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Sample records for atlantic bight zooplankton

  1. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Zooplankton responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhofer, G.A.

    1992-09-25

    This study sought to determine and understand the major processes governing the abundance, distribution, composition and eventual fate of zooplankton on the southeastern shelf of the US in relation to water circulation. Over much of the shelf circulation is dominated by the Gulf Stream and/or atmospheric forcing. Most of our studies concentrated on processes on the middle and outer shelf. On the latter, pronounced biological production occurs year-round at frequent intervals and is due to Gulf Stream eddies which move by at an average frequency of one every week. These eddies are rich in nutrients which, when upwelled into the euphoric zone, lead to pronounced primary production which then triggers zooplankton production.

  2. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic Bight: Zooplankton responses. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhofer, G.A.

    1992-09-25

    This study sought to determine and understand the major processes governing the abundance, distribution, composition and eventual fate of zooplankton on the southeastern shelf of the US in relation to water circulation. Over much of the shelf circulation is dominated by the Gulf Stream and/or atmospheric forcing. Most of our studies concentrated on processes on the middle and outer shelf. On the latter, pronounced biological production occurs year-round at frequent intervals and is due to Gulf Stream eddies which move by at an average frequency of one every week. These eddies are rich in nutrients which, when upwelled into the euphoric zone, lead to pronounced primary production which then triggers zooplankton production.

  3. Diel Vertical Dynamics of Gelatinous Zooplankton (Cnidaria, Ctenophora and Thaliacea in a Subtropical Stratified Ecosystem (South Brazilian Bight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodeli Nogueira Júnior

    Full Text Available The diel vertical dynamics of gelatinous zooplankton in physically stratified conditions over the 100-m isobath (~110 km offshore in the South Brazilian Bight (26°45'S; 47°33'W and the relationship to hydrography and food availability were analyzed by sampling every six hours over two consecutive days. Zooplankton samples were taken in three depth strata, following the vertical structure of the water column, with cold waters between 17 and 13.1°C, influenced by the South Atlantic Central Water (SACW in the lower layer (>70 m; warm (>20°C Tropical Water in the upper 40 m; and an intermediate thermocline with a deep chlorophyll-a maximum layer (0.3-0.6 mg m-3. Two distinct general patterns were observed, emphasizing the role of (i physical and (ii biological processes: (i a strong influence of the vertical stratification, with most zooplankton absent or little abundant in the lower layer. The influence of the cold SACW on the bottom layer apparently restricted the vertical occupation of most species, which typically inhabit epipelagic warm waters. Even among migratory species, only a few (Aglaura hemistoma, Abylopsis tetragona eudoxids, Beroe sp., Thalia democratica, Salpa fusiformis crossed the thermocline and reached the bottom layer. (ii A general tendency of partial migrations, with variable intensity depending on the different species and developmental stages; populations tended to be more widely distributed through the water column during daylight, and to become more aggregated in the upper layer during the night, which can be explained based on the idea of the "hunger-satiation hypothesis", maximizing feeding and minimizing the chances of being predated.

  4. Diel Vertical Dynamics of Gelatinous Zooplankton (Cnidaria, Ctenophora and Thaliacea) in a Subtropical Stratified Ecosystem (South Brazilian Bight).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira Júnior, Miodeli; Brandini, Frederico Pereira; Codina, Juan Carlos Ugaz

    2015-01-01

    The diel vertical dynamics of gelatinous zooplankton in physically stratified conditions over the 100-m isobath (~110 km offshore) in the South Brazilian Bight (26°45'S; 47°33'W) and the relationship to hydrography and food availability were analyzed by sampling every six hours over two consecutive days. Zooplankton samples were taken in three depth strata, following the vertical structure of the water column, with cold waters between 17 and 13.1°C, influenced by the South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) in the lower layer (>70 m); warm (>20°C) Tropical Water in the upper 40 m; and an intermediate thermocline with a deep chlorophyll-a maximum layer (0.3-0.6 mg m-3). Two distinct general patterns were observed, emphasizing the role of (i) physical and (ii) biological processes: (i) a strong influence of the vertical stratification, with most zooplankton absent or little abundant in the lower layer. The influence of the cold SACW on the bottom layer apparently restricted the vertical occupation of most species, which typically inhabit epipelagic warm waters. Even among migratory species, only a few (Aglaura hemistoma, Abylopsis tetragona eudoxids, Beroe sp., Thalia democratica, Salpa fusiformis) crossed the thermocline and reached the bottom layer. (ii) A general tendency of partial migrations, with variable intensity depending on the different species and developmental stages; populations tended to be more widely distributed through the water column during daylight, and to become more aggregated in the upper layer during the night, which can be explained based on the idea of the "hunger-satiation hypothesis", maximizing feeding and minimizing the chances of being predated.

  5. Biological processes in the water column of the South Atlantic bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffenhoefer, G.A.; Yoder, J.A.

    1980-01-31

    Progress is reported on research conducted during 1979 on the biological oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. The presentation consists of a number of published articles and abstracts of oral presentations. (ACR)

  6. Habitat classification from multibeam. SEFIS Survey Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a vector shapefile describing the geomorphology of 21 areas along the shelf edge off the South Atlantic Bight where NOAA South East Fisheries...

  7. Multibeam Mapping of the South Atlantic Bight: Georgia 2005, a Proposed MPA on the Continental Shelf

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Fisheries laboratory in Panama City, Florida coordinated an acoustic survey at the new proposed Marine Protected Areas in the South Atlantic Bight area June...

  8. Phytoplankton Assemblage Patterns in the Southern Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinen, Carla; Moisan, Tiffany A. (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Wallops Coastal Oceans Observing Laboratory (Wa-COOL) Project, we sampled a time-series transect in the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) biweekly. Our 2-year time-series data included physical parameters, nutrient concentrations, and chlorophyll a concentrations. A detailed phytoplankton assemblage structure was examined in the second year. During the 2-year study, chlorophyll a concentration (and ocean color satellite imagery) indicated that phytoplankton blooms occurred in January/February during mixing conditions and in early autumn under stratified conditions. The chlorophyll a concentrations ranged from 0.25 microgram 1(exp -1) to 15.49 microgram 1(exp -1) during the 2-year period. We were able to discriminate approximately 116 different species under phase contrast microscopy. Dominant phytoplankton included Skeletonema costatum, Rhizosolenia spp., and Pseudo-nitzschia pungens. In an attempt to determine phytoplankton species competition/succession within the assemblage, we calculated a Shannon Weaver diversity index for our diatom microscopy data. Diatom diversity was greatest during the winter and minimal during the spring. Diatom diversity was also greater at nearshore stations than at offshore stations. Individual genera appeared patchy, with surface and subsurface patches appearing abruptly and persisting for only 1-2 months at a time. The distribution of individual species differed significantly from bulk variables of the assemblage (chlorophyll a ) and total phytoplankton assemblage (cells), which indicates that phytoplankton species may be limited in growth in ways that differ from those of the total assemblage. Our study demonstrated a highly diverse phytoplankton assemblage throughout the year, with opportunistic species dominating during spring and fall in response to seasonal changes in temperature and nutrients in the southern MAB.

  9. Multibeam Mapping of the South Atlantic Bight: South Carolina 2005, a Proposed MPA on the Continental Shelf

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Fisheries laboratory in Panama City, Florida coordinated an acoustic survey at the new proposed Marine Protected Areas in the South Atlantic Bight area June...

  10. Zooplankton species identities and other data collected from zooplankton net casts in the NE Atlantic Ocean from DISCOVERY; 12 November 1969 to 01 July 1988 (NODC Accession 9500097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton species identities and other data were collected by DISCOVERY using zooplankton net casts in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from 12...

  11. Atlantic surfclam connectivity within the Middle Atlantic Bight: Mechanisms underlying variation in larval transport and settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinzhong; Munroe, Daphne; Haidvogel, Dale; Powell, Eric N.

    2016-05-01

    Larval transport and settlement have been shown in various studies to be essential in determining population abundance and connectivity for benthic invertebrates. This transport is influenced by both the physical environment and biological behavior. The Atlantic surfclam, Spisula solidissima, is a commercially important benthic invertebrate fishery species along the U.S northeastern coast. In this study, a physical circulation model is coupled to a surfclam larval model to investigate the dynamics of larval transport and settlement within the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) shelf in 2006. The main physical mechanisms causing variability in larval transport and settlement are also examined. Model results show that surfclam larvae released from July to early October experience relatively larger settlement rates, due to higher average temperatures experienced by larvae. Larval along-shore transport exhibits a mean down-coast pattern following the coastal current from the northeast to the southwest, with most high-frequency (period of 2-10 days) variations caused by fluctuations in the along-shore surface wind stress, and with seasonal variations speculated to be driven mainly by changes in the across-shelf density gradient. Larval across-shelf movement is highly correlated with the along-shore surface wind stress mediated by coastal upwelling and downwelling episodes, but the correlation is further dependent on the vertical distribution of the larvae, particularly their position relative to the thermocline. Most surfclam larvae released from the Middle Atlantic shelf stay below the thermocline and experience a net onshore transport during the summer-stratified season when upwelling-favorable wind forcing dominates. A proposed critical value of water temperature at the thermocline successfully regulates the observed patterns of vertical distribution of surfclam larvae and their across-shelf movement off the New Jersey and South Virginia shelves; that is, when the water

  12. Zooplankton data from zooplankton net casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Ocean Continental Shelf (OCS - Mid Atlantic) project, 03 November 1976 - 18 November 1977 (NODC Accession 7800340)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using zooplankton net casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean from November 3, 1976 to November 18,...

  13. Observations of the Surface Circulation over the Mid Atlantic Bight Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roarty, H.; Kohut, J. T.; Palamara, L. J.; Brown, W. S.; Seim, H.; Atkinson, L. P.; Smith, M. J.; Glenn, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    What is understood about the mean and seasonal flow off the Mid Atlantic Bight has been gathered with point measurements that span on average of a single year. The spatial structure and interannual variability of the flow can be resolved further. The mean and seasonal surface circulation of the Mid Atlantic Bight was measured using eight years of High Frequency radar data (2007-2014). The data was binned into seasonal and annual time frames and analyzed. The mean surface flow over the eight year study period is 3-6 cm/s down shelf and offshore to the south. There is an intensification seaward of the 50 m isobath to a speed 6-9 cm/s. When the water reaches Cape Hatteras to the south it is then advected towards the northeast by the Gulf Stream. The surface current asymptotes at 9 cm/s shoreward of the 100 m isobath, which matches the measurements of the Oleander Project. The data was compared on a seasonal cycle and the fall of 2009 displayed a surface current that was twice the magnitude of the eight-year record. The measurements show good agreement with the model of Lentz (2008) and help fill in the sparsity and unevenness of the acoustic current measurements.

  14. Continental shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrafesa, L.J.

    1978-03-01

    The objectives of the project were to determine the physical/dynamical processes controlling/affecting the distribution of phytoplankton nutrients on the continental shelf in the South Atlantic Bight. The initial objectives were to determine the short term, i.e., 2 to 10 day and longer term flux of nutrients onto the continental shelf. This is clearly related to the more general problem of combined physical and biogenic control of phytoplankton nutrients. During the period from June, 1975 to March, 1978 the study of the continental shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight has been principally involved with a substantial, coordinated field effort. The success of the data acquisition phase of the program has now required an intensive data analysis phase which has been slowly increasing in effort. Emphasis is placed on the main phase of the field program, located in Onslow Bay, which has beel completed and the data are being analyzed. During the three-year period 20 cruises were made into the Carolina Capes area and samples were collected. A list is included of some 100 publications during the period.

  15. Zooplankton

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jyothibabu, R.; Madhu, N.V.

    in general and copepods in particular, dominate the zooplankton community. Species belonging to the copepod families – Acartidae, Pseudodiaptomidae and Paracalanidae are common in these estuaries. Other important groups are larvae of decapods and cirriped...

  16. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Rugosity, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the rugosity of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  17. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2009), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  18. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Backscatter, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Navy Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  19. Current meter, CTD, and other data from the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 13 April 2003 to 17 April 2003 (NODC Accession 0002443)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter, CTD, and other data were collected using CTD, current meter, fluorometer, and tow in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from April 14, 2003 to April 17, 2003....

  20. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Navy Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  1. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Rugosity, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ron Brown - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the rugosity of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  2. NOAA TIFF Image - 30m Rugosity, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Navy Pathfinder - (2003), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 30x30 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  3. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  4. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Multibeam Bathymetry, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic Bight,...

  5. Zooplankton data collected from zooplankton net casts in TOGA Area - Atlantic and Indian Ocean by GAVESHANI and other platforms from 01 March 1963 to 31 March 1965 (NODC Accession 9400163)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected from GAVESHANI and other platforms using zooplankton net casts in the TOGA Area - Atlantic and Indian Ocean. Data were collected from...

  6. Seasonal and interannual variability of physical and biological dynamics at the shelfbreak front of the Middle Atlantic Bight: nutrient supply mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. He

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution, 3-dimensional coupled biophysical model is used to simulate ocean circulation and ecosystem variations at the shelfbreak front of the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB. Favorable comparisons between satellite observations and model hindcast solutions from January 2004 to November 2007 indicate the model has intrinsic skills in resolving fundamental physical and biological dynamics at the MAB shelfbreak. Seasonal and interannual variability of ocean physical and biological states and their driving mechanisms are further analyzed. The domain-wide upper water column nutrient content is found to peak in late winter-early spring. Phytoplankton spring bloom starts 1–2 months later, followed by zooplankton bloom in early summer. Our analysis shows the variability of shelfbreak nutrient supply is controlled by local mixing that deepens the mixed layer and injects deep ocean nutrients into the upper water column and alongshore nutrient transport by the shelfbreak jet and associated currents. Nutrient vertical advection associated with the shelfbreak bottom boundary layer convergence is another significant contributor. Spring mean nutrient budget diagnostics along the Nantucket transect are compared between nutrient rich 2004 and nutrient poor 2007. Physical advection and diffusion play the major role in determining strong interannual variations in shelfbreak nutrient content. The biological (source minus sink term is very similar between these two years.

  7. Molecular Gut Content Profiling to Investigate the In Situ Grazing and Selectivity of Dolioletta gegenbauri in Summer Continental Shelf Intrusion Waters of the South Atlantic Bight, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, T. L.; Frazier, L.; Gibson, D. M.; Paffenhofer, G. A.; Frischer, M. E.

    2016-02-01

    Gelatinous metazooplankton play a crucial role in marine planktonic food webs and it has been suggested that they may become increasingly important in the Future Ocean. However, largely due to methodological challenges and reliance on laboratory cultivation approaches, the in situ diet of zooplankton with complex life histories and diverse prey choices remains poorly investigated. This is particularly true for the gelatinous zooplankton including the pelagic tunicate, Dolioletta gegenbauri that form large blooms in productive subtropical continental shelf environments. To investigate the diet of D. gegenbauri we developed a molecular gut profiling approach based on the use of a Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) PCR blocker. Using a doliolid-specific PNA blocker, it was possible to enrich the amplification of prey and parasite DNA from whole animal DNA extracts of doliolids. Gut contents from the water column, wild and captive-fed doliolids were profiled after PNA-PCR by denaturing HPLC (dHPLC), clone library and next generation sequencing (NGS) approaches. Studies were conducted during 5 summer cruises in the mid-shelf of the South Atlantic Bight. Comparison of gut profiles to available prey in the water column revealed evidence of prey selection towards larger prey species, including diatoms, dinoflagelletes and also metazoan prey that were likely captured as larvae and eggs. Wild-caught doliolids contained significantly more metazoan sequences than did the captive-fed doliolids. Ingestion of metazoan prey suggests that metazoans may contribute both the nutrition of doliolids and the potential role of doliolids as trophic cascade agents in continental shelf pelagic food webs.

  8. Initial Results From SABSOON: A Coastal Ocean Observatory on the South Atlantic Bight Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J. R.; Seim, H. E.

    2002-12-01

    The coastal ocean observing system for the South Atlantic Bight off the SE U.S. is in an early stage of development. However, the existing time series of meteorological and oceanographic observations illustrate the potential multidisciplinary applications of these data. Here, we will first review the existing observing system assets for the region in terms of spatial distributions and the parameters measured, then provide examples of results from the South Atlantic Bight Synoptic Offshore Observational Network (SABSOON), a dataset that strongly complements physical and biogeochemical studies in the region. Among the physical studies has been an examination of a thirteen-month record of vertically resolved currents (35 m depth) for variations in tidal flow. A harmonic analysis was carried out on each month. Subsequent study focused on variability in the largest semi-diurnal constituent. Stratification is found to cause significant shifts in vertical shear, ellipticity, tidal phase and ellipse orientation. Estimates of bed stress and roughness length also vary in time and suggest that surface gravity waves are modulating the properties of the benthic boundary layer and impacting tidal current speed. A linearized, one-dimensional momentum balance was used to estimate the eddy viscosity necessary to explain the vertical current structure. Vertical structure of the eddy viscosity was also found to vary with stratification and maximum values range from 0.01 to 0.05 m2/s. Comparison of the observations during unstratified conditions with a one-dimensional model that includes a turbulence closure scheme confirms observational estimates of a roughness length of 2-10 cm, consistent with a strong influence of the surface gravity wave field on the benthic boundary layer. Such physical studies have important implications for studies of the continental shelf biogeochemistry. Along with physical data, bio-optical measurements from SABSOON and ocean color satellite imagery

  9. Invertebrate communities associated with hard bottom habitats in the South Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenner, E. L.; Knott, D. M.; Van Dolah, R. F.; Burrell, V. G.

