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Sample records for atlas experimental cavern

  1. Constructing the ATLAS experimental cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2001-01-01

    The huge cavern that will house the ATLAS experiment on the LHC at CERN is seen in these images during construction. The site, located 100 m underground near the France-Swiss border, has one of the longest underground spans ever built at 35 m. The 1380 square metre cavern that will hold the 46X25X25 cubic metre detector (the largest of its type in the world) requires its ceiling to be held by ground anchors installed from galleries excavated laterally from the access shafts.

  2. ATLAS Cavern baseplate

    CERN Multimedia

    It-UDS-Audiovisual Services

    2002-01-01

    This video shows the incredible amounth of iron used for ATLAS cavern. Please look at the related links and also videos that are concerning the civil engineering where you can see even more detailed cavern excavation work.

  3. The huge ATLAS cavern now fully excavated

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Excavation of the ATLAS cavern is now complete! At the end of two years' work involving a tremendous technical challenge, the civil engineering contractors have succeeded in digging out one of the biggest experimental caverns in the world. Bravo!

  4. Ceremony for ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Wednesday 4 June will be a special day for CERN. The President of the Swiss Confederation, Pascal Couchepin, will officially inaugurate the huge ATLAS cavern now that the civil engineering works have ended. The inauguration ceremony will be held in the ATLAS surface building, with speeches by Pascal Couchepin and CERN, ATLAS and civil engineering personalities. This ceremony will be Webcast live. To access the Webcast on 4 June at 18h00 go to CERN Intranet home page or the following address : http://webcast.cern.ch/live.php

  5. Surveying the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    The cathedral-like cavern into which the ATLAS experiment will be lowered and installed forms a vital part of the engineering work at CERN in preparation for the new LHC accelerator. This cavern, being measured by surveyors in these images, will have one of the largest spans of any man-made underground structure. The massive 46X25X25 cubic metre detector will be the largest of its type in the world when it is completed for the LHC start-up in 2008.

  6. Simulations of argon accident scenarios in the ATLAS experimental cavern a safety analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Balda, F

    2002-01-01

    Some characteristic accidents in the ATLAS experimental cavern (UX15) are simulated by means of STAR-CD, a code using the "Finite-Volume" method. These accidents involve different liquid argon leaks from the barrel cryostat of the detector, thus causing the dispersion of the argon into the Muon Chamber region and the evaporation of the liquid. The subsequent temperature gradients and distribution of argon concentrations, as well as their evolution in time are simulated and discussed, with the purpose of analysing the dangers related to asphyxiation and to contact with cryogenic fluids for the working personnel. A summary of the theory that stands behind the code is also given. In order to validate the models, an experimental test on a liquid argon spill performed earlier is simulated, showing that the program is able to output reliable results. At the end, some safety-related recommendations are listed.

  7. 09 September 2013 - Japanese Members of Internal Affairs and Communications Committee House of Representatives visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Spokesperson D. Charlton. T. Kondo and K. Yoshida present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    09 September 2013 - Japanese Members of Internal Affairs and Communications Committee House of Representatives visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Spokesperson D. Charlton. T. Kondo and K. Yoshida present.

  8. 29 May 2013 - Rector Politecnico di Torino M. Gilli in the ATLAS experimental cavern with L. Pontecorvo (ATLAS Collaboration) and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Engineering Department Head R. Saban.

    CERN Multimedia

    VMO

    2013-01-01

    29 May 2013 - Rector Politecnico di Torino M. Gilli in the ATLAS experimental cavern with L. Pontecorvo (ATLAS Collaboration) and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Engineering Department Head R. Saban.

  9. The ATLAS cavern in the spotlight

    CERN Multimedia

    On Wednesday, 4th June, the President of the Swiss Confederation, Pascal Couchepin, inaugurated the world's largest experimental cavern, which is to house the ATLAS detector in 2007, and announced Switzerland's gift to CERN of the "Palais de l'Equilibre".

  10. 27 Febuary 2012 - US DoE Associate Director of Science for High Energy Physics J. Siegrist visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with adviser J.-P. Koutchouk and engineer M. Bajko; in CMS experimental cavern with Spokesperson J. Incadela;in ATLAS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford; in ALICE experimental cavern with Spokesperson P. Giubellino; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli

    2012-01-01

    27 Febuary 2012 - US DoE Associate Director of Science for High Energy Physics J. Siegrist visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with adviser J.-P. Koutchouk and engineer M. Bajko; in CMS experimental cavern with Spokesperson J. Incadela;in ATLAS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford; in ALICE experimental cavern with Spokesperson P. Giubellino; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  11. ATLAS Cavern - Sainte-Barbe evening

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The December at cavern of ATLAS was full of surprises, while during the iron mounting and concrete work the cavern got its new purpose for being the restaurant under little while -Live music and happy people.

  12. 12 April 2013 - The British Royal Academy of Engineering visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with R. Veness and the ATLAS experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    12 April 2013 - The British Royal Academy of Engineering visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with R. Veness and the ATLAS experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton.

  13. Civil engineering in the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    Work continues in the cathedral-like cavern that will soon contain ATLAS, the largest particle detector of its type in the world. For such a huge detector, an equally giant cavern must be excavated 100 m underground. The roof must be held without any normal rests at the base; instead it will be supported by huge anchors embedded in concrete that will stop the roof from caving in, located in galleries above the cavern.

  14. ATLAS cavern magnetic field calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach has been adopted in an attempt to produce a complete ATLAS cavern B-field map using a more precise methodological approach (variable magnetisation, depending on the external field) and the latest design taking into account of the structural elements. The basic idea was to produce a dedicated basic TOSCA model and then to insert a series of ferromagnetic structure elements to monitor the perturbative effect on the basic field map. Eventually, it was found: the bedplate field perturbation is an order of magnitude above the permissible level; manufacturing of the bedplates from nonmagnetic material or careful evaluation of their field contribution in the event reconstruction codes is required; the field value at the rack positions is higher than the permissible one; the final position of racks should be chosen taking into account the detailed magnetic field distribution

  15. 30 August 2013 - Senior Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs in Japan M. Matsuyama signing the guest book with CERN Director-General; visit the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Spokesperson D. Charlton and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with former ATLAS Japan national contact physicist T. Kondo. R. Voss and K. Yoshida present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    30 August 2013 - Senior Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs in Japan M. Matsuyama signing the guest book with CERN Director-General; visit the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Spokesperson D. Charlton and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with former ATLAS Japan national contact physicist T. Kondo. R. Voss and K. Yoshida present throughout.

  16. 16 December 2013 - Hooke Professor of Experimental Physics and Pro Vice Chancellor University of Oxford Prof. I. Walmsley visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, Physics Department, ATLAS Collaboration P. Wells and Chair, CMS Collaboration Board, Oxford University and Purdue University I. Shipsey

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    16 December 2013 - Hooke Professor of Experimental Physics and Pro Vice Chancellor University of Oxford Prof. I. Walmsley visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, Physics Department, ATLAS Collaboration P. Wells and Chair, CMS Collaboration Board, Oxford University and Purdue University I. Shipsey

  17. Inauguration of the ATLAS cavern, June 2003.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Before the inauguration, Pascal Couchepin visited the ATLAS cavern. From left to right: Peter Jenni, ATLAS spokesman; Maurice Bourquin, President of the CERN Council; Carlo Lamprecht, State councillor, Canton of Geneva; Pascal Couchepin, President of the Swiss Confederation; Luciano Maiani, CERN Director-General; Marzio Nessi, ATLAS technical coordinator; Arturo Henniger, ZSCHOKKE-LOCHER AG Director; Benno Baettig, personal advisor of President Couchepin; Jean-Luc Baldy, head of CERN Civil Engineering Group.

  18. Civil Engineering in the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    Ghostly figures can be seen wandering the cavern that will eventually house the ATLAS experiment, part of the LHC at CERN. Quite fitting since the detector will hunt the illusive 'ghostly' particles, such as the Higgs boson and dark matter. These engineers are excavating the huge cavern that has to be anchored from above as the detector will fill so much space that there is no room for support pillars.

  19. Special people visit the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Muriel

    ATLAS has been host to many important visitors lately. Here are a selected few: Professor Stephen Hawking visits the ATLAS cavern On Tuesday 26 September 2006 the ATLAS Collaboration was honoured by a very special visit to the detector in the underground cavern. We were pleased to guide Professor Stephen Hawking, the famous cosmologist holding the post of Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University (position held by Isaac Newton in the 17th century), on a tour of the ATLAS pit and the LHC tunnel. The visit was accompanied by a few colleagues from the CERN Theory group, and was only possible thanks to the professional assistance of Olga Beltramello and Bernard Lebegue, who had also taken care of all the necessary preparatory work in the cavern. Professor Hawking was very keen to check for himself the status of the detector installation, and he admired, in particular, the spectacular TGC big wheel on side C. (left) Stephen Hawking in the ATLAS cavern side-C (right) and in the LHC tunnel...

  20. Installation of the Liquid Argon Calorimater Barrel in the ATLAS Experimental Cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Vandoni, G.

    On the 27th of October, the Liquid Argon Barrel cryostat was transported from Building 180 to point 1. The next day, the Barrel was lowered into the cavern, and was placed on jacks close to its final position inside the completed lower half of the Tile calorimeter. After a day of precise adjustment, it was resting within a few millimetres of its nominal final position, waiting for the upper half of the Tile calorimeter to be installed. Tight requests had been issued by the Liquid Argon collaboration for the whole transport. It was foreseen that the cryostat should not see any acceleration larger than 0.15g along its axis, 0.08g transversally and 0.3g in the vertical direction. In addition, no acceleration higher than 0.03g (or even 0.003g for permanent oscillation) would be allowed at 20Hz, to avoid the risk of damaging the absorbers at this spontaneous vibration frequency. The difficulty would arise when coping these demands with the tortuous route, its slopes and curbs, vibration transmission from the engi...

  1. 19 July 2013 - Chairman of the Policy Committee, European Cancer Organisation, President, European Association for Cancer Research E. Celis visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, B. Heinemann and signing the Guest Book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers. Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    19 July 2013 - Chairman of the Policy Committee, European Cancer Organisation, President, European Association for Cancer Research E. Celis visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, B. Heinemann and signing the Guest Book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers. Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh present.

  2. 1 October 2013 - British Minister of State for Trade and Investment Lord Green of Hurstpierpoint signing the guest book with Head of Internationals Relations R. Voss; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 and the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Members K. Behr and J. Catmore.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    1 October 2013 - British Minister of State for Trade and Investment Lord Green of Hurstpierpoint signing the guest book with Head of Internationals Relations R. Voss; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 and the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Members K. Behr and J. Catmore.

  3. 13 September 2013 - Chairman of the Board of Directors of the von Karman Institute Kingdom of Belgium J.-P. Contzen visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department N. Delruelle and signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli (visit)

    2013-01-01

    13 September 2013 - Chairman of the Board of Directors of the von Karman Institute Kingdom of Belgium J.-P. Contzen visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department N. Delruelle and signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka present.

  4. 9 April 2013 - Minister for Universities and Science United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland D. Willetts in the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Beams Department Head P. Collier. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Editor at the Communication Group K. Kahle and Beams Department Engineer R. Veness present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    9 April 2013 - Minister for Universities and Science United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland D. Willetts in the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Beams Department Head P. Collier. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Editor at the Communication Group K. Kahle and Beams Department Engineer R. Veness present.

  5. 23 July - Italian Director-General for Prevention G. Ruocco and Director-General for European and International Relations Ministry of Health D. Roderigo visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson B. Heinemann. Life Sciences Section M. Cirilli and Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    23 July - Italian Director-General for Prevention G. Ruocco and Director-General for European and International Relations Ministry of Health D. Roderigo visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson B. Heinemann. Life Sciences Section M. Cirilli and Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh present.

  6. ATLAS - End-Cap calorimeter lowered in to the cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The End-cap calorimeter was lowered into the ATLAS cavern at POINT1. This calorimeter will measure the energy of particles close to the beam axis when protons collide. Cooling is important for maximum detector efficiency.

  7. 3 May 2014 - His Excellency Dr Karolos Papoulias President of the Hellenic Republic in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 and in ATLAS experimental cavern with Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2014-01-01

    In the LHC tunnel at Point 1: Beams Department, Controls Group Leader E. Hatziangeli and Technology Department, Cryogenics Group Deputy Leader D. Delikaris. In the ATLAS cavern: ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson B. Heinemann and ATLAS Collaboration National contact person and CAST Collaboration National Technical University of Athens Team Leader E. Gazis.

  8. 2 April 2014 - H. E. Mr Joachim Gauck, President of the Federal Republic of Germany in the ATLAS experimental cavern with Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2014-01-01

    in the ATLAS cavern: Minister of State at the Federal Foreign Office M. Böhmer (green jacket) and Mrs daniela Schadt (First Lady). 201404-069_39.jpg: State Secretary, Federal Ministry of Education and Research G. Schütte, Minister of State at the Federal Foreign Office M. Böhmer, President Gauck, CERN DG, State Secretary, Chief of the Federal President´s Office D. Gill and Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany to the Swiss Confederation O. Lampe.

  9. 21 January 2008 - Vice-President of the Human Rights Commission Z. Muhsin Al Hussein, Ambassador to United Nations A. Attar and their delegation from Saudi Arabia, visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Technical Coordinator M. Nessi.

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2008-01-01

    21 January 2008 - Vice-President of the Human Rights Commission Z. Muhsin Al Hussein, Ambassador to United Nations A. Attar and their delegation from Saudi Arabia, visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Technical Coordinator M. Nessi.

  10. 7 May 2013 - Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany to Switzerland and Liechtenstein P. Gottwald and Mrs Gottwald in the ATLAS experimental cavern and LHC tunnel with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler and German Scientists A. Schopper and V. Mertens.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    7 May 2013 - Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany to Switzerland and Liechtenstein P. Gottwald and Mrs Gottwald in the ATLAS experimental cavern and LHC tunnel with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler and German Scientists A. Schopper and V. Mertens.

  11. 16 July 2013 - Israel Ministry of Education Director-General D. Stauber in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with L. Tavian, visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Senior Physicist G. Mikenberg; Israeli Delegate to CERN Council E. Rabinovici and CERN Adviser for Israel E. Tsesmelis present; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    16 July 2013 - Israel Ministry of Education Director-General D. Stauber in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with L. Tavian, visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Senior Physicist G. Mikenberg; Israeli Delegate to CERN Council E. Rabinovici and CERN Adviser for Israel E. Tsesmelis present; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  12. 28 March 2014 - Italian Minister of Education, University and Research S. Giannini welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci in the ATLAS experimental cavern with Former Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti. Signature of the guest book with Belgian State Secretary for the Scientific Policy P. Courard.

    CERN Multimedia

    Gadmer, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    28 March 2014 - Italian Minister of Education, University and Research S. Giannini welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci in the ATLAS experimental cavern with Former Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti. Signature of the guest book with Belgian State Secretary for the Scientific Policy P. Courard.

  13. 3 February 2011 - British Members of the Science and Technology Committee (Commons)led by A. Miller MP signing the guest book with CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers; in the ATLAS experimental cavern at LHC Point 1 with Spokesperson F. Gianotti and Deputy D. Charlton.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    3 February 2011 - British Members of the Science and Technology Committee (Commons)led by A. Miller MP signing the guest book with CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers; in the ATLAS experimental cavern at LHC Point 1 with Spokesperson F. Gianotti and Deputy D. Charlton.

  14. 6 November 2013 - Permanent Representative of Chile to the United Nations Office and Other international organizations in Geneva Ambassador J. Balmaceda Serigos signing the guest book with Adviser for Latin America J. Salicio Diez; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton (Spouse, Son and First Secretary present).

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    6 November 2013 - Permanent Representative of Chile to the United Nations Office and Other international organizations in Geneva Ambassador J. Balmaceda Serigos signing the guest book with Adviser for Latin America J. Salicio Diez; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton (Spouse, Son and First Secretary present).

  15. 12 December 2013 - Sir Konstantin Novoselov, Nobel Prize in Physics 2010, signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton; in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. I. Antoniadis, CERN Theory Group Leader, accompanies throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    12 December 2013 - Sir Konstantin Novoselov, Nobel Prize in Physics 2010, signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton; in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. I. Antoniadis, CERN Theory Group Leader, accompanies throughout.

  16. The First Result of Global Commissioning of the ATLAS Endcap Muon Trigger System in ATLAS Cavern

    CERN Document Server

    Sugimoto, T; Takahashi, Y; Tomoto, M; Fukunaga, C; Ikeno, M; Iwasaki, H; Nagano, K; Nozaki, M; Sasaki, O; Tanaka, S; Yasu, Y; Hasegawa, Y; Oshita, H; Takeshita, T; Nomachi, M; Sugaya, Y; Kubota, T; Ishino, M; Kanaya, N; Kawamoto, T; Kobayashi, T; Kuwabara, T; Nomoto, H; Sakamoto, H; Yamaguchi, T; Kadosaka, T; Kawagoe, K; Kiyamura, H; Kurashige, H; Niwa, T; Ochi, A; Omachi, C; Takeda, H; Lifshitz, R; Lupu, N; Bressler, S; Tarem, S; Kajomovitz, E; Ben Ami, S; Bahat Treidel, O; Benhammou, Ya; Etzion, E; Lellouch, D; Levinson, L; Mikenberg, G; Roich, A

    2007-01-01

    We report on the ATLAS commissioning run from the view point of the Thin Gap Chamber (TGC), which is the ATLAS end cap muon trigger detector. All the TGC sectors with on-detector electronics are going to be installed to the ATLAS cavern by the end of September 2007. To integrate all sub-detectors before the physics run starting from early 2008, the global commissioning run together with other sub-detectors has been performed from June 2007. We have evaluated the performance of the complete trigger chain of the TGC electronics and provide the trigger signal using cosmic-ray to the sub-systems in the global run environment.

  17. Reinforcement of the concrete base slab of the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 02: UX15 cavern, preparation for concreting of base slab first lift. Photo 05: UX15 cavern, placing of reinforcement for base slab first lift. Photo 07: UX15 cavern, preparation for concreting of base slab first lift. Photo 09: UX15 cavern, placing of reinforcement for base slab first lift. Photo 10: UX15 cavern, view into PX14 shaft above. Photo 12: UX15 cavern, temporary access platform of RB16 tunnel. Photo 15: UJ17 chamber, invert excavation.

  18. The Armenian minister for trade and economic development Karen Chshmaritian, visited CERN on 4 July and toured the ATLAS experimental cavern and assembly hall

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Armenian Minister for Trade and Economic Development, K. Chshmaritian third from right with from left to right : Aram Kotzinian, JINR, Dubna; Dr Marzio Nessi, ATLAS, Zohrad Mnatsakanian, Ambassador at the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Armenia in Geneva, Karen Chshmaritian, Armenian Minister for Trade and Economic Development, Alexey Sissakian, Vice-Director of JINR and Peter Jenni, ATLAS Spokesperson.

  19. Second Barrel Toroid Coil Installed in ATLAS Cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Tappern, G.

    The second barrel toroid coil was lowered into the ATLAS Cavern on Friday, 26 November. The operation takes approximately five hours of precision crane and winch operations. Before lowering, several checks are made to ensure that no loose items have been left on the coil which would fall during the lowering down the shaft. This is a very difficult, but very important check, with the first coil in position, and partly below the shaft. After changing the winch tooling on Wednesday December 1st, the coil was lifted, rotated and placed into the feet. The girders which support the coil and the Z direction stops had all been pre-set before putting the coil in the feet. The angle is controlled by an inclinometer. When the final adjustments of position have been made, which will locate the coils at the plus/minus two mm level, the connection beams (voussoirs and struts) will be put in place; this requires a complex shimming procedure. This will lock together the two coils into the feet and forms the foundation for th...

  20. 21 May 2013 - Greek Minister of Health A. Lykouretzos signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting the LHC tunnel at POint 5 and CMS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi. CERN-HERMES Network Technical Coordinator E. Dimovasili; Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh; National Contact Physicist, ATLAS Collaboration, NTU, Athens E. Gazis and International Relations Adviser R. Voss accompany the delegation throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    21 May 2013 - Greek Minister of Health A. Lykouretzos signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting the LHC tunnel at POint 5 and CMS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi. CERN-HERMES Network Technical Coordinator E. Dimovasili; Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh; National Contact Physicist, ATLAS Collaboration, NTU, Athens E. Gazis and International Relations Adviser R. Voss accompany the delegation throughout.

  1. View of the ATLAS cavern at SX15

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Photo 01: Coactivity in UX15: installation of the cranes and of the metallic structures. Photo 02: The ATLAS HO structure in UX15: a 12 storey metallic frame underground Photo 03: ATLAS giant structures under construction in UX15.

  2. Visits to the ATLAS cavern - A record of 20000 visitors in 2006!

    CERN Multimedia

    Alessandra Ciocio

    The year 2006 closed with the impressive record of just under 20000 visitors to the ATLAS cavern. These visitors come from all walks of life - people within ATLAS, groups from other CERN divisions, retired CERN staff, school groups both from the local area and from far away, companies looking for something different as a special outing, celebrities (Cirque du Soleil, Black Eyed Peas hip-hop group) passing through Geneva who had read Angels and Demons, a stream of VIP visitors and now, more and more, Press visitors. There have been public visits in the ATLAS cavern since the middle of 2003. At that time a lot of the visitors were guided by Bernard Lebegue and Francois Butin. The total number of visits in 2003 was 2220 people. Not bad for just two guides! Over the following three years demand for visits increased to such an extent that the ATLAS Visits Service was created and is now run very successfully under the supervision of Connie Potter in the ATLAS Secretariat in close collaboration with the ever-helpfu...

  3. Dedication of the massive ATLAS art mural painted by Josef Kristofoletti directly above the cavern of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni, Michael Barnett

    2010-01-01

    Ceremony to celebrate the massive mural of the ATLAS detector at CERN painted by artist Josef Kristofoletti. The mural is located at the ATLAS Experiment site, and it shows on two perpendicular walls the detector with a collision event superimposed. The event on the large wall shows a simulation of an event that would be recorded in ATLAS if a Higgs boson was produced. The cavern of the ATLAS Experiment with the detector is 100 meters directly below the mural. The height of the mural is about 12 meters (40 feet). The actual ATLAS detector is more than twice as big.

  4. The Asian earthquakes detected in the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    At the end of December, mysterious vibrations were picked up by the deformation sensors under the feet that are to support the ATLAS detector. It transpired that they had detected waves produced by the earthquakes responsible for the terrible tsunami in Asia.

  5. Major clean-up effort in the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Marzio Nessi

    On Tuesday 10 October, 58 ATLAS collaborators volunteered to give a hand for a major clean-up of the ATLAS detector prior to the toroid magnet ramp-up. This special task monopolised all of the technical coordination team and eight supervisors to oversee the volunteers who were assigned to two separate five-hour shifts. The volunteers removed all sorts of loose material inside and outside the detector, focusing mainly on potentially magnetic material lost inside the detector and dirt accumulated over several months, not to mention zillions of clipped cable ties! The technical crew provided 120 garbage bags and all were used. All sorts of material that had been lost inside the detector by various people was retrieved, in particular small tools which could potentially damage the detector, as well as metallic fillings hazardous for the electronics once the magnet will be ramped up. A more detailed inspection followed for all the inside of the detector, making sure the current on the magnet could be raised to 5KA ...

  6. Study of the ventilation at ATLAS cavern UX15 air velocity and temperature around the muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Vigo-Castellví, E

    2000-01-01

    The Muon Chambers of ATLAS detector cannot work under temperature differences between two opposed faces above 3 K. In addition, a low velocity of the air around the Muon Chambers is essential to avoid vibration problems. The CV group at the ST division is involved in an airflow simulation inside UX15 cavern to check air temperature and velocity profiles around the ATLAS Muon Chambers. In this paper, the status and the content of the performed theoretical studies will be explained. Three simulation models, which helped to understand the Muon Spectrometer thermal environment and the efficiency of the ventilation system at ATLAS cavern, will be presented. Besides, it will be shown how these studies support the proposal of a deeper individual Muon Chamber study.

  7. First cosmic ray results of the RPC commissioning in the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Document Server

    Solfaroli, E

    2008-01-01

    The first commissioning test of three muon towers of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer, installed in the cavern, was carried out. The stations under test belong to the barrel sector 13, which is a large sector. A muon tower consists of three stations: the Inner, the Middle and the Outer, starting from the interaction point. The Barrel Inner Large (BIL) stations are constituted by MDT chambers; the Barrel Middle Large (BML) stations by MDTs assembled between two RPC chambers; and the Barrel Outer Large (BOL) stations by MDTs with only one RPC mounted downstream. Specific Level-1 trigger algorithms have been studied to trigger on cosmic rays and implemented to commission the muon stations. Comparison between the measured trigger rate and the simulated results will be presented. Moreover, the RPC performances have been studied by comparing the MDT track extrapolations with the firing RPC readout strips. The RPC detection efficiency is evaluated in the eta measuring view, resulting as a combination of gas volume effici...

  8. March 2008 - ITER Organization Director-General K.Ikeda and Deputy Director-General N. Holtkamp, visiting the ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni, Accelerators Technology Department Head P. Lebrun and LHC Mangnets Group Leader L. Rossi.

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2008-01-01

    March 2008 - ITER Organization Director-General K.Ikeda and Deputy Director-General N. Holtkamp, visiting the ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni, Accelerators Technology Department Head P. Lebrun and LHC Mangnets Group Leader L. Rossi.

  9. 21 October 2008 - LHC Inauguration - Deputy Minister for Environment, Physical Planning and Public Works T. Xanthopulos welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Aymar, visiting the ATLAS cavern and LHC tunnel and signing the electronic guest book with E. Tsesmelis.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Photo Service

    2008-01-01

    21 October 2008 - LHC Inauguration - Deputy Minister for Environment, Physical Planning and Public Works T. Xanthopulos welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Aymar, visiting the ATLAS cavern and LHC tunnel and signing the electronic guest book with E. Tsesmelis.

  10. Dr Mauro Dell’Ambrogio, State Secretary for Education and Research of the Swiss Confederation visit the ATLAS Cavern and the LHC Machine with with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Technical Coordinator M. Nessi.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    Dr Mauro Dell’Ambrogio, State Secretary for Education and Research of the Swiss Confederation visit the ATLAS Cavern and the LHC Machine with with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Technical Coordinator M. Nessi.

  11. 18 MArch 2008 - Director, Basic and Generic Research Division, Research Promotion Bureau, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Prof.Ohtake visiting ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    18 MArch 2008 - Director, Basic and Generic Research Division, Research Promotion Bureau, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Prof.Ohtake visiting ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  12. Transporting the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The first coil for the ATLAS toroid magnet is transported from its assembly hall at the CERN Meyrin site to the storage hall above the ATLAS cavern. This involves driving the massive transportation vehicle first through the Meyrin site and then across a main road only metres from the France-Swiss border. Eight magnets in total will be transported in this way before being lowered into the experimental cavern where they will be mounted in a huge ring surrounding the detector.

  13. Statistical combination of experimental results in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Gadatsch, Stefan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The combination of experimental results requires a careful statistical treatment. We review the methods and tools used in ATLAS for the statistical combination of measurements and of limits on new physics. We highlight the methods used in the recent combination of ATLAS and CMS measurements of the Higgs boson production/decay rates and the constraints on the Higgs coupling parameters.

  14. Limestone Caverns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Richard L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the origin of limestone caverns, using Mammoth Cave as an example, with particular reference to the importance of groundwater information of caverns, the present condition of groundwater, and how caverns develop within fluctuating groundwater zones. (BR)

  15. ATLAS: civil engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. Nice view from the surface to the cavern from the pit side - all the big machines looked very small. The film has original working sound.

  16. The ATLAS experiment at the CERN large hadron collider

    OpenAIRE

    Çetin, Serkant Ali; ATLAS Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS detector as installed in its experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN is described in this paper. A brief overview of the expected performance of the detector when the Large Hadron Collider begins operation is also presented.

  17. 18 December 2012 - British University of Edinburgh Principal T. O’Shea and delegation (see list below) visiting the CERN Control Centre with Beams Department D. Nisbet, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Beams Department R. Veness, in the ATLAS Visitor Centre and experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, in LHCb experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Campana and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    The delegation was throughout accompanied by Beams Department R. Veness and Physics Department and ATLAS Collaboration P. Wells 1.\tProf. Sir Timothy O'Shea, Principal, University of Edinburgh 2.\tProf. Lesley Yellowlees, Vice Principal, Head of College of Science and Engineering 3.\tProf Jeff Haywood, Vice Principal for Knowledge Management 4.\tProf. Peter Higgs, Professor of Theoretical Physics 5.\tMr Bruce Minto, Supporter of the University 6.\tProf. Walter Nimmo, Supporter of the University 7.\tProf. Arthur Trew, Head of School of Physics and Astronomy 8.\tProf David Robertson, Head of School of Informatics 9.\tProf Stefano Brandani, Head of School of Engineering 10.\tMr Alan Walker, accompanying Prof. Higgs 11.\tProf. Peter Clarke, LHCb Collaboration, School of Physics and Astronomy

  18. ATLAS cavern hand-over ceremony on 4th June 2003 in the presence of the President of the Swiss Confederation

    CERN Multimedia

    Jenni, P

    The 4th of June 2003 will be remembered as a very major milestone in the history of the ATLAS detector construction. In the presence of the President of the Swiss Confederation, Mr. Pascal Couchepin, the ATLAS cavern was handed over by the CERN Director-General, Professor Luciano Maiani, to the Collaboration. For this highly press-mediated event the CERN Director-General had invited some 100 political personalities and representatives from the Geneva and the neighbouring French regions, and from CERN Member and Non-Member States. The surface building was transformed for this occasion into an attractive multi- media hall with films and exhibitions from ATLAS and the civil engineering, with a bar and the CERN jazz band. Besides of course the cavern itself, the Swiss President visited also the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet and the LAr calorimeter assembly activities in Hall 180. The Swiss President visiting the Barrel Toroid integration work in Hall 180 He was very interested and impressed by these, aski...

  19. Tuesday 28 January 2014 - K. E. Huthmacher Ministerialdirektor Provision for the Future - Basic and Sustainability Research Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) visiting the stands with R. Heuer CERN Director-General on the occasion of the Inauguration of the Industrial Exhibition Germany@CERN and visiting the ATLAS Cavern with D. Charlton ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson and R. Voss Head of International Relations.

    CERN Multimedia

    Pantelia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Tuesday 28 January - K. E. Huthmacher Ministerialdirektor Provision for the Future - Basic and Sustainability Research Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) visiting the stands with R. Heuer CERN Director-General on the occasion of the Inauguration of the Industrial Exhibition Germany@CERN and visiting the ATLAS Cavern with D. Charlton ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson and R. Voss Head of International Relations.

  20. 17 October 2013 - C. Ashton High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Vice-President of the European Commission visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    17 October 2013 - C. Ashton High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Vice-President of the European Commission visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  1. 5 June 2013 - European Union Ambassador to Switzerland and the Principality of Liechtenstein R. Jones in the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Head of the EU Projects Office S. Stavrev present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    5 June 2013 - European Union Ambassador to Switzerland and the Principality of Liechtenstein R. Jones in the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Head of the EU Projects Office S. Stavrev present.

  2. 16 December 2013 - P. Lavie President of the Technion Institute of Technology in Israel visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. G. Mikenberg, E. Rabinovici, Y. Rozen and S. Tarem present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    16 December 2013 - P. Lavie President of the Technion Institute of Technology in Israel visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. G. Mikenberg, E. Rabinovici, Y. Rozen and S. Tarem present throughout.

  3. Senior Senator from Florida and Chairman, Senate Committee on Space, Aeronautics and Related Sciences W. Nelson, visiting the ATLAS cavern and LHC tunnel with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and AMS Collaboration Spokesperson S.C.C.Ting, 16 March 2008.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    Senior Senator from Florida and Chairman, Senate Committee on Space, Aeronautics and Related Sciences W. Nelson, visiting the ATLAS cavern and LHC tunnel with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and AMS Collaboration Spokesperson S.C.C.Ting, 16 March 2008.

  4. Mr Lars Leijonborg, Minister for Higher Education and Research of Sweden visiting the cavern ATLAS, the control room of ATLAS and the machine LHC at Point 1 with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Dr. Jos Engelen, Chief Scientific Officer of CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    Mr Lars Leijonborg, Minister for Higher Education and Research of Sweden visiting the cavern ATLAS, the control room of ATLAS and the machine LHC at Point 1 with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Dr. Jos Engelen, Chief Scientific Officer of CERN.

  5. 17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

  6. Preparing an ATLAS toroid magnet end-cap for lowering

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    One of the two 13-m high toroid magnet end-caps for the ATLAS experiment being transported from the construction hall to the experimental area. The end-cap will be lowered into the ATLAS cavern and attached to an end of the detector.

  7. 10 September 2013 - Italian Minister for Economic Development F. Zanonato visiting the ATLAS cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and Italian scientists F. Gianotti and A. Di Ciaccio; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; in the LHC tunnel with S. Bertolucci, Technology Deputy Department Head L. Rossi and Engineering Department Head R. Saban; visiting CMS cavern with Scientists G. Rolandi and P. Checchia.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    10 September 2013 - Italian Minister for Economic Development F. Zanonato visiting the ATLAS cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and Italian scientists F. Gianotti and A. Di Ciaccio; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; in the LHC tunnel with S. Bertolucci, Technology Deputy Department Head L. Rossi and Engineering Department Head R. Saban; visiting CMS cavern with Scientists G. Rolandi and P. Checchia.

  8. ATLAS Visit of Indian President

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Welcomed by CERN's Director General, Robert Aymar, the President of India Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam visited the LHC tunnel, the ATLAS experimental cavern and the test facility for the LHC magnets. There the President had the chance to meet Indian scientists working at CERN.

  9. 1er février 2011-Première Présidente de la Confédération Suisse (1999)-Mme Ruth Dreifuss-Visite de la caverne expérimentale d’ATLAS avec F. Pauss, Chef des Relations internationales

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Photo 1-24:Collaboration ATLAS, Ancien Porte-parole P. Jenni+F. Pauss+Experte en pédagogie S. Forster+R. Dreifuss+C. Bossy+JP Bossy, visite de la caverne ATLAS Photo 25-40:Visite du Tunnel LHC au Point 1

  10. Digging a cavern for a titan

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Civil engineers work 100 m underground near the France-Swiss border on the cavern that will soon house ATLAS, one of the experiments on CERN's new LHC accelerator. All personnel and equipment must be lowered by crane down the access shaft. When completed this cavern will have one of the largest spans constructed at 35 m, which required the roof to be supported by large steel anchors buried in concrete.

  11. 19 September 2012 - Indonesian Members of Parliament visiting the CMS control room and experimental cavern at Point 5 with Former Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck and International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis.

    CERN Document Server

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    19 September 2012 - Indonesian Members of Parliament visiting the CMS control room and experimental cavern at Point 5 with Former Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck and International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis.

  12. 28 November 2013 - N. N. Kudryavtsev, Russian Rector of the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology signing an Agreement and the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson B. Heinemann and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with AGH University of Science and Technology A. Erokhin. M. Savino, Physics Department, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research also present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    28 November 2013 - N. N. Kudryavtsev, Russian Rector of the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology signing an Agreement and the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson B. Heinemann and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with AGH University of Science and Technology A. Erokhin. M. Savino, Physics Department, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research also present.

  13. 4th July 2011 - Russian Deputy Director-General Director of Directorate for Scientific and Technical Complex ROSATOM V. Pershukov in the ATLAS underground experimental area with Adviser T. Kurtyka, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Russian users.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    4th July 2011 - Russian Deputy Director-General Director of Directorate for Scientific and Technical Complex ROSATOM V. Pershukov in the ATLAS underground experimental area with Adviser T. Kurtyka, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Russian users.

  14. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    maximilien brice

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator.

  15. 28th January 2011-Vice-President Max Planck Society-Prof. Martin Stratmann-Germany-visiting the ATLAS experimental area and the LHC Tunnel at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    Photo 1:ATLAS visitor Center with P. Jenni, ATLAS Collaboration former spokesperson Photo 2-10:visiting the ATLAS cavern Photo 10:D. Hoppe,P. Jenni,M. Stratmann,S. Bethke,S. Braun,D. Klammer Photo 11-15:visiting the LHC tunnel Photo 16-18:Signature of the Guest Book with S. Lettow,Director for Administration and General Infrastructure

  16. First ATLAS Events Recorded Underground

    CERN Multimedia

    Teuscher, R

    As reported in the CERN Bulletin, Issue No.30-31, 25 July 2005 The ATLAS barrel Tile calorimeter has recorded its first events underground using a cosmic ray trigger, as part of the detector commissioning programme. This is not a simulation! A cosmic ray muon recorded by the barrel Tile calorimeter of ATLAS on 21 June 2005 at 18:30. The calorimeter has three layers and a pointing geometry. The light trapezoids represent the energy deposited in the tiles of the calorimeter depicted as a thick disk. On the evening of June 21, the ATLAS detector, now being installed in the underground experimental hall UX15, reached an important psychological milestone: the barrel Tile calorimeter recorded the first cosmic ray events in the underground cavern. An estimated million cosmic muons enter the ATLAS cavern every 3 minutes, and the ATLAS team decided to make good use of some of them for the commissioning of the detector. Although only 8 of the 128 calorimeter slices ('superdrawers') were included in the trigg...

  17. 29 August 2013 - J.-F. Jauslin, Directeur de l’Office fédéral de la culture (OFC) Ambassadeur suisse auprès de l’UNESCO et de l’OIF au 1er septembre 2013 Confédération suisse visite le centre visiteurs de l’expérience ATLAS ainsi que la caverne expérimentale d'ATLAS avec P. Jenny, ancien Porte-parole d'ATLAS. M. Bona, Conseiller du Directeur général pour les relations avec les Organisations internationales présent tout au long.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    29 August 2013 - J.-F. Jauslin, Directeur de l’Office fédéral de la culture (OFC) Ambassadeur suisse auprès de l’UNESCO et de l’OIF au 1er septembre 2013 Confédération suisse visite le centre visiteurs de l’expérience ATLAS ainsi que la caverne expérimentale d'ATLAS avec P. Jenny, ancien Porte-parole d'ATLAS. M. Bona, Conseiller du Directeur général pour les relations avec les Organisations internationales présent tout au long.

  18. Experimental evaluation of job provenance in ATLAS environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krenek, A; Sitera, J; Chudoba, J; Dvorak, F; Filipovic, J; KmunIcek, J; Matyska, L; Mulas, M; Ruda, M; Sustr, Z [CESNET, z.s.p.o., Prague (Czech Republic); Campana, S [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Molinari, E; Rebatto, D [INFN, Milano (Italy)], E-mail: ljocha@ics.muni.cz

    2008-07-15

    Grid middleware stacks, including gLite, matured into the state of being able to process up to millions of jobs per day. Logging and Bookkeeping, the gLite job-tracking service, keeps pace with this rate; however, it is not designed to provide a long-term archive of information on executed jobs. ATLAS - representative of a large user community - addresses this issue with its own job catalogue (ProdDB). Development of such a customized service, not easily reusable, took considerable effort which is not affordable by smaller communities. On the contrary, Job Provenance (JP), a generic gLite service designed for long-term archiving of information on executed jobs focusing on scalability, extensibility, uniform data view, and configurability, allows more specialized catalogues to be easily built. We present the first results of an experimental JP deployment for the ATLAS production infrastructure where a JP installation was fed with a part of ATLAS jobs, and also stress tested with real production data. The main outcome of this work is a demonstration that JP can complement large-scale application-specific job catalogue services, while serving a similar purpose where there are none available.

  19. Experimental evaluation of job provenance in ATLAS environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grid middleware stacks, including gLite, matured into the state of being able to process up to millions of jobs per day. Logging and Bookkeeping, the gLite job-tracking service, keeps pace with this rate; however, it is not designed to provide a long-term archive of information on executed jobs. ATLAS - representative of a large user community - addresses this issue with its own job catalogue (ProdDB). Development of such a customized service, not easily reusable, took considerable effort which is not affordable by smaller communities. On the contrary, Job Provenance (JP), a generic gLite service designed for long-term archiving of information on executed jobs focusing on scalability, extensibility, uniform data view, and configurability, allows more specialized catalogues to be easily built. We present the first results of an experimental JP deployment for the ATLAS production infrastructure where a JP installation was fed with a part of ATLAS jobs, and also stress tested with real production data. The main outcome of this work is a demonstration that JP can complement large-scale application-specific job catalogue services, while serving a similar purpose where there are none available

  20. ATLAS Calorimeter Part 2/2

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    There are two videos about lowering and this one is the second part that shows the final positioning of the object. The first part shows how the ATLAS calorimeter with solenoid is lowered down in the ATLAS cavern.

  1. Experimental limits from ATLAS on Standard Model Higgs production.

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Experimental limits from ATLAS on Standard Model Higgs production in the mass range 110-600 GeV. The solid curve reflects the observed experimental limits for the production of a Higgs of each possible mass value (horizontal axis). The region for which the solid curve dips below the horizontal line at the value of 1 is excluded with a 95% confidence level (CL). The dashed curve shows the expected limit in the absence of the Higgs boson, based on simulations. The green and yellow bands correspond (respectively) to 68%, and 95% confidence level regions from the expected limits. Higgs masses in the narrow range 123-130 GeV are the only masses not excluded at 95% CL

  2. ATLAS: last few metresfor the Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    On Friday 4th November, the ATLAS Barrel Calorimeter was moved from its assembly point at the side of the ATLAS cavern to the centre of the toroidal magnet system. The detector was finally aligned, to the precision of within a millimetre, on Wednesday 9th November. The ATLAS installation team, led by Tommi Nyman, after having positioned the Barrel Calorimeter in its final location in the ATLAS experimental cavern UX15. The Barrel Calorimeter which will absorb and measure the energy of photons, electrons and hadrons at the core of the ATLAS detector is 8.6 meters in diameter, 6.8 meters long, and weighs over 1600 Tonnes. It consists of two concentric cylindrical detector elements. The innermost comprises aluminium pressure vessels containing the liquid argon electromagnetic calorimeter and the solenoid magnet. The outermost is an assembly of 64 hadron tile calorimeter sectors. Assembled 18 meters away from its final position, the Barrel Calorimeter was relocated with the help of a railway, which allows the ...

  3. Experimental biological effects assessment associated with on-shore brine discharge from the creation of gas storage caverns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintino, Victor; Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Freitas, Rosa; Ré, Ana

    2008-09-01

    Most of the studies on biological and ecological effects associated with brine discharge into the marine environment are related to the operation of desalination plants, for the production of freshwater. In this study we analysed the biological effects of a brine effluent from a completely different source, produced from the lixiviation of rock salt caves, for the creation of natural gas storage caverns. Lethal and sub-lethal endpoints following exposure to the brine were studied in a range of macrofauna species characteristic of the soft and hard bottom habitats in the vicinity of the discharge area, namely the isopod Eurydice pulchra, the annelids Sabellaria alveolata and Ophelia radiata, the sea-urchin Paracentrotus lividus and the bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis. In a first series of experiments, brine, with salinity above 300, was diluted in distilled water to a salinity value close to that of the seawater in the discharge area (salinity 36) and, surprisingly, none of the exposed species was able to survive or develop into viable larvae. A second series of experiments exposed the species to brine diluted with seawater, simulating more realistic discharge circumstances. All the tested species at all the measured endpoints (adult survival, larval abnormal development, sperm fertilization success) showed negative biological effects in brine solutes always at a lower salinity than that of a salinity control obtained with concentrated seawater. The sub-lethal experiments with larval development of P. lividus, S. alveolata and M. galloprovincialis, and the fertilization success of P. lividus gave EC 50 values for the brine solute with salinity in the range of 40.9-43.5, whereas the EC 50 values for the concentrated seawater were in the range of salinity 44.2-49.0. It is hypothesised that differences in the ionic composition of the brine cause the inability of the species to tolerate the exposure to brine.

  4. ATLAS Visitors Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS Visitors Centre has opened its shiny new doors to the public. Officially launched on Monday February 23rd, 2009, the permanent exhibition at Point 1 was conceived as a tour resource for ATLAS guides, and as a way to preserve the public’s opportunity to get a close-up look at the experiment in action when the cavern is sealed.

  5. Cavernous Angioma and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Canoeing – Wear a life vest and helmet Caving Golf Ice-skating or hockey – Wear a helmet Boxing ... emergency. Cavernous malformations may play a role in learning or behavior problems a child might experience. Knowing ...

  6. ATLAS starts moving in

    CERN Multimedia

    Della Mussia, S

    2004-01-01

    The first large active detector component was lowered into the ATLAS cavern on 1st March. It consisted of the 8 modules forming the lower part of the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter. The work of assembling the barrel, which comprises 64 modules, started the following day. Two road trailers each with 64 wheels, positioned side by side. This was the solution chosen to transport the lower part of the central barrel of ATLAS' tile hadronic calorimeter from Building 185 to the PX16 shaft at Point 1 (see Figure 1). The transportation, and then the installation of the component in the experimental cavern, which took place over three days were, to say the least, rather spectacular. On 25 February, the component, consisting of eight 6-metre modules, was loaded on to the trailers. The segment of the barrel was transported on a steel support so that it wouldn't move an inch during the journey. On 26 February, once all the necessary safety checks had been carried out, the convoy was able to leave Buildi...

  7. Supporting ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen feet made of stainless steel will support the barrel ATLAS detector in the cavern at Point 1. In total, the ATLAS feet system will carry approximately 6000 tons, and will give the same inclination to the detector as the LHC accelerator. The installation of the feet is scheduled to finish during January 2004 with an installation precision at the 1 mm level despite their height of 5.3 metres. The manufacture was carried out in Russia (Company Izhorskiye Zavody in St. Petersburg), as part of a Russian and JINR Dubna in-kind contribution to ATLAS. Involved in the installation is a team from IHEP-Protvino (Russia), the ATLAS technical co-ordination team at CERN, and the CERN survey team. In all, about 15 people are involved. After the feet are in place, the barrel toroid magnet and the barrel calorimeters will be installed. This will keep the ATLAS team busy for the entire year 2004.

  8. Last piece of the puzzle for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Clare Ryan

    At around 15.40 on Friday 29th February the ATLAS collaboration cracked open the champagne as the second of the small wheels was lowered into the cavern. Each of ATLAS' small wheels are 9.3 metres in diameter and weigh 100 tonnes including the massive shielding elements. They are the final parts of ATLAS' muon spectrometer. The first piece of ATLAS was installed in 2003 and since then many detector elements have journeyed down the 100 metre shaft into the ATLAS underground cavern. This last piece completes this gigantic puzzle.

  9. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    1999-01-01

    ATLAS Civil Engineering - Point 1 In the film you can see various stages of construction in Point 1: that is the experiment zone for ATLAS experimentation. One part of the video is filmed on the surface of Point 1. Therefore you can get the view of the hall SX 1 and the cranes. Cranes are located close to the ridge of the hall roof. The film gives you the view of the hall that covers the caps and the wells to underground cavern where the experiment will be implemented. The machinery for excavation lifts and cranes as well as the stock areas can also be seen. There are iron mounting and concrete works too

  10. 16 February 2012 - Chinese Taipei Ambassador to Switzerland F. Hsieh in the ATLAS visitor centre, ATLAS experimental area and LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Collaboration Deputy Sookesperson A. Lankford, throughout accompanied by International Relations Adviser R. Voss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    16 February 2012 - Chinese Taipei Ambassador to Switzerland F. Hsieh in the ATLAS visitor centre, ATLAS experimental area and LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Collaboration Deputy Sookesperson A. Lankford, throughout accompanied by International Relations Adviser R. Voss.

  11. 14 December 2011 - Czech Republic Delegation to CERN Council and Finance Committees visiting ATLAS experimental area, LHC tunnel and ATLAS visitor centre with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, accompanied by Physicist R. Leitner and Swiss student A. Lister.

    CERN Multimedia

    Estelle Spirig

    2011-01-01

    14 December 2011 - Czech Republic Delegation to CERN Council and Finance Committees visiting ATLAS experimental area, LHC tunnel and ATLAS visitor centre with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, accompanied by Physicist R. Leitner and Swiss student A. Lister.

  12. Calibration and performance of the tile calorimeter of ATLAS with cosmic ray muons

    OpenAIRE

    Saraiva, João Gentil Mendes, 1972-

    2010-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Física, Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2011 The installation of the ATLAS detector in the experimental cavern, took place from 2005 until 2009. During this period, technicians, engineers and physicists have been intensivelyworking on the preparation of the detector for its main objective: probing the new frontiers of high energy physics with the LHC, the particle collider with the largest center of mass energy (14 TeV nominal) and very high...

  13. Lowering the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN will consist of eight toroid magnets, the first of which was lowered into the cavern in these images on 26 October 2004. The coils are supported on platforms where they will be attached to form a giant torus. The platforms will hold about 300 tonnes of ATLAS' muon chambers and will envelop the inner detectors.

  14. 9th May 2008 - Members of Saudi government visiting ATLAS control room and cavern with Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and Adviser to the Director-General D. Blechschmidt.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    CERN-HI-0804043 05: from left to right 1st row Mrs. Ibtesam Badhrees, ATLAS Collaboration user Mr. Nadhmi Al-Nassr, Interim President, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, KAUST H.E. Dr. Khaled S. Al-Sultan, Rector, King Fahd University for Petroleum and Minerals Mr. Abdallah S. Jum’ah, President and Chief Executive Officer, Saudi Aramco H.E. Dr. Ibrahim A. Al-Assaf, Minister of Finance H.E. Dr. Abdul Rahman Al-Tuwaijri, Chairman of Capital Markets Authority H.E. Dr. Mohammed I. Al-Suwaiyel, President, King Abdul Aziz City for Science & Technology KACST; 2nd row Mr. Salim S. Al-Aydh, Senior Vice President – Engineering & Project Management, Saudi Aramco Mr. Khalid A. Al-Falih, Executive Vice President – Operations, Saudi Aramco Mr. A. Othman, Saudi Aramco Mr. Peter Woicke, Member of the Saudi Aramco Board of Directors Mr. Abdulaziz F. Al-Khayyal, Senior Vice President – Industrial Relations, Saudi Aramco Mr. James W. Kinnear, Retired President & Chief Executive Office...

  15. ATLAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Scientists from Brookhaven have played...

  16. Make way for the ATLAS magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    On 5 and 6 February, the first ATLAS End Cap Toroid magnet was transported to begin a two-month regime of cryogenic testing. The magnet is scheduled to be installed in the cavern the first week of June.

  17. New experimental results in atlas-based brain morphometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, James C.; Fabella, Brian A.; Fernandes, Siddharth E.; Turetsky, Bruce I.; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.

    1999-05-01

    In a previous meeting, we described a computational approach to MRI morphometry, in which a spatial warp mapping a reference or atlas image into anatomic alignment with the subject is first inferred. Shape differences with respect to the atlas are then studied by calculating the pointwise Jacobian determinant for the warp, which provides a measure of the change in differential volume about a point in the reference as it transforms to its corresponding position in the subject. In this paper, the method is used to analyze sex differences in the shape and size of the corpus callosum in an ongoing study of a large population of normal controls. The preliminary results of the current analysis support findings in the literature that have observed the splenium to be larger in females than in males.

  18. Penile cavernous hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmoughit ECHCHAOUI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are benign lesions that occur in any part of the body in newborns or in young patients, they are typically capillary or cavernous. Cavernous hemangioma of the penis is extremely rare; and its etiology is not completely understood. Treatment options (surgical excision, laser therapy or sclerotherapy… are controversial and are required if pain, cosmetic defect and/or bleeding during intercourse.                                                  We report a case of a 26 years old man presented with a five years history of a painless lesion on his penis. Physical examination showed an ovoid, solid, 1 x 2 mm in size on the dorsum of penis (Panel A and two elevated irregular lesions on the ventral side (Panel B. The lesions were compressive, nonpulsatile and bluish-red in color with strawberry like appearance. Biopsy and histopathological examination of the lesion revealed a gaping and communicating vessels proliferated in the superficial and medium dermis which is pathognomonic for cavernous hemangioma (Panel C and D. Given the small size, the large number of the lesions, the young age, and the ulceration risk during intercourse if skin graft after excision, Neodymium: YAG laser coagulation was recommended to get a good cosmetic results and sexual function satisfaction.

  19. The Latest from ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Since November 2008, ATLAS has undertaken detailed maintenance, consolidation and repair work on the detector (see Bulletin of 20 July 2009). Today, the fraction of the detector that is operational has increased compared to last year: less than 1% of dead channels for most of the sub-systems. "We are going to start taking data this year with a detector which is even more efficient than it was last year," agrees ATLAS Spokesperson, Fabiola Gianotti. By mid-September the detector was fully closed again, and the cavern sealed. The magnet system has been operated at nominal current for extensive periods over recent months. Once the cavern was sealed, ATLAS began two weeks of combined running. Right now, subsystems are joining the run incrementally until the point where the whole detector is integrated and running as one. In the words of ATLAS Technical Coordinator, Marzio Nessi: "Now we really start physics." In parallel, the analysis ...

  20. Spring comes for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Butin, F.

    2004-01-01

    (First published in the CERN weekly bulletin 24/2004, 7 June 2004.) A short while ago the ATLAS cavern underwent a spring clean, marking the end of the installation of the detector's support structures and the cavern's general infrastructure. The list of infrastructure to be installed in the ATLAS cavern from September 2003 was long: a thousand tonnes of mechanical structures spread over 13 storeys, two lifts, two 65-tonne overhead travelling cranes 25 metres above cavern floor, with a telescopic boom and cradle to access the remaining 10 metres of the cavern, a ventilation system for the 55 000 cubic metre cavern, a drainage system, a standard sprinkler system and an innovative foam fire-extinguishing system, as well as the external cryogenic system for the superconducting magnets and the liquid argon calorimeters (comprising, amongst other things, two helium refrigeration units, a nitrogen refrigeration unit and 5 km of piping for gaseous or liquid helium and nitrogen), not to mention the handling eq...

  1. Lino Baranao, President of the National Agency for the Promotion of Science and Technology in Argentina, toured the ATLAS experiment's underground cavern during his visit to CERN on 9 May

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2005-01-01

    Picture 01 : Here he is seen with ATLAS spokesperson, Peter Jenni (left), and the ATLAS Muon System project leader, Giora Mikenberg, listening to Karina Loureiro (right), an Argentinian student at the University of Wisconsin

  2. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Barrel and END-CAP Toroids In order to produce a powerful magnetic field to bend the paths of the muons, the ATLAS detector uses an exceptionally large system of air-core toroids arranged outside the calorimeter volumes. The large volume magnetic field has a wide angular coverage and strengths of up to 4.7tesla. The toroids system contains over 100km of superconducting wire and has a design current of 20 500 amperes. (ATLAS brochure: The Technical Challenges)

  3. Atlas of experimentally-induced neoplasia in beagle dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, G.E.; Watson, C.R.

    1996-10-01

    Beagle dogs have been utilized extensively in biomedical research. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has sponsored life-span dose-effect radiation studies in beagles at various laboratories. Because results from studies in the various laboratories were to be compared, all the investigators strove to use similar nomenclature and criteria to describe biological effects. For this reason, pathologists from these laboratories met on five occasions between 1976 and 1977 to discuss nomenclature and histologic criteria for diagnoses. At these meeting, criteria were discussed for histopathologic description of lesions in bone, liver, lung, hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues, mammary gland, pituitary, testis, and thyroid. To provide further assurance of cooperation among the DOE laboratories involved, DOE organized several Task Groups in 1985, composed of staff members from the laboratories. The Task Group on Biological Effects was asked to standardize nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for pathology; this beagle pathology atlas is the result of that request. The atlas describes target organs of particular interest: lungs for radionuclides delivered by inhalation; bones for bone-seeking radionuclides; and hematopoietic and other soft tissues for external irradiation.

  4. Atlas of experimentally-induced neoplasia in beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beagle dogs have been utilized extensively in biomedical research. The US Department of Energy''s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) has sponsored life-span dose-effect radiation studies in beagles at various laboratories. Because results from studies in the various laboratories were to be compared, all the investigators strove to use similar nomenclature and criteria to describe biological effects. For this reason, pathologists from these laboratories met on five occasions between 1976 and 1977 to discuss nomenclature and histologic criteria for diagnoses. At these meeting, criteria were discussed for histopathologic description of lesions in bone, liver, lung, hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues, mammary gland, pituitary, testis, and thyroid. To provide further assurance of cooperation among the DOE laboratories involved, DOE organized several Task Groups in 1985, composed of staff members from the laboratories. The Task Group on Biological Effects was asked to standardize nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for pathology; this beagle pathology atlas is the result of that request. The atlas describes target organs of particular interest: lungs for radionuclides delivered by inhalation; bones for bone-seeking radionuclides; and hematopoietic and other soft tissues for external irradiation

  5. Giant Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Eric; Costic, Joseph; Laub, Glenn

    2015-07-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma in a 71-year-old man. The intracardiac mass was discovered incidentally during surveillance for his prostate cancer; however, the patient initially declined intervention. On presentation to our institution 7 years later, the lesion had enlarged significantly, and the patient consented to excision. At surgery, an 8 × 6.5 × 4.8 cm intracardiac mass located on the inferior heart border was excised with an intact capsule through a median sternotomy approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We discuss the diagnostic workup, treatment, and characteristics of this rare cardiac tumor. PMID:26140782

  6. ATLAS starts moving in

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The first large active detector component was lowered into the ATLAS cavern on 1 March. It consisted of the 8 modules forming the lower part of the central barrel of the tile hadronic calorimeter. The work of assembling the barrel, which comprises 64 modules, started the following day.

  7. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    2000-01-01

    Point 1 -the zone for the ATLAS experiment. The film includes various stages of construction, especially from the pit of UX 15. Underground work includes the excavation work of the cavern, demolishing the central pillars and posing the support bars for the pit. The UX 15 - will shelter the detector itself. The cavern is located about 100 m below the surface and it is 53 m long, 30 m wide and 34.90 m high.

  8. 21 May 2013 - Slovakian State Secretary, Ministry of Health V. Čislák signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 with V. Senaj (Technology Department); in the ALICE experimental cavern with P. Chochula (Physics Department). M. Cirilli (Knowledge Transfer Group) present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    21 May 2013 - Slovakian State Secretary, Ministry of Health V. Čislák signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 with V. Senaj (Technology Department); in the ALICE experimental cavern with P. Chochula (Physics Department). M. Cirilli (Knowledge Transfer Group) present.

  9. 18 February 2013 - Foundation for Polish Science President M. Zylicz signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting the ALICE experimental cavern with K. Safarik and L. Graczykowskind LHC tunnel with Technology Department A. Siemko.

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2013-01-01

    18 February 2013 - Foundation for Polish Science President M. Zylicz signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting the ALICE experimental cavern with K. Safarik and L. Graczykowskind LHC tunnel with Technology Department A. Siemko.

  10. 22 May 2013 - Turkish Minister of Health M. Müezzinoğlu signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer; in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis; in CMS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi. Turkish Scientists S. A. Cetin and B. Demirkoz present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    22 May 2013 - Turkish Minister of Health M. Müezzinoğlu signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer; in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis; in CMS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi. Turkish Scientists S. A. Cetin and B. Demirkoz present.

  11. 24 May 2013 - Rector of the Polish Stanislaw Staszic AGH University of Science and Technology T. Slomka in the LHC tunnel at Point 8 with Senior Polish Staff Member A. Siemko, in LHCb experimental cavern with LHCb Collaboration Spokesperson P. Campana and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Adviser for Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    24 May 2013 - Rector of the Polish Stanislaw Staszic AGH University of Science and Technology T. Slomka in the LHC tunnel at Point 8 with Senior Polish Staff Member A. Siemko, in LHCb experimental cavern with LHCb Collaboration Spokesperson P. Campana and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Adviser for Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka present.

  12. 16 Augur 2013 -Bulgarian Minister of Education and Sciences A. Klisarova visiting the LHC tunnel with S. Russenschuck and CMS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi and V. Genchev ; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Accompanied throughout by P. Hristov, L. Litov, R. Voss and Z. Zaharieva.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    16 Augur 2013 -Bulgarian Minister of Education and Sciences A. Klisarova visiting the LHC tunnel with S. Russenschuck and CMS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi and V. Genchev ; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Accompanied throughout by P. Hristov, L. Litov, R. Voss and Z. Zaharieva.

  13. ATLAS: First rehearsal for the tile calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The dry run assembly of the first barrel of the ATLAS tile hadron calorimeter has been successfully completed. It is now being dismantled again so that it can be lowered into the ATLAS cavern where it will be reassembled in October 2004.

  14. ATLAS-Lowering the first Barrel Toroid coil

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Cranes lowered the first of ATLAS's eight Barrel Toroid coils into the cavern. The part is 25 metres long and the cranes had to hold the 100 tonne coil at a sharp angle while it passed through the 18-metre diameter vertical shaft into the cavern. Then they laid the magnet to a horisontal robust platform. Images from Camera 1

  15. ATLAS-Lowering the first Barrel Toroid coil

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    2004-01-01

    Cranes lowered the first of ATLAS's eight Barrel Toroid coils into the cavern. The part is 25 meters long and the cranes had to hold the 100 tonne coil at a sharp angle while it passed through the 18-meter diameter vertical shaft into the cavern. Then they laid the magnet to a horizontal robust platform. Images from Camera 2

  16. ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Akhnazarov, V; Canepa, A; Bremer, J; Burckhart, H; Cattai, A; Voss, R; Hervas, L; Kaplon, J; Nessi, M; Werner, P; Ten kate, H; Tyrvainen, H; Vandelli, W; Krasznahorkay, A; Gray, H; Alvarez gonzalez, B; Eifert, T F; Rolando, G; Oide, H; Barak, L; Glatzer, J; Backhaus, M; Schaefer, D M; Maciejewski, J P; Milic, A; Jin, S; Von torne, E; Limbach, C; Medinnis, M J; Gregor, I; Levonian, S; Schmitt, S; Waananen, A; Monnier, E; Muanza, S G; Pralavorio, P; Talby, M; Tiouchichine, E; Tocut, V M; Rybkin, G; Wang, S; Lacour, D; Laforge, B; Ocariz, J H; Bertoli, W; Malaescu, B; Sbarra, C; Yamamoto, A; Sasaki, O; Koriki, T; Hara, K; Da silva gomes, A; Carvalho maneira, J; Marcalo da palma, A; Chekulaev, S; Tikhomirov, V; Snesarev, A; Buzykaev, A; Maslennikov, A; Peleganchuk, S; Sukharev, A; Kaplan, B E; Swiatlowski, M J; Nef, P D; Schnoor, U; Oakham, G F; Ueno, R; Orr, R S; Abouzeid, O; Haug, S; Peng, H; Kus, V; Vitek, M; Temming, K K; Dang, N P; Meier, K; Schultz-coulon, H; Geisler, M P; Sander, H; Schaefer, U; Ellinghaus, F; Rieke, S; Nussbaumer, A; Liu, Y; Richter, R; Kortner, S; Fernandez-bosman, M; Ullan comes, M; Espinal curull, J; Chiriotti alvarez, S; Caubet serrabou, M; Valladolid gallego, E; Kaci, M; Carrasco vela, N; Lancon, E C; Besson, N E; Gautard, V; Bracinik, J; Bartsch, V C; Potter, C J; Lester, C G; Moeller, V A; Rosten, J; Crooks, D; Mathieson, K; Houston, S C; Wright, M; Jones, T W; Harris, O B; Byatt, T J; Dobson, E; Hodgson, P; Hodgkinson, M C; Dris, M; Karakostas, K; Ntekas, K; Oren, D; Duchovni, E; Etzion, E; Oren, Y; Ferrer, L M; Testa, M; Doria, A; Merola, L; Sekhniaidze, G; Giordano, R; Ricciardi, S; Milazzo, A; Falciano, S; De pedis, D; Dionisi, C; Veneziano, S; Cardarelli, R; Verzegnassi, C; Soualah, R; Ochi, A; Ohshima, T; Kishiki, S; Linde, F L; Vreeswijk, M; Werneke, P; Muijs, A; Vankov, P H; Jansweijer, P P M; Dale, O; Lund, E; Bruckman de renstrom, P; Dabrowski, W; Adamek, J D; Wolters, H; Micu, L; Pantea, D; Tudorache, V; Mjoernmark, J; Klimek, P J; Ferrari, A; Abdinov, O; Akhoundov, A; Hashimov, R; Shelkov, G; Khubua, J; Ladygin, E; Lazarev, A; Glagolev, V; Dedovich, D; Lykasov, G; Zhemchugov, A; Zolnikov, Y; Ryabenko, M; Sivoklokov, S; Vasilyev, I; Shalimov, A; Lobanov, M; Paramoshkina, E; Mosidze, M; Bingul, A; Nodulman, L J; Guarino, V J; Yoshida, R; Drake, G R; Calafiura, P; Haber, C; Quarrie, D R; Alonso, J R; Anderson, C; Evans, H; Lammers, S W; Baubock, M; Anderson, K; Petti, R; Suhr, C A; Linnemann, J T; Richards, R A; Tollefson, K A; Holzbauer, J L; Stoker, D P; Pier, S; Nelson, A J; Isakov, V; Martin, A J; Adelman, J A; Paganini, M; Gutierrez, P; Snow, J M; Pearson, B L; Cleland, W E; Savinov, V; Wong, W; Goodson, J J; Li, H; Lacey, R A; Gordeev, A; Gordon, H; Lanni, F; Nevski, P; Rescia, S; Kierstead, J A; Liu, Z; Yu, W W H; Bensinger, J; Hashemi, K S; Bogavac, D; Cindro, V; Hoeferkamp, M R; Coelli, S; Iodice, M; Piegaia, R N; Alonso, F; Wahlberg, H P; Barberio, E L; Limosani, A; Rodd, N L; Jennens, D T; Hill, E C; Pospisil, S; Smolek, K; Schaile, D A; Rauscher, F G; Adomeit, S; Mattig, P M; Wahlen, H; Volkmer, F; Calvente lopez, S; Sanchis peris, E J; Pallin, D; Podlyski, F; Says, L; Boumediene, D E; Scott, W; Phillips, P W; Greenall, A; Turner, P; Gwilliam, C B; Kluge, T; Wrona, B; Sellers, G J; Millward, G; Adragna, P; Hartin, A; Alpigiani, C; Piccaro, E; Bret cano, M; Hughes jones, R E; Mercer, D; Oh, A; Chavda, V S; Carminati, L; Cavasinni, V; Fedin, O; Patrichev, S; Ryabov, Y; Nesterov, S; Grebenyuk, O; Sasso, J; Mahmood, H; Polsdofer, E; Dai, T; Ferretti, C; Liu, H; Hegazy, K H; Benjamin, D P; Zobernig, G; Ban, J; Brooijmans, G H; Keener, P; Williams, H H; Le geyt, B C; Hines, E J; Fadeyev, V; Schumm, B A; Law, A T; Kuhl, A D; Neubauer, M S; Shang, R; Gagliardi, G; Calabro, D; Conta, C; Zinna, M; Jones, G; Li, J; Stradling, A R; Hadavand, H K; Mcguigan, P; Chiu, P; Baldelomar, E; Stroynowski, R A; Kehoe, R L; De groot, N; Timmermans, C; Lach-heb, F; Addy, T N; Nakano, I; Moreno lopez, D; Grosse-knetter, J; Tyson, B; Rude, G D; Tafirout, R; Benoit, P; Danielsson, H O; Elsing, M; Fassnacht, P; Froidevaux, D; Ganis, G; Gorini, B; Lasseur, C; Lehmann miotto, G; Kollar, D; Aleksa, M; Sfyrla, A; Duehrssen-debling, K; Fressard-batraneanu, S; Van der ster, D C; Bortolin, C; Schumacher, J; Mentink, M; Geich-gimbel, C; Yau wong, K H; Lafaye, R; Crepe-renaudin, S; Albrand, S; Hoffmann, D; Pangaud, P; Meessen, C; Hrivnac, J; Vernay, E; Perus, A; Henrot versille, S L; Le dortz, O; Derue, F; Piccinini, M; Polini, A; Terada, S; Arai, Y; Ikeno, M; Fujii, H; Nagano, K; Ukegawa, F; Aguilar saavedra, J A; Conde muino, P; Castro, N F; Eremin, V; Kopytine, M; Sulin, V; Tsukerman, I; Korol, A; Nemethy, P; Bartoldus, R; Glatte, A; Chelsky, S; Van nieuwkoop, J; Bellerive, A; Sinervo, J K; Battaglia, A; Barbier, G J; Pohl, M; Rosselet, L; Alexandre, G B; Prokoshin, F; Pezoa rivera, R A; Batkova, L; Kladiva, E; Stastny, J; Kubes, T; Vidlakova, Z; Esch, H; Homann, M; Herten, L G; Zimmermann, S U; Pfeifer, B; Stenzel, H; Andrei, G V; Wessels, M; Buescher, V; Kleinknecht, K; Fiedler, F M; Schroeder, C D; Fernandez, E; Mir martinez, L; Vorwerk, V; Bernabeu verdu, J; Salt, J; Civera navarrete, J V; Bernard, R; Berriaud, C P; Chevalier, L P; Hubbard, R; Schune, P; Nikolopoulos, K; Batley, J R; Brochu, F M; Phillips, A W; Teixeira-dias, P J; Rose, M B D; Buttar, C; Buckley, A G; Nurse, E L; Larner, A B; Boddy, C; Henderson, J; Costanzo, D; Tarem, S; Maccarrone, G; Laurelli, P F; Alviggi, M; Chiaramonte, R; Izzo, V; Palumbo, V; Fraternali, M; Crosetti, G; Marchese, F; Yamaguchi, Y; Hessey, N P; Mechnich, J M; Liebig, W; Kastanas, K A; Sjursen, T B; Zalieckas, J; Cameron, D G; Banka, P; Kowalewska, A B; Dwuznik, M; Mindur, B; Boldea, V; Hedberg, V; Smirnova, O; Sellden, B; Allahverdiyev, T; Gornushkin, Y; Koultchitski, I; Tokmenin, V; Chizhov, M; Gongadze, A; Khramov, E; Sadykov, R; Krasnoslobodtsev, I; Smirnova, L; Kramarenko, V; Minaenko, A; Zenin, O; Beddall, A J; Ozcan, E V; Hou, S; Wang, S; Moyse, E; Willocq, S; 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Mcgarvie, S A; Kilvington, G J; D'auria, S; O'shea, V; Mcglone, H M; Fox, H; Henderson, R; Kartvelishvili, V; Davies, B; Sherwood, P; Fraser, J T; Lancaster, M A; Tseng, J C; Hays, C P; Apolle, R; Dixon, S D; Parker, K A; Gazis, E; Papadopoulou, T; Panagiotopoulou, E; Karastathis, N; Hershenhorn, A D; Milov, A; Groth-jensen, J; Bilokon, H; Miscetti, S; Canale, V; Rebuzzi, D M; Capua, M; Bagnaia, P; De salvo, A; Gentile, S; Safai tehrani, F; Solfaroli camillocci, E; Sasao, N; Tsunada, K; Massaro, G; Magrath, C A; Van kesteren, Z; Beker, M G; Van den wollenberg, W; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Read, A L; Gjelsten, B K; Banas, E A; Turnau, J; Derendarz, D K; Kisielewska, D; Chesneanu, D; Rotaru, M; Maurer, J B; Wong, M L; Lund-jensen, B; Asman, B; Jon-and, K B; Silverstein, S B; Johansen, M; Alexandrov, I; Iatsounenko, I; Krumshteyn, Z; Peshekhonov, V; Rybaltchenko, K; Samoylov, V; Cheplakov, A; Kekelidze, G; Lyablin, M; Teterine, V; Bednyakov, V; Kruchonak, U; Shiyakova, M M; Demichev, M; Denisov, S P; Fenyuk, A; Djobava, T; Salukvadze, G; Cetin, S A; Brau, B P; Pais, P R; Proudfoot, J; Van gemmeren, P; Zhang, Q; Beringer, J A; Ely, R; Leggett, C; Pengg, F X; Barnett, M R; Quick, R E; Williams, S; Gardner jr, R W; Huston, J; Brock, R; Wanotayaroj, C; Unel, G N; Taffard, A C; Frate, M; Baker, K O; Tipton, P L; Hutchison, A; Walsh, B J; Norberg, S R; Su, J; Tsybyshev, D; Caballero bejar, J; Ernst, M U; Wellenstein, H; Vudragovic, D; Vidic, I; Gorelov, I V; Toms, K; Alimonti, G; Petrucci, F; Kolanoski, H; Smith, J; Jeng, G; Watson, I J; Guimaraes ferreira, F; Miranda vieira xavier, F; Araujo pereira, R; Poffenberger, P; Sopko, V; Elmsheuser, J; Wittkowski, J; Glitza, K; Gorfine, G W; Ferrer soria, A; Fuster verdu, J A; Sanchis lozano, A; Reinmuth, G; Busato, E; Haywood, S J; Mcmahon, S J; Qian, W; Villani, E G; Laycock, P J; Poll, A J; Rizvi, E S; Foster, J M; Loebinger, F; Forti, A; Plano, W G; Brown, G J A; Kordas, K; Vegni, G; Ohsugi, T; Iwata, Y; Cherkaoui el moursli, R; Sahin, M; Akyazi, E; Carlsen, A; Kanwal, B; Cochran jr, J H; Aronnax, M V; Lockner, M J; Zhou, B; Levin, D S; Weaverdyck, C J; Grom, G F; Rudge, A; Ebenstein, W L; Jia, B; Yamaoka, J; Jared, R C; Wu, S L; Banerjee, S; Lu, Q; Hughes, E W; Alkire, S P; Degenhardt, J D; Lipeles, E D; Spencer, E N; Savine, A; Cheu, E C; Lampl, W; Veatch, J R; Roberts, K; Atkinson, M J; Odino, G A; Polesello, G; Martin, T; White, A P; Stephens, R; Grinbaum sarkisyan, E; Vartapetian, A; Yu, J; Sosebee, M; Thilagar, P A; Spurlock, B; Bonde, R; Filthaut, F; Klok, P; Hoummada, A; Ouchrif, M; Pellegrini, G; Rafi tatjer, J M; Navarro, G A; Blumenschein, U; Weingarten, J C; Mueller, D; Graber, L; Gao, Y; Bode, A; Capeans garrido, M D M; Carli, T; Wells, P; Beltramello, O; Vuillermet, R; Dudarev, A; Salzburger, A; Torchiani, C I; Serfon, C L G; Sloper, J E; Duperrier, G; Lilova, P T; Knecht, M O; Lassnig, M; Anders, G; Deviveiros, P; Young, C; Sforza, F; Shaochen, C; Lu, F; Wermes, N; Wienemann, P; Schwindt, T; Hansen, P H; Hansen, J B; Pingel, A M; Massol, N; Elles, S L; Hallewell, G D; Rozanov, A; Vacavant, L; Fournier, D A; Poggioli, L; Puzo, P M; Tanaka, R; Escalier, M A; Makovec, N; Rezynkina, K; De cecco, S; Cavalleri, P G; Massa, I; Zoccoli, A; Tanaka, S; Odaka, S; Mitsui, S; Tomasio pina, J A; Santos, H F; Satsounkevitch, I; Harkusha, S; Baranov, S; Nechaeva, P; Kayumov, F; Kazanin, V; Asai, M; Mount, R P; Nelson, T K; Smith, D; Kenney, C J; Malone, C M; Kobel, M; Friedrich, F; Grohs, J P; Jais, W J; O'neil, D C; Warburton, A T; Vincter, M; Mccarthy, T G; Groer, L S; Pham, Q T; Taylor, W J; La marra, D; Perrin, E; Wu, X; Bell, W H; Delitzsch, C M; Feng, C; Zhu, C; Tokar, S; Bruncko, D; Kupco, A; Marcisovsky, M; Jakoubek, T; Bruneliere, R; Aktas, A; Narrias villar, D I; Tapprogge, S; Mattmann, J; Kroha, H; Crespo, J; Korolkov, I; Cavallaro, E; Cabrera urban, S; Mitsou, V; Kozanecki, W; Mansoulie, B; Pabot, Y; Etienvre, A; Bauer, F; Chevallier, F; Bouty, A R; Watkins, P; Watson, A; Faulkner, P J W; Curtis, C J; Murillo quijada, J A; Grout, Z J; Chapman, J D; Cowan, G D; George, S; Boisvert, V; Mcmahon, T R; Doyle, A T; Thompson, S A; Britton, D; Smizanska, M; Campanelli, M; Butterworth, J M; Loken, J; Renton, P; Barr, A J; Issever, C; Short, D; Crispin ortuzar, M; Tovey, D R; French, R; Rozen, Y; Alexander, G; Kreisel, A; Conventi, F; Raulo, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Giagu, S; Luci, C; Nisati, A; Cobal, M; Ishikawa, A; Jinnouchi, O; Bos, K; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J; Van vulpen, I B; Kieft, G; Mora, K D; Olsen, F; Rohne, O M; Pajchel, K; Nilsen, J K; Wosiek, B K; Wozniak, K W; Badescu, E; Jinaru, A; Bohm, C; Johansson, E K; Sjoelin, J B R; Clement, C; Buszello, C P; Huseynova, D; Boyko, I; Popov, B; Poukhov, O; Vinogradov, V; Tsiareshka, P; Skvorodnev, N; Soldatov, A; Chuguev, A; Gushchin, V; Yazici, E; Lutz, M S; Malon, D; Vanyashin, A; Lavrijsen, W; Spieler, H; Biesiada, J L; Bahr, M; Kong, J; Tatarkhanov, M; Ogren, H; Van kooten, R J; Cwetanski, P; Butler, J M; Shank, J T; Chakraborty, D; Ermoline, I; Sinev, N; Whiteson, D O; Corso radu, A; Huang, J; Werth, M P; Kastoryano, M; Meirose da silva costa, B; Namasivayam, H; Hobbs, J D; Schamberger jr, R D; Guo, F; Potekhin, M; Popovic, D; Gorisek, A; Sokhrannyi, G; Hofsajer, I W; Mandelli, L; Ceradini, F; Graziani, E; Giorgi, F; Zur nedden, M E G; Grancagnolo, S; Volpi, M; Nunes hanninger, G; Rados, P K; Milesi, M; Cuthbert, C J; Black, C W; Fink grael, F; Fincke-keeler, M; Keeler, R; Kowalewski, R V; Berghaus, F O; Qi, M; Davidek, T; Tas, P; Jakubek, J; Duckeck, G; Walker, R; Mitterer, C A; Harenberg, T; Sandvoss, S A; Del peso, J; Llorente merino, J; Gonzalez millan, V; Irles quiles, A; Crouau, M; Gris, P L Y; Liauzu, S; Romano saez, S M; Gallop, B J; Jones, T J; Austin, N C; Morris, J; Duerdoth, I; Thompson, R J; Kelly, M P; Leisos, A; Garas, A; Pizio, C; Venda pinto, B A; Kudin, L; Qian, J; Wilson, A W; Mietlicki, D; Long, J D; Sang, Z; Arms, K E; Rahimi, A M; Moss, J J; Oh, S H; Parker, S I; Parsons, J; Cunitz, H; Vanguri, R S; Sadrozinski, H; Lockman, W S; Martinez-mc kinney, G; Goussiou, A; Jones, A; Lie, K; Hasegawa, Y; Olcese, M; Gilewsky, V; Harrison, P F; Janus, M; Spangenberg, M; De, K; Ozturk, N; Pal, A K; Darmora, S; Bullock, D J; Oviawe, O; Derkaoui, J E; Rahal, G; Sircar, A; Frey, A S; Stolte, P; Rosien, N; Zoch, K; Li, L; Schouten, D W; Catinaccio, A; Ciapetti, M; Delruelle, N; Ellis, N; Farthouat, P; Hoecker, A; Klioutchnikova, T; Macina, D; Malyukov, S; Spiwoks, R D; Unal, G P; Vandoni, G; Petersen, B A; Pommes, K; Nairz, A M; Wengler, T; Mladenov, D; Solans sanchez, C A; Lantzsch, K; Schmieden, K; Jakobsen, S; Ritsch, E; Sciuccati, A; Alves dos santos, A M; Ouyang, Q; Zhou, M; Brock, I C; Janssen, J; Katzy, J; Anders, C F; Nilsson, B S; Bazan, A; Di ciaccio, L; Yildizkaya, T; Collot, J; Malek, F; Trocme, B S; Breugnon, P; Godiot, S; Adam bourdarios, C; Coulon, J; Duflot, L; Petroff, P G; Zerwas, D; Lieuvin, M; Calderini, G; Laporte, D; Ocariz, J; Gabrielli, A; Ohska, T K; Kurochkin, Y; Kantserov, V; Vasilyeva, L; Speransky, M; Smirnov, S; Antonov, A; Bulekov, O; Tikhonov, Y; Sargsyan, L; Vardanyan, G; Budick, B; Kocian, M L; Luitz, S; Young, C C; Grenier, P J; Kelsey, M; Black, J E; Kneringer, E; Jussel, P; Horton, A J; Beaudry, J; Chandra, A; Ereditato, A; Topfel, C M; Mathieu, R; Bucci, F; Muenstermann, D; White, R M; He, M; Urban, J; Straka, M; Vrba, V; Schumacher, M; Parzefall, U; Mahboubi, K; Sommer, P O; Koepke, L H; Bethke, S; Moser, H; Wiesmann, M; Walkowiak, W A; Fleck, I J; Martinez-perez, M; Sanchez sanchez, C A; Jorgensen roca, S; Accion garcia, E; Sainz ruiz, C A; Valls ferrer, J A; Amoros vicente, G; Vives torrescasana, R; Ouraou, A; Formica, A; Hassani, S; Watson, M F; Cottin buracchio, G F; Bussey, P J; Saxon, D; Ferrando, J E; Collins-tooth, C L; Hall, D C; Cuhadar donszelmann, T; Dawson, I; Duxfield, R; Argyropoulos, T; Brodet, E; Livneh, R; Shougaev, K; Reinherz, E I; Guttman, N; Beretta, M M; Vilucchi, E; Aloisio, A; Patricelli, S; Caprio, M; Cevenini, F; De vecchi, C; Livan, M; Rimoldi, A; Vercesi, V; Ayad, R; Mastroberardino, A; Ciapetti, G; Luminari, L; Rescigno, M; Santonico, R; Salamon, A; Del papa, C; Kurashige, H; Homma, Y; Tomoto, M; Horii, Y; Sugaya, Y; Hanagaki, K; Bobbink, G; Kluit, P M; Koffeman, E N; Van eijk, B; Lee, H; Eigen, G; Dorholt, O; Strandlie, A; Strzempek, P B; Dita, S; Stoicea, G; Chitan, A; Leven, S S; Moa, T; Brenner, R; Ekelof, T J C; Olshevskiy, A; Roumiantsev, V; Chlachidze, G; Zimine, N; Gusakov, Y; Grigalashvili, N; Mineev, M; Potrap, I; Barashkou, A; Shoukavy, D; Shaykhatdenov, B; Pikelner, A; Gladilin, L; Ammosov, V; Abramov, A; Arik, M; Sahinsoy, M; Uysal, Z; Azizi, K; Hotinli, S C; Zhou, S; Berger, E; Blair, R; Underwood, D G; Einsweiler, K; Garcia-sciveres, M A; Siegrist, J L; Kipnis, I; Dahl, O; Holland, S; Barbaro galtieri, A; Smith, P T; Parua, N; Franklin, M; Mercurio, K M; Tong, B; Pod, E; Cole, S G; Hopkins, W H; Guest, D H; Severini, H; Marsicano, J J; Abbott, B K; Wang, Q; Lissauer, D; Ma, H; Takai, H; Rajagopalan, S; Protopopescu, S D; Snyder, S S; Undrus, A; Popescu, R N; Begel, M A; Blocker, C A; Amelung, C; Mandic, I; Macek, B; Tucker, B H; Citterio, M; Troncon, C; Orestano, D; Taccini, C; Romeo, G L; Dova, M T; Taylor, G N; Gesualdi manhaes, A; Mcpherson, R A; Sobie, R; Taylor, R P; Dolezal, Z; Kodys, P; Slovak, R; Sopko, B; Vacek, V; Sanders, M P; Hertenberger, R; Meineck, C; Becks, K; Kind, P; Sandhoff, M; Cantero garcia, J; De la torre perez, H; Castillo gimenez, V; Ros, E; Hernandez jimenez, Y; Chadelas, R; Santoni, C; Washbrook, A J; O'brien, B J; Wynne, B M; Mehta, A; Vossebeld, J H; Landon, M; Teixeira dias castanheira, M; Cerrito, L; Keates, J R; Fassouliotis, D; Chardalas, M; Manousos, A; Grachev, V; Seliverstov, D; Sedykh, E; Cakir, O; Ciftci, R; Edson, W; Prell, S A; Rosati, M; Stroman, T; Jiang, H; Neal, H A; Li, X; Gan, K K; Smith, D S; Kruse, M C; Ko, B R; Leung fook cheong, A M; Cole, B; Angerami, A R; Greene, Z S; Kroll, J I; Van berg, R P; Forbush, D A; Lubatti, H; Raisher, J; Shupe, M A; Wolin, S; Oshita, H; Gaudio, G; Das, R; Konig, A C; Croft, V A; Harvey, A; Maaroufi, F; Melo, I; Greenwood jr, Z D; Shabalina, E; Mchedlidze, G; Drechsler, E; Rieger, J K; Blackston, M; Colombo, T

    2002-01-01

    % ATLAS \\\\ \\\\ ATLAS is a general-purpose experiment for recording proton-proton collisions at LHC. The ATLAS collaboration consists of 144 participating institutions (June 1998) with more than 1750~physicists and engineers (700 from non-Member States). The detector design has been optimized to cover the largest possible range of LHC physics: searches for Higgs bosons and alternative schemes for the spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism; searches for supersymmetric particles, new gauge bosons, leptoquarks, and quark and lepton compositeness indicating extensions to the Standard Model and new physics beyond it; studies of the origin of CP violation via high-precision measurements of CP-violating B-decays; high-precision measurements of the third quark family such as the top-quark mass and decay properties, rare decays of B-hadrons, spectroscopy of rare B-hadrons, and $ B ^0 _{s} $-mixing. \\\\ \\\\The ATLAS dectector, shown in the Figure includes an inner tracking detector inside a 2~T~solenoid providing an axial...

  17. ATLAS End-cap Part II

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The epic journey of the ATLAS magnets is drawing to an end. On Thursday 12 July, the second end-cap of the ATLAS toroid magnet was lowered into the cavern of the experiment with the same degree of precision as the first (see Bulletin No. 26/2007). This spectacular descent of the 240-tonne component, is one of the last transport to be completed for ATLAS.

  18. ATLAS' major cooling project

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    In 2005, a considerable effort has been put into commissioning the various units of ATLAS' complex cryogenic system. This is in preparation for the imminent cooling of some of the largest components of the detector in their final underground configuration. The liquid helium and nitrogen ATLAS refrigerators in USA 15. Cryogenics plays a vital role in operating massive detectors such as ATLAS. In many ways the liquefied argon, nitrogen and helium are the life-blood of the detector. ATLAS could not function without cryogens that will be constantly pumped via proximity systems to the superconducting magnets and subdetectors. In recent weeks compressors at the surface and underground refrigerators, dewars, pumps, linkages and all manner of other components related to the cryogenic system have been tested and commissioned. Fifty metres underground The helium and nitrogen refrigerators, installed inside the service cavern, are an important part of the ATLAS cryogenic system. Two independent helium refrigerators ...

  19. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    2000-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1 : zone of the ATLAS experiment The film is about the excavation work in the cavern and tunnels of ATLAS experiment in the point 1. You can see people working for iron mounting at the side of the pit where the parts of the detector will be lowered in the future. Partly the film concentrates the USA 15 and the work done there.

  20. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1: zone of the ATLAS experiment 18-10-2000 UX 15 cavern and PX16 15-12-2000 USA 15 - UX 15 concreting the arch 14-02-2001 UX 15 - ancrages, isolation and scaffolding

  1. ATLAS Fact Sheet : To raise awareness of the ATLAS detector and collaboration on the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2010-01-01

    Facts on the Detector, Calorimeters, Muon System, Inner Detector, Pixel Detector, Semiconductor Tracker, Transition Radiation Tracker,, Surface hall, Cavern, Detector, Magnet system, Solenoid, Toroid, Event rates, Physics processes, Supersymmetric particles, Comparing LHC with Cosmic rays, Heavy ion collisions, Trigger and Data Acquisition TDAQ, Computing, the LHC and the ATLAS collaboration. This fact sheet also contains images of ATLAS and the collaboration as well as a short list of videos on ATLAS available for viewing.

  2. The ALICE cavern and solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ALICE experiment, one of the four major experiments of CERN's LHC project, will be housed in the cavern that once contained the L3 experiment at the LEP accelerator. The huge solenoid is the only remaining piece of the L3 experiment and will be used by ALICE.

  3. Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochelle Sweis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia analyzed the clinical and radiographic findings in 12 cases of cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST seen between 2000 and 2013, and conducted a literature search and review of the pooled data.

  4. ATLAS support rails

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    These supports will hold the 7000 tonne ATLAS detector in its cavern at the LHC. The huge toroid will be assembled from eight coils that will house some of the muon chambers. Supported within the toroid will be the inner detector, containing tracking devices, as well as devices to measure the energies of the particles produced in the 14 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC.

  5. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    CAMERA ON TOROID The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. The video is about the slow lowering of the toroid down to the cavern of ATLAS. It is very demanding task. The camera is placed on top of the toroid.

  6. ATLAS- lowering the muon small wheel

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS - the two muon small wheels lowered into the cavern Like briefly separated twin sisters, ATLAS’s small wheels were once again united at the experiment’s surface building at Point 1 on St Valentine’s Day. The lowering of the small wheels into the tunnel will mark the end of the installation of detector components for the experiment. At around 15.40 on Friday 29th February the ATLAS collaboration cracked open the champagne as the second of the small wheels was lowered into the cavern.

  7. Characterization and commissioning of the ATLAS micromegas quadruplet prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Bianco, Michele; The ATLAS collaboration; Iengo, Paolo; Lin, Tai-hua; Schott, Matthias; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Wotschack, Jorg; Zibell, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Micromegas (Micro Mesh Gaseous Detector) chambers have been chosen for the upgrade of the forward muon spectrometer of the ATLAS experiment to provide precision tracking and also to contribute to the trigger. A quadruplet (1m X 0.5m) has been built at the CERN laboratories, it will serve as prototype for the future ATLAS chambers. This detector is realized using resistive-strip technology and decoupling the amplification mesh from the readout structure. The four readout planes host overall 4096 strips with a pitch of 415$\\mu m$. A complete detector characterization carried out with cosmic rays, X-Ray source and dedicated test beam is discussed, characterization is obtained by use of analog front-end chip (APV25). The efforts that lead to the chamber construction and the preparation for the installation in the ATLAS experimental cavern are presented. Finally, an overview of the readout system developed for this prototype, and integration in to the ATLAS Data Acquisition System is provided.

  8. Searching possibilities of a composite structure of quarks from the jet studies in the ATLAS experiment: physical and experimental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents the searching possibilities of a composite structure of quark from the jet studies in the ATLAS experiment. ATLAS is one of the major detectors on the LHC, the next proton-proton collider at CERN. The general physic framework of the quark compositeness is first introduced, the its expected search from the contact terms in the channel 2 → 2 is explained. After a description of the ATLAS apparatus and of the prototype of the hadronic scintillating tiles calorimeter, various experimental properties of the hadron calorimeter with respect to the jet measurement are studied. The effect of the non-linearity of the calorimeter response is particularly discussed, including the light red out with the photomultipliers. The laser monitoring system enables a full control of the gain stability of the photomultipliers and of their non-linearity for large signals. Its design and the measured performance are shown. Finally, by considering both the expected performances of the ATLAS detector and the theoretical uncertainties, it appears that the compositeness scale controlled at the LHC, for quarks, should reach 15 to 20 TeV depending upon the luminosity, from jet measurement up to 3 TeV. (author)

  9. In-vitro effects of PDE5 inhibitor and statin treatment on the contractile responses of experimental MetS rabbit's cavernous smooth muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasin Erden

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hypercholesterolaemia promotes erectile dysfunction through increased superoxide formation and decreased nitric oxide bioactivity in cavernosal tissue. The role of nitric oxide on erectile function is well known. Statins have lipid lowering properties and can modulate endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability. Sildenafil, enhances smooth muscle relaxation in corpus cavernosum. We invastigated in-vitro effects of sildenafil and rosuvastatin on nonadrenergic, non-cholinergic and nitric oxide mediated cavernosal smooth musle relaxation in metabolic syndrome rabbits, since alterations in this pathway are recognised in diabetic and hypercholesterolemic erectile dysfunction. Methods: Ten male rabbits were fed a standart diet as control group, fourty male rabbits were fed a hypercholesterolemic diet for 12 weeks. Hypercholesterolemic group were divided for without treatment, rosuvastatin treatment, sildenafil teratment, and rosuvastatin + sildenafil treatment (N = 10 per groups. Results: Serum levels of cholesterol and glucose were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group (p < 0.05. After theraphy no differences were found among the groups in relaxation responses to sodium nitroprusside. The relaxation responses to carbachol and EFS were significantly reduced in metabolic syndrome group to control group (p < 0.05, but there were no differences between the other groups and control group. There was a significantly lower in-vitro relaxation response in the metabolic syndrome rabbits than in controls and the others (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Both agents improve in-vitro relaxation responses of erectile tissue from metabolic syndrome rabbits to endothelial non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic and nitric oxide. This finding supports to the results of other clinical studies with these drugs.

  10. A 12-year cavern abandonment test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brouard B.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1997-1998, an abandonment test was performed in a 950-m deep, 8000-m3 salt cavern operated by GDF SUEZ at Etrez, France. In this relatively small brine-filled cavern, which had been kept idle for 15 years before the test, thermal equilibrium was reached. A special system was designed to monitor leaks, which proved to be exceedingly small. In these conditions, brine permeation and cavern creep closure are the only factors to play significant roles in pressure evolution. This test strongly suggested that obtaining an equilibrium pressure such that the effects of these two factors were exactly equal would be reached in the long term. Four years later, pressure monitoring in the closed cavern resumed. Pressure evolution during the 2002-2009 period confirmed that cavern brine pressure will remain constant and significantly smaller than geostatic pressure in the long term, precluding any risk of fracturing and brine seepage to the overburden layers.

  11. ATLAS Installation: Building a Modern-day "Ship in a Bottle"

    CERN Multimedia

    Eisenstein, R

    By now, almost everyone connected with the ATLAS project is aware of its tremendously exciting discovery potential for physics. ATLAS is designed both to search for an as-yet-undiscovered piece of the Standard Model - the Higgs boson - as well as to search for indications of possible new physics - such as Supersymmetry - that lie beyond it. It is just this excitement that has propelled more than 2000 physicists, engineers, technical workers and students from all over the world to commit a significant part of their research careers to this massive undertaking. As the sub-detector components of ATLAS continue to arrive regularly here at CERN, the magnitude - and the quality - of that commitment has become very real. Actual objects exist, in building 180 and other places around the CERN site, waiting for installation into the ATLAS cavern, UX15. That installation will begin next April when ATLAS takes delivery of the experimental hall and associated other buildings and underground structures at Point 1. Indeed,...

  12. ATLAS Civil Engineering at Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Views of ATLAS cavern under the construction, many views also from the Pit where all the parts and machines will be lowered in the future. This film includes views that are taken partly from the tunnel side also. Please note that the video is partly in form of seguence pictures on photo style.

  13. Successfully Managing the Experimental Area of a Large Physics Experiment from Civil Engineering to the First Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Butin, F

    2010-01-01

    The role of "Experimental Area Manager" supported by a well organized, charismatic and motivated team is absolutely essential for managing the huge effort needed for a multi-cultural, multi-disciplinary installation of cathedral-size underground caverns housing a billion dollar physics experiment. Between the years 2002 and 2008, we supervised and coordinated the ATLAS work site at LHC, from the end of the civil engineering to the first circulating beams, culminating with 240 workers on the site, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, with activities taking place simultaneously on the surface, in the 60 m shafts and in the 100 m underground experimental cavern. We depict the activities preparation scheme (including tasks ranging from the installation of 280 ton cranes to super-delicate silicon detectors), the work-site organization method, the safety management that was a top priority throughout the whole project, and the opencommunication strategy that required maintaining permanent public visits. The accumulation o...

  14. CAROTID CAVERNOUS FISTULA: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotico - cavernous fistula represent abnormal communication between the carotid circulation and the cavernous sinus. They can be classified as direct or indirect which are separate conditions with different aetiologies. Direct Carotico - cavernous fistulas ( CCFs are often secondary to trauma, and as such the demographics reflect the distribution of head trauma, most commonly seen in the young male patients. Presentation is acute and symptoms develop rapidly. In contrast, indirect CCFs have a predilection for the postmenopausal female patient a nd the onset of symptoms is often insiduous. Other conditions that predispose to increased risk include . Ehlers - Danlos syndrome . Fibromuscular dysplasia .

  15. 10 janvier 2014 - A. Kilani, Ambassadeur Représentant permanent de la Tunisie auprès de l'Office des Nations Unies à Genève et des institutions spécialisées en Suisse visite la caverne de l'expérience ATLAS avec P. Jenni, ancien porte-parole d'ATLAS; visite le tunnel du LHC au Point 1 avec J.M. Jiménez, Chef du Département Technologie et signe le livre d'or avec F. Bordry, Directeur des accélérateurs et de la technologie. P. Fassnacht, Bureau des Relations internationales, Conseiller pour la République tunisienne présent.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude, Gadmer

    2014-01-01

    10 janvier 2014 - A. Kilani, Ambassadeur Représentant permanent de la Tunisie auprès de l'Office des Nations Unies à Genève et des institutions spécialisées en Suisse visite la caverne de l'expérience ATLAS avec P. Jenni, ancien porte-parole d'ATLAS; visite le tunnel du LHC au Point 1 avec J.M. Jiménez, Chef du Département Technologie et signe le livre d'or avec F. Bordry, Directeur des accélérateurs et de la technologie. P. Fassnacht, Bureau des Relations internationales, Conseiller pour la République tunisienne présent.

  16. The Measurement of Spectral Characteristics and Composition of Radiation in ATLAS with MEDIPIX2-USB Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, M.; Greiffenberg, D.; Heijne, E.; Holy, T.; Idárraga, J.; Jakubek, J.; Král, V.; Králík, M.; Lebel, C.; Leroy, C.; Llopart, X.; Lord, G.; Maneuski, D.; Ouellette, O.; Sochor, V.; Prospísil, S.; Suk, M; Tlustos, L.; Vykydal, Z.; Wilhelm, I.

    2008-01-01

    A network of devices to perform real-time measurements of the spectral characteristics and composition of radiation in the ATLAS detector and cavern during its operation is being built. This system of detectors will be a stand alone system fully capable of delivering real-time images of fluxes and spectral composition of different particle species including slow and fast neutrons. The devices are based on MEDIPIX2 pixel silicon detectors that will be operated via active USB cables and USB-Ethernet extenders through an Ethernet network by a PC located in the USA15 ATLAS control room. The installation of 14 devices inside ATLAS (detector and cavern) is in progress.

  17. End of construction of the CMS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    View of the CMS cavern with its impressive dimensions: 53 m long, 27 m wide and 24 m high. The construction of this underground complex has been a spectacular feat of engineering. This second of the new caverns for the LHC experiments is the result of six-and-a-half years of work, and its completion marks the end of the large-scale engineering work for the LHC.

  18. Extraosseous, Epidural Cavernous Hemangioma with Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkal, Birol; Yaldiz, Can; Yaman, Onur; Ozdemır, Nail; Dalbayrak, Sedat

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cavernous malformations are characterized by enlarged vascular structures located in benign neural tissues within the cerebellum and spinal cord of the central nervous system. Cavernous hemangiomas (CHs) account for 5% to 12% of all spinal vascular malformations. Case Report We removed a hemorrhagic thoracic mass in a 40-year-old male patient who presented with progressive neurological deficits. Conclusions We found it appropriate to present this case due to its rarity. PMID:25960818

  19. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Chalupkova, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) is a silicon strip detector and one of the key precision tracking devices in the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC. The SCT is constructed of 4088 silicon detector modules for a total of 6.3 million strips. Each module is designed, constructed and tested to operate as a stand-alone unit, mechanically, electrically, optically and thermally. The modules are mounted into two types of structures: one barrel (4 cylinders) and two end-cap systems (9 disks on each end of the barrel). The SCT silicon micro-strip sensors are processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signals from the strips are processed in the front-end ASICS ABCD3TA, working in the binary readout mode. Data is transferred to the off-detector readout electronics via optical fibers. The completed SCT has been installed inside the ATLAS experimental cavern since 2007 and has been operational since then. Calibration data has been taken regularly and analyzed to determine the noise performance of the ...

  20. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    NAGAI, K; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT) is a silicon strip detector and one of the key precision tracking devices in the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment at CERN LHC. The SCT is constructed of 4088 silicon detector modules for a total of 6.3 million strips. Each module is designed, constructed and tested to operate as a stand-alone unit, mechanically, electrically, optically and thermally. The modules are mounted into two types of structures: one barrel (4 cylinders) and two end-cap systems (9 disks on each end of the barrel). The SCT silicon micro-strip sensors are processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The signals from the strips are processed in the front-end ASICS ABCD3TA, working in the binary readout mode. Data is transferred to the off-detector readout electronics via optical fibres. The completed SCT has been installed inside the ATLAS experimental cavern since 2007 and has been operational since then. Calibration data has been taken regularly and analysed to determine the noise performance of the ...

  1. LS1 Report: Handing in the ATLAS keys

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso, Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    After completing more than 250 work packages concerning the whole detector and experimental site, the ATLAS and CERN teams involved with LS1 operations are now wrapping things up before starting the commissioning phase in preparation for the LHC restart. The giant detector is now more efficient, safer and even greener than ever thanks to the huge amount of work carried out over the past two years.   Cleaning up the ATLAS cavern and detector in preparation for Run 2. Hundreds of people, more than 3000 certified interventions, huge and delicate parts of the detector completely refurbished: the ATLAS detector that will take data during Run 2 is a brand new machine, which will soon be back in the hands of the thousands of scientists who are preparing for the high-energy run of the LHC accelerator. “During LS1, we have upgraded the detector’s basic infrastructure and a few of its sub-detectors,” explains Beniamino Di Girolamo, ATLAS Technical Coordinator. &...

  2. The ATLAS ALFA and AFP detectors - the experimental challenge of measuring forward protons at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Trzebinski, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS (ALFA) and ATLAS Forward Protons (AFP) detectors are introduced. The forward proton trajectories are shown. The similarities and differences between these two detector systems are described. Finally, the physics possible to be done in these forward detectors is discussed. In particular, in case of ALFA the elastic scattering and exclusive di-pion production are described. In case of AFP, the hard diffractive processes like: Single Diffractive Jet, Double Pomeron Exchange Jet, Exclusive Jet and anomalous coupling production are described.

  3. Experimental Results of A1.2 Test for OECD-ATLAS Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Bae, Byoung-Uhn; Park, Yu-Sun; Kim, Jong-Rok; Choi, Nam-Hyun; Choi, Ki-Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In order to meet the international interests in the multiple high-risk design extension conditions (DECs) raised after the Fukushima accident, KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) is operating an OECD/NEA project (hereafter, OECD-ATLAS project) by utilizing a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation). As for a prolonged SBO transient of the OECD-ATLAS project, two tests, named A1.1 and A1.2, were determined to be performed. In particular, passive safety systems are considered as the most promising alternatives to reinforce the safety and reliability of an ultimate heat removal system without any operator actions in the SBO transients. As one of the new safety improvement concepts to mitigate an SBO accident efficiently, a cooling and operational performance of the passive auxiliary feedwater system (PAFS) is investigated in the framework of the OECD-ATLAS project to produce clearer knowledge of the actual phenomena and to provide the best guidelines for accident management. As the second test of the OECD-ATLAS project, the A1.2 test was conducted to simulate a prolonged SBO with asymmetric secondary cooling through the supply of passive auxiliary feedwater only to SG-2. When the collapsed water level of steam generator reached a wide range of 25%, PAFS was actuated. PAFS played a key role in cooling down the primary system by the heat transfer and the natural circulation. With the actuation of PAFS, the fluid temperatures at the core inlet and outlet started to decrease without any excursion of the maximum heater surface temperature in the core. This integral effect test data of A1.2 test can be used to evaluate the prediction capability of existing safety analysis codes and identify any code deficiency for an SBO simulation with an operation of a passive system such as PAFS.

  4. Progress on CMS detector lowering: the YE+2 section arriving in the cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    2006-01-01

    On 12 December, a further section of the detector (YE+2) containing the cathode strip chamber made the 10-hour journey underground. This piece is 16 m high and weighs 880 tonnes. There are now four sections of the detector in the experimental cavern, with a further 11 to follow.

  5. 27 February 2012 - German Secretary General, Volkswagen Foundation, W. Krull signing the guest book with Director for Administration and general infrastructure S. Lettow and International Relations Adviser R. Voss; in the ATLAS visitor centre and ATLAS underground experimental area with Collaboration Member T. Wengler.

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent Egli

    2012-01-01

    27 February 2012 - German Secretary General, Volkswagen Foundation, W. Krull signing the guest book with Director for Administration and general infrastructure S. Lettow and International Relations Adviser R. Voss; in the ATLAS visitor centre and ATLAS underground experimental area with Collaboration Member T. Wengler.

  6. 14 February 2012 - Ambassadors from Algeria, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chad, Tunisia, Permanent Representatives to the United Nations Office at Geneva in the LHC tunnel at Point 1, ATLAS visitor centre, and ATLAS underground experimental area, throughout accompanied by Advisers P. Fassnacht, E. Tsesmelis and R. Voss

    CERN Document Server

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    14 February 2012 - Ambassadors from Algeria, Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chad, Tunisia, Permanent Representatives to the United Nations Office at Geneva in the LHC tunnel at Point 1, ATLAS visitor centre, and ATLAS underground experimental area, throughout accompanied by Advisers P. Fassnacht, E. Tsesmelis and R. Voss

  7. A lymph nodal capillary-cavernous hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellachà, A; Fulcheri, E; Campisi, C

    1999-09-01

    A capillary-cavernous hemangioma in an obturator lymph node was found incidentally in a 64 year-old woman who had undergone unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and lymphadenectomy for an ovarian neoplasm. Vascular tumors of lymph nodes are briefly reviewed including eight previously described nodal capillary-cavernous hemangiomas. The association with other splanchnic hemangiomas is pointed out and the likelihood that the lesion is a hamartoma rather than a true neoplasm is addressed. Despite its rarity, this entity needs to be recognized by lymphologists who image lymph nodes by lymphangiography as well as by lymph nodal pathologists. PMID:10494525

  8. Underground storage of gas in salt caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantin, C.; Leblanc, B.

    1981-01-01

    In areas lacking geologic formations suitable for aquiferous storage, salt caverns can serve as underground storage reservoirs if (1) the salt layers are thick enough (over 500 ft) and deep enough (1650-5000 ft), (2) the average concentration of insolubles is less than about 25%, (3) the layer of insolubles is less than 3 ft thick, (4) the distribution of insolubles is homogeneous enough, and (5) the brine can be discharged at a 10,600-14,000 ft/sup 3//hr flow rate. The development and operation of a typical salt-cavern storage reservoir, including leaching techniques and control equipment are described.

  9. Cavernous haemangioma mimicking as clitoral hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid Nayyar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Haemangioma is the most common benign neoplasm of infantile age. It is most commonly located in head and neck region, trunk and extremities but very rarely it can be located at clitoris. However, it is very important to differentiate clitoral haemangioma from enlargement of the clitoris secondary to androgen excess. Only four cases of clitoromegaly caused by cavernous haemangioma have been reported in the literature so far. Herein, we report our experience with a 10-year-old girl who presented with clitoromegaly and normal hormonal assay that turned out to be clitoral cavernous haemangioma after histopathological examination of the clitoral mass.

  10. ATLAS experiment : From virtual world to real world

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN ATLAS

    2005-01-01

    The film is a combination of three dimensional cad-based animations together with the real film taken with webcams during the construction, lowering and installation of elements belonging to ATLAS Detector. Very nice movie that gives the view of the both planning and real construction of this huge detector complex located in underground cavern in POINT1. This movie is worth to see!

  11. ATLAS Forward Detectors and Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Soni, N

    2010-01-01

    In this communication I describe the ATLAS forward physics program and the detectors, LUCID, ZDC and ALFA that have been designed to meet this experimental challenge. In addition to their primary role in the determination of ATLAS luminosity these detectors - in conjunction with the main ATLAS detector - will be used to study soft QCD and diffractive physics in the initial low luminosity phase of ATLAS running. Finally, I will briefly describe the ATLAS Forward Proton (AFP) project that currently represents the future of the ATLAS forward physics program.

  12. Mechanical stability of a salt cavern submitted to rapid pressure variations: Application to the underground storage of natural gas, compressed air and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salt caverns used for the underground storage of large volumes of natural gas are in high demand given the ever-increasing energy needs. The storage of renewable energy is also envisaged in these salt caverns for example, storage of compressed air and hydrogen mass storage. In both cases, salt caverns are more solicited than before because they are subject to rapid injection and withdrawal rates. These new operating modes raise new mechanical problems, illustrated in particular by sloughing, and falling of overhanging blocks at cavern wall. Indeed, to the purely mechanical stress related to changes in gas pressure variations, repeated dozens of degrees Celsius of temperature variation are superimposed; causes in particular during withdrawal, additional tensile stresses whom may lead to fractures at cavern wall; whose evolution could be dangerous. The mechanical behavior of rock salt is known: it is elasto-viscoplastic, nonlinear and highly thermo sensitive. The existing rock salt constitutive laws and failures and damages criteria have been used to analyze the behavior of caverns under the effects of these new loading. The study deals with the thermo mechanics of rocks and helps to analyze the effects of these new operations modes on the structural stability of salt caverns. The approach was to firstly design and validate a thermodynamic model of the behavior of gas in the cavern. This model was used to analyze blowout in gas salt cavern. Then, with the thermo mechanical coupling, to analyze the effects of rapid withdrawal, rapid injection and daily cycles on the structural stability of caverns. At the experimental level, we sought the optimal conditions to the occurrence and the development of cracks on a pastille and a block of rock salt. The creep behavior of rock salt specimens in triaxial extension also was analyzed. (author)

  13. Imaging diagnosis of dural and direct cavernous carotid fistulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Daniela dos; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Cruz, Antonio Augusto Velasco e; Colli, Benedicto Oscar; Abud, Daniel Giansante, E-mail: danisantos2404@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    2014-07-15

    Arteriovenous fistulae of the cavernous sinus are rare and difficult to diagnose. They are classified into dural cavernous sinus fistulae or direct carotid-cavernous fistulae. Despite the similarity of symptoms between both types, a precise diagnosis is essential since the treatment is specific for each type of fistula. Imaging findings are remarkably similar in both dural cavernous sinus fistulae and carotid-cavernous fistulae, but it is possible to differentiate one type from the other. Amongst the available imaging methods (Doppler ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and digital subtraction angiography), angiography is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. The present essay is aimed at didactically presenting the classification and imaging findings of cavernous sinus arteriovenous fistulae. (author)

  14. Numerical Simulation of Gas Storage Caverns in Qom Region

    CERN Document Server

    Sharifzadeh, Mostafa

    2009-01-01

    The rock mechanical design of gas storage cavern in salt requires the analysis of the stability and the usability of the cavern over the planned operating time period. The design includes the build up of a rock mass model and a numerical model taking into account the geological situation, load condition, geometrical condition, and material parameters. In this paper multiple caverns in salt formation with geological and geomechanical situation in Qom (central part of Iran) was investigated a using creep model. Minimum safe center to center distances (CTCD) of multiple horizontal caverns also were studied. CTCD of caverns interact at less than two times of cavern diameter. With increasing the CTCD to 2.5 times cavern diameters, diminish most interaction.

  15. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    1999-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1 : zone of the ATLAS experiment The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. The film has original working sound.

  16. Tensile effective stresses in hydrocarbon storage caverns

    CERN Document Server

    Djizanne, Hippolyte; Brouard, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    The "no-tensile effective stress" criterion is discussed. It is proven that effective tensile stresses can be generated at a cavern wall after a rapid increase or decrease in pressure. The Etzel K-102 test, performed in Germany more than 20 years ago, is revisited using the notion of effective tensile stresses.

  17. Tensile effective stresses in hydrocarbon storage caverns

    OpenAIRE

    Djizanne, Hippolyte; Berest, Pierre; Brouard, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    International audience The "no-tensile effective stress" criterion is discussed. It is proven that effective tensile stresses can be generated at a cavern wall after a rapid increase or decrease in pressure. The Etzel K-102 test, performed in Germany more than 20 years ago, is revisited using the notion of effective tensile stresses.

  18. Entrevistando a un cavernísofo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Negrete

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Interview with Juan. A. Negrete, annual prize 2014 to the promotion of the philosophy and the culture in Málaga. The award is extended to the network of blogs: Cavernisofía, Cavernética and Cavernisofíasegundaplanta.

  19. Cavernous Hemangioma of the Bony Orbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua Yan; Yu Cai; Zhongyao Wu; Ji Han; Youjian Pang

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To study the clinical features, diagnosis and management of intraosseous cavernous hemangioma of the orbit.Methods: Five cases of intraosseous cavernous hemangioma seen in our hospital from Jan 1, 1986 to Dec 31, 2000 were reviewed.Results: Among all five cases, two were male and three were female. The mean age was 47.6 years old, ranging from 39.0 to 55.0 years. The left orbit was affected in 4 cases and the right one in 1 case. The bony involvement occurred in frontal bone (two cases),zygomatic bone (two cases) and sphenoid bone (one case). A painless, slowly enlarging hard bony mass fixed to the bone with no pulsations was the main clinical sign. The x-ray and CT appearance of intraosseous cavernous hemangioma of the orbit were characteristic and usually diagnostic. The differential diagnosis of it included fibrous dysplasia,eosinophilic granuloma, multiple myeloma and metastatic carcinoma. Treatment is local removal of the bone containing the tumor.Conclusions: Intraosseous cavernous hemangioma is a rare tumor of the orbit and usually has good surgical result.

  20. Experimental Results of A1.1 Test for OECD-ATLAS Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Bae, Byoung-Uhn; Park, Yu-Sun; Kim, Jong-Rok; Choi, Nam-Hyun; Choi, Ki-Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) is operating an OECD/NEA project (hereafter, OECD-ATLAS project) by utilizing a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation). Considering the importance of the SBO scenario and the related accident mitigation measures, a prolonged SBO scenario was selected as the first test subject worthy of investigation in the OECD-ATLAS project as summarized in Table 1. After the Fukushima accident, design extension conditions (DECs) such as an SBO and a total loss of feed water (TLOFW) attracted wide international attention in that such high-risk multiple failure accidents should be revisited from the viewpoint of the reinforcement of the 'defense in depth' concept. In particular, an SBO is one of the most important DECs because a total loss of heat sink can lead to a core melt-down scenario under high pressure without any proper operator action. As for a prolonged SBO transient of the OECD-ATLAS project, two tests, named A1.1 and A1.2, were determined to be performed. In most nuclear power plants (NPPs), a turbine-driven auxiliary feedwater system was designed to remove the decay heat during the early period of an SBO transient. From a conservative point of view, however, it is necessary to investigate the thermal-hydraulic behaviors of the NPP when a turbine-driven auxiliary feedwater supply is not available during the initial period of an SBO transient and moreover a mobile pump-driven auxiliary feedwater supply can only become realized in the later period of the scenario. In particular, asymmetric heat removal characteristic through the supply of auxiliary feedwater only to one steam generator has its own peculiar importance in terms of safety analysis code validation. With an aim of considering these safety importance, in the A1.1 test, a prolonged SBO transient was simulated with two temporal phases: Phase (I) for a conservative SBO transient

  1. 17 May 2013 - Honourable Minister of Communications, Science and Technology of the Kingdom of Lesotho T. Mokhosi visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN International Adviser for Turkey R. Voss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    17 May 2013 - Honourable Minister of Communications, Science and Technology of the Kingdom of Lesotho T. Mokhosi visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN International Adviser for Turkey R. Voss.

  2. Last piece of ATLAS takes the plunge

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On Friday 29 February the second small wheel was lowered 100 metres underground into the ATLAS cavern in front of a captivated audience. Although called the "small wheels" they are small in name only - each wheel is 9.3 metres in diameter and weighs 100 tonnes including the massive shielding elements. This piece completes ATLAS’ muon spectrometer, which has the ability to accurately track particles to the width of a human hair. The first piece of ATLAS was installed in 2003 and, five years later, this small wheel is the final large piece of the detector to take the subterranean voyage to its final resting place.

  3. Alan Alda visits the ATLAS Experiment cavern at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2012-01-01

    Alan Alda, is an American actor, director, screenwriter, and author. A six-time Emmy Award and Golden Globe Award winner, he is best known for his role as Hawkeye Pierce in the TV series M*A*S*H. He is currently a Visiting Professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook School of Journalism and a member of the advisory board of The Center for Communicating Science.[1

  4. Blunt cavernous nerve injury: A new animal model mimicking postradical prostatectomy neurogenic impotence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakiewicz, P I; Bazinet, M; Zvara, P; Begin, L R; Brock, G B

    1996-01-01

    Our goal was to develop an animal model of cavernous nerve injury similar to that encountered among patients having undergone a successful nerve sparing radical prostatectomy and to compare patterns of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase staining to quality of erections using the newly developed model. We studied 50 mature Sprague Dawley rats, which were divided into five equal groups. Animals were either observed (sham), underwent an exploratory laparotomy, underwent moderate or severe percussive injury to both cavernous nerves, or underwent ablation of both cavernous nerves. Between 28 and 30 days later, all animals underwent electrostimulation and simultaneous recording of intracavernosal pressure. After sacrifice, penes were harvested and penile tissue NADPH-diaphorase staining pattern was assessed. Severity of cavernous nerve percussive injury and NADPH-diaphorase staining patterns correlated with the quality of recorded erections. This model is a useful experimental tool for research in the field of erectile dysfunction such as is encountered following a successful nerve sparing radical prostatectomy. Penile biopsy assessing NADPH-diaphorase staining may potentially prove to be a useful minimally-invasive diagnostic modality quantifying neurogenic erectile function among patients following radical prostatectomy. PMID:21224162

  5. Hundreds of fridges to cool the heart of ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The detectors used in the LHC experiments are packed with electronics that will register thousands of particles produced in the collisions. All this hard work will generate a lot of heat, but there are systems in place to help the electronics to cool down, not shut down. Members of the DC section team in USA15 of the ATLAS cavern, standing behind four of the compressors used in the cooling system. The inlet and outlet pipes that carry the refrigerant to the experimental hall can be seen on the left. Left to right: M. Battistin, P. Bonneau, C. Houd, P. Feraudet, F. Corbaz, J. Lethinen, P. Guglielmini, M. Ciclet, P. Tropea, S. Berry (M. Pimenta absent).An unconfirmed member of the DC section :-) in charge of a part of the perfluoropropane distribution network for the ATLAS evaporative cooling system. The next time your desktop computer crashes from overheating, spare a thought for Pierre Feraudet, a member of the Detector Cooling section (TS/CV/DC). He is in charge of constructing the cooling systems for the d...

  6. First Cryogenic Testing of the ATLAS Superconducting Prototype Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Haug, F; Mayri, C; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Pirotte, O; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroids and the barrel toroid made of eight coils (BT) symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. All these magnets will be individually tested in an experimental area prior to their final installation in the underground cavern of the LHC collider. A dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed and built for this purpose. It mainly consists of a 1'200 W at 4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit, a cryostat housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps, a distribution valve box and transfer lines. Prior to the start of the series tests of the BT magnets, two model coils are used at this facility. The first one, the so-called B00 of comparatively small size, contains the three different types of superconductors used for the ATLAS magnets which are wound on a cylindrical mandrel. The second magnet, the B0, is a reduced model of basically identical design concept as the...

  7. Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    To secure a stable supply of petroleum gas, underground storage caverns for liquified petroleum gas (LPG) are commonly used in many countries worldwide. Storing LPG in underground caverns requires that the surrounding rock mass remain saturated with groundwater and that the water pressure be higher than the liquid pressure inside the cavern. In previous studies, gas containment criteria for underground gas storage based on hydraulic gradient and pressure have been discussed, but these s...

  8. Allowable pillar to diameter ratio for strategic petroleum reserve caverns.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2011-05-01

    This report compiles 3-D finite element analyses performed to evaluate the stability of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns over multiple leach cycles. When oil is withdrawn from a cavern in salt using freshwater, the cavern enlarges. As a result, the pillar separating caverns in the SPR fields is reduced over time due to usage of the reserve. The enlarged cavern diameters and smaller pillars reduce underground stability. Advances in geomechanics modeling enable the allowable pillar to diameter ratio (P/D) to be defined. Prior to such modeling capabilities, the allowable P/D was established as 1.78 based on some very limited experience in other cavern fields. While appropriate for 1980, the ratio conservatively limits the allowable number of oil drawdowns and hence limits the overall utility and life of the SPR cavern field. Analyses from all four cavern fields are evaluated along with operating experience gained over the past 30 years to define a new P/D for the reserve. A new ratio of 1.0 is recommended. This ratio is applicable only to existing SPR caverns.

  9. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Nose Complicated with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Swaminath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive life threatening bacterial infection of the skin, the subcutaneous tissue, and the fascia. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the nose complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis. Few cases of septic cavernous sinus thrombosis have been reported to be caused by cellulitis of the face but necrotizing fasciitis of the nose is rare. It is very important to recognize the early signs of cavernous thrombosis. Treatment for septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is controversial but early use of empirical antibiotics is imperative.

  10. Clinical study on CyberKnife for treating giant cavernous hemangioma in cavernous sinus region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu SUN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the efficacy and safety of CyberKnife for giant cavernous hemangioma in cavernous sinus. Methods The data of 7 cases of giant cavernous hemangioma in cavernous sinus region confirmed by imaging examination and treated with CyberKnife were collected. The tumor volume was 11.86-70.12 cm3 (median 23.30 cm3. CT and MRI were acquired and fused by MIM 6.5.4 software. The acquired data sets were imported into a CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System (Multiplan 4.0.2 and used to delineate the target organs at risk. The irradiation doses received by the lesions were 21 Gy/3 times in 5 cases, 25 Gy/5 times in one case and 30 Gy/3 times in one case. The exposure field was 109-155, and target volume reached over 95%. Patients maintained at supine positionduring treatment and utilized a 6D-skull trace mode specific to CyberKnife. Changes of clinical symptoms and imaging immediately after treatment and during follow-up period were observed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this therapeutic method. Results Patients were followed-up for 6-18 months, and the meanfollow-up period was 9.37 months. Volumes of lesions were calculated after operation. All of these patients showed decrease in tumor volume (35.48% to 84.03% and improvement in symptoms (including visual impairment, visual field defect and headaches after therapy. Postoperative MRI revealed the tumor volume was 6.75-28.35 cm3 (median 10.50 cm3, which were significantly lower than that of before treatment [11.86-70.12 cm3 (median 23.30 cm3; Z = -2.366, P = 0.018]. Only one case presented radioactive cerebral edema, and the symptom was disappeared after 5-day treatment with mannitol and dexamethasone. Conclusions CyberKnife is an effective treatment method for giant cavernous hemangioma in cavernous sinus region. It is suggested to be the first selection for patients with giant cavernous hemangioma in cavernous sinus, who are not suitable for traditional surgeries and general

  11. 25th January 2011-Chief Scientist-Ministry of Industry,Trade and Labor-Mr Avi Hasson-Israel visiting the ATLAS Experiment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Photo 1-13:The delegation visiting ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Former Spokesperson Dr P. Jenni Photo 14:P. Jenni+ATLAS Collaboration Weizmann Institute of Sciences Israeli Industrial Liaison Office (ILO) Prof. Giora Mikenberg+Mr A. Hasson+Adviser for Israel Dr John Ellis+Commercial Attaché to Switzerland and Deputy Permanent Representative to the WTO Permanent Mission of Israel Mr Shai Moses Photo 15-22:Signature of the Guest Book with J. Ellis

  12. Clean tracks for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    First cosmic ray tracks in the integrated ATLAS barrel SCT and TRT tracking detectors. A snap-shot of a cosmic ray event seen in the different layers of both the SCT and TRT detectors. The ATLAS Inner Detector Integration Team celebrated a major success recently, when clean tracks of cosmic rays were detected in the completed semiconductor tracker (SCT) and transition radiation tracker (TRT) barrels. These tracking tests come just months after the successful insertion of the SCT into the TRT (See Bulletin 09/2006). The cosmic ray test is important for the experiment because, after 15 years of hard work, it is the last test performed on the fully assembled barrel before lowering it into the ATLAS cavern. The two trackers work together to provide millions of channels so that particles' tracks can be identified and measured with great accuracy. According to the team, the preliminary results were very encouraging. After first checks of noise levels in the final detectors, a critical goal was to study their re...

  13. ATLAS : civil engineering at Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    2002-01-01

    The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video.

  14. Initial design for an experimental investigation of strongly coupled plasma behavior in the ATLAS facility

    CERN Document Server

    Munson, C P; Taylor, A J; Trainor, R J; Wood, B P; Wysocki, F J

    1999-01-01

    Summary form only given. Atlas is a high current (~30 MA peak, with a current risetime ~4.5 mu sec), high energy (E/sub stored/=24 MJ, E /sub load/=3-6 MJ), pulsed power facility which is being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory with a scheduled completion date in the year 2000. When operational, this facility will provide a platform for experiments in high pressure shocks (>20 Mbar), adiabatic compression ( rho / rho /sub 0/>5, P>10 Mbar), high magnetic fields (~2000 T), high strain and strain rates ( epsilon >200, d epsilon /dt~10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 6/ s/sup -1/), hydrodynamic instabilities of materials in turbulent regimes, magnetized target fusion, equation of state, and strongly coupled plasmas. For the strongly coupled plasma experiments, an auxiliary capacitor bank will be used to generate a moderate density (<0.1 solid), relatively cold (~1 eV) plasma by ohmic heating of a conducting material of interest such as titanium. This target plasma will be compressed against a central column conta...

  15. The Effect of Audio Tours on Learning and Social Interaction: An Evaluation at Carlsbad Caverns National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novey, Levi T.; Hall, Troy E.

    2007-01-01

    Auditory forms of nonpersonal communication have rarely been evaluated in informal settings like parks and museums. This study evaluated the effect of an interpretive audio tour on visitor knowledge and social behavior at Carlsbad Caverns National Park. A cross-sectional pretest/posttest quasi-experimental design compared the responses of audio…

  16. ATLAS: civil engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Different phases of the SX 15 realisation to Point 1 : zone of the ATLAS experiment 00:13:43 Realization of the concrete floor 19-10-1998 00:29:26 Putting up the metal rails for the roof 19-10-1998 00:33:42 Road alignment entering to POINT1 and in Bollot wood 27-10-1998 00:41:53 General sight of the buildings in construction Building SX gives the cover for the work at the experiment It is used to shelter the Pit and the work for the underground cavern as well as for covering the ground work with big cranes that allows the lowering of the components belonging to the detector. The hall is also used as a detector part storage and cover during the assembly. It shelters small workshops of mechanics and electronics necessary for the assembly and the maintenance of the ATLAS experiment.

  17. Recovery of opthalmoplegia associated with cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas after transvenous cavernous sinus packing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv Xianli; Jiang Chuhan; Li Youxiang; Yang Xinjian [Beijing Neurosurgical institute, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, 6, Tiantan Xili, Chongwen, Beijing (China); Wu Zhongxue, E-mail: ttyyzjb@sina.co [Beijing Neurosurgical institute, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, 6, Tiantan Xili, Chongwen, Beijing (China)

    2010-08-15

    Background: We report the recovery of ophthalmoplegia in 11 patients with cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula (CSDAVF) after sinus packing at follow-up. Methods: Of 18 patients with CSDAVF treated with transvenous cavernous sinus packing between August 2002 and December 2007 at Beijing Tiantan Hospital, there were 9 patients with initial CNIII or CNVI dysfunction and 2 patients with CNVI dysfunction immediately after cavernous sinus packing selected and reevaluated. Results: Of 11 patients with CNIII or CNVI palsy, recovery was complete in 10. In 1 patient, complete CNVI palsy was unchanged because the CSDAVF was not cured. There were 6 men and 5 women with a mean age of 52.9 years. In 5 patients, CNVI palsy was associated with chemosis, proptosis and pulsatile tinnitus. Timing of treatment after onset of symptoms was from 4 to 35 days in 9 patients. All CSDAVFs were Barrow type D. Mean follow-up after treatment was 17.7 months (range, 2-54 months). Conclusion: CSDAVF-induced CNIII or CNVI palsies can be cured after cavernous sinus packing transvenously in most patients.

  18. Calcified cavernous hemangioma of the ovary: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeon Hee [Dankook Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    Ovarian hemangiomas are very uncommon and most are of the cavernous type. A few reports have described the radiologic findings of this neoplasm, but as far as the author is aware, the literature contains no description of calcified cavernous hemangioma. A case in which this condition involved the ovary is now reported.

  19. Calcified cavernous hemangioma of the ovary: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovarian hemangiomas are very uncommon and most are of the cavernous type. A few reports have described the radiologic findings of this neoplasm, but as far as the author is aware, the literature contains no description of calcified cavernous hemangioma. A case in which this condition involved the ovary is now reported

  20. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carlsbad Caverns National Park. 7.47 Section 7.47 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.47 Carlsbad Caverns National Park....

  1. Design of cavern blasting based on controllable parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shu-li; WANG Shu-ren; ZHU Jian-ming

    2008-01-01

    After a thorough review of some controllable parameters, which included field investigations, cavern dimensions, explosive, rock strength etc., cut, contour, lifters and stoping holes were introduced for blasting cavern of nucleus submarine. These design were conducted using a U. Langefors and B. Kihlstrom theory.

  2. Optical coherence tomography of the rat cavernous nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Chuang, Ying; Burnett, Arthur L.; Su, Li-Ming

    2007-02-01

    Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during radical prostatectomy, which are responsible for erectile function, may improve nerve preservation and postoperative potency. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of real-time, high-resolution, cross-sectional, in vivo tissue imaging. The rat prostate serves as an excellent model for studying the use of OCT for imaging the cavernous nerves, as the rat cavernous nerve is a large, visible, and distinct bundle allowing for easy identification with OCT in addition to histologic confirmation. Imaging was performed with the Niris OCT system and a handheld 8 Fr probe, capable of acquiring real-time images with 11-μm axial and 25-μm lateral resolution in tissue. Open surgical exposure of the prostate was performed on a total of 6 male rats, and OCT images of the prostate, cavernous nerve, pelvic plexus ganglion, seminal vesicle, blood vessels, and periprostatic fat were acquired. Cavernous nerve electrical stimulation with simultaneous intracorporeal pressure measurements was performed to confirm proper identification of the cavernous nerves. The prostate and cavernous nerves were also processed for histologic analysis and further confirmation. Cross-sectional and longitudinal OCT images of the cavernous nerves were acquired and compared with histologic sections. The cavernous nerve and ganglion could be differentiated from the surrounding prostate gland, seminal vesicle, blood vessels, bladder, and fatty tissue. We report preliminary results of OCT images of the rat cavernous nerves with histologic correlation and erectile stimulation measurements, thus providing interpretation of prostate structures as they appear in OCT images.

  3. CAVERNOUS HEMANGIOMA OF THE INTERNAL AUDITORY CANAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Hekmatara

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Cavernous hemangioma is a rare benign tumor of the internal auditory canal (IAC of which fourteen cases have been reported so far."nTinnitus and progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL are the chief complaints of the patients. Audiological and radiological planes, CTScan, and magnetic resonance image (MRI studies are helpful in diagnosis. The only choice of treatment is surgery with elective transmastoid trans¬labyrinthine approach. And if tumor is very large, the method of choice will be retrosigmoid approach.

  4. A tough truck for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    One of the mobile support structures that will be used to manoeuvre and assemble components of the ATLAS detector in its cavern was put through its paces at the end of July and passed its load tests with flying colours. The tests, which involved the surveyors taking measurements to detect any load-induced mechanical deformations, were carried out in Building 191. "The "truck" has been subjected to static tests with loads of up to 1250 tonnes and can carry and transport on air cushions a nominal load of up to 1000 tonnes at a top speed of 30 cm per minute," explains project leader Tommi Nyman. "It took two weeks to assemble the truck's components, the last of which arrived at CERN on 24 June. It then took a further 20 days to load the truck up for the test." The 8.5 metre-high truck will be used for final assembly of some of the ATLAS components, including the calorimeters, in cavern UX15. This powerful device is the result of a collaboration between CERN and the Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear ...

  5. ATLAS Civil Engineering Point 1

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Vialis

    2000-01-01

    Different phases of realisation to Point 1 : zone of the ATLAS experiment The ATLAS experimental area is located in Point 1, just across the main CERN entrance, in the commune of Meyrin. There people are ever so busy to finish the different infrastructures for ATLAS. Real underground video. When passing throw the walls the succeeding can be heard and seen. The film has original working sound.

  6. Strategic petroleum reserve caverns casing damage update 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A.; Neal, J.T. [and others

    1998-01-01

    Hanging casing strings are used for oil and brine transfer in the domal salt storage caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Damage to these casings is of concern because hanging string replacement is costly and because of implications on cavern stability. Although the causes of casing damage are not always well defined, many events leading to damage are assumed to be the result of salt falls impacting the hanging strings. However, in some cases, operational aspects may be suspected. The history of damage to hanging strings is updated in this study to include the most recent events. Potential general domal and local operational and material factors that could influence the tendency for caverns to have salt falls are examined in detail. As a result of this examination, general factors, such as salt dome anomalies and crude type, and most of the operational factors, such as geometry, location and depressurizations, are not believed to be primary causes of casing damage. Further analysis is presented of the accumulation of insolubles during cavern solutioning and accumulation of salt fall material on the cavern floor. Inaccuracies in sump geometry probably make relative cavern insolubles contents uncertain. However, determination of the salt fall accumulations, which are more accurate, suggest that the caverns with the largest salt fall accumulations show the greatest number of hanging string events. There is good correlation between the accumulation rate and the number of events when the event numbers are corrected to an equivalent number for a single hanging string in a quiescent, operating cavern. The principal factor that determines the propensity for a cavern to exhibit this behavior is thought to be the effect of impurity content on the fracture behavior of salt.

  7. 6 June 2008 - Chancellor F. Tomàs Vert, University of Valencia, visiting ATLAS control room and experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    6 June 2008 - Chancellor F. Tomàs Vert, University of Valencia, visiting ATLAS control room and experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni. Other participants: Prof. Francisco José Botella, Director, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, University of València and CSIC Prof. José Peñarrocha, Dean, Faculty of Physics Prof. Antonio Ferrer, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, University of València and CSIC Prof. Antonio Pich, University of València, Member of IFIC (CSIC - Univ. València), Coordinator of CPAN, Spanish National Centre for Particle, Astroparticle and Nuclear Physics.

  8. Mechanical characteristics of the ATLAS B0 model coil

    CERN Document Server

    Foussat, A; Dudarev, A; Mayri, C; Miele, P; Sun, Z; ten Kate, H H J; Volpini, G

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS B0 model coil has been tested at CERN to verify the design parameters of the Barrel Toroid coils (BT). The mechanical behavior of the B0 superconducting coil and its support structure is reported and compared with coil design calculations. The mechanical stresses and structural force levels during cooling down and excitation phases were monitored using strain gauges, position sensors and capacitive force transducers instrumentation. In the ATLAS magnet test facility, a magnetic mirror is used to reproduce the electromagnetic forces present in the BT coils, once these are assembled in toroid in the underground cavern in 2004. (8 refs).

  9. ATLAS Christmas lunch

    CERN Document Server

    Francois Butin; Markus Nordberg

    The end of the year ATLAS pit lunch is now a well established tradition: the 4th edition took place in the most prestigious place at CERN; the "Globe de l'innovation", or simply "the Globe". This end-of-year event is the opportunity to thank all those working so hard at Point 1. The first event took place in December 2003. At that time, there was no Globe yet, and the party took place in SX1 building, at the top of the shafts leading to the ATLAS cavern, with some 100 guests. In December 2004, we had the privilege to be the first to organize a lunch in the Globe with some 200 guests. Since then, many have followed our example! Well, almost: we were requested to refrain from serving "Tartiflette" again in there (a Savoyard specialty, using vast amounts of Reblochon, a smelly cheese...). It was said to have left a poignant odour for following events throughout 2004... Long queues formed for this special event. In December 2005, we were authorized to party in the Globe again (once we promised we would b...

  10. Dural fistulas of the cavernous sinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert-Tranier, F.; Piton, J.; Caille, J.M.; Lemoine, J.J.

    1984-11-01

    Five cases of dural fistulas of the cavernous sinus are reported. The clinical aspect of this lesion is often misleading in the absence of subjective or objective bruits. The diagnosis is made at angiography which should systematically include the internal and external carotid arteries bilaterally. The goal of this study was to elucidate the great variability of the venous drainage and to correlate it with the clinical symptoms and course. The main problem is to know when and how these fistulas should be treated. Vascular ligatures should not be performed. Therapeutic angiography is the treatment of choice, but should be limited to the following indications: poorly tolerated bruits, severe ophthalmic damage (elevated ocular tension, diminished visual acuity, or oculomotor paralysis), angiographically demonstrated massive arteriovenous shunting, and a high degree of cortical venous reflux. Whatever the indication, the course after embolisation is rarely predictable and in particular the risk of extensive venous thrombosis or recurrence is great.

  11. Dural fistulas of the cavernous sinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five cases of dural fistulas of the cavernous sinus are reported. The clinical aspect of this lesion is often misleading in the absence of subjective or objective bruits. The diagnosis is made at angiography which should systematically include the internal and external carotid arteries bilaterally. The goal of this study was to elucidate the great variability of the venous drainage and to correlate it with the clinical symptoms and course. The main problem is to know when and how these fistulas should be treated. Vascular ligatures should not be performed. Therapeutic angiography is the treatment of choice, but should be limited to the following indications: poorly tolerated bruits, severe ophthalmic damage (elevated ocular tension, diminished visual acuity, or oculomotor paralysis), angiographically demonstrated massive arteriovenous shunting, and a high degree of cortical venous reflux. Whatever the indication, the course after embolisation is rarely predictable and in particular the risk of extensive venous thrombosis or recurrence is great. (orig.)

  12. [Cavernous hemangioma confined to the tongue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletti, C

    1988-12-01

    The authors relate on a case of an isolated cavernous haemangioma of the body of the tongue characterized by considerable size. Such neoplasms, usually described within the more extensive chapter of the more common angiomatous lesion of the oral cavity, are relatively rare. The authors describe a personal case discussing the diagnostic spects of such lesion and emphasizing the importance of the arteriography of the carotid artery and the of the selective arteriography of the lingual arteries, especially in considering surgery. Biopsies are not recommended. After discussing the histopathological and clinical aspects of such lesions the Authors emphasize the therapeutic ones. Even though radiotherapy, cryotherapy, laser therapy, medical treatment, injection of sclerosing substances and the selective embolization, of the lingual artery seem to have some efficacy, the authors conclude that surgery in the therapy of choice in the isolated vascular lesions of the body of the tongue. PMID:3274631

  13. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao;

    2015-01-01

    -controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability...... vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy.......Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case...

  14. Underground caverns. a developing storage method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-15

    A report on papers given at the Rockstore 80 conference held recently in Stockholm covers the obstacles to subsurface storage of oil encountered in South and Central Europe, the US, and the Far East, where the geophysical conditions are not as favorable for the construction of underground structures as in Finland, Norway, and Sweden; the economic and environmental advantages of underground over aboveground storage; the technical problems involved in the creation of Gaz de France's pressure relief-operated gas storages in salt cavities, as well as in aquiferous beds, and the efforts of the company's subsidiary, Sofregaz, to solve these problems; and the design of a storage facility at Mesilat Zion, 20 km west of Jerusalem, which is now under construction for storing 7500 tons of LPG in lined caverns above the water table.

  15. THE DIAGNOSIS OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR SPINAL CAVERNOUS ANGIOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To assess the characteristics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for spinal cavernous angiomas.Methods The examinations of plain scan and contrast enhanced scan of magnetic resonance (MR) were performed in three patients with spinal cavernous angiomas.Results The focus of two cases was located in thorax segment of the spinal cord and one in lower cervical segment.All focuses were single and the shape of spinal cord was normal or slightly thick. MRI characteristic of spinal cavernous angiomas was just like popcorn or mulberry with a jumbled gobbet signal. Low and short T2 signal appeared around the focus. In all cases, there were no obvious contrast enhanced signal in 2 cases and one case with moderate contrast enhanced signal. The diameter of hemorrhage was smaller than that of the spinal cord.Conclusion MRI has higher sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of spinal cavernous angioma.

  16. Pedunculated cavernous hemangioma originating in the olfactory cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kaiming; Zhang, Weitian; Shi, Haibo; Yin, Shankai

    2014-09-01

    Sinonasal cavernous hemangioma is a rare condition that usually affects the lateral wall of the nasal cavity. We report the case of a 77-year-old man who presented with severe epistaxis, nasal congestion, and olfactory dysfunction. Endoscopic examination of the nasal cavity revealed the presence of a red-blue tumor that had almost completely filled the nasopharynx. Preoperatively, it was difficult to distinguish this lesion from a juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma. During endoscopic surgery, the tumor was found to originate in the left olfactory cleft, and it had a long peduncle that contained blood vessels. Postoperative histopathologic examination indicated that the mass was a cavernous hemangioma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of an olfactory cleft cavernous hemangioma and the first case of olfactory cleft disease associated with a cavernous hemangioma to be reported in the English-language literature. PMID:25255356

  17. 2nd February 2011-Vice-Chancellor of Jammu University-Prof. Varun Sahni-India visiting ALICE cavern and LHC Tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    Sylvain Chapeland

    2011-01-01

    Photo 1-2,4-8:The delegation visiting the ATLAS cavern Photo 3:ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino+ALICE Collaboration University of Jammu S. Mahajan+ALICE Collaboration University of Jammu A. Bhasin+ALICE Collaboration Universita degli Studi di Torino R. Bala+V. Sahni+Adviser for India R.Voss+S. Arriaga+ALICE Collaboration University of Jammu A. Gupta Photo 9-13:The delegation visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2 Photo 14-22: Signature of the Guest Book with R. Voss

  18. ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered

  19. Interactive evolution concept for analyzing a rock salt cavern under cyclic thermo-mechanical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Diethard; Mahmoudi, Elham; Khaledi, Kavan; von Blumenthal, Achim; Schanz, Tom

    2016-04-01

    The excess electricity produced by renewable energy sources available during off-peak periods of consumption can be used e.g. to produce and compress hydrogen or to compress air. Afterwards the pressurized gas is stored in the rock salt cavities. During this process, thermo-mechanical cyclic loading is applied to the rock salt surrounding the cavern. Compared to the operation of conventional storage caverns in rock salt the frequencies of filling and discharging cycles and therefore the thermo-mechanical loading cycles are much higher, e.g. daily or weekly compared to seasonally or yearly. The stress strain behavior of rock salt as well as the deformation behavior and the stability of caverns in rock salt under such loading conditions are unknown. To overcome this, existing experimental studies have to be supplemented by exploring the behavior of rock salt under combined thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. Existing constitutive relations have to be extended to cover degradation of rock salt under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. At least the complex system of a cavern in rock salt under these loading conditions has to be analyzed by numerical modeling taking into account the uncertainties due to limited access in large depth to investigate material composition and properties. An interactive evolution concept is presented to link the different components of such a study - experimental modeling, constitutive modeling and numerical modeling. A triaxial experimental setup is designed to characterize the cyclic thermo-mechanical behavior of rock salt. The imposed boundary conditions in the experimental setup are assumed to be similar to the stress state obtained from a full-scale numerical simulation. The computational model relies primarily on the governing constitutive model for predicting the behavior of rock salt cavity. Hence, a sophisticated elasto-viscoplastic creep constitutive model is developed to take into account the dilatancy and damage progress, as well as

  20. 30 January 2012 - Danish National Research Foundation Chairman of board K. Bock and University of Copenhagen Rector R. Hemmingsen visiting ATLAS underground experimental area, CERN Control Centre and ALICE underground experimental area, throughout accompanied by J. Dines Hansen and B. Svane Nielsen; signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    30 January 2012 - Danish National Research Foundation Chairman of board K. Bock and University of Copenhagen Rector R. Hemmingsen visiting ATLAS underground experimental area, CERN Control Centre and ALICE underground experimental area, throughout accompanied by J. Dines Hansen and B. Svane Nielsen; signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  1. Features of Bayou Choctaw SPR caverns and internal structure of the salt dome.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, Darrell E.

    2007-07-01

    The intent of this study is to examine the internal structure of the Bayou Choctaw salt dome utilizing the information obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data of the internal cavern surfaces. Many of the Bayou Choctaw caverns have been abandoned. Some existing caverns were purchased by the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program and have rather convoluted histories and complex cavern geometries. In fact, these caverns are typically poorly documented and are not particularly constructive to this study. Only two Bayou Choctaw caverns, 101 and 102, which were constructed using well-controlled solutioning methods, are well documented. One of these was constructed by the SPR for their use while the other was constructed and traded for another existing cavern. Consequently, compared to the SPR caverns of the West Hackberry and Big Hill domes, it is more difficult to obtain a general impression of the stratigraphy of the dome. Indeed, caverns of Bayou Choctaw show features significantly different than those encountered in the other two SPR facilities. In the number of abandoned caverns, and some of those existing caverns purchased by the SPR, extremely irregular solutioning has occurred. The two SPR constructed caverns suggest that some sections of the caverns may have undergone very regular solutioning to form uniform cylindrical shapes. Although it is not usually productive to speculate, some suggestions that point to the behavior of the Bayou Choctaw dome are examined. Also the primary differences in the Bayou Choctaw dome and the other SPR domes are noted.

  2. Evidence for remotely triggered microearthquakes during salt cavern collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Philippe; Rohmer, Jérémy

    2016-04-01

    Microseismicity is a good indicator of spatio-temporal evolution of physical properties of rocks prior to catastrophic events like volcanic eruptions or landslides and may be triggered by a number of causes including dynamic characteristics of processes in play or/and external forces. We show evidence of triggered microseismicity observed in the vicinity of an underground salt cavern prone to collapse by a remote M ˜ 7.2 earthquake, which occurred ˜12 000 km away. High-dynamic range broad-band records reveal the strong time-correlation between a dramatic change in the rate of local high-frequency microseismicity and the passage of low-frequency seismic waves, including body, Love and Rayleigh surface waves. Pressure was lowered in the cavern by pumping operations of brine out of the cavern. We demonstrate the near critical state of the cavern before the collapse by means of 2-D axisymmetric elastic finite-element simulations. On this basis, we show that the increment of stress necessary for the failure of the Dolomite layer, which ensures the stability of the whole system, is of the same order of magnitude as the maximum dynamic stress magnitude observed during the passage of the earthquakes waves. This suggests that the stress oscillations due to the seismic waves correlated with the recorded microearthquakes induced damage of the overburden, which eventually led to the collapse of the salt cavern. We show that the contribution of Rayleigh waves is the most efficient to trigger microseismicity at periods close to the natural fundamental frequency of the cavern system found at about 10-20 s by investigating the impulse response of the cavern + overburden + brine system.

  3. Lunar Holes and Their Associating Subsurface Caverns: From SELENE (Kaguya) to UZUME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, J.; Kawano, I.; Nishibori, T.; Iwata, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Shimada, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Hasenaka, T.; Morota, T.; Nishino, M. N.; Hashizume, K.; Shirao, M.; Komatsu, G.; Hasebe, N.; Shimizu, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Yokobori, S.; Miyake, Y.; Michikawa, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Shinoda, R.

    2016-05-01

    We present a summary of lunar holes and associated caverns. Furthermore, we also introduce the project Unprecedented Zipangu Underworld of the Moon/Mars Exploration (UZUME) to explore the holes and caverns.

  4. Hemiparesis in carotid cavernous fistulas (CCFs):a case report and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧晓; 白如林; 黄承光; 卢亦成; 张光霁

    2004-01-01

    @@ Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are abnormal arteriovenous anastamoses between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. These fistulas may be classified by cause (spontaneous or traumatic), flow velocity (high or low ), or pathogenesis (direct or indirect).

  5. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao; Girard, Romuald; Shenkar, Robert; Guo, Xiaodong; Shah, Akash; Larsson, Henrik B W; Tan, Huan; Li, Luying; Wishnoff, Matthew S; Shi, Changbin; Christoforidis, Gregory A; Awad, Issam A

    2015-10-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive familial CCM disease had greater WMF permeability compared to those with milder disease phenotype, but similar lesion permeability. Subjects receiving statin medications for routine cardiovascular indications had a trend of lower WMF, but not lesion, permeability. This is the first demonstration of brain vascular hyperpermeability in humans with an autosomal dominant disease, as predicted mechanistically. Brain permeability, more than lesion permeability, may serve as a biomarker of CCM disease activity, and help calibrate potential drug therapy.

  6. Underground hydrogen storage. Final report. [Salt caverns, excavated caverns, aquifers and depleted fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foh, S.; Novil, M.; Rockar, E.; Randolph, P.

    1979-12-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of storing hydrogen in underground storage reservoirs is evaluated. The past and present technology of storing gases, primarily natural gas is reviewed. Four types of reservoirs are examined: salt caverns, excavated caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields. A technical investigation of hydrogen properties reveals that only hydrogen embrittlement places a limit on the underground storage by hydrogen. This constraint will limit reservoir pressures to 1200 psi or less. A model was developed to determine economic feasibility. After making reasonable assumptions that a utility might make in determining whether to proceed with a new storage operation, the model was tested and verified on natural gas storage. A parameteric analysis was made on some of the input parameters of the model to determine the sensitivity of the cost of service to them. Once the model was verified it was used to compute the cost of service of storing hydrogen in the four reservoir types. The costs of service for hydrogen storage ranged from 26 to 150% of the cost of the gas stored. The study concludes that it is now both safe and economic to store hydrogen in underground reservoirs.

  7. Bedded salt in Ontario : geology, solution mining and cavern storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, T. [Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, London, ON (Canada). Petroleum Resources Centre

    2009-07-01

    This presentation discussed bedded salt geology in Ontario in relation to cavern storage and solution mining. Ontario's salt basin forms part of the Michigan basin. The salt formed as reefs surrounding the shallow basin restricted the flow of water. Salt then formed as the water evaporated. The bedded salt occurs in several layers underlying up to 16,000 km{sup 2} in the province. Subsurface resources used in the area include salt cavern hydrocarbon storage; oil and gas reservoirs; and natural gas reservoir storage. The Salina Group stratigraphy is comprised of several separate salt beds with a maximum combined thickness of 90 m. The Salina salt beds exhibit evidence of dissolution after deposition. There are currently 20 active solution mining wells in operation in the Windsor and Goderich regions. There are currently 112 wells and 70 caverns used for cavern storage in Ontario that are used to store approximately 27 million bbl of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and oil. Non-salt layers in the salt beds can interfere with both solution mining and cavern storage operations. tabs., figs.

  8. Endoscopic transsphenoidal approach to pituitary adenomas invading the cavernous sinus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Yu-xin; QU Qiu-yi; WANG Zhen-lin; ZHANG Qiu-hang

    2010-01-01

    Background Surgery of pituitary adenomas invading cavernous sinus has always been thought as a challenge due to the complex anatomical structures and high risk of complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate endoscopic trarssphenoidal approach to pituitary adenomas invading cavernous sinus.Methods The clinical data of 22 patients who admitted to Xuanwu Hospital with pituitary adenomas invading cavernous sinus were analyzed retrospectively. All patients underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery. To expose the surgical field sufficiently, the opening of sellar floor was exceeded the bone overlying the invaded cavernous sinus, and synthetic dura was used to repair and strengthen the sella floor for preventing the leak of cerebrospinal fluid.Results Among 22 patients, total resection was achieved in 14, subtotal resection in 5, and partial resection in 3; no patient underwent insufficient resection. Visual symptoms improved in 7 of 9 patients. In one patient diplopia disappeared.Headache was relieved to various extents in all patients. No serious complications were found. Patient's hospital stay ranged from 7 to 20 days.Conclusion These data suggest that the endoscopic transsphenoid approach is a safe, minimally invasive, and efficient surgical technique, which might be an important therapeutic strategy for the pituitary adenoms invading cavernous sinus.

  9. Cavernous angioma of the optic chiasm--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Y; Yamanaka, K; Nakajima, H; Miyaura, T

    1999-08-01

    A 31-year-old female presented with cavernous angioma originating from the optic chiasm manifesting as sudden onset of right retroorbital pain and right visual disturbance. She had a psychomotor seizure 10 years ago. Cavernous angioma at the right basal ganglia had been partially removed at that time. After the operation, the patient had left hemiparesis, but gradually improved. Neurological examination revealed decreased right visual acuity, left homonymous hemianopsia, and left hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mixed signal intensity mass at the right optic nerve to the optic chiasm with a low signal intensity rim on T2-weighted imaging, situated at the right basal ganglia where the cavernous angioma had been partially resected. Right frontotemporal craniotomy was performed by the pterional approach. A subpial hematoma was situated at the right optic nerve to the optic chiasm. The hematoma with an angiomatous component was completely resected from the surrounding structure. Histological examination of the specimens confirmed cavernous angioma. Postoperatively, her right visual acuity was slightly improved, but the visual field defect was unchanged. We emphasize the importance of correct diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent resection for preserving and improving the visual function of patients with cavernous angiomas of the optic chiasm. PMID:10487042

  10. Endovascular embolization for the treatment of carotid cavernous fistula: recent progresses in research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carotid cavernous fistula is the abnormal arteriovenous communications, which can be located within the internal carotid cavernous segment itself, or between the cavernous and the internal carotid branches or external carotid meningeal branches. With the development of interventional neuroradiology, endovascular embolization has become the choice of treatment for the carotid cavernous fistula, as the technique is less invasive, simple and reliable. This paper aims to review the recent progresses in this respect in order to further improve its clinical diagnosis and treatment. (authors)

  11. Surrounding rock mass stability monitoring of underground caverns in a geomechanical model test using FBG sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Zhu, Weishen; Zheng, Wenhua; He, Jianping

    2009-07-01

    Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG) sensor is widely accepted as a structural stability device for all kinds of geomaterials by either embedding into or bonding onto the structures. The physical model in geotechnical engineering, which can accurately simulate the construction processes and the effects on the stability of underground caverns on basis of satisfying the similarity principles, is an actual physical entity. Due to a large number of restrained factors, a series of experiments are difficult to be carried out, in particular for how to obtain physical parameters during the experiments. Using the geo-mechanical model test of underground caverns in Shuangjiangkou Hydropower Station as a research object, the FBG sensors were mainly focused on and adopted to figure out the problem how to achieve the small displacements in the large-scale model test. The final experimental results show that the FBG sensor has higher measuring accuracy than other conventional sensors like strain gages and mini-extensometers. The experimental results agree well with the numerical simulation results. In the process of building the model, it's successful to embed the FBG sensors in the physical model through making a reserved pore and adding some special glue. In conclusion, FBG sensors can effectively measure the small displacement of monitoring points in the whole process of the geomechanical model test. The experimental results reveal the deformation and failure characteristics of the surrounding rock mass and make some guidance for the in-situ engineering construction.

  12. [Trigeminal-cavernous fistula. Report of a case and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Franco, Jorge; Sánchez Olivera, Carlos; Saavedra Andrade, Rafael; Sandoval Balanzario, Miguel Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Persistent primitive trigeminal artery is a rare anatomical variant resulting from the absence of obliteration of the embryonic trigeminal artery. The shunt between the persistent primitive trigeminal artery and the cavernous sinus is called trigeminal-cavernous fistula. We report the case of a woman with a trigeminal-cavernous fistula secondary to head trauma who was treated by transarterial embolization. PMID:24108341

  13. The big wheels of ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS cavern is filling up at an impressive rate. The installation of the first of the big wheels of the muon spectrometer, a thin gap chamber (TGC) wheel, was completed in September. The muon spectrometer will include four big moving wheels at each end, each measuring 25 metres in diameter. Of the eight wheels in total, six will be composed of thin gap chambers for the muon trigger system and the other two will consist of monitored drift tubes (MDTs) to measure the position of the muons (see Bulletin No. 13/2006). The installation of the 688 muon chambers in the barrel is progressing well, with three-quarters of them already installed between the coils of the toroid magnet.

  14. 28 August 2013 - Director of Technical Quality Management Head of ESTEC Establishment European Space Agency F. Ongaro visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Technology Department J.-P. Tock; visiting the ATLAS experimental area with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Accompanied throughout by F. Bordry and V. Parma.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    28 August 2013 - Director of Technical Quality Management Head of ESTEC Establishment European Space Agency F. Ongaro visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Technology Department J.-P. Tock; visiting the ATLAS experimental area with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Accompanied throughout by F. Bordry and V. Parma.

  15. Case history: blowout at an LPG storage cavern in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamberger, Ulrika

    1991-01-01

    A ''blowout'' occurred when an additional well was drilled to secure sufficient water pressure at an underground LPG storage cavern in September 1989. The leak was stopped after 12 hours. By grouting through the drill rod, it was possible to fill up the cavity around the drill bit. It was then possible to grout the hole up to ground level. The 48,000 m{sup 3}-capacity underground storage, which is located in Karlshamn on the south coast of Sweden, has been in operation since April 1990. Storage is accomplished under hydrostatic water conditions. The storage cavern is placed at such a depth so as to guarantee a sufficient groundwater pressure above the whole storage. A ''curtain'' of drill holes, which efficiently spread the groundwater, is placed above the cavern. The groundwater was carefully observed in wells during the excavation period and these observations continue. (author).

  16. Giant hepatic cavernous hemangioma. Findings on computed helical tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To describe computed helical tomography characteristics of the giant hepatic cavernous hemangioma. Method: During five years, we evaluated 21 patients with 21 giant hepatic cavernous hemangiomas with computed helical and multislice tomography. We included 18 women (86%) and 3 men (14%) with a mean age of 45 years. Results: The mean size of hemangiomas was 10.4 cm. Non enhanced computed tomography Showed 21 hemangiomas with lower density than adjacent hepatic parenchyma , all hemangiomas showed a central cleft area with low density. None hemangioma showed calcifications neither internal septa. In enhanced helical tomography all lesions demonstrated a globular, peripheral enhancing pattern with centripetal filling that begin in the arterial phase and continued in portal and delayed phases. None of the lesions showed complete filling. Conclusion: giant hepatic cavernous hemangiomas showed low attenuation in non enhanced computed tomography. central cleft area was very frequently seen. The enhancement pattern is characteristic, starting at the periphery with centripetal filling but it was never complete.

  17. Radiological features of childhood giant cavernous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozgen, Burce; Senocak, Efsun; Oguz, Kader K. [Hacettepe University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Soylemezoglu, Figen [Hacettepe University, Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Akalan, Nejat [Hacettepe University, Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-04-15

    Giant cavernous malformations (GCM) are very large, low-flow vascular malformations, which usually have atypical imaging features and are commonly misdiagnosed preoperatively as neoplasms or vascular malformations. These lesions have mostly been reported in children. As cavernomas show different features in children compared to adults, we evaluated the imaging features of pediatric GCMs in order to help in the preoperative diagnosis of these malformations. Brain MR studies of nine children (mean age of 4 years; 8 months-9 years) with biopsy-proven GCM were retrospectively evaluated. We defined GCMs as cavernomas of {>=}4 cm. Lesions were evaluated regarding their size, location, signal characteristics, general appearance (uni/multilocular) as well as regarding the presence of mass effect, edema, and fluid-fluid levels and were classified according to the Mottolese classification of pediatric cavernomas. Lesion locations were parietal (n = 5), frontal (n = 2), temporal, and intraventricular. Seven lesions were in the periventricular region (with five in the periatrial region). Six patients had T1 hyperintense multilobulated lesions with ''bubbles of blood'' appearance and three patients had heterogeneous lesions with reticular core. All lesions had mass effect, edema (marked in four cases), and peripheral hemosiderin rim. Fluid-fluid levels were also common (n = 7). Most of our lesions (six of nine) were classified as type IIIA, two as type IIIC, and one as type IA. In children, a GCM should be considered in case of very large hemorrhagic intra-axial mass with ''bubbles of blood'' multicystic appearance, surrounding hemosiderin ring, fluid-fluid levels, and accompanying edema-mass effect, especially in the periatrial location. (orig.)

  18. Heuber Maneuver in Evaluation of Direct Carotid-Cavernous Fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Rengarajan; Mehta, Neeraj; Saran, Sonal; Khera, Pushpinder S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Carotid-cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid system and the cavernous sinus. Elevated venous pressure produces congestion in the orbit with resultant transudation of fluid and increased intraocular pressure, thereby leading to secondary glaucoma which may result in visual loss. Immediate treatment is hence, warranted in these cases. The planning of endovascular management is dependent on many parameters, the most important of which are the size and location of the fistula. Since these are high-flow fistulas, assessment requires certain manoeuvers. Heuber manoeuver is one of the manoeuvers used to demonstrate the size of the fistula.

  19. CAVERNOUS HAEMANGIOMA WITH RETIFORM HAEMANGIOENDOTHELIOMA - A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamina

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION : Retiform hemangioendothelioma is a rare variant of lo w - grade angiosarcoma with an indolent clinical behaviour, with predilection for young adults. Mostly is seen in the extremities, especially the distal lower limbs. CASE REPORT: An eighty year old lady, presented with complaints of a solitary, well defined swelling below the nape of the neck since two years. The swelling was clinically diagnosed as cavernous haemangioma. However the colour of the lesion s was looking like a melanocytic naevus. Excision was done under local anaesthesia and was sent for histopa tho lo gical examination. Histopathological diagnosis was confirmed as “Cavernous haemangioma with Retiform Haemangioendothelioma”

  20. [Ovarian torsion revealing an ovarian cavernous hemangioma in a child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'pemba Loufoua-Lemay, A-B; Peko, J-F; Mbongo, J-A; Mokoko, J-C; Nzingoula, S

    2003-11-01

    The authors report one case of cavernous hemangioma of the left ovary, which was revealed by ovarian torsion. Such benign tumors of the blood vessels are rare in ovaries during childhood. This hemangioma was observed in a 13-year-old patient, who presented with abdominal and pelvic pain and vomiting. The pelvic mass was noted and sonography revealed a cystic tumor. An annexectomia was realized. Histology showed narcotized ovary cells, with an increased number of vascular channels composed of thin walled vessels, whose wall consisted of an endothelium. This aspect evoked a cavernous hemangioma of the ovary. PMID:14613693

  1. Ovarian cavernous hemangioma in an 8-year-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirilas, P; Georgiou, G; Zevgolis, G

    1999-04-01

    The case of an ovarian cavernous hemangioma with torsion in an 8-year-old girl is described. Current literature records less than 50 cases of which only 8 are in children. The presenting symptoms of acute abdomen and the ultrasonographic study led to the preoperative diagnosis of torsion of an ovarian tumor. Salpingo-oophorectomy and appendicectomy were performed with an uneventful postoperative course. The histological pattern of the tumor was that of an entirely cavernous hemangioma. The case is reported in view of its rarity. PMID:10342121

  2. Cavernous sinus thrombosis and air embolism following surgery for acoustic neurinoma : a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadkarni T

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available A 55 year old male patient was operated on for a massive and vascular acoustic neurinoma in a sitting position. The tumor was completely excised. Post-operatively, the patient developed irritability and clinical features suggestive of contralateral cavernous sinus thrombosis. CT scan showed air within the dural walls of the cavernous sinus on the side of surgery. However, there was no radiological evidence of cavernous sinus thrombosis on the contralateral side. Cavernous sinus thrombosis as a post-surgery complication has not been reported. Air within the dural confines of the cavernous sinus has also not been observed or radiologically recorded in the literature.

  3. ATLAS "Splash event" 2008

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Experiment

    2014-01-01

    "Splash events": As the LHC was being tuned up on 10 September 2008, beam was initially directed at beam collimators just outside the detector, so that a splash of particles would fill much of the detector allowing ATLAS experimenters to prepare the detector for actual running.

  4. Celebration for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Representatives from Funding Agencies and Barrel Toroid Magnet Laboratories during the ceremony. From left to right: Jean Zinn-Justin (Head of DAPNIA/CEA/Saclay), CERN Director-General Robert Aymar, and Roberto Petronzio (President INFN).Allan Clark (DPNC University Geneva) and Enrique Fernandez (IFAE Barcelona) were among the guests visiting the ATLAS cavern. The barrel toroid is visible in the background. A celebration took place at Point 1 on 13 December to toast the recent powering-up of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet to full field (Bulletin No. 47-48/06). About 70 guests were invited to attend, mainly composed of representatives from funding partners and key members of the laboratory management teams of the barrel toroid magnet, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. An introductory speech by ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni the scene for evening. This was followed by the ATLAS magnet system project leader Herman Ten Kate's account of the...

  5. Discovery Mondays: 'The civil engineering genius of the 100-metre deep underground caverns'

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    CERN is first and foremost a place where physicists study particle collisions. But to be able to observe the infinitely small, they need huge pieces of equipment, the accelerators and detectors, whose construction, some 100 metres below the earth's surface calls on the services of other fascinating disciplines. Take civil engineering, for example. For the construction of the LHC some 420 000 cubic metres of rock have had to be excavated for the 6500 metres of tunnel, 6 new shafts and 32 underground chambers and caverns. To avoid disrupting other experiments in progress, the work on these exceptional structures has had to be done without creating vibrations. The ATLAS experiment hall, a huge cathedral-like structure 100 metres below ground, is another mind-blowing feat of civil engineering. Its construction involved the use of ground-breaking technology, such as the system for suspending the ceiling put in place during the excavation work. At the next Discovery Monday, the specialists responsible for...

  6. Valuation of gas stored in salt cavern facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Michael A. [St. Mary' s University, TX (United States); Grant, Floyd H. [Purdue University, IN (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Since natural gas production is relatively inelastic towards demand in the short term, underground storage is used as a buffer against periods of high demand. Of the three most common storage facility types, depleted reservoirs, aquifers and manmade salt caverns, the latter is the most costly to develop. The challenge then is to maximize profits through efficient operation, well-timed injection and withdrawal of gas. The valuation of a commodity in storage is a challenging problem and has been the subject of study for decades. We investigate selected existing valuation approaches and look for ways to leverage salt-cavern-specific physical characteristics for financial advantage. The basis for our valuation is the Black-Scholes model for pricing options. Then, applying Monte-Carlo methods and simulation, we model combinations of characteristics in multi-cavern facilities and their impact on profitability. We describe the theory behind our work and our analytical framework and provide numerical results of our analysis. Our approach offers increased efficiency in salt-cavern gas storage facility operations. (author)

  7. Fat deposition in the cavernous sinus in Cushing disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachow, T.B.; Hesselink, J.R.; Aaron, J.O.; Davis, K.R.; Taveras, J.M.

    1984-10-01

    Fat density in the cavernous sinus on computed tomography (CT) is described in 6 out of 16 (37.5%) patients with Cushing disease. This finding may aid in making a specific diagnosis in patients with a pituitary mass. It was not seen in 30 random CT studies of the sella; however, supra seller fat was incidentally noted in the patient with acromegaly.

  8. Lowering End-cap YE-1 in the CMS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On Tuesday 22 January, the dance of the CMS end-caps came to an end with the lowering of YE-1, the heaviest of them all. After a spectacular lowering operation lsting ten hours, this mammoth component completed the 100-metre descent and was gently placed on the floor of the CMS cavern to the applause of the many onlookers.

  9. Analysis of SPR salt cavern remedial leach program 2013.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Paula D.; Gutierrez, Karen A.; Lord, David L.; Rudeen, David Keith

    2013-09-01

    The storage caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) exhibit creep behavior resulting in reduction of storage capacity over time. Maintenance of oil storage capacity requires periodic controlled leaching named remedial leach. The 30 MMB sale in summer 2011 provided space available to facilitate leaching operations. The objective of this report is to present the results and analyses of remedial leach activity at the SPR following the 2011 sale until mid-January 2013. This report focuses on caverns BH101, BH104, WH105 and WH106. Three of the four hanging strings were damaged resulting in deviations from normal leach patterns; however, the deviations did not affect the immediate geomechanical stability of the caverns. Significant leaching occurred in the toes of the caverns likely decreasing the number of available drawdowns until P/D ratio criteria are met. SANSMIC shows good agreement with sonar data and reasonably predicted the location and size of the enhanced leaching region resulting from string breakage.

  10. Sensitivity analysis of influencing parameters in cavern stability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abolfazl Abdollahipour; Reza Rahmannejad

    2012-01-01

    In order to analyze the stability of the underground rock structures,knowing the sensitivity of geomechanical parameters is important.To investigate the priority of these geomechanical properties in the stability of cavern,a sensitivity analysis has been performed on a single cavern in various rock mass qualities according to RMR using Phase 2.The stability of cavern has been studied by investigating the side wall deformation.Results showed that most sensitive properties are coefficient of lateral stress and modulus of deformation.Also parameters of Hoek-Brown criterion and σc have no sensitivity when cavern is in a perfect elastic state.But in an elasto-plastic state,parameters of Hoek-Brown criterion and σc affect the deformability; such effect becomes more remarkable with increasing plastic area.Other parameters have different sensitivities concerning rock mass quality (RMR).Results have been used to propose the best set of parameters for study on prediction of sidewall displacement.

  11. Orbital cavernous hemangiomas: ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantopoulou, A; Damianidis, Ch; Kyriakou, V; Kotziamani, N; Emmanouilidou, M; Goutsaridou, F; Tsitouridis, I

    2010-03-01

    Cavernous hemangioma is the most common intraorbital lesion in adults. The aim of our study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) characteristics of cavernous hemangioma and their role in the differential diagnosis of orbital tumors. Eight patients with orbital cavernous hemangiomas, five women and three men with a mean age of 48 years were examined in a period of six years. All patients underwent MRI examination and four patients were also evaluated by US. In all cases MRI depicted a well-defined intraconal tumor. The lesions were homogeneous, isointense to muscle on T1-weighted sequence and hyperintense to muscle on T2-weighted sequence in six patients. In one patient the mass was isointense on T1WI with heterogeneous signal intensity on T2WI and in one patient the lesion had heterogeneous signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences. After intravenous contrast medium administration, the tumors showed initial inhomogeneous enhancement with progressive accumulation of contrast material on delayed images in seven patients and initial homogeneous enhancement in one patient. On ultrasonography, the orbital masses appeared slightly hyperechoic, heterogeneous with small areas of slow blood flow. The analysis of imaging characteristics of a well-defined intraconal lesion in an adult patient with painless progressive proptosis can be highly suggestive of the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Leakage from Underground LPG Storage Caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Hajime; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-09-01

    To secure a stable supply of petroleum gas, underground storage caverns for liquified petroleum gas (LPG) are commonly used in many countries worldwide. Storing LPG in underground caverns requires that the surrounding rock mass remain saturated with groundwater and that the water pressure be higher than the liquid pressure inside the cavern. In previous studies, gas containment criteria for underground gas storage based on hydraulic gradient and pressure have been discussed, but these studies do not consider the physicochemical characteristics and behavior of LPG such as vaporization and dissolution in groundwater. Therefore, while these studies are very useful for designing storage caverns, they do not provide better understanding of the either the environmental effects of gas contamination or the behavior of vaporized LPG. In this study, we have performed three-phase fluid flow simulations of gas leakage from underground LPG storage caverns, using the multiphase multicomponent nonisothermal simulator TMVOC (Pruess and Battistelli, 2002), which is capable of solving the three-phase nonisothermal flow of water, gas, and a multicomponent mixture of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in multidimensional heterogeneous porous media. A two-dimensional cross-sectional model resembling an actual underground LPG facility in Japan was developed, and gas leakage phenomena were simulated for three different permeability models: (1) a homogeneous model, (2) a single-fault model, and (3) a heterogeneous model. In addition, the behavior of stored LPG was studied for the special case of a water curtain suddenly losing its function because of operational problems, or because of long-term effects such as clogging of boreholes. The results of the study indicate the following: (1) The water curtain system is a very powerful means for preventing gas leakage from underground storage facilities. By operating with appropriate pressure and layout, gas containment can be ensured. (2

  13. Fracture and Healing of Rock Salt Related to Salt Caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, K.S.; Fossum, A.F.; Munson, D.E.

    1999-03-01

    In recent years, serious investigations of potential extension of the useful life of older caverns or of the use of abandoned caverns for waste disposal have been of interest to the technical community. All of the potential applications depend upon understanding the reamer in which older caverns and sealing systems can fail. Such an understanding will require a more detailed knowledge of the fracture of salt than has been necessary to date. Fortunately, the knowledge of the fracture and healing of salt has made significant advances in the last decade, and is in a position to yield meaningful insights to older cavern behavior. In particular, micromechanical mechanisms of fracture and the concept of a fracture mechanism map have been essential guides, as has the utilization of continuum damage mechanics. The Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which is summarized extensively in this work was developed specifically to treat both the creep and fracture of salt, and was later extended to incorporate the fracture healing process known to occur in rock salt. Fracture in salt is based on the formation and evolution of microfractures, which may take the form of wing tip cracks, either in the body or the boundary of the grain. This type of crack deforms under shear to produce a strain, and furthermore, the opening of the wing cracks produce volume strain or dilatancy. In the presence of a confining pressure, microcrack formation may be suppressed, as is often the case for triaxial compression tests or natural underground stress situations. However, if the confining pressure is insufficient to suppress fracture, then the fractures will evolve with time to give the characteristic tertiary creep response. Two first order kinetics processes, closure of cracks and healing of cracks, control the healing process. Significantly, volume strain produced by microfractures may lead to changes in the permeability of the salt, which can become a major concern in

  14. T.D Lee and Lisa Randall visit ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauline Gagnon

    Professor Tsung-Dao Lee, who received the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1957 for postulating that parity is not conserved in weak interactions, visited the ATLAS detector this month. He is seen here in the company of Peter Jenni, spokesperson for ATLAS. T.D. Lee is still very active at over 80, pursuing his theory work to this day. Professor Lisa Randall from Harvard University, the well-known theorist behind the Randall-Sundrum theory for extra dimensions, was also part of the group visiting the ATLAS detector. She is seen here with Fabiola Gianotti, deputy spokesperson for ATLAS. Lisa Randall's two initial papers have been quoted both more than 2500 times, making her the most cited theoretical physicist in the world in the last five years as of last autumn - a total of about 10,000 citations! One wonders here if Peter is pointing to a CP-violating graviton spotted in the ATLAS cavern... From left to right: Fabiola Gianotti, Gustaaf Brooijmans, convener of the ATLAS Exotics physics gro...

  15. Fungal communities on speleothem surfaces in Kartchner Caverns, Arizona, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kartchner Caverns, located near Benson, Arizona, USA, is an active carbonate cave that serves as the major attraction for Kartchner Caverns State Park. Low-impact development and maintenance have preserved prediscovery macroscopic cavern features and minimized disturbances to biological communities within the cave.. The goal of this study was to examine fungal diversity in Kartchner Caverns on actively-forming speleothem surfaces. Fifteen formations were sampled from five sites across the cave. Richness was assessed using standard culture-based fungal isolation techniques. A culture-independent analysis using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE was used to assay evidence of community homogeneity across the cave through the separation of 18S rDNA amplicons from speleothem community DNA. The culturing effort recovered 53 distinct morphological taxonomic units (MTUs, corresponding to 43 genetic taxonomic units (GTUs that represented 21 genera. From the observed MTU accumulation curve and the projected total MTU richness curve, it is estimated that 51 percent of the actual MTU richness was recovered. The most commonly isolated fungi belonged to the genera Penicillium, Paecilomyces, Phialophora, and Aspergillus.This culture- based analysis did not reveal significant differences in fungal richness or number of fungi recovered across sites. Cluster analysis using DGGE band profiles did not reveal distinctive groupings of speleothems by sample site. However, canonical correspondence analysis (CCA analysis of culture-independent DGGE profiles showed a significant effect of sampling site and formation type on fungal community structure.Taken together, these results reveal that diverse fungal communities exist on speleothem surfaces in Kartchner Caverns, and that these communities are not uniformly distributed spatially. Analysis of sample saturation indicated that more sampling depth is required to uncover the full scale of mycological richness

  16. Studies of the performance of the ATLAS detector using cosmic-ray muons

    OpenAIRE

    The ATLAS Collaboration; Aad, Georges; Jez, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Muons from cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere provide a high-statistics source of particles that can be used to study the performance and calibration of the ATLAS detector. Cosmic-ray muons can penetrate to the cavern and deposit energy in all detector subsystems. Such events have played an important role in the commissioning of the detector since the start of the installation phase in 2005 and were particularly important for understanding the detector performance in the time prior to ...

  17. Studies of the performance of the ATLAS detector using cosmic-ray muons

    OpenAIRE

    The ATLAS Collaboration; Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; A. A. Abdelalim; Buanes, Trygve

    2011-01-01

    Muons from cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere provide a high-statistics source of particles that can be used to study the performance and calibration of the ATLAS detector. Cosmic-ray muons can penetrate to the cavern and deposit energy in all detector subsystems. Such events have played an important role in the commissioning of the detector since the start of the installation phase in 2005 and were particularly important for understanding the detector performan...

  18. Studies of the performance of the ATLAS detector using cosmic-ray muons

    OpenAIRE

    The ATLAS Collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Muons from cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere provide a high-statistics source of particles that can be used to study the performance and calibration of the ATLAS detector. Cosmic-ray muons can penetrate to the cavern and deposit energy in all detector subsystems. Such events have played an important role in the commissioning of the detector since the start of the installation phase in 2005 and were particularly important for understanding the detector performance in the time prior to ...

  19. Preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste into salt caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.; Ayers, R.C. Jr.; Grunewald, B.

    1996-06-01

    Caverns can be readily formed in salt formations through solution mining. The caverns may be formed incidentally, as a result of salt recovery, or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or compressed air or disposing of wastes. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the feasibility, suitability, and legality of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns. Chapter 2 provides background information on: types and locations of US subsurface salt deposits; basic solution mining techniques used to create caverns; and ways in which salt caverns are used. Later chapters provide discussion of: federal and state regulatory requirements concerning disposal of oil field waste, including which wastes are considered eligible for cavern disposal; waste streams that are considered to be oil field waste; and an evaluation of technical issues concerning the suitability of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field waste. Separate chapters present: types of oil field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location; disposal operations; and closure and remediation. This report does not suggest specific numerical limits for such factors or variables as distance to neighboring activities, depths for casings, pressure testing, or size and shape of cavern. The intent is to raise issues and general approaches that will contribute to the growing body of information on this subject.

  20. ATLAS $t\\bar{t}$ Resonance Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Sosa, David; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In this talk the search for new resonances decaying to ttbar is presented. The search is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using proton-proton collision data. The current status of the ATLAS searches will be reviewed, addressing the used analysis techniques, in particular the selection criteria, the background modelling and the related experimental uncertainties.

  1. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon

    2009-03-01

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes for strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  2. ATLAS status and physics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The ATLAS detector will observe proton collisions in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which is scheduled for commissioning in 2007. When operational the LHC will collide protons at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV with nominally 2 X 108 collisions per second at each of four beam-crossing points. ATLAS has been optimised for the detection of the hypothesised Higgs Boson, the only missing component of the otherwise experimentally well-verified electro-weak theory. In addition ATLAS is also sensitive to many other physics processes including QCD, b-physics, heavy ion interactions and those that could provide first evidence for super-symmetry. The current status of the LHC and the various aspects of the ATLAS detector will be discussed as well as the ability of ATLAS to observe new physics. The Australian contributions to the ATLAS project will also be described. These include: 1. Development and implementation of components of the Semi-Conductor Tracker (SCT), which provides spatial information for charged particles traversing the ATLAS inner detector. 2. Fast algorithms for simulating electromagnetic events in the calorimeter. 3. Development and application of fast reconstruction algorithms within the ATLAS software framework. 4. Analysis of Monte-Carlo data produced using simulated models of the ATLAS detector. The information provided will determine the most efficient strategies in searching for new physics once collisions at the LHC commence. 5. Advances in grid computing to handle the storage, transfer and offline processing of data amassed by LHC experiments, which totals over 2.4 P-bytes per annum. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  3. Cluster Headache Secondary to Macroprolactinoma with Ipsilateral Cavernous Sinus Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Levy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 25 year-old man with episodic cluster headache that was refractory to all standard pharmacological prophylactic and abortive treatments. Because of the lack of response, an MRI brain was performed which showed a large pituitary tumour with ipsilateral cavernous sinus invasion. The serum prolactin was significantly elevated at 54,700 miU/L (50–400 confirming a macro-prolactinoma. Within a few days of cabergoline therapy the headache resolved. He continues to be headache free several years after starting the dopamine agonist. This case highlights the importance of imaging the pituitary fossa in patients with refractory cluster headache, It also raises the potential anatomical importance of the cavernous sinus in pituitary-associated headache.

  4. Adult primary retroperitoneal cavernous hemangioma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Hang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary retroperitoneal cavernous hemangioma (PRCH in an adult is extremely rare. We report on the diagnosis and treatment of a patient with PRCH with subtle clinical features and atypical findings on imaging scans. A 38-year-old man was admitted to hospital with a 5-day history of epigastralgia after alcohol drinking. Using various imaging methods, we found a giant cyst-like retroperitoneal mass compressing the surrounding organs. Surgical resection of the tumor was performed, and the mass was found to be a cavernous hemangioma measuring 90 × 80 × 60 mm, with a thick fibrotic wall and extensive intracystic hemorrhage. Physicians should be aware that PRCH may mimic a cystic neoplasm, and that a large tumor size probably indicates intracystic hemorrhage. Surgical resection is a curative approach for PRCH.

  5. A giant frontal cavernous malformation with review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arvind; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous malformations (CMs) are vascular anomalies with dilated spaces called caverns. These spaces are lined by endothelial cells and collage and devoid of smooth muscle or intervening neural tissue, and filled with blood at various stages of stasis, thrombosis, organization, and calcification. Most CMs are relatively small in size but when they are large enough they can produce sing of mass effect and may simulate neoplastic, vascular, inflammatory pathology. Giant CM (size >6 cm) are very rare lesions and very few cases are reported in world literature. We are reporting such a rare case of a 16 year male. Our case is also unique in the sense that it is the largest reported CM in Indian population. PMID:27114662

  6. Bilateral Persistent Trigeminal Arteries with Unilateral Trigeminal Artery to Cavernous Sinus Fistula: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, David; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, Jiann-Jy; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Ku, Jan-Wen

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year-old man who denied a history of trauma presented with left pulsatile tinnitus and left orbital swelling for six months. Digital subtraction angiography showed a left persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) with a trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus (trigeminal-cavernous sinus) fistula and a right PTA. Transarterial detachable coil embolization of the left trigeminal-cavernous sinus fistula was performed, and the symptoms subsided. There has been no report of bilateral PTAs with a sponta...

  7. Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Tumors with Linear Accelerator Radiosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Steven D; Doty, James R; Martin, David P.; Hancock, Steven L.; Adler, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1989, 79 patients with benign or malignant cavernous sinus tumors, have been treated at Stanford University with linear accelerator (linac) radiosurgery. Radiosurgery has been used as (1) a planned second-stage procedure for residual tumor following surgery, (2) primary treatment for patients whose medical conditions preclude surgery, (3) palliation of malignant lesions, and (4) definitive treatment for small, well-localized, poorly accessible tumors. Mean patient age was 52 years (rang...

  8. Configuration of Fibrous and Adipose Tissues in the Cavernous Sinus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liang; Gao, Fei; Xu, Qunyuan; Zhang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objective Three-dimensional anatomical appreciation of the matrix of the cavernous sinus is one of the crucial necessities for a better understanding of tissue patterning and various disorders in the sinus. The purpose of this study was to reveal configuration of fibrous and adipose components in the cavernous sinus and their relationship with the cranial nerves and vessels in the sinus and meningeal sinus wall. Materials and Methods Nineteen cadavers (8 females and 11 males; age range, 54–89 years; mean age, 75 years) were prepared as transverse (6 sets), coronal (3 sets) and sagittal (10 sets) plastinated sections that were examined at both macroscopic and microscopic levels. Results Two types of the web-like fibrous networks were identified and localized in the cavernous sinus. A dural trabecular network constituted a skeleton-frame in the sinus and contributed to the sleeves of intracavernous cranial nerves III, IV, V1, V2 and VI. A fine trabecular network, or adipose tissue, was the matrix of the sinus and was mainly distributed along the medial side of the intracavernous cranial nerves, forming a dumbbell-shaped adipose zone in the sinus. Conclusions This study revealed the nature, fine architecture and localization of the fine and dural trabecular networks in the cavernous sinus and their relationship with intracavernous cranial nerves and vessels. The results may be valuable for better understanding of tissue patterning in the cranial base and better evaluation of intracavernous disorders, e.g. the growth direction and extent of intracavernous tumors. PMID:24586578

  9. Is the Gamma Knife Treatment of Cerebral Cavernous Angioma Effective?

    OpenAIRE

    Wenchuan, Zhang; Wenxiang, Zhong; Xuhui, Wang

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of cerebral cavernous angioma (CCA) has caused great controversy. In the case of recurrent haemorrhage, frequent epileptic attacks, clear dysneuria, etc., and by taking into consideration focal positions, number of foci, and conditions conducive to operations, it is our opinion that excision of CCA foci is the first choice to cure the disease. Controversy regarding the gamma knife treatment of CCA has existed for a long time. The main reason behind this i...

  10. Cavernous Angioma of the Corpus Callosum Presenting with Acute Psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Giacomo Pavesi; Francesco Causin; Alberto Feletti

    2014-01-01

    Psychiatric symptoms may occasionally be related to anatomic alterations of brain structures. Particularly, corpus callosum lesions seem to play a role in the change of patients’ behavior. We present a case of a sudden psychotic attack presumably due to a hemorrhagic cavernous angioma of the corpus callosum, which was surgically removed with complete resolution of symptoms. Although a developmental defect like agenesis or lipoma is present in the majority of these cases, a growing lesion of t...

  11. Cavernous Hemangioma of the Rib: A Rare Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavros Gourgiotis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioma of the rib is an uncommon benign vascular tumour. A case of rib hemangioma in a 29-year-old woman is presented. Chest roentgenogram and computed tomography revealed a mass along the inner surface of the 7th left rib with bone destruction. She underwent resection of the 7th rib. The pathologic diagnosis was cavernous hemangioma. Hemangiomas of the rib are rare tumours but should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of rib tumours.

  12. Carotid Cavernous Fistula Subsequent to Nasal Septoplasty; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Moin

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Carotid cavernous fistula (CCF is a rare and lethal condition; it can be spontaneous, traumatic or iatrogenic. This report Presents a case of CCF subsequent to nasal septoplasty who was a 24 years old lady with proptosis and severe decreased visual acuity. After cerebral angiography, trapping and embolization of fistula was performed with good recovery. Like our case, review of articles shows that the patients are signs and symptoms free after embolization.

  13. Structural analysis of the West Hackbery No. 6 SPR storage cavern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzley, S.E.

    1980-08-01

    Four separate structural analyses of the West Hackberry No. 6 SPR storage cavern are presented. One analysis covers the creep response of the cavern beginning shortly before the time when an accidental fire occurred and proceeding through the cavern recertification pressure test. The second analysis models the surface uplife that is expected during the same pressure test. The third and fourth numerical studies investigate the structural response of West Hackberry No. 6 to slabbing and a rapid pressure drop. All analyses indicate that this cavern should be structurally stable for the conditions assumed.

  14. Bilateral Persistent Trigeminal Arteries with Unilateral Trigeminal Artery to Cavernous Sinus Fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, Jiann-Jy; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Ku, Jan-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Summary A 59-year-old man who denied a history of trauma presented with left pulsatile tinnitus and left orbital swelling for six months. Digital subtraction angiography showed a left persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) with a trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus (trigeminal-cavernous sinus) fistula and a right PTA. Transarterial detachable coil embolization of the left trigeminal-cavernous sinus fistula was performed, and the symptoms subsided. There has been no report of bilateral PTAs with a spontaneous fistula connected from one PTA to the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. This paper reports such a rare circumstance. PMID:24070083

  15. Bilateral persistent trigeminal arteries with unilateral trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus fistula. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, Jiann-Jy; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Ku, Jan-Wen

    2013-09-01

    A 59-year-old man who denied a history of trauma presented with left pulsatile tinnitus and left orbital swelling for six months. Digital subtraction angiography showed a left persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) with a trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus (trigeminal-cavernous sinus) fistula and a right PTA. Transarterial detachable coil embolization of the left trigeminal-cavernous sinus fistula was performed, and the symptoms subsided. There has been no report of bilateral PTAs with a spontaneous fistula connected from one PTA to the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. This paper reports such a rare circumstance. PMID:24070083

  16. The role of Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of orbital cavernous hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayit, E; Durak, I; Capakaya, G; Yilmaz, M; Durak, H

    2001-04-01

    The cavernous hemangioma is the most common benign orbital tumor in adults. Its presentation is during the forth to fifth decades with a slowly progressive unilateral proptosis. Intraconal cavernous hemangiomas may be difficult to differentiate from other intraconal lesions such as schwannomas, meningiomas and hemangiopericytomas. We report a case of orbital cavernous hemangioma diagnosed by Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy. Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy revealed a typical scintigraphic pattern in which there is intense focally increased uptake on the delayed image. We conclude that Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy can be a useful method in the differential diagnosis of orbital cavernous hemangioma as in hepatic hemangioma. PMID:11448074

  17. Construction of cavern-type gas storage reservoirs and the related problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sames, P.

    1980-09-01

    Analysis of the operation of an aquiferous cavern-type gas storage reservoir that uses water pressure to maintain a constant gas pressure in the cavern shows the inadequacy of this method. Because of the large amount of storage gas absorbed by the sealing water and the gas's later desorption in the exit-waterline running from the cavern to the holding tank, this arrangement cannot perform its intended function. The cavern is also threatened by the danger of blowout during the injection cycle.

  18. Outcome of LINAC radiosurgery for a cavernous angioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Se Mie; Chie, Eui Kyu; Kim, Il Han; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Suk Won [College of Medicine, Halym Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To establish the role of stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator for the treatment of patients with cavernous angioma. Between February 1995 and May 1997, 11 patients with cavernous angioma were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator. Diagnoses were based on the magnetic resonance imaging in 8 patients, and the histological in 3. The vascular lesions were located in the brainstem (5 cases), cerebellum (2 cases) thalamus (1 case) and cerebrum (3 cases), The clinical presentation at onset included previous intracerebral hemorrhages (9 cases) and seizures (2 cases). All patients were treated with a linac-based radiosurgery. The median dose of radiation delivered was 16 Gy ranging from 14 to 24 Gy, which was typically prescribed to the 80% isodose surface (range 50-80%), corresponding to the periphery of the lesion with a single isocenter. Ten patients were followed-up. The median follow-up was 49 months ranging from 8 to 73 months, during which time two patients developed an intracerebral hemorrhage, 1 at 8 months, with the other at 64 months post radiosurgery. One patient developed neurological deficit after radiosurgery, and two developed an edema on the T2 weighted images of the MRI surrounding the radiosurgical target. The use of stereotactic radiosurgery in the treatment of a cavernous angioma may be effective in the prevention of rebleeding, and can be safely delivered. However, a longer follow-up period will be required.

  19. Role of radiosurgery in the management of cavernous sinus meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective - To provide our early experience and philosophy in the utility of radiosurgery in the management of cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods - Twenty-five consecutive cases with cavernous sinus meningiomas treated between 1990 and 1995 were reviewed. Three cases were treated with gamma-knife radiosurgery, 15 with preceding surgery and gamma knife, 7 with surgery. Mean follow-up following radiosurgery and surgery were 34.8 and 25.4 months, respectively. Results - The 5-year actuarial tumor control rate following radiosurgery was 85.7% and tumor remission rate was 61.4%. Permanent neurological deterioration after radiosurgery was seen in 1 case (5.9%), whereas newly developed or worsened neurological deficits permanently persisted in 59.1% of patients after surgery. There was a clear correlation between surgical radiocality and postoperative morbidity rate. Conclusions - Gamma-knife radiosurgery is a valuable addition to surgical removal in the treatment of cavernous sinus meningiomas. Combination of non-radical resection and subsequent radiosurgery in recommended to improve treatment-associated morbidity. (au)

  20. Gas hydrates in gas storage caverns; Gashydrate bei der Gaskavernenspeicherung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenefeld, P. [Kavernen Bau- und Betriebs-GmbH, Hannover (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Given appropriate pressure and temperature conditions the storage of natural gas in salt caverns can lead to the formation of gas hydrates in the producing well or aboveground operating facilities. This is attributable to the stored gas becoming more or less saturated with water vapour. The present contribution describes the humidity, pressure, and temperature conditions conducive to gas hydrate formation. It also deals with the reduction of the gas removal capacity resulting from gas hydrate formation, and possible measures for preventing hydrate formation such as injection of glycol, the reduction of water vapour absorption from the cavern sump, and dewatering of the cavern sump. (MSK) [Deutsch] Bei der Speicherung von Erdgas in Salzkavernen kann es unter entsprechenden Druck- und Temperaturverhaeltnissen zur Gashydratbildung in den Foerdersonden oder obertaegigen Betriebseinrichtungen kommen, weil sich das eingelagerte Gas mehr oder weniger mit Wasserdampf aufsaettigt. Im Folgenden werden die Feuchtigkeits-, Druck- und Temperaturbedingungen, die zur Hydratbildung fuehren erlaeutert. Ebenso werden die Verringerung der Auslagerungskapazitaet durch die Hydratbildung, Massnahmen zur Verhinderung der Hydratbildung wie die Injektion von Glykol, die Verringerung der Wasserdampfaufnahme aus dem Kavernensumpf und die Entwaesserung der Kavernensumpfs selbst beschrieben.

  1. Carotid Cavernous Fistula Associated with Persistent Trigeminal Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Robert W.; Howard, Robert S.; Zager, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) associated with persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare but important clinical entity. We present a case treated by microcoil embolization with preservation of internal carotid, PTA, and hasilar artery flow following embolization. A 62-year-old female developed pulsatile tinnitus followed by left eye proptosis and diplopia. Examination revealed a cranial nerve VI palsy and an objective bruit over the left orbit. Angiographic evaluation revealed a carotid cavernous fistula originating from a persistent trigeminal artery. Placement of a detachable balloon across the fistula site while preserving the PTA proved impossible, and the fistula was treated with microcoils following placement of a microcatheter across the fistula into the cavernous sinus. Complete closure of the fistula was followed by resolution of the patient's symptoms. Preservation of all major vessels including the PTA was accomplished through the use of coil embolization. Careful evaluation of the angiogram is necessary to identify PTA associated with a CCF. Previous reports have described treatment of CCF with PTA by surgical or balloon ocolusion, some involving sacrifice of the PTA. Examination of the relevant embryology and anatomy reveals, however, that occlusion of the PTA must be approached with caution due to potential supply to the posterior circulation. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:17171071

  2. Bryan Mound SPR cavern 113 remedial leach stage 1 analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudeen, David Keith [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM; Weber, Paula D.; Lord, David L.

    2013-08-01

    The U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve implemented the first stage of a leach plan in 2011-2012 to expand storage volume in the existing Bryan Mound 113 cavern from a starting volume of 7.4 million barrels (MMB) to its design volume of 11.2 MMB. The first stage was terminated several months earlier than expected in August, 2012, as the upper section of the leach zone expanded outward more quickly than design. The oil-brine interface was then re-positioned with the intent to resume leaching in the second stage configuration. This report evaluates the as-built configuration of the cavern at the end of the first stage, and recommends changes to the second stage plan in order to accommodate for the variance between the first stage plan and the as-built cavern. SANSMIC leach code simulations are presented and compared with sonar surveys in order to aid in the analysis and offer projections of likely outcomes from the revised plan for the second stage leach.

  3. ATLAS's inner detector installed in the heart of the experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration recently celebrated a major engineering milestone, namely the transport and installation of the central part of the inner detector (ID-barrel) into the ATLAS detector. Right: Engineers and technicians work to carefully align and install the inner detector in the centre of ATLAS.Left: The crane used in the carefully coordinated effort by the ATLAS collaboration to lower down the fragile inner detector 100 metres underground to its new home. Many members of the collaboration gathered to witness this moment at Point 1. After years of design, construction and commissioning, the two outer detectors (TRT and SCT) of the inner detector barrel (ID-barrel) were moved from the SR1 cleanroom to the ATLAS cavern. The barrel was moved across the car park from Building 2175 to SX1. Although only a journey of about 100 metres, this required weeks of planning and some degree of luck as far as the weather was concerned. Special measures were in place to minimize shock and vibration during transportati...

  4. The CERN cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m/sup 2/ experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and i...

  5. The CERN Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel Toroid Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m2 experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and its ins...

  6. Feasibility analysis of using abandoned salt caverns for large-scale underground energy storage in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A method is proposed for the evaluation of using an abandoned salt cavern for energy (natural gas) storage. • A feasibility analysis is given of China’s first UGS (Underground Gas Storage) facility using an abandoned salt cavern. • Numerical modeling has been used to investigate mechanical safety of a gas pressurized cavern. • Chinese abandoned salt caverns show good feasibility of being converted to UGSs. • China’s bedded rock salt can meet the requirements for UGS. - Abstract: Rock salt in China is primarily bedded salt, usually composed of many thin salt layers and interlayers (e.g. anhydrite, mudstone, and glauberite). Thus, the feasibility analysis of abandoned salt caverns located in salt beds to be used as Underground Gas Storage (UGS) facilities is full of challenges. In this paper, we introduce the feasibility analysis of China’s first salt cavern gas storage facility using an abandoned salt cavern. The cavern is located in Jintan city, Jiangsu province, China. The mechanical properties and permeability of the bedded salts are obtained by experiments. Based on the results of the analyses, it appears to be quite feasible to convert the abandoned salt caverns of Jintan city to UGS facilities. The stability of the cavern is evaluated by the 3D geomechanical numerical simulations, and the operating parameters are proposed accordingly. Results indicate that the maximum volume shrinkage of the cavern is less than 25% and the maximum deformations are less than 2% of the caverns’ maximum diameters after operating for 20 years. It is recommended that the weighted average internal gas pressure be maintained as 11 MPa to control the extent of the plastic zones to a safe level. Safety factors decrease with operating time, especially those of the interface between rock salt and mudstone layers decrease significantly. Effective strain is generally greater than 2%, and locally is greater than 3% after operating 20 years. The maximum

  7. Geomechanical Analysis and Design Considerations for Thin-Bedded Salt Caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael S. Bruno

    2005-06-15

    The bedded salt formations located throughout the United States are layered and interspersed with non-salt materials such as anhydrite, shale, dolomite and limestone. The salt layers often contain significant impurities. GRI and DOE have initialized this research proposal in order to increase the gas storage capabilities by providing operators with improved geotechnical design and operating guidelines for thin bedded salt caverns. Terralog has summarized the geologic conditions, pressure conditions, and critical design factors that may lead to: (1) Fracture in heterogeneous materials; (2) Differential deformation and bedding plane slip; (3) Propagation of damage around single and multiple cavern; and (4) Improved design recommendations for single and multiple cavern configurations in various bedded salt environments. The existing caverns within both the Permian Basin Complex and the Michigan and Appalachian Basins are normally found between 300 m to 1,000 m (1,000 ft to 3,300 ft) depth depending on local geology and salt dissolution depth. Currently, active cavern operations are found in the Midland and Anadarko Basins within the Permian Basin Complex and in the Appalachian and Michigan Basins. The Palo Duro and Delaware Basins within the Permian Basin Complex also offer salt cavern development potential. Terralog developed a number of numerical models for caverns located in thin bedded salt. A modified creep viscoplastic model has been developed and implemented in Flac3D to simulate the response of salt at the Permian, Michigan and Appalachian Basins. The formulation of the viscoplastic salt model, which is based on an empirical creep law developed for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Program, is combined with the Drucker-Prager model to include the formation of damage and failure. The Permian salt lab test data provided by Pfeifle et al. 1983, are used to validate the assumptions made in the material model development. For the actual cavern simulations two

  8. Review of applicable technology: solution mining of caverns in salt domes to serve as repositories for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an abundance of salt domes in the Gulf Coastal region. Advances in leaching technology and cavern shape control make it possible to build large caverns with configurations approaching teardrops, cylinders, and spheres. Fenix and Scisson has designed and constructed several dozen caverns in sizes up to three million barrels (16.8 million cubic feet). It is now within current technological bounds to evacuate the brine left in the cavern following construction, dehumidify the cavern atmosphere and supply conditioned cavern ventilation. The state-of-the-art in drilling large diameter holes has advanced to the point that it is now possible to drill 120-in. holes as deep as 6,000 ft and 144-in. holes to lesser depths. Additional research is needed in the area of cavern stability. Cavern shrinkage rates are known to increase with depth because of lower salt strengths at higher pressures and temperatures

  9. Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elcock, D.

    1998-03-05

    In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. Argonne determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, Argonne subsequently conducted a preliminary evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in domal salt caverns. Steps used in this evaluation included the following: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing contaminant toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and calculating human cancer and noncancer risk estimates. Five postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (referring to noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results led to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

  10. Analysis of cavern and well stability at the West Hackberry SPR site using a full-dome model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolik, Steven R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) West Hackberry site. The cavern field comprises 22 caverns. Five caverns (6, 7, 8, 9, 11) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 17 caverns (101-117) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a three-dimensional geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios corresponding to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant results in this report are relevant to Cavern 6. The cavern is shaped like a bowl with a large ceiling span and is in close proximity to Cavern 9. The analyses predict tensile stresses at the edge of the ceiling during repressurization of Cavern 6 following workover conditions. During a workover the cavern is at low pressure to service a well. The wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension around the edge of the large ceiling span. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state because of salt creep. However, the potential for salt fracture and propagation exists, particularly towards Cavern 9. With only 200 feet of salt between the caverns, the operational consequences must be examined if the two caverns become connected. A critical time may be during a workover of Cavern 9 in part because of the operational vulnerabilities, but also because dilatant damage

  11. SUSY Searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuang, Xuai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles, with focus on those obtained using proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 13 TeV using 2015+2016 data. The searches with final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons will be presented.

  12. 16 December 2011 - Israeli Minister of Industry, Trade and Labour S.Simhon visiting ATLAS undeground area, ATLAS visitor centre and LHC tunnel with Senior Physicist G. Mikenberg. ATLAS Collaboration Former Spokesperson is also present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Israeli minister of industry, trade and labour, Shalom Simhon, was welcomed in the ATLAS visitor centre before he toured the ATLAS underground experimental area, where he could see the ATLAS detector. He also had a chance to see the LHC tunnel and the CERN Control Centre.

  13. Features of West Hackberry SPR Caverns and Internal Structure Of the Salt Dome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, Darrell Eugene [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Underground Storage Technology Dept.

    2006-09-01

    The intent of this report is to examine the internal structure of the West Hackberry salt dome utilizing the information from the geometric configuration of the internal cavern surfaces obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data. In a general sense, the caverns of West Hackberry are remarkable in the symmetry of their shapes. There are only rather moderate deviations from what would be considered an ideal cylindrical solution mining geometry in these caverns. This finding is in marked contrast to the directional solutioning found in the elliptical cross sectioned, sometimes winged, caverns of Big Hill. None of the persistent lineaments prevalent in Big Hill caverns are evident in West Hackberry caverns. Irregularities of the West Hackberry caverns are restricted to preferential solution formed pits and protuberances with moderate dimensions. In fact, the principal characteristic of West Hackberry caverns is the often large sections of smooth and cylindrical cavern wall. Differences in the cavern characteristics between West Hackberry and Big Hill suggest that the former dome is quite homogeneous, while the latter still retains strong remnants of the interbeds of the original bedded Louann salt. One possible explanation is that the source of the two domes, while both from the Louann mother salt, differs. While the source of the Big Hill dome is directly from the mother salt bed, it appears that the West Hackberry arises from a laterally extruded sill of the mother salt. Consequently, the amount of deformation, and hence, mixing of the salt and interbed material in the extruded sill is significantly greater than would be the case for the directly formed diapir. In West Hackberry, remnants of interbeds apparently no longer exist. An important aspect of the construction of the West Hackberry caverns is the evidence of an attempt to use a uniform solutioning construction practice. This uniformity involved the utilization of single well solutioning and

  14. Development of a Micro Pixel Chamber for the ATLAS Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Ochi, Atsuhiko; Komai, Hidetoshi; Edo, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    The Micro Pixel Chamber (μ-PIC) is being developed a sacandidate for the muon system of the ATLAS detector for upgrading in LHC experiments. The μ-PIC is a micro-pattern gaseous detector that doesn’t have floating structure such as wires, mesh, or foil. This detector can be made by printed-circuit-board (PCB) technology, which is commercially available and suited for mass production. Operation tests have been performed under high flux neutrons under similar conditions to the ATLAS cavern. Spark rates are measured using several gas mixtures under 7 MeV neutron irradiation, and good properties were observed using neon, ethane, and CF4 mixture of gases.Using resistive materials as electrodes, we are also developing a new μ-PIC, which is not expected to damage the electrodes in the case of discharge sparks.

  15. Structural Stability Monitoring of a Physical Model Test on an Underground Cavern Group during Deep Excavations Using FBG Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG sensors are comprehensively recognized as a structural stability monitoring device for all kinds of geo-materials by either embedding into or bonding onto the structural entities. The physical model in geotechnical engineering, which could accurately simulate the construction processes and the effects on the stability of underground caverns on the basis of satisfying the similarity principles, is an actual physical entity. Using a physical model test of underground caverns in Shuangjiangkou Hydropower Station, FBG sensors were used to determine how to model the small displacements of some key monitoring points in the large-scale physical model during excavation. In the process of building the test specimen, it is most successful to embed FBG sensors in the physical model through making an opening and adding some quick-set silicon. The experimental results show that the FBG sensor has higher measuring accuracy than other conventional sensors like electrical resistance strain gages and extensometers. The experimental results are also in good agreement with the numerical simulation results. In conclusion, FBG sensors could effectively measure small displacements of monitoring points in the whole process of the physical model test. The experimental results reveal the deformation and failure characteristics of the surrounding rock mass and make some guidance for the in situ engineering construction.

  16. Mongolian Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Climatic atlas dated 1985, in Mongolian, with introductory material also in Russian and English. One hundred eight pages in single page PDFs.

  17. Atlas civil engineering

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The first things lowered to the cavern were not parts of the new detector or parts for the accelerator rather than the machines digging the cavern bigger and lifts that transport stones and other excess material up to the surface. This work was very demanding already.

  18. Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elcock, D.

    1998-03-10

    Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined

  19. 24 October 2014 - President of the Republic of Ecuador R. Correa Delgado signing the guest book with Vice President L. Moreno and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    Guillaume, Jeanneret

    2014-01-01

    visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Collaboration PSokesperson D. Charlton and ATLAS User F. Monticelli; throughout accompanied by Adviser for Ecuador J. Salicio Diez and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  20. Fibrosis of corpus cavernosum in animals following cavernous nerve ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-LiHu; Li-QuanHu; jianSong; Shi-WenLi; Xin-MinZheng; BeiCheng; Bing-ChunTian

    2004-01-01

    t Aim: To investigate alterations of smooth muscle cells and collagen fibers in corpus cavernosum following cavernous neurectomy and its relation to the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Methods: Ten adult male SD rats (neurectomy group) were subject to a bilateral cavernous nerve (CN) resection aseptically under an operating microscope, with 6 sham-operated rats as the control. Fifteen weeks after the operation, the penile specimens were collected and prepared for quantitative-analyzing of ratio of smooth muscle to collagen fibers in corpus cavernosum with confocal microscopy, and for detecting the expression of TGF-β1 by RT-PCR and westernblot.Results: Smooth muscle cells that show red color after fluorescent-labeling with tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanatephalloidin and collagen fibers that produce green autofluorescence after paraformaldehyde fixation were clearly identified under the confocal microscope. Quantification of fluorescent intensity showed that the ratio of smooth muscle to collagen fibers in corpus cavernosum in neurectomy group was 0.265± 0.125, which was significantly lower than that in sham-operated group (0.760±0.196, P<0.01). RT-PCR and western-blot analyses revealed a significantlyhigher expression of TGF-β1 in the penile tissues of the neurectomy animals than that in sham-operated group.Conclusion: Bilateral ablation of CN can lead to fibrosis of corpus cavernosum, which may be related to an increased expression of TGF-β1 induced by hypoxia in cavernous tissue after denervation.

  1. Worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments subsequent to closure of a carotid cavernous fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thinda Sumeer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotid cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the cavernous sinus and the external or internal carotid arteries. Although rare, closure of carotid cavernous fistulas can lead to immediate ocular complications. To our knowledge, our case represents the first report of worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments over an extended period of two months subsequent to closure of a carotid cavernous fistula. Case presentation A 70-year-old female with a history of primary angle closure glaucoma presented with 4 mm of proptosis, resistance to retropulsion, tortuous corkscrew blood vessels and an orbital bruit of the right eye. Diagnostic cerebral angiogram showed a small indirect Barrow type D right carotid cavernous fistula. Transarterial embolization was planned but repeat cerebral angiography prior to the procedure demonstrated spontaneous partial closure of the carotid cavernous fistula and the procedure was aborted. One month later, our patient was noted to have worsening vision and choroidal detachments of the right eye. She declined further testing and was thus started on self-administered manual carotid jugular compressions. One month later, she developed progressive worsening of her choroidal detachments and angle closure. She eventually opted for surgical intervention but repeat cerebral angiography showed significant thrombosis of the carotid cavernous fistula and no intervention was warranted. Examination two months later showed complete resolution of the choroidal detachments and open angles of both eyes. Conclusions Our patient demonstrated worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments after spontaneous closure of her carotid cavernous fistula had been noted. Ocular complications, including acute angle closure, have been reported to occur immediately after closure of carotid cavernous fistulas, but not over months as in our patient. It is imperative that individuals who have

  2. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for the treatment of cavernous sinus hemangiomas

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Qingsheng; Shen, Jian; Feng, Yiping; ZHAN, Renya

    2015-01-01

    The present retrospective study aimed to analyze the outcome of patients with cavernous sinus hemangioma (CSH) treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKS). Between August 2011 and April 2014, 7 patients with CSHs underwent GKS. GKS was performed as the sole treatment option in 5 patients, whilst partial resection had been performed previously in 1 patient and biopsy had been performed in 1 patient. The mean volume of the tumors at the time of GKS was 12.5±10.2 cm3 (range, 5.3–33.2 cm3), and t...

  3. Is cerebral cavernous malformation a pre-glioma lesion?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ji-yang; MING Zong-yi; WU An-hua

    2012-01-01

    Glioma is the most malignant tumor in the brain,the origin of glioma is still unknown.Recently some papers indicated that glioma may be developed from cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM).We describe a man with a right temporal lobe CCM,after gamma-knife radiotherapy,the patient developed a low-grade astrocytoma in the area of the preexistent CCM.This case,together with other reports,may indicated an oncogenetic properties of CCM,and we proposed that CCM may be a pre-glioma lesion.

  4. Cavernous Angioma of the Corpus Callosum Presenting with Acute Psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Pavesi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric symptoms may occasionally be related to anatomic alterations of brain structures. Particularly, corpus callosum lesions seem to play a role in the change of patients’ behavior. We present a case of a sudden psychotic attack presumably due to a hemorrhagic cavernous angioma of the corpus callosum, which was surgically removed with complete resolution of symptoms. Although a developmental defect like agenesis or lipoma is present in the majority of these cases, a growing lesion of the corpus callosum can rarely be the primary cause. Since it is potentially possible to cure these patients, clinicians should be aware of this association.

  5. Brain templates and atlases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alan C; Janke, Andrew L; Collins, D Louis; Baillet, Sylvain

    2012-08-15

    The core concept within the field of brain mapping is the use of a standardized, or "stereotaxic", 3D coordinate frame for data analysis and reporting of findings from neuroimaging experiments. This simple construct allows brain researchers to combine data from many subjects such that group-averaged signals, be they structural or functional, can be detected above the background noise that would swamp subtle signals from any single subject. Where the signal is robust enough to be detected in individuals, it allows for the exploration of inter-individual variance in the location of that signal. From a larger perspective, it provides a powerful medium for comparison and/or combination of brain mapping findings from different imaging modalities and laboratories around the world. Finally, it provides a framework for the creation of large-scale neuroimaging databases or "atlases" that capture the population mean and variance in anatomical or physiological metrics as a function of age or disease. However, while the above benefits are not in question at first order, there are a number of conceptual and practical challenges that introduce second-order incompatibilities among experimental data. Stereotaxic mapping requires two basic components: (i) the specification of the 3D stereotaxic coordinate space, and (ii) a mapping function that transforms a 3D brain image from "native" space, i.e. the coordinate frame of the scanner at data acquisition, to that stereotaxic space. The first component is usually expressed by the choice of a representative 3D MR image that serves as target "template" or atlas. The native image is re-sampled from native to stereotaxic space under the mapping function that may have few or many degrees of freedom, depending upon the experimental design. The optimal choice of atlas template and mapping function depend upon considerations of age, gender, hemispheric asymmetry, anatomical correspondence, spatial normalization methodology and disease

  6. Exotics searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Vranjes, N; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We report on the latest searches for (non-SUSY) Beyond Standard Model phenomena performed with the ATLAS detector. The searches have been performed with the data from proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV collected in 2010 and 2011. Various experimental signatures have been studied involving reconstruction and measurement of leptons, photons, jets, missing transverse energy, as well as reconstruction of top quarks. For most of the signatures, the experimental reach is significantly increased with respect to previous results.

  7. Cavernous hemangioma in the thymus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ose, Naoko; Kobori, Yuko; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Susaki, Yoshiyuki; Taniguchi, Seiji; Maeda, Hajime

    2016-12-01

    Cavernous hemangioma is not a neoplasm, but rather a congenital venous malformation with the potential to develop in all parts of the body, though it is very rarely seen in the thymus. We report a case of cavernous hemangioma in the thymus partially resected. A 71-year-old woman presented with pericardial discomfort, and chest computed tomography (CT) showed a left lateral mediastinal mass which was 2.0 × 1.2 × 1.8 cm in size, with border regularity and without calcification. Its interior was partially enhanced. Three-dimensional chest computed tomography image showed a tortuous vessel connecting to the tumor. Surgical resection was performed for the purpose of providing a definitive diagnosis and treatment because a mediastinal tumor such as thymoma or teratoma was suspected. Partial resection of the thymus including the mass was done by utilizing a three-port, left-sided video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) approach with hoisting of the third rib with the patient in a spinal position. A wine-colored mass bulging from the surface of the left lobe of the thymus was identified along with the communicating vessel which could only be cut with an energy device. It is considered that thymic partial resection using VATS is a better option for small and non-infiltrative lesions. PMID:26943686

  8. Ultrasonography guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for hepatic cavernous hemangioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Cui; Hong-Wen Zhang; Li-Yan Zhou; Man-Ku Dong; Ping Wang; Min Ji; Xiao-Ou Li; Chang-Wei Chen; Zi-Pei Liu; Yong-Jie Xu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Hepatic cavernous hemangioma (HCH) is the mostcommon benign tumor of the liver and its management isstill controversial. Recent successin situ radiofrequencyablation of hepatic malignancies has led us to consider usingthis technique in patients with HCH. This study was to assessthe efficacy, safety, and complications of percutaneousradiofrequency ablation (PRFA) under ultrasonographyguidance in patients with HCH.METHODS: Twelve patients (four men and eight women,age ranged 33-56 years, mean age was 41.7 years) with 15hepatic cavernous hemangiomas (2.5 cm to 9.5 cm) weretreated using the RF-2000 generator and 10-needle LeVeenelectrode percutaneously guided by B-ultrasound. Lesionslarger than 3 cm were treated by multiple overlappingablations that encompass the entire lesion as well as a rimof normal liver tissue (approximately 0.5 cm).RESULTS: All the patients who received PRFA therapy hadno severe pain, bleeding or bile leakage during and afterthe procedures. Nine to 34 months′ follow-up (mean, 21months) by ultrasound and/or spiral CT scan demonstratedthat the ablated lesions in this group were shrunk remarkably,and the shrunken range was 38-79 % (mean, 67 % per 21months). The contrast enhancement was disappeared withinthe tumor or at its periphery in all cases on spiral CT scansobtained 3 to 6 months after treatment.CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that PRFAtherapy is a mini-invasive, simple, safe, and effective methodfor the treatment of selected patients with HCH.

  9. Nitrogen Monitoring of West Hackberry 117 Cavern Wells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettin, Giorgia; Lord, David

    2015-02-01

    U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern West Hackberry 117 was tested under extended nitrogen monitoring following a successful mechanical integrity test in order to validate a newly developed hydrostatic column model to be used to differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen. High resolution wireline pressure and temperature data were collected during the test period and used in conjunction with the hydrostatic column model to predict the nitrogen/oil interface and the pressure along the entire fluid column from the bradenhead flange nominally at ground surface to bottom of brine pool. Results here and for other SPR caverns have shown that wells under long term nitrogen monitoring do not necessarily pressurize with a relative rate (P N2 /P brine) of 1. The theoretical relative pressure rate depends on the well configuration, pressure and the location of the nitrogen-oil interface and varies from well to well. For the case of WH117 the predicted rates were 0.73 for well A and 0.92 for well B. The measured relative pressurization rate for well B was consistent with the model prediction, while well A rate was found to be between 0.58-0.68. A number of possible reasons for the discrepancy between the model and measured rates of well A are possible. These include modeling inaccuracy, measurement inaccuracy or the possibility of the presence of a very small leak (below the latest calculated minimum detectable leak rate).

  10. Extradural spinal cavernous angiomas: report of seven cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Antonio; Piccirilli, Manolo; Bristot, Roberto; di Norcia, Valerio; Salvati, Maurizio; Delfini, Roberto

    2005-10-01

    The authors describe seven cases of extradural spinal cavernous angioma. Although cavernoma itself is not rare, the extradural spinal localization is uncommon and makes preoperative differential diagnosis difficult. Routine MRI investigation has aided neurosurgeons in evaluating the true incidence of these vascular malformations, which was understimated in the past. The data published so far have not entirely clarified the treatment of choice for these lesions. Considering their rarity in this site, their presenting symptoms and the difficulties involved in neuroradiological diagnosis, the authors discuss the role of surgery as the principal form of treatment and review the relevant literature. Seven patients (4 male, 3 female) were admitted to our Institute of Neurosurgery between 1992 and 2004, with a 5-6 month history (range=2-365 days) of low back pain or radicular pain, sometimes associated with paresthesia. All patients had a CT scan, as well as MRI with gadolinium when possible, which detected an extradural roundish lesion: differential diagnosis was very difficult, especially between neurinoma and cavernoma. Treatment was always surgical and resection of the lesion radical. Postoperatively, all patients presented complete regression of clinical symptoms. In all cases histological diagnosis was cavernous angioma. Postoperative MRI with gadolinium or CT scan with IV contrast, performed before discharge, confirmed radical removal of the vascular malformation in all cases. Our experience confirms that surgery should be the treatment of choice for these lesions, in view of both their tendency to bleed and their straightforward surgical removal.

  11. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Genova University

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Virtual Visit is included in the program of the Course in Particle and Nuclear Experimental Physics at the Physics Department of the Genova University. Students are introduced to experimental techniques and instrumentation and run few experiences in the laboratory. Besides that, they visit the Department groups that are involved both in Nuclear or High Energy Particle physics experiments. In this context, the ATLAS team will open them the doors to laboratory where ~1/3 of the Pixel detector has been built and where we are currently assembling and qualifying part of the electrical services and modules for the Insertable B layer (IBL) that will be installed in 2014 in ATLAS. Students will be introduced to LHC, ATLAS and the physics program before having the possibility to meet ATLAS physicists in ATLAS control room. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2013/Genova-2013_2.html

  12. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the Genova University

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS Virtual Visit is included in the program of the Course in Particle and Nuclear Experimental Physics at the Physics Department of the Genova University. Students are introduced to experimental techniques and instrumentation and run few experiences in the laboratory. Besides that, they visit the Department groups that are involved both in Nuclear or High Energy Particle physics experiments. In this context, the ATLAS team will open them the doors to laboratory where ~1/3 of the Pixel detector has been built and where we are currently assembling and qualifying part of the electrical services and modules for the Insertable B layer (IBL) that will be installed in 2014 in ATLAS. Students will be introduced to LHC, ATLAS and the physics program before having the possibility to meet ATLAS physicists in ATLAS control room. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2013/Genova-2013_1.html

  13. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by the University of Genova

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Experiment

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Virtual Visit is included in the program of the Course in Particle and Nuclear Experimental Physics at the Physics Department of the Genova University. Students are introduced to experimental techniques and instrumentation and run few experiences in the laboratory. Besides that, they visit the Department groups that are involved both in Nuclear or High Energy Particle physics experiments. In this context, the ATLAS team will open them the doors to laboratory where ~1/3 of the Pixel detector has been built and where we are currently assembling and qualifying part of the electrical services and modules for the Insertable B layer (IBL) that will be installed in 2014 in ATLAS. Students will be introduced to LHC, ATLAS and the physics program before having the possibility to meet ATLAS physicists in ATLAS control room. http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2012/Genova-2012.html

  14. Cosmic ray runs acquired with ATLAS muon stations

    CERN Multimedia

    Cerutti, F.

    Starting in the fall 2005 several cosmic ray runs have been acquired in the ATLAS pit with six muon stations. These were three large outer and three large middle chambers of the feet sector (sector 13) that have been readout in the ATLAS cavern. In the first data taking period the trigger was based on two large scintillators (~300x30 cm2) positioned in sector 13 just below the large chambers. In this first run the precision chambers (the Monitored Drift Tubes) were operated in a close to final configuration. Typical trigger rates with this setup were of the order of 1 Hz. Several data sets of 10k events were acquired with final electronics up to the muon ROD and analysed with ATHENA-based software. These data allowed the first checks of the functionality and efficiency of the MDT stations in the ATLAS pit and the first measurement of the FE electronics noise in the ATLAS environment. A few event were also collected in a combined run with the TILE barrel calorimeter. An event display of a cosmic ray a...

  15. A NOVEL PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LNG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; Marcus Krekel; James F. Davis; D. Braxton Scherz

    2005-05-31

    This cooperative research project validates use of man made salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships in lieu of large liquid LNG tanks. Salt caverns will not tolerate direct injection of LNG because it is a cryogenic liquid, too cold for contact with salt. This research confirmed the technical processes and the economic benefits of pressuring the LNG up to dense phase, warming it to salt compatible temperatures and then directly injecting the dense phase gas into salt caverns for storage. The use of salt caverns to store natural gas sourced from LNG imports, particularly when located offshore, provides a highly secure, large scale and lower cost import facility as an alternative to tank based LNG import terminals. This design can unload a ship in the same time as unloading at a tank based terminal. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve uses man made salt caverns to securely store large quantities of crude oil. Similarly, this project describes a novel application of salt cavern gas storage technologies used for the first time in conjunction with LNG receiving. The energy industry uses man made salt caverns to store an array of gases and liquids but has never used man made salt caverns directly in the importation of LNG. This project has adapted and expanded the field of salt cavern storage technology and combined it with novel equipment and processes to accommodate LNG importation. The salt cavern based LNG receiving terminal described in the project can be located onshore or offshore, but the focus of the design and cost estimates has been on an offshore location, away from congested channels and ports. The salt cavern based terminal can provide large volumes of gas storage, high deliverability from storage, and is simplified in operation compared to tank based LNG terminals. Phase I of this project included mathematical modeling that proved a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at lower capital cost, and would have significantly higher

  16. Literature Survey Concerning the Feasibility of Remedial Leach for Select Phase I Caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Paula D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flores, Karen A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lord, David L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Bryan Mound 5 ( BM5 ) and West Hackberry 9 ( WH9 ) have the potential to create a significant amount of new storage space should the caverns be deemed "leach - ready". This study discusses the original drilling history of the caverns, surrounding geology, current stability, and, based on this culmination of data, makes a preliminary assessment of the leach potential for the cavern. The risks associated with leaching BM5 present substantial problems for the SPR . The odd shape and large amount of insoluble material make it difficult to de termine whether a targeted leach would have the desired effect and create useable ullage or further distort the shape with preferential leaching . T he likelihood of salt falls and damaged or severed casing string is significant . In addition, a targeted le ach would require the relocation of approximately 27 MMB of oil . Due to the abundance of unknown factors associated with this cavern, a targeted leach of BM5 is not recommended. A targeted leaching of the neck of WH 9 could potentially eliminate or diminis h the mid - cavern ledge result ing in a more stable cavern with a more favorable shape. A better understanding of the composition of the surrounding salt and a less complicated leaching history yields more confidence in the ability to successfully leach this region. A targeted leach of WH9 can be recommended upon the completion of a full leach plan with consideration of the impacts upon nearby caverns .

  17. [Plea for a unifying concept of the cavernous sinus and the trigeminal cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, B; Sakka, M; Lapierre, F

    The object of this study is a scientific research in human and compared anatomy of the cavernous sinus and Meckel's cave. The observations made in the foetus and human adult are compared to these made in non human primates and domestic mammals, the cavernous sinus and the Meckel's cave contribute to realize a entirety that we call "a morphological and functional anatomical system". The human cavernous sinus and Meckel's cave are described as an indissociable parasellar space representing a heavy traffic area for vascular and nervous structures. In the human and non human primates, the authors observe a parasellar space which agreed with the concept of "trigeminal-cavernous anatomical system". In the cat, the same observations are made and an osseous outline closing the roof of the parasellar space is observed; this is the evidence of a more ancient osseous or cartilaginous wall. The authors demonstrate in the last part of this study that the morphogenesis of this trigeminal-cavernous system is in relation with the phylogenic development of its morphological and functional environment, that we call the "externation". This study is of interest: to a best understanding of the tumors involving the cavernous sinus, to a semantic point of view: an attempt to a review of the terminology applied to the cavernous sinus and Meckel's cave. PMID:7729219

  18. Development and test of the DAQ system for a Micromegas prototype installed into the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zibell, Andre; The ATLAS collaboration; Bianco, Michele; Martoiu, Victor Sorin

    2015-01-01

    A Micromegas (MM) quadruplet prototype with an active area of 0.5 m$^2$ that adopts the general design foreseen for the upgrade of the innermost forward muon tracking systems (Small Wheels) of the ATLAS detector in 2018-2019, has been built at CERN and is going to be tested in the ATLAS cavern environment during the LHC RUN-II period 2015-2017. The integration of this prototype detector into the ATLAS data acquisition system using custom ATCA equipment is presented. An ATLAS compatible ReadOutDriver (ROD) based on the Scalable Readout System (SRS), the Scalable Readout Unit (SRU), will be used in order to transmit the data after generating valid event fragments to the high-level Read Out System (ROS). The SRU will be synchronized with the LHC bunch crossing clock (40.08 MHz) and will receive the Level-1 trigger signals from the Central Trigger Processor (CTP) through the TTCrx receiver ASIC. The configuration of the system will be driven directly from the ATLAS Run Control System. By using the ATLAS TDAQ Soft...

  19. The ATLAS Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Schlenker, S; Kersten, S; Hirschbuehl, D; Braun, H; Poblaguev, A; Oliveira Damazio, D; Talyshev, A; Zimmermann, S; Franz, S; Gutzwiller, O; Hartert, J; Mindur, B; Tsarouchas, CA; Caforio, D; Sbarra, C; Olszowska, J; Hajduk, Z; Banas, E; Wynne, B; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Nemecek, S; Thompson, PD; Mandic, I; Deliyergiyev, M; Polini, A; Kovalenko, S; Khomutnikov, V; Filimonov, V; Bindi, M; Stanecka, E; Martin, T; Lantzsch, K; Hoffmann, D; Huber, J; Mountricha, E; Santos, HF; Ribeiro, G; Barillari, T; Habring, J; Arabidze, G; Boterenbrood, H; Hart, R; Marques Vinagre, F; Lafarguette, P; Tartarelli, GF; Nagai, K; D'Auria, S; Chekulaev, S; Phillips, P; Ertel, E; Brenner, R; Leontsinis, S; Mitrevski, J; Grassi, V; Karakostas, K; Iakovidis, G.; Marchese, F; Aielli, G

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is one of the multi-purpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), constructed to study elementary particle interactions in collisions of high-energy proton beams. Twelve different sub-detectors as well as the common experimental infrastructure are supervised by the Detector Control System (DCS). The DCS enables equipment supervision of all ATLAS sub-detectors by using a system of >130 server machines running the industrial SCADA product PVSS. This highly distributed system reads, processes and archives of the order of 106 operational parameters. Higher level control system layers allow for automatic control procedures, efficient error recognition and handling, and manage the communication with external systems such as the LHC. This contribution firstly describes the status of the ATLAS DCS and the experience gained during the LHC commissioning and the first physics data taking operation period. Secondly, the future evolution and maintenance constraints for the coming years an...

  20. CNS Cavernous Hemangioma; Imaging, Clinical Presentation and Related Anatomophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Jalal Shokouhi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nClinical and imaging judgement or decision: "n- Is it a CH “CM, CA“? "n- Is it solitary, multiple or familial? "n- Is there an associated venous malformation? "n- Are there risks and consequences of hemorrhage? "n- Is the anatomic location critical and life threatening? "nCavernous malformation is a low pressure, slow flowing malformation and composes 10 – 15 % of vascular malformations. Cavernous angioma consists of enlarged sinusoidal vascular spaces, a compact mass in the brain and spinal cord, the endothelial lining is weak and blood element leakage is frequent.Calcification is possible "X – ray CT ". 75% located in the brain and 25 % in the posterior fossa and brain stem. "nAll 50% of cases are multiple and this form is familial in 80 % of cases “possibility combined with cord cavernoma“. "nExtra – medullary and extra – paranchymal forms are rare. "n- 40-60 % of the patients demonstrate seizure because of hemorrhage inside the cavernoma. "n10 – 15 % of complicated patients show significant clinical signs especially in the brain stem."n Imaging: "n1- X-ray CT: Isodense or hyperdense with frequent and heavy calcification . "nEnhanced CT may show the degree of enhancement. "n2 – By MRI: T1 may be isointense but in case of hemorrhage there is bright methemoglobin inside. By T2 and flair a thin capsule and a rim of hemosiderin – ferritin "popcorn or mulberries" and shows enhancement "GD-GRE-MRI pulse". "nCompanion of venous angioma and cavernoma is possible. "nBleeding is more likely from cavernous malformations during pregnancy. "nConclusion: CT and MRI demonstrate all forms and sites of brain and spinal cord cavernomas. "nAttention is necessary for brain stem lesions especially during pregnancy."n Treatment: 1- Medial and serial MRI controls. "n2- Radiosurgery "Gama-knife", rare. "n3- Microsurgery, very rare Multiple forms of these lesions are demonstratable in 55 patients.  

  1. 24 January 2012 - British Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge Sir Leszek Borysiewicz signing the guest book with CERN Director-General, visiting ATLAS experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson D. Charlton and Sm18 with engineer R. Veness.

    CERN Document Server

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    24 January 2012 - British Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge Sir Leszek Borysiewicz signing the guest book with CERN Director-General, visiting ATLAS experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson D. Charlton and Sm18 with engineer R. Veness.

  2. 16 February 2012 - Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations Office and other international organisations at Geneva Ambassador A.Borodavkin signing the the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting ATLAS underground experimental area with Collaboration Members O. Fedin, S. Malyukov and A. Romaniouk; throughout accompanied by Adviser T. Kurtyka.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    16 February 2012 - Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the United Nations Office and other international organisations at Geneva Ambassador A.Borodavkin signing the the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting ATLAS underground experimental area with Collaboration Members O. Fedin, S. Malyukov and A. Romaniouk; throughout accompanied by Adviser T. Kurtyka.

  3. 31st August 2011 - Government of Japan R. Chubachi, Executive Member of the Council for Science and Technology Policy, Cabinet Office, Vice Chairman, Representative Corporate Executive Officer and Member of the Board, Sony Corporation, visiting the ATLAS experimental area with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Senior physicist T. Kondo.

    CERN Document Server

    Raphaël Piguet

    2011-01-01

    31st August 2011 - Government of Japan R. Chubachi, Executive Member of the Council for Science and Technology Policy, Cabinet Office, Vice Chairman, Representative Corporate Executive Officer and Member of the Board, Sony Corporation, visiting the ATLAS experimental area with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Senior physicist T. Kondo.

  4. 13th February 2012 - German CEO Barmenia Insurance Group and Chair of the Hochschulrat Board of Governors of the Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal J. Beutelmann visiting ATLAS experimental area and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Advise R. Voss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    13th February 2012 - German CEO Barmenia Insurance Group and Chair of the Hochschulrat Board of Governors of the Bergische Universitaet Wuppertal J. Beutelmann visiting ATLAS experimental area and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Advise R. Voss.

  5. 13 February 2012 - World Economic Forum Founder and Executive Chairman K. Schwab and Chairperson and Co-Founder Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship H. Schwab (Mrs)in the ATLAS experimental area at LHC Point 1 with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    13 February 2012 - World Economic Forum Founder and Executive Chairman K. Schwab and Chairperson and Co-Founder Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship H. Schwab (Mrs)in the ATLAS experimental area at LHC Point 1 with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  6. 24 February 2012 - Polish Vice-Rectors AGH University of Science and Technology Cracow visiting the ATLAS underground experimental area with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni; Vice Rector J. Lis signs a collaboration agreement with A. Unnervik; Adviser T. Kurtyka and A. Siemko accompany the delegation throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    24 February 2012 - Polish Vice-Rectors AGH University of Science and Technology Cracow visiting the ATLAS underground experimental area with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni; Vice Rector J. Lis signs a collaboration agreement with A. Unnervik; Adviser T. Kurtyka and A. Siemko accompany the delegation throughout.

  7. Impact of ATLAS measurements on PDFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the ATLAS measurements sensitive to parton distribution functions is presented. The analyses use proton–proton collision data at center–of–mass–energy √s = 7 TeV collected at the Large Hadron Collider between April and November 2011. When included in QCD fits, the ATLAS data allow for improving the experimental constraints on the gluon and strange–quark parton density functions of the proton.

  8. Atlas V Aft Bulkhead Carrier Rideshare System

    OpenAIRE

    Willcox, Maj Travis

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives the background and details of the Atlas V Aft Bulkhead Carrier to be flown on the National Recoinnassance Office Launch 36 with the Operationally Unique Technologies Satellite Auxiliary Payload. The CubeSats included are from a number of labs, universities and government entities for the purpose of technology demonstration, science experimentation and operational proof of concepts. This mission will pave the way for rideshare on NRO missions and other Atlas V launches.

  9. ATLAS Outreach Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Cheatham, Susan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS outreach team is very active, promoting particle physics to a broad range of audiences including physicists, general public, policy makers, students and teachers, and media. A selection of current outreach activities and new projects will be presented. Recent highlights include the new ATLAS public website and ATLAS Open Data, the very recent public release of 1 fb-1 of ATLAS data.

  10. Dynamic Response Analysis of Leaching Tube Used in Salt Cavern Gas Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongtao Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluid-structure coupling finite element model is proposed to analysis the dynamic response of leaching tube in the construction of salt cavern gas storage. The stress and deformation of leaching tube induced by the carrying fluid flow are studied. Meanwhile, an experiment on the dynamic response of plastic tube caused by carrying fluid flow is carried out to verify the calculation accuracy of the proposed model. Experimental results prove that the finite element model proposed in the study has a high accuracy, which can well characterize the stress and deformation of leaching tube under the action of fluid flow. The errors between experimental and numerical results are about 5%, which can satisfy the engineering accuracy demands. Excited pressure produced by fluid flow has significant effects on the stress and deformation of leaching tube string, which is the main cause of tube damage. Therefore, low injected freshwater velocity is proposed at the initial stage and then it is increased slowly. Moreover, rapidly opening or closing the valve should be avoided.

  11. Research on base rock mechanic characteristics of caverns for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been considered that underground space is mechanically stable as compared with on the ground, and superior for storing radioactive waste for long period. However, in order to utilize underground space for the place of radioactive waste disposal, its long term stability such as the aseismatic ability of base rocks must be ensured, and for this purpose, it is necessary to grasp the mechanical characteristics of the base rocks around caverns, and to advance the technology for measuring and evaluating minute deformation and earth pressure change. In this research, the study on the fracture mechanics characteristics of base rocks and the development of the technology for measuring long terms stress change of base rocks were carried out. In this research, what degree the memory of past stress is maintained by rocks was presumed by measuring AE and strain when stress was applied to rock test pieces. The rocks tested were tuff, sandstone and granite. The experimental method and the experimental results of the prestress by AE method and DRA are reported. (K.I.)

  12. A method for the construction of strongly reduced representations of ATLAS experimental uncertainties and the application thereof to the jet energy scale

    CERN Document Server

    Boerner, Daniela; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented for the reduction of large sets of related uncertainty sources into strongly reduced representations which retain a suitable level of correlation information for use in many cases. The method provides a self-consistent means of determining whether a given analysis is sensitive to the loss of correlation information arising from the reduction procedure. The method is applied to the ATLAS Jet Energy Scale (JES) uncertainty, demonstrating that the set of 60+ independent sources can be reduced to form a representation constructed of 3 nuisance parameters. By forming a set of four such representations, it is shown that JES correlation information is retained or probed over the full parameter space to within an average of 1%. This procedure is expected to significantly reduce the computational requirements placed upon early ATLAS searches in the upcoming 2015 dataset while still providing sufficient performance and correlation structure to avoid changing the analysis results.

  13. 29 January 2009 - Italian Minister for Foreign Affairs F. Frattini, visiting the ATLAS experimental area with Director-General R. Heuer and Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    Present during the ATLAS undegrround visit: Dr Fabiola Gianotti,ATLAS CollaborationDeputy Spokesperson and Spokesperson Designate; Dr Monica Pepe-Altarelli, LHCb Collaboration CERN Team Leader; Prof. Guido Tonelli,CMS Collaboration, Deputy Spokesperson; Prof. Roberto Petronzio, INFN President. CERN participants present in the audience during the presentations by the Director-General R. Heuer and by Prof. Antonino Zichichi, ALICE Collaboration, University of Bologna: Prof. Sergio Bertolucci,Director for Research and Scientific Computing; Prof. Felicitas Pauss, Coordinator for External Relations Coordinator; Prof. Carlo Rubbia, CERN Former Director-General, Nobel Prize in Physics 1984; Dr Jurgen Schukraft, ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson. Members of the delegation in the audience: Ambassador to the UN, H. Exc. Mr Caracciolo di Vetri; Ambassador Alain G.M. Economides,Capo di Gabinetto; Prof. Antonio Bettanini\tCons. dell’On. Ministro per le Relazioni istituzionali; On. Mario Pescante and Min. Plen Maurizio Mas...

  14. 18 December 2012 -Portuguese President of FCT M. Seabra visiting the Computing Centre with IT Department Head F. Hemmer, ATLAS experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti and A. Henriques Correia, in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and CMS experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson J. Varela, signing an administrative agreement with Director-General R. Heuer; LIP President J. M. Gago and Delegate to CERN Council G. Barreia present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2012-01-01

    18 December 2012 -Portuguese President of FCT M. Seabra visiting the Computing Centre with IT Department Head F. Hemmer, ATLAS experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti and A. Henriques Correia, in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and CMS experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson J. Varela, signing an administrative agreement with Director-General R. Heuer; LIP President J. M. Gago and Delegate to CERN Council G. Barreia present.

  15. ATLAS Story

    CERN Multimedia

    Nordberg, Markus

    2012-01-01

    This film produced in July 2012 explains how fundamental research connects to Society and what benefits collaborative way of working can and may generate in the future, using ATLAS Collaboration as a case study. The film is intellectually inspired by the book "Collisions and Collaboration" (OUP) by Max Boisot (ed.), see: collisionsandcollaboration.com. The film is directed by Andrew Millington (OMNI Communications)

  16. Observations on vapor pressure in SPR caverns : sources.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, Darrell Eugene

    2010-05-01

    The oil of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) represents a national response to any potential emergency or intentional restriction of crude oil supply to this country, and conforms to International Agreements to maintain such a reserve. As assurance this reserve oil will be available in a timely manner should a restriction in supply occur, the oil of the reserve must meet certain transportation criteria. The transportation criteria require that the oil does not evolve dangerous gas, either explosive or toxic, while in the process of transport to, or storage at, the destination facility. This requirement can be a challenge because the stored oil can acquire dissolved gases while in the SPR. There have been a series of reports analyzing in exceptional detail the reasons for the increases, or regains, in gas content; however, there remains some uncertainty in these explanations and an inability to predict why the regains occur. Where the regains are prohibitive and exceed the criteria, the oil must undergo degasification, where excess portions of the volatile gas are removed. There are only two known sources of gas regain, one is the salt dome formation itself which may contain gas inclusions from which gas can be released during oil processing or storage, and the second is increases of the gases release by the volatile components of the crude oil itself during storage, especially if the stored oil undergoes heating or is subject to biological generation processes. In this work, the earlier analyses are reexamined and significant alterations in conclusions are proposed. The alterations are based on how the fluid exchanges of brine and oil uptake gas released from domal salt during solutioning, and thereafter, during further exchanges of fluids. Transparency of the brine/oil interface and the transfer of gas across this interface remains an important unanswered question. The contribution from creep induced damage releasing gas from the salt surrounding the cavern is

  17. Management of Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: From Diagnosis to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Mouchtouris

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral cavernous malformations are the most common vascular malformations and can be found in many locations in the brain. If left untreated, cavernomas may lead to intracerebral hemorrhage, seizures, focal neurological deficits, or headaches. As they are angiographically occult, their diagnosis relies on various MR imaging techniques, which detect different characteristics of the lesions as well as aiding in planning the surgical treatment. The clinical presentation and the location of the lesion are the most important factors involved in determining the optimal course of treatment of cavernomas. We concisely review the literature and discuss the advantages and limitations of each of the three available methods of treatment—microsurgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery, and conservative management—depending on the lesion characteristics.

  18. Sonographic Findings of Cavernous Hemangioma in Fatty Liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm, Jin Kyeung; Kim, Ki Whang; Yoon, Sang Wook; Kim, Tae Hoon; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Kim, Myung Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ji, Hoon [Aju Univeristy, College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    Typical cavernous hemangioma presents no diagnostic difficulty at sonography. However, in cases of atypical hemangioma, further evaluation is needed to differentiate it from malignancy. On the other hand, thcechogenicity of the lesion may be iso echo or hypoecho when it occurs in association with fatty liver. We analyzed the sonographic features of hemangioma in fatty liver. We reviewed the sonograms of 22 lesions from 19 patients. We divided the lesions into two groups; the lesion measuring less than 3cm in diameter (group I) and the lesions measuring same or greater than 3cm (group II). The lesions of each group were analyzed in terms of location, shape, distinction of margin, internal echogenicity, posterior enhancement, lateral shadowing, and peritumoral hypoechoic halo. The lesions were located in subcapsular or perivascular areain 86%. They strowed round or lobulated shape with well defined margin in 82%. Internal echo of the lesions was hypoechoic in 82% and homogeneous in 64%. Posterior enhancement was seen in 77%. The posterior wall of the lesion was distinct in 68%. There was no statistical difference in incidence of each finding described above between the two groups except the internal echogenicity(p<0.05). All of the four hyperechoic lesions measured greater than 3cmin diameter, and three of them showed uneven thickness of echogenic rind. Definitive diagnosis of hemangioma could be obtained in 82%. In remaining 18% of hemangioma, the lesions showed peripheral hypoechoic halo and lateral shadowing that made the diagnosis of hemangioma difficult. However, the possibility of hemangioma could be suggested because they showed haemangiomas internal eye-catching and posterior enhancement. Hepatic cavernous hemangioma presents with variable eye-catching as compared to the surrounding tissue when it is associated with fatty liver disease, Thus, in differentiating hemangiomas from other localized hepatic mass, other characteristics such as homogeneity of the

  19. 海绵体神经损伤所致ED大鼠模型建立%Rat model of erectile dysfunction caused by cavernous nerve ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张新华; 胡礼泉; 尹静; 莫曾南; 陈坚

    2002-01-01

    目的寻找大鼠海绵体神经并建立神经损伤所致ED大鼠模型.方法对20只大鼠进行解剖,在外科显微镜下找到海绵体神经并经电刺激试验证实.随后将42只实验大鼠随机分为假手术对照组、单侧海绵体神经损伤组及双侧海绵体神经损伤组.术后3周用阿朴吗啡试验来评估所建动物模型.结果盆主要神经节位于背侧前列腺后外侧叶表面,其最大的传出神经就是海绵体神经.诱发阴茎勃起的电刺激参数是:电压5V、刺激频率20Hz及刺激时间5ms.术后3周,阿朴吗啡均能诱发对照组大鼠阴茎勃起,30分钟内平均勃起次数为2.57±1.40,实验组大鼠,无论单侧损伤还是双侧损伤,均丧失勃起功能(0.00±0.00).结论大鼠较大的盆主要神经节及海绵体神经易于辨认,电刺激反应明显,而且大鼠价格便宜,易于饲养及购买,是建立海绵体神经损伤性ED模型的理想动物.此外还发现,无论是单侧海绵体神经损伤还是双侧损伤,损伤后早期,大鼠均丧失勃起功能.%Objective To identify the rat cavernous nerve and establish a rat model of erectile dysfunction (ED) caused by injury of the cavernous nerve. Methods Twenty rats underwent dissections. Cavernous nerves were identified with the aid of an operating microscope and confirmed by electrical stimulation. Then, 42 experimental rats were randomized into 3 groups, including sham-operated controls and unilateral and bilateral cavernous nerve ablation groups. Three weeks after surgery, rat models were evaluated with the Apomorphine test.Results The major pelvic ganglion lies on either side of the dorsolateral lobes of the prostate. It includes 2 inflows, one called hypogastric nerve and the other, the pelvic nerve. The largest outflow is termed the cavernous nerve. Stimulus parameters which could induce obvious penile erection were 5 volts, a frequency of 20 Hertz and a duration of 5 milliseconds. Three weeks after surgery, apomorphine

  20. Bilateral Carotid-Cavernous Fistulas: An Uncommon Cause of Pituitary Enlargement and Hypopituitarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechan, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are rare, pathologic communications of the carotid artery and the venous plexus of the cavernous sinus. They can develop spontaneously in certain at risk individuals or following traumatic head injury. Typical clinical manifestations include headache, proptosis, orbital pain, and diplopia. We report a case of bilateral carotid-cavernous fistulas associated with these symptoms and also with pituitary enlargement and hypopituitarism, which improved following surgical intervention. Arterialization of the cavernous sinus and elevated portal pressure may interfere with normal venous drainage and the conveyance of inhibiting and releasing hormones from the hypothalamus, resulting in pituitary enlargement and hypopituitarism. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypopituitarism associated with anterior pituitary enlargement.

  1. A dural arteriovenous fistula in cavernous sinus developed from viral meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Jian; Zhang, Lin; Wan, Jue-Feng; Su, Shao-Hua; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Gui-Yun

    2011-06-01

    Although hormonal influences, inflammation, trauma, sinus thrombosis, venous hypertension, and congenital origin have been proposed as sources of dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) in cavernous and sigmoid sinuses, the etiology of these lesions remains controversial. We present a case with a cavernous sinus DAVF developed from viral meningitis which has not been previously described. A 24-year-old male was admitted to our institute because of periorbital pain, decreased vision, pulsatile tinnitus, chemosis, and exophthalmos on the right side after he had suffered viral meningitis four months before. Cerebral angiography demonstrated a cavernous sinus DAVF, which was successfully obliterated with several platinum coils using a transvenous approach. The viral meningitis most likely caused the inflammation, that may be responsible for the occurrence of the cavernous sinus DAVF. Prompt treatment for inflammation may help to prevent the development of DAVFs.

  2. Transient behaviour of deep underground salt caverns; Comportement transitoire des cavites salines profondes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimi-Jafari, M

    2007-11-15

    This work deals with the transient behaviour of deep underground salt caverns. It has been shown that a cavern is a complex system, in which there are mechanical, thermal, chemical and hydraulic evolutions. The importance of the transient evolutions, particularly the role of the 'reverse' creep in the interpretation of the tightness test in a salt cavern is revealed. Creep is characterized by a formulation of the behaviour law which presents the advantage, in a practical point of view, to only have a reduced number of parameters while accounting of the essential of what it is observed. The initiation of the rupture in the effective traction in a salt cavern rapidly pressurized is discussed. A model fitted to a very long term behaviour (after abandonment) is developed too. In this case too, a lot of phenomena, more or less coupled, occur, when the existing literature took only into account some phenomena. (O.M.)

  3. [Anatomical study of the cavernous nerve in relation to nerve sparing operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanawa, K

    1994-08-01

    Recently, nerve sparing radical prostatectomy has became widely considered as the primary goal for maintaining a high standard of quality of life (QOL). However, anatomical localization of the cavernous nerve has not yet been precisely clarified in terms of the terminal end in the corpus cavernous penis distal to the urogenital membrane. Here in attempt to demonstrate the precise localization of the cavernous nerve, in six adult male cadaver. The cavernous nerves ran between the prostatic capsule and the prostatic fascia, through the capsule of the seminal vesicle. The nerves penetrated the membranous urethra at 8 mm from the margin of the urethra at the position of 5 and 7 o'clock. Therefore, the following procedures are critical to achieve successful nerve sparing: 1) meticulous division of the seminal-vesicle, 2) precise separation of the neurovascular bundle between the prostatic capsule and fascia, and 3) the careful transaction of the membranous urethra.

  4. Diagnosis and management of trigemino-cavernous fistulas: case reports and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy R; Jindal, Gaurav; Mohan, Suyash; Fortes, Manuel; Hurst, Robert; Pukenas, Bryan; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2015-01-01

    Although usually asymptomatic, a persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) can rarely be associated with a direct fistula to the cavernous sinus (ie, trigemino-cavernous fistula). We present three patients with trigemino-cavernous fistulas; two were subsequently treated using modern endovascular techniques while the third initially declined therapy. We then review the literature of reported cases of this unusual entity. The aberrant anatomy associated with a PTA presents unique challenges to the management of these lesions, and must be well delineated prior to treatment. Finally, conservative management of trigemino-cavernous fistulas, either de novo or recurrent, may be considered if they demonstrate no evidence of cortical venous reflux and patient symptoms are tolerable. PMID:24394154

  5. Dural carotid cavernous sinus fistula presenting as isolated oculomotor nerve palsy: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şehnaz Arıcı

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Indirect (dural carotid cavernous fistula is formed by the connection between meningeal branches of the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinüs, and low flow circulation with low pressure is occured. Proptosis, ophtalmoplegia, headache, scleral and conjuctival hyperemia expanding around the eyeball can be observed. A forty-eight year old female patient with a background of diabetes mellitus and hypertension was admitted with complaints of double vision. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy was found in neurological examination and an indirect carotid cavernous fistula was revealed by digital subtraction angiography. Our case with carotid cavernous fistula as a rare cause of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy is worth to be reported.

  6. Transorbital superior ophthalmic vein sacrifice to preserve vision in ocular hypertension from aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Travis R; Davis, Brandon J; He, Lucy; Mawn, Louise A; Mocco, J

    2015-12-01

    Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) is rare and may clinically masquerade as a carotid cavernous fistula. Conventional management includes oral anticoagulation, but cases of ocular hypertension affecting vision may require more aggressive intervention. We report a case of a woman with spontaneous bilaterally occluded cavernous sinuses with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), which resolved immediately following unilateral superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) sacrifice. She was subsequently placed on oral anticoagulants. By 4 months postoperatively her IOP was normalized and her vision had improved. Repeat angiography demonstrated stable venous filling, with some mild improvement of flow through the cavernous sinus. Coil-mediated sacrifice of the SOV might be an effective means to relieve ocular hypertension and preserve vision in the setting of aseptic CST.

  7. EXAMINE AND EVALUATE A PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; D. Braxton Scherz

    2003-04-24

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy cooperative research project is to define, describe, and validate, a process to utilize salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships. The project defines the process as receiving LNG from a ship, pumping the LNG up to cavern injection pressures, warming it to cavern compatible temperatures, injecting the warmed vapor directly into salt caverns for storage, and distribution to the pipeline network. The performance of work under this agreement is based on U.S. Patent 5,511,905, and other U.S. and Foreign pending patent applications. The cost sharing participants in the research are The National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. Department of Energy), BP America Production Company, Bluewater Offshore Production Systems (U.S.A.), Inc., and HNG Storage, L.P. Initial results indicate that a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at about half the capital cost, less than half the operating costs and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. There is a significant body of knowledge and practice concerning natural gas storage in salt caverns, and there is a considerable body of knowledge and practice in handling LNG, but there has never been any attempt to develop a process whereby the two technologies can be combined. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or terrorist acts, and much more acceptable to the community. The project team developed conceptual designs of two salt cavern based LNG terminals, one with caverns located in Calcasieu Parish Louisiana, and the second in Vermilion block 179 about 50 miles offshore Louisiana. These conceptual designs were compared to conventional tank based LNG terminals and demonstrate superior security, economy and capacity. The potential for the development of LNG receiving terminals

  8. Traumatic Persistent Trigeminal Artery - Cavernous Sinus Fistula Treated by Transcatheter Arterial Embolization: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Asai, K.; Hasuo, K; Hara, T.; Miyagishima, T.; Terano, N.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a rare case of traumatic persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) - cavernous sinus fistula. Cerebral angiography showed direct communication between the right PTA and the cavernous sinus which was treated by transcathether arterial embolization. Although previous reports have indicated the use of more coils to treat this condition, we successfully treated the patient with only two coils placed near the orifice of the fistula after sufficient anatomical evaluation.

  9. Light and scanning electron microscopical study of the cavernous sinus of the monkey, Macaca fascicularis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rajendran, K.; Ling, E A

    1985-01-01

    The cavernous sinus of Macaca fascicularis is in many respects similar to the human sinus. It consists predominantly of one main venous channel that, together with the internal carotid artery, occupies a meningo-endocranial compartment lateral to the pituitary gland. Trabeculae are few and do not in any way cause the sinus to appear cavernous. They are mostly flattened in the direction of the main venous channel. Cranial nerves three, four, six and the ophthalmic division of five are all loca...

  10. TIPS Placement via Combined Transjugular and Transhepatic Approach for Cavernous Portal Vein Occlusion: Targeted Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Natanel Jourabchi; Justin Pryce McWilliams; Edward Wolfgang Lee; Steven Sauk; Stephen Thomas Kee

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We report a novel technique which aided recanalization of an occluded portal vein for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation in a patient with symptomatic portal vein thrombosis with cavernous transformation. Some have previously considered cavernous transformation a contraindication to TIPS. Case Presentation. 62-year-old man with chronic pancreatitis, portal vein thrombosis, portal hypertension and recurrent variceal bleeding presents with melena and hemateme...

  11. Spontaneous occlusion of traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula - the effect of angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfel, G.

    1984-08-01

    In two patients with a traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula, permanent occlusion of the lesion was observed following cerebral angiography and confirmed by further angiography. A delay is therefore recommended between performing angiography and carrying out further treatment, which may carry some risk. Possibly the use of ionic contrast media, which irritate the vessels, compression of the carotid artery, which reduces flow through the fistula, and general anaesthesia, which may drop the blood pressure, initiate thrombosis in the cavernous sinus. 3 figs.

  12. Traumatic Persistent Trigeminal Artery - Cavernous Sinus Fistula Treated by Transcatheter Arterial Embolization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, K.; Hasuo, K.; Hara, T.; Miyagishima, T.; Terano, N.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We describe a rare case of traumatic persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) - cavernous sinus fistula. Cerebral angiography showed direct communication between the right PTA and the cavernous sinus which was treated by transcathether arterial embolization. Although previous reports have indicated the use of more coils to treat this condition, we successfully treated the patient with only two coils placed near the orifice of the fistula after sufficient anatomical evaluation. PMID:20377986

  13. Traumatic persistent trigeminal artery--cavernous sinus fistula treated by transcatheter arterial embolization. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, K; Hasuo, K; Hara, T; Miyagishima, T; Terano, N

    2010-03-01

    We describe a rare case of traumatic persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) - cavernous sinus fistula. Cerebral angiography showed direct communication between the right PTA and the cavernous sinus which was treated by transcathether arterial embolization. Although previous reports have indicated the use of more coils to treat this condition, we successfully treated the patient with only two coils placed near the orifice of the fistula after sufficient anatomical evaluation. PMID:20377986

  14. Diagnosis of orbital cavernous hemangioma with Tc-99m RBC SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, W W; Shin, J W; Won, K S; Ryu, J S; Yang, S O; Lee, H K; Kim, Y J

    1997-08-01

    The authors report two cases of orbital cavernous hemangioma diagnosed by Tc-99m RBC SPECT. Tc-99m RBC SPECT showed a typical scintigraphic pattern commonly seen in hepatic hemangioma in which there is intense focally increased uptake on delayed SPECT images. Tc-99m RBC SPECT in orbital cavernous hemangioma may be as useful a diagnostic modality as in hepatic hemangioma. PMID:9262901

  15. Supersymmetry searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Meloni, Federico; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    This document summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric particles using LHC proton-proton collision data. Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. We consider both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios. The searches involve final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, taus or photons, as well as long-lived particle signatures. Sensitivity projections for the data that will be collected in 2015 are also presented.

  16. Supersymmetry searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Meloni, Federico; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. This talk summarises recent ATLAS results for searches for supersymmetric (SUSY) particles. Weak and strong production in both R-Parity conserving and R-Parity violating SUSY scenarios are considered. The searches involved final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, light leptons, taus or photons, as well as long-lived particle signatures. Sensitivity projections for the data that will be collected in 2015 are also presented.

  17. Risk analyses for disposing nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.; Caudle, D.

    1997-12-01

    Salt caverns have been used for several decades to store various hydrocarbon products. In the past few years, four facilities in the US have been permitted to dispose nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns. Several other disposal caverns have been permitted in Canada and Europe. This report evaluates the possibility that adverse human health effects could result from exposure to contaminants released from the caverns in domal salt formations used for nonhazardous oil field waste disposal. The evaluation assumes normal operations but considers the possibility of leaks in cavern seals and cavern walls during the post-closure phase of operation. In this assessment, several steps were followed to identify possible human health risks. At the broadest level, these steps include identifying a reasonable set of contaminants of possible concern, identifying how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the toxicities of these contaminants, estimating their intakes, and characterizing their associated human health risks. The contaminants of concern for the assessment are benzene, cadmium, arsenic, and chromium. These were selected as being components of oil field waste and having a likelihood to remain in solution for a long enough time to reach a human receptor.

  18. Deformation and Failure Characteristics of the Rock Masses around Deep Underground Caverns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The deformation and failure characteristics of deep rock masses are the focus of this study on deep rock mass engineering. The study identifies the deformation and failure characteristics of a deep cavern under different ground stress conditions using model test and theoretical analysis methods. First, the similarity theory for model tests is introduced, and then the scale factors used in the present study are calculated according to the Froude criterion. Based on the study objectives, the details of the study methods (the similarity coefficient, the loading conditions, the test steps, etc. are introduced. Finally, the failure characteristics of the deep cavern and the strain distribution characteristics surrounding the caverns under different ground stress conditions are identified using the model test. It was found that compared with shallow rock masses the rock masses of the deep cavern have a much greater tensile range, which reaches 1.5 times the diameter of the cavern under the conditions established in the present study. Under different ground stress conditions, there are differences in failure characteristics and the reasons of the differences were analyzed. The implication of the test results on the design of support system for deep caverns was presented.

  19. Hazard assessment of the stability of a cavern roof along the coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, A.; Lollino, P.

    2009-04-01

    This work concerns the hazard assessment about the stability of a large shallow depth cavern, located along the coastline rocky sector of Polignano town (Apulia, Southern Italy) under an intensely urbanised area. This cavern, which lies at the sea level, has been created by a prolonged process of sea erosion within a rock mass formed of a lower stratified limestone mass and an upper Gravina Calcarenite mass. The thickness of the cavern roof, which has a dome shape, is less than 10 metres in the centre. Important buildings, as hotels and private houses, are located just above the top of the roof. Erosion processes have been observed to be still active along the whole cavern due to climate factors and, in particular, to sea salt weathering and sea spray effects. In 2007 a large calcarenite block, 3 m large, fell down from the cavern roof and consequently a field investigation campaign was carried out for a rational stabilization plan in order to understand the current stability conditions of the roof and the potential failure mechanism. Therefore, a thorough geo-structural survey has firstly been carried out, together with laboratory and in-situ testing for measuring the physical and mechanical properties of the calcarenite rock and of the corresponding joints. A monitoring system has also been planned and installed in order to measure the erosional rate and the block displacements in the cavern.

  20. Transvenous embolization of indirect carotid-cavernous fistula via upper ophthalmic/facial vein - Case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indirect carotid-cavernous fistula or dural arterio-venous fistula of cavernous sinus is relatively rare pathologic finding. Different classifications of carotid-cavernous fistulae are proposed. Now days more and more they are treated by endovascular approach. A case of authors' practice of transvenous embolization of carotid-cavernous fistula via upper ophthalmic vein in 52 year old female is presented with review of the literature. A week later ocular symptoms of the patient regressed. Control angiography at the third month follow up does not visualize fistula. The transvenous approach in management of carotid cavernous fistulae is safe and effective in cases direct arterial approach is absent or technically impossible. Key words: Indirect Carotid-Cavernous Fistula. Embolization. Transvenous Approach

  1. Japan's exploration of vertical holes and subsurface caverns on the Moon and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruyama, J.; Kawano, I.; Kubota, T.; Yoshida, K.; Kawakatsu, Y.; Kato, H.; Otsuki, M.; Watanabe, K.; Nishibori, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Iwata, T.; Ishigami, G.; Yamada, T. T.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, gigantic vertical holes exceeding several tens of meters in diameter and depth were discovered on the Moon and Mars. Based on high-resolution image data, lunar holes and some Martian pits (called 'holes' hereafter) are probably skylights of subsurface caverns such as lava tubes or magma chambers. We are starting preparations for exploring the caverns through the vertical holes. The holes and subsurface caverns have high potential as resources for scientific studies. Various important geological and mineralogical processes could be uniquely and effectively observed inside these holes and subsurface caverns. The exposed fresh lava layers on the vertical walls of the lunar and Martian holes would provide information on volcanic eruption histories. The lava layers may also provide information on past magnetic fields of the celestial bodies. The regolith layers may be sandwiched between lava layers and may preserve volatile elements including solar wind protons that could be a clue to understanding past solar activities. Water molecules from solar winds or cometary/meteorite impacts may be stored inside the caverns because of mild temperatures there. The fresh lava materials forming the walls and floors of caverns might trap endogenic volatiles from magma eruptions that will be key materials for revealing the formation and early evolution of the Moon and Mars. Furthermore, the Martian subsurface caverns are highly expected to be life cradles where the temperatures are probably stable and that are free from ultra-violet and other cosmic rays that break chemical bonds, thus avoiding polymerization of molecules. Discovering extraterrestrial life and its varieties is one of our ultimate scientific purposes for exploring the lunar and Martian subsurface caverns. In addition to scientific interests, lunar and Martian subsurface caverns are excellent candidates for future lunar bases. We expect such caverns to have high potential due to stable temperatures; absence

  2. 14 February 2012 - Vice-President of the Senate of the Parliament of the Czech Republic A. Gajduskova signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting ATLAS experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti. Ambassador Sequensova to the UN accompanies the Vice-President.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Vice-president of the Senate of the Parliament of the Czech Republic, Alena Gajduskova was welcomed to CERN by Rolf Heuer, CERN’s director-general, on 14 and 15 February. Her time at CERN included the ATLAS Visitor Centre and underground experimental area, the LHC tunnel, the LHC superconducting-magnet test hall and the ALICE underground experimental area. She also heard a presentation on the LHC Computing Grid Project at CERN’s Computer Centre.

  3. Cauda equina cavernous angioma presenting as acute low back pain and sciatica. A report of two cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalatbari, M R; Hamidi, M; Moharamzad, Y; Taheri, B

    2011-08-31

    Spinal cavernous angiomas are rare vascular lesions occurring mainly in the vertebral bodies extending secondary into the extradural space. Only 3% of these lesions are intradural, usually localized within the spinal cord. Rarely, cavernous angioma has been reported to occur in the cauda equina. We describe clinical, diagnostic imaging, and surgical procedures of two cases of cavernous angioma of the cauda equina who presented with acute back pain and sciatica. The relevant literature is also reviewed. PMID:24059723

  4. Design Principles and Operational Results of the Cryogenic System for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Fabre, C; Chalifour, M; Gonidec, G; Passardi, Giorgio; Petit, P; Pezzetti, M; Wicek, F

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS liquid argon calorimeter housed in three independent cryostats containing a total argon volume of about 78 m3 has been installed in the underground cavern. The three detectors have been cooled down following stringent temperature gradient limits and have been filled with liquid argon. The cryostats are now in a stable condition for periods going up to almost two years. The temperature uniformity within each of the three detector volumes is found to be within 70 mK rms, while the temperature stability stays below 5 mK rms.

  5. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Goldfarb; Mitch McLachlan; Homer A. Neal

    Web Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials from 2005 until this past month are available via the University of Michigan portal here. Most recent additions include the Trigger-Aware Analysis Tutorial by Monika Wielers on March 23 and the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal.Feedback WelcomeOur group is making arrangements now to record plenary sessions, tutorials, and other important ATLAS events for 2007. Your suggestions for potential recording, as well as your feedback on existing archives is always welcome. Please contact us at wlap@umich.edu. Thank you.Enjoy the Lectures!

  6. Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts: Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none

    1998-09-30

    Over the past 40 years, cavern storage of LPG's, petrochemicals, such as ethylene and propylene, and other petroleum products has increased dramatically. In 1991, the Gas Processors Association (GPA) lists the total U.S. underground storage capacity for LPG's and related products of approximately 519 million barrels (82.5 million cubic meters) in 1,122 separate caverns. Of this total, 70 are hard rock caverns and the remaining 1,052 are caverns in salt deposits. However, along the eastern seaboard of the U.S. and the Pacific northwest, salt deposits are not available and therefore, storage in hard rocks is required. Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. Competing methods include LNG facilities and remote underground storage combined with pipeline transportation to the area. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. DOE has identified five regions, that have not had favorable geological conditions for underground storage development: New England, Mid-Atlantic (NY/NJ), South Atlantic (DL/MD/VA), South Atlantic (NC/SC/GA), and the Pacific Northwest (WA/OR). PB-KBB reviewed published literature and in-house databases of the geology of these regions to determine suitability of hard rock formations for siting

  7. Commissioning of the ATLAS inner detector with cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, H.

    2008-07-01

    The inner detector of the ATLAS experiment is in the process of being commissioned using cosmic ray events. First tests were performed in the SR1 assembly hall at CERN with both barrel and endcaps for all different detector technologies (pixels and microstrips silicon detectors as well as straw tubes with additional transition radiation detection). Integration with the rest of the ATLAS sub-detectors is now being done in the ATLAS cavern. The full software chain has been set up in order to reconstruct and analyse this kind of events. Final detector decoders have been developed, different pattern recognition algorithms and track fitters have been validated as well as the various alignment and calibration methods. The infrastructure to deal with conditions data coming from the data acquisition, detector control system and calibration runs has been put in place, allowing also to apply alignment and calibration constants. The software has also been essential to monitor the detector performance during data taking. Detector efficiencies, noise occupancies and resolutions have been studied in detail and compared with those obtained from simulation.

  8. Development and test of the DAQ system for a Micromegas prototype to be installed in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Zibell, Andre; The ATLAS collaboration; Bianco, Michele; Martoiu, Victor Sorin

    2015-01-01

    A Micromegas (MM) quadruplet prototype with an active area of 0.5 m 2 that adopts the general design foreseen for the upgrade of the innermost forward muon tracking systems (Small Wheels) of the ATLAS detector in 2018-2019, has been built at CERN and is going to be tested in the ATLAS cavern environment during the LHC RUN-II period 2015-2017. The integration of this prototype detector into the ATLAS data acquisition system using custom ATCA equipment is presented. An ATLAS compatible Read Out Driver (ROD) based on the Scalable Readout System (SRS), the Scalable Readout Unit (SRU), will be used in order to transmit the data after generating valid event fragments to the high-level Read Out System (ROS). The SRU will be synchronized with the LHC bunch crossing clock (40.08 MHz) and will receive the Level-1 trigger signals from the Central Trigger Processor (CTP) through the TTCrx receiver ASIC. The configuration of the system will be driven directly from the ATLAS Run Control System. By using the ATLAS TDAQ Soft...

  9. Surgical management of cavernous malformations coursing with drug resistant epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Arturo Alonso-Vanegas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral cavernous malformations (CM are dynamic lesions characterized by continuous size changes and repeated bleeding. When involving cortical tissue, CM pose a significant risk for the development of drug-resistant epilepsy, which is thought to be result of an altered neuronal network caused by the lesion itself and its blood degradation products. Preoperative evaluation should comprise a complete seizure history, neurological examination, epilepsy-oriented MRI, EEG, video-EEG, completed with SPECT, PET, functional MRI and/or invasive monitoring as needed. Radiosurgery shows variable rates of seizure freedom and a high incidence of complications, thus microsurgical resection remains the optimal treatment for CM coursing with drug-resistant epilepsy.Two thirds of patients reach Engel I class at three-year follow-up, regardless of lobar location. Those with secondarily generalized seizures, a higher seizure frequency, and generalized abnormalities on preoperative or postoperative EEG, show poorer outcomes, while factors such as gender, duration of epilepsy, lesion size, age, bleeding at the time of surgery, do not correlate consistently with seizure outcome. Electrocorticography and a meticulous removal of all cortical hemosiderin –beyond pure lesionectomy– reduce the risk of symptomatic recurrences.

  10. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for the treatment of cavernous sinus hemangiomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    XU, QINGSHENG; SHEN, JIAN; FENG, YIPING; ZHAN, RENYA

    2016-01-01

    The present retrospective study aimed to analyze the outcome of patients with cavernous sinus hemangioma (CSH) treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKS). Between August 2011 and April 2014, 7 patients with CSHs underwent GKS. GKS was performed as the sole treatment option in 5 patients, whilst partial resection had been performed previously in 1 patient and biopsy had been performed in 1 patient. The mean volume of the tumors at the time of GKS was 12.5±10.2 cm3 (range, 5.3–33.2 cm3), and the median prescription of peripheral dose was 14.0 Gy (range, 10.0–15.0 Gy). The mean follow-up period was 20 months (range, 6–40 months). At the last follow-up, the lesion volume had decreased in all patients, and all cranial neuropathies observed prior to GKS had improved. There were no radiation-induced neuropathies or complications during the follow-up period. GKS appears to be an effective and safe treatment modality for the management of CSHs. PMID:26893777

  11. Chlorophyll f-driven photosynthesis in a cavernous cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Lars; Brejnrod, Asker; Schliep, Martin; Sørensen, Søren J; Larkum, Anthony W D; Kühl, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Chlorophyll (Chl) f is the most recently discovered chlorophyll and has only been found in cyanobacteria from wet environments. Although its structure and biophysical properties are resolved, the importance of Chl f as an accessory pigment in photosynthesis remains unresolved. We found Chl f in a cyanobacterium enriched from a cavernous environment and report the first example of Chl f-supported oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria from such habitats. Pigment extraction, hyperspectral microscopy and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of Chl a and f in unicellular cyanobacteria found in enrichment cultures. Amplicon sequencing indicated that all oxygenic phototrophs were related to KC1, a Chl f-containing cyanobacterium previously isolated from an aquatic environment. Microsensor measurements on aggregates demonstrated oxygenic photosynthesis at 742 nm and less efficient photosynthesis under 768- and 777-nm light probably because of diminished overlap with the absorption spectrum of Chl f and other far-red absorbing pigments. Our findings suggest the importance of Chl f-containing cyanobacteria in terrestrial habitats.

  12. Treatment Outcome Of Seizures Associated With Intracranial Cavernous Angiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nievera Conrad C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures are among the typical presentations of intracranial cavernous angiomas (ICA. Twenty-one patients (age range: 2 to 53 years treated for seizures associated with ICA between 1983 and 1997 were restrospectively studied to evaluate their outcome following medical or surgical intervention. The mean interval between seizure onset and initial presentation at our institution was 7.6 years. Seizures were simple partial in 3 patients, complex partial in 15 and secondarily generalized tonic-clonic in 13. The commonest site of the lesion was the temporal lobe (52%. Multiple angiomas were observed in 5 (24% patients. Seven (32% patients were medically-managed with antiepileptic therapy and 14 (68% underwent either lesionectomy with resection of the epileptogenic zone (9 patients or temporal lobectomy (5 patients. Mean follow-up time was 4 years (range: 3 months to 14 years. Of the medically-managed patients, 3 (43% remained seizure-free whereas 4 (57% continued to have seizures with an average frequency of one per day. Of the surgically-managed patients, 12 (86% became seizure-free and 2 (14% had no more than two seizures per year. Surgery appears to be extremely effective in the management of seizures associated with ICA and should receive a strong and early consideration in patients who fail medical therapy.

  13. An object-oriented approach to deploying highly configurable Web interfaces for the ATLAS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Bruno; Maidantchik, Carmen; Pommes, Kathy; Pavani, Varlen; Arosa, Breno; Abreu, Igor

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS Technical Coordination disposes of 17 Web systems to support its operation. These applications, whilst ranging from managing the process of publishing scientific papers to monitoring radiation levels in the equipment in the experimental cavern, are constantly prone to changes in requirements due to the collaborative nature of the experiment and its management. In this context, a Web framework is proposed to unify the generation of the supporting interfaces. FENCE assembles classes to build applications by making extensive use of JSON configuration files. It relies heavily on Glance, a technology that was set forth in 2003 to create an abstraction layer on top of the heterogeneous sources that store the technical coordination data. Once Glance maps out the database modeling, records can be referenced in the configuration files by wrapping unique identifiers around double enclosing brackets. The deployed content can be individually secured by attaching clearance attributes to their description thus ensuring that view/edit privileges are granted to eligible users only. The framework also provides tools for securely writing into a database. Fully HTML5-compliant multi-step forms can be generated from their JSON description to assure that the submitted data comply with a series of constraints. Input validation is carried out primarily on the server- side but, following progressive enhancement guidelines, verification might also be performed on the client-side by enabling specific markup data attributes which are then handed over to the jQuery validation plug-in. User monitoring is accomplished by thoroughly logging user requests along with any POST data. Documentation is built from the source code using the phpDocumentor tool and made readily available for developers online. Fence, therefore, speeds up the implementation of Web interfaces and reduces the response time to requirement changes by minimizing maintenance overhead.

  14. Electroweak Physics with ATLAS

    OpenAIRE

    Akhundov, Arif

    2008-01-01

    The precision measurements of electroweak parameters of the Standard Model with the ATLAS detector at LHC are reviewed. An emphasis is put on the bridge connecting the ATLAS measurements with the SM analysis at LEP/SLC and the Tevatron.

  15. Three-dimensional atlas system for mouse and rat brain imaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trine Hjornevik

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Tomographic neuroimaging techniques allow visualization of functionally and structurally specific signals in the mouse and rat brain. The interpretation of the image data relies on accurate determination of anatomical location, which is frequently obstructed by the lack of structural information in the data sets. Positron emission tomography (PET generally yields images with low spatial resolution and little structural contrast, and many experimental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI paradigms give specific signal enhancements but often limited anatomical information. Side-by-side comparison of image data with conventional atlas diagram is hampered by the 2-D format of the atlases, and by the lack of an analytical environment for accumulation of data and integrative analyses. We here present a method for reconstructing 3-D atlases from digital 2-D atlas diagrams, and exemplify 3-D atlas-based analysis of PET and MRI data. The reconstruction procedure is based on two seminal mouse and brain atlases, but is applicable to any stereotaxic atlas. Currently, 30 mouse brain structures and 60 rat brain structures have been reconstructed. To exploit the 3-D atlas models, we have developed a multi-platform atlas tool (available via The Rodent Workbench, http://rbwb.org which allows combined visualization of experimental image data within the 3-D atlas space together with 3-D viewing and user-defined slicing of selected atlas structures. The tool presented facilitates assignment of location and comparative analysis of signal location in tomographic images with low structural contrast.

  16. A study on the structural behaviour of rock caverns for underground radioactive waste repository(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to develope the basic technology necessary for the assurance of structural safety of rock caverns for a permanent radioactive waste repository. The structural analysis of rock caverns subjected to external loads, especially seismic loads, is performed to make sure of the structural integrity of the underground radioactive repository, and finally seeking the sufficient isolation of radioactive wastes from the human life environment during the hazardous lifetime of radionuclides. It is generally known that the structural behavior of rock caverns is greatly influenced by the type of structures and material properties of rock masses around the cavern. In order to develop seismic analysis techniques of underground structures such as the radioactive waste repository, the followings should be studied: depth and site dependence of earthquake characteristics, dynamic material properties of rock, modelling the behavior of rock discontinuities, and structural analysis methods. This study reviews the present status of the research on the aforementioned areas and includes the dynamic structural analysis of the underground cavern subjected to earthquake loading in order to assess the structural stability of an underground radioactive waste repository. (Author)

  17. 19 September 2011 - Austrian State Secretary for European and International Affairs W. Waldner, signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting CMS service cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with M. Zerlauth.

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoît Jeannet

    2011-01-01

    Austrian state secretary for foreign affairs, Wolfgang Waldner, left, was welcomed to CERN by Felicitas Pauss, head of international relations at CERN, on 19 September. While at CERN, he toured the CMS control room and underground experimental service cavern, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall, and the Universe of Particles exhibition in the Globe of Science and Innovation.

  18. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Herr

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: Atlas Physics Workshop 6-11 June 2005 June 2005 ATLAS Week Plenary Session Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  19. Bow-tie risk assessment combining causes and effects applied to gasoil storage in an abandoned salt cavern,

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, K; Hendriks, D.; Wildenborg, T.; Duijne, H.

    2014-01-01

    A semi-quantitative risk assessment is presented for the storage of gas oil in depleted salt caverns in the Twente region, the Netherlands. It is based on a bow-tie model, in which an incident, leakage of gas oil from the storage system (cavern and wells), is evaluated by assessing its possible caus

  20. ATLAS Simulation using Real Data: Embedding and Overlay

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, Andy; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    For some physics processes studied with the ATLAS detector, a more accurate simulation in some respects can be achieved by including real data into simulated events, with substantial potential improvements in the CPU, disk space, and memory usage of the standard simulation configuration, at the cost of significant database and networking challenges. Real proton-proton background events can be overlaid (at the detector digitization output stage) on a simulated hard-scatter process, to account for pileup background (from nearby bunch crossings), cavern background, and detector noise. A similar method is used to account for the large underlying event from heavy ion collisions, rather than directly simulating the full collision. Embedding replaces the muons found in Z->mumu decays in data with simulated taus at the same 4-momenta, thus preserving the underlying event and pileup from the original data event. In all these cases, care must be taken to exactly match detector conditions (beamspot, magnetic fields, ali...

  1. Commissioning of the magnetic field in the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaud, M; Bergsma, F; Bobbink, G; Bruni, A; Chevalier, L; Ennes, P; Fleischmann, P; Fontaine, M; Formica, A; Gautard, V; Groenstege, H; Guyot, C; Hart, R; Kozanecki, W; Iengo, P; Legendre, M; Nikitina, T; Perepelkin, E; Ponsot, P; Richardson, A; Vorozhtsov, A; Vorozthsov, S

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is a general-purpose detector at the 14 TeV proton-proton Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The muon spectrometer will operate in the magnetic field provided by a large, eight-coil barrel toroid magnet bracketed by two smaller toroidal end-caps. The toroidal field is non-uniform, with an average value of about 0.5 T in the barrel region, and is monitored using three-dimensional Hall sensors which must be accurate to 1 mT. The barrel coils were installed in the cavern from 2004 to 2006, and recently powered up to their nominal current. The Hall-sensor measurements are compared with calculations to validate the magnetic models, and used to reconstruct the position and shape of the coil windings. Field perturbations by the magnetic materials surrounding the muon spectrometer are found in reasonable agreement with finite-element magnetic-field simulations.

  2. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - Atlas Area Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Portland, OR Atlas Area. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the EnviroAtlas Area....

  3. ATLAS DBM Module Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gorisek, Andrej [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zavrtanik, Marko [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sokhranyi, Grygorii [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); McGoldrick, Garrin [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Cerv, Matevz [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-06-18

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Jozef Stefan Institute, CERN, and University of Toronto who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) diamond has a number of properties that make it attractive for high energy physics detector applications. Its large band-gap (5.5 eV) and large displacement energy (42 eV/atom) make it a material that is inherently radiation tolerant with very low leakage currents and high thermal conductivity. CVD diamond is being investigated by the RD42 Collaboration for use very close to LHC interaction regions, where the most extreme radiation conditions are found. This document builds on that work and proposes a highly spatially segmented diamond based luminosity monitor to complement the time segmented ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM) so that when Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators (MTBS) and LUCID (LUminosity measurement using a Cherenkov Integrating Detector) have difficulty functioning the ATLAS luminosity measurement is not compromised.

  4. Cavernous sinus thrombosis secondary to aspergillus granuloma: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenet, Esteban; Boulagnon-Rombi, Camille; N'guyen, Yohan; Litré, Claude-Fabien

    2016-10-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare but serious complication of sphenoid aspergillosis. The rarity of this pathology makes its diagnostic very difficult on a clinical, biological and radiological sense. The authors present a case of cavernous sinus thrombosis with ipsilateral internal carotid artery thrombosis secondary to a non-invasive sphenoid aspergillosis in an immunocompetent host, responsible of a cavernous syndrome associated to a Claude Bernard Horner syndrome. One year after surgery, the patient is still asymptomatic without recurrence. Diagnostic modalities are detailed and several management of this pathology are compared. Surgery is essential in a diagnostic and therapeutic sense. There is no evidence of the interest of adjuvant therapies such as antibiotic and anticoagulation. Concerning the antifungal treatment, the attitude towards a non-invasive sphenoid aspergillosis in an immunocompetent host is unclear. PMID:26860234

  5. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis presenting as a cavernous sinus syndrome: Case report with review of existing literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Kapadia M.D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculoma involving the cavernous sinus is a rare presentation of CNS disease, with only twelve cases reported in previous literature. We report a case of a 48 year old woman who presented with a right cavernous sinus syndrome of 2 months duration. MRI showed a mass in the right cavernous sinus, and serologic workup revealed an elevated sedimentation rate and positive Quantiferon®-GOLD testing. 18-FDG PET-CT demonstrated a hypermetabolic 3 cm subcarinal lymph node, and lymph node biopsy showed caseating granuloma. Culture of lymphatic tissue grew drug-sensitive M. tuberculosis. The patient was treated with a non-standard 4-drug regimen and prednisone, with rapid improvement of symptoms and radiologic abnormalities. Total length of treatment was 12 months. In addition, we review the 12 cases found in literature, and discuss clinical features, diagnostic dilemmas, and approaches to treatment.

  6. Spectacular test of the fire extinguishing system in the underground cavern of the CMS experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    The enormous rumbling heard 100 m under the earth on Friday, 12 May, was not the start of a foam party at CMS. The Safety Team looked on from the second tier of the CMS underground cavern as it reechoed to the sound of water rushing through the two huge pipes overhead and the air was filled with a mixture of water and foam. A minute later it was a winter wonderland, as fluffy puffs of foam came shooting out of the twelve foam blowers lining the upper cavern walls on both sides. In less than two minutes 7 m3 of water mixed with a small percentage of foaming liquid, was transformed into 5600 m3 of foam and discharged into the cavern.

  7. 19 January 2011 - Korean Vice Minister II of Education, Science and Technology K.Chang-Kyung with Adviser R. Voss, Director-General R. Heuer and head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Korean vice-minister II of education, science and technology, Kim Chang-Kyung, visiting the CMS experimental area at CERN on 19 January. He also had the opportunity to view part of the LHC tunnel, as well as to visit the CERN Control Centre.

  8. ATLAS Recordings

    CERN Multimedia

    Jeremy Herr; Homer A. Neal; Mitch McLachlan

    The University of Michigan Web Archives for the 2006 ATLAS Week Plenary Sessions, as well as the first of 2007, are now online. In addition, there are a wide variety of Software and Physics Tutorial sessions, recorded over the past couple years, to chose from. All ATLAS-specific archives are accessible here.Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally.In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Shaping Collaboration 2006The Michigan group is happy to announce a complete set of recordings from the Shaping Collaboration conference held last December at the CICG in Geneva.The event hosted a mix of Collaborative Tool experts and LHC Users, and featured presentations by the CERN Deputy Director General, Prof. Jos Engelen, the President of Internet2, and chief developers from VRVS/EVO, WLAP, and other tools...

  9. ATLAS Virtual Visit Terascale-10-07-2014

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale (CoEPP) is a collaborative research venture between the University of Melbourne, the University of Adelaide, the University of Sydney and Monash University. Through the Centre, terascale, high-energy and particle physics research across Australia is coordinated, bringing together theoretical and experimental physicists, who work on the ATLAS experiment. This ATLAS virtual visit is the culmination of our international masterclass day for high-school students. Students will work with CoEPP physicists to analyse ATLAS events and then — like in an international research collaboration — the participants join in a video conference for discussion and combination of their results. The discussion of results will be moderated by Fermilab. - See more at: http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2014/Australia-2014.html#sthash.VNiawvRe.dpuf

  10. Cavernous sinus sampling in patients with Cushing's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Till; Flitsch, Jörg; van Leyen, Philine; Sauer, Nina; Aberle, Jens; Grzyska, Ulrich; Lüdecke, Dieter K

    2015-02-01

    OBJECT Correct diagnosis and precise localization of adenomas in patients with Cushing's disease are essential for avoiding unsuccessful transsphenoidal pituitary exploration. In addition to the well-established inferior petrosal sinus sampling, preoperative cavernous sinus sampling (CSS) was introduced as a potentially improved way to predict adenoma lateralization. The authors present their results with CSS in a consecutive series of patients with Cushing's disease. METHODS During 1999-2014, transsphenoidal surgeries were consecutively performed in 510 patients with Cushing's disease. For most patients, suppression of cortisol in high-dose dexamethasone tests and stimulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol after administration of corticotropin-releasing hormone were sufficient to prove the diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent hypercortisolism. Of the 510 patients, 67 (13%) were referred to the department of neuroradiology for CSS according to the technique of Teramoto. The indications for CSS were unclear endocrine test results or negative MRI results. Data for all patients were retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS A central/peripheral gradient was found in 59 patients; lateralization to the left or right side was found in 51. For 8 patients with a central/peripheral gradient, no left/right gradient could be determined. For another 8 patients with equivocal test results, no central/peripheral gradient was found. No severe CSS-associated complications were encountered. Of the 51 patients who underwent transsphenoidal surgery, the predicted lateralization was proven correct for 42 (82%). CONCLUSIONS As MRI techniques have improved, the number of potential candidates for this invasive method has decreased in the past decade. However, because detecting minute adenomas remains problematic, CSS remains a useful diagnostic tool for patients with Cushing's disease.

  11. Manifestations of hepatic cavernous hemangioma in carbon dioxidedigital subtraction angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wei; LI Yan-ha0; HE Xiao-feng; CHEN Yong; ZENG Qing-le

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the characteristic appearance of cavernous hemangioma of the liver (CHL)presented in carbon dioxide digital subtraction angiography (CO2-DSA) and to evaluate the significance of CO2-DSA in the diagnosis of CHL. Methods: Both CO2-DSA and iodinated contrast DSA (IC-DSA) were performed in all 16 patients with CHL, and the angiographic manifestations in the same patients were compared. The image quality was rated by three experienced angiographers, and the complications were also assessed. Results; There was good correlation between angiographers on image quality (R=0. 73). Diagnostic images were obtained with both CO2-DSA and IC-DSA in all CHL patients. No difference was noted between IC-DSA and CO2-DSA in visualizing the proper hepatic arteries and its branches (P>0. 05). CO2-DSA produced better images that clearly described the tumor size, shape and margination than those by IC-DSA (P<0. 05), but both demonstrated characteristic appearances of early opacification and persistent contrast enhancement of the tumors. The portal vein branches near the tumors were constantly demonstrated by CO2-DSA in 15 cases (15/16) but only in 2 cases (2/16) by IC-DSA. Conclusion: CO2-DSA is sensitive in CHL diagnosis, and in patients with contraindications to IC or with unsatisfactory imaging results by IC-DSA,CO2-DSA is a good alternative. As show in most cases by CO2-DSA, the portal veins might act as the main drainage vein of CHLs.

  12. Clitoromegaly caused by cavernous hemangioma: A rare case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Geramizadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioma is a common benign neoplasm, but a location such as the clitoris is very rare. However, it is very important to differentiate clitoral hemangioma from enlargement of the clitoris secondary to androgen excess. To the best of our knowledge, only three cases of clitoromegaly caused by cavernous hemangioma have been reported in the English literature. Herein, we report our experience with a 16-year-old girl who presented with clitoromegaly and normal hormonal assay that turned out to be clitoral cavernous hemangioma after pathologic examination of the clitoral mass.

  13. Treatment of traumatic trigeminal-cavernous fistula by coil embolization and compression of carotid artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xinjian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a traumatic cavernous fistula supplied by a persistent primitive trigeminal artery. The process of treatment was unique in this case. Fistula was subcompletely occluded by coiling from primitive trigeminal artery. Residual fistula was helped to form thrombosis by compression of the carotid artery with hand in the procedure. Long-term follow-up was satisfactory. Traumatic cavernous fistula supplied by a persistent primitive trigeminal artery could be treated by embolization and temporal compression of the parent artery might be useful for residual minimal fistula.

  14. Ultimate storage in salt caverns / status report; Endverwahrung von Salzkavernen / Stand der Entwicklung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crotogino, F.; Schmidt, U. [Kavernen Bau- und Betriebs-GmbH, Hannover (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The contribution reviews the state of knowledge on final storage in salt caverns. The long-term effects of a hermetically sealed, brine-filled cavern are discussed. So far, there are no valid predictions. (orig.) [Deutsch] In dem Beitrag wird der derzeitige Kenntnis- und Diskussionsstand zur Endverwahrung von Salzkavernen zusammengefasst. Aufbauend auf den bisher vorliegenden Vorstellungen zur Soleimpraegnation bei einem Innendruck, der nahezu dem Ueberlagerungsdruck entspricht, werden die denkbaren langfristigen Auswirkungen einer vollstaendig abgeschlossenen solegefuellten Kaverne skizziert; belastbare Prognosen sind derzeit noch nicht moeglich. (orig.)

  15. Adult onset segmental cavernous hemangioma, varicose veins and limb atrophy (klippel-trenaunay-Weber syndrome variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawhney MPS

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A 22 year-old woman presented with multiple soft, compressible, protuberant, bluish cutaneous lesions as well as firm, non-compressible, subcutaneous masses and varicose veins affecting the right upper limb of three years duration. There was atrophy of soft tissue of forearm by 2.5 cm. X-ray showed soft tissue densities, multiple phleboliths and hypoplastic forearm bones. Histopathological examination from cutaneous lesions revealed cavernous hemangioma. Adult onset cavernous hemangioma involving one upper limb and breast with multiple phleboliths and limb atrophy is a very unusual presentation of Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome.

  16. Simulation of Mechanical Processes in Gas Storage Caverns for Short-Term Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Norbert; Nagel, Thomas; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, Germany's energy management has started to be transferred from fossil fuels to renewable and sustainable energy carriers. Renewable energy sources such as solar and wind power are subjected by fluctuations, thus the development and extension of energy storage capacities is a priority in German R&D programs. This work is a part of the ANGUS+ Project, funded by the federal ministry of education and research, which investigates the influence of subsurface energy storage on the underground. The utilization of subsurface salt caverns as a long-term storage reservoir for fossil fuels is a common method, since the construction of caverns in salt rock is inexpensive in comparison to solid rock formations due to solution mining. Another advantage of evaporate as host material is the self-healing behaviour of salt rock, thus the cavity can be assumed to be impermeable. In the framework of short-term energy storage (hours to days), caverns can be used as gas storage reservoirs for natural or artificial fuel gases, such as hydrogen, methane, or compressed air, where the operation pressures inside the caverns will fluctuate more frequently. This work investigates the influence of changing operation pressures at high frequencies on the stability of the host rock of gas storage caverns utilizing numerical models. Therefore, we developed a coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) model based on the finite element method utilizing the open-source software platform OpenGeoSys. The salt behaviour is described by well-known constitutive material models which are capable of predicting creep, self-healing, and dilatancy processes. Our simulations include the thermodynamic behaviour of gas storage process, temperature development and distribution on the cavern boundary, the deformation of the cavern geometry, and the prediction of the dilatancy zone. Based on the numerical results, optimal operation modes can be found for individual caverns, so the risk of host rock damage

  17. Bilateral indirect carotid cavernous fistula post trivial injury- A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siti Hajar Mat Abu; Hanizasurana Hashim; Tara Mary George; Norfariza Ngah; Adil Hussein

    2013-01-01

    Fifty-seven years old Malay lady, post menopausal with co-morbid of diabetes mellitus and hypertension presented with three months history of bilateral painful red eyes associated with double vision. Examination revealed both eyes proptosis, corkscrew vessels with present of bruit, secondary narrow angle with raised intraocular pressure, 6th cranial nerve palsy, and bilateral venous stasis retinopathy. CT angiogram showed bilateral dilated superior ophthalmic veins with cerebral angiogram findings of bilateral indirect carotid cavernous fistula involving small meningeal vessels. Indirect or dural cavernous sinus Fistula can easily be missed or misdiagnosed. Trivial injury especially in the predisposing patient can initiate the occurrence.

  18. A NOVEL PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LNG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; Marcus Krekel; James F. Davis; D. Braxton Scherz

    2005-05-31

    This cooperative research project validates use of man made salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships in lieu of large liquid LNG tanks. Salt caverns will not tolerate direct injection of LNG because it is a cryogenic liquid, too cold for contact with salt. This research confirmed the technical processes and the economic benefits of pressuring the LNG up to dense phase, warming it to salt compatible temperatures and then directly injecting the dense phase gas into salt caverns for storage. The use of salt caverns to store natural gas sourced from LNG imports, particularly when located offshore, provides a highly secure, large scale and lower cost import facility as an alternative to tank based LNG import terminals. This design can unload a ship in the same time as unloading at a tank based terminal. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve uses man made salt caverns to securely store large quantities of crude oil. Similarly, this project describes a novel application of salt cavern gas storage technologies used for the first time in conjunction with LNG receiving. The energy industry uses man made salt caverns to store an array of gases and liquids but has never used man made salt caverns directly in the importation of LNG. This project has adapted and expanded the field of salt cavern storage technology and combined it with novel equipment and processes to accommodate LNG importation. The salt cavern based LNG receiving terminal described in the project can be located onshore or offshore, but the focus of the design and cost estimates has been on an offshore location, away from congested channels and ports. The salt cavern based terminal can provide large volumes of gas storage, high deliverability from storage, and is simplified in operation compared to tank based LNG terminals. Phase I of this project included mathematical modeling that proved a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at lower capital cost, and would have significantly higher

  19. ATLAS Distributed Computing Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Schovancova, J; The ATLAS collaboration; Borrego, C; Campana, S; Di Girolamo, A; Elmsheuser, J; Hejbal, J; Kouba, T; Legger, F; Magradze, E; Medrano Llamas, R; Negri, G; Rinaldi, L; Sciacca, G; Serfon, C; Van Der Ster, D C

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment benefits from computing resources distributed worldwide at more than 100 WLCG sites. The ATLAS Grid sites provide over 100k CPU job slots, over 100 PB of storage space on disk or tape. Monitoring of status of such a complex infrastructure is essential. The ATLAS Grid infrastructure is monitored 24/7 by two teams of shifters distributed world-wide, by the ATLAS Distributed Computing experts, and by site administrators. In this paper we summarize automation efforts performed within the ATLAS Distributed Computing team in order to reduce manpower costs and improve the reliability of the system. Different aspects of the automation process are described: from the ATLAS Grid site topology provided by the ATLAS Grid Information System, via automatic site testing by the HammerCloud, to automatic exclusion from production or analysis activities.

  20. Detail-preserving construction of neonatal brain atlases in space-frequency domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuyao; Shi, Feng; Yap, Pew-Thian; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-06-01

    Brain atlases are commonly utilized in neuroimaging studies. However, most brain atlases are fuzzy and lack structural details, especially in the cortical regions. This is mainly caused by the image averaging process involved in atlas construction, which often smoothes out high-frequency contents that capture fine anatomical details. Brain atlas construction for neonatal images is even more challenging due to insufficient spatial resolution and low tissue contrast. In this paper, we propose a novel framework for detail-preserving construction of population-representative atlases. Our approach combines spatial and frequency information to better preserve image details. This is achieved by performing atlas construction in the space-frequency domain given by wavelet transform. In particular, sparse patch-based atlas construction is performed in all frequency subbands, and the results are combined to give a final atlas. For enhancing anatomical details, tissue probability maps are also used to guide atlas construction. Experimental results show that our approach can produce atlases with greater structural details than existing atlases. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2133-2150, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Atlas of Nuclear Isomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Ashok Kumar, E-mail: ajainfph@iitr.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee-247667 (India); Maheshwari, Bhoomika; Garg, Swati; Patial, Monika [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee-247667 (India); Singh, Balraj [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario-L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    We present an atlas of nuclear isomers containing the experimental data for the isomers with a half-life ≥ 10 ns together with their various properties such as excitation-energy, half-life, decay mode(s), spin-parity, energies and multipolarities of emitted gamma transitions, etc. The ENSDF database complemented by the XUNDL database has been extensively used in extracting the relevant data. Recent literature from primary nuclear physics journals, and the NSR bibliographic database have been searched to ensure that the compiled data Table is as complete and current as possible. The data from NUBASE-12 have also been checked for completeness, but as far as possible original references have been cited. Many interesting systematic features of nuclear isomers emerge, some of them new; these are discussed and presented in various graphs and figures. The cutoff date for the extraction of data from the literature is August 15, 2015.

  2. Atlas of Nuclear Isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ashok Kumar; Maheshwari, Bhoomika; Garg, Swati; Patial, Monika; Singh, Balraj

    2015-09-01

    We present an atlas of nuclear isomers containing the experimental data for the isomers with a half-life ≥ 10 ns together with their various properties such as excitation-energy, half-life, decay mode(s), spin-parity, energies and multipolarities of emitted gamma transitions, etc. The ENSDF database complemented by the XUNDL database has been extensively used in extracting the relevant data. Recent literature from primary nuclear physics journals, and the NSR bibliographic database have been searched to ensure that the compiled data Table is as complete and current as possible. The data from NUBASE-12 have also been checked for completeness, but as far as possible original references have been cited. Many interesting systematic features of nuclear isomers emerge, some of them new; these are discussed and presented in various graphs and figures. The cutoff date for the extraction of data from the literature is August 15, 2015.

  3. ATLAS Large Scale Thin Gap Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-04-29

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of the ATLAS sTGC New Small Wheel collaboration who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the FY2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program.

  4. The data path of the ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger preprocessor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei, George Victor

    2010-10-27

    The PreProcessor of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger provides digital values of transverse energy in real-time to the subsequent object-finding processors. The input comprises more than 7000 analogue signals of reduced granularity from the calorimeters of the ATLAS detector. The Level-1 trigger decision must be verified. For this, the PreProcessor transmits copies of the real-time digital data to the Data Acquisition (DAQ) system. In addition, the PreProcessor system provides a standard VMEbus interface to the computing infrastructure of the experiment, on which configuration data is loaded and control or monitoring data are read out. A dedicated system that ensures both the transfer of event data to storage in ATLAS and the data transfer over the VME was implemented on the 124 modules of the PreProcessor system in the form of a ''Readout Manager''. The ''Field Programmable Gate Array'' (FPGA) is located on each module. The rst part of this work describes the algorithms developed to meet the functionality of the Readout Manager. The second part deals with the tests that were carried out to ensure the proper functionality of the modules before they were installed at CERN in the ATLAS cavern. (orig.)

  5. The data path of the ATLAS level-1 calorimeter trigger preprocessor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PreProcessor of the ATLAS Level-1 Calorimeter Trigger provides digital values of transverse energy in real-time to the subsequent object-finding processors. The input comprises more than 7000 analogue signals of reduced granularity from the calorimeters of the ATLAS detector. The Level-1 trigger decision must be verified. For this, the PreProcessor transmits copies of the real-time digital data to the Data Acquisition (DAQ) system. In addition, the PreProcessor system provides a standard VMEbus interface to the computing infrastructure of the experiment, on which configuration data is loaded and control or monitoring data are read out. A dedicated system that ensures both the transfer of event data to storage in ATLAS and the data transfer over the VME was implemented on the 124 modules of the PreProcessor system in the form of a ''Readout Manager''. The ''Field Programmable Gate Array'' (FPGA) is located on each module. The rst part of this work describes the algorithms developed to meet the functionality of the Readout Manager. The second part deals with the tests that were carried out to ensure the proper functionality of the modules before they were installed at CERN in the ATLAS cavern. (orig.)

  6. ATLAS at the CERN Open Day

    CERN Multimedia

    Burckhart, H.; Potter, C.; Schmid, P.; Schuh, S.

    The CERN Open Day celebrating the 50th anniversary has been a big success. More than 30000 visitors came to discover CERN's activities at 50 different sites. ATLAS showed the assemblies in hall 180, the test-beam set-up in the North Area hall and - apparently one of the biggest attractions of all - the cavern and the control room at our pit. Technical Coordination put a lot of effort into preparing the visit itinerary at Point 1 and by operating both lifts during the entire day without interruption almost 4000 visitors got the chance to see this impressive hall and the first pieces of the detector already down there. Some people even waited for more than an hour to have their turn - they remained in good spirits also thanks to videos presented to them standing in the queue and guides explaining the site. What impressed visitors most was the sheer size of our detectors: an estimated 5000 people came to see the toroids and the LAr calorimeters in halls 180 and 191, where they could watch cosmic rays i...

  7. The Magnetic Resonance hnage and Pathology of Spinal Cord Cavernous Hemangioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    同志勤; 白斌; 同志超; 宋广义; 赵京龙

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics of magnetic resonance image(MRI) of spinal cord cavernous hemangioma. Methods Six cases of spinal cord cavernous heman-gioma diagnosed by MRI and confirmed by pathology were reviewed. The characteristics of MRI wereanalgzed and correlated with pathological characteristics of spinal cord cavernous hemangioma. ResultsIn 4 cases, the tumors were located in thoracic segment of the spinal cord and 2 in cervical cord. Alllesions were solitary and the spinal cords were normal or a little thicker. The MRI showed that the im-ages of focus were ball-like popcorn or mulberry with mixed signal,with short T2 signal around the fo-cus. Under microscope, the hemangioma was composed of highly expanded blood sinusoids and its wallwas thin and consisted of flat epithelial cells. T'here were some red blood cells in the cavity of the sinu-soid and a little fibrous tissue in the diazoma between blood sinusoids. And also some fresh and old hem-orrhages could be seen in the specimen. Conclusion MRI has high sensitivity and specificity in thediagnosis of spinal cavernous hemangioma.

  8. Arteriovenous Malformation in Temporal Lobe Presenting as Contralateral Ocular Symptoms Mimicking Carotid-Cavernous Fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadzillah Mohd-Tahir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To report a rare case of arteriovenous malformation in temporal lobe presenting as contralateral orbital symptoms mimicking carotid-cavernous fistula. Method. Interventional case report. Results. A 31-year-old Malay gentleman presented with 2-month history of painful progressive exophthalmos of his left eye associated with recurrent headache, diplopia, and reduced vision. Ocular examination revealed congestive nonpulsating 7 mm exophthalmos of the left eye with no restriction of movements in all direction. There was diplopia in left lateral gaze. Left IOP was elevated at 29 mmHg. Left eye retinal vessels were slightly dilated and tortuous. CT scan was performed and showed right temporal arteriovenous malformation with a nidus of 3.8 cm × 2.5 cm with right middle cerebral artery as feeding artery. There was dilated left superior ophthalmic vein of 0.9 mm in diameter with enlarged left cavernous sinus. MRA and carotid angiogram confirmed right temporal arteriovenous malformation with no carotid-cavernous fistula. Most of the intracranial drainage was via left cavernous sinus. His signs and symptoms dramatically improved following successful embolisation, completely resolved after one year. Conclusion. Intracranial arteriovenous malformation is rarely presented with primary ocular presentation. Early intervention would salvage the eyes and prevent patients from more disaster morbidity or fatality commonly due to intracranial haemorrhage.

  9. Preliminary Technical and Legal Evaluation of Disposing of Nonhazardous Oil Field Waste into Salt Caverns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayers, Robert C.; Caudle, Dan; Elcock, Deborah; Raivel, Mary; Veil, John; and Grunewald, Ben

    1999-01-21

    This report presents an initial evaluation of the suitability, feasibility, and legality of using salt caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes. Given the preliminary and general nature of this report, we recognize that some of our findings and conclusions maybe speculative and subject to change upon further research on this topic.

  10. Gas-cooled HTR reactor installed in a pressure vessel cavern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pebble-bed reactor in a pressure vessel cavern is described which has a reflector which in case of accidents with pressure equalisation between cold gas and hot gas transfers the resulting loads to a lateral thermal shield constructed in the form of a pressure-tight metal cylinder. (TK)

  11. Thermo-mechanical modelling of cyclic gas storage applications in salt caverns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Norbert; Watanabe, Norihiro; Görke, Uwe-Jens; Kolditz, Olaf; Nagel, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Due to the growing importance of renewable energy sources it becomes more and more necessary to investigate energy storage potentials. One major way to store energy is the power-to-gas concept. Excessive electrical energy can be used either to produce hydrogen or methane by electrolysis or methanation or to compress air, respectively. Those produced gases can then be stored in artificial salt caverns, which are constructed in large salt formations by solution mining. In combination with renewable energy sources, the power-to-gas concept is subjected to fluctuations. Compression and expansion of the storage gases lead to temperature differences within the salt rock. The variations can advance several metres into the host rock, influencing its material behaviour, inducing thermal stresses and altering the creep response. To investigate the temperature influence on the cavern capacity, we have developed a numerical model to simulate the thermo-mechanical behaviour of salt caverns during cyclic gas storage. The model considers the thermodynamic behaviour of the stored gases as well as the heat transport and the temperature dependent material properties of the host rock. Therefore, we utilized well-known constitutive thermo-visco-plastic material models, implemented into the open source-scientific software OpenGeoSys. Both thermal and mechanical processes are solved using a finite element approach, connected via a staggered coupling scheme. The model allows the assessment of the structural safety as well as the convergence of the salt caverns.

  12. Giant Cavernous Aneurysm Associated with a Persistent Trigeminal Artery and Persistent Otic Artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chang Wei; Xie, Xiao Dong; Yang, Zhi Gang; Wang, Chao Hua; You, Chao; Mao, Bo Yong; He, Min; Sun, Hong [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Sichuan (China)

    2009-10-15

    Primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) and primitive otic artery (POA) is a very rare entity in adult life. We present a case of PTA and POA associated with a giant unruptured cavernous aneurysm in a 54-year-old woman. The PTA and the POA arose from the sac of the aneurysm directly, which greatly complicated endovascular therapy management

  13. Giant Cavernous Aneurysm Associated with a Persistent Trigeminal Artery and Persistent Otic Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang-wei; Yang, Zhi-gang; Wang, Chao-hua; You, Chao; Mao, Bo-yong; He, Min; Sun, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Primitive trigeminal artery (PTA) and primitive otic artery (POA) is a very rare entity in adult life. We present a case of PTA and POA associated with a giant unruptured cavernous aneurysm in a 54-year-old woman. The PTA and the POA arose from the sac of the aneurysm directly, which greatly complicated endovascular therapy management. PMID:19721839

  14. Post-Traumatic Cavernous Fistula Fed by Persistent Trigeminal Artery: Treatment by GDC Embolisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deol, P.S.; Mishra, N.K.; Gupta, V.; Gaikwad, S.B.; Garg, A.; Singh, N.

    2001-01-01

    Summary A case of traumatic persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) cavernous sinus fistula treated with GDC embolisation is reported. Because of the small lumen of PPTA, posteriorly directed course and flow contribution from the posterior circulation, balloon embolisation via the carotid system was not considered appropriate. The fistula was successfully closed by GDC embolisation. PMID:20663331

  15. Intravascular treatment of a cavernous fistula by rupture of a traumatic carotid trigeminal aneurysm. Case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flandroy, P.; Collignon, J.; Lacour, P.; Marsault, C.; Stevenaert, A.

    1987-05-01

    The authors report the particular treatment of a traumatic cavernous fistula caused by the rupture of an exceptional lesion: a false aneurysm of the C5 segment of the right carotid artery situated at the origin of a persistent trigeminal artery.

  16. Antioxidative mechanism of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides promotes repair and regeneration following cavernous nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhan-Kui; Yu, Hong-Lian; Liu, Bo; Wang, Hui; Luo, Qiong; Ding, Xie-Gang

    2016-08-01

    Polysaccharides extracted from Lycium barbarum exhibit antioxidant properties. We hypothesized that these polysaccharides resist oxidative stress-induced neuronal damage following cavernous nerve injury. In this study, rat models were intragastrically administered Lycium barbarum polysaccharides for 2 weeks at 1, 7, and 14 days after cavernous nerve injury. Serum superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities significantly increased at 1 and 2 weeks post-injury. Serum malondialdehyde levels decreased at 2 and 4 weeks. At 12 weeks, peak intracavernous pressure, the number of myelinated axons and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase-positive nerve fibers, levels of phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein and 3-nitrotyrosine were higher in rats administered at 1 day post-injury compared with rats administered at 7 and 14 days post-injury. These findings suggest that application of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides following cavernous nerve crush injury effectively promotes nerve regeneration and erectile functional recovery. This neuroregenerative effect was most effective in rats orally administered Lycium barbarum polysaccharides at 1 day after cavernous nerve crush injury. PMID:27651780

  17. Spall formation in solution mined storage caverns based on a creep and fracture analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MUNSON,DARRELL E.

    2000-02-02

    Because of limited direct observation, understanding of the interior conditions of the massive storage caverns constructed in Gulf Coast salt domes is realizable only through predictions of salt response. Determination of the potential for formation of salt spans, leading to eventual salt falls, is based on salt creep and fracture using the Multimechanism-Deformation Coupled Fracture (MCDF) model. This is a continuum model for creep, coupled to continuum damage evolution. The model has been successfully tested against underground results of damage around several test rooms at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Model simulations, here, evaluate observations made in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage caverns, namely, the accumulation of material on cavern floors and evidence of salt falls. A simulation of a smooth cavern wall indicates damage is maximum at the surface but diminishes monotonically into the salt, which suggests the source of salt accumulation is surface sluffing. If a protuberance occurs on the wall, fracture damage can form beneath the protuberance, which will eventually cause fracture, and lead to a salt fall.

  18. Segmentation of optical coherence tomography images for differentiation of the cavernous nerves from the prostate gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitchian, Shahab; Weldon, Thomas P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2009-07-01

    The cavernous nerves course along the surface of the prostate and are responsible for erectile function. Improvements in identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery may improve nerve preservation and postoperative sexual potency. Two-dimensional (2-D) optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of the rat prostate were segmented to differentiate the cavernous nerves from the prostate gland. To detect these nerves, three image features were employed: Gabor filter, Daubechies wavelet, and Laws filter. The Gabor feature was applied with different standard deviations in the x and y directions. In the Daubechies wavelet feature, an 8-tap Daubechies orthonormal wavelet was implemented, and the low-pass sub-band was chosen as the filtered image. Last, Laws feature extraction was applied to the images. The features were segmented using a nearest-neighbor classifier. N-ary morphological postprocessing was used to remove small voids. The cavernous nerves were differentiated from the prostate gland with a segmentation error rate of only 0.058+/-0.019. This algorithm may be useful for implementation in clinical endoscopic OCT systems currently being studied for potential intraoperative diagnostic use in laparoscopic and robotic nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery.

  19. Hybrid Control System for the ATLAS Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermal-hydraulic integral effect test (IET) loop, advanced thermal-hydraulic test loop for accident simulation (ATLAS), has been constructed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). For the data acquisition and control system, hybrid control system (HCS) was adopted to enhance the integrated performance of demanding process control application for acquiring of experimental data. The whole feature of the data acquisition and control system consists of 1 set of the HCS for headware connection, 1 server station for signal processing schemes, 1 engineering work station (EWS) for control logics, and 3 operator interface station (OPS) for human-machine interface. The total number of signals for the data acquisition and the system control of the atlas facility is up to about 2010 channels, which are distributed in 16 chasses which are installed in 10 cabinets. The main focus of this paper is to present the technical configuration of the HCS of the atlas facility

  20. Material science experiments at the ATLAS facility

    CERN Document Server

    Keinigs, R K; Atchison, W L; Bartsch, R R; Faehl, R J; Flower-Maudlin, E C; Hammerberg, J E; Holtkamp, D B; Kyrala, G A; Oro, D M; Parker, J V; Preston, D L; Removsky, R E; Scudder, D W; Sheehey, P T; Shlachter, J S; Taylor, A J; Tonks, D L; Turchi, P J; Chandler, E A

    2001-01-01

    Summary form only given, as follows. Three experimental campaigns designed for fielding on the Atlas Pulsed Power Facility are discussed. The foci of these experiments are directed toward a better understanding of three material science issues; (1) strength at high strain and high strain rate, (2) friction at material interfaces moving at high relative velocities, and (3) material failure in convergent geometry. Atlas provides an environment for investigating these problems in parameter regimes and geometries that are inaccessible with standard techniques. For example, flow stress measurements of material strength using conventional Hopkinson bar experiments are limited to strain rates ~10/sup 4/ sec/sup -1/. Atlas will be capable of imploding metal shells to combined strains of 200% and strain rates >10/sup 6/ sec/sup -1/. Data obtained regimes is used to test different constitutive strength models used in several Los Alamos hydrocodes. Dynamic friction has been investigated for nearly 300 years, but a first...

  1. Adrenal Cavernous Hemangioma: A Case Report with Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Noh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Adrenal cavernous hemangioma is a rare type of tumor that is usually diagnosed post-operatively. There have only been approximately 63 cases reported in the literature to date. Case report We report a case of adrenal cavernous hemangioma in a 27-year-old pregnant woman. The mass was discovered on ultrasonography when she visited a gastroenterologist for vague epigastric discomfort and vomiting. The laboratory tests were within normal limits and did not show any features suggestive of adrenal endocrinologic dysfunction. Computed Tomography (CT revealed a well-defined 7.8 × 7.8 oval mass in the right adrenal gland with speckled calcifications. The mass was removed by transabdominal laparoscopic surgery. Strong positive immunostaining for CD31 and CD34 with weakly positive staining for podoplanin/D2-40 confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma. Conclusions We reviewed 52 case reports of adrenal cavernous hemangioma in an attempt to identify tumor characteristics. More than half of the patients reviewed showed a heterogeneous internal structure of the mass with peripheral patchy enhancement on CT. They also showed focal or speckled calcifications either on X-ray or CT. Nevertheless, many of these characteristics overlap with the imaging phenotypes of other common diseases of the adrenal gland and therefore do not seem to provide definite evidence for differential diagnosis. Laparoscopic approach is a feasible and safe modality to remove adrenal cavernous hemangiomas because they seem to form a rigid fibrotic capsule; hence the risk of bleeding due to surgical manipulation is relatively low.

  2. Clinical, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Treatment Features in Orbital Cavernous Hemangiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rövşen Nesirov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To report the clinical, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and treatment features in cases of orbital cavernous hemangioma. Materials and Methods: TThe records of 32 patients with orbital cavernous hemangioma operated in the Department of Ophthalmology at Ankara University School of Medicine from June 1998 to April 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Twenty-three patients were female and 9 patients were male. The mean age was 42 years, ranging from 9 to 62 years. In MRI of 21 patients, all tumors were isointense to muscle in T1A-weighted images, hyperintense to muscle in T2A-weighted images, and demonstrated heterogeneous contrast enhancement. The tumor was intraconal in 13 patients, superomedial in 3 patients, superotemporal in 3 patients, and inferomedial in 2 patients. In all patients, orbitotomy was performed and the orbital mass was totally removed in one piece. The endoscopic approach used was as follows; upper temporal in 13 patients, inferior temporal in 10, upper nasal in 8, and transnasal orbitotomy in 1 patient. In all patients, no residual/recurrent mass was found after surgery. In eighteen patients, visual acuity remained the same before and after surgery. In fourteen patients, mean visual acuity at first month after surgery increased to 0.10±0.14 logMAR, while mean visual acuity before surgery was 0.25±0.21 LogMAR (p<0.01. Conclusion: In patients with orbital cavernous hemangioma, a presumptive diagnosis can be made by clinical and radiological findings. Anterior orbitotomy through a skin incision was used in most patients with orbital cavernous hemangioma in this series. Significant improvement in visual acuity and examination findings were observed after surgery in patients with orbital cavernous hemangioma. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2015; 45: 105-110

  3. Neurturin enhances the recovery of erectile function following bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Robert D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms responsible for the survival and preservation of function for adult parasympathetic ganglion neurons following injury remain incompletely understood. However, advances in the neurobiology of growth factors, neural development, and prevention of cell death have led to a surge of clinical interest for protective and regenerative neuromodulatory strategies, as surgical therapies for prostate, bladder, and colorectal cancers often result in neuronal axotomy and debilitating loss of sexual function or continence. In vitro studies have identified neurturin, a glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, as a neuromodulator for pelvic cholinergic neurons. We present the first in vivo report of the effects of neurturin upon the recovery of erectile function following bilateral cavernous nerve crush injury in the rat. Methods In these experiments, groups (n = 8 each consisted of uninjured controls and animals treated with injection of albumin (blinded crush control group, extended release neurotrophin-4 or neurturin to the site of cavernous nerve crush injury (100 μg per animal. After 5 weeks, recovery of erectile function (treatment effect was assessed by cavernous nerve electrostimulation and peak aortic pressures were measured. Investigators were unblinded to specific treatments after statistical analyses were completed. Results Erectile dysfunction was not observed in the sham group (mean maximal intracavernous pressure [ICP] increase of 117.5 ± 7.3 cmH2O, whereas nerve injury and albumin treatment (control produced a significant reduction in ICP elevation of 40.0 ± 6.3 cmH2O. Neurturin facilitated the preservation of erectile function, with an ICP increase of 55% at 62.0 ± 9.2 cmH2O (p Conclusion Treatment with neurturin at the site of cavernous nerve crush injury facilitates recovery of erectile function. Results support further investigation of neurturin as a neuroprotective and/or neuroregenerative

  4. ATLAS Silicon Microstrip Tracker Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Berglund, E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has started taking data last autumn with the inauguration of the LHC. The SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) is the key precision tracking device in ATLAS, made up from silicon micro-strip detectors processed in the planar p-in-n technology. The completed SCT has been installed inside the ATLAS experimental hall. Since then the detector was operated for many months under realistic conditions. Calibration data has been taken and analyzed to determine the noise performance of the system. In addition, extensive commissioning with cosmic ray events has been performed both with and without magnetic field. The cosmic muon data has been used to align the detector, to check the timing of the front-end electronics as well as to measure the hit efficiency of modules. The sensor behavior in magnetic field was studied by measurements of the Lorentz angle. For the initial running with unfocused LHC beam operation with undepleted sensors is foreseen. Efficiency and nois...

  5. The ATLAS Analysis Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Amir Farbin

    The ATLAS Analysis Model is a continually developing vision of how to reconcile physics analysis requirements with the ATLAS offline software and computing model constraints. In the past year this vision has influenced the evolution of the ATLAS Event Data Model, the Athena software framework, and physics analysis tools. These developments, along with the October Analysis Model Workshop and the planning for CSC analyses have led to a rapid refinement of the ATLAS Analysis Model in the past few months. This article introduces some of the relevant issues and presents the current vision of the future ATLAS Analysis Model. Event Data Model The ATLAS Event Data Model (EDM) consists of several levels of details, each targeted for a specific set of tasks. For example the Event Summary Data (ESD) stores calorimeter cells and tracking system hits thereby permitting many calibration and alignment tasks, but will be only accessible at particular computing sites with potentially large latency. In contrast, the Analysis...

  6. The Irish Wind Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R. [Univ. College Dublin, Dept. of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Dublin (Ireland); Landberg, L. [Risoe National Lab., Meteorology and Wind Energy Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The development work on the Irish Wind Atlas is nearing completion. The Irish Wind Atlas is an updated improved version of the Irish section of the European Wind Atlas. A map of the irish wind resource based on a WA{sup s}P analysis of the measured data and station description of 27 measuring stations is presented. The results of previously presented WA{sup s}P/KAMM runs show good agreement with these results. (au)

  7. The Detector Control System of the ATLAS SemiCondutor Tracker during Macro-Assembly and Integration

    CERN Document Server

    Abdesselam, A; Basiladze, S; Bates, R L; Bell, P; Bingefors, N; Böhm, J; Brenner, R; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Clark, A; Codispoti, G; Colijn, A P; D'Auria, S; Dorholt, O; Doherty, F; Ferrari, P; Ferrère, D; Górnicki, E; Koperny, S; Lefèvre, R; Lindquist, L-E; Malecki, P; Mikulec, B; Mohn, B; Pater, J; Pernegger, H; Phillips, P; Robichaud-Véronneau, A; Robinson, D; Roe, S; Sandaker, H; Sfyrla, A; Stanecka, E; Stastny, J; Viehhauser, G; Vossebeld, J; Wells, P

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) is one of the largest existing semiconductor detectors. It is situated between the Pixel detector and the Transition Radiation Tracker at one of the four interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). During 2006-2007 the detector was lowered into the ATLAS cavern and installed in its final position. For the assembly, integration and commissioning phase, a complete Detector Control System (DCS) was developed to ensure the safe operation of the tracker. This included control of the individual powering of the silicon modules, a bi-phase cooling system and various types of sensors monitoring the SCT environment and the surrounding test enclosure. The DCS software architecture, performance and operational experience will be presented in the view of a validation of the DCS for the final SCT installation and operation phase.

  8. Cryogenic Characteristics of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Superconducting Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, R; Delruelle, N; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Passardi, Giorgio; Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS, one of the experiments of the LHC accelerator under commissioning at CERN, is equipped with a large superconducting magnet the Barrel Toroid (BT) that has been tested at nominal current (20500 A). The BT is composed of eight race-track superconducting coils (each one weights about 45 tons) forming the biggest air core toroidal magnet ever built. By means of a large throughput centrifugal pump, a forced flow (about 10 liter/second at 4.5 K) provides the indirect cooling of the coils in parallel. The paper describes the results of the measurements carried out on the complete cryogenic system assembled in the ATLAS cavern situated 100 m below the ground level. The measurements include, among other ones, the static heat loads, i.e., with no or constant current in the magnet, and the dynamic ones, since additional heat losses are produced, during the current ramp-up or slow dump, by eddy currents induced on the coil casing.

  9. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S

    2005-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: Atlas Software Week Plenary 6-10 December 2004 North American ATLAS Physics Workshop (Tucson) 20-21 December 2004 (17 talks) Physics Analysis Tools Tutorial (Tucson) 19 December 2004 Full Chain Tutorial 21 September 2004 ATLAS Plenary Sessions, 17-18 February 2005 (17 talks) Coming soon: ATLAS Tutorial on Electroweak Physics, 14 Feb. 2005 Software Workshop, 21-22 February 2005 Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  10. Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Control Room by Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On June 27th, 2013, a Virtual Visit to the ATLAS Experiment at CERN will take place. This Virtual Visit will be presented by Professor Amadeu Albino Jr (IFRN), Anderson Guedes (SEEC/RN) and Denis Damazio (researcher at the ATLAS experiment/CERN). The event will take place in LAPEFA - the Laboratory for Research in Physics and Astronomy Teaching - located in the Department of theoretical and experimental physics of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN). The event will start at 9 a.m. local time. - See more at: http://atlas-live-virtual-visit.web.cern.ch/atlas-live-virtual-visit/2013/Natal-2013.html

  11. Western Portion IKONOS and Landsat ETM Merge Satellite Imagery for Carlsbad Caverns National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — IKONOS and Landsat ETM+ image merge for Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico. The image has a spatial resolution of 12 meters and is comprised of 11 layers....

  12. Small bowel autotransplantation combined with pancreato-duodenectomy for enormous cavernous hemangioma of the small intestine mesentery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yong; WU Hong; YANG Jia-yin

    2008-01-01

    @@ Recent advances in transplantation techniques have allowed pancreatoduodenectomy, distal gastrectomy, hemicolectomy and small bowel autotransplantation to be the therapy of choice for enormous cavernous hemangioma of the small intestine mesentery. There have been a few case reports about small bowel autotransplantation combined with pancreatoduodenectomy for enormous mesenteric cavernous hemangioma of small intestine.1-4 The present surgical methods for enormous cavernous hemangioma of the small intestine mesentery mainly included tumor excision and/or small bowel resection. However, these therapies are not effective for those patients in whom the angiocavernoma has infiltrated the mesenteric artery or pancreas, and these patients often give up therapy. It is recognized that enormous cavernous hemangioma of the small intestine mesentery is a benign lesion, and patients may have an excellent prognosis after complete resection of the lesion.

  13. Carotid-cavernous fistula caused by laceration of persistent fetal trigeminal artery treated with single catheter coil embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the endovascular treatment of traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula from persistent fetal trigeminal artery (PFTA laceration. To date, there are six such cases of traumatic PFTA-cavernous fistulas reported in the literature. These injuries can pose a unique challenge in that rupture of a PFTA in its course through the cavernous sinus may produce a fistula feeding from both anterior and posterior circulations. Previously, these have been treated with dual catheter coil embolization from the carotid and basilar systems. We utilize a single catheter technique accessing the cavernous sinus through the origin of the PFTA on the internal carotid. Both anterior and posterior fistula components may be embolized through this single access. This represents a simple yet safe treatment option.

  14. Persistent trigeminal artery arising from the arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Kurita, Hiroki; Ishihara, Shoichiro

    2012-09-01

    A persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomosis, usually arising from the cavernous or precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and connecting to the distal basilar artery. There are two types of PTA, lateral and medial. We present the first case of a lateral-type PTA arising from the large arterial ring/fenestration of the cavernous segment of the left ICA with findings from both magnetic resonance angiography and selective catheter angiography. PMID:22215430

  15. Cavern disposal concepts for HLW/SF: assuring operational practicality and safety with maximum programme flexibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most conventional engineered barrier system (EBS) designs for HLW/SF repositories are based on concepts developed in the 1970s and 1980s that assured feasibility with high margins of safety, in order to convince national decision makers to proceed with geological disposal despite technological uncertainties. In the interval since the advent of such 'feasibility designs', significant progress has been made in reducing technological uncertainties, which has lead to a growing awareness of other, equally important uncertainties in operational implementation and challenges regarding social acceptance in many new, emerging national repository programs. As indicated by the NUMO repository concept catalogue study (NUMO, 2004), there are advantages in reassessing how previous designs can be modified and optimised in the light of improved system understanding, allowing a robust EBS to be flexibly implemented to meet nation-specific and site-specific conditions. Full-scale emplacement demonstrations, particularly those carried out underground, have highlighted many of the practical issues to be addressed; e.g., handling of compacted bentonite in humid conditions, use of concrete for support infrastructure, remote handling of heavy radioactive packages in confined conditions, quality inspection, monitoring / ease of retrieval of emplaced packages and institutional control. The CAvern REtrievable (CARE) concept reduces or avoids such issues by emplacement of HLW or SF within multi-purpose transportation / storage / disposal casks in large ventilated caverns at a depth of several hundred metres. The facility allows the caverns to serve as inspectable stores for an extended period of time (up to a few hundred years) until a decision is made to close them. At this point the caverns are backfilled and sealed as a final repository, effectively with the same safety case components as conventional 'feasibility designs'. In terms of operational practicality an d safety, the CARE

  16. Commercial potential of natural gas storage in lined rock caverns (LRC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    The geologic conditions in many regions of the United States will not permit the development of economical high-deliverability gas storage in salt caverns. These regions include the entire Eastern Seaboard; several northern states, notably Minnesota and Wisconsin; many of the Rocky Mountain States; and most of the Pacific Northwest. In late 1997, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Federal Energy Technology Center engaged Sofregaz US to investigate the commercialization potential of natural gas storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC). Sofregaz US teamed with Gaz de France and Sydkraft, who had formed a consortium, called LRC, to perform the study for the USDOE. Underground storage of natural gas is generally achieved in depleted oil and gas fields, aquifers, and solution-mined salt caverns. These storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Unlined rock caverns have been used for decades to store hydrocarbons - mostly liquids such as crude oil, butane, and propane. The maximum operating pressure in unlined rock caverns is limited, since the host rock is never entirely impervious. The LRC technology allows a significant increase in the maximum operating pressure over the unlined storage cavern concept, since the gas in storage is completely contained with an impervious liner. The LRC technology has been under development in Sweden by Sydkraft since 1987. The development process has included extensive technical studies, laboratory testing, field tests, and most recently includes a storage facility being constructed in southern Sweden (Skallen). The LRC development effort has shown that the concept is technically and economically viable. The Skallen storage facility will have a rock cover of 115 meters (375 feet), a storage volume of 40,000 cubic meters (250,000 petroleum barrels), and a maximum operating pressure of 20 MPa (2,900 psi). There is a potential for commercialization of the LRC technology in the United States. Two regions were studied

  17. Commercial potential of natural gas storage in lined rock caverns (LRC); FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geologic conditions in many regions of the United States will not permit the development of economical high-deliverability gas storage in salt caverns. These regions include the entire Eastern Seaboard; several northern states, notably Minnesota and Wisconsin; many of the Rocky Mountain States; and most of the Pacific Northwest. In late 1997, the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) Federal Energy Technology Center engaged Sofregaz US to investigate the commercialization potential of natural gas storage in Lined Rock Caverns (LRC). Sofregaz US teamed with Gaz de France and Sydkraft, who had formed a consortium, called LRC, to perform the study for the USDOE. Underground storage of natural gas is generally achieved in depleted oil and gas fields, aquifers, and solution-mined salt caverns. These storage technologies require specific geologic conditions. Unlined rock caverns have been used for decades to store hydrocarbons - mostly liquids such as crude oil, butane, and propane. The maximum operating pressure in unlined rock caverns is limited, since the host rock is never entirely impervious. The LRC technology allows a significant increase in the maximum operating pressure over the unlined storage cavern concept, since the gas in storage is completely contained with an impervious liner. The LRC technology has been under development in Sweden by Sydkraft since 1987. The development process has included extensive technical studies, laboratory testing, field tests, and most recently includes a storage facility being constructed in southern Sweden (Skallen). The LRC development effort has shown that the concept is technically and economically viable. The Skallen storage facility will have a rock cover of 115 meters (375 feet), a storage volume of 40,000 cubic meters (250,000 petroleum barrels), and a maximum operating pressure of 20 MPa (2,900 psi). There is a potential for commercialization of the LRC technology in the United States. Two regions were studied

  18. Dr Flavia Schlegel Assistant Director-General for Natural Sciences UNESCO

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    27 January 2016 - UNESCO Assistant Director-General for Natural Sciences UNESCO F. Schlegel visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson B. Heinemann. M. Bona, Relations with International Organisations, accompanies the delegation throughout.

  19. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern sulphur mines 2-4-5 certification tests and analysis. Part I: 1981 testing. Part II: 1982 testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Well leak tests and a cavern pressure were conducted in June through December 1981, and are described in Part I. The tests did not indicate conclusively that there was no leakage from the cavern, but the data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely. The test results indicated that retesting and well workover were desirable prior to making a decision on the cavern use. Well leak tests were conducted in March through May 1982, and are described in Part II. The tests indicated that there was no significant leakage from wells 2 and 4 but that the leakage from wells 2A and 5 exceeded the DOE criterion. Because of the proximity of cavern 2-4-5 to the edge of the salt, this cavern should be considered for only one fill/withdrawal cycle prior to extensive reevaluation. 57 figures, 17 tables.

  20. ATLAS brochure (Norwegian version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter. Français

  1. The ATLAS tile calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Louis Rose-Dulcina, a technician from the ATLAS collaboration, works on the ATLAS tile calorimeter. Special manufacturing techniques were developed to mass produce the thousands of elements in this detector. Tile detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  2. The ATLAS pixel detector

    OpenAIRE

    Cristinziani, M.

    2007-01-01

    After a ten years planning and construction phase, the ATLAS pixel detector is nearing its completion and is scheduled to be integrated into the ATLAS detector to take data with the first LHC collisions in 2007. An overview of the construction is presented with particular emphasis on some of the major and most recent problems encountered and solved.

  3. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    La Givrine near St Cergue Cross Country Skiing and Fondue at Basse Ruche with M Nordberg, P Jenni, M Nessi, F Gianotti and Co. ATLAS Management Fondu dinner, reviewing state of play of the experiment Many fun scenes from cross country skiing and after 41 minutes of the film starts the fondue dinner in a nice chalet with many persons working for ATLAS experiment

  4. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Budker Nuclear Physics Institute, Novosibirsk Sequence 1 Shots of aircraft factory where machining for ATLAS is done Shots of aircraft Work on components for ATLAS big wheel Discussions between Tikhonov and Nordberg in workshop Sequence 2 Shots of downtown Novosibirsk, including little church which is mid-point of Russian Federation Sequence 3 Interview of Yuri Tikhonov by Andrew Millington

  5. ATLAS Colouring Book

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment Colouring Book is a free-to-download educational book, ideal for kids aged 5-9. It aims to introduce children to the field of High-Energy Physics, as well as the work being carried out by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  6. ATLAS people can run!

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira; Pauline Gagnon

    It must be all the training we are getting every day, running around trying to get everything ready for the start of the LHC next year. This year, the ATLAS runners were in fine form and came in force. Nine ATLAS teams signed up for the 37th Annual CERN Relay Race with six runners per team. Under a blasting sun on Wednesday 23rd May 2007, each team covered the distances of 1000m, 800m, 800m, 500m, 500m and 300m taking the runners around the whole Meyrin site, hills included. A small reception took place in the ATLAS secretariat a week later to award the ATLAS Cup to the best ATLAS team. For the details on this complex calculation which takes into account the age of each runner, their gender and the color of their shoes, see the July 2006 issue of ATLAS e-news. The ATLAS Running Athena Team, the only all-women team enrolled this year, won the much coveted ATLAS Cup for the second year in a row. In fact, they are so good that Peter Schmid and Patrick Fassnacht are wondering about reducing the women's bonus in...

  7. ATLAS-Hadronic Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Hall 180 work on Hadronic Calorimeter The ATLAS hadronic tile calorimeter The Tile Calorimeter, which constitutes the central section of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter, is a non-compensating sampling device made of iron and scintillating tiles. (IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 53 (2006) 1275-81)

  8. A Slice of ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    An entire section of the ATLAS detector is being assembled at Prévessin. Since May the components have been tested using a beam from the SPS, giving the ATLAS team valuable experience of operating the detector as well as an opportunity to debug the system.

  9. ATLAS Brochure (english version)

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  10. ATLAS brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  11. ATLAS Brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  12. ATLAS brochure (Danish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  13. ATLAS brochure (Italian version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2010-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  14. ATLAS brochure (French version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  15. ATLAS brochure (Catalan version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  16. ATLAS Brochure (german version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  17. ATLAS brochure (Polish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  18. ATLAS Brochure (english version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  19. ATLAS Brochure (french version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  20. ATLAS rewards industry

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    For contributing vital pieces to the ATLAS puzzle, three industries were recognized on Friday 5 May during a supplier awards ceremony. After a welcome and overview of the ATLAS experiment by spokesperson Peter Jenni, CERN Secretary-General Maximilian Metzger stressed the importance of industry to CERN's scientific goals. Picture 30 : representatives of the three award-wining companies after the ceremony

  1. ATLAS Thesis Awards 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on Thursday 25 February. The winners also presented their work in front of members of the ATLAS Collaboration. Winners: Javier Montejo Berlingen, Barcelona (Spain), Ruth Pöttgen, Mainz (Germany), Nils Ruthmann, Freiburg (Germany), and Steven Schramm, Toronto (Canada).

  2. ATLAS brochure (Spanish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS is the largest detector at the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. ATLAS is a multi-purpose detector, designed to throw light on fundamental questions such as the origin of mass and the nature of the Universe's dark matter.

  3. Dear ATLAS colleagues,

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2008-01-01

    We are collecting old pairs of glasses to take out to Mali, where they can be re-used by people there. The price for a pair of glasses can often exceed 3 months salary, so they are prohibitively expensive for many people. If you have any old spectacles you can donate, please put them in the special box in the ATLAS secretariat, bldg.40-4-D01 before the Christmas closure on 19 December so we can take them with us when we leave for Africa at the end of the month. (more details in ATLAS e-news edition of 29 September 2008: http://atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch/atlas-service-enews/news/news_mali.php) many thanks! Katharine Leney co-driver of the ATLAS car on the Charity Run to Mali

  4. ATLAS Virtual Visits

    CERN Document Server

    Goldfarb, Steven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS Virtual Visits is a project initiated in 2011 for the Education & Outreach program of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN. Its goal is to promote public appreciation of the LHC physics program and particle physics, in general, through direct dialogue between ATLAS physicists and remote audiences. A Virtual Visit is an IP-based videoconference, coupled with a public webcast and video recording, between ATLAS physicists and remote locations around the world, that typically include high school or university classrooms, Masterclasses, science fairs, or other special events, usually hosted by collaboration members. Over the past two years, more than 10,000 people, from all of the world’s continents, have actively participated in ATLAS Virtual Visits, with many more enjoying the experience from the publicly available webcasts and recordings. We present an overview of our experience and discuss potential development for the future.

  5. Wind Atlas for Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Said Said, Usama; Badger, Jake

    2006-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityproducing wind turbine installations. The regional wind...... climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations from more than 30 stations all over Egypt, and a numerical wind atlas based on long-term reanalysis data and a mesoscale model (KAMM). The mean absolute error comparing the two methods is about...... 10% for two large-scale KAMM domains covering all of Egypt, and typically about 5% for several smaller-scale regional domains. The numerical wind atlas covers all of Egypt, whereas the meteorological stations are concentrated in six regions. The Wind Atlas for Egypt represents a significant step...

  6. Wind Atlas for Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityproducing wind turbine installations. The regional wind...... climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations from more than 30 stations all over Egypt, and a numerical wind atlas based on long-term reanalysis data and a mesoscale model (KAMM). The mean absolute error comparing the two methods is about...... 10% for two large-scale KAMM domains covering all of Egypt, and typically about 5% for several smaller-scale regional domains. The numerical wind atlas covers all of Egypt, whereas the meteorological stations are concentrated in six regions. The Wind Atlas for Egypt represents a significant step...

  7. A novel support system for shallow buried caverns based on the mining method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-Qi, Ding; Ya-Fei, Qiao; Yue-Lang, Jin; Qing-Zhao, Zhang

    2016-02-01

    In order to maintain the original appearance of the rocks on a cavern roof and protect the ground environment, a new supporting method for shallow-buried caverns is proposed. This study investigates the design theory and construction process. Based to this method, some crisscross small tunnel sheds are embedded in the overburden layer. Hence a supporting system of interaction between surrounding rocks and supporting structures is formed. By combining the numerical calculation with monitoring measurement, we found that the distribution of calculated deformation generally agreed with the monitoring measurements. The monitoring results revealed that the proportion of rock shelf load-bearing reached 47%. The self-bearing capacity of the surrounding rocks is brought into significantly play.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of a cerebral cavernous haemangioma in a dog : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Schoeman

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available A 13-month-old, neutered, male Golden retriever presented with seizures and progressive depression. Clinical and neurological assessment was consistent with severe intracranial disease. The neurological condition progressively deteriorated and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed the presence of a large, contrast-enhancing, space-occupying mass in the right cerebral hemisphere. Therapy with corticosteroids, mannitol and furosemide ameliorated the signs of depression and ataxia, but the owner elected euthanasia after 1 week. Post mortem examination of the brain confirmed the presence of a large haemorrhagic lesion in the right olfactory lobe, the histopathological appearance of which was consistent with cerebral cavernous haemangioma. This is the 1st case describing the MRI appearance of a cavernous haemangioma of the cerebrum in the veterinary literature.

  9. Endovascular treatment of a giant internal carotid artery bifurcation aneurysm with drainage into cavernous sinus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhen-hai; YANG Xin-jian; WU Zhong-xue; LI You-xiang; JIANG Peng

    2012-01-01

    This report documents the treatment of a giant aneurysm of the internal carotid artery bifurcation with a fistula to the cavernous sinus,which appeared following closed head trauma.A 39-year-old man suffered from a blunt head trauma in an automobile accident.Two weeks after the trauma,progressive chemosis of left eye was presented.Four months after the trauma,digital subtraction angiography showed an internal carotid artery bifurcation aneurysm,with drainage into the cavernous sinus.The lesion was successfully obliterated with preservation of the parent artery by using coils in conjunction with Onyx.Follow-up angiography obtained 3 months postoperatively revealed persistent obliteration of the aneurysm and fistula as well as patency of the parent artery.Endovascular treatment involving the use of coils combined with Onyx appears to be a feasible and effective option for treatment of this hard-to-treat lesion.

  10. Design and construction of the tensioned ties for UX15 cavern vault

    CERN Document Server

    Parkin, R J H

    2002-01-01

    Due to the programme constraints for the UX15 cavern set by CERN, it has been necessary to complete the concrete lining of the vault prior to the excavation of the bench. The vault lining is therefore being temporarily suspended from a number of pre-tensioned high capacity multi-strand tensioned ties. During excavation of the bench, additional loads will be imposed onto the vault lining due to ground displacements. In order to minimise the number of ties, the previously completed linings of the PX14 and PX16 access shafts will be used to support some of the load. Three-dimensional modelling has been undertaken to design the structures and determine the expected behaviour of this complex support system. Geotechnical instrumentation has been installed in the concrete linings and the ground to monitor loads and displacements during construction. After the cavern walls have been completed, the ties will be released.

  11. Cavernous hemangioma arising from the gastro-splenic ligament: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kin-Fah Chin; Ghaith Khair; Palani Sathish Babu; David Russell Morgan

    2009-01-01

    We present a rare case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with epigastric pain associated with early satiety and weight loss. Imaging revealed a large intraabdominal mass in the epigastrium. Despite intensive investigations, including ultrasound scanning, computed tomography, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, and percutaneous biopsy, a diagnosis could not be obtained.A histological diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma arising from the gastro-splenic ligament was confirmed after laparoscopic excision and histological examination of the intra-abdominal epigastric mass.

  12. First DT+RPC chambers installation round in the UX5 cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Jesus Puerta-Pelayo

    2007-01-01

    DT+RPC packages corresponding to sectors 1 and 7 of the barrel region cannot be installed on surface, since the lowering gantry from SX5 to UX5 uses their gaps to hold the wheels. Therefore this installation has to be carried out in the cavern. These pictures illustrate the first installation round on YB+2 right after the lowering. A total of 8 chambers were successfully installed in 2 days.

  13. Phenotypic modulation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells in a rat model of cavernous neurectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yang

    Full Text Available Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP are at high risk for erectile dysfunction (ED due to potential cavernous nerve (CN damage during surgery. Penile hypoxia after RP is thought to significantly contribute to ED pathogenesis.We previously showed that corpora cavernosum smooth muscle cells (CCSMCs undergo phenotypic modulation under hypoxic conditions in vitro. Here, we studied such changes in an in vivo post-RP ED model by investigating CCSMCs in bilateral cavernous neurectomy (BCN rats.Sprague-Dawley rats underwent sham (n = 12 or BCN (n = 12 surgery. After 12 weeks, they were injected with apomorphine to determine erectile function. The penile tissues were harvested and assessed for fibrosis using Masson trichrome staining and for molecular markers of phenotypic modulation using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. CCSMC morphological structure was evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM.Erectile function was significantly lower in BCN rats than in sham rats. BCN increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and collagen protein expression in corpora cavernous tissue. H&E staining and TEM showed that CCSMCs in BCN rats underwent hypertrophy and showed rough endoplasmic reticulum formation. The expression of CCSMC phenotypic markers, such as smooth muscle α-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, and desmin, was markedly lower, whereas vimentin protein expression was significantly higher in BCN rats than in control rats.CCSMCs undergo phenotype modulation in rats with cavernous neurectomy. The results have unveiled physiological transformations that occur at the cellular and molecular levels and have helped characterize CN injury-induced ED.

  14. Diffuse Cavernous Hemangioma of the Penis, Scrotum, Perineum, and Rectum - A rare tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Rastogi Rajul

    2008-01-01

    Hemangiomas are benign lesions that occur in any part of the body. Genital hemangioma involving the entire penis and scrotum are extremely rare. More rarely they can extend in to the pelvis making preoperative imaging imperative and decisive in treatment. Very few cases have been reported in the medical literature. Hereby, a rare cavernous hemangioma that involves the entire penis, scrotum and extends into perineum and rectum in an 18-year-old male is presented with review of literature.

  15. Diffuse Cavernous Hemangioma of the Penis, Scrotum, Perineum, and Rectum - A rare tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastogi Rajul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangiomas are benign lesions that occur in any part of the body. Genital hemangioma involving the entire penis and scrotum are extremely rare. More rarely they can extend in to the pelvis making preoperative imaging imperative and decisive in treatment. Very few cases have been reported in the medical literature. Hereby, a rare cavernous hemangioma that involves the entire penis, scrotum and extends into perineum and rectum in an 18-year-old male is presented with review of literature.

  16. A cavernous haemangioma of breast in male: radiological-pathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreira, C.; Romero, C.; Urbasos, M.; Pinto, J. [Servicio de Radiologia, Hospital ' ' Virgen de la Salud' ' , Toledo (Spain); Rodriguez, R.; Francisco, J.M. de [Servicio de Anatomia Patologica, Hospital ' ' Virgen de la Salud' ' , Toledo (Spain)

    2001-02-01

    Vascular tumours of the breast are especially rare in men, and a majority of them are angiosarcomas. In fact, we found only four cases of haemangioma in males in the literature. We present a case of cavernous haemangioma in a male aged 48 years, and which commenced as a palpable mass. We performed differential diagnosis and radiological-pathological correlation. We established the correct classification of this case histologically, and decided on the definitive therapeutic approach. (orig.)

  17. Cavernous mesenteric lymphangiomatosis mimicking metastasis in a patient with rectal cancer: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seong Su Hwang; Hyun Joo Choi; Soo Youn Park

    2009-01-01

    Lymphangioma usually occurs in children and usually involves the skin. Mesenteric lymphangioma is extremely rare in adults. Typically, lymphangioma appears on computed tomography (CT) as a lower attenuation of a cystic mass, however, some cases appear to be a solid mass. We describe the CT and 18FFDG positron emission tomography/CT appearance in a case of jejunal and mesenteric cavernous lymphangiomatosis mimicking metastasis in an adult patient with rectal cancer.

  18. Current status of the demonstration test of underground cavern-type disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, the underground cavern-type disposal facilities for low-level waste (LLW) with relatively high radioactivity, mainly generated from power reactor decommissioning, and for certain transuranic (TRU) waste, mainly from spent fuel reprocessing, are designed to be constructed in a cavern 50-100 m underground and to employ an engineered barrier system (EBS) made of bentonite and cement materials. To advance a disposal feasibility study, the Japanese government commissioned the Demonstration Test of Underground Cavern-Type Disposal Facilities in fiscal year (FY) 2005. Construction of a full-scale mock-up test facility in an actual subsurface environment started in FY 2007. The main test objective is to establish the construction methodology and procedures that ensure the required quality of the EBS on-site. A portion of the facility was constructed by 2010, and the test has demonstrated both the practicability of the construction and the achievement of quality standards: low permeability of less than 5x10-13 m/s and low-diffusion of less than 1x10-12 m2/s at the completion of construction. This paper covers the test results from the construction of certain parts using bentonite and cement materials. (author)

  19. Evaluation of Computational Method of High Reynolds Number Slurry Flow for Caverns Backfilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettin, Giorgia [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The abandonment of salt caverns used for brining or product storage poses a significant environmental and economic risk. Risk mitigation can in part be address ed by the process of backfilling which can improve the cavern geomechanical stability and reduce the risk o f fluid loss to the environment. This study evaluate s a currently available computational tool , Barracuda, to simulate such process es as slurry flow at high Reynolds number with high particle loading . Using Barracuda software, a parametric sequence of simu lations evaluated slurry flow at Re ynolds number up to 15000 and loading up to 25%. Li mitations come into the long time required to run these simulation s due in particular to the mesh size requirement at the jet nozzle. This study has found that slurry - jet width and centerline velocities are functions of Re ynold s number and volume fractio n The solid phase was found to spread less than the water - phase with a spreading rate smaller than 1 , dependent on the volume fraction. Particle size distribution does seem to have a large influence on the jet flow development. This study constitutes a first step to understand the behavior of highly loaded slurries and their ultimate application to cavern backfilling.

  20. Resection of Giant Hepatic Cavernous Hemangiomas after Dissection of the Third Porta Hepatis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAOXiaoping; ZHOUWeiping; WANGYi; WUMengchao; JINGLiang

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To estabhsh a novel and safe operation technique for the resection of giant hepatic cavernous hemangiomas involving the retro-hepatic vena cava.Methods:After ligating the hepatic artery of affected lobe, the short hepatic veins at the third porta hepatis were dissected and ligated individually to separate the tumor from the retrohepatic vena cava, followed by the resection of the tumor under intermittent interruption of the porta hepatis.Results:A total of 62 giant hepatic cavernous hemangiomas were successfully resected without hepatic vascular exclusion. Right and caudate lobectomies were done in 27 cases, right hemihepatectornies in 5 cases, right upper segnentectomies in 7 cases, right posterior lobectomies in 7 cases, extended left and caudate lobectomies in 10 cases, and caudate lobectomies in 6 cases. The blood transfusion requirement during operation was 1 400 ml on average. All did well postoperatively during a follow up of 4 - 84 months.Conclusion:It is safe and feasible to resect giant hepatic cavernous hemangioma following dissection of the third porta hepatis. Duringoperation the key step is dissection of the short hepatic veins.

  1. RESISTANCE OF KARST CAVERNS NITROGEN-FIXING BACTERIA TO EXTREME FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashyrev O. B.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To determine the studied bacteria resistance quantitative parameters of extreme factors such as toxic metals (Cu2+, organic xenobiotics (p-nitrochlorobenzene and UV-irradiation were the aim of the research. Six strains of nitrogen-fixing bacteria isolated from clays of two caverns Mushkarova Yama (Podolia, Ukraine and Kuybyshevskaya (Western Caucasus, Abkhazia and Azotobacter vinelandii УКМ В-6017 as a reference strain have been tested. For this purpose the maximum permissible concentration of Cu2+ and p-nitrochlorobenzene in the concentration gradient and lethal doses of UV by the survival caverns have been determined. Maximum permissible concentrations for strains were as 10 ppm Cu2+, 70–120 ppm of p-nitrochlorobenzene. The maximum doses of UV-irradiation varied in the range of 55–85 J/m2 (LD99.99. It is shown that three classes of extreme factors resistance parameters of karst caverns strains are similar to the strain of terrestrial soil ecosystems. The most active studied strains reduce the concentration of p-nitrochlorobenzene in the medium in 13 times. The ability of nitrogen-fixing bacteria to degrade p-nitrochlorobenzene could be used in creation new environmental biotechnology for industrial wastewater treatment from nitrochloroaromatic xenobiotics. Isolated strains could be used as destructors for soils bioremediation in agrobiotechnologies and to optimize plants nitrogen nutrition in terrestrial ecosystems.

  2. Helical CT finding of carotid-cavernous fistula: a sign of early enhancing superior ophthalmic vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of a sign of early enhancing superior ophthalmic vein (SOV), as seen on helical CT images in patients with carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF). This study involved 16 patients with CCF and 28 control patients. Axial CT images with scanning delays of 30 seconds following bolus injection of contrast material (90 mL, 3 mL/sec) were obtained, and this procedure was followed by coronal CT imaging. To determine the presence or absence of early enhancement or, dilatation of the SOV, bulging of the cavernous sinus, and enlargement of extraocular muscle, CT images were analysed by three observers in a blinded, random manner. Early enhancement of SOV was determined to be present where enhancement of the SOV was similar to or stronger than that of the ipsilateral posterior cerebral artery. A sign of early enhancing SOV was seen in 14 of the 16 patients with CCF but in no control patients (88% sensitivity and 100% specificity). The respective sensitivity and specificity of other CT features were 71% and 100% (dilatation of the SOV, as seen on axial images), 60% and 83% (dilatation of the SOV, as seen on coronal images), 71% and 89% (dilatation of the cavernous sinus), and 65% and 98% (enlargement of extraocular muscle). A sign of early enhancing SOV is a characteristic and specific CT finding of CCF, and is useful for the diagnosis of CCF. (author)

  3. Superior ophthalmic vein approach for endovascular treatment of dural cavernous sinus fistulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the method for surgical exposure the superior ophthalmic vein with embolization of the cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula and evaluate its efficacy and safety. Methods: Surgical exposure of the superior ophthalmic vein was performed by eyelid incision and followed by catheterization and embolization with micro-coils for 16 patients with cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas. Results: Clinical cure was achieved in all patients and complete angiographic obliteration of fistula was documented in 15 patients (94%). Residual fistula was left in 1 patients with compact occlusion via pterygoid drainage but disappeared one month later by manual compression of the carotid artery. Headache and vomiting were the most common symptoms after the embolization, other 2 patients had mild diplopia and relieved within two months. No permanent procedure-related morbidity and recurrence occurred during clinical follow up for 5 months to 6 years. Conclusion: Surgical exposure of the superior ophthalmic vein for embolization of cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula is a safe and efficient method. (authors)

  4. Continuous-wave vs. pulsed infrared laser stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Cilip, Christopher M.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Optical nerve stimulation has recently been developed as an alternative to electrical nerve stimulation. However, recent studies have focused primarily on pulsed delivery of the laser radiation and at relatively low pulse rates. The objective of this study is to demonstrate faster optical stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves using continuouswave (CW) infrared laser radiation, for potential diagnostic applications. A Thulium fiber laser (λ = 1870 nm) was used for non-contact optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo. Optical nerve stimulation, as measured by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the penis, was achieved with the laser operating in either CW mode, or with a 5-ms pulse duration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 100 Hz. Successful optical stimulation was observed to be primarily dependent on a threshold nerve temperature (42-45 °C), not an incident fluence, as previously reported. CW optical nerve stimulation provides a significantly faster ICP response time using a laser with lower power output than pulsed stimulation. CW optical nerve stimulation may therefore represent an alternative mode of stimulation for intra-operative diagnostic applications where a rapid response is critical, such as identification of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery.

  5. Research at the fragment mass analyser at ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental program at the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) at the ATLAS heavy ion accelerator of the Argonne National Laboratory is described. The brief description and operational properties of the FMA are presented. The highest mass resolution obtained with the FMA is 525/1. Some experimental results are presented. 5 refs., 7 figs

  6. ATLAS Point 1 Construction

    CERN Multimedia

    Inigo-Golfin, J

    After 3 years of work in point 1, a number of surface buildings have already been completed and handed over to CERN (the control, the gas and the cooling and ventilation buildings) and, probably more appealing to the public, 60,000 m3 of earth have already been excavated from underground. At present, the technical cavern USA15 and its access shaft are almost finished, leaving only the main cavern and the liaison galleries to be completed in the coming year and a half. The main cavern has been excavated down to the radiation limit and its walls and vault will presently be concreted (see below the picture of the section of the vault with the impressive shell of 1.2 m thickness). The excavation of the bench (27 vertical metres to go yet!) will proceed from August, when some additional civil engineering work in the LHC tunnel will be undertaken. Needless to say many different services are necessary around the detector, both for its installation and future operation for physics. To that end much of the heavy...

  7. Role of EPI in diagnosing cavernous hemangioma and small HCC : comparison with fast T2-weighted MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Chang Won; Jung, Hyun Woo; Choi, Sang Yoel; Lee, Suck Hong; Kim, Byung Soo [Pusan National Univeraty Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare single-shot echo-planar MR imaging (EPI) with breath-hold fast T2-weighted imaging (HASTE or Turbo spin-echo T2WI) for evaluation of the role of EPI in distinguishing small hepatocellular carcinoma from cavernous hemangioma. We retrospectively evaluated MR images of 35 patients (21 cases of small HCC and 14 cases of cavernous hemangioma). EPI and breath-hold fast T2WI images were obtained and compared on the basis of lesion detection sensitivity, lesion-to-liver signal intensity ratio (SIR), contrast ratio (CR), and lesion-to-liver contrast to noise ratio (CNR). For the detection of small HCC, the sensitivity of EPI and breath-hold fast T2WI were equal in 14 of 21 cases (71.4%). The detection sensitivity of cavernous hemangioma with EPI and breath-hold fast T2WI was 100 % (14/14). Mean SIR on breath-hold fast T2WI was 2.02 {+-} 0.45 for small HCC and 3.65 {+-} 0.97 for cavernous hemangioma; on EPI, the corresponding figures were 2.91 {+-} 0.57 for cavernous hemangioma; On EPI, the figures obtained were 2.27 {+-} 0.52 and 6.26 {+-} 2.19, respectively. Mean CNR on breath-hold fast T2WI was 14.24 {+-} 4.098 for small HCC and 50.28 {+-} 10.96 for cavernous hemangioma, while on EPI, the corresponding figures were 13.84 {+-} 3.02 and 45.44 {+-} 11.21. In detecting focal hepatic mass, the sensitivity of EPI and breath-hold fast T2WI are comparable for the diagnosis of small HCC and cavernous hemangioma, EPI can provided additional information. (author). 20 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  8. A very special visit to ATLAS: America's Cup Winner Team Alinghi

    CERN Multimedia

    Jenni, P

    It is an honour for ATLAS to frequently welcome in its cavern and the assembly sites VIP visits by Heads of State, Ministers, Directors of Funding Agencies and other political dignitaries. Rarely, however, have we had such an illustrious and competent visitor group as on December 3rd, 2003, when the full Research and Design Team from the Swiss America's Cup Team Alinghi looked at the ATLAS integration work in Halls 180 and 191 and visited Pit-1. The Team was led by 'their' Technical Coordinator Grant Simmer and principal designer Rolf Vrolijk. The Alinghi R&D team spans a very broad range of engineering and management competence; just to list a few of the team's special skills: mechanical and material engineering, electronics and software engineering, sail design, construction management, performance analysis and predictions, and last but not least direct feedback from the actual sailing team (strategist Murray Jones). Amazingly there are a lot of commonalities between Team Alinghi and ATLAS which made...

  9. Electrocorticography-Guided Surgical Treatment of Solitary Supratentorial Cavernous Malformations with Secondary Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Wang; Chao You; Guo-qiang Han; Jun Wang; Yun-biao Xiong; Chuang-xi Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of electrocorticographic (ECoG) monitoring and the application of different surgical approaches in the surgical treatment of solitary supretentorial cavernous malformations with secondary epilepsy. Methods This study enrolled a consecutive series of 36 patients with solitary supratentorial cavernous malformations and secondary epilepsy who underwent surgery with intraoperative ECoG monitoring in the Department of Neurosurgery between January 2004 and January 2008. The patients were composed of 15 males and 21 females, aged between 8 and 52 years (mean age 27.3±2.8 years) at the time of surgery. Epilepsy history, the type of epilepsy at the presentation, lesion location, the incidence of residual epileptiform discharges, and postoperative outcomes were evaluated. Results Histopathological examination indicated cavernous malformations and hippocampal sclerosis in 36 and 5 cases, respectively. Neuronal degeneration, glial cell proliferation, and neurofibrillary tangles were found in all the resected cerebral tissues of extended lesionectomy of residual epileptic foci. Lesionectomy, anterior temporal lobectomy, anterior temporal lobectomy plus cortical thermocoagulation, extended lesionectomy, extended lesionectomy plus cortical thermocoagulation were performed in 4, 4, 1, 14, and 13 cases, respectively. Residual epileptiform discharges were captured in 9 out of the 14 patients who had additional cortical thermocoagulation. According to Engle class for postoperative outcomes, 27 cases were class I (75.00%), 5 were class II (13.89%), 2 were class III (5.56%), and 2 were class IV (5.56%), thus the total effective rate (class I+class II) was 88.89%. Neither of epilepsy history, the type of epilepsy, and the location of cavernous malformation was significantly related to outcomes (P>0.05). A significant relationship was found between the incidence of residual epileptiform discharges and outcomes (P=0.041). Conclusions Intraoperative ECo

  10. 26th February 2009 - US Google Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist V. Cerf signing the guest book with Director for research and Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting ATLAS control room and experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    HI-0902038 05: IT Department Head, F. Hemmer; US Google Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist V. Cerf; Computing Security Officer and Colloquium Convenor D. R. Myers; Member of the Internet Society Advisory Council F. Flückiger; Director for Research and Scientific Computing, S. Bertolucci ; Honorary Staff Member, B. Segal. HI-0902038 16: Computing Security Officer and Colloquium Convenor D. R. Myers; UC Irvine, ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson elect A. J. Lankford; US Google Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist V. Cerf; ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni; IT Department Head, F. Hemmer.

  11. Serge Dassault, chair of the Dassault Group and Socpresse and senator of Essonne, participated in the Amicable Economic and Social Council of France at CERN on 15 June.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Dassault visited the underground cavern of the ATLAS experiment together with his son, Olivier, and Jean Jacques Blaising, head of the Physics Department. The participants also toured the LHC magnet assembly and testing hall, and the surface assembly hall and experimental cavern of the CMS experiment.

  12. EnviroAtlas - Memphis, TN - EnviroAtlas Community Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset shows the boundary of the Memphis, TN EnviroAtlas Community. It represents the outside edge of all the block groups included in the...

  13. Recent Development in the ATLAS Control Room

    CERN Multimedia

    Armen Vartapetian

    Only recently the name ATLAS Control Room (ACR) was more associated with the building at Point 1 (SCX1) than with the real thing. But just within the last several months, with the installation of the ACR hardware, that perception has changed significantly. The recently furnished ATLAS control room. But first of all, if you are not familiar with the ATLAS experimental site and are interested in visiting the ATLAS control room to see the place that in the near future will become the brain of the detector operations, it is quite easy to do so. You don't even need safety helmet or shoes! The ACR is located on the ground floor of a not so typical, glass-covered building in Point 1. The building number on the CERN map is 3162, or SCX1 as we call it. It is also easy to recognize that building by its shiny appearance within the cluster of Point 1 buildings if you are driving from Geneva. Final design and prototyping of the ACR hardware started at the beginning of 2006. Evaluation of the chosen hardware confi...

  14. ATLAS Inner Detector Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Bocci, A

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is a multi-purpose particle detector that will study high-energy particle collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In order to achieve its physics goals, the ATLAS tracking requires that the positions of the silicon detector elements have to be known to a precision better than 10 μm. Several track-based alignment algorithms have been developed for the Inner Detector. An extensive validation has been performed with simulated events and real data coming from the ATLAS. Results from such validation are reported in this paper.

  15. ATLAS Event - First Splash of Particles in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2008-01-01

    A simulated event. September 10, 2008 - The ATLAS detector lit up as a flood of particles traversed the detector when the beam was occasionally directed at a target near ATLAS. This allowed ATLAS physicists to study how well the various components of the detector were functioning in preparation for the forthcoming collisions. The first ATLAS data recorded on September 10, 2008 is seen here. Running time 24 seconds

  16. Run-2 Supersymmetry searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Soffer, Abner; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Despite the absence of experimental evidence, weak scale supersymmetry remains one of the best motivated and studied Standard Model extensions. With the large increase in collision energy with the LHC Run-2 (from 8TeV to 13 TeV) the sensitivity to heavy strongly produced SUSY particles (squarks and gluinos) increases tremendously. This talk presents recent ATLAS Run-2 searches for such particles in final states including jets, missing transverse momentum, and possibly light leptons.

  17. Pre-Test Analysis of Major Scenarios for ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS was constructed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The ATLAS is a 1/2 reduced height and 1/288 volume scaled test facility based on the design features of the APR1400. The simulation capability of the ATLAS for major design basis accidents (DBAs), including a large-break loss-of-coolant (LBLOCA), DVI line break and main steam line break (MSLB) accidents, is evaluated by the best-estimate system code, MARS, with the same control logics, transient scenarios and nodalization scheme. The validity of the applied scaling law and the thermal-hydraulic similarity between the ATLAS and the APR1400 for the major design basis accidents are assessed. It is confirmed that the ATLAS has a capability of maintaining an overall similarity with the reference plant APR1400 for the major design basis accidents considered in the present study. However, depending on the accident scenarios, there are some inconsistencies in certain thermal hydraulic parameters. It is found that the inconsistencies are mainly due to the reduced power effect and the increased stored energy in the structure. The present similarity analysis was successful in obtaining a greater insight into the unique design features of the ATLAS and would be used for developing the optimized experimental procedures and control logics

  18. Pre-Test Analysis of Major Scenarios for ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Euh, Dong-Jin; Choi, Ki-Yong; Park, Hyun-Sik; Kwon, Tae-Soon

    2007-02-15

    A thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS was constructed at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The ATLAS is a 1/2 reduced height and 1/288 volume scaled test facility based on the design features of the APR1400. The simulation capability of the ATLAS for major design basis accidents (DBAs), including a large-break loss-of-coolant (LBLOCA), DVI line break and main steam line break (MSLB) accidents, is evaluated by the best-estimate system code, MARS, with the same control logics, transient scenarios and nodalization scheme. The validity of the applied scaling law and the thermal-hydraulic similarity between the ATLAS and the APR1400 for the major design basis accidents are assessed. It is confirmed that the ATLAS has a capability of maintaining an overall similarity with the reference plant APR1400 for the major design basis accidents considered in the present study. However, depending on the accident scenarios, there are some inconsistencies in certain thermal hydraulic parameters. It is found that the inconsistencies are mainly due to the reduced power effect and the increased stored energy in the structure. The present similarity analysis was successful in obtaining a greater insight into the unique design features of the ATLAS and would be used for developing the optimized experimental procedures and control logics.

  19. 19 January 2011 - British University of Manchester, Vice-President and Dean for the Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences Professor of Structural Engineering School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering C. Bailey in CERN Control Centre with Department Head P. Collier; at LHCb with R. Lindner and ATLAS underground experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson D. Charlton, througout accompanied by . Collier with R. Appleby and F. Loebinger

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    19 January 2011 - British University of Manchester, Vice-President and Dean for the Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences Professor of Structural Engineering School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering C. Bailey in CERN Control Centre with Department Head P. Collier; at LHCb with R. Lindner and ATLAS underground experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson D. Charlton, througout accompanied by . Collier with R. Appleby and F. Loebinger

  20. Splitting failure in side walls of a large-scale underground cavern group: a numerical modelling and a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhishen; Li, Yong; Zhu, Weishen; Xue, Yiguo; Yu, Song

    2016-01-01

    Vertical splitting cracks often appear in side walls of large-scale underground caverns during excavations owing to the brittle characteristics of surrounding rock mass, especially under the conditions of high in situ stress and great overburden depth. This phenomenon greatly affects the integral safety and stability of the underground caverns. In this paper, a transverse isotropic constitutive model and a splitting failure criterion are simultaneously proposed and secondly programmed in FLAC3D to numerically simulate the integral stability of the underground caverns during excavations in Dagangshan hydropower station in Sichuan province, China. Meanwhile, an in situ monitoring study on the displacement of the key points of the underground caverns has also been carried out, and the monitoring results are compared with the numerical results. From the comparative analysis, it can be concluded that the depths of splitting relaxation area obtained by numerical simulation are almost consistent with the actual in situ monitoring values, as well as the trend of the displacement curves, which shows that the transverse isotropic constitutive model combining with the splitting failure criterion is appropriate for investigating the splitting failure in side walls of large-scale underground caverns and it will be a helpful guidance of predicting the depths of splitting relaxation area in surrounding rock mass. PMID:27652101

  1. Recent ATLAS Articles on WLAP

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S.

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project is a system for the archiving and publishing of multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. We list here newly available WLAP items relating to ATLAS: June ATLAS Plenary Meeting Tutorial on Physics EDM and Tools (June) Freiburg Overview Week Ketevi Assamagan's Tutorial on Analysis Tools Click here to browse WLAP for all ATLAS lectures.

  2. Recent results from ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Sergei; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The 2nd LHC run has started in 2015 with a pp centre-of-mass collision energy of 13 TeV and ATLAS has taken more than 20 fb-1 of data at the new energy by 2016 summer. In this talk, an overview is given on the ATLAS data taking and the improvements made to the ATLAS experiment during the 2-year shutdown 2013/2014. Selected new results from the recent data analysis from ATLAS is also presented.

  3. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    OMNI communication

    2006-01-01

    CERN, Building 40 Interview with theorist Mr. Philip Hinchliffe (Berkeley) as well an interview with his wife Mrs. Hinchliffe who is also Physics Department head at Berkeley. They are both working in ATLAS Experiment.

  4. California Ocean Uses Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a result of the California Ocean Uses Atlas Project: a collaboration between NOAA's National Marine Protected Areas Center and Marine Conservation...

  5. Lunar Sample Atlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sample Atlas provides pictures of the Apollo samples taken in the Lunar Sample Laboratory, full-color views of the samples in microscopic thin-sections,...

  6. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  7. Printed circuit for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    A printed circuit board made by scientists in the ATLAS collaboration for the transition radiaton tracker (TRT). This will read data produced when a high energy particle crosses the boundary between two materials with different electrical properties.

  8. ATLAS DAQ Configuration Databases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.Alexandrov; A.Amorim; 等

    2001-01-01

    The configuration databases are an important part of the Trigger/DAQ system of the future ATLAS experiment .This paper describes their current status giving details of architecture,implementation,test results and plans for future work.

  9. ATLAS TV PROJECT

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    ATLAS Physics Workshop at the University of Roma Tre held from Monday 06 June 2005 to Saturday 11 June 2005. Experts establishing workshop, poster, people milling Shots of Peter Jenni introduction Many audience shots Sequences from various talks

  10. General Dynamics Atlas family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, James

    Developments concerning the Atlas family of launch vehicles over the last three or four years are summarized. Attention is given to the center of gravity, load factors, acoustics, pyroshock, low-frequency sinusoidal vibration, and high-frequency random vibration.

  11. Budker INP in ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The Novosibirsk group has proposed a new design for the ATLAS liquid argon electromagnetic end-cap calorimeter with a constant thickness of absorber plates. This design has signifi- cant advantages compared to one in the Technical Proposal and it has been accepted by the ATLAS Collaboration. The Novosibirsk group is responsible for the fabrication of the precision aluminium structure for the e.m.end-cap calorimeter.

  12. ATLAS physics results

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2074312

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has been successfully taking data since the end of 2009 in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, and in heavy ion collisions. In these lectures, some of the most recent ATLAS results will be given on Standard Model measurements, the discovery of the Higgs boson, searches for supersymmetry and exotics and on heavy-ion results.

  13. ATLAS Transitional Radiation Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2006-01-01

    This colorful 3D animation is an excerpt from the film "ATLAS-Episode II, The Particles Strike Back." Shot with a bug's eye view of the inside of the detector. The viewer is taken on a tour of the inner workings of the transitional radiation tracker within the ATLAS detector. Subjects covered include what the tracker is used to measure, its structure, what happens when particles pass through the tracker, how it distinguishes between different types of particles within it.

  14. The ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Michel Mathieu, a technician for the ATLAS collaboration, is cabling the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter's first end-cap, before insertion into its cryostat. Millions of wires are connected to the electromagnetic calorimeter on this end-cap that must be carefully fed out from the detector so that data can be read out. Every element on the detector will be attached to one of these wires so that a full digital map of the end-cap can be recreated.

  15. ATLAS Jet Energy Scale

    OpenAIRE

    D. Schouten; Tanasijczuk, A.; Vetterli, M.(Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada); Collaboration, for the ATLAS

    2012-01-01

    Jets originating from the fragmentation of quarks and gluons are the most common, and complicated, final state objects produced at hadron colliders. A precise knowledge of their energy calibration is therefore of great importance at experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, while is very difficult to ascertain. We present in-situ techniques and results for the jet energy scale at ATLAS using recent collision data. ATLAS has demonstrated an understanding of the necessary jet energy cor...

  16. Annex 3: Determining the hydration heat data of a granulate/filler mixture filled into a 10 m3 model cavern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One important aim of the model cavern experiments was a comparison of the measured product temperatures with the calculated time-and place-dependent temperature curves, from which conclusions can be drawn on the quality of temperature estimates for a large cavern. (orig./PW)

  17. ATLAS Facility Description Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation), has been constructed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). The ATLAS has the same two-loop features as the APR1400 and is designed according to the well-known scaling method suggested by Ishii and Kataoka to simulate the various test scenarios as realistically as possible. It is a half-height and 1/288-volume scaled test facility with respect to the APR1400. The fluid system of the ATLAS consists of a primary system, a secondary system, a safety injection system, a break simulating system, a containment simulating system, and auxiliary systems. The primary system includes a reactor vessel, two hot legs, four cold legs, a pressurizer, four reactor coolant pumps, and two steam generators. The secondary system of the ATLAS is simplified to be of a circulating loop-type. Most of the safety injection features of the APR1400 and the OPR1000 are incorporated into the safety injection system of the ATLAS. In the ATLAS test facility, about 1300 instrumentations are installed to precisely investigate the thermal-hydraulic behavior in simulation of the various test scenarios. This report describes the scaling methodology, the geometric data of the individual component, and the specification and the location of the instrumentations in detail

  18. Atlas warping for brain morphometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Alexei M. C.; Gee, James C.

    1998-06-01

    In this work, we describe an automated approach to morphometry based on spatial normalizations of the data, and demonstrate its application to the analysis of gender differences in the human corpus callosum. The purpose is to describe a population by a reduced and representative set of variables, from which a prior model can be constructed. Our approach is rooted in the assumption that individual anatomies can be considered as quantitative variations on a common underlying qualitative plane. We can therefore imagine that a given individual's anatomy is a warped version of some referential anatomy, also known as an atlas. The spatial warps which transform a labeled atlas into anatomic alignment with a population yield immediate knowledge about organ size and shape in the group. Furthermore, variation within the set of spatial warps is directly related to the anatomic variation among the subjects. Specifically, the shape statistics--mean and variance of the mappings--for the population can be calculated in a special basis, and an eigendecomposition of the variance performed to identify the most significant modes of shape variation. The results obtained with the corpus callosum study confirm the existence of substantial anatomical differences between males and females, as reported in previous experimental work.

  19. Metalloproteinases ADAM12 and MMP-14 are associated with cavernous sinus invasion in pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junwen; Voellger, Benjamin; Benzel, Julia; Schlomann, Uwe; Nimsky, Christopher; Bartsch, Jörg W; Carl, Barbara

    2016-09-15

    Invasion of tumor cells critically depends on cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Enzymes capable of modulating these interactions belong to the proteinase families of ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) and MMP (matrix metalloprotease) proteins. Our objective is to examine their expression levels and evaluate the relationship between expression levels and cavernous sinus invasion in pituitary adenomas. Tissue samples from 35 patients with pituitary adenomas were analyzed. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was employed to assess mRNA expression levels for ADAM and MMP genes. Protein levels were examined using immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. Correlation analyses between expression levels and clinical parameters were performed. By silencing ADAM12 and MMP-14 with siRNA in a mouse pituitary adenoma cell line (TtT/GF), their cellular effects were investigated. In our study, nine women and 26 men were included, with a mean age of 53.1 years (range 15-84 years) at the time of surgery. There were 19 cases with cavernous sinus invasion. The proteins ADAM12 and MMP-14 were significantly up-regulated in invasive adenomas compared to noninvasive adenomas. Both human isoforms of ADAM12 (ADAM12L and ADAM12s) were involved in tumor invasion; moreover, ADAM12L was found to correlate positively with Ki-67 proliferation index in pituitary adenomas. In TtT/GF pituitary adenoma cells, silencing of ADAM12 and MMP-14 significantly inhibited cell invasion and migration, respectively, whereas only silencing of ADAM12 suppressed cell proliferation. We conclude that ADAM12 and MMP-14 are associated with cavernous sinus invasion in pituitary adenomas, which qualifies these proteins in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27144841

  20. Pancreatic portal cavernoma in patients with cavernous transformation of the portal vein: MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilgrain, Valerie [Universite Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Paris (France); AP-HP, Hopital Beaujon, Department of Radiology, Clichy (France); INSERM, Centre de recherche Biomedicale Bichat-beaujon, CRB3, Paris (France); Hopital Beaujon, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Condat, Bertrand; Plessier, Aurelie [AP-HP, Hopital Beaujon, Department of Gastroenterology, Clichy (France); O' Toole, Dermot [Centre de reference des maladies vasculaires du foie, AP-HP, Hopital Beaujon, Department of Hepatology, PMAD, Clichy (France); Ruszniewski, Philippe [Universite Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Paris (France); INSERM, Centre de recherche Biomedicale Bichat-beaujon, CRB3, Paris (France); Centre de reference des maladies vasculaires du foie, AP-HP, Hopital Beaujon, Department of Hepatology, PMAD, Clichy (France); Valla, Dominique C. [Universite Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Paris (France); INSERM, Centre de recherche Biomedicale Bichat-beaujon, CRB3, Paris (France); AP-HP, Hopital Beaujon, Department of Gastroenterology, Clichy (France)

    2009-11-15

    The purpose of the article was to prospectively evaluate the MR findings of pancreatic portal cavernoma in a consecutive series of patients with cavernous transformation of the portal vein. This study was approved by the review board of our institution, and informed consent was obtained. The clinical and biological data and the MR imaging for 20 patients (11 female, 9 male; median age, 49 years) with cavernous transformation of the portal vein and no evidence of previous pancreatic disease were reviewed. The presence of pancreatic portal cavernoma (defined as intra- and/or peripancreatic portal cavernoma), morphological changes in the pancreas, biliary and ductal pancreatic abnormalities, and extension of the portal venous thrombosis were qualitatively assessed. Fifteen patients (75%) had pancreatic portal cavernoma with collateral formation in the pancreas and/or collaterals around the pancreas seen on dynamic contrast-enhanced MR sequences: three patients had both intra- and peripancreatic portal cavernoma, six had intrapancreatic portal cavernoma alone and six had peripancreatic portal cavernoma only. The presence of intra- or peripancreatic portal cavernoma was significantly associated with extension of the thrombosis to the splenic and superior mesenteric veins (p = 0.05). Morphological changes in the pancreas, heterogeneity on T2-weighted sequences and main ductal pancreatic abnormalities were seen in two, four and two patients, respectively. All these patients had intrapancreatic portal cavernoma. Bile duct dilatation was observed in 13 (65%) patients: among them three had extrahepatic dilatation only and these three patients had associated intrapancreatic portal cavernoma. In patients with cavernous transformation of the portal vein, intra- or peripancreatic portal cavernoma is common. In conclusion, intra- or peripancreatic portal cavernoma was only observed in patients with extension of the thrombosis to the splenic vein and/or the superior mesenteric