results have been analysed and compared with data under the aspect of their sensitivity to details of the hadronic interaction, in particular in the 3 GeV/n - 20 TeV/n region. The muon charge ratio proves to be a sensitive test quantity for the production model and propagation and it exhibits peculiar features at low energies (< 1 GeV). Results are shown, from magnetic spectrometer experiments in the difficult region of low momenta as well as the precise values obtained with the WILLI detector by observing the lifetime of negative muons stopped in material. The CORSIKA predictions on the charge ratio show a drop below 1 for very low muon momentum and needs further experimental investigations. The EAST-WEST effect is characteristic for low muon momenta and is well reproduced by simulations. The WILLI detector is planned to be developed in a new configuration, being able to investigate with high accuracy the muon charge ratio at different zenithal and azimuthal directions. (authors)

  7. On the Structure and Adjustment of Inversion-Capped Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flows: Large-Eddy Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Kelly, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    A range of large-eddy simulations, with differing free atmosphere stratification and zero or slightly positive surface heat flux, is investigated to improve understanding of the neutral and near-neutral, inversion-capped, horizontally homogeneous, barotropic atmospheric boundary layer with emphasis...... on the upper region. We find that an adjustment time of at least 16 h is needed for the simulated flow to reach a quasi-steady state. The boundary layer continues to grow, but at a slow rate that changes little after 8 h of simulation time. A common feature of the neutral simulations is the development...... of a super-geostrophic jet near the top of the boundary layer. The analytical wind-shear models included do not account for such a jet, and the best agreement with simulated wind shear is seen in cases with weak stratification above the boundary layer. Increasing the surface heat flux decreases the magnitude...

  8. Simulation of the Interaction of X-rays with a Gas in an Ionization Chamber by the Monte Carlo Method; Simulacion Monte Carlo de la Interaccion de Rays X con el Gas de una Camara de Ionizacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau Carles, A.; Garcia Gomez-Tejedor, G.

    2001-07-01

    The final objective of any ionization chamber is the measurement of the energy amount or radiation dose absorbed by the gas into the chamber. The final value depends on the composition of the gas, its density and temperature, the ionization chamber geometry, and type and intensity of the radiation. We describe a Monte Carlo simulation method, which allows one to compute the dose absorbed by the gas for a X-ray beam. Verification of model has been carried out by simulating the attenuation of standard X-ray radiation through the half value layers established in the ISO 4037 report, while assuming a Weibull type energy distribution for the incident photons. (Author) 6 refs.

  9. HGSYSTEMUF6, Simulating Dispersion Due to Atmospheric Release of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, G; Chang, J.C.; Zhang, J.X.; Bloom, S.G.; Goode, W.D. Jr; Lombardi, D.A.; Yambert, M.W.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: HGSYSTEMUF6 is a suite of models designed for use in estimating consequences associated with accidental, atmospheric release of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF 6 ) and its reaction products, namely Hydrogen Fluoride (HF), and other non-reactive contaminants which are either negatively, neutrally, or positively buoyant. It is based on HGSYSTEM Version 3.0 of Shell Research LTD., and contains specific algorithms for the treatment of UF 6 chemistry and thermodynamics. HGSYSTEMUF6 contains algorithms for the treatment of dense gases, dry and wet deposition, effects due to the presence of buildings (canyon and wake), plume lift-off, and the effects of complex terrain. The models components of the suite include (1) AEROPLUME/RK, used to model near-field dispersion from pressurized two-phase jet releases of UF6 and its reaction products, (2) HEGADAS/UF6 for simulating dense, ground based release of UF 6 , (3) PGPLUME for simulation of passive, neutrally buoyant plumes (4) UF6Mixer for modeling warm, potentially reactive, ground-level releases of UF 6 from buildings, and (5) WAKE, used to model elevated and ground-level releases into building wake cavities of non-reactive plumes that are either neutrally or positively buoyant. 2 - Methods: The atmospheric release and transport of UF 6 is a complicated process involving the interaction between dispersion, chemical and thermodynamic processes. This process is characterized by four separate stages (flash, sublimation, chemical reaction entrainment and passive dispersion) in which one or more of these processes dominate. The various models contained in the suite are applicable to one or more of these stages. For example, for modeling reactive, multiphase releases of UF 6 , the AEROPLUME/RK component employs a process-splitting scheme which numerically integrates the differential equations governing dispersion, UF 6 chemistry, and thermodynamics. This algorithm is based on the assumption that

  10. Simulations of smog-chamber experiments using the two-dimensional volatility basis set: linear oxygenated precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Madrid, Heber J; Murphy, Benjamin N; Pandis, Spyros N; Donahue, Neil M

    2012-10-16

    We use a two-dimensional volatility basis set (2D-VBS) box model to simulate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields of linear oxygenated molecules: n-tridecanal, 2- and 7-tridecanone, 2- and 7-tridecanol, and n-pentadecane. A hybrid model with explicit, a priori treatment of the first-generation products for each precursor molecule, followed by a generic 2D-VBS mechanism for later-generation chemistry, results in excellent model-measurement agreement. This strongly confirms that the 2D-VBS mechanism is a predictive tool for SOA modeling but also suggests that certain important first-generation products for major primary SOA precursors should be treated explicitly for optimal SOA predictions.

  11. Fluid dynamics simulation of aqueous humour in a posterior-chamber phakic intraocular lens with a central perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamorita, Takushi; Uozato, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Kimiya

    2012-06-01

    A modified implantable collamer lens (ICL) with a central hole (diameter, 0.36 mm), a "Hole-ICL", was created to improve aqueous humour circulation. The aim of this study was to investigate the fluid dynamic characteristics of aqueous humour in a Hole-ICL using computational fluid dynamics. Fluid dynamics simulation using an ICL was performed with thermal-hydraulic analysis software FloEFD V5 (Mentor Graphics Corp.). For the simulation, three-dimensional eye models based on a modified Liou-Brennan model eye with conventional ICL (Model ICM, STAAR SURGICAL) and a Hole-ICL were used. Both ICLs were -9.0 diopters (D) and 12.0 mm in length, with an optic of 5.5 mm. The vaulting was 0.50 mm. The quantity of aqueous humour produced by the ciliary body was set at 2.80 μl/min. Flow distribution between the anterior surface of the crystalline lens and the posterior surface of the ICL was also calculated, and trajectory analysis was performed. The flow velocity 0.25 mm in front of the centre of the crystalline lens was 1.52 × 10(-1) mm/sec for the Hole-ICL and 1.21 × 10(-5) mm/sec for the conventional ICL. Outward flow from the hole in the Hole-ICL was confirmed by trajectory analysis. These results suggest that Hole-ICLs improve the circulation of aqueous humour to the anterior surface of the crystalline lens.

  12. Longitudinal biases in the Seychelles Dome simulated by 35 ocean-atmosphere coupled general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagura, Motoki; Sasaki, Wataru; Tozuka, Tomoki; Luo, Jing-Jia; Behera, Swadhin K.; Yamagata, Toshio

    2013-02-01

    Seychelles Dome refers to the shallow climatological thermocline in the southwestern Indian Ocean, where ocean wave dynamics efficiently affect sea surface temperature, allowing sea surface temperature anomalies to be predicted up to 1-2 years in advance. Accurate reproduction of the dome by ocean-atmosphere coupled general circulation models (CGCMs) is essential for successful seasonal predictions in the Indian Ocean. This study examines the Seychelles Dome as simulated by 35 CGCMs, including models used in phase five of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Among the 35 CGCMs, 14 models erroneously produce an upwelling dome in the eastern half of the basin whereas the observed Seychelles Dome is located in the southwestern tropical Indian Ocean. The annual mean Ekman pumping velocity in these models is found to be almost zero in the southern off-equatorial region. This result is inconsistent with observations, in which Ekman upwelling acts as the main cause of the Seychelles Dome. In the models reproducing an eastward-displaced dome, easterly biases are prominent along the equator in boreal summer and fall, which result in shallow thermocline biases along the Java and Sumatra coasts via Kelvin wave dynamics and a spurious upwelling dome in the region. Compared to the CMIP3 models, the CMIP5 models are even worse in simulating the dome longitudes.

  13. Full Coupling Between the Atmosphere, Surface, and Subsurface for Integrated Hydrologic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Jason Hamilton; Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Sudicky, Edward A.; Mallia, Derek V.; Lin, John C.

    2018-01-01

    An ever increasing community of earth system modelers is incorporating new physical processes into numerical models. This trend is facilitated by advancements in computational resources, improvements in simulation skill, and the desire to build numerical simulators that represent the water cycle with greater fidelity. In this quest to develop a state-of-the-art water cycle model, we coupled HydroGeoSphere (HGS), a 3-D control-volume finite element surface and variably saturated subsurface flow model that includes evapotranspiration processes, to the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model, a 3-D finite difference nonhydrostatic mesoscale atmospheric model. The two-way coupled model, referred to as HGS-WRF, exchanges the actual evapotranspiration fluxes and soil saturations calculated by HGS to WRF; conversely, the potential evapotranspiration and precipitation fluxes from WRF are passed to HGS. The flexible HGS-WRF coupling method allows for unique meshes used by each model, while maintaining mass and energy conservation between the domains. Furthermore, the HGS-WRF coupling implements a subtime stepping algorithm to minimize computational expense. As a demonstration of HGS-WRF's capabilities, we applied it to the California Basin and found a strong connection between the depth to the groundwater table and the latent heat fluxes across the land surface.

  14. Simulation of non-hydrostatic gravity wave propagation in the upper atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Deng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The high-frequency and small horizontal scale gravity waves may be reflected and ducted in non-hydrostatic simulations, but usually propagate vertically in hydrostatic models. To examine gravity wave propagation, a preliminary study has been conducted with a global ionosphere–thermosphere model (GITM, which is a non-hydrostatic general circulation model for the upper atmosphere. GITM has been run regionally with a horizontal resolution of 0.2° long × 0.2° lat to resolve the gravity wave with wavelength of 250 km. A cosine wave oscillation with amplitude of 30 m s−1 has been applied to the zonal wind at the low boundary, and both high-frequency and low-frequency waves have been tested. In the high-frequency case, the gravity wave stays below 200 km, which indicates that the wave is reflected or ducted in propagation. The results are consistent with the theoretical analysis from the dispersion relationship when the wavelength is larger than the cutoff wavelength for the non-hydrostatic situation. However, the low-frequency wave propagates to the high altitudes during the whole simulation period, and the amplitude increases with height. This study shows that the non-hydrostatic model successfully reproduces the high-frequency gravity wave dissipation.

  15. An atmospheric turbulence and telescope simulator for the development of AOLI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puga, Marta; López, Roberto; King, David; Oscoz, Alejandro

    2014-08-01

    AOLI, Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager, is the next generation of extremely high resolution instruments in the optical range, combining the two more promising techniques: Adaptive optics and lucky imaging. The possibility of reaching fainter objects at maximum resolution implies a better use of weak energy on each lucky image. AOLI aims to achieve this by using an adaptive optics system to reduce the dispersion that seeing causes on the spot and therefore increasing the number of optimal images to accumulate, maximizing the efficiency of the lucky imaging technique. The complexity of developments in hardware, control and software for in-site telescope tests claim for a system to simulate the telescope performance. This paper outlines the requirements and a concept/preliminary design for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) and atmospheric turbulence simulator. The design consists of pupil resemble, a variable intensity point source, phase plates and a focal plane mask to assist in the alignment, diagnostics and calibration of AOLI wavefront sensor, AO loop and science detectors, as well as enabling stand-alone test operation of AOLI.

  16. Interannual Tropical Rainfall Variability in General Circulation Model Simulations Associated with the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, K. R.; Palmer, T. N.

    1996-11-01

    The interannual variability of rainfall over the Indian subcontinent, the African Sahel, and the Nordeste region of Brazil have been evaluated in 32 models for the period 1979-88 as part of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP). The interannual variations of Nordeste rainfall are the most readily captured, owing to the intimate link with Pacific and Atlantic sea surface temperatures. The precipitation variations over India and the Sahel are less well simulated. Additionally, an Indian monsoon wind shear index was calculated for each model. Evaluation of the interannual variability of a wind shear index over the summer monsoon region indicates that the models exhibit greater fidelity in capturing the large-scale dynamic fluctuations than the regional-scale rainfall variations. A rainfall/SST teleconnection quality control was used to objectively stratify model performance. Skill scores improved for those models that qualitatively simulated the observed rainfall/El Niño- Southern Oscillation SST correlation pattern. This subset of models also had a rainfall climatology that was in better agreement with observations, indicating a link between systematic model error and the ability to simulate interannual variations.A suite of six European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) AMIP runs (differing only in their initial conditions) have also been examined. As observed, all-India rainfall was enhanced in 1988 relative to 1987 in each of these realizations. All-India rainfall variability during other years showed little or no predictability, possibly due to internal chaotic dynamics associated with intraseasonal monsoon fluctuations and/or unpredictable land surface process interactions. The interannual variations of Nordeste rainfall were best represented. The State University of New York at Albany/National Center for Atmospheric Research Genesis model was run in five initial condition realizations. In this model, the Nordeste rainfall

  17. Simulation of atmospheric krypton-85 transport to assess the detectability of clandestine nuclear reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Jens Ole

    2010-02-02

    The radioactive noble gas krypton-85 is released into the atmosphere during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel or irradiated breeding targets. This is a necessary step for plutonium separation. Therefore the {sup 85}Kr signature of reprocessing could possibly be used for the detection of undeclared nuclear facilities producing nuclear weaponusable material. The {sup 85}Kr content of the atmosphere has grown over the last decades as the emissions from military and civilian nuclear industry could not be compensated by the decay with a half-life of 10.76 years. In this study, the global {sup 85}Kr background distribution due to emissions of known reprocessing facilities for the period from 1971 until 2006 was simulated using the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 applying the newest available annual emission data. The convective tracer transport scheme and the operator splitting for the physical calculations in the model were modified in order to guarantee physically correct results for tracer point sources, in particular non negative concentrations. An on-line routine controlling the {sup 85}Kr -budget in the model enforced exact mass conservation. The results of the simulation were evaluated by extensive comparison with measurements performed by the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection with very good agreement at most observation sites except those in the direct vicinity of {sup 85}Kr sources. Of particular interest for the {sup 85}Kr detection potential was the variability of {sup 85}Kr background concentrations which was evaluated for the first time in a global model. In addition, the interhemispheric transport as simulated by ECHAM5 was analyzed using a two-box model providing a mean exchange time of τ {sub ex} = 10.5 months. The analysis of τ{sub ex} over simulated 35 years indicates that in years with strong South Asian or African Monsoon the interhemispheric transport is faster during the monsoon season. A correlation analysis of

  18. Premar-2: a Monte Carlo code for radiative transport simulation in atmospheric environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupini, E. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna, (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    The peculiarities of the PREMAR-2 code, aimed at radiation transport Monte Carlo simulation in atmospheric environments in the infrared-ultraviolet frequency range, are described. With respect to the previously developed PREMAR code, besides plane multilayers, spherical multilayers and finite sequences of vertical layers, each one with its own atmospheric behaviour, are foreseen in the new code, together with the refraction phenomenon, so that long range, highly slanted paths can now be more faithfully taken into account. A zenithal angular dependence of the albedo coefficient has moreover been introduced. Lidar systems, with spatially independent source and telescope, are allowed again to be simulated, and, in this latest version of the code, sensitivity analyses to be performed. According to this last feasibility, consequences on radiation transport of small perturbations in physical components of the atmospheric environment may be analyze and the related effects on searched results estimated. The availability of a library of physical data (reaction coefficients, phase functions and refraction indexes) is required by the code, providing the essential features of the environment of interest needed of the Monte Carlo simulation. Variance reducing techniques have been enhanced in the Premar-2 code, by introducing, for instance, a local forced collision technique, especially apt to be used in Lidar system simulations. Encouraging comparisons between code and experimental results carried out at the Brasimone Centre of ENEA, have so far been obtained, even if further checks of the code are to be performed. [Italian] Nel presente rapporto vengono descritte le principali caratteristiche del codice di calcolo PREMAR-2, che esegue la simulazione Montecarlo del trasporto della radiazione elettromagnetica nell'atmosfera, nell'intervallo di frequenza che va dall'infrarosso all'ultravioletto. Rispetto al codice PREMAR precedentemente sviluppato, il codice

  19. B33C-0612: Evaluation of Simulated Biospheric Carbon Dioxide Fluxes and Atmospheric Concentrations Using Global in Situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Sajeev; Johnson, Matthew S.; Potter, Christopher S.; Genovese, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric mixing ratios of carbon dioxide (CO2) are largely controlled by anthropogenic emission sources and biospheric sources/sinks. Global biospheric fluxes of CO2 are controlled by complex processes facilitating the exchange of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. These processes which play a key role in these terrestrial ecosystem-atmosphere carbon exchanges are currently not fully understood, resulting in large uncertainties in the quantification of biospheric CO2 fluxes. Current models with these inherent deficiencies have difficulties simulating the global carbon cycle with high accuracy. We are developing a new modeling platform, GEOS-Chem-CASA by integrating the year-specific NASA-CASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach) biosphere model with the GEOS-Chem (Goddard Earth Observation System-Chemistry) chemical transport model to improve the simulation of atmosphere-terrestrial ecosystem carbon exchange. We use NASA-CASA to explicitly represent the exchange of CO2 between terrestrial ecosystem and atmosphere by replacing the baseline GEOS-Chem land net CO2 flux and forest biomass burning CO2 emissions. We will present the estimation and evaluation of these "bottom-up" land CO2 fluxes, simulated atmospheric mixing ratios, and forest disturbance changes over the last decade. In addition, we will present our initial comparison of atmospheric column-mean dry air mole fraction of CO2 predicted by the model and those retrieved from NASA's OCO-2 (Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2) satellite instrument and model-predicted surface CO2 mixing ratios with global in situ observations. This evaluation is the first step necessary for our future work planned to constrain the estimates of biospheric carbon fluxes through "top-down" inverse modeling, which will improve our understanding of the processes controlling atmosphere-terrestrial ecosystem greenhouse gas exchanges, especially over regions which lack in

  20. SIMULATIONS NUMERIQUES DE L'ATMOSPHERE URBAINE AVEC LE MODELE SUBMESO :
    APPLICATION A LA CAMPAGNE CLU-ESCOMPTE SUR L'AGGLOMERATION DE MARSEILLE

    OpenAIRE

    Leroyer , Sylvie

    2006-01-01

    In view of understanding and forecasting pollutant dispersion in urban areas, high resolution numerical simulations are performed. The aim is to reproduce atmospheric characteristics above complex urbanised site. An accurate method is developed to implement numerical simulations of the urban atmosphere based on three complementary tools, optimized on Marseille agglomeration example: the atmospheric Large Eddy Simulation model SUBMESO and the soil model for sub-meso scales, urban, SM2-U, and t...

  1. INVESTIGATION OF THE HUMIDITY EFFECT ON THE FAC-IR-300 IONIZATION CHAMBER RESPONSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Seyed Mostafa; Tavakoli-Anbaran, Hossein

    2018-02-01

    The free-air ionization chamber is communicating with the ambient air, therefore, the atmospheric parameters such as temperature, pressure and humidity effect on the ionization chamber performance. The free-air ionization chamber, entitled as FAC-IR-300, that design at the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, AEOI, is required the atmospheric correction factors for correct the chamber reading. In this article, the effect of humidity on the ionization chamber response was investigated. For this reason, was introduced the humidity correction factor, kh. In this article, the Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine the kh factor. The simulation results show in relative humidities between 30% to 80%, the kh factor is equal 0.9970 at 20°C and 0.9975 at 22°C. From the simulation results, at low energy the energy dependence of the kh factor is significant and with increasing energy this dependence is negligible. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Simulation of cold plasma in a chamber under high- and low-frequency voltage conditions for a capacitively coupled plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Daoxin; Cheng Jia; Ji Linhong; Sun Yuchun

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of cold plasma,especially for a dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma (CCP),play an important role for plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition,which stimulates further studies using different methods.In this paper,a 2D fluid model was constructed for N2 gas plasma simulations with CFD-ACE+,a commercial multi-physical software package.First,the distributions of electric potential (Epot),electron number density (Ne),N number density (N) and electron temperature (Te) are described under the condition of high frequency (HF),13.56 MHz,HF voltage,300 V,and low-frequency (LF) voltage,0 V,particularly in the sheath.Based on this,the influence of HF on Ne is further discussed under different HF voltages of 200 V,300 V,400 V,separately,along with the influence of LF,0.3 MHz,and various LF voltages of 500 V,600 V,700 V.The results show that sheaths of about 3 mm are formed near the two electrodes,in which Epot and Te vary extensively with time and space,while in the plasma bulk Epot changes synchronously with an electric potential of about 70 V and Te varies only in a small range.N is also modulated by the radio frequency,but the relative change in N is small.Ne varies only in the sheath,while in the bulk it is steady at different time steps.So,by comparing Ne in the plasma bulk at the steady state,we can see that Ne will increase when HF voltage increases.Yet,Ne will slightly decrease with the increase of LF voltage.At the same time,the homogeneity will change in both x and y directions.So both HF and LF voltages should be carefully considered in order to obtain a high-density,homogeneous plasma.

  3. Inter-annual variability of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations as simulated with global terrestrial biosphere models and an atmospheric transport model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Daisuke; Saeki, Tazu; Nakazawa, Takakiyo [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Center for Atmospheric and Oceanic Studies; Ishizawa, Misa; Maksyutov, Shamil [Inst. for Global Change Research, Yokohama (Japan). Frontier Research System for Global Change; Thornton, Peter E. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States). Climate and Global Dynamics Div.

    2003-04-01

    Seasonal and inter-annual variations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} for the period from 1961 to 1997 have been simulated using a global tracer transport model driven by a new version of the Biome BioGeochemical Cycle model (Biome-BGC). Biome-BGC was forced by daily temperature and precipitation from the NCEP reanalysis dataset, and the calculated monthly-averaged CO{sub 2} fluxes were used as input to the global transport model. Results from an inter-comparison with the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach model (CASA) and the Simulation model of Carbon CYCLE in Land Ecosystems (Sim-CYCLE) model are also reported. The phase of the seasonal cycle in the Northern Hemisphere was reproduced generally well by Biome-BGC, although the amplitude was smaller compared to the observations and to the other biosphere models. The CO{sub 2} time series simulated by Biome-BGC were compared to the global CO{sub 2} concentration anomalies from the observations at Mauna Loa and the South Pole. The modeled concentration anomalies matched the phase of the inter-annual variations in the atmospheric CO{sub 2} observations; however, the modeled amplitude was lower than the observed value in several cases. The result suggests that a significant part of the inter-annual variability in the global carbon cycle can be accounted for by the terrestrial biosphere models. Simulations performed with another climate-based model, Sim-CYCLE, produced a larger amplitude of inter-annual variability in atmospheric CO{sub 2}, making the amplitude closer to the observed range, but with a more visible phase mismatch in a number of time periods. This may indicate the need to increase the Biome-BGC model sensitivity to seasonal and inter-annual changes in temperature and precipitation.

  4. Inter-annual variability of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations as simulated with global terrestrial biosphere models and an atmospheric transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Daisuke; Saeki, Tazu; Nakazawa, Takakiyo; Ishizawa, Misa; Maksyutov, Shamil; Thornton, Peter E.

    2003-01-01

    Seasonal and inter-annual variations of atmospheric CO 2 for the period from 1961 to 1997 have been simulated using a global tracer transport model driven by a new version of the Biome BioGeochemical Cycle model (Biome-BGC). Biome-BGC was forced by daily temperature and precipitation from the NCEP reanalysis dataset, and the calculated monthly-averaged CO 2 fluxes were used as input to the global transport model. Results from an inter-comparison with the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach model (CASA) and the Simulation model of Carbon CYCLE in Land Ecosystems (Sim-CYCLE) model are also reported. The phase of the seasonal cycle in the Northern Hemisphere was reproduced generally well by Biome-BGC, although the amplitude was smaller compared to the observations and to the other biosphere models. The CO 2 time series simulated by Biome-BGC were compared to the global CO 2 concentration anomalies from the observations at Mauna Loa and the South Pole. The modeled concentration anomalies matched the phase of the inter-annual variations in the atmospheric CO 2 observations; however, the modeled amplitude was lower than the observed value in several cases. The result suggests that a significant part of the inter-annual variability in the global carbon cycle can be accounted for by the terrestrial biosphere models. Simulations performed with another climate-based model, Sim-CYCLE, produced a larger amplitude of inter-annual variability in atmospheric CO 2 , making the amplitude closer to the observed range, but with a more visible phase mismatch in a number of time periods. This may indicate the need to increase the Biome-BGC model sensitivity to seasonal and inter-annual changes in temperature and precipitation

  5. Mechanism of climate change over South America during the LGM in coupled Ocean- Atmosphere model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodri, M.

    2006-12-01

    On a regional perspective the database of proxy information for South America during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) shows large and regionally extensive changes of the mean climate and vegetation types over the Amazon basin. In some instances these changes were associated with decrease in the mean precipitation amount (and most probably in moist deep convection) over the Amazonian and South East Brazil monsoon regions and wetter mean conditions in present day drought-prone regions such as Northeast of Brazil (Nordeste). These changes have been interpreted as local responses to shift in the mean position and intensity of the Atlantic ITCZ due to glacial extratropical forcings or to changes in the South American Monsoons. However there are still two issues is the path to further understand the mechanism of climate change over South America during the LGM. The first is incomplete knowledge in both the modeling and observational communities of how the moist deep convection over the Amazonian region respond to glacial boundary condition and how this changes might interact with the meridional shift of rainfall over Nordeste and Atlantic Ocean. The second is our understanding of how ocean-atmosphere changes that do occur in the tropical Pacific region influence the climate of the remainder of the planet and on a regional way over South America. Using PMIP-2 coupled Ocean-Atmosphere simulations for LGM and comparison to paleodata we show that hydrological cycle changes over the Amazon basin might be independent of their Atlantic Ocean counterpart, while teleconnections with Pacific Ocean might have played a significant role in the observed changes over tropical South America.

  6. A simulated Linear Mixture Model to Improve Classification Accuracy of Satellite Data Utilizing Degradation of Atmospheric Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WIDAD Elmahboub

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Researchers in remote sensing have attempted to increase the accuracy of land cover information extracted from remotely sensed imagery. Factors that influence the supervised and unsupervised classification accuracy are the presence of atmospheric effect and mixed pixel information. A linear mixture simulated model experiment is generated to simulate real world data with known end member spectral sets and class cover proportions (CCP. The CCP were initially generated by a random number generator and normalized to make the sum of the class proportions equal to 1.0 using MATLAB program. Random noise was intentionally added to pixel values using different combinations of noise levels to simulate a real world data set. The atmospheric scattering error is computed for each pixel value for three generated images with SPOT data. Accuracy can either be classified or misclassified. Results portrayed great improvement in classified accuracy, for example, in image 1, misclassified pixels due to atmospheric noise is 41 %. Subsequent to the degradation of atmospheric effect, the misclassified pixels were reduced to 4 %. We can conclude that accuracy of classification can be improved by degradation of atmospheric noise.

  7. Forcing of global ocean models using an atmospheric boundary layer model: assessing consequences for the simulation of the AMOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Rafael; Boening, Claus

    2015-04-01

    Current practice in the atmospheric forcing of ocean model simulations can lead to unphysical behaviours. The problem lies in the bulk formulation of the turbulent air-sea fluxes in conjunction with a prescribed, and unresponsive, atmospheric state as given, e.g., by reanalysis products. This forcing formulation corresponds to assuming an atmosphere with infinite heat capacity, and effectively damps SST anomalies even on basin scales. It thus curtails an important negative feedback between meridional ocean heat transport and SST in the North Atlantic, rendering simulations of the AMOC in such models excessively sensitive to details in the freshwater fluxes. As a consequence, such simulations are known for spurious drift behaviors which can only partially controlled by introducing some (and sometimes strong) unphysical restoring of sea surface salinity. There have been several suggestions during the last 20 years for at least partially alleviating the problem by including some simplified model of the atmospheric boundary layer (AML) which allows a feedback of SST anomalies on the near-surface air temperature and humidity needed to calculate the surface fluxes. We here present simulations with a simple, only thermally active AML formulation (based on the 'CheapAML' proposed by Deremble et al., 2013) implemented in a global model configuration based on NEMO (ORCA05). In a suite of experiments building on the CORE-bulk forcing methodology, we examine some general features of the AML-solutions (in which only the winds are prescribed) in comparison to solutions with a prescribed atmosperic state. The focus is on the North Atlantic, where we find that the adaptation of the atmospheric temperature the simulated ocean state can lead to strong local modifications in the surface heat fluxes in frontal regions (e.g., the 'Northwest Corner'). We particularly assess the potential of the AML-forcing concept for obtaining AMOC-simulations with reduced spurious drift, without

  8. Comparison of energy fluxes at the land surface-atmosphere interface in an Alpine valley as simulated with different models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Grossi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of a research project coupling meteorological and hydrological models in mountainous areas a distributed Snow-Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model was developed and applied to simulate the energy fluxes at the land surface – atmosphere interface in an Alpine valley (Toce Valley - North Italy during selected flood events in the last decade. Energy fluxes simulated by the distributed energy transfer model were compared with those simulated by a limited area meteorological model for the event of June 1997 and the differences in the spatial and temporal distribution. The Snow/Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer model was also applied to simulate the energy fluxes at the land surface-atmosphere interface for a single cell, assumed to be representative of the Siberia site (Toce Valley, where a micro-meteorological station was installed and operated for 2.5 months in autumn 1999. The Siberia site is very close to the Nosere site, where a standard meteorological station was measuring precipitation, air temperature and humidity, global and net radiation and wind speed during the same special observing period. Data recorded by the standard meteorological station were used to force the energy transfer model and simulate the point energy fluxes at the Siberia site, while turbulent fluxes observed at the Siberia site were used to derive the latent heat flux from the energy balance equation. Finally, the hourly evapotranspiration flux computed by this procedure was compared to the evapotranspiration flux simulated by the energy transfer model. Keywords: energy exchange processes, land surface-atmosphere interactions, turbulent fluxes

  9. Proceedings of workshop on streamer chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hidihiko; Takahashi, Kaoru; Hirose, Tachishige; Masaike, Akira

    1978-08-01

    For high accuracy observation of multiple-body reactions, a vertex detector of high efficiency is essential. A bubble chamber, though excellent for tracks detection, is problematic in statistics accuracy. The vertex detector with a wire chamber, while better in this respect, difficult in multiple-particle detection etc. The workshop has had several meetings on a streamer chamber as a detector combining features of both bubble chamber and counter, with emphasis on tracks observation in avalanche mode and recordings not using films. Contents are on streamer chamber gas, analytical photography, data processing, simulation program, etc. (Mori, K.)

  10. Simulated nutrient dissolution of Asian aerosols in various atmospheric waters: Potential links to marine primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyan; Bi, Yanfeng; Zhang, Guosen; Liu, Sumei; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Zhaomeng; Ren, Jingling; Zhang, Guiling

    2017-09-01

    To probe the bioavailability and environmental mobility of aerosol nutrient elements (N, P, Si) in atmospheric water (rainwater, cloud and fog droplets), ten total suspended particulate (TSP) samples were collected at Fulong Mountain, Qingdao from prevailing air mass trajectory sources during four seasons. Then, a high time-resolution leaching experiment with simulated non-acidic atmospheric water (non-AAW, Milli-Q water, pH 5.5) and subsequently acidic atmospheric water (AAW, hydrochloric acid solution, pH 2) was performed. We found that regardless of the season or source, a monotonous decreasing pattern was observed in the dissolution of N, P and Si compounds in aerosols reacted with non-AAW, and the accumulated dissolved curves of P and Si fit a first-order kinetic model. No additional NO3- + NO2- dissolved out, while a small amount of NH4+ in Asian dust (AD) samples was released in AAW. The similar dissolution behaviour of P and Si from non-AAW to AAW can be explained by the Transition State Theory. The sources of aerosols related to various minerals were the natural reasons that affected the amounts of bioavailable phosphorus and silicon in aerosols (i.e., solubility), which can be explained by the dissolution rate constant of P and Si in non-AAW with lower values in mineral aerosols. The acid/particle ratio and particle/liquid ratio also have a large effect on the solubility of P and Si, which was implied by Pearson correlation analysis. Acid processing of aerosols may have great significance for marine areas with limited P and Si and post-acidification release increases of 1.1-10-fold for phosphorus and 1.2-29-fold for silicon. The decreasing mole ratio of P and Si in AAW indicates the possibility of shifting from a Si-limit to a P-limit in aerosols in the ocean, which promotes the growth of diatoms prior to other algal species.

  11. Numerical simulation of idealized front motion in neutral and stratified atmosphere with a hyperbolic system of equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudin, M. S.

    2017-11-01

    In the present paper, stratification effects on surface pressure in the propagation of an atmospheric gravity current (cold front) over flat terrain are estimated with a non-hydrostatic finite-difference model of atmospheric dynamics. Artificial compressibility is introduced into the model in order to make its equations hyperbolic. For comparison with available simulation data, the physical processes under study are assumed to be adiabatic. The influence of orography is also eliminated. The front surface is explicitly described by a special equation. A time filter is used to suppress the non-physical oscillations. The results of simulations of surface pressure under neutral and stable stratification are presented. Under stable stratification the front moves faster and shows an abrupt pressure jump at the point of observation. This fact is in accordance with observations and the present-day theory of atmospheric fronts.

  12. Simulation of wind-induced snow transport and sublimation in alpine terrain using a fully coupled snowpack/atmosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vionnet, V.; Martin, E.; Masson, V.; Guyomarc'h, G.; Naaim-Bouvet, F.; Prokop, A.; Durand, Y.; Lac, C.

    2014-03-01

    In alpine regions, wind-induced snow transport strongly influences the spatio-temporal evolution of the snow cover throughout the winter season. To gain understanding on the complex processes that drive the redistribution of snow, a new numerical model is developed. It directly couples the detailed snowpack model Crocus with the atmospheric model Meso-NH. Meso-NH/Crocus simulates snow transport in saltation and in turbulent suspension and includes the sublimation of suspended snow particles. The coupled model is evaluated against data collected around the experimental site of Col du Lac Blanc (2720 m a.s.l., French Alps). First, 1-D simulations show that a detailed representation of the first metres of the atmosphere is required to reproduce strong gradients of blowing snow concentration and compute mass exchange between the snowpack and the atmosphere. Secondly, 3-D simulations of a blowing snow event without concurrent snowfall have been carried out. Results show that the model captures the main structures of atmospheric flow in alpine terrain. However, at 50 m grid spacing, the model reproduces only the patterns of snow erosion and deposition at the ridge scale and misses smaller scale patterns observed by terrestrial laser scanning. When activated, the sublimation of suspended snow particles causes a reduction of deposited snow mass of 5.3% over the calculation domain. Total sublimation (surface + blowing snow) is three times higher than surface sublimation in a simulation neglecting blowing snow sublimation.

  13. Effect of hydrogen chloride on the corrosion of an FeCrAlY alloy in simulated coal gasifier atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coley, K.S.; Rhoades-Brown, J.E.; Blick, K.

    1989-03-01

    An iron chromium aluminium yttrium steel was exposed to a simulated coal gasifier atmosphere containing 1000 ppm and 2200 ppm hydrogen chloride at 450/sup 0/C. Increasing hydrogen chloride content was found to accelerate reaction rates, and significantly alter the microstructure and composition of the corrosion product. Tentative explanations for these results, involving vapour phase transport of metal chlorides are proposed.

  14. Validation of techniques for simulating long range dispersal and deposition of atmospheric pollutants based upon measurements after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tveten, U.

    1987-02-01

    Problem specifications and a time schedule for an international study of computerized simulation of transfrontier atmospheric contamination are presented. Started on the initiative of the Nordic Liaison Committee for Atomic Energy, the study will be based on international measurements after the Chernobyl accident

  15. TransCom model simulations of hourly atmospheric CO2: Experimental overview and diurnal cycle results for 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, R. M.; Peters, W.; Roedenbeck, C.; Aulagnier, C.; Baker, I.; Bergmann, D. J.; Bousquet, P.; Brandt, J.; Bruhwiler, L.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Christensen, J. H.; Delage, F.; Denning, A. S.; Fan, S.; Geels, C.; Houweling, S.; Imasu, R.; Karstens, U.; Kawa, S. R.; Kleist, J.; Krol, M. C.; Lin, S. -J.; Lokupitiya, R.; Maki, T.; Maksyutov, S.; Niwa, Y.; Onishi, R.; Parazoo, N.; Patra, P. K.; Pieterse, G.; Rivier, L.; Satoh, M.; Serrar, S.; Taguchi, S.; Takigawa, M.; Vautard, R.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Zhu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    [1] A forward atmospheric transport modeling experiment has been coordinated by the TransCom group to investigate synoptic and diurnal variations in CO2. Model simulations were run for biospheric, fossil, and air-sea exchange of CO2 and for SF6 and radon for 2000-2003. Twenty-five models or model

  16. TransCom model simulations of hourly atmospheric CO2: Experimental overview and diurnal cycle results for 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, R. M.; Peters, W.; RöDenbeck, C.; Aulagnier, C.; Baker, I.; Bergmann, D. J.; Bousquet, P.; Brandt, J.; Bruhwiler, L.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Christensen, J. H.; Delage, F.; Denning, A. S.; Fan, S.; Geels, C.; Houweling, S.; Imasu, R.; Karstens, U.; Kawa, S. R.; Kleist, J.; Krol, M. C.; Lin, S.-J.; Lokupitiya, R.; Maki, T.; Maksyutov, S.; Niwa, Y.; Onishi, R.; Parazoo, N.; Patra, P. K.; Pieterse, G.; Rivier, L.; Satoh, M.; Serrar, S.; Taguchi, S.; Takigawa, M.; Vautard, R.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Zhu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    A forward atmospheric transport modeling experiment has been coordinated by the TransCom group to investigate synoptic and diurnal variations in CO2. Model simulations were run for biospheric, fossil, and air-sea exchange of CO2 and for SF6 and radon for 2000-2003. Twenty-five models or model

  17. Doriot Climatic Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Doriot Climatic Chambers are two, 60-feet long, 11-feet high, 15-feet wide chambers that are owned and operated by NSRDEC. The Doriot Climatic Chambers are among...

  18. Longitudinal Biases in the Seychelles Dome Simulated by 34 Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled General Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagura, M.; Sasaki, W.; Tozuka, T.; Luo, J.; Behera, S. K.; Yamagata, T.

    2012-12-01

    The upwelling dome of the southern tropical Indian Ocean is examined by using simulated results from 34 ocean-atmosphere coupled general circulation models (CGCMs) including those from the phase five of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Among the current set of the 34 CGCMs, 12 models erroneously produce the upwelling dome in the eastern half of the basin while the observed Seychelles Dome is located in the southwestern tropical Indian Ocean (Figure 1). The annual mean Ekman pumping velocity is almost zero in the southern off-equatorial region in these models. This is in contrast with the observations that show Ekman upwelling as the cause of the Seychelles Dome. In the models that produce the dome in the eastern basin, the easterly biases are prominent along the equator in boreal summer and fall that cause shallow thermocline biases along the Java and Sumatra coasts via Kelvin wave dynamics and result in a spurious upwelling dome there. In addition, these models tend to overestimate (underestimate) the magnitude of annual (semiannual) cycle of thermocline depth variability in the dome region, which is another consequence of the easterly wind biases in boreal summer-fall. Compared to the CMIP3 models (Yokoi et al. 2009), the CMIP5 models are even worse in simulating the dome longitudes and magnitudes of annual and semiannual cycles of thermocline depth variability in the dome region. Considering the increasing need to understand regional impacts of climate modes, these results may give serious caveats to interpretation of model results and help in further model developments.; Figure 1: The longitudes of the shallowest annual-mean D20 in 5°S-12°S. The open and filled circles are for the observations and the CGCMs, respectively.

  19. Simulation of Electrical Discharge Initiated by a Nanometer-Sized Probe in Atmospheric Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ran; Chen Chilai; Liu Youjiang; Wang Huanqin; Kong Deyi; Ma Yuan; Cada Michael; Brugger Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional nanometer scale tip-plate discharge model has been employed to study nanoscale electrical discharge in atmospheric conditions. The field strength distributions in a nanometer scale tip-to-plate electrode arrangement were calculated using the finite element analysis (FEA) method, and the influences of applied voltage amplitude and frequency as well as gas gap distance on the variation of effective discharge range (EDR) on the plate were also investigated and discussed. The simulation results show that the probe with a wide tip will cause a larger effective discharge range on the plate; the field strength in the gap is notably higher than that induced by the sharp tip probe; the effective discharge range will increase linearly with the rise of excitation voltage, and decrease nonlinearly with the rise of gap length. In addition, probe dimension, especially the width/height ratio, affects the effective discharge range in different manners. With the width/height ratio rising from 1:1 to 1:10, the effective discharge range will maintain stable when the excitation voltage is around 50 V. This will increase when the excitation voltage gets higher and decrease as the excitation voltage gets lower. Furthermore, when the gap length is 5 nm and the excitation voltage is below 20 V, the diameter of EDR in our simulation is about 150 nm, which is consistent with the experiment results reported by other research groups. Our work provides a preliminary understanding of nanometer scale discharges and establishes a predictive structure-behavior relationship

  20. Preservation of Biomarkers from Cyanobacteria Mixed with Mars­Like Regolith Under Simulated Martian Atmosphere and UV Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqué, Mickael; Verseux, Cyprien; Böttger, Ute; Rabbow, Elke; de Vera, Jean-Pierre Paul; Billi, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    The space mission EXPOSE-R2 launched on the 24th of July 2014 to the International Space Station is carrying the BIOMEX (BIOlogy and Mars EXperiment) experiment aimed at investigating the endurance of extremophiles and stability of biomolecules under space and Mars-like conditions. In order to prepare the analyses of the returned samples, ground-based simulations were carried out in Planetary and Space Simulation facilities. During the ground-based simulations, Chroococcidiopsis cells mixed with two Martian mineral analogues (phyllosilicatic and sulfatic Mars regolith simulants) were exposed to a Martian simulated atmosphere combined or not with UV irradiation corresponding to the dose received during a 1-year-exposure in low Earth orbit (or half a Martian year on Mars). Cell survival and preservation of potential biomarkers such as photosynthetic and photoprotective pigments or DNA were assessed by colony forming ability assays, confocal laser scanning microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and PCR-based assays. DNA and photoprotective pigments (carotenoids) were detectable after simulations of the space mission (570 MJ/m2 of UV 200-400 nm irradiation and Martian simulated atmosphere), even though signals were attenuated by the treatment. The fluorescence signal from photosynthetic pigments was differently preserved after UV irradiation, depending on the thickness of the samples. UV irradiation caused a high background fluorescence of the Martian mineral analogues, as revealed by Raman spectroscopy. Further investigation will be needed to ensure unambiguous identification and operations of future Mars missions. However, a 3-month exposure to a Martian simulated atmosphere showed no significant damaging effect on the tested cyanobacterial biosignatures, pointing out the relevance of the latter for future investigations after the EXPOSE-R2 mission. Data gathered during the ground-based simulations will contribute to interpret results from space experiments and guide our

  1. Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber comprises a power anechoic chamber and one transverse electromagnetic cell for characterizing radiofrequency (RF) responses of...

  2. Multiple chamber ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-chambered ionisation detector enables the amount of radiation entering each chamber from a single radioactive, eg β, source to be varied by altering the proportion of the source protruding into each chamber. Electrodes define chambers and an extended radioactive source is movable to alter the source length in each chamber. Alternatively, the source is fixed relative to outer electrodes but the central electrode may be adjusted by an attached support altering the chamber dimensions and hence the length of source in each. Also disclosed are a centrally mounted source tiltable towards one or other chamber and a central electrode tiltable to alter chamber dimensions. (U.K.)

  3. The consumption of atmospheric methane by soil in a simulated future climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Curry

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A recently developed model for the consumption of atmospheric methane by soil (Curry, 2007 is used to investigate the global magnitude and distribution of methane uptake in a simulated future climate. In addition to solving the one-dimensional diffusion-reaction equation, the model includes a parameterization of biological CH4 oxidation that is sensitive to soil temperature and moisture content, along with specified reduction factors for land cultivation and wetland fractional coverage. Under the SRES emission scenario A1B, the model projects an 8% increase in the global annual mean CH4 soil sink by 2100, over and above the 15% increase expected from increased CH4 concentration alone. While the largest absolute increases occur in cool temperate and subtropical forest ecosystems, the largest relative increases in consumption (>40% are seen in the boreal forest, tundra and polar desert environments of the high northern latitudes. Methane uptake at mid- to high northern latitudes increases year-round in 2100, with a 68% increase over present-day values in June. This increase is primarily due to enhanced soil diffusivity resulting from lower soil moisture produced by increased evaporation and reduced snow cover. At lower latitudes, uptake is enhanced mainly by elevated soil temperatures and/or reduced soil moisture stress, with the dominant influence determined by the local climate.

  4. Effects of Simulated Smog Atmospheres in Rodent Models of Metabolic and Immunologic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee Hargrove, Marie; Snow, Samantha J; Luebke, Robert W; Wood, Charles E; Krug, Jonathan D; Krantz, Q Todd; King, Charly; Copeland, Carey B; McCullough, Shaun D; Gowdy, Kymberly M; Kodavanti, Urmila P; Gilmour, M Ian; Gavett, Stephen H

    2018-03-06

    Air pollution is a diverse and dynamic mixture of gaseous and particulate matter, limiting our understanding of associated adverse health outcomes. The biological effects of two simulated smog atmospheres (SA) with different compositions but similar air quality health indexes were compared in a nonobese diabetic rat model (Goto-Kakizaki, GK) and three mouse immune models (house dust mite (HDM) allergy, antibody response to heat-killed pneumococcus, and resistance to influenza A infection). In GK rats, both SA-PM (high particulate matter) and SA-O 3 (high ozone) decreased cholesterol levels immediately after a 4-h exposure, whereas only SA-O 3 increased airflow limitation. Airway responsiveness to methacholine was increased in HDM-allergic mice compared with nonallergic mice, but exposure to SA-PM or SA-O 3 did not significantly alter responsiveness. Exposure to SA-PM did not affect the IgM response to pneumococcus, and SA-O 3 did not affect virus titers, although inflammatory cytokine levels were decreased in mice infected at the end of a 7-day exposure. Collectively, acute SA exposures produced limited health effects in animal models of metabolic and immune diseases. Effects of SA-O 3 tended to be greater than those of SA-PM, suggesting that gas-phase components in photochemically derived multipollutant mixtures may be of greater concern than secondary organic aerosol PM.

  5. Large eddy simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer above a forest canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Jahrul

    2017-11-01

    A goal of this talk is to discuss large eddy simulation (LES) of atmospheric turbulence within and above a canopy/roughness sublayer, where coherent turbulence resembles a turbulent mixing layer. The proposed LES does not resolve the near wall region. Instead, a near surface canopy stress model has been combined with a wall adapting local eddy viscosity model. The canopy stress is represented as a three-dimensional time dependent momentum sink, where the total kinematic drag of the canopy is adjusted based on the measurements in a forest canopy. This LES has been employed to analyze turbulence structures in the canopy/roughness sublayer. Results indicate that turbulence is more efficient at transporting momentum and scalars in the roughness sublayer. The LES result has been compared with the turbulence profile measured over a forest canopy to predict the turbulence statistics in the inertial sublayer above the canopy. Turbulence statistics between the inertial sublayer, the canopy sublayer, and the rough-wall boundary layer have been compared to characterize whether turbulence in the canopy sublayer resembles a turbulent mixing layer or a boundary layer. The canopy turbulence is found dominated by energetic eddies much larger in scale than the individual roughness elements. Financial support from the National Science and Research Council (NSERC), Canada is acknowledged.

  6. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Theory and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, Christoph C.; Schlaepfer, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels; (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels. (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an "Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption" (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than +5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  7. Advances on fission chamber modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filliatre, Philippe; Jammes, Christian; Geslot, Benoit; Veenhof, Rob

    2013-06-01

    In-vessel, online neutron flux measurements are routinely performed in mock-up and material testing reactors by fission chambers. Those measurements have a wide range of applications, including characterization of experimental conditions, reactor monitoring and safety. Depending on the application, detectors may experience a wide range of constraints, of several magnitudes, in term of neutron flux, gamma-ray flux, temperature. Hence, designing a specific fission chamber and measuring chain for a given application is a demanding task. It can be achieved by a combination of experimental feedback and simulating tools, the latter being based on a comprehensive understanding of the underlying physics. A computation route that simulates fission chambers, named CHESTER, is presented. The retrieved quantities of interest are the neutron-induced charge spectrum, the electronic and ionic pulses, the mean current and variance, the power spectrum. It relies on the GARFIELD suite, originally developed for drift chambers, and makes use of the MAGBOLTZ code to assess the drift parameters of electrons within the filling gas, and the SRIM code to evaluate the stopping range of fission products. The effect of the gamma flux is also estimated. Computations made with several fission chambers exemplify the possibilities of the route. A good qualitative agreement is obtained when comparing the results with the experimental data available to date. In a near future, a comprehensive experimental programme will be undertaken to qualify the route using the known neutron sources, mock-up reactors and wide choice of fission chambers, with a stress on the predictiveness of the Campbelling mode. Depending on the results, a refinement of the modelling and an effort on the accuracy of input data are also to be considered. CHESTER will then make it possible to predict the overall sensitivity of a chamber, and to optimize the design for a given application. Another benefit will be to increase the

  8. Atmospheric Corrosion Behavior and Mechanism of a Ni-Advanced Weathering Steel in Simulated Tropical Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Zeng, Zhongping; Cheng, Xuequn; Li, Xiaogang; Liu, Bo

    2017-12-01

    Corrosion behavior of Ni-advanced weathering steel, as well as carbon steel and conventional weathering steel, in a simulated tropical marine atmosphere was studied by field exposure and indoor simulation tests. Meanwhile, morphology and composition of corrosion products formed on the exposed steels were surveyed through scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Results indicated that the additive Ni in weathering steel played an important role during the corrosion process, which took part in the formation of corrosion products, enriched in the inner rust layer and promoted the transformation from loose γ-FeOOH to dense α-FeOOH. As a result, the main aggressive ion, i.e., Cl-, was effectively separated in the outer rust layer which leads to the lowest corrosion rate among these tested steels. Thus, the resistance of Ni-advanced weathering steel to atmospheric corrosion was significantly improved in a simulated tropical marine environment.

  9. Time-Dependent Simulations of the Formation and Evolution of Disk-Accreted Atmospheres Around Terrestrial Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoekl, Alexander; Dorfi, Ernst

    2014-05-01

    In the early, embedded phase of evolution of terrestrial planets, the planetary core accumulates gas from the circumstellar disk into a planetary envelope. This atmosphere is very significant for the further thermal evolution of the planet by forming an insulation around the rocky core. The disk-captured envelope is also the staring point for the atmospheric evolution where the atmosphere is modified by outgassing from the planetary core and atmospheric mass loss once the planet is exposed to the radiation field of the host star. The final amount of persistent atmosphere around the evolved planet very much characterizes the planet and is a key criterion for habitability. The established way to study disk accumulated atmospheres are hydrostatic models, even though in many cases the assumption of stationarity is unlikely to be fulfilled. We present, for the first time, time-dependent radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the accumulation process and the interaction between the disk-nebula gas and the planetary core. The calculations were performed with the TAPIR-Code (short for The adaptive, implicit RHD-Code) in spherical symmetry solving the equations of hydrodynamics, gray radiative transport, and convective energy transport. The models range from the surface of the solid core up to the Hill radius where the planetary envelope merges into the surrounding protoplanetary disk. Our results show that the time-scale of gas capturing and atmospheric growth strongly depends on the mass of the solid core. The amount of atmosphere accumulated during the lifetime of the protoplanetary disk (typically a few Myr) varies accordingly with the mass of the planet. Thus, a core with Mars-mass will end up with about 10 bar of atmosphere while for an Earth-mass core, the surface pressure reaches several 1000 bar. Even larger planets with several Earth masses quickly capture massive envelopes which in turn become gravitationally unstable leading to runaway accretion and the eventual

  10. Uncertainties in United States agricultural N2O emissions: comparing forward model simulations to atmospheric N2O data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevison, C. D.; Saikawa, E.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Andrews, A. E.; Sweeney, C.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric N2O concentrations have increased from 275 ppb in the preindustrial to about 325 ppb in recent years, a ~20% increase with important implications for both anthropogenic greenhouse forcing and stratospheric ozone recovery. This increase has been driven largely by synthetic fertilizer production and other perturbations to the global nitrogen cycle associated with human agriculture. Several recent regional atmospheric inversion studies have quantified North American agricultural N2O emissions using top-down constraints based on atmospheric N2O data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network, including surface, aircraft and tall tower platforms. These studies have concluded that global N2O inventories such as EDGAR may be underestimating the true U.S. anthropogenic N2O source by a factor of 3 or more. However, simple back-of-the-envelope calculations show that emissions of this magnitude are difficult to reconcile with the basic constraints of the global N2O budget. Here, we explore some possible reasons why regional atmospheric inversions might overestimate the U.S. agricultural N2O source. First, the seasonality of N2O agricultural sources is not well known, but can have an important influence on inversion results, particularly when the inversions are based on data that are concentrated in the spring/summer growing season. Second, boundary conditions can strongly influence regional inversions but the boundary conditions used may not adequately account for remote influences on surface data such as the seasonal stratospheric influx of N2O-depleted air. We will present a set of forward model simulations, using the Community Land Model (CLM) and two atmospheric chemistry tracer transport models, MOZART and the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), that examine the influence of terrestrial emissions and atmospheric chemistry and dynamics on atmospheric variability in N2O at U.S. and

  11. The global impact of the transport sectors on atmospheric aerosol: simulations for year 2000 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Righi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We use the EMAC (ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry global model with the aerosol module MADE (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications to quantify the impact of transport emissions (land transport, shipping and aviation on the global aerosol. We consider a present-day (2000 scenario according to the CMIP5 (Climate Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 emission data set developed in support of the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report. The model takes into account particle mass and number emissions: The latter are derived from mass emissions under different assumptions on the size distribution of particles emitted by the three transport sectors. Additional sensitivity experiments are performed to quantify the effects of the uncertainties behind such assumptions. The model simulations show that the impact of the transport sectors closely matches the emission patterns. Land transport is the most important source of black carbon (BC pollution in the USA, Europe and the Arabian Peninsula, contributing up to 60–70% of the total surface-level BC concentration in these regions. Shipping contributes about 40–60% of the total aerosol sulfate surface-level concentration along the most-traveled routes of the northern Atlantic and northern Pacific oceans, with a significant impact (~ 10–20% along the coastlines. Aviation mostly affects aerosol number, contributing about 30–40% of the particle number concentration in the northern midlatitudes' upper troposphere (7–12 km, although significant effects are also simulated at the ground, due to the emissions from landing and take-off cycles. The transport-induced perturbations to the particle number concentrations are very sensitive to the assumptions on the size distribution of emitted particles, with the largest uncertainties (about one order of magnitude obtained for the land transport sector. The simulated climate impacts, due to

  12. The atmospheric boundary layer in the CSIRO global climate model: simulations versus observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, J. R.; Rotstayn, L. D.; Krummel, P. B.

    2002-07-01

    A 5-year simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer in the CSIRO global climate model (GCM) is compared with detailed boundary-layer observations at six locations, two over the ocean and four over land. Field observations, in the form of surface fluxes and vertical profiles of wind, temperature and humidity, are generally available for each hour over periods of one month or more in a single year. GCM simulations are for specific months corresponding to the field observations, for each of five years. At three of the four land sites (two in Australia, one in south-eastern France), modelled rainfall was close to the observed climatological values, but was significantly in deficit at the fourth (Kansas, USA). Observed rainfall during the field expeditions was close to climatology at all four sites. At the Kansas site, modelled screen temperatures (Tsc), diurnal temperature amplitude and sensible heat flux (H) were significantly higher than observed, with modelled evaporation (E) much lower. At the other three land sites, there is excellent correspondence between the diurnal amplitude and phase and absolute values of each variable (Tsc, H, E). Mean monthly vertical profiles for specific times of the day show strong similarities: over land and ocean in vertical shape and absolute values of variables, and in the mixed-layer and nocturnal-inversion depths (over land) and the height of the elevated inversion or height of the cloud layer (over the sea). Of special interest is the presence climatologically of early morning humidity inversions related to dewfall and of nocturnal low-level jets; such features are found in the GCM simulations. The observed day-to-day variability in vertical structure is captured well in the model for most sites, including, over a whole month, the temperature range at all levels in the boundary layer, and the mix of shallow and deep mixed layers. Weaknesses or unrealistic structure include the following, (a) unrealistic model mixed

  13. Emulation of simulations of atmospheric dispersion at Fukushima for Sobol' sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Sylvain; Korsakissok, Irène; Mallet, Vivien

    2015-04-01

    Polyphemus/Polair3D, from which derives IRSN's operational model ldX, was used to simulate the atmospheric dispersion at the Japan scale of radionuclides after the Fukushima disaster. A previous study with the screening method of Morris had shown that - The sensitivities depend a lot on the considered output; - Only a few of the inputs are non-influential on all considered outputs; - Most influential inputs have either non-linear effects or are interacting. These preliminary results called for a more detailed sensitivity analysis, especially regarding the characterization of interactions. The method of Sobol' allows for a precise evaluation of interactions but requires large simulation samples. Gaussian process emulators for each considered outputs were built in order to relieve this computational burden. Globally aggregated outputs proved to be easy to emulate with high accuracy, and associated Sobol' indices are in broad agreement with previous results obtained with the Morris method. More localized outputs, such as temporal averages of gamma dose rates at measurement stations, resulted in lesser emulator performances: tests simulations could not satisfactorily be reproduced by some emulators. These outputs are of special interest because they can be compared to available observations, for instance for calibration purpose. A thorough inspection of prediction residuals hinted that the model response to wind perturbations often behaved in very distinct regimes relatively to some thresholds. Complementing the initial sample with wind perturbations set to the extreme values allowed for sensible improvement of some of the emulators while other remained too unreliable to be used in a sensitivity analysis. Adaptive sampling or regime-wise emulation could be tried to circumvent this issue. Sobol' indices for local outputs revealed interesting patterns, mostly dominated by the winds, with very high interactions. The emulators will be useful for subsequent studies. Indeed

  14. "Flat-Fish" Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    The picture shows a "Flat-Fish" vacuum chamber being prepared in the ISR workshop for testing prior to installation in the Split Field Magnet (SFM) at intersection I4. The two shells of each part were hydroformed from 0.15 mm thick inconel 718 sheet (with end parts in inconel 600 for easier manual welding to the arms) and welded toghether with two strips which were attached by means of thin stainless steel sheets to the Split Field Magnet poles in order to take the vertical component of the atmospheric pressure force. This was the thinnest vacuum chamber ever made for the ISR. Inconel material was chosen for its high elastic modulus and strenght at chamber bake-out temperature. In this picture the thin sheets transferring the vertical component of the atmosferic pressure force are attached to a support frame for testing. See also 7712182, 7712179.

  15. Test of an undulated vacuum chamber for the ISR

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This picture shows mechanical tests of an undulated vacuum chamber for downstream arms of ISR intersections. This chamber, made of 0.3 mm thick inconel, had inner dimensions of 150 mm by 50 mm. The deflection under vacuum is measured by dial gauges. On the left one sees the large vessel where vacuum chambers were tested at pressures above atmospheric pressure.

  16. The development of simulation and atmospheric shower reconstruction tools for the study of future Cherenkov Imaging telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajjad, S.

    2007-09-01

    The future of ground based gamma-ray astronomy lies in large arrays of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes with better capabilities: lower energy threshold, higher sensitivity, better resolution and background rejection. The design of IACT systems and the optimisation of their parameters requires an understanding of the atmospheric showers as well as dedicated tools for the simulation of telescope systems and the evaluation of their performance. The first part of this dissertation deals with atmospheric showers, the various properties of the Cherenkov light they emit and their simulation. The second part presents the tools we have developed for the simulation of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and the characteristics of the shower images obtained by them. The third part of this thesis contains a presentation of the tools developed for the reconstruction of the source position in the sky, core position on the ground and energy of the gamma-rays as well as ideas for gamma-hadron separation. In the end, we use these tools to study two large arrays of telescopes at two altitudes and evaluate their performance for gamma-ray detection. (author)

  17. Simulating low frequency changes in atmospheric CO2 during the last 740 000 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Köhler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric CO2 measured in Antarctic ice cores shows a natural variability of 80 to 100 ppmv during the last four glacial cycles and variations of approximately 60 ppmv in the two cycles between 410 and 650 kyr BP. We here use various paleo-climatic records from the EPICA Dome C Antarctic ice core and from oceanic sediment cores covering the last 740 kyr to force the ocean/atmosphere/biosphere box model of the global carbon cycle BICYCLE in a forward mode over this time in order to interpret the natural variability of CO2. Our approach is based on the previous interpretation of carbon cycle variations during Termination I (Köhler et al., 2005a. In the absense of a process-based sediment module one main simplification of BICYCLE is that carbonate compensation is approximated by the temporally delayed restoration of deep ocean [CO32−]. Our results match the low frequency changes in CO2 measured in the Vostok and the EPICA Dome C ice core for the last 650 kyr BP (r2≈0.75. During these transient simulations the carbon cycle reaches never a steady state due to the ongoing variability of the overall carbon budget caused by the time delayed response of the carbonate compensation to other processes. The average contributions of different processes to the rise in CO2 during Terminations I to V and during earlier terminations are: the rise in Southern Ocean vertical mixing: 36/22 ppmv, the rise in ocean temperature: 26/11 ppmv, iron limitation of the marine biota in the Southern Ocean: 20/14 ppmv, carbonate compensation: 15/7 ppmv, the rise in North Atlantic deep water formation: 13/0 ppmv, the rise in gas exchange due to a decreasing sea ice cover: −8/−7 ppmv, sea level rise: −12/−4 ppmv, and rising terrestrial carbon storage: −13/−6 ppmv. According to our model the smaller interglacial CO2 values in the pre-Vostok period prior to Termination V are mainly caused by smaller interglacial Southern Ocean SST and an Atlantic THC which stayed

  18. Emergence of granular-sized magnetic bubbles through the solar atmosphere. I. Spectropolarimetric observations and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Ada; Hansteen, Viggo H.; Van der Voort, Luc Rouppe [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Bellot Rubio, Luis R. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apdo. 3040, E-18080 Granada (Spain); De la Cruz Rodríguez, Jaime, E-mail: ada@astro.uio.no [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-02-01

    We study a granular-sized magnetic flux emergence event that occurred in NOAA 11024 in 2009 July. The observations were made with the CRISP spectropolarimeter at the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope achieving a spatial resolution of 0.''14. Simultaneous full Stokes observations of the two photospheric Fe I lines at 630.2 nm and the chromospheric Ca II 854.2 nm line allow us to describe in detail the emergence process across the solar atmosphere. We report here on three-dimensional (3D) semi-spherical bubble events, where instead of simple magnetic footpoints, we observe complex semi-circular feet straddling a few granules. Several phenomena occur simultaneously, namely, abnormal granulation, separation of opposite-polarity legs, and brightenings at chromospheric heights. However, the most characteristic signature in these events is the observation of a dark bubble in filtergrams taken in the wings of the Ca II 854.2 nm line. There is a clear coincidence between the emergence of horizontal magnetic field patches and the formation of the dark bubble. We can infer how the bubble rises through the solar atmosphere as we see it progressing from the wings to the core of Ca II 854.2 nm. In the photosphere, the magnetic bubble shows mean upward Doppler velocities of 2 km s{sup –1} and expands at a horizontal speed of 4 km s{sup –1}. In about 3.5 minutes it travels some 1100 km to reach the mid chromosphere, implying an average ascent speed of 5.2 km s{sup –1}. The maximum separation attained by the magnetic legs is 6.''6. From an inversion of the observed Stokes spectra with the SIR code, we find maximum photospheric field strengths of 480 G and inclinations of nearly 90° in the magnetic bubble interior, along with temperature deficits of up to 250 K at log τ = –2 and above. To aid the interpretation of the observations, we carry out 3D numerical simulations of the evolution of a horizontal, untwisted magnetic flux sheet injected in the convection

  19. Simulation of atmospheric temperature inversions over greater cairo using the MM5 Meso-Scale atmospheric model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, H.A.; Elhadidi, B.M.; Kader, A. A.; Moaty, A.A.; Sherif, A.O.

    2006-01-01

    Air pollution episodes have been recorded in Cairo, during the fall season, since 1999, as a result of specific meteorological conditions combined with large quantity of pollutants created by several ground-based sources. The main reason for the smog-like episodes (black clouds) is adverse weather conditions with low and variable winds, high humidity and strong temperature inversions in the few-hundred meters above the ground. The two important types of temperature inversion affecting the air pollution are surface or ground (radiation) inversion and subsidence (elevated) inversion. The surface temperature inversion is associated with a rapid decrease in the ground surface temperature with the simultaneous existence of warm air in the lower troposphere. The inversion develops at dusk and continues until the surface warms again the following day. Pollutants emitted during the night are caught under this i nversion lid. S ubsidence inversion forms when warm air masses move over colder air masses. The inversion develops with a stagnating high-pressure system (generally associated with fair weather). Under these conditions, the pressure gradient becomes progressively weaker so that winds become light. These light winds greatly reduce the horizontal transport and dispersion of pollutants. At the same time, the subsidence inversion acts as a barrier to the vertical dispersion of the pollutants. In this study, the Penn State/NCAR meso -scale model (MM5) is used to simulate the temperature inversion phenomenon over Greater Cairo region during the fall season of 2004. Accurate computations of the heat transfer at the surface are needed to capture this phenomenon. This can only be achieved by high-resolution simulations in both horizontal and vertical directions. Hence, for accurate simulation of the temperature inversion over Greater Cairo, four nested domains of resolutions of 27 km, 9 km, 3 km and 1 km, respectively, were used in the horizontal planes. Furthermore, 42

  20. Assessing the Habitability of TRAPPIST-1e: MHD Simulations of Atmospheric Loss Due to CMEs and Stellar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbach, Laura Marshall; Drake, Jeremy J.; Garraffo, Cecilia; Alvarado-Gomez, Julian D.; Moschou, Sofia P.; Cohen, Ofer

    2018-01-01

    Recently, three rocky planets were discovered in the habitable zone of the nearby planetary system TRAPPIST-1. The increasing number of exoplanet detections has led to further research into the planetary requirements for sustaining life. Habitable zone occupants have, in principle, the capacity to retain liquid water, whereas actual habitability might depend on atmospheric retention. However, stellar winds and photon radiation interactions with the planet can lead to severe atmospheric depletion and have a catastrophic impact on a planet’s habitability. While the implications of photoevaporation on atmospheric erosion have been researched to some degree, the influence of stellar winds and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) has yet to be analyzed in detail. Here, we model the effect of the stellar wind and CMEs on the atmospheric envelope of a planet situated in the orbit of TRAPPIST-1e using 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. In particular, we discuss the atmospheric loss due to the effect of a CME, and the relevance of the stellar and planetary magnetic fields on the sustainability of M-dwarf exoplanetary atmospheres.

  1. Simulation of wind-induced snow transport in alpine terrain using a fully coupled snowpack/atmosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vionnet, V.; Martin, E.; Masson, V.; Guyomarc'h, G.; Naaim-Bouvet, F.; Prokop, A.; Durand, Y.; Lac, C.

    2013-06-01

    In alpine regions, wind-induced snow transport strongly influences the spatio-temporal evolution of the snow cover throughout the winter season. To gain understanding on the complex processes that drive the redistribution of snow, a new numerical model is developed. It couples directly the detailed snowpack model Crocus with the atmospheric model Meso-NH. Meso-NH/Crocus simulates snow transport in saltation and in turbulent suspension and includes the sublimation of suspended snow particles. A detailed representation of the first meters of the atmosphere allows a fine reproduction of the erosion and deposition process. The coupled model is evaluated against data collected around the experimental site of Col du Lac Blanc (2720 m a.s.l., French Alps). For this purpose, a blowing snow event without concurrent snowfall has been selected and simulated. Results show that the model captures the main structures of atmospheric flow in alpine terrain, the vertical profile of wind speed and the snow particles fluxes near the surface. However, the horizontal resolution of 50 m is found to be insufficient to simulate the location of areas of snow erosion and deposition observed by terrestrial laser scanning. When activated, the sublimation of suspended snow particles causes a reduction in deposition of 5.3%. Total sublimation (surface + blowing snow) is three times higher than surface sublimation in a simulation neglecting blowing snow sublimation.

  2. Chemistry Simulations Using MERRA-2 Reanalysis with the GMI CTM and Replay in Support of the Atmospheric Composition Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Luke D.; Strahan, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Simulations using reanalyzed meteorological conditions have been long used to understand causes of atmospheric composition change over the recent past. Using the new Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, version 2 (MERRA-2) meteorology, chemistry simulations are being conducted to create products covering 1980-2016 for the atmospheric composition community. These simulations use the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical mechanism in two different models: the GMI Chemical Transport Model (CTM) and the GEOS-5 model developed Replay mode. Replay mode means an integration of the GEOS-5 general circulation model that is incrementally adjusted each time step toward the MERRA-2 analysis. The GMI CTM is a 1 x 1.25 simulation and the MERRA-2 GMI Replay simulation uses the native MERRA-2 approximately horizontal resolution on the cubed sphere. The Replay simulations is driven by the online use of key MERRA-2 meteorological variables (i.e. U, V, T, and surface pressure) with all other variables calculated in response to those variables. A specialized set of transport diagnostics is included in both runs to better understand trace gas transport and changes over the recent past.

  3. Modeling and numerical simulation of the dynamics of nanoparticles applied to free and confined atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devilliers, Marion

    2012-01-01

    It is necessary to adapt existing models in order to simulate the number concentration, and correctly account for nanoparticles, in both free and confined atmospheres. A model of particle dynamics capable of following accurately the number as well as the mass concentration of particles, with an optimal calculation time, has been developed. The dynamics of particles depends on various processes, the most important ones being condensation/evaporation, followed by nucleation, coagulation, and deposition phenomena. These processes are well-known for fine and coarse particles, but some additional phenomena must be taken into account when applied to nanoparticles, such as the Kelvin effect for condensation/evaporation and the van der Waals forces for coagulation. This work focused first on condensation/evaporation, which is the most numerically challenging process. Particles were assumed to be of spherical shape. The Kelvin effect has been taken into account as it becomes significant for particles with diameter below 50 nm. The numerical schemes are based on a sectional approach: the particle size range is discretized in sections characterized by a representative diameter. A redistribution algorithm is used, after condensation/ evaporation occurred, in order to keep the representative diameter between the boundaries of the section. The redistribution can be conducted in terms of mass or number. The key point in such algorithms is to choose which quantity has to be redistributed over the fixed sections. We have developed a hybrid algorithm that redistributes the relevant quantity for each section. This new approach has been tested and shows significant improvements with respect to most existing models over a wide range of conditions. The process of coagulation for nanoparticles has also been solved with a sectional approach. Coagulation is monitored by the Brownian motion of nanoparticles. This approach is shown to be more efficient if the coagulation rate is evaluated

  4. Atmospheric pre-corrected differential absorption techniques to retrieve columnar water vapor: Theory and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borel, C.C.; Schlaepfer, D.

    1996-03-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels; and (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an {open_quote}Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption{close_quote} (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than {+-}5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  5. Prospects for simulating macromolecular surfactant chemistry at the ocean–atmosphere boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, S; Burrows, S M; Liu, X; Deal, C; Long, M; Ogunro, O; Wingenter, O; Russell, L M

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic lipids and polymers are surveyed for their ability to adsorb at the water–air interfaces associated with bubbles, marine microlayers and particles in the overlying boundary layer. Representative ocean biogeochemical regimes are defined in order to estimate local concentrations for the major macromolecular classes. Surfactant equilibria and maximum excess are then derived based on a network of model compounds. Relative local coverage and upward mass transport follow directly, and specific chemical structures can be placed into regional rank order. Lipids and denatured protein-like polymers dominate at the selected locations. The assigned monolayer phase states are variable, whether assessed along bubbles or at the atmospheric spray droplet perimeter. Since oceanic film compositions prove to be irregular, effects on gas and organic transfer are expected to exhibit geographic dependence as well. Moreover, the core arguments extend across the sea–air interface into aerosol–cloud systems. Fundamental nascent chemical properties including mass to carbon ratio and density depend strongly on the geochemical state of source waters. High surface pressures may suppress the Kelvin effect, and marine organic hygroscopicities are almost entirely unconstrained. While bubble adsorption provides a well-known means for transporting lipidic or proteinaceous material into sea spray, the same cannot be said of polysaccharides. Carbohydrates tend to be strongly hydrophilic so that their excess carbon mass is low despite stacked polymeric geometries. Since sugars are abundant in the marine aerosol, gel-based mechanisms may be required to achieve uplift. Uncertainties distill to a global scale dearth of information regarding two dimensional kinetics and equilibria. Nonetheless simulations are recommended, to initiate the process of systems level quantification. (papers)

  6. Indian Ocean and Indian summer monsoon: relationships without ENSO in ocean-atmosphere coupled simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crétat, Julien; Terray, Pascal; Masson, Sébastien; Sooraj, K. P.; Roxy, Mathew Koll

    2017-08-01

    The relationship between the Indian Ocean and the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) and their respective influence over the Indo-Western North Pacific (WNP) region are examined in the absence of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in two partially decoupled global experiments. ENSO is removed by nudging the tropical Pacific simulated sea surface temperature (SST) toward SST climatology from either observations or a fully coupled control run. The control reasonably captures the observed relationships between ENSO, ISM and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD). Despite weaker amplitude, IODs do exist in the absence of ENSO and are triggered by a boreal spring ocean-atmosphere coupled mode over the South-East Indian Ocean similar to that found in the presence of ENSO. These pure IODs significantly affect the tropical Indian Ocean throughout boreal summer, inducing a significant modulation of both the local Walker and Hadley cells. This meridional circulation is masked in the presence of ENSO. However, these pure IODs do not significantly influence the Indian subcontinent rainfall despite overestimated SST variability in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean compared to observations. On the other hand, they promote a late summer cross-equatorial quadrupole rainfall pattern linking the tropical Indian Ocean with the WNP, inducing important zonal shifts of the Walker circulation despite the absence of ENSO. Surprisingly, the interannual ISM rainfall variability is barely modified and the Indian Ocean does not force the monsoon circulation when ENSO is removed. On the contrary, the monsoon circulation significantly forces the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal SSTs, while its connection with the western tropical Indian Ocean is clearly driven by ENSO in our numerical framework. Convection and diabatic heating associated with above-normal ISM induce a strong response over the WNP, even in the absence of ENSO, favoring moisture convergence over India.

  7. Uncertainty evaluation of the kerma in the air, related to the active volume in the ionization chamber of concentric cylinders, by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo Bianco, A.S.; Oliveira, H.P.S.; Peixoto, J.G.P.

    2009-01-01

    To implant the primary standard of the magnitude kerma in the air for X-ray between 10 - 50 keV, the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiations (LNMRI) must evaluate all the uncertainties of measurement related with Victtoren chamber. So, it was evaluated the uncertainty of the kerma in the air consequent of the inaccuracy in the active volume of the chamber using the calculation of Monte Carlo as a tool through the Penelope software

  8. Proton beam monitor chamber calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomà, C; Meer, D; Safai, S; Lorentini, S

    2014-01-01

    The first goal of this paper is to clarify the reference conditions for the reference dosimetry of clinical proton beams. A clear distinction is made between proton beam delivery systems which should be calibrated with a spread-out Bragg peak field and those that should be calibrated with a (pseudo-)monoenergetic proton beam. For the latter, this paper also compares two independent dosimetry techniques to calibrate the beam monitor chambers: absolute dosimetry (of the number of protons exiting the nozzle) with a Faraday cup and reference dosimetry (i.e. determination of the absorbed dose to water under IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions) with an ionization chamber. To compare the two techniques, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to convert dose-to-water to proton fluence. A good agreement was found between the Faraday cup technique and the reference dosimetry with a plane-parallel ionization chamber. The differences—of the order of 3%—were found to be within the uncertainty of the comparison. For cylindrical ionization chambers, however, the agreement was only possible when positioning the effective point of measurement of the chamber at the reference measurement depth—i.e. not complying with IAEA TRS-398 recommendations. In conclusion, for cylindrical ionization chambers, IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions for monoenergetic proton beams led to a systematic error in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, especially relevant for low-energy proton beams. To overcome this problem, the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers should be taken into account when positioning the reference point of the chamber. Within the current IAEA TRS-398 recommendations, it seems advisable to use plane-parallel ionization chambers—rather than cylindrical chambers—for the reference dosimetry of pseudo-monoenergetic proton beams. (paper)

  9. Outcomes and challenges of global high-resolution non-hydrostatic atmospheric simulations using the K computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Masaki; Tomita, Hirofumi; Yashiro, Hisashi; Kajikawa, Yoshiyuki; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Yamaura, Tsuyoshi; Miyakawa, Tomoki; Nakano, Masuo; Kodama, Chihiro; Noda, Akira T.; Nasuno, Tomoe; Yamada, Yohei; Fukutomi, Yoshiki

    2017-12-01

    This article reviews the major outcomes of a 5-year (2011-2016) project using the K computer to perform global numerical atmospheric simulations based on the non-hydrostatic icosahedral atmospheric model (NICAM). The K computer was made available to the public in September 2012 and was used as a primary resource for Japan's Strategic Programs for Innovative Research (SPIRE), an initiative to investigate five strategic research areas; the NICAM project fell under the research area of climate and weather simulation sciences. Combining NICAM with high-performance computing has created new opportunities in three areas of research: (1) higher resolution global simulations that produce more realistic representations of convective systems, (2) multi-member ensemble simulations that are able to perform extended-range forecasts 10-30 days in advance, and (3) multi-decadal simulations for climatology and variability. Before the K computer era, NICAM was used to demonstrate realistic simulations of intra-seasonal oscillations including the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO), merely as a case study approach. Thanks to the big leap in computational performance of the K computer, we could greatly increase the number of cases of MJO events for numerical simulations, in addition to integrating time and horizontal resolution. We conclude that the high-resolution global non-hydrostatic model, as used in this five-year project, improves the ability to forecast intra-seasonal oscillations and associated tropical cyclogenesis compared with that of the relatively coarser operational models currently in use. The impacts of the sub-kilometer resolution simulation and the multi-decadal simulations using NICAM are also reviewed.

  10. A simulation of the OMEGA/Mars Express observations: Analysis of the atmospheric contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorri, R.; Drossart, P.; Fouchet, T.; Bézard, B.; Forget, F.; Gendrin, A.; Bibring, J. P.; Manaud, N.; OMEGA Team; Berthé, M.; Bibring, J.-P.; Langevin, Y.; Forni, O.; Gendrin, A.; Gondet, B.; Manaud, N.; Poulet, F.; Poulleau, G.; Soufflot, A.; Mangold, N.; Bonello, G.; Forget, F.; Bezard, B.; Combes, M.; Drossart, P.; Encrenaz, T.; Fouchet, T.; Melchiorri, R.; Erard, S.; Bellucci, G.; Altieri, F.; Formisano, V.; Fonti, S.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Kottsov, V.; Ignatiev, N.; Moroz, V.; Titov, D.; Zasova, L.; Pinet, P.; Schmitt, B.; Sotin, C.; Hauber, E.; Hoffmann, H.; Jaumann, R.; Keller, U.; Arvidson, R.; Mustard, J.; Duxbary, T.

    2006-08-01

    Spectral images of Mars obtained by the Mars Express/OMEGA experiment in the near infrared are the result of a complex combination of atmospheric, aerosol and ground features. Retrieving the atmospheric information from the data is important, not only to decorrelate mineralogical against atmospheric features, but also to retrieve the atmospheric variability. Once the illumination conditions have been taken into account, the main source of variation on the CO2 absorption is due to the altitude of the surface, which governs atmospheric pressure variation by more than an order of magnitude between the summit of Olympus Mons down to the bottom of Valles Marineris. In this article we present a simplified atmospheric spectral model without scattering, specially developed for the OMEGA observations, which is used to retrieve the local topography through the analysis of the 2.0μmCO2 band. OMEGA atmospheric observations increase the horizontal resolution compared to MOLA altimetry measurements, and therefore complement the mineralogical studies from the same instrument. Finally, residual variations of the pressure can be related to atmospheric structure variation.

  11. Dual-chamber inflatable oil boom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, R.M.; Tedeschi, E.T.

    1993-01-01

    An elongated floating material containment boom section is described having a normally vertical ballasted skirt depending from flotation means, and convertible from a flattened collapsed condition to a deployable condition wherein buoyancy chamber means extending along the upper edge of said skirt are inflated to expanded buoyant configuration, including: a gas-impervious sleeve extending along the upper edge of said normally vertical skirt forming a first outer collapsible and inflatable flotation chamber, a first inflation valve connecting the interior of said sleeve with the ambient atmosphere, through which gas under pressure may be introduced into said sleeve to inflate said first buoyant outer flotation chamber, elongated gas-impervious tube means positioned inside said outer flotation chamber and forming second collapsible and inflatable internal flotation bladder chamber means, second inflation valve means connecting the interior of said bladder means through said outer flotation chamber to the ambient atmosphere through which gas under pressure may be introduced into said bladder means to inflate it forming said second flotation chamber means inside said outer flotation chamber

  12. Simulation of influence of some climatic factors on radiocarbon concentration in the Earth atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmetkereev, S.Kh.; Dergachev, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of different climatic factors on radiocarbon concentration in the Earth atmosphere is analyzed by modelling the exchange radiocarbon system. It is supposed that the exchange system consists of four reservoirs: long-lived surface vegetation and its remnants, the atmosphere, surface layer of the World ocean. It is shown that the variations of the ocean temperature and the variations in CO 2 amount in the atmosphere connected with it do not affect the atmosphere radiocarbon concentration. Variations in the square of sea ice on the time scale of >=1000 years could bring about variations in the 14 C concentration with the amplitude up to 1%. 14 C concentration in the atmosphere in the icing maximum 18 thousands of years ago was 7% higher than present concentration [ru

  13. Local-scale high-resolution atmospheric dispersion model using large-eddy simulation. LOHDIM-LES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hiromasa; Nagai, Haruyasu

    2016-03-01

    We developed LOcal-scale High-resolution atmospheric DIspersion Model using Large-Eddy Simulation (LOHDIM-LES). This dispersion model is designed based on LES which is effective to reproduce unsteady behaviors of turbulent flows and plume dispersion. The basic equations are the continuity equation, the Navier-Stokes equation, and the scalar conservation equation. Buildings and local terrain variability are resolved by high-resolution grids with a few meters and these turbulent effects are represented by immersed boundary method. In simulating atmospheric turbulence, boundary layer flows are generated by a recycling turbulent inflow technique in a driver region set up at the upstream of the main analysis region. This turbulent inflow data are imposed at the inlet of the main analysis region. By this approach, the LOHDIM-LES can provide detailed information on wind velocities and plume concentration in the investigated area. (author)

  14. AccuRT: A versatile tool for radiative transfer simulations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamre, Børge; Stamnes, Snorre; Stamnes, Knut; Stamnes, Jakob

    2017-02-01

    Reliable, accurate, and efficient modeling of the transport of electromagnetic radiation in turbid media has important applications in the study of the Earth's climate by remote sensing. For example, such modeling is needed to develop forward-inverse methods used to quantify types and concentrations of aerosol and cloud particles in the atmosphere, the dissolved organic and particulate biogeochemical matter in lakes, rivers, coastal, and open-ocean waters. It is also needed to simulate the performance of remote sensing detectors deployed on aircraft, balloons, and satellites as well as radiometric detectors deployed on buoys, gliders and other aquatic observing systems. Accurate radiative transfer modeling is also required to compute irradiances and scalar irradiances that are used to compute warming/cooling and photolysis rates in the atmosphere and primary production and warming/cooling rates in the water column. AccuRT is a radiative transfer model for the coupled atmosphere-water system that is designed to be a versatile tool for researchers in the ocean optics and remote sensing communities. It addresses the needs of researchers interested in analyzing irradiance and radiance measurements in the field and laboratory as well as those interested in making simulations of the top-of-the-atmosphere radiance in support of remote sensing algorithm development.

  15. Modeling and simulation of critical parameters of the first chamber of the dimuon arm spectrometer of the Alice experiment; Modelisation et simulation de parametres critiques de la premiere station du spectrometre dimuons d'ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guez, D

    2003-10-01

    The Alice experiment that is dedicated to the study of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions, will take place in the future large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN. The dimuon arm spectrometer of the Alice experiment is devoted to the search of a new signature of the existence of the quark gluon plasma (QGP). The first chapter is dedicated to the physics notions linked to the study of QGP, a few signatures are proposed for the detection of QGP, particularly the signature concerning the production rate of quarkonium. The second chapter deals with particle detection involved in Alice experiment, the dimuon arm spectrometer is a detector dedicated to the track reconstruction of muons issued from the decay of heavy mesons from J/{psi} and {upsilon} families. The third and the fourth chapters present the studies made to integrate a reliable model of the dimuon arm in the global simulation code of Alice (Aliroot). The fifth chapter presents the software TB{sup 2} that has been developed within the framework of this thesis in order to check and control the output data when the detector is tested with a real particle beam. The sixth chapter presents the results of the tests that have been performed with a 7 GeV/c pion beam. These tests have shown that the electronic noise is coherent with the specifications of Alice experiment. A factor 1,8 between the highest and the weakest values of the gain has been measured in the chamber. The detection efficiency of the chamber has been estimated to 99% in the different cases studied. (A.C.)

  16. SIMULACIÓN DE UN ESCURRIMIENTO REACTIVO AL INTERIOR DE UNA CÁMARA DE COMBUSTIÓN REACTIVE FLUID FLOW SIMULATION INSIDE COMBUSTION CHAMBER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos H Salinas Lira

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo dice relación con la simulación de gases calientes al interior de una cámara de tubular combustión. Siendo así, se generan mallas en dominios tubulares curvilíneos. La inyección de combustible es realizada a través de un cuerpo esférico posicionado en el eje de simetría de la cámara afectado por un flujo primario axial y un flujo secundario radial. El fluido es considerado Newtoniano incompresible y con propiedades termo físicas constantes, en cuanto el flujo es considerado laminar, modelado a través de la ecuaciones de Navier-Stokes. La formulación de Shvab-Zel'dovich es utilizada para modelar el transporte de energía y especies a través de una variable denominada Potencial de Acoplamiento. El modelo matemático es resuelto numéricamente a través del Método de los Volúmenes Finitos descrito en coordenadas curvilíneas con arreglo co-localizado de variables. Los términos difusivos son representados por diferencias centradas y se usa el esquema WUDS para los términos convectivos. La integración temporal es del tipo implícito. Resultados de campos de velocidades, temperaturas y concentraciones son mostrados y comparados con datos encontrados en la literatura especializada. Se concluye en cuanto a la calidad cualitativa y cuantitativa de los resultados generados y en particular en lo que dice relación con la forma de la llama.The present work is related to the simulation of hot gases inside a tubular combustion chamber. This way, meshes are generated in tubular curvilinear domains. The fuel injection is carried out through a spherical body positioned in the chamber symmetry axis, affected by an axial primary flow and a radial secondary flow. The fluid is considered Newtonian incompressible, with constant thermo physics properties. In regard to the fluid flow, this is considered laminar, modeled through Navier-Stokes Equations. The Shvab-Zel'dovich formulation is used to model energy and species transport

  17. A Non-hydrostatic Atmospheric Model for Global High-resolution Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, X.; Li, X.

    2017-12-01

    A three-dimensional non-hydrostatic atmosphere model, GRAPES_YY, is developed on the spherical Yin-Yang grid system in order to enforce global high-resolution weather simulation or forecasting at the CAMS/CMA. The quasi-uniform grid makes the computation be of high efficiency and free of pole problem. Full representation of the three-dimensional Coriolis force is considered in the governing equations. Under the constraint of third-order boundary interpolation, the model is integrated with the semi-implicit semi-Lagrangian method using the same code on both zones. A static halo region is set to ensure computation of cross-boundary transport and updating Dirichlet-type boundary conditions in the solution process of elliptical equations with the Schwarz method. A series of dynamical test cases, including the solid-body advection, the balanced geostrophic flow, zonal flow over an isolated mountain, development of the Rossby-Haurwitz wave and a baroclinic wave, are carried out, and excellent computational stability and accuracy of the dynamic core has been confirmed. After implementation of the physical processes of long and short-wave radiation, cumulus convection, micro-physical transformation of water substances and the turbulent processes in the planetary boundary layer include surface layer vertical fluxes parameterization, a long-term run of the model is then put forward under an idealized aqua-planet configuration to test the model physics and model ability in both short-term and long-term integrations. In the aqua-planet experiment, the model shows an Earth-like structure of circulation. The time-zonal mean temperature, wind components and humidity illustrate reasonable subtropical zonal westerly jet, meridional three-cell circulation, tropical convection and thermodynamic structures. The specific SST and solar insolation being symmetric about the equator enhance the ITCZ and tropical precipitation, which concentrated in tropical region. Additional analysis and

  18. Assessing the impact of aerosol-atmosphere interactions in convection-permitting regional climate simulations: the Rolf medicane in 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Gómez-Navarro, Juan; María López-Romero, José; Palacios-Peña, Laura; Montávez, Juan Pedro; Jiménez-Guerrero, Pedro

    2017-04-01

    A critical challenge for assessing regional climate change projections relies on improving the estimate of atmospheric aerosol impact on clouds and reducing the uncertainty associated with the use of parameterizations. In this sense, the horizontal grid spacing implemented in state-of-the-art regional climate simulations is typically 10-25 kilometers, meaning that very important processes such as convective precipitation are smaller than a grid box, and therefore need to be parameterized. This causes large uncertainties, as closure assumptions and a number of parameters have to be established by model tuning. Convection is a physical process that may be strongly conditioned by atmospheric aerosols, although the solution of aerosol-cloud interactions in warm convective clouds remains nowadays a very important scientific challenge, rendering parametrization of these complex processes an important bottleneck that is responsible from a great part of the uncertainty in current climate change projections. Therefore, the explicit simulation of convective processes might improve the quality and reliability of the simulations of the aerosol-cloud interactions in a wide range of atmospheric phenomena. Particularly over the Mediterranean, the role of aerosol particles is very important, being this a crossroad that fuels the mixing of particles from different sources (sea-salt, biomass burning, anthropogenic, Saharan dust, etc). Still, the role of aerosols in extreme events in this area such as medicanes has been barely addressed. This work aims at assessing the role of aerosol-atmosphere interaction in medicanes with the help of the regional chemistry/climate on-line coupled model WRF-CHEM run at a convection-permitting resolution. The analysis is exemplary based on the "Rolf" medicane (6-8 November 2011). Using this case study as reference, four sets of simulations are run with two spatial resolutions: one at a convection-permitting configuration of 4 km, and other at the

  19. Design and Simulation Tools for Planetary Atmospheric Entry Vehicles, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric entry is one of the most critical phases of flight during planetary exploration missions. During the design of an entry vehicle, experimental and...

  20. Long-Term Simulated Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition Alters Leaf and Fine Root Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition has been suggested to increase forest carbon sequestration across much of the Northern Hemisphere; slower organic matter decomposition could contribute to this increase. At four sugar maple (Acer saccharum)-dominated northern hardwood forests, we p...

  1. The atmospheric chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1: consistent simulation of ozone from the surface to the mesosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jöckel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The new Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy describes atmospheric chemistry and meteorological processes in a modular framework, following strict coding standards. It has been coupled to the ECHAM5 general circulation model, which has been slightly modified for this purpose. A 90-layer model setup up to 0.01 hPa was used at spectral T42 resolution to simulate the lower and middle atmosphere. With the high vertical resolution the model simulates the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation. The model meteorology has been tested to check the influence of the changes to ECHAM5 and the radiation interactions with the new representation of atmospheric composition. In the simulations presented here a Newtonian relaxation technique was applied in the tropospheric part of the domain to weakly nudge the model towards the analysed meteorology during the period 1998–2005. This allows an efficient and direct evaluation with satellite and in-situ data. It is shown that the tropospheric wave forcing of the stratosphere in the model suffices to reproduce major stratospheric warming events leading e.g. to the vortex split over Antarctica in 2002. Characteristic features such as dehydration and denitrification caused by the sedimentation of polar stratospheric cloud particles and ozone depletion during winter and spring are simulated well, although ozone loss in the lower polar stratosphere is slightly underestimated. The model realistically simulates stratosphere-troposphere exchange processes as indicated by comparisons with satellite and in situ measurements. The evaluation of tropospheric chemistry presented here focuses on the distributions of ozone, hydroxyl radicals, carbon monoxide and reactive nitrogen compounds. In spite of minor shortcomings, mostly related to the relatively coarse T42 resolution and the neglect of inter-annual changes in biomass burning emissions, the main characteristics of the trace gas distributions are generally reproduced well. The MESSy

  2. Venturi vacuum systems for hypobaric chamber operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R; Swaby, G; Sutton, T; Fife, C; Powell, M; Butler, B D

    1997-11-01

    Physiological studies of the effects of high altitude on man often require the use of a hypobaric chamber to simulate the reduced ambient pressures. Typical "altitude" chambers in use today require complex mechanical vacuum systems to evacuate the chamber air, either directly or via reservoir system. Use of these pumps adds to the cost of both chamber procurement and maintenance, and service of these pumps requires trained support personnel and regular upkeep. In this report we describe use of venturi vacuum pumps to perform the function of mechanical vacuum pumps for human and experimental altitude chamber operations. Advantages of the venturi pumps include their relatively low procurement cost, small size and light weight, ease of installation and plumbing, lack of moving parts, and independence from electrical power sources, fossil fuels and lubricants. Conversion of three hyperbaric chambers to combined hyper/hypobaric use is described.

  3. Note: Small anaerobic chamber for optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvet, Adrien A. P., E-mail: adrien.chauvet@gmail.com; Chergui, Majed [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Ultrarapide, ISIC, Faculté des Sciences de Base, Station 6, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Agarwal, Rachna; Cramer, William A. [Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    The study of oxygen-sensitive biological samples requires an effective control of the atmosphere in which they are housed. In this aim however, no commercial anaerobic chamber is adequate to solely enclose the sample and small enough to fit in a compact spectroscopic system with which analysis can be performed. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis requires the probe beam to pass through the whole chamber, introducing a requirement for adequate windows. In response to these challenges, we present a 1 l anaerobic chamber that is suitable for broad-band spectroscopic analysis. This chamber has the advantage of (1) providing access, via a septum, to the sample and (2) allows the sample position to be adjusted while keeping the chamber fixed and hermetic during the experiment.

  4. Evaluation of a present-day climate simulation with a new coupled atmosphere-ocean model GENMOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Alder

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a new, non-flux corrected AOGCM, GENMOM, that combines the GENESIS version 3 atmospheric GCM (Global Environmental and Ecological Simulation of Interactive Systems and MOM2 (Modular Ocean Model version 2 nominally at T31 resolution. We evaluate GENMOM by comparison with reanalysis products (e.g., NCEP2 and three models used in the IPCC AR4 assessment. GENMOM produces a global temperature bias of 0.6 °C. Atmospheric features such as the jet stream structure and major semi-permanent sea level pressure centers are well simulated as is the mean planetary-scale wind structure that is needed to produce the correct position of stormtracks. Most ocean surface currents are reproduced except where they are not resolvable at T31 resolution. Overall, GENMOM captures reasonably well the observed gradients and spatial distributions of annual surface temperature and precipitation and the simulations are on par with other AOGCMs. Deficiencies in the GENMOM simulations include a warm bias in the surface temperature over the southern oceans, a split in the ITCZ and weaker-than-observed overturning circulation.

  5. Simulation of the impact of thunderstorm activity on atmospheric gas composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Mareev, E. A.; Galin, V. Ya.

    2010-08-01

    A chemistry-climate model of the lower and middle atmosphere has been used to estimate the sensitivity of the atmospheric gas composition to the rate of thunderstorm production of nitrogen oxides at upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric altitudes. The impact that nitrogen oxides produced by lightning have on the atmospheric gas composition is treated as a subgrid-scale process and included in the model parametrically. The natural uncertainty in the global production rate of nitrogen oxides in lightning flashes was specified within limits from 2 to 20 Tg N/year. Results of the model experiments have shown that, due to the variability of thunderstorm-produced nitrogen oxides, their concentration in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere can vary by a factor of 2 or 3, which, given the influence of nitrogen oxides on ozone and other gases, creates the potential for a strong perturbation of the atmospheric gas composition and thermal regime. Model calculations have shown the strong sensitivity of ozone and the OH hydroxyl to the amount of lightning nitrogen oxides at different atmospheric altitudes. These calculations demonstrate the importance of nitrogen oxides of thunderstorm origin for the balance of atmospheric odd ozone and gases linked to it, such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals. Our results demonstrate that one important task is to raise the accuracy of estimates of the rate of nitrogen oxide production by lightning discharges and to use physical parametrizations that take into account the local lightning effects and feedbacks arising in this case rather than climatological data in models of the gas composition and general circulation of the atmosphere.

  6. Multispecimen dual-beam irradiation damage chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packan, N.H.; Buhl, R.A.

    1980-06-01

    An irradiation damage chamber that can be used to rapidly simulate fast neutron damage in fission or fusion materials has been designed and constructed. The chamber operates in conjunction with dual Van de Graaff accelerators at ORNL to simulate a wide range of irradiation conditions, including pulsed irradiation. Up to six experiments, each with up to nine 3-mm disk specimens, can be loaded into the ultrahigh vacuum chamber. Specimen holders are heated with individual electron guns, and the temperature of each specimen can be monitored during bombardment by an infrared pyrometer. Three different dose levels may be obtained during any single bombardment, and the heavy-ion flux on each of the nine specimens can be measured independently with only a brief interruption of the beam. The chamber has been in service for nearly three years, during which time approximately 250 bombardments have been successfully carried out. An appendix contains detailed procedures for operating the chamber

  7. Tracking with wire chambers at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.; Gundy, M.C.; Palounek, A.P.T.

    1989-07-01

    Limitations placed on wire chambers by radiation damage and rate requirements in the SSC environment are reviewed. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tacking systems that meet these requirements are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. 13 refs., 11 fig., 1 tab

  8. Tracking with wire chambers at high luminosities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.

    1989-12-01

    Radiation damage and rate limitations impose severe constraints on wire chambers at the SSC. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems that satisfy these constraints are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. 11 refs., 10 figs

  9. Simulation of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides using an Eulerian-Lagrangian modelling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Abdul; Espinosa, Francisco; Avila, Ruben; Raza, S; Irfan, N

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we present an atmospheric dispersion scenario for a proposed nuclear power plant in Pakistan involving the hypothetical accidental release of radionuclides. For this, a concept involving a Lagrangian stochastic particle model (LSPM) coupled with an Eulerian regional atmospheric modelling system (RAMS) is used. The atmospheric turbulent dispersion of radionuclides (represented by non-buoyant particles/neutral traces) in the LSPM is modelled by applying non-homogeneous turbulence conditions. The mean wind velocities governed by the topography of the region and the surface fluxes of momentum and heat are calculated by the RAMS code. A moving least squares (MLS) technique is introduced to calculate the concentration of radionuclides at ground level. The numerically calculated vertical profiles of wind velocity and temperature are compared with observed data. The results obtained demonstrate that in regions of complex terrain it is not sufficient to model the atmospheric dispersion of particles using a straight-line Gaussian plume model, and that by utilising a Lagrangian stochastic particle model and regional atmospheric modelling system a much more realistic estimation of the dispersion in such a hypothetical scenario was ascertained. The particle dispersion results for a 12 h ground release show that a triangular area of about 400 km(2) situated in the north-west quadrant of release is under radiological threat. The particle distribution shows that the use of a Gaussian plume model (GPM) in such situations will yield quite misleading results.

  10. Study of the collecting electrode material of an extrapolation chamber by Monte Carlo simulation; Estudo do material do eletrodo coletor de uma câmara de extrapolação por simulação de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedovato, Uly Pita; Santos, William S.; Perini, Ana Paula, E-mail: anapaula.perini@ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (INFIS/UFU), Uberlândia, MG (Brazil). Instituto de Física; Neves, Lucio Pereira; Caldas, Linda V. E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Belinato, Walmir [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia da Bahia (IFBA), Vitória da Conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In this work, the influence of different materials of the collecting electrode on the response of an extrapolation ionization chamber, was evaluated. This ionization chamber was simulated with the MCNP-4C Monte Carlo code and the spectrum of a standard diagnostic radiology beam (RQR5) was utilized. The different results are due to interactions of photons with different materials of the collecting electrode contributing with different values of energy deposited in the sensitive volume of the ionization chamber, which depends on the atomic number of the evaluated materials. The material that presented the least influence was graphite, the original constituent of the ionization chamber. (author)

  11. The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP): Overview and Description of Models, Simulations and Climate Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarque, J.-F.; Shindell, D. T.; Naik, V.; Plummer, D.; Josse, B.; Righi, M.; Rumbold, S. T.; Schulz, M.; Skeie, R. B.; Strode, S.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) consists of a series of time slice experiments targeting the long-term changes in atmospheric composition between 1850 and 2100, with the goal of documenting composition changes and the associated radiative forcing. In this overview paper, we introduce the ACCMIP activity, the various simulations performed (with a requested set of 14) and the associated model output. The 16 ACCMIP models have a wide range of horizontal and vertical resolutions, vertical extent, chemistry schemes and interaction with radiation and clouds. While anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions were specified for all time slices in the ACCMIP protocol, it is found that the natural emissions are responsible for a significant range across models, mostly in the case of ozone precursors. The analysis of selected present-day climate diagnostics (precipitation, temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind) reveals biases consistent with state-of-the-art climate models. The model-to- model comparison of changes in temperature, specific humidity and zonal wind between 1850 and 2000 and between 2000 and 2100 indicates mostly consistent results. However, models that are clear outliers are different enough from the other models to significantly affect their simulation of atmospheric chemistry.

  12. Dual ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallory, J.; Turlej, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Dual ionization chambers are provided for use with an electronic smoke detector. The chambers are separated by electrically-conductive partition. A single radiation source extends through the partition into both chambers, ionizing the air in each. The mid-point current of the device may be balanced by adjusting the position of the source

  13. Investigations of the ratios of stable carbon isotopes in atmospheric relevant VOC using simulation and field experiments; Untersuchungen der Verhaeltnisse stabiler Kohlenstoffisotope in atmosphaerisch relevanten VOC in Simulations- und Feldexperimenten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spahn, Holger

    2010-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) play an important role in the regional and global atmospheric chemistry. The author of the contribution under consideration reports on the analysis of the ratios of stable carbon isotopes ({delta}({sup 13}C) analysis) in atmospheric VOCs. At first, the state of the art of this analytical technique is described. For the first time {delta}({sup 13}C) values of different monoterpenes have been determined in the investigation of vegetable emissions at a plant chamber. By means of the oxidation of {beta}-pinene by ozone in an aerosol chamber, the kinetic isotope effect of this reaction was determined. In southern Germany, air samples for the {delta}({sup 13}C) analysis were collected using a zeppelin. This enables a height-resolved measurement of {delta}({sup 13}C) values. Based on these measurements, the average photochemical age for methanol, toluene and p-xylene at different heights was calculated.

  14. Phosphine and methylphosphine production by simulated lightning - s study for the volatile phosphorus cycle and cloud formation in the earth atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Glindemann, D.; Edwards, M.; Schrems, Otto

    2004-01-01

    Phosphine (PH3), was recently found worldwide even in the remote atmosphere (Naturwissenschaften 83 (1996a,131, Atmos. Environ. 37 (2003) 2429). It is of interest to find natural mechanisms which could produce phosphine gas and drive a volatile link of the atmospheric phosphorus cycle and the formation of phosphoric acid as possible condensation nuclei for clouds.Here we report on simulated lightning exposing sodium phosphate in a reducing medium (methane model atmosphere or organic matter) f...

  15. ANSYS有限元法在测长绝热真空腔二维热分析中的应用%Two-dimentional Thermal Analysis of Adiabatic Vacuum Chamber with ANSYS Finite Element Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽峰; 罗志勇; 徐爱华

    2012-01-01

    According to the difficulties of measuring temperature distribution in the adiabatic vacuum chamber, the method of combing ANSYS finite element simulation with experimental study is proposed. ANSYS finite element modeling, parameter identification, meshing, applying loads, and the solution process are described. Simulation results show that changes in ambient temperature 1℃ , heat insulation vacuum chamber temperature will change 0. 085 ℃, and verify the simulation results of the experiments. Test results show that use of the simulation can be accurate and reliable analysis of insulation vacuum chamber temperature, and improve test efficiency and reduce experimental costs.%针对测长绝热真空腔内温度场测量困难的特点,提出应用ANSYS有限元仿真与实验研究相结合的方法进行二维热分析.详细介绍了真空腔的ANSYS有限元建模、参数确定、网格划分、施加载荷和求解过程.仿真结果表明外界环境温度变化1℃,绝热真空腔内温度将变化0.085℃.对仿真结果进行了实验验证,实验结果证明利用该仿真技术可准确、可靠地分析绝热真空腔内的温度场,并且提高实验效率的同时降低了实验成本.

  16. Hyperbaric and hypobaric chamber fires: a 73-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, P J; Desautels, D A

    1997-09-01

    Fire can be catastrophic in the confined space of a hyperbaric chamber. From 1923 to 1996, 77 human fatalities occurred in 35 hyperbaric chamber fires, three human fatalities in a pressurized Apollo Command Module, and two human fatalities in three hypobaric chamber fires reported in Asia, Europe, and North America. Two fires occurred in diving bells, eight occurred in recompression (or decompression) chambers, and 25 occurred in clinical hyperbaric chambers. No fire fatalities were reported in the clinical hyperbaric chambers of North America. Chamber fires before 1980 were principally caused by electrical ignition. Since 1980, chamber fires have been primarily caused by prohibited sources of ignition that an occupant carried inside the chamber. Each fatal chamber fire has occurred in an enriched oxygen atmosphere (> 28% oxygen) and in the presence of abundant burnable material. Chambers pressurized with air (Hyperbaric Medical Society's Chamber Experience and Mishap Database. This epidemiologic review focuses on information learned from critical analyses of chamber fires and how it can be applied to safe operation of hypobaric and hyperbaric chambers.

  17. Simulation of N-atom production in dielectric-barrier discharge in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyganov, Dmitry; Pancheshnyi, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    A plasma-chemical model of atomic nitrogen production in a Townsend dielectric-barrier discharge in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure is presented. On the basis of the comparison with measured densities, a significant discrepancy between the calculated and the measured production rate of nitrogen atoms is observed and discussed. (paper)

  18. Coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave simulations of a storm event over the Gulf of Lion and Balearic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Lionel; Chiggiato, Jacopo; Warner, John C.; Gomez, Marta; Vizoso, Guillermo; Tintore, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    The coastal areas of the North-Western Mediterranean Sea are one of the most challenging places for ocean forecasting. This region is exposed to severe storms events that are of short duration. During these events, significant air-sea interactions, strong winds and large sea-state can have catastrophic consequences in the coastal areas. To investigate these air-sea interactions and the oceanic response to such events, we implemented the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport Modeling System simulating a severe storm in the Mediterranean Sea that occurred in May 2010. During this event, wind speed reached up to 25 m.s-1 inducing significant sea surface cooling (up to 2°C) over the Gulf of Lion (GoL) and along the storm track, and generating surface waves with a significant height of 6 m. It is shown that the event, associated with a cyclogenesis between the Balearic Islands and the GoL, is relatively well reproduced by the coupled system. A surface heat budget analysis showed that ocean vertical mixing was a major contributor to the cooling tendency along the storm track and in the GoL where turbulent heat fluxes also played an important role. Sensitivity experiments on the ocean-atmosphere coupling suggested that the coupled system is sensitive to the momentum flux parameterization as well as air-sea and air-wave coupling. Comparisons with available atmospheric and oceanic observations showed that the use of the fully coupled system provides the most skillful simulation, illustrating the benefit of using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere-wave model for the assessment of these storm events.

  19. Simulation of Degraded Properties of 2D plain Woven C/SiC Composites under Preloading Oxidation Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xihui; Sun, Zhigang; Sun, Jianfen; Song, Yingdong

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a numerical model which incorporates the oxidation damage model and the finite element model of 2D plain woven composites is presented for simulation of the oxidation behaviors of 2D plain woven C/SiC composite under preloading oxidation atmosphere. The equal proportional reduction method is firstly proposed to calculate the residual moduli and strength of unidirectional C/SiC composite. The multi-scale method is developed to simulate the residual elastic moduli and strength of 2D plain woven C/SiC composite. The multi-scale method is able to accurately predict the residual elastic modulus and strength of the composite. Besides, the simulated residual elastic moduli and strength of 2D plain woven C/SiC composites under preloading oxidation atmosphere show good agreements with experimental results. Furthermore, the preload, oxidation time, temperature and fiber volume fractions of the composite are investigated to show their influences upon the residual elastic modulus and strength of 2D plain woven C/SiC composites.

  20. Measurement of optical blurring in a turbulent cloud chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Corey D.; Ciochetto, David S.; Cantrell, Will H.; Roggemann, Michael C.; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2016-10-01

    Earth's atmosphere can significantly impact the propagation of electromagnetic radiation, degrading the performance of imaging systems. Deleterious effects of the atmosphere include turbulence, absorption and scattering by particulates. Turbulence leads to blurring, while absorption attenuates the energy that reaches imaging sensors. The optical properties of aerosols and clouds also impact radiation propagation via scattering, resulting in decorrelation from unscattered light. Models have been proposed for calculating a point spread function (PSF) for aerosol scattering, providing a method for simulating the contrast and spatial detail expected when imaging through atmospheres with significant aerosol optical depth. However, these synthetic images and their predicating theory would benefit from comparison with measurements in a controlled environment. Recently, Michigan Technological University (MTU) has designed a novel laboratory cloud chamber. This multiphase, turbulent "Pi Chamber" is capable of pressures down to 100 hPa and temperatures from -55 to +55°C. Additionally, humidity and aerosol concentrations are controllable. These boundary conditions can be combined to form and sustain clouds in an instrumented laboratory setting for measuring the impact of clouds on radiation propagation. This paper describes an experiment to generate mixing and expansion clouds in supersaturated conditions with salt aerosols, and an example of measured imagery viewed through the generated cloud is shown. Aerosol and cloud droplet distributions measured during the experiment are used to predict scattering PSF and MTF curves, and a methodology for validating existing theory is detailed. Measured atmospheric inputs will be used to simulate aerosol-induced image degradation for comparison with measured imagery taken through actual cloud conditions. The aerosol MTF will be experimentally calculated and compared to theoretical expressions. The key result of this study is the

  1. Simulation of trace metals and PAH atmospheric pollution over Greater Paris: Concentrations and deposition on urban surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouron, L.; Seigneur, C.; Kim, Y.; Legorgeu, C.; Roustan, Y.; Bruge, B.

    2017-10-01

    Urban areas can be subject not only to poor air quality, but also to contamination of other environmental media by air pollutants. Here, we address the potential transfer of selected air pollutants (two metals and three PAH) to urban surfaces. To that end, we simulate meteorology and air pollution from Europe to a Paris suburban neighborhood, using a four-level one-way nesting approach. The meteorological and air quality simulations use urban canopy sub-models in order to better represent the effect of the urban morphology on the air flow, atmospheric dispersion, and deposition of air pollutants to urban surfaces. This modeling approach allows us to distinguish air pollutant deposition among various urban surfaces (roofs, roads, and walls). Meteorological model performance is satisfactory, showing improved results compared to earlier simulations, although precipitation amounts are underestimated. Concentration simulation results are also satisfactory for both metals, with a fractional bias Paris region. The model simulation results suggest that both wet and dry deposition processes need to be considered when estimating the transfer of air pollutants to other environmental media. Dry deposition fluxes to various urban surfaces are mostly uniform for PAH, which are entirely present in fine particles. However, there is significantly less wall deposition compared to deposition to roofs and roads for trace metals, due to their coarse fraction. Meteorology, particle size distribution, and urban morphology are all important factors affecting air pollutant deposition. Future work should focus on the collection of data suitable to evaluate the performance of atmospheric models for both wet and dry deposition with fine spatial resolution.

  2. MicroHH 1.0: a computational fluid dynamics code for direct numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heerwaarden, Chiel C.; van Stratum, Bart J. H.; Heus, Thijs; Gibbs, Jeremy A.; Fedorovich, Evgeni; Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes MicroHH 1.0, a new and open-source (www.microhh.org) computational fluid dynamics code for the simulation of turbulent flows in the atmosphere. It is primarily made for direct numerical simulation but also supports large-eddy simulation (LES). The paper covers the description of the governing equations, their numerical implementation, and the parameterizations included in the code. Furthermore, the paper presents the validation of the dynamical core in the form of convergence and conservation tests, and comparison of simulations of channel flows and slope flows against well-established test cases. The full numerical model, including the associated parameterizations for LES, has been tested for a set of cases under stable and unstable conditions, under the Boussinesq and anelastic approximations, and with dry and moist convection under stationary and time-varying boundary conditions. The paper presents performance tests showing good scaling from 256 to 32 768 processes. The graphical processing unit (GPU)-enabled version of the code can reach a speedup of more than an order of magnitude for simulations that fit in the memory of a single GPU.

  3. Spontaneous abrupt climate change due to an atmospheric blocking-sea-ice-ocean feedback in an unforced climate model simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drijfhout, Sybren; Gleeson, Emily; Dijkstra, Henk A; Livina, Valerie

    2013-12-03

    Abrupt climate change is abundant in geological records, but climate models rarely have been able to simulate such events in response to realistic forcing. Here we report on a spontaneous abrupt cooling event, lasting for more than a century, with a temperature anomaly similar to that of the Little Ice Age. The event was simulated in the preindustrial control run of a high-resolution climate model, without imposing external perturbations. Initial cooling started with a period of enhanced atmospheric blocking over the eastern subpolar gyre. In response, a southward progression of the sea-ice margin occurred, and the sea-level pressure anomaly was locked to the sea-ice margin through thermal forcing. The cold-core high steered more cold air to the area, reinforcing the sea-ice concentration anomaly east of Greenland. The sea-ice surplus was carried southward by ocean currents around the tip of Greenland. South of 70 °N, sea ice already started melting and the associated freshwater anomaly was carried to the Labrador Sea, shutting off deep convection. There, surface waters were exposed longer to atmospheric cooling and sea surface temperature dropped, causing an even larger thermally forced high above the Labrador Sea. In consequence, east of Greenland, anomalous winds changed from north to south, terminating the event with similar abruptness to its onset. Our results imply that only climate models that possess sufficient resolution to correctly represent atmospheric blocking, in combination with a sensitive sea-ice model, are able to simulate this kind of abrupt climate change.

  4. Adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at the air-water interface: Molecular dynamics simulations and experimental atmospheric observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vácha, Robert; Jungwirth, Pavel; Chen, J.; Valsaraj, K.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 38 (2006), s. 4461-4467 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC512; GA MŠk(CZ) ME 644 Grant - others:NSF(US) CHE0431312; NSF(US) CHE0209719; NSF(US) ATM-0355291 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * water surface * molecular dynamics simulations * heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.892, year: 2006

  5. Simulation calculations on the construction of the energy-tagged photon beam as well as development and test of the side drift chambers of the Bonn SAPHIR detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahnen, T.

    1990-01-01

    The SAPHIR-detector is built up at the continuous photon beam of the Electron Stretcher and Accelerator ELSA in Bonn. The equipment is designed for investigations of reactions with more then two particles in the final state and for photon energies up to 3.5 GeV. A tagging-system determines the energy of the Bremsstrahlung-photons and a set-up of five large driftchambers measures the tracks of the charged particles. This work describes a program which was used to develop the best design of the tagging-hodoscope. In a second part the tests of the planar side-chambers and their evaluation is described. These measurements were carried out to fix the gasfilling and the parameters of the best working point. It is shown, that the chambers can reach a resolution of σ≤200 μm. (orig.) [de

  6. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, HBOT is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. HBOT is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The HHC technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system to provide controlled pressurization and adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the patient and operating personnel, and physiological considerations. The simple schematic, comprised of easily acquired commercial hardware

  7. Numerical simulation of torus breakdown to chaos in an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.; Wang, Y. H.; Wang, D. Z.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the routes to chaos occurring in atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge systems by changing controlling parameters is very important to predict and control the dynamical behaviors. In this paper, a route of a quasiperiodic torus to chaos via the strange nonchaotic attractor is observed in an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge driven by triangle-wave voltage. By increasing the driving frequency, the discharge system first bifurcates to a quasiperiodic torus from a stable single periodic state, and then torus and phase-locking periodic state appear and disappear alternately. In the meantime, the torus becomes increasingly wrinkling and stretching, and gradually approaches a fractal structure with the nonpositive largest Lyapunov exponent, i.e., a strange nonchaotic attractor. After that, the discharge system enters into chaotic state. If the driving frequency is further increased, another well known route of period-doubling bifurcation to chaos is also observed

  8. Numerical simulation of torus breakdown to chaos in an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J.; Wang, Y. H.; Wang, D. Z. [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Electron, and Ion Beams, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2013-08-15

    Understanding the routes to chaos occurring in atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge systems by changing controlling parameters is very important to predict and control the dynamical behaviors. In this paper, a route of a quasiperiodic torus to chaos via the strange nonchaotic attractor is observed in an atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge driven by triangle-wave voltage. By increasing the driving frequency, the discharge system first bifurcates to a quasiperiodic torus from a stable single periodic state, and then torus and phase-locking periodic state appear and disappear alternately. In the meantime, the torus becomes increasingly wrinkling and stretching, and gradually approaches a fractal structure with the nonpositive largest Lyapunov exponent, i.e., a strange nonchaotic attractor. After that, the discharge system enters into chaotic state. If the driving frequency is further increased, another well known route of period-doubling bifurcation to chaos is also observed.

  9. Progress in observations and simulations of global change in the upper atmosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Qian, L.; Laštovička, Jan; Roble, R. G.; Solomon, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Roč