    1983-08-01

    Epibenthic invertebrates associated with nine hard bottom areas in the South Atlantic Bight between South Carolina and northern Florida were collected with dredge, trawl, suction and grab samplers to evaluate species composition, biomass, abundance, diversity, spatial distributions, and seasonality (winter and summer). Species composition changed noticeably with depth and season. Inner and outer shelf stations were least similar in species composition. Middle shelf areas were transitional and contained taxa characteristic of both inner and outer sites. Bryozoa (88 taxa), Cnidaria (85 taxa), Porifera (67 taxa), Annelida (261 taxa) and Mollusca (203 taxa) represented the richest taxonomic groups of the 1175 taxa collected. Both diversity (1175 total taxa) and biomass (1995 kg total) of invertebrates from hard bottom areas exceeded those reported in the literature for sand bottom communities. Sponges accounted for >60% of the total invertebrate biomass collected by dredge and trawl during both seasons. High diversity values were attributed primarily to habitat complexity and did not exhibit any discernible pattern with depth or latitude.

  10. Parameterization of synoptic weather systems in the South Atlantic Bight for modeling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaodong; Voulgaris, George; Kumar, Nirnimesh

    2017-10-01

    An event based, long-term, climatological analysis is presented that allows the creation of coastal ocean atmospheric forcing on the coastal ocean that preserves both frequency of occurrence and event time history. An algorithm is developed that identifies individual storm event (cold fronts, warm fronts, and tropical storms) from meteorological records. The algorithm has been applied to a location along the South Atlantic Bight, off South Carolina, an area prone to cyclogenesis occurrence and passages of atmospheric fronts. Comparison against daily weather maps confirms that the algorithm is efficient in identifying cold fronts and warm fronts, while the identification of tropical storms is less successful. The average state of the storm events and their variability are represented by the temporal evolution of atmospheric pressure, air temperature, wind velocity, and wave directional spectral energy. The use of uncorrected algorithm-detected events provides climatologies that show a little deviation from those derived using corrected events. The effectiveness of this analysis method is further verified by numerically simulating the wave conditions driven by the characteristic wind forcing and comparing the results with the wave climatology that corresponds to each storm type. A high level of consistency found in the comparison indicates that this analysis method can be used for accurately characterizing event-based oceanic processes and long-term storm-induced morphodynamic processes on wind-dominated coasts.

  11. Identification of polyamine-responsive bacterioplankton taxa in South Atlantic Bight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinxin; Sun, Shulei; Hollibaugh, James T; Mou, Xiaozhen

    2015-12-01

    Putrescine and spermidine are short-chained aliphatic polyamines (PAs) that are ubiquitously distributed in seawater. These compounds may be important sources of dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen for marine bacterioplankton. Here, we used pyrotag sequencing to quantify the response of bacterioplankton to putrescine and spermidine amendments in microcosms established using surface waters collected at various stations in the South Atlantic Bight in October 2011. Our analysis showed that PA-responsive bacterioplankton consisted of bacterial taxa that are typically dominant in marine systems. Rhodobacteraceae (Alphaproteobacteria) was the taxon most responsive to PA additions at the nearshore site. Gammaproteobacteria of the families Piscirickettsiaceae; Vibrionaceae; and Vibrionaceae and Pseudoalteromonadaceae, were the dominant PA-responsive taxa in samples from the river-influenced coastal station, offshore station and open ocean station, respectively. The spatial variability of PA-responsive taxa may be attributed to differences in composition of the initial bacterial community and variations of in situ physiochemical conditions among sites. Our results also provided the first empirical evidence that Gammaproteobacteria might play an important role in PA transformation in marine systems. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Cold event in the South Atlantic Bight during summer of 2003: Model simulations and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretxabaleta, Alfredo; Blanton, Brian O.; Seim, Harvey E.; Werner, Francisco E.; Nelson, James R.; Chassignet, Eric P.

    2007-05-01

    A set of model simulations are used to determine the principal forcing mechanisms that resulted in anomalously cold water in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB) in the summer of 2003. Updated mass field and elevation boundary conditions from basin-scale Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) simulations are compared to climatological forcing to provide offshore and upstream influences in a one-way nesting sense. Model skill is evaluated by comparing model results with observations of velocity, water level, and surface and bottom temperature. Inclusion of realistic atmospheric forcing, river discharge, and improved model dynamics produced good skill on the inner shelf and midshelf. The intrusion of cold water onto the shelf occurred predominantly along the shelf-break associated with onshore flow in the southern part of the domain north of Cape Canaveral (29° to 31.5°). The atmospheric forcing (anomalously strong and persistent upwelling-favorable winds) was the principal mechanism driving the cold event. Elevated river discharge increased the level of stratification across the inner shelf and midshelf and contributed to additional input of cold water into the shelf. The resulting pool of anomalously cold water constituted more than 50% of the water on the shelf in late July and early August. The excess nutrient flux onto the shelf associated with the upwelling was approximated using published nitrate-temperature proxies, suggesting increased primary production during the summer over most of the SAB shelf.

  13. Monthly climatology of the continental shelf waters of the South Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Brian O.; Aretxabaleta, Alfredo; Werner, Francisco E.; Seim, Harvey E.

    2003-08-01

    Monthly circulation of the South Atlantic Bight is diagnosed using a 3-D, shallow water, finite element model forced with monthly wind stress and hydrographic climatology. Temperature and salinity observations from the period 1950-1999 are objectively interpolated onto the model domain, and Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) wind velocities from 1975-1999 are used to prescribe the model surface wind stress. The resulting monthly temperature and salinity fields compare favorably to existing shelf climatology. River discharge maxima are evident in the spring temperature and salinity fields, and the rapid heating and cooling of the shelf are captured. The diagnostic circulation is largely wind-driven in the inner and mid-shelf, and the Gulf Stream is apparent in the solutions on the outer shelf. We present the monthly fields, including the temporal and spatial distribution of available hydrographic data, the regional COADS data that provide surface wind stress forcing, the objective analysis, and the model response to these forcings. The hydrographic and velocity fields provide best-prior-estimates of the circulation for data assimilation studies in the region, as well as initial conditions for process-oriented prognostic model studies in the Georgia coastal region.

  14. Monthly Variation in the M2 Tidal Characteristics in the South Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, B. O.; Seim, H.; Muglia, M.; Werner, F. E.

    2002-12-01

    Barotropic tides in the South Atlantic Bight of the eastern United States coast are examined using a combination of recent observations of pressure and velocity from a permanent coastal ocean observing system and shorter term instrument deployments in the region. The data extent from near-shore to shelf-break and cover the region from Onslow Bay, North Carolina, to St. Augustine, Florida. The principal tidal elevation and depth-averaged velocity ellipse characteristics are described. Monthly variation in the tidal elevation and depth-averaged velocity is assessed from the longest available records. Cross-shelf semi-diurnal water level amplification and phase lag associated with shelf width changes are observed. Maximum M2 amplification and cross-shelf phase lag occurs at the widest part of the shelf and decrease to the north and south. Monthly variability of the M2 tidal elevation and depth-averaged velocity ellipse phase appears significant. Monthly analysis indicates M2 elevation phase variation of about 5 degrees. Diurnal constituent variability is generally below the error estimates. Comparison with a baroclinic numerical model is discussed.

  15. Short-term variability of aragonite saturation state in the central Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan-Yuan; Cai, Wei-Jun; Gao, Yonghui; Wanninkhof, Rik; Salisbury, Joseph; Chen, Baoshan; Reimer, Janet J.; Gonski, Stephen; Hussain, Najid

    2017-05-01

    The uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere has resulted in a decrease in seawater aragonite saturation state (Ωarag), which affects the health of carbonate-bearing organisms and the marine ecosystem. A substantial short-term variability of surface water Ωarag, with an increase of up to 0.32, was observed in the central Mid-Atlantic Bight off the Delaware and the Chesapeake Bays over a short period of 10 days in summer 2015. High-frequency underway measurements for temperature, salinity, percentage saturation of dissolved oxygen, oxygen to argon ratio, pH, fCO2, and measurements based on discrete samples for pH, dissolved inorganic carbon, and total alkalinity are used to investigate how physical and biogeochemical processes contribute to the changes of Ωarag. Quantitative analyses show that physical advection and mixing processes are the dominant forces for higher Ωarag in slope waters while biological carbon removal and CO2 degassing contribute to increased Ωarag in shelf waters.

  16. Modeling larval connectivity of the Atlantic surfclams within the Middle Atlantic Bight: Model development, larval dispersal and metapopulation connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinzhong; Haidvogel, Dale; Munroe, Daphne; Powell, Eric N.; Klinck, John; Mann, Roger; Castruccio, Frederic S.

    2015-02-01

    To study the primary larval transport pathways and inter-population connectivity patterns of the Atlantic surfclam, Spisula solidissima, a coupled modeling system combining a physical circulation model of the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB), Georges Bank (GBK) and the Gulf of Maine (GoM), and an individual-based surfclam larval model was implemented, validated and applied. Model validation shows that the model can reproduce the observed physical circulation patterns and surface and bottom water temperature, and recreates the observed distributions of surfclam larvae during upwelling and downwelling events. The model results show a typical along-shore connectivity pattern from the northeast to the southwest among the surfclam populations distributed from Georges Bank west and south along the MAB shelf. Continuous surfclam larval input into regions off Delmarva (DMV) and New Jersey (NJ) suggests that insufficient larval supply is unlikely to be the factor causing the failure of the population to recover after the observed decline of the surfclam populations in DMV and NJ from 1997 to 2005. The GBK surfclam population is relatively more isolated than populations to the west and south in the MAB; model results suggest substantial inter-population connectivity from southern New England to the Delmarva region. Simulated surfclam larvae generally drift for over one hundred kilometers along the shelf, but the distance traveled is highly variable in space and over time. Surfclam larval growth and transport are strongly impacted by the physical environment. This suggests the need to further examine how the interaction between environment, behavior, and physiology affects inter-population connectivity. Larval vertical swimming and sinking behaviors have a significant net effect of increasing larval drifting distances when compared with a purely passive model, confirming the need to include larval behavior.

  17. Shelf-Slope Exchanges near Submarine Canyons in the Southern Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Gong, D.

    2016-02-01

    Shelf-slope exchange processes are major physical drivers of biological productivity near the shelf-break. Observations from two Slocum ocean gliders in Fall 2013 are used to explore the driving mechanisms of cross-shelf-slope exchanges near Norfolk Canyon and Washington Canyon in the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight. Offshore excursion of bottom "cold pool" water, and shoreward intrusion of slope water at surface layer and thermocline depth occurred during northeasterly along-shelf winds. The saline intrusions of surface slope water resided between the cold pool and surface shelf water, and reached the bottom on the outer and mid-shelf, while the offshore excursion of cold pool water was found between the surface and intermediate slope-water over the canyon. Ekman transport calculation shows wind-driven cross-shelf transport can partially explain this interleaving pattern of intrusions. Scaling analysis of double diffusive processes demonstrate that they also likely played a role in the cross-shelf-slope exchange. A unique canyon upwelling event was captured in and around Washington Canyon during a period of southwesterly along-shelf wind and along-shelf flow to the northeast. The water mass distributions and isopycnal responses in both along-canyon and cross-canyon transects are consistent with scaling analysis and numerical studies of canyon upwelling. Temperature-Salinity properties of water masses in the canyon suggest active mixing between shelf and slope water masses near the canyon head. These results point to the importance of wind, double diffusion, and canyon topography on shelf-slope exchange in the MAB.

  18. Distributions and habitat associations of deep-water corals in Norfolk and Baltimore Canyons, Mid-Atlantic Bight, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, S. D.; Watts, M. W.; Heil, A. D.; Rhode, M.; Mienis, F.; Duineveld, G. C. A.; Davies, A. J.; Ross, S. W.

    2017-03-01

    A multi-disciplinary study of two major submarine canyons, Baltimore Canyon and Norfolk Canyon, off the US mid-Atlantic coast focused on the ecology and biology of canyon habitats, particularly those supporting deep-sea corals. Historical data on deep-sea corals from these canyons were sparse with less than 750 records for the mid-Atlantic region, with most being soft sediment species. This study substantially increased the number of deep-sea coral records for the target canyons and the region. Large gorgonians were the dominant structure-forming coral taxa on exposed hard substrates, but several species of scleractinians were also documented, including first observations of Lophelia pertusa in the mid-Atlantic Bight region. Coral distribution varied within and between the two canyons, with greater abundance of the octocoral Paragorgia arborea in Baltimore Canyon, and higher occurrence of stony corals in Norfolk Canyon; these observations reflect the differences in environmental conditions, particularly turbidity, between the canyons. Some species have a wide distribution (e.g., P. arborea, Primnoa resedaeformis, Anthothela grandiflora), while others are limited to certain habitat types and/or depth zones (e.g., Paramuricea placomus, L. pertusa, Solenosmilia variabilis). The distribution of a species is driven by a combination of factors, which include availability of appropriate physical structure and environmental conditions. Although the diversity of the structure-forming corals (gorgonians, branching scleractinians and large anemones) was low, many areas of both canyons supported high coral abundance and a diverse coral-associated community. The canyons provide suitable habitat for the development of deep-sea coral communities that is not readily available elsewhere on the sedimented shelf and slope of the Mid-Atlantic Bight.

  19. The deep-sea zooplankton of the North, Central, and South Atlantic: Biomass, abundance, diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchaka, Alexander; Abyzova, Galina; Lunina, Anastasia; Musaeva, Eteri

    2017-03-01

    Ocean-scale surveys of vertical distribution of the zooplankton from the surface to the bathypelagic zone along transects are quite rare in the North Atlantic and absent in the Equatorial and South Atlantic. We present the first deep-sea quantitative survey of the zooplankton in the Equatorial and South Atlantic, analyze the interaction between environment (depth, water masses, surface productivity) and zooplankton abundance and biomass, and assess the biodiversity and role of copepods in various deep strata. Samples were taken at 20 sites along a submeridional transect between 40°N and 30°S at four discrete depth strata: epi- meso-, upper- and lower- bathypelagic. A closing Bogorov-Rass plankton net (1 m2 opening, 500 μm mesh size, towed at a speed of 1 m s-1) was used and three major plankton groups were defined: non-gelatinous mesozooplankton (mainly copepods and chaetognaths; 1-30 mm length), gelatinous mesozooplankton (mainly siphonophorans, medudae and salps; individual or zooid; 1-30 mm length) and macroplankton (mainly shrimps; over 30 mm length). Over 300 plankton taxa were identified, among which 243 belonged to Copepoda. Two-dimensional distribution (latitude versus depth zone) of major group biomass, total copepod abundance, and abundance of dominant species is presented as well as distribution of biodiversity parameters (number of species, Shannon and 'dominance' indices). Biomass and abundance of all major groups were depth-dependent. The number of taxa (N) was depended on surface productivity, diversity of the communities was strongly linked to depth, whilst 'evenness' was independant upon both variables. Each of depth strata was inhabited by distinct copepod assemblages, which significantly differed from each other. The paper is concluded with brief descriptions of the deep Atlantic plankton communities from studied strata.

  20. Terrestrially derived dissolved organic matter in the chesapeake bay and the middle atlantic bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Siddhartha; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Guo, Laodong; Santschi, Peter H.

    2000-10-01

    Concentrations of lignin-phenols were analyzed in high molecular weight dissolved organic matter (0.2 μm > HMW DOM > 1 kDa) isolated from surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay (C. Bay), and surface and bottom waters of the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB). The abundance of lignin-phenols in HMW DOM was higher in the C. Bay (0.128 ± 0.06 μg L -1) compared to MAB surface waters (0.016 ± 0.004 μg L -1) and MAB bottom waters (0.005 ± 0.003 μg L -1). On an organic carbon-normalized basis, lignin-phenol abundances in the HMW DOM (i.e., Λ 6), were significantly higher ( p lignin, ranged from 0.165 to 0.422 in C. Bay, 0.100 to 0.314 in MAB surface waters, and 0.076 to 0.357 in MAB bottom waters. Ratios of vanillic acid to vanillin (Ad/Al) V in HMW DOM, indicative of lignin decay, ranged from 0.611 to 1.37 in C. Bay, 0.534 to 2.62 in MAB surface waters, and 0.435 to 1.96 in MAB bottom water. Ratios of S/V and (Ad/Al) V showed no significant differences between each environment, providing no evidence of any compositionally distinct input of terrestrial organic matter into each environment. When considering depth profiles of suspended particulate matter in the MAB, with C:N ratios, and bulk radiocarbon ages and stable carbon isotopic values in HMW DOM isolated from these areas, two scenarios present themselves regarding the sources and transport of terrestrially derived HMW DOM in the MAB. Scenario #1 assumes that a low amount of refractory terrestrial organic matter and old DOC are uniformly distributed in the oceans, both in surface and bottom waters, and that primary production in surface waters increases DOC with low lignin and younger DOC which degrades easily. In this case, many of the trends in age and biomarker composition likely reflect general patterns of Atlantic Ocean surface and bottom water circulation in the area of the MAB. Scenario 2 assumes terrestrial organic matter in bottom waters of the MAB may have originated from weathered shelf and slope sediments

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2012-10-25 to 2012-11-05 (NCEI Accession 0145723)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slocum glider ru23 was deployed prior to the movement of Hurrican Sandy into the Mid-Atlantic Bight and was deployed to sample the sub-surface waters during the...

  2. Mean Sea Level Variability and Influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation on Long-Term Trends in the German Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Jensen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the seasonal cycle of mean sea level (MSL may affect the heights of storm surges and thereby flood risk in coastal areas. This study investigates the intra- and inter-annual variability of monthly MSL and its link to the North Atlantic Oscillation using records from 13 tide gauges located in the German Bight. The amplitudes of the seasonal MSL cycle are not regionally uniform and vary between 20 and 29 cm. Generally, the amplitudes are smaller at the southwestern stations, increasing as one travels to the northeastern part. The amplitudes, as well as the phase of the seasonal cycle, are characterized by a large inter-annual and inter-decadal variability, but no long-term trend could be detected. Nevertheless, in the last two decades annual maximum peaks more frequently occurred in January and February, whereas beforehand an accumulation was detected for the November and December period. These changes in phase in the various sea level time series are consistent with a shift in the annual cycle, which is, however, not significant. The changes are associated with strongly increasing trends in monthly MSL of the winter season (J–M, which are considerably higher compared to the remaining seasons. For the same season, the MSL and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO indices show strong similarities, resulting in statistically significant correlations (r ~ 0.7. Hence, these changes are linked with changing pressure conditions over the North Atlantic, which lead to a strong phase of positive values in the NAO index between the 1960’s and 1990’s.

  3. Modelling the future biogeography of North Atlantic zooplankton communities in response to climate change

    KAUST Repository

    Villarino, E

    2015-07-02

    Advances in habitat and climate modelling allow us to reduce uncertainties of climate change impacts on species distribution. We evaluated the impacts of future climate change on community structure, diversity, distribution and phenology of 14 copepod species in the North Atlantic. We developed and validated habitat models for key zooplankton species using continuous plankton recorder (CPR) survey data collected at mid latitudes of the North Atlantic. Generalized additive models (GAMs) were applied to relate the occurrence of species to environmental variables. Models were projected to future (2080–2099) environmental conditions using coupled hydroclimatix–biogeochemical models under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) A1B climate scenario, and compared to present (2001–2020) conditions. Our projections indicated that the copepod community is expected to respond substantially to climate change: a mean poleward latitudinal shift of 8.7 km per decade for the overall community with an important species range variation (–15 to 18 km per decade); the species seasonal peak is expected to occur 12–13 d earlier for Calanus finmarchicus and C. hyperboreus; and important changes in community structure are also expected (high species turnover of 43–79% south of the Oceanic Polar Front). The impacts of the change expected by the end of the century under IPCC global warming scenarios on copepods highlight poleward shifts, earlier seasonal peak and changes in biodiversity spatial patterns that might lead to alterations of the future North Atlantic pelagic ecosystem. Our model and projections are supported by a temporal validation undertaken using the North Atlantic climate regime shift that occurred in the 1980s: the habitat model built in the cold period (1970–1986) has been validated in the warm period (1987–2004).

  4. Zooplankton data collected using net casts from the ALMIRANTE SALDANHA in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean from 05 November 1958 to 15 January 1959 (NODC Accession 0000942)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using net casts in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean from ALMIRANTE SALDANHA. Data were collected from 05 November 1958 to 15 January...

  5. Zooplankton and other data collected in Northwest Atlantic Ocean from CTD, bottle casts, and other instruments from 10 September 1963 to 24 August 1964 (NODC Accession 7101509)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected using CTD, bottle casts, and other instruments in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from 10 September 1963...

  6. Zooplankton species identities and other data collected by ATLANTIS II from net casts in NW Atlantic Ocean from 23 November 1988 to 04 December 1988 (NODC Accession 9500081)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton species identities and other data were collected using net casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from ATLANTIS II. Data were collected from 23 November...

  7. South Atlantic Bight Habitat Mapping on NOAA Ship Nancy Foster in North Atlantic Ocean between 20070626 and 20070702

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This expedition on the NOAA Ship Nancy Foster used the recently-developed National Undersea Research Center for the North Atlantic and Great Lakes (NURC-NAGL) ROV...

  8. Zooplankton biomass (displacement and settled volume) data collected during the International Cooperative Investigations of the Tropical Atlantic EQUALANT I, EQUALANT II, and EQUALANT III projects from 1963-02-15 to 1964-07-09 (NODC Accession 0071432)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton biomass (displacement and settled volume) data collected during the International Cooperative Investigations of the Tropical Atlantic EQUALANT I,...

  9. Exchange of phytoplankton across the continental shelf-slope boundary of the Middle Atlantic Bight during spring 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirick, Creighton D.

    A moored array of current meters, transmissometers and fluorometers was deployed off the Delmarva Peninsula, United States, from 8 February to 9 June 1988 to measure the exchange of particles, phytoplankton and water between the continental shelf and the slope sea. The measurements were made at the 90-m isobath and near the shelf-slope front, which is the natural physical boundary between the shelf- and slope-water. The highest standing stocks of phytoplankton (>4 mg Chl a l -1) occurred during April and May directly above the shelf-slope front. Although the shelf-slope front and associated phytoplankton populations made large cross-shelf excursions (>40 km), the vertically averaged advective transport of phytoplankton was onshore at the 90-m isobath. Compared with the estimated primary production on the inner shelf, the advective transport across the 90-m isobath was -2.60% ± 5.52% of the spring production, with the negative values indicating import. These calculations suggest that primary production occurring landward of the 90-m isobath is not exported laterally, as phytoplankton or phytodetritus, to the ocean basin. This places a limit on the possible export from the shelf, but does not exclude shelf export because roughly half the volume of shelf water from Cape Cod to Cape Hatteras lies in a thin surface wedge outside the 100-m isobath [ WRIGHT and PARKER (1976) Limnology and Oceanography, 21, 563-571]. Carbon and nitrogen budgets of the Middle Atlantic Bight should acknowledge the limited exchange of phytoplankton between the inner and outer portions of the shelf.

  10. Variability of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide apparent quantum yield spectra in three coastal estuaries of the South Atlantic Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. E. Reader

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The photochemical oxidation of oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC to carbon monoxide (CO and carbon dioxide (CO2 has been estimated to be a significant process with global photoproduction transforming petagrams of DOC to inorganic carbon annually. To further quantify the importance of these two photoproducts in coastal DOC cycling, 38 paired apparent quantum yield (AQY spectra for CO and CO2 were determined at three locations along the coast of Georgia, USA over the course of one year. The AQY spectra for CO2 were considerably more varied than CO. CO AQY spectra exhibited a seasonal shift in spectrally integrated (260 nm–490 nm AQY from higher efficiencies in the autumn to less efficient photoproduction in the summer. While full-spectrum photoproduction rates for both products showed positive correlation with pre-irradiation UV-B sample absorption (i.e. chromophoric dissolved organic matter, CDOM as expected, we found no correlation between AQY and CDOM for either product at any site. Molecular size, approximated with pre-irradiation spectral slope coefficients, and aromatic content, approximated by the specific ultraviolet absorption of the pre-irradiated samples, were also not correlated with AQY in either data set. The ratios of CO2 to CO photoproduction determined using both an AQY model and direct production comparisons were 23.2 ± 12.5 and 22.5 ± 9.0, respectively. Combined, both products represent a loss of 2.9 to 3.2% of the DOC delivered to the estuaries and inner shelf of the South Atlantic Bight yearly, and 6.4 to 7.3% of the total annual degassing of CO2 to the atmosphere. This result suggests that direct photochemical production of CO and CO2 is a small, yet significant contributor to both DOC cycling and CO2 gas exchange in this coastal system.

  11. Joint Geophysical and Hydrologic Constraints on Shallow Groundwater Flow Systems in Clastic Salt Marshes of the South Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, C.; Fulton, P.; Schultz, G. M.; Castillo, L.; Bartlett, J.; Sibley, S.

    2005-12-01

    Salt marsh systems play a critical role in buffering upland coastal areas from the influence of open saltwater bodies and in filtering contaminants that originate offshore or are flushed from uplands. For these reasons, it is important to understand the salt marsh hydrologic cycle, especially the interaction of groundwater and surface water across low-lying coastal fringes and the changes in physical, chemical, and ecological parameters across salinity gradients extending from upland to tidal creek to open water. For the past 5 years, we have conducted hydrogeophysical surveys (inductive EM and DC resistivity) and collected limited, coincident groundwater hydrologic data in clastic salt marshes throughout the South Atlantic Bight (SAB), stretching from South Carolina on the north to the Georgia-Florida border on the south. All of the marshes are dominated by Spartina and Juncus grasses and are cut by tidally-influenced creeks, but both the lithology and age of the marshes vary widely. For example, one highly homogeneous marsh study site has formed only within the past century, while most sites have existed for thousands of years and have laterally and vertically heterogeneous lithology. Geophysical images of the marsh subsurface and coincident monitoring of groundwater temperature, water level, and/or chemistry consistently show that marshes in the mixed energy environment of the middle part of the SAB (GCE LTER) tend to be dominated by submarsh discharge of freshwater to adjacent tidal creeks. In the South Carolina part of the SAB, we have greater evidence for seepage, particularly through biologically-created macropore networks and permeable sediment bodies that intersect tidal creeks. It is possible though that the South Carolina results are not so much 'universal' as reflective of local lithology. In a very young marsh near the Florida border, geophysical imaging implies a mixture of seepage and submarsh flow, and hydrologic data provide unequivocal proof that

  12. Thermal habitat constraints on zooplankton species associated with Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) on the US Northeast Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Kevin D.; Kane, Joe; Hare, Jonathan A.; Lough, R. Gregory; Fratantoni, Paula S.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Nye, Janet A.

    2013-09-01

    The US Northeast Continental Shelf is experiencing a period of increasing temperature levels and range, which impacts the quantity of thermal habitats within the ecosystem. With increasing temperatures, the amount of warmer, surface water thermal habitats (16-27 °C) has increased while there has been a reciprocal decline in cooler water habitats (5-15 °C). These cooler water habitats are the most abundant and comprise the core habitats of the ecosystem. The coldest thermal habitats (1-4 °C), however, have increased slightly in amount or have remained constant, reflecting a discontinuity in the progression of warming along a latitudinal gradient. This discontinuity may be the result of recent changes in the circulation of water masses in the northern Gulf of Maine, potentially associated with the Labrador Current. The contraction of core thermal habitats appears to have had biological consequences on multiple trophic levels. In particular, two zooplankton species associated with the larval feeding of Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, have declined in abundance in the same areas where cod populations have exhibited continually poor recruitment. The zooplankton species group Pseudocalanus spp., which is associated with winter-spawning cod, has declined on Georges Bank and in the Eastern Gulf of Maine. The zooplankton Centropages typicus has declined in the Gulf of Maine during late summer into fall, potentially affecting spring-spawning cod in that area. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that portions of the population complex of cod have lower reproductive output due to changes in zooplankton abundance, which we associate with the distribution of temperatures within the ecosystem.

  13. (The role of zooplankton and micronektron in the cycling and remineralization of chemical materials in the Southern California Bight: Progress report, November 1985-June 1986)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-06-01

    A Progress Report on Grant FG05-85ER60340 has already been submitted to DOE, and is appended here. The appended report covers much of the work completed during the current contract period. Work on the just-completed May 1986 cruise samples is just beginning at the time of writing. Sediment traps deployed at two locations in Santa Monica Basin in October 1985 were recovered in February 1986. The traps have sequentially rotating cups set to collect material for 14 days each during the deployment period. We have finished radiochemical analyses on the sediment trap samples collected on the February 1986 Cruise. Pellet production rates for salps and euphausiids were reported earlier. The February cruise was principally a hydrographic and trap recovery cruise, and there was no time for pellet production rate experiments. Thus, all the February hauls are being analyzed to assess diel biomass estimates of selected size classes of zooplankton in the vicinity of the traps. 5 tabs.

  14. Atlantic Coastal Experiment VI: R/V KNORR cruise, 23 August--11 September 1980, data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, W.; von Bock, K. (eds)

    1983-01-01

    An investigation of the influence of estuaries on the ecosystem of the Mid-Atlantic Bight was undertaken. Data were collected from excursions into the Hudson, Delaware and Chesapeake estuaries, three across-shelf and one along-shelf transects, and two time series stations. In all, 139 stations were occupied and 164 XBT soundings were taken. In addition to standard hydrographic measurements, nutrient , chlorophyll, particulate carbon and nitrogen, 14C, 15N, DNA, particle size, FTD, phytoplankton and zooplankton analyses were made.

  15. Regional and inter-annual variability in Atlantic zooplankton en route to the Arctic Ocean: potential effects of multi-path Atlantic water advection through Fram Strait and the Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasniewski, Slawomir; Gluchowska, Marta; Trudnowska, Emilia; Ormanczyk, Mateusz; Walczowski, Waldemar; Beszczynska-Moeller, Agnieszka

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic is among the regions where the climate change effects on ecosystem will be the most rapid and consequential, with Arctic amplification recognized as an integral part of the process. Great part of the changes are forced by advection of warm waters from the North Atlantic and the expected modifications of Arctic marine ecosystem will be induced not only by changing environmental conditions but also as a result of introducing Atlantic biota. Thus, the knowledge of physical and biological heterogeneity of Atlantic inflow is requisite for understanding the effects of climate change on biological diversity and ecosystem functioning in the Arctic. The complex and variable two-branched structure of the Atlantic Water flow via Fram Strait and the Barents Sea most likely has a strong influence on the ocean biology in these regions, especially in the pelagic realm. Zooplankton are key components of marine ecosystems which form essential links between primary producers and grazer/predator consumers, thus they are important for functioning of the biological carbon pump. Changes in zooplankton distribution and abundance may have cascading effects on ecosystem functioning, with regulatory effects on climate. Based on data collected in summers of 2012-2014, within the scope of the Polish-Norwegian PAVE research project, we investigate zooplankton distribution, abundance and selected structural characteristics of communities, in relation to water mass properties in the Atlantic Water complex flow to the Arctic Ocean. The main questions addressed here are: what are the differences in zooplankton patterns between the Fram Strait and Barents Sea branches, and how does the inter-annual variability of Atlantic Water advection relate to changes in zooplankton? The results of the investigation are precondition for foreseeing changes in the pelagic realm in the Arctic Ocean and are necessary for constructing and tuning plankton components of ecosystem models.

  16. Zooplankton biomass (displacement volume, dry mass, ash-free dry mass) data collected in Eastern Central Atlantic during CIPREA project from 1978-07-25 to 1978-09-12 by France (NODC Accession 0070783)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton biomass (displacement volume, dry mass, and ashfree dry mass) data collected in Eastern Central Atlantic during CIPREA project in Jul - Sep 1978 by...

  17. Zooplankton and other data from net and bottle casts in the North Atlantic from the CARVALHO ALMEIDA by Miya Fisheries High School from 24 October 1972 to 29 October 1973 (NODC Accession 0000502)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected using net and bottle casts in the North Atlantic from the CARVALHO ALMEIDA from 24 October 1972 to 29 October 1973. Data...

  18. Seasonal variability in particulate matter source and composition to the depositional zone of Baltimore Canyon, U.S. Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, Nancy G.; Mienis, Furu; Campbell, P.; Roark, E. Brendan; Davies, Andrew; Robertson, Craig M.; Duineveld, Gerard; Ross, Steve W.; Rhodes, M.; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.

    2017-01-01

    Submarine canyons are often hotspots of biomass and productivity in the deep sea. However, the majority of deep-sea canyons remain poorly sampled. Using a multi-tracer approach, results from a detailed geochemical investigation from a year-long sediment trap deployment reveals details concerning the source, transport, and fate of particulate matter to the depositional zone (1318 m) of Baltimore Canyon on the US Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB). Both organic biomarker composition (sterol and n-alkanes) and bulk characteristics (δ13C, Δ14C, Chl-a) suggest that on an annual basis particulate matter from marine and terrestrially-derived organic matter are equally important. However, elevated Chlorophyll-a and sterol concentrations during the spring sampling period highlight the seasonal influx of relatively fresh phytodetritus. In addition, the contemporaneous increase in the particle reactive elements cadmium (Cd) and molybdenum (Mo) in the spring suggest increased scavenging, aggregation, and sinking of biomass during seasonal blooms in response to enhanced surface production within the nutricline. While internal waves within the canyon resuspend sediment between 200 and 600 m, creating a nepheloid layer rich in lithogenic material, near-bed sediment remobilization in the canyon depositional zone is minimal. Instead, vertical transport and lateral transport across the continental margin are the dominant processes driving seasonal input of particulate matter. In turn, seasonal variability in deposited particulate organic matter may be linked to benthic faunal composition and ecosystem scale carbon cycling.

  19. Upslope transport of near-bed zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Cheryl Ann

    2009-09-01

    Zooplankton residing just above the deep-sea floor is an important component of the benthic/benthopelagic food chain. Consuming planktonic particulates and organisms, holoplankton and meroplankton are prey for fish and large invertebrates. Mechanisms controlling their abundances have been explored over relatively long time scales (months to years). Here, zooplankton were sampled every 2 h for 2.2 d using a moored, automated, serial zooplankton pump. The physical regime (currents and temperature) 1-100 m above bottom was measured during an inclusive 24-d period. The study site was located on the upper continental slope (750 m) of the Mid-Atlantic Bight, between the productive shelf and more impoverished rise and abyss. The coupled biological and physical records indicated tidally driven, net upslope transport of the holoplankton. The copepod (74.5% of collections) time series showed marked periodicity with a peak frequency of ˜13 h, approximately the diurnal tide (Fourier analysis). Local maxima corresponded with minimal water temperatures. Moreover, tidal cross-slope flow was highly coherent and 90° out of phase with temperature. Thus, maximal copepod concentrations, originating in colder deeper water, would be transported up the slope by the tide. Estimated net displacement of ˜1 km/d would deliver the animals to continental-shelf depths within a couple weeks. Time series of the much less abundant larvaceans (urochordates) (15.3%) and polychaete larvae (8.9%) showed periodicities with peak frequencies of 8-9 h. Statistical significance of the periodic signals could not be determined due to low numbers. Revealing holoplankton dynamics on scales of hours, this study may contribute to understanding of, for example, copepod feeding and aggregation near the deep-sea floor.

  20. Downscaling, 2-way Nesting, and Data Assimilative Modeling in Coastal and Shelf Waters of the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, J.; Levin, J.; Lopez, A.; Arango, H.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal ocean models that downscale output from basin and global scale models are widely used to study regional circulation at enhanced resolution and locally important ecosystem, biogeochemical, and geomorphologic processes. When operated as now-cast or forecast systems, these models offer predictions that assist decision-making for numerous maritime applications. We describe such a system for shelf waters of the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) and Gulf of Maine (GoM) where the MARACOOS and NERACOOS associations of U.S. IOOS operate coastal ocean observing systems that deliver a dense observation set using CODAR HF-radar, autonomous underwater glider vehicles (AUGV), telemetering moorings, and drifting buoys. Other U.S. national and global observing systems deliver further sustained observations from moorings, ships, profiling floats, and a constellation of satellites. Our MAB and GoM re-analysis and forecast system uses the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS; myroms.org) with 4-dimensional Variational (4D-Var) data assimilation to adjust initial conditions, boundary conditions, and surface forcing in each analysis cycle. Data routinely assimilated include CODAR velocities, altimeter satellite sea surface height (with coastal corrections), satellite temperature, in situ CTD data from AUGV and ships (NMFS Ecosystem Monitoring voyages), and all in situ data reported via the WMO GTS network. A climatological data assimilative analysis of hydrographic and long-term mean velocity observations specifies the regional Mean Dynamic Topography that augments altimeter sea level anomaly data and is also used to adjust boundary condition biases that would otherwise be introduced in the process of downscaling from global models. System performance is described with respect to the impact of satellite, CODAR and in situ observations on analysis skill. Results from a 2-way nested modeling system that adds enhanced resolution over the NSF OOI Pioneer Array in the central MAB are also

  1. Seasonal variability in the source and composition of particulate matter in the depositional zone of Baltimore Canyon, U.S. Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, N. G.; Mienis, F.; Campbell-Swarzenski, P.; Roark, E. B.; Davies, A. J.; Robertson, C. M.; Duineveld, G.; Ross, S. W.; Rhode, M.; Demopoulos, A. W. J.

    2017-09-01

    Submarine canyons are often hotspots of biomass due to enhanced productivity and funneling of organic matter of marine and terrestrial origin. However, most deep-sea canyons remain poorly studied in terms of their role as conduits of terrestrial and marine particles. A multi-tracer geochemical investigation of particles collected yearlong by a sediment trap in Baltimore Canyon on the US Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) revealed temporal variability in source, transport, and fate of particulate matter. Both organic biomarker composition (sterol and n-alkanes) and bulk characteristics (δ13C, Δ14C, Chl-a) suggest that while on average the annual contribution of terrestrial and marine organic matter sources are similar, 42% and 52% respectively, marine sources dominate. Elevated Chlorophyll-a and sterol concentrations during the spring sampling period highlight a seasonal influx of relatively fresh phytodetritus. In addition, the contemporaneous increase in the particle reactive micronutrients cadmium (Cd) and molybdenum (Mo) in the spring suggest increased scavenging, aggregation, and sinking of phytodetrital biomass in response to enhanced surface production within the nutricline. While tidally driven currents within the canyon resuspend sediment between 200 and 600 m, resulting in the formation of a nepheloid layer rich in lithogenic material, near-bed sediment remobilization in the canyon depositional zone was minimal. Instead, vertical transport and lateral transport across the continental margin were the dominant processes driving seasonal input of particulate matter. In turn, seasonal variability in deposited particulate organic matter is likely linked to benthic faunal composition and ecosystem scale carbon cycling.

  2. Biogeochemical and Remote Sensing Approaches to Evaluating the Sources and Fates of DOM and Particles in the U.S. Middle Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, A.; Russ, M. E.; Hooker, S. B.

    2007-12-01

    Estuaries and the coastal ocean experience a high degree of variability in the composition and concentration of particulate and dissolved organic matter (DOM) as a consequence of riverine/estuarine fluxes of terrigenous DOM, sediments, detritus and nutrients into coastal waters and associated phytoplankton blooms. Our approach integrates biogeochemical measurements (elemental content, stable isotopes and molecular analyses), optical properties (absorbance) and remote sensing to examine the sources and fates of organic matter in the U.S. Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB). Remote sensing of chromophoric DOM (CDOM) is applied to track terrigenous DOM and quantify dissolved organic carbon (DOC) within the coastal ocean. Satellite validation analyses demonstrate successful retrieval of particulate organic carbon (POC), DOC, and CDOM absorption coefficient (aCDOM) for coastal ocean waters using the MODIS-Aqua and SeaWiFS satellite sensors with absolute percent differences between satellite and field measurements of 8±6.4% for DOC, 18±15% for aCDOM(355 nm) and 25±17% for POC. The seasonal processes that influence CDOM distributions in the MAB include freshwater discharge, photooxidation, and wind-induced vertical mixing in autumn and winter. DOC and POC distributions are driven primarily by river/estuary discharge, net ecosystem production, and the ocean circulation pattern along the shelf and continental slope. Satellite data analysis of aCDOM can be used to quantify photooxidation rates, track the inputs of terrigenous DOM from rivers or estuaries into the coastal ocean and beyond, and trace water masses with different CDOM signatures. Satellite-derived DOC and POC can be applied to quantify the fluxes of DOC and POC entering the coastal ocean and exported from the continental margin to the open ocean, estimate net C production, and assess the standing stocks of DOC and POC.

  3. From the epipelagic zone to the abyss: Trophic structure at two seamounts in the subtropical and tropical Eastern Atlantic - Part I zooplankton and micronekton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denda, Anneke; Stefanowitsch, Benjamin; Christiansen, Bernd

    2017-12-01

    Specific mechanisms, driving trophic interactions within the pelagic community may be highly variable in different seamount systems. This study investigated the trophic structure of zooplankton and micronekton above and around Ampère and Senghor, two shallow seamounts in the subtropical and tropical Eastern Atlantic, and over the adjacent abyssal plains. For the identification of food sources and trophic positions stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) were used. δ13C ranged from -24.7‰ to -15.0‰ and δ15N covered a total range of 0.9-15.9‰. Based on epipelagic particulate organic matter, zooplankton and micronekton usually occupied the 1st-3rd trophic level, including herbivorous, omnivorous and carnivorous taxa. δ13C and δ15N values were generally lower in zooplankton and micronekton of the subtropical waters as compared to the tropical region, due to the differing nutrient availability and phytoplankton communities. Correlations between δ13C and δ15N values of particulate organic matter, zooplankton, micronekton and benthopelagic fishes suggest a linear food chain based on a single energy source from primary production for Ampère Seamount, but no evidence was found for an autochthonus seamount production as compared to the open ocean reference site. Between Senghor Seamount and the open ocean δ13C signatures indicate that hydrodynamic effects at seamounts may modify the energy supply at times, but evidence for a seamount effect on the trophic structure of the pelagic communities was weak, which supports the assumption that seamount communities rely to a large extent on advected food sources.

  4. Microplastic ingestion by zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew; Lindeque, Pennie; Fileman, Elaine; Halsband, Claudia; Goodhead, Rhys; Moger, Julian; Galloway, Tamara S

    2013-06-18

    Small plastic detritus, termed "microplastics", are a widespread and ubiquitous contaminant of marine ecosystems across the globe. Ingestion of microplastics by marine biota, including mussels, worms, fish, and seabirds, has been widely reported, but despite their vital ecological role in marine food-webs, the impact of microplastics on zooplankton remains under-researched. Here, we show that microplastics are ingested by, and may impact upon, zooplankton. We used bioimaging techniques to document ingestion, egestion, and adherence of microplastics in a range of zooplankton common to the northeast Atlantic, and employed feeding rate studies to determine the impact of plastic detritus on algal ingestion rates in copepods. Using fluorescence and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy we identified that thirteen zooplankton taxa had the capacity to ingest 1.7-30.6 μm polystyrene beads, with uptake varying by taxa, life-stage and bead-size. Post-ingestion, copepods egested faecal pellets laden with microplastics. We further observed microplastics adhered to the external carapace and appendages of exposed zooplankton. Exposure of the copepod Centropages typicus to natural assemblages of algae with and without microplastics showed that 7.3 μm microplastics (>4000 mL(-1)) significantly decreased algal feeding. Our findings imply that marine microplastic debris can negatively impact upon zooplankton function and health.

  5. A “Rosetta Stone” for metazoan zooplankton: DNA barcode analysis of species diversity of the Sargasso Sea (Northwest Atlantic Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucklin, Ann; Ortman, Brian D.; Jennings, Robert M.; Nigro, Lisa M.; Sweetman, Christopher J.; Copley, Nancy J.; Sutton, Tracey; Wiebe, Peter H.

    2010-12-01

    Species diversity of the metazoan holozooplankton assemblage of the Sargasso Sea, Northwest Atlantic Ocean, was examined through coordinated morphological taxonomic identification of species and DNA sequencing of a ˜650 base-pair region of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (mtCOI) as a DNA barcode (i.e., short sequence for species recognition and discrimination). Zooplankton collections were made from the surface to 5,000 meters during April, 2006 on the R/V R.H. Brown. Samples were examined by a ship-board team of morphological taxonomists; DNA barcoding was carried out in both ship-board and land-based DNA sequencing laboratories. DNA barcodes were determined for a total of 297 individuals of 175 holozooplankton species in four phyla, including: Cnidaria (Hydromedusae, 4 species; Siphonophora, 47); Arthropoda (Amphipoda, 10; Copepoda, 34; Decapoda, 9; Euphausiacea, 10; Mysidacea, 1; Ostracoda, 27); and Mollusca (Cephalopoda, 8; Heteropoda, 6; Pteropoda, 15); and Chaetognatha (4). Thirty species of fish (Teleostei) were also barcoded. For all seven zooplankton groups for which sufficient data were available, Kimura-2-Parameter genetic distances were significantly lower between individuals of the same species (mean=0.0114; S.D. 0.0117) than between individuals of different species within the same group (mean=0.3166; S.D. 0.0378). This difference, known as the barcode gap, ensures that mtCOI sequences are reliable characters for species identification for the oceanic holozooplankton assemblage. In addition, DNA barcodes allow recognition of new or undescribed species, reveal cryptic species within known taxa, and inform phylogeographic and population genetic studies of geographic variation. The growing database of "gold standard" DNA barcodes serves as a Rosetta Stone for marine zooplankton, providing the key for decoding species diversity by linking species names, morphology, and DNA sequence variation. In light of the pivotal position of zooplankton in ocean

  6. Zooplankton species identities and other data from net tows from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV and other platforms from NE Atlantic (limit-40 W) as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-04-20 to 1986-12-10 (NCEI Accession 9400006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton species identities and other data were collected from net tows from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV and other platforms in the NE Atlantic (limit-40 W) from 20...

  7. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Slope, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Ron Brown - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the slope (in degrees) of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic...

  8. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetry Mosaic, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ron Brown - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the bathymetry (depth) of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic...

  9. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Slope, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the slope (in degrees) of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic...

  10. NOAA TIFF Image - 5m Backscatter Mosaic, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2007), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 5x5 meter cell size representing the backscatter (intensity) of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic...

  11. NOAA TIFF Image - 3m Multibeam Bathymetry, Miami, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - Lost Coast Explorer - (2010), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 3x3 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the continental shelf off of Jacksonville, FL in the South Atlantic...

  12. NOAA TIFF Image - 10m Bathymetric Slope, South Atlantic Bight - Deep Coral Priority Areas - NOAA Ship Nancy Foster - (2009), UTM 17N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a unified GeoTiff with 10x10 meter cell size representing the slope (in degrees) of several deep coral priority areas off the South Atlantic...

  13. Zooplankton Hydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadhwa, Navish

    cycle, and found qualitative differences in flow structures, energy expenditure, and swimming efficiency, between the early and later stages. The spatial decay rate of flow disturbances was faster in the later stages, suggesting that those may be less vulnerable to predation. Broadening the scope, we...... flow disturbances that may attract predators. The first part of this thesis attempts to quantify the trade-offs associated with the swimming behaviour of diverse zooplankton. We measured the swimming kinematics and flow fields around the 'jumping' copepod Acartia tonsa at various stages of its life...... then measured flows around a wide range of zooplankton which use a variety of swimming modes such as hovering, cruising, jumping, and breast stroke swimming. We found that the spatial decay rate of the flow velocity is dictated by the swimming mode. The modes used for swimming only, such as jumping and breast...

  14. Zooplankton biomass data measurements collected using OSD and net from several platforms in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1977 to 2001 (NODC Accession 0051894)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton biomass data sampled during the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment, & Prediction - Research Vessel (MARMAP-RV) surveys 1977 - 2001 years...

  15. Potential zooplankton preys (Copepoda and Appendicularia for Engraulis anchoita in relation to early larval and spawning distributions in the Patagonian frontal system (SW Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela L. Spinelli

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the spatial distribution of the abundance, biomass and size of zooplankton (nauplii, calanoids, cyclopoids and appendicularians in relation to the distribution of first-feeding larvae and eggs of Engraulis anchoita across the frontal system of Peninsula Valdés. Twelve samples of zooplankton and ichthyoplankton were taken with small Bongo (67 μm and Pairovet (200 μm nets during the spring of 2004 along two transects. The total abundance of zooplankton and the chlorophyll a concentration were higher in homogeneous waters, while total biomasses were higher in stratified waters. Temperature was negatively correlated with biological variables and was the main factor affecting the zooplankton distribution. In both transects, abundance peaks of first-feeding larvae were detected at coastal stations along with the smallest fraction of zooplankton ( < 500 μm, while the largest fraction was dominant at the external stations, coinciding with the highest egg abundance. The physical structure of this front generates different levels of food availability for first-feeding larvae. Calanoids (southern transect and cyclopoids (northern transect are predominant followed by nauplii and appendicularians. The biomass of zooplankton preys contributes to the carbon transfer to the upper trophic levels and is probably important for the survival and growth of anchovy larvae in this frontal system.

  16. Effect of Zooplankton Community Structure on Particle Flux and Nutrient Cycling at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, D. K.; Madin, L. P.

    2001-12-01

    The structure of zooplankton communities has a significant impact on vertical transport and cycling of elements in the sea. Zooplankton play an integral role in the flux of material out of the euphotic zone at BATS via active transport by vertical migrators and by production of rapidly sinking fecal pellets. Zooplankton biomass in the upper 200 m at BATS is on average 1.7 times higher at night than day due to vertical migration. Migrating zooplankton actively transport a substantial amount of dissolved inorganic and organic carbon and nitrogen to deep water at BATS (via respiration and excretion), which can be significant relative to the passive flux of sinking particles. Active transport of C is equal to a mean of 8% (maximum 39%), and N equal to a mean of 13% (maximum 164%) of the gravitational vertical export of particulate organic C and N, respectively, measured with sediment traps at 150 m. Substantial excretion of dissolved organic material by migrators (mean of 24% of total C and 32% of total N metabolized) could be important to the microbial community at depth. Dissolved material exported by zooplankton is usually not at a Redfield C:N ratio of 6.6, contributing to non-Redfield remineralization patterns seen at depth. Changes in the zooplankton community can also dramatically affect the composition and sedimentation rate of fecal pellets, and thus the export of organic material. However, zooplankton biomass alone is not necessarily a good predictor of flux; the species composition of the resident community may at times more considerably affect export of organic material to the deep ocean. For example, there is a positive but weak relationship between monthly zooplankton biomass and organic C flux at BATS. Analysis of the bloom dynamics of salps (large gelatinous zooplankton) over the ten-year time series at BATS indicates salps graze on average 4% of the primary production, but fecal flux from salps can constitute on average 33% (maximum over 10-fold) of

  17. The Partitioning of Carbon Biomass among the Pico- and Nano-plankton Community in the South Brazilian Bight during a Strong Summer Intrusion of South Atlantic Central Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascha M. Bergo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available To investigate how pico- and nano-plankton respond to oceanographic conditions in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean, we assessed the influence of a summer intrusion of the South Atlantic Central Water (SACW on the spatial and vertical dynamics of planktonic abundance and carbon biomass across environmental gradients. Seawater samples were collected from six depths within the euphotic zone at nine oceanographic stations in a transect on the Brazilian continental shelf in January 2013. The abundance of pico- and nano-plankton populations was determined by flow cytometry, and carbon biomass was calculated based on conversion factors from the literature. The autotrophic Synechococcus spp., picoeukaryotes, and nanoeukaryotes were more abundant in the surface layers of the innermost stations influenced by Coastal Water (maximum of 1.19 × 105, 1.5 × 104, and 8.61 × 103 cell·mL−1, respectively, whereas Prochlorococcus spp. dominated (max. of 6.57 × 104 cell·mL−1 at the outermost stations influenced by Tropical Water and in the uplifting layers of the SACW around a depth of 100 m. Numerically, heterotrophic bacterial populations were predominant, with maximum concentrations (2.11 × 106 cell·mL−1 recorded in the surface layers of the inner and mid shelves in Coastal Water and the upper limits of the SACW. Nutrient-rich (high silicate and phosphate and relatively less saline waters enhanced the picoeukaryotic biomass, while Synechococcus and heterotrophic bacteria were linked to higher temperatures, lower salinities, and higher inputs of ammonia and dissolved organic carbon. The relative importance of each group to carbon biomass partitioning under upwelling conditions is led by heterotrophic bacteria, followed by picoeukaryotes, Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus, and when the SACW is not as influential, the relative contribution of each phytoplanktonic group is more evenly distributed. In addition to habitat preferences, the physical structure

  18. Short-finned Pilot Whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) Target Gulf Stream and Shelf Break Waters in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, L. H.; Foley, H.; Webster, D.; Baird, R.; Swaim, Z.; Read, A.

    2016-02-01

    Short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) are deep-diving predators that feed on squid and regularly exploit prey at depths of more than 500 m. Detailed information on the habitat use of pilot whales in the Northwest Atlantic is lacking, which complicates management of the species, particularly for efforts to mitigate bycatch and depredation in the pelagic longline fishery. To address this limitation, we tracked the horizontal and vertical movements of short-finned pilot whales with LIMPET satellite-linked transmitters off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, in 2014. We deployed 14 satellite tags and 4 satellite-linked depth recording tags, with deployments of 2 to 194 days (mean=57 days). Using randomly-generated temporally-matched pseudo-absences with modeled distance constraints and mixed-effects generalized additive models (GAMMs), we evaluated pilot whale movement relative to environmental variables (distance to shelf break, sea surface temperature SST), location of Gulf Stream, bathymetric slope, and depth). Pilot whales showed two types of behavior, showing a strong affinity for either the shelf break or waters of the Gulf Stream. Slope, distance to shelf break, and SST were significant predictors of habitat use (pwhales demonstrated a preference for waters close to the shelf break, with warmer SST values (peak preference 25°C) and medium to high bathymetric slopes (peak preference 40 percent rise). We observed seasonal patterns in pilot whale movements, with whales diving to deeper depths in late summer and fall months than in spring months (Wilcoxon test, pwhales took longer and deeper dives in warmer waters (Pearson's correlation coefficients >0.40, pwhale habitat relative to seasonal and environmental factors in order to identify areas and times of high risk for interactions between pilot whales and longline gear.

  19. Transcriptome profiling reveals that feeding wild zooplankton to larval Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) influences suites of genes involved in oxidation-reduction, mitosis, and selenium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rise, Matthew L; Hall, Jennifer R; Nash, Gordon W; Xue, Xi; Booman, Marije; Katan, Tomer; Gamperl, A Kurt

    2015-11-26

    Larval nutrition and growth are key issues for wild and cultured cod. While it was shown previously that larval cod fed wild zooplankton grow faster than those fed only rotifers, the mechanisms involved in this enhanced growth are not completely understood. We used microarrays to identify larval cod transcripts that respond to feeding with small amounts of wild zooplankton (5-10 % of live prey items). The larval transcriptome was compared between 3 treatment groups [fed rotifers (RA), rotifers with protein hydrolysate (RA-PH), or rotifers with zooplankton (RA-Zoo)] at 9-10 mm length [26-30 days post-hatch (dph)] to identify a robust suite of zooplankton-responsive genes (i.e. differentially expressed between RA-Zoo and both other groups). The microarray experiment identified 147 significantly up-regulated and 156 significantly down-regulated features in RA-Zoo compared with both RA and RA-PH. Gene ontology terms overrepresented in the RA-Zoo responsive gene set included "response to selenium ion" and several related to cell division and oxidation-reduction. Ten selenoprotein-encoding genes, and 2 genes involved in thyroid hormone generation, were up-regulated in RA-Zoo compared with both other groups. Hierarchical clustering of RA-Zoo responsive genes involved in oxidation-reduction and selenium homeostasis demonstrated that only the zooplankton treatment had a considerable and consistent impact on the expression of these genes. Fourteen microarray-identified genes were selected for QPCR involving 9-13 mm larvae, and 13 of these were validated as differentially expressed between RA-Zoo and both other groups at ~9 mm. In contrast, in age-matched (34-35 dph; ~11 mm RA and RA-PH, ~13 mm RA-Zoo) and size-matched (~13 mm) older larvae, only 2 and 3 genes, respectively, showed the same direction of RA-Zoo-responsive change as in ~9 mm larvae. The modulation of genes involved in selenium binding, redox homeostasis, and thyroid hormone generation in ~9 mm RA-Zoo larvae in

  20. On the occurrence of Diogenes pugilator in the German Bight (Crustacea: Decapoda Diogenidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkay, Michael

    2014-06-01

    The occurrence of Diogenes pugilator in the German Bight has been examined since 2005. The steady onshore and offshore presence confirms that this southern species has established sustaining populations. The morphometric features are comparable to that of other populations in the adjacent Atlantic Ocean.

  1. Zooplankton in the Arctic outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloviev, K. A.; Dritz, A. V.; Nikishina, A. B.

    2009-04-01

    Climate changes in the Arctic cause the changes in the current system that may have cascading effect on the structure of plankton community and consequently on the interlinked and delicately balanced food web. Zooplankton species are by definition incapable to perform horizontal moving. Their transport is connected with flowing water. There are zooplankton species specific for the definite water masses and they can be used as markers for the different currents. That allows us to consider zooplankton community composition as a result of water mixing in the studied area. Little is known however about the mechanisms by which spatial and temporal variability in advection affect dynamics of local populations. Ice conditions are also very important in the function of pelagic communities. Melting time is the trigger to all "plankton blooming" processes, and the duration of ice-free conditions determines the food web development in the future. Fram Strait is one of the key regions for the Arctic: the cold water outflow comes through it with the East Greenland Current and meets warm Atlantic water, the West Spitsbergen Current, producing complicated hydrological situation. During 2007 and 2008 we investigated the structure functional characteristics of zooplankton community in the Fram Strait region onboard KV "Svalbard" (April 2007, April and May 2008) and RV "Jan Mayen" (May 2007, August 2008). This study was conducted in frame of iAOOS Norway project "Closing the loop", which, in turn, was a part of IPY. During this cruises multidisciplinary investigations were performed, including sea-ice observations, CTD and ADCP profiling, carbon flux, nutrients and primary production measurements, phytoplankton sampling. Zooplankton was collected with the Hydro-Bios WP2 net and MultiNet Zooplankton Sampler, (mouth area 0.25 m2, mesh size 180 um).Samples were taken from the depth strata of 2000-1500, 1500-1000, 1000-500,500-200, 200-100, 100-60, 60-30, 30-0 m. Gut fluorescence

  2. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2014-09-16 to 2014-09-29 (NCEI Accession 0137968)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2014-08-14 to 2014-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0137967)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  4. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-09-10 to 2013-09-26 (NCEI Accession 0137965)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  5. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru22 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-09-24 to 2013-10-17 (NCEI Accession 0138013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  6. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-03-05 to 2013-03-23 (NCEI Accession 0137964)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2013-10-17 to 2013-11-06 (NCEI Accession 0137966)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  8. Physical trajectory profile data from glider ru23 deployed by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2015-10-08 to 2015-10-27 (NCEI Accession 0153545)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Consortium of Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) glider deployment to survey the physical and biological properties of Mid-Atlantic...

  9. Zooplankton and fisheries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.

    is dominatEd. by herbivores. Zooplankton constitutes the main food item of several economic important animals. The pelagic fishes migrate in shoals to the feeding ground rich in food and hence zooplankton are used as indicators of rich potential fishing...

  10. A Biogeographic Assessment of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary - Kriged Predictive Map of Zooplankton Samples

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton communities have been well studied in the northeast Atlantic (Sherman et al., 1983) and on Georges Bank within the Gulf of Maine (Bigelow, 1927; Davis,...

  11. A Biogeographic Assessment of the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary - Kriged Probability Map of Zooplankton Samples

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton communities have been well studied in the northeast Atlantic (Sherman et al., 1983) and on Georges Bank within the Gulf of Maine (Bigelow, 1927; Davis,...

  12. Physical trajectory profile data from glider blue deployed by University of Massachusetts; University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from 2016-08-18 to 2016-08-22 (NCEI Accession 0156657)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — U.S. IOOS Mid-Atlantic Regional Association Coastal Ocean Observing System (MARACOOS) glider deployment. This is the second of a series of yearly seasonal...

  13. Zooplankton body composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    I compiled literature on zooplankton body composition, from protozoans to gelatinous plankton, and report allometric relations and average body composition. Zooplankton segregate into gelatinous and non-gelatinous forms, with few intermediate taxa (chaetognaths, polychaetes, and pteropods). In most...... groups body composition is size independent. Exceptions are protozoans, chaetognaths, and pteropods, where larger individuals become increasingly watery. I speculate about the dichotomy in body composition and argue that differences in feeding mechanisms and predator avoidance strategies favor either...

  14. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, zooplankton biomass, zooplankton count, phytoplankton count, and fish count measurements collected from multiple Soviet Union research vessels in the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico from 1963-03-09 to 1989-11-20 (NODC Accession 0001310)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection of physical, chemical, and biological data presented on CD-ROM "Pelagic Ecosystems of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean". Data were collected from Atlantic...

  15. Zooplankton excretion metabolites stimulate Southern Ocean phytoplankton growth

    KAUST Repository

    Coello-Camba, A.

    2017-04-24

    Warming over Antarctica is leading to changes in the zooplankton communities inhabiting the Southern Ocean. It has been observed that zooplankton not only regulates phytoplankton through grazing, but also through the recycling of nutrients that are essential for phytoplankton growth. In this way, the effects of warming on zooplankton populations will change the amount or proportion at which recycled nutrients are restored. To estimate how the recycled nutrients released by zooplankton populations, dominated by krill (Euphausia superba), amphipods or copepods, affect the phytoplankton uptake and communities, we performed four incubation experiments: two close to the Antarctic Peninsula and two at the Southern Atlantic Ocean. Our results showed a stimulating effect of the addition of metabolites on ammonia removal rates and on the net growth of phytoplankton communities, with different responses amongst the different phytoplankton groups. According to our results, phytoplankton net growth and community composition may be altered if this relevant source of nutrients is lost due to projected changes in the abundance or distribution of these zooplankton populations.

  16. The effects of environmental parameters on zooplankton assemblages in tropical coastal estuary, South-west, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waidi O. Abdul

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to examine the distribution and assemblage structure of zooplankton in relation to environmental parameters of tropical coastal estuarine ecosystem impounding Bight of Benin, Nigeria. The estuarine water samples were collected between January and December, 2014 from three sampling zones (Brushpark, Open water and Wetland then were fixed in 4% formalin. A total of twenty-eight (28 species belonging to four (4 groups were recorded in this study. These groups were rotifera, copepoda, cladocerans and ostracodas, and were all widely distributed in the three investigated zones. Higher richness, dominance and abundance indices were recorded in Zone I when compared to both Zones II and III. Cluster analysis showed five distinct species communities. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA showed a distinct smattering positive and negative correlation on the distribution of zooplankton indicating that the relative abundance of any species was dependent on specific environmental variables.

  17. Towards an integrated view of benthic and pelagic processes in the southern North Sea (German Bight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Neumann, Andreas; Naderipour, Celine

    2015-04-01

    The North Sea can be classified as a semi-enclosed shelf on the western-European continent. Atlantic influences are mainly through the Fair Isle current Channel in the North, and through the Strait of Dover in the South. An anti-clockwise circulation prevails, driven by mainly semi-diurnal tides and winds. The German Bight is located in the south-eastern part of the North Sea, and is strongly influenced by continental rivers. The outflow from the rivers Scheldt, Maas and Rhine is carried towards the German Bight with the residual currents. The German rivers Ems, Weser and Elbe directly debouche into the German Bight. On the shallow shelf, the water column is completely mixed by tidal forces and wind, largely preventing downward flux of particles and instead fostering temporary deposition and resuspension, which influences benthic mineralization. Hence, complex interactions between pelagic and benthic processes occur. Previous budget calculations indicate that the nutrient inventory has to be processed several times to support observed primary production, and, depending on water depth; only 10-20% remineralisation occurs in sediments of the German Bight whereas about 50% of organic matter is remineralised in the sediments of the shallow Wadden Sea. In this presentation, we use in-situ and ex-situ field data on pelagic and benthic oxygen respiration and benthic nutrient fluxes to assess the intense mineralization activity in the German Bight, the partitioning of benthic and pelagic processes and the factors influencing organic matter mineralization. Measurements of pelagic oxygen respiration based on Winkler titration, in-situ benthic oxygen uptake measurements based on flux-chamber landers and ex-situ incubations of intact sediment cores revealed that benthic remineralisation rates are about an order of magnitude smaller than pelagic rates, in agreement with previous budget estimates. Both benthic and pelagic oxygen respiration show a strong seasonality; with higher

  18. Zooplankton in Arabian Sea, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariadoss Kalaiarasi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The abundance of zooplankton in marine environment has direct influence on fishery resources and it is influenced by environmental parameters such as circulatory movements (eddies and vertical turbulent mixing. The important role of plankton including both microzooplankton and macrozooplankton in supporting life in the sea was recognized in the past, but the study related to ecology of these organisms has still recently formed as intractable aspect in marine ecosystem. Life in the sea has been broadly classified into three groups, viz., the plankton, the nekton and the benthos. The majority of the faunal assemblages of the plankton consists of zooplankton. Among the various levels of production in the sea the secondary production, i.e., production of zooplankton, attains significance as it serves as a link between primary production and tertiary production. The zooplankton chiefly consumes the primary producers and forms the major food source for tertiary producers. Zooplankton plays an important role in coral reef ecosystem. They serve as food for corals, and a variety of other invertebrates and reef fishes. From the fishery point of view, zooplankton forms food of/ from important batfishes belonging to the families Clupeidae, Caesionidae and Apogonidae. Some fishes are exclusively zooplankton feeders and therefore their abundance is directly linked to the presence of zooplankton.

  19. Zooplankton biomass data collected by Research Institute of Marine Fisheries & Oceanography (PINRO) from 1958-03-25 to 1964-06-18 (NODC Accession 0070127)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton biomass data collected in North Atlantic Ocean, Greenland Sea, North Sea, Norwegian Sea, and Bering Sea from 03 Mar 1958 to 18 Jun 1964 by PINRO. Data...

  20. Biological drivers of zooplankton patchiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folt; Burns

    1999-08-01

    Until recently, biological drivers of plankton aggregation were under-appreciated, because most studies concentrated on physical processes. New technological advances, novel experiments and theory have shifted focus to the pivotal role of behaviour in plankton patch dynamics. Our review highlights four biological drivers of zooplankton spatial patchiness and brings together recent research on well studied marine and freshwater taxa, primarily copepods and cladocerans. Diverse and powerful behavioural responses by zooplankton to physical and chemical signals are shown to contribute to the formation and breakdown of zooplankton patches over several different spatial scales.

  1. Fishery survey, benthic organism, and zooplankton data collected using trawls and tows from the EASTWARD and other platforms in the North Atlantic Ocean and Others from 1980-01-16 to 1984-03-14 (NODC Accession 8500245)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fishery survey, fishing duration and other benthic organism data from unknown and other platforms from North Atlantic Ocean was collected over four years between...

  2. US AMLR Program zooplankton dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton research in the US AMLR Program focuses on the link between prey production, availability, and climate variability in relation to predator and fishery...

  3. Zooplankton variability in the Zuari estuary, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, S.R.S.

    Short term variability in the secondary production and composition of zooplankton were studied during February to March 1979 by collecting zooplankton every alternate day from a station located near the mouth of Zuari. Irregularity in the production...

  4. Oceanographic data collected during the EX1305 (Summer Ecosystem Monitoring Survey) expedition on NOAA Ship OKEANOS EXPLORER in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2013-08-21 to 2013-09-01 (NODC Accession 0113335)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The survey consists of 120 random stratified stations in the Middle Atlantic Bight, Southern New England, Georges Bank and the Gulf of Maine. Depending on the...

  5. Temporal and spatial variation of hyperiid amphipod assemblages in response to hydrographic processes in the Panama Bight, eastern tropical Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Bellineth; Lavaniegos, Bertha; Giraldo, Alan; Rodríguez-Rubio, Efraín

    2013-03-01

    The variability of hyperiid amphipod assemblages was analyzed based on seasonal (dry vs. wet) and spatial differences (neritic vs. oceanic) in the Panama Bight. Four oceanographic cruises were carried out during 2007-2008, two during the dry season (Feb. 2007 and Mar. 2008) and two during the wet season (Sep. 2007 and Sep. 2008). Cooler (34 psu) at 30 m were observed during the dry season, while the opposite pattern occurred during the wet season (>25 °C,oceanic contrast in salinity, while it was spatially similar during the dry season, as a consequence of species penetration toward the coast promoted by colder and saltier waters. The abundance of hyperiids was significantly correlated with the abundance of gelatinous zooplankton (siphonophores, ctenophores, doliolids and salps), which are commonly used as hosts by this group.

  6. Future marine zooplankton research - a perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bathmann, U.; Bundy, M.H.; Clarke, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    During the Second Marine Zooplankton Colloquium (MZC2) 3 issues were added to those developed 11 yr ago during the First Marine Zooplankton Colloquium (MZC1). First, we focused on hot spots, i.e., locations where zooplankton occur in higher than regular abundance and/or operate at higher rates, W...

  7. DNA Barcoding of Zooplankton in the Hampton Roads Area: A Biodiversity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo, A.; Rodríguez, Á. E.; Gibson, D. M.

    2016-02-01

    The study of zooplankton biodiversity and distribution is crucial to understand oceanic ecosystems and anticipate the effects of climate change. Previously, identification of zooplankton relied in morphological identification employed by expert taxonomists. DNA barcoding, a technique that uses the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) Cytochrome Oxidase 1 (CO1) gene is widely used for taxonomic identification. Thus, this molecular technique will be used to begin a detailed characterization of zooplankton diversity, abundance and community structure in the Hampton Roads Area (HRA). Stations 1 (Jones Creek) and 3 (lower Chesapeake Bay) were sampled in June 19, 2015. Stations 1, 2 (James River), and 3 were sampled in September 2015. Zooplankton samples were collected in triplicates with a 0.5m, 200 µm mesh net. Physical parameters (dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature and, water transparency) were measured. Species identified as Opistonema oglinum (Atlantic Thread Herring) and Paracalanus parvus copepods were found at station 3; Anchoa mitchilli and Acartia tonsa copepods were found at stations 1 and 3. This study indicates that mtDNA-CO1 barcoding is suitable to identify zooplankton to the species level and helps validate DNA barcoding as a faster, more accurate taxonomic approach. The long term objective of this project is to provide a comprehensive assessment of zooplankton in the HRA and to generate a reference record for broad monitoring programs; vital for a better understanding and management of ecologically and commercially important species.

  8. Mesoscale physical processes and zooplankton transport-retention in the northern Norwegian shelf region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yiwu; Tande, Kurt S.; Zhou, Meng

    2009-10-01

    Northern Norwegian shelf regions are highly productive, supporting fisheries rich in commercially important species such as cod, herring and capelin. It has been long recognized that the mesoscale jets, meanders and eddies associated with interactions between the North Atlantic Current, Norwegian Coastal Current and regional bottom topographic features such as troughs, banks and shelfbreaks play important roles in transporting and retaining zooplankton. To investigate zooplankton distributions and their correspondence with the physical fields, three large-scale surveys with mesoscale resolutions on physical and biological fields were conducted in northern Norwegian shelf regions between latitudes 68°15'N and 70°15'N in springs of 2000-2002. Survey results provide insights into the relationships between zooplankton distributions and the physical features such as fronts, the Norwegian Coastal Current and eddies related to topographic features. The physical and biological data are integrated and analyzed focusing on water types, estimation of geostrophic currents from direct current measurements, along-shelf transport of zooplankton, and retention of zooplankton by the mesoscale meander-eddy over a typical bank area on the shelf. The estimated mean transport in the upper 100 m on the shelf in the survey region is approximately 6.4×10 3 tonnes wet weight day -1 northward. High zooplankton abundances were found over both Malangsgrunnen and Sveinsgrunnen banks. The specific accumulation rate from northward-southward transport in the upper 100 m over Malangsgrunnen was approximately 0.08 day -1, while variable currents with an offshore gradient of zooplankton abundance over Sveinsgrunnen implies an offshore dispersion of coastal-originated zooplankton cohort.

  9. Dipole vortices in the Great Australian Bight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cresswell, George R.; Lund-Hansen, Lars C.; Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard

    2015-01-01

    Shipboard measurements from late 2006 made by the Danish Galathea 3 Expedition and satellite sea surface temperature images revealed a chain of cool and warm mushroom' dipole vortices that mixed warm, salty, oxygen-poor waters on and near the continental shelf of the Great Australian Bight (GAB......) with cooler, fresher, oxygen-rich waters offshore. The alternating jets' flowing into the mushrooms were directed mainly northwards and southwards and differed in temperature by only 1.5 degrees C; however, the salinity difference was as much as 0.5, and therefore quite large. The GAB waters were slightly...... denser than the cooler offshore waters. The field of dipoles evolved and distorted, but appeared to drift westwards at 5km day-1 over two weeks, and one new mushroom carried GAB water southwards at 7km day(-1). Other features encountered between Cape Leeuwin and Tasmania included the Leeuwin Current...

  10. Hydrodynamically-driven distribution of lanternfish larvae in the Southeast Brazilian Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namiki, Cláudia; Katsuragawa, Mario; Napolitano, Dante Campagnoli; Zani-Teixeira, Maria de Lourdes; Mattos, Rafael Augusto de; Silveira, Ilson Carlos Almeida da

    2017-06-01

    This study analyzes the influence of the Brazil Current and Ekman transport on the distribution of lanternfish larvae in the Southeast Brazilian Bight during summer and winter. Larvae of 19 taxa of lanternfish were identified, and Diaphus spp. and M. affine were the most abundant. Three water masses were present in the area: Coastal Water, Tropical Water and South Atlantic Central Water. Lanternfish larvae were associated with the Tropical Water in both seasons. During summer, species of Lampanyctinae were associated with the shallowest layers and Myctophinae in the deepest layers. In winter most species of both subfamilies were associated with intermediate depths, probably because greater mixing of water masses occurred at the surface and 100 m depth, limiting their distribution. During both cruises, the presence of lanternfish larvae in the continental shelf was related to the pattern of Tropical Water intrusion, which was mostly driven by the mesoscale activity of the Brazil Current and its interaction with the continental shelf.

  11. Biovolume-size spectra of epipelagic zooplankton using a multi-frequency acoustic profiling system (MAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napp, J. M.; Ortner, P. B.; Pieper, R. E.; Holliday, D. V.

    1993-03-01

    Zooplankton biovolume data from a Multi-frequency Acoustic Profiling System were used to construct biovolume-size spectra for the Gulf Stream and the Southern California Bight. These spectra were linear through most, but not all, of the size range sampled (0.025-4.00 mm, ESR). Analysis of covariance was sometimes a useful tool to distinguish among spectra taken at different times and places. Difference spectra offered an alternative method of visualizing disparities between spectra. We compared our acoustically-derived spectra from the Gulf Stream with those obtained from other oceans with different samplers and those obtained in the same waters with a different sampler. The results indicate that differences attributable to sampler bias within the same system presently make it difficult, if not impossible, to interpret comparisons from different samplers in different ecosystems.

  12. New York Bight Study: Report 5, NY Bight Biological Review Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Federal Water Pollution Control Act [PL 92- 50001 , and Endangered Species Act [PL 93-205]), regulations (most notably the Council on Environmental...NEAR-COASTAL NORTH 2000- 1750- ISOO- 1250- 2 ISO - 2so - YEAR Figume 3-3. Mean catch per unit effort and rage for the su’f clam SpvWz soldiima and...F]Igu 3-5. (Colamed). C Appendix C Inventory of NY Bight Benthos Surveys ROCK CRAB LONG ISLAND COAST ISO 10 127 90- 30- 2 0- U 40- is - I 81 2 8 848

  13. The unique south: marine biodiversity in the Great Australian Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edyvane, K.S. [South Australian Research and Development Institute, Henley Beach, SA (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The Great Australian Bight is an area of international conservation significance, containing globally significant breeding populations of rare and endangered marine mammals, and also, some of the highest levels of endemism and marine biodiversity in Australia (and the world). The fauna and flora of the in-shore and offshore regions of the Bight, however, particularly the seabirds, fish and invertebrates, remains poorly known. Existing marine biodiversity research and conservation management efforts in the region are low with, until recently, only 260 hectares of the 18.6 million hectares of the Bight being formally protected and managed as marine Protected Areas. Despite the risk of increasing conflicts with marine biodiversity in the region from existing uses, such as commercial fisheries, and also from emerging uses such as marine mammal-based ecotourism (in WA and SA) and sea-based aquaculture (in SA), regional multiple-use management arrangements or management plans are generally lacking. The proposed Great Australian Bight Marine Park, which has been developed with industry and community participation, will, if established, represent the first multiple-use management regime and the first formal reservation of the ecosystems and habitats of the Great Australian Bight. (author). 6 figs., refs.

  14. Annual variations in zooplankton from a polluted coastal environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Haridas, P.; Menon, P.G.; Madhupratap, M.

    . Copepods followed by cladocerans contributed to the bulk of zooplankton. Species composition of zooplankton and their ecology are discussed. Diversity of zooplankton was high in the postmonsoon months and also in April...

  15. Zooplankton species identities, zooplankton species number per sample, and zooplankton abundance collected using zooplankton net as part of the California Cooperative Fisheries Investigation (CALCOFI) project, for 1994-03-01 (NODC Accession 9700104)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton species identities, zooplankton species number per sample, and zooplankton abundance were collected from March 1, 1994 to March 1, 1994. Data were...

  16. Morphological evolution in the San Francisco Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Daniel M.; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2007-01-01

    San Francisco Bight, located near the coast of San Francisco, USA, is an extremely dynamic tidal inlet environmental subject to large waves and strong currents. Wave heights coming from the Pacific Ocean commonly exceed 5 m during winter storms. During peak flow tidal currents approach 3 m/s at the Golden Gate, a 1 km wide entrance that connects San Francisco Bay to the Pacific Ocean. Flow structure in this region varies markedly spatially and temporally due to the complex interaction by wind, waves and tidal currents. A multibeam sonar survey was recently completed that mapped in high resolution, for the first time, the bottom morphology in the region of the ebb tidal delta. This data set includes a giant sand wave field covering an area of approximately 4 square kilometers. The new survey enables the calculation of seabed change that has occurred in the past 50 years, since the last comprehensive survey of the area was completed. This comparison indicates an average erosion of 60 centimeters which equates to a total volume change of approximately 9.3 x 107 m3. Morphologic change also indicates that flood channels have filled and that the entire ebb delta is contracting radially.

  17. Preliminary census of zooplanktons and phytoplanktons community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The zooplankton and phytoplankton community of Ajeko Stream, North Central Nigeria were assessed between October and December 2010. Prior to sampling, Temperature, Transparency, Dissolve Oxygen and pH were evaluated. Zooplankton and phytoplanktons were sampled using plankton net of 20μm diameter with a ...

  18. High evolutionary potential of marine zooplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peijnenburg, K.T.C.A.; Goetze, E.

    2013-01-01

    Open ocean zooplankton often have been viewed as slowly evolving species that have limited capacity to respond adaptively to changing ocean conditions. Hence, attention has focused on the ecological responses of zooplankton to current global change, including range shifts and changing phenology.

  19. Zooplankton abundance of the Andaman sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, S.R.S.; Nair, V.R.

    the dominant component followed by Chaetognatha and Tunicata Estimates of zooplankton biomass to dry weight and to organic carbon content are made. The average standing crop of zooplankton is 288.8 mg C m2 for the upper 200 m column...

  20. Organic carbon content of tropical zooplankton

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.

    In the Zuari and Mandovi estuaries variations in organic carbon of zooplankton are 26.4-38.8 and 24-39.9% of dry weight respectively. Maximum carbon content of estuarine zooplankton is observed in November. Organic carbon in nearshore and oceanic...

  1. Spatial and Temporal Variation of Zooplanktonic Fauna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results showed highest species richness of 20 spp recovered at site A, with higest zooplankton density of 691.28 org/L, while lowest species richness was recorded at site C, 13 species with zooplankton density of 443.19 org/L. Species richness accrdig to taxa showed highest was highest among the Protozoa with 12 spp., ...

  2. Zooplankton of the Zaporiz’ke Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Mykolaichuk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to zooplankton species composition in the Zaporiz’ke Reservoir. The greatest species diversity was found in the macrophyte communities of the upper reservoir’s littoral, but the least zooplankton diversity – in the pelagic zone of the lower reservoir.

  3. Zooplankton composition, abundance and distribution in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to contribute to the understanding of estuarine zooplankton dynamics in cool-temperate systems, zooplankton samples were collected by plankton tows, using two modified WP2 nets, in nine estuaries on the south and west coasts of South Africa, seasonally between June 2003 and March 2004. A total of 44 taxa ...

  4. How Do Density Fronts Interact with Zooplankton Distributions to Create Baleen Whale Prey-Fields in Roseway Basin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckdeschel, G.; Ross, T.; Davies, K. T. A.

    2016-02-01

    On the Scotian Shelf in the northwest Atlantic, Roseway Basin is a feeding ground for several species of large baleen whales, including the highly endangered North Atlantic right whale. In this habitat, aggregations of zooplankton must be present at concentrations high enough for baleen whales to obtain an energetic benefit. Regions of highly concentrated zooplankton are formed within the habitat through various biophysical interactions, such as fontal accumulation and retention. In Roseway Basin, humpback and fin whales prey on accumulated euphausiids, while right and sei whales forage for deep layers of Calanoid copepods. Right whales are found most often along the southeastern basin margin in Roseway, and this is also where density fronts occur and are associated with zooplankton patches that can form and disaggregate at tidal scales. The temporal persistence and biophysical mechanisms behind the observed interactions of zooplankton and frontal features have not been assessed. To understand how density fronts impact zooplankton distributions at the scale of feeding whales, we deployed Slocum gliders equipped with conductivity-temperature-depth sensors and echosounders in a series of cross-isobath transects along the sloped southeastern margin of Roseway Basin during August to November 2015. By looking for the presence of density fronts that are also regions of elevated acoustic backscatter (primarily from copepods and euphausiids) and quantifying their persistence over time, we aim to determine how these biophysical interactions create whale prey-fields.

  5. Circulation patterns in the Delagoa Bight, Mozambique, and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation of the circulation patterns and thermohaline structures in the Delagoa Bight, Mozambique, was undertaken during May 2004, August 2004, April 2005, and April 2006, using hydrographic surveys, surface drifters and satellite imagery. Hydrographic and satellite data during May 2004 illustrated a cyclonic ...

  6. Diel vertical migration of zooplankton in the Tanzanian waters of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diel vertical migration of zooplankton was studied in the Southern part of Lake Victoria in January and July 2002. A van dorn water sampler was used to collect zooplankton. In January 2002, zooplankton showed a pronounced diel vertical migration whereby zooplankton were moving upward at around sunset and ...

  7. Increasing zooplankton variance in the late 1990s unveils hydroclimate modifications in the Balearic Sea, Western Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández de Puelles, Ma Luz; Molinero, Juan Carlos

    2013-05-01

    We examined seasonal and interannual patterns of zooplankton functional groups in the Balearic Sea from 1994 to 2003 and revealed a conspicuous increase in zooplankton variance at community and population levels. The change occurred in 1999-2000, and paralleled modifications in the North Atlantic climate that cascaded down affecting the water column thermal gradient in the Balearic Sea. The observed modifications in both hydroclimate and ecological compartments raise the question of a potential ecological shift in the pelagic ecosystem of the Western Mediterranean in the late 1990s. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Trait-based approaches to zooplankton communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtman, E.; Ohman, M.D.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Zooplankton are major primary consumers and predators in most aquatic ecosystems. They exhibit tremendous diversity of traits, ecological strategies and, consequently, impacts on other trophic levels and the cycling of materials and energy. An adequate representation of this diversity in community...... traits, such as body size and motility, transcend several functions and are major determinants of zooplankton ecological strategies. Future developments of trait-based approaches to zooplankton should assemble a comprehensive matrix of key traits for diverse groups and explore it for general patterns...

  9. Metabarcoding Baseline for the Sargasso Sea Zooplankton Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Bercial, L.; Alam, S.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the responses and evolution of any community over space and time requires a deep knowledge of the species present at each location and their interactions. Where taxonomy turns out to be challenging, as it is in the case of zooplankton, supra-species grouping is a common resort in community characterization. Although this makes morphological identification manageable, there is the associated price of a limited depth of study and the risk of mixing different species' organismal responses. As global change begins to influence species distributions and physiologies, it becomes ever more important to discriminate at a species specific level. The development of DNA-based identification protocols during the last decades are rapidly driving these limitations away, increasing our understanding of the existing complexity of even very close taxa to different stressors or environmental conditions. Beyond the mere taxonomic discrimination of the analyzed community, the use of DNA sequences allows for the rapid integration of phylogenetic measurements and related indexes. In this presentation, we show our first results tackling one of the regions with the highest zooplankton diversity, the Subtropical North Atlantic at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-Series Study (BATS) site. The chosen metabarcoding region was the hypervariable V9 region of the 18S rRNA gene. In this first investigation, we establish the baseline information needed for further and more comprehensive analyses on the time series: minimum coverage depth per sample, taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity of the community and effect of the Diel Vertical Migration in the epipelagic community. We also analyze the limitations of the species identification in relation to the variability of the V9 region within and between species.

  10. Carbon export by vertically migrating zooplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Agnethe Nøhr; Visser, André W.

    2016-01-01

    of the active transport of carbon by different size fractions of the migrating zooplankton population as function of time and space. The approach is motivated by the difficulty in incorporating behavioral aspects of carbon transport into large scale carbon budgets of the world's oceans. The results show......Through diel vertical migration (DVM), zooplankton add an active transport to the otherwise passive sinking of detrital material that constitutes the biological pump. This active transport has proven difficult to quantify. We present a model that estimates both the temporal and depth characteristic...... that despite their lower abundance, large zooplankton (length circa 1–2 mm) migrate deeper and transport approximately twice as much carbon as do the smaller zooplankton (length circa 0.2–0.3 mm). In mid- latitudes (∼30°N to ∼45°N), where pronounced spring blooms are observed, up to 20% more carbon...

  11. Diurnal variation of zooplankton off Versova (Bombay)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gajbhiye, S.N.; Nair, V.R.; Desai, B.N.

    Physicochemical parameters and diurnal variaion of zooplankton were studied off Versova on 17/18 February 1981. Salinity and dissolved oxygen showed limited variation during the period of study. Nutrient values followed the tidal rhythm and high...

  12. Zooplankton along the Tamil Nadu coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Santhakumari, V.; Saraswathy, M.

    Zooplankton abundance along two sectors at Cape Comorin and Tuticorin of Tamil Nadu Coast, southeast coast of India was studied. High biomass contributed by Ostracods, Salps, Chaetognaths etc., were observed along Tuticorin transect. In the Cape...

  13. Review of parasites of marine zooplankton

    OpenAIRE

    大塚, 攻; 長澤, 和也; 槐島, 光次郎

    2000-01-01

    Symbiotic relationships of marine zooplankton, ranging from protozoans to ichtyoplankton, are briefly reviewed. Marine symbionts range from loose associates through parasites s.s. to parasitoids. Symbionts include protozoans, diatoms, fungi, and a wide variety of metazoans such as trematodes, cestodes, nematodes, acanthocephalans, polychaetes, and crustaceans. Host zooplankton infected by parasites s.s. can be classified into three categories: intermediate host, final host and paratenic (tran...

  14. A Review: Potentiality of Zooplankton as Bioindicator

    OpenAIRE

    Zannatul Ferdous; A. K.M Muktadir

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: This review tended to summarize some recent research on zooplankton as bioindicator in India and some other countries of the world. Approach: These researches were mainly on fresh water bodies. Results: Qualitative as well as quantitative analysis were done by Shannon diversity index (H'), Evenness index (J), Species Richness index (S) and Saprobic index. In most of the cases zooplankton population size was correlated with biotic and abiotic parameters (pH, alkalinity, temp...

  15. Diel changes in the near-surface biomass of zooplankton and the carbon content of vertical migrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Graeme C.; Harris, Roger P.; Head, Robert N.

    Zooplankton biomass and the carbon content of vertical migrants were measured in the NE Atlantic (36.5°N, 19.2°W) between 11 and 18 July 1996 as part of the Plankton Reactivity in the Marine Environment (PRIME) programme. The increase in zooplankton biomass near the surface (0-100 m) at night compared to during the day suggested that diel vertical migration was an important feature at this site. For three species of vertically migrant copepods, Pleuromamma pisekii, P. gracilis and P. abdominalis, the carbon content of individuals collected at dusk was significantly less than for individuals collected at dawn, with this reduction being 6.2, 7.3 and 14.8%, respectively. This dawn-dusk reduction in carbon content is consistent with the diel pattern of feeding and fasting exhibited by vertical migrants and supports the suggestion that migrating zooplankton will cause an active export of carbon from the surface layers.

  16. Variations in the structural and functional diversity of zooplankton over vertical and horizontal environmental gradients en route to the Arctic Ocean through the Fram Strait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluchowska, Marta; Trudnowska, Emilia; Goszczko, Ilona; Kubiszyn, Anna Maria; Blachowiak-Samolyk, Katarzyna; Walczowski, Waldemar; Kwasniewski, Slawomir

    2017-01-01

    A multi-scale approach was used to evaluate which spatial gradient of environmental variability is the most important in structuring zooplankton diversity in the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC). The WSC is the main conveyor of warm and biologically rich Atlantic water to the Arctic Ocean through the Fram Strait. The data set included 85 stratified vertical zooplankton samples (obtained from depths up to 1000 metres) covering two latitudinal sections (76°30'N and 79°N) located across the multi-path WSC system. The results indicate that the most important environmental variables shaping the zooplankton structural and functional diversity and standing stock variability are those associated with depth, whereas variables acting in the horizontal dimension are of lesser importance. Multivariate analysis of the zooplankton assemblages, together with different univariate descriptors of zooplankton diversity, clearly illustrated the segregation of zooplankton taxa in the vertical plane. The epipelagic zone (upper 200 m) hosted plentiful, Oithona similis-dominated assemblages with a high proportion of filter-feeding zooplankton. Although total zooplankton abundance declined in the mesopelagic zone (200-1000 m), zooplankton assemblages in that zone were more diverse and more evenly distributed, with high contributions from both herbivorous and carnivorous taxa. The vertical distribution of integrated biomass (mg DW m-2) indicated that the total zooplankton biomass in the epipelagic and mesopelagic zones was comparable. Environmental gradients acting in the horizontal plane, such as the ones associated with different ice cover and timing of the spring bloom, were reflected in the latitudinal variability in protist community structure and probably caused differences in succession in the zooplankton community. High abundances of Calanus finmarchicus in the WSC core branch suggest the existence of mechanisms advantageous for higher productivity or/and responsible for physical

  17. Microcystins affect zooplankton biodiversity in oxbow lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krztoń, Wojciech; Pudaś, Krzysztof; Pociecha, Agnieszka; Strzesak, Magdalena; Kosiba, Joanna; Walusiak, Edward; Szarek-Gwiazda, Ewa; Wilk-Woźniak, Elżbieta

    2017-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that zooplankton diversity and density are affected by the presence of cyanotoxins in the water. The authors focused on 4 oxbow lakes of the Vistula River in southern Poland, which are subjected to mass cyanobacterial development. In 2 of the oxbows (Piekary and Tyniec), microcystins released into the water were found. The highest concentration of microcystins (0.246 μg/L) was observed for microcystins LR. Zooplankton diversity showed a weak response to the presence of microcystins released into the water. The Shannon index (H') of total zooplankton diversity decreased in the Piekary and Tyniec oxbows during periods when the microcystin concentrations were highest. The same trend was noted for diversity of rotifers in both oxbows and for diversity of copepods in Piekary, but not for copepods in Tyniec. No such trends were found for the diversity of cladocerans in any of the oxbows, nor was a relationship found between density of zooplankton and microcystins. Statistical analyses showed that the number of species in individual samples was negatively correlated with the levels of sulfates, phosphates, and ammonia, but the microcystin concentration was positively related to those levels. This points to the complexity of the interactions and synergies among toxins, abiotic factors, and zooplankton biodiversity. In focusing on the problem of cyanotoxins, conservation studies should pay attention to this complexity. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:165-174. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  18. Pico and nanoplankton abundance and carbon stocks along the Brazilian Bight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérikas Ribeiro, Catherine; Lopes Dos Santos, Adriana; Marie, Dominique; Helena Pellizari, Vivian; Pereira Brandini, Frederico; Vaulot, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Pico and nanoplankton communities from the Southwest Atlantic Ocean along the Brazilian Bight are poorly described. The hydrography in this region is dominated by a complex system of layered water masses, which includes the warm and oligotrophic Tropical Water (TW), the cold and nutrient rich South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and the Coastal Water (CW), which have highly variable properties. In order to assess how pico- and nanoplankton communities are distributed in these different water masses, we determined by flow cytometry the abundance of heterotrophic bacteria, Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes along three transects, extending from 23°S to 31°S and 39°W to 49°W. Heterotrophic bacteria (including archaea, maximum of 1.5 × 10(6) cells mL(-1)) were most abundant in Coastal and Tropical Water whereas Prochlorococcus was most abundant in open-ocean oligotrophic waters (maximum of 300 × 10(3) cells mL(-1)). Synechococcus(up to 81 × 10(3) cells mL(-1)), as well as autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes seemed to benefit from the influx of nutrient-rich waters near the continental slope. Autotrophic pico and nanoeukaryotes were also abundant in deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) layers from offshore waters, and their highest abundances were 20 × 10(3) cells mL(-1) and 5 × 10(3) cells mL(-1), respectively. These data are consistent with previous observations in other marine areas where Synechococcus and autotrophic eukaryotes dominate mesotrophic waters, whereas Prochlorococcus dominate in more oligotrophic areas. Regardless of the microbial community structure near the surface, the carbon stock dominance by autotrophic picoeukaryotes near the DCM is possibly linked to vertical mixing of oligotrophic surface waters with the nutrient-rich SACW and their tolerance to lower light levels.

  19. Empirical relationships between phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass in Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayalakshmy, K.V.

    Empirical models based on regression analysis are derived using published values of phytoplankton and crustacean zooplankton biomass from Indian Ocean. Three regression models are derived. There is significant correlation between zooplankton...

  20. Monsoon regime in the Indian Ocean and zooplankton variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.

    The monsoonal effects on zooplankton lead to characteristic zoogeographic patterns in the open ocean and coastal waters. The evaluation of zooplankton variability in the Indian Ocean is presented in three sections: the open ocean, coastal waters...

  1. Zooplankton variability in polluted and unpolluted waters off Bombay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gajbhiye, S.N.; Desai, B.N.

    Zooplankton abundance in the waters around Bombay was studied at Versova, Bombay Harbour (less polluted), Mahim and Thana (highly polluted) from October 1977 to December 1978. A rich zooplankton population was observed throughout the period of study...

  2. Biomass relations between phytoplankton and zooplankton in Goa waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pant, A.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Goswami, S.C.

    Biomass of phytoplankton and zooplankton, measured as particulate oxidizable carbon, shows that at shallowest stations (5 m) there is large excess of phytoplankton organic carbon over zooplankton carbon in all the samples There is no significant...

  3. Biomass measurements collected using net in the North and South Atlantic from several platforms from 1950 to 989 (NODC Accession 0053277)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton biomass data collected by Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas from the Atlantic Ocean in 1950-1989 years and received from the NMFS.

  4. Fish-mediated trait compensation in zooplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hylander, Samuel; Souza, M.S.; Balseiro, E.

    2012-01-01

    predation and UVR defences. 3. Zooplankton exposed to fish predator cues (no direct predation) reduced their pigmentation by c. 30% in 20 days. However, they were able to rapidly counteract negative UVR effects by increasing the activity of antioxidant defences such as glutathione S-transferase (GST). When...... pigmentation and antioxidant enzymes are flexible UVR defence systems, which can be induced when needed. Zooplankton may employ antioxidant defences when pigmentation is reduced to counteract predation risk and thereby rapidly respond to detrimental effects of UVR exposure, that is, they can compensate one......1. Environmental factors fluctuate spatially and temporally, and organisms that can alter phenotype in response to these changes may increase their fitness. Zooplankton are known to be able to induce body pigmentation in response to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and to reduce the pigmentation when...

  5. Intercomparison of six Mediterranean zooplankton time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berline, Léo; Siokou-Frangou, Ioanna; Marasović, Ivona; Vidjak, Olja; Fernández de Puelles, M.a. Luz; Mazzocchi, Maria Grazia; Assimakopoulou, Georgia; Zervoudaki, Soultana; Fonda-Umani, Serena; Conversi, Alessandra; Garcia-Comas, Carmen; Ibanez, Frédéric; Gasparini, Stéphane; Stemmann, Lars; Gorsky, Gabriel

    2012-05-01

    We analyzed and compared Mediterranean mesozooplankton time series spanning 1957-2006 from six coastal stations in the Balearic, Ligurian, Tyrrhenian, North and Middle Adriatic and Aegean Sea. Our analysis focused on fluctuations of major zooplankton taxonomic groups and their relation with environmental and climatic variability. Average seasonal cycles and interannual trends were derived. Stations spanned a large range of trophic status from oligotrophic to moderately eutrophic. Intra-station analyses showed (1) coherent multi-taxa trends off Villefranche sur mer that diverge from the previous results found at species level, (2) in Baleares, covariation of zooplankton and water masses as a consequence of the boundary hydrographic regime in the middle Western Mediterranean, (3) decrease in trophic status and abundance of some taxonomic groups off Naples, and (4) off Athens, an increase of zooplankton abundance and decrease in chlorophyll possibly caused by reduction of anthropogenic nutrient input, increase of microbial components, and more efficient grazing control on phytoplankton. (5) At basin scale, the analysis of temperature revealed significant positive correlations between Villefranche, Trieste and Naples for annual and/or winter average, and synchronous abrupt cooling and warming events centered in 1987 at the same three sites. After correction for multiple comparisons, we found no significant correlations between climate indices and local temperature or zooplankton abundance, nor between stations for zooplankton abundance, therefore we suggest that for these coastal stations local drivers (climatic, anthropogenic) are dominant and that the link between local and larger scale of climate should be investigated further if we are to understand zooplankton fluctuations.

  6. Zooplankton abundance in the River Kars, Northeast Turkey: Impact ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The zooplankton of the River Kars was studied from May to October 2005 at five sampling stations. Thirty different zooplankton taxa were recorded, consisting of one copepod, four cladocera and twentyfive rotifers. The highest zooplankton densities were recorded in July and the lowest in October. Water temperature and ...

  7. Zooplankton characteristics of the coastal ecosystem off Bombay, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.; Ramaiah, Neelam

    The nearshore waters of Bombay sustain a rich and diverse zooplankton fauna. Continuous observations for a period of 15 months indicated a variation from 0.4 to 19.9 mg C.m sup(3) (av. 4.3 mg C.m sup(-3)) in zooplankton biomass. The zooplankton...

  8. Zooplankton biomass to chlorophyll ratios in relation to trophic status ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rising eutrophication in South African reservoirs is of major concern, leading to the consideration of top-down biomanipulation as a management option – reducing zooplankton-eating fish to sustain zooplankton grazing pressure and thus restrict autotrophic plankton that proliferate with nutrient increases. The biomass ratio ...

  9. Composition and abundance of the zooplankton community in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The taxonomic composition of the zooplankton community of the Bitter Lakes, Egypt, was examined in 2003–2004 in relation to the spatial and temporal distribution of environmental factors. Copepoda were dominant, forming 49% of the zooplankton, followed by Protista at 37%. During the autumn, zooplankton in Small ...

  10. The zooplankton of Msikaba estuary | Wooldridge | African Zoology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stratification is well developed in Msikaba estuary and has a major influence on the distribution of the zooplankton. The oligohaline zooplankton component does not become well established, while marine zooplankton organisms penetrate relatively far up the estuary in the high salinity bottom waters. The euryhaline ...

  11. Zooplankton abundance in the River Kars, Northeast Turkey: Impact ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... The zooplankton of the River Kars was studied from May to October 2005 at five sampling stations. Thirty different zooplankton taxa were recorded, consisting of one copepod, four cladocera and twenty- five rotifers. The highest zooplankton densities were recorded in July and the lowest in October. Water.

  12. Turbulence and zooplankton production: insights from PROVESS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre; Stips, A.

    2002-01-01

    , are actively able to mitigate the effects of turbulence by modifying their behaviour, e.g. vertical migration, prey switching and habituation to hydromechanical stimuli. Both theoretical treatments of these processes and field observations from the northern North Sea are examined. Field observations show...... that some copepod species actively migrate to avoid high turbulence levels in surface waters. Furthermore, observations show a negative relationship between turbulence and zooplankton ingestion rates. This supports the paradigm of a dome-shaped response for zooplankton production with environmental...

  13. Metagenomic insights into zooplankton-associated bacterial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Corte, Daniele; Srivastava, Abhishek; Koski, Marja

    2018-01-01

    Zooplankton and microbes play a key role in the ocean's biological cycles by releasing and consuming copious amounts of particulate and dissolved organic matter. Additionally, zooplankton provide a complex microhabitat rich in organic and inorganic nutrients in which bacteria thrive. In this study...... ocean. The zooplankton-associated bacterial community is able to colonize the zooplankton's internal and external surfaces by using a large set of adhesion mechanisms and to metabolize complex organic compounds released or exuded by the zooplankton such as chitin, taurine and other complex molecules...

  14. Ecological factors affecting the distribution of zooplankton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results show that the state of the lagoon is a hyper-eutrophic environment, characterized by high levels of chlorophyll-a and nitrogen. Pollution-tolerant zooplankton such as Brachionus was the dominant species in the lagoon. A total of 61 taxa were recorded, including 35 rotifers, 13 copepods, 5 ostracods, 6 protozoa and ...

  15. Zooplankton abundance and composition in the hypertrophic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings reflect negligible zooplanktivory in Rietvlei, ruling out top-down biomanipulation prospects for its remedial management. Keywords: crustacean zooplankton, eutrophication management, food web manipulation, reservoir ecosystem, seasonal variability. African Journal of Aquatic Science 2012, 37(3): 311–321 ...

  16. A multivariate approach to environmental-zooplankton relationships in Maldonado Bay (Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Milstein

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available Environment-zooplankton relationships were analysed in Maldonado Bay (Uruguay, an estuarine area between the River Plate and the Atlantic Ocean. This was done through Principal Component Analysis. Most of the environment variability is accounted for, primarily, by the outflow of the River Plate and the inflow of coastal waters which change through the annual cycle, and in the second place by surface water conditions. On the other hand, most of the zooplankton variability is accounted for by 17 taxa abundant in April and February and by one dominant species present only from May to August. A second source of zooplanktonic variability is due to species which occurred in fall only The main observed variabili ty occurred on an annual scale. On it, variations on smaller scales overlap: from one day to another, between Maldonado Bay and the adjacent waters of the River Plate. The main factors involved were different at each scale. The Bay is relatively isolated from adjacent waters, but the degree of isolation varies throughout the year. The influence of coastal water is greater and occurs first outside the Bay. Biological processes may develop under different conditions in the Bay and in the adjacent waters of the River Plate.

  17. Interannual abundance changes of gelatinous carnivore zooplankton unveil climate-driven hydrographic variations in the Iberian Peninsula, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, Mariaelena; Molinero, Juan C; Azeiteiro, Ulisses M; Pardal, Miguel A; Primo, Ana L; Nyitrai, Daniel; Marques, Sónia C

    2016-09-01

    The persistent massive blooms of gelatinous zooplankton recorded during recent decades may be indicative of marine ecosystem changes. In this study, we investigated the potential influence of the North Atlantic climate (NAO) variability on decadal abundance changes of gelatinous carnivore zooplankton in the Mondego estuary, Portugal, over the period 2003-2013. During the 11-year study, the community of gelatinous carnivores encompassed a larger diversity of hydromedusae than siphonophores; the former dominated by Obelia spp., Lizzia blondina, Clythia hemisphaerica, Liriope tetraphylla and Solmaris corona, while the latter dominated by Muggiaea atlantica. Gelatinous carnivore zooplankton displayed marked interannual variability and mounting species richness over the period examined. Their pattern of abundance shifted towards larger abundances ca. 2007 and significant phenological changes. The latter included a shift in the mean annual pattern (from unimodal to bimodal peak, prior and after 2007 respectively) and an earlier timing of the first annual peak concurrent with enhanced temperatures. These changes were concurrent with the climate-driven environmental variability mainly controlled by the NAO, which displayed larger variance after 2007 along with an enhanced upwelling activity. Structural equation modelling allowed depicting cascading effects derived from the NAO influence on regional climate and upwelling variability further shaping water temperature. Such cascading effect percolated the structure and dynamics of the community of gelatinous carnivore zooplankton in the Mondego estuary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oceanographic profile; phosphate, silicate and other measurements collected using bottle and high resolution CTD from the DANA, JAN MAYEN (LAHV) and other platforms in the Coastal N Atlantic, Arctic and other locations from 1995 to 1997 (NODC Accession 0000566)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile, zooplankton, and nutrients data were collected using net and bottle casts from DANA and JAN MAYEN in the North Atlantic Ocean. Data were...

  19. Marine Ecosystems Analysis (MESA) Program, New York Bight Surficial Sediment Analyses

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Ecosystems Analysis (MESA) Program, New York Bight Study was funded by NOAA and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The Atlas was a historical...

  20. The impact of different hydrographic conditions and zooplankton communities on provisioning Little Auks along the West coast of Spitsbergen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasniewski, Slawomir; Gluchowska, Marta; Jakubas, Dariusz; Wojczulanis-Jakubas, Katarzyna; Walkusz, Wojciech; Karnovsky, Nina; Blachowiak-Samolyk, Katarzyna; Cisek, Malgorzata; Stempniewicz, Lech

    2010-10-01

    Composition and abundance of zooplankton were studied simultaneously with feeding ecology of planktivorous Little Auks ( Alle alle) in two different sea shelf areas of West Spitsbergen, Norway, in summer 2007. Zooplankton was collected adjacent to bird colonies in Magdalenefjorden (influenced by Atlantic West Spitsbergen Current) and Hornsund (dominated by the Arctic Sørkapp Current). In spite of different hydrological situations, the abundance of prey preferred by Little Auks, Arctic Calanus glacialis copepodids stage V, among zooplankton was similar in both localities. However, there was much more of Atlantic Calanus finmarchicus on the shelf outside Magdalenefjorden compared to Hornsund, resulting in different abundance ratios of Arctic to Atlantic copepods in the two areas (1:14 and 1:1, respectively). Even greater differences between the two areas occurred in the ratio of C. glacialis CV to other zooplankters, amounting to 1:40 in Magdalenefjorden and 1:6 in Hornsund. In both Little Auk colonies food brought by parents to their chicks contained mainly C. glacialis CV, albeit the proportion of this copepod in meals was significantly higher in Hornsund. Meals delivered to Little Auk chicks in Hornsund had also higher zooplankton numbers, biomass and energy content. In Magdalenefjorden, on the other hand, a higher number of feedings and longer duration of foraging trips were recorded. These differences became more apparent with increasing energy requirements of the fast growing nestlings. This was probably a consequence of lower relative abundance of the Little Auks’ preferred prey in the sea adjacent to Magdalenefjorden colony. It seems that searching for the preferred food items, such as C. glacialis, among abundant but less favored C. finmarchicus, may require more time and energy demanding foraging behavior. As a consequence, foraging effort of the Little Auk parents from Magdalenefjorden was higher, and feeding efficiency lower, than those of birds from

  1. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (South Atlantic): American Eel,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    freshwater (see the maturation is more rapid in popula- GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS section for , . S tions along the South Atlantic Bight. aging methods ). 4...1.1 mm (Tesch that eels may use geoelectric fields 1977). Incubation periods of American generated by ocean currents to navi- eel eggs are not known...common Robins, C. R., D. M. Cohen, and C. H. methods in eel assessment. Rapp. Robins. 1979. The eels, Anquilla P.-V. Reun. Cons. Int. Explor. and

  2. DNA barcoding and its application to marine zooplankton ecology

    OpenAIRE

    Chaolun Li; Minxiao Wang; Fangping Cheng; Song Sun

    2011-01-01

    As the main components of marine biota, zooplankton play vital roles in the marine biodiversity, trophic relationships and ecosystem dynamics. However, morphological identification of zooplankton is time-consuming and even impossible for some taxa, especially for pelagic larvae. Diversity of marine zooplankton is believed to be underestimated. DNA Barcodes (short DNA sequences for species recognition and discrimination) provide powerful tools for rapid species identification and are quickly a...

  3. Zooplankton from can Giuoc River in Southern Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Pham Anh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the variables of zooplankton and water quality were investigated in the Can Giuoc River, Southern Vietnam. Zooplankton was monitored in April and September 2015 at 5 sampling sites in the river. Some basic water quality parameters were also tested, including pH, total suspended solid (TSS, dissolved oxygen (DO, biological oxygen demand (BOD5, inorganic nitrogen (NH4+, dissolved phosphorus (PO43−, and coliform. The zooplankton biodiversity indices were applied for the water quality assessment.

  4. Studies on zooplankton from the Arabian sea off the south-central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan; Selvakumar, R.A.; Rao, T.S.S.

    Zooplankton biomass, composition and biochemical constituents were studied. Estimated average zooplankton biomass was 8.76 ml/100 m super(3). Of the major components constituting the zooplankton biomass, copepods formed the dominant group. Protein...

  5. Zooplankton assemblage of Oyun Reservoir, Offa, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshood K Mustapha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of physico-chemical properties of Oyun Reservoir, Offa, Nigeria (a shallow tropical African reservoir on its zooplankton composition and abundance were investigated at three stations for two years between January 2002 and December 2003. Diversity is not high: only three groups of zooplankton were found: Rotifera with eight genera; and Cladocera and Copepoda with three genera each. Rotifera dominated numerically (71.02%, followed by Cladocera (16.45% and Copepoda (12.53%. The zooplankton was more prevalent during the rainy season, and there were variations in the composition and abundance along the reservoir continuum. Factors such as temperature, nutrients, food availability, shape and hydrodynamics of the reservoir, as well as reproductive strategies of the organisms, strongly influence the generic composition and population density of zooplankton. Prevention of ecological deterioration of the water body would greatly should result in a more productive water body, rich in zooplankton and with better fisheries. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (4: 1027-1047. Epub 2009 December 01.La influencia de las propiedades fisicoquímicas del Reservorio Oyun, Offa, Nigeria (un embalse tropical somero sobre la composición y abundancia del zooplancton fue investigada en tres estaciones entre enero de 2002 y diciembre de 2003. La diversidad no resultó muy alta con tres grupos de zooplancton: Rotifera con ocho géneros, y Cladocera y Copepoda con tres géneros cada uno. Rotifera dominó (71.02%, seguido de Cladocera (16.45% y Copepoda (12.53%. El zooplancton fue más común durante la temporada de lluvias, y hubo variaciones en su composición y abundancia a lo largo del embalse. Factores tales como la temperatura, los nutrientes, la disponibilidad de alimentos, la forma y la hidrodinámica del embalse, así como las estrategias reproductivas de los organismos, influyen fuertemente en la composición genérica y la densidad poblacional del zooplancton. La

  6. Numerical diagnostic of the circulation in the Santos Bight with COROAS hydrographic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Cirano

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This work represents part of the analyses of the data generated during the first two mesoscale hydrographic cruises of COROAS Project: one during the Summer and the other during the Winter of 1993. The area surveyed during these cruises is the region of the South Brazil Bight (or Santos Bight limited at the coast by the cities of Ubatuba and Iguape, extending from the 50 m isobath to oceanic regions with depths greater than 2500 m. The main goal of this work consisted of the adaptation of the Princeton Ocean Model to the area of study, including realistic topography, observed thermohaline structure and open boundaries. Using this model, a set of diagnostic experiments was realized using density structures based on the COROAS hydrographic data. The baroclinic velocity fields obtained, as expected from preliminary analyses of the thermohaline structures, showed similar features for the Brazil Current in bOla seasonal cruises. The results show an intrusion of Tropical Water over the continental shelf in the region between Ubatuba and Santos, both during the Summer and the Winter cruises. The results also suggest the penetration of the South Atlantic Central Water, underneath the Tropical Water, to the external part of the continental shelf in both occasions.Este artigo representa parte das análises desenvolvidas com os dados hidrográficos coletados durante os dois primeiros cruzeiros do sub-projeto Hidrografia de Meso-escala (HM do Projeto COROAS: o primeiro no verão e o outro no inverno de 1993. A área amostrada nos dois cruzeiros é limitada na costa pelas cidades de Iguape e Ubatuba, estendendo-se da isóbata de 50 m até regiões oceânicas com mais de 2500 m de profundidade. O objetivo central deste trabalho resumiu-se na adaptação do Princeton Ocean Model para a região de estudo, incluindo batimetria real, os campos termohalinos observados e contornos abertos. Usando-se esse modelo, realizou-se um conjunto de experimentos diagn

  7. Zooplankton are not fish: improving zooplankton realism in size-spectrum models mediates energy transfer in food webs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan F Heneghan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The evidence for an equal distribution of biomass from bacteria to whales has led to development of size-spectrum models that represent the dynamics of the marine ecosystem using size rather than species identity. Recent advances have improved the realism of the fish component of the size-spectrum, but these often assume that small fish feed on an aggregated plankton size-spectrum, without any explicit representation of zooplankton dynamics. In these models, small zooplankton are grouped with phytoplankton as a resource for larval fish, and large zooplankton are parameterized as small fish. Here we investigate the impact of resolving zooplankton and their feeding traits in a dynamic size-spectrum model. First, we compare a base model, where zooplankton are parameterized as smaller fish, to a model that includes zooplankton-specific feeding parameters. Second, we evaluate how the parameterization of zooplankton feeding characteristics, specifically the predator-prey mass ratio (PPMR, assimilation efficiency and feeding kernel width, affects the productivity and stability of the fish community. Finally, we compare how feeding characteristics of different zooplankton functional groups mediate increases in primary production and fishing pressure. Incorporating zooplankton-specific feeding parameters increased productivity of the fish community, but also changed the dynamics of the entire system from a stable to an oscillating steady-state. The inclusion of zooplankton feeding characteristics mediated a trade-off between the productivity and resilience of the fish community, and its stability. Fish communities with increased productivity and lower stability were supported by zooplankton with a larger PPMR and a narrower feeding kernel – specialized herbivores. In contrast, fish communities that were stable had lower productivity, and were supported by zooplankton with a lower PPMR and a wider feeding kernel – generalist carnivores. Herbivorous

  8. Some crustacean zooplankton of Wular lake in Kashmir Himalaya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muslim

    2013-05-10

    May 10, 2013 ... In a taxonomic survey of crustacean zooplankton collected from Wular lake of Kashmir, a pictorial key was developed. Thirty-six (36) pictures of 25 species of crustacean zooplankton, out of which 21 represented 16 Cladocera taxa belonging to Chydoridae (Alona affinis, A. rectangula and A. monacantha ...

  9. Diel vertical migration of zooplankton in a hypertrophic shallow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zooplankton as important links in the food web of aquatic ecosystems have been studied extensively. In current literature their diel vertical migration (DVM) is a highly discussed issue. In this investigation DVM by zooplankton is studied in a hypertrophic shallow lake in Germany. The objectives of the study were to see if ...

  10. diel vertical migration of zooplankton in a hypertrophic shallow

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT: Zooplankton as important links in the food web of aquatic ecosystems have been studied extensively. In current literature their diel vertical migration (DVM) is a highly discussed issue. In this investigation DVM by zooplankton is studied in a hypertrophic shallow lake in Germany. The objectives of the study were ...

  11. A comparison of methods for incubating zooplankton diapausing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determining the composition of zooplankton in endorheic pans can be challenging, and live sampling of these microcrustaceans does not give a true indication of their species diversity and abundance. The incubation of zooplankton diapausing eggs can assist in determining their diversity and abundance. In this study the ...

  12. Dredging induced changes in zooplankton community and water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted from July 2013 to June 2014 to assess the outcome of dredging activity on the water characteristics and zooplankton community structure in Dal Lake. An assessment was done with respect to alterations in physico-chemical parameters and zooplankton community changes in predredged and ...

  13. Metals in coastal zooplanktons - A coastal living resource hazard

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paimpillil, J.S.; Joseph, T.; Rejomon, G.; Gerson, V.J.

    and euphausids. The trace metals were generally low in water column and in the zooplanktons, except in the vicinity of two major ports. The metal content trend in the zooplankton had a decreasing tendency as Fe>Zn>Mn>Cu>Ni>Co>Cd>Cr>Pb. The concentration factor...

  14. Zooplankton assessment of Iyikpesu river Aragba- Orogun, Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rotifers constituted 86% of the total zooplankton, water mites (13.3%), copepods (4.8%), cladocera (1.6 %) and protozoa had the least with 0.8%. Among the rotifers, the most common genera were Filina, Polyarthra, Lecane, Testudinella and Notholca. Five major factors influenced the zooplankton composition and ...

  15. The Influence of Physico-Chemical Parameters on the Zooplankton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zooplankton studies of Kusalla Reservoir in Karaye Local Government Area of Kano State were carried out over a period of twelve months from June, 2006 to May, 2007. Alongside the physicochemical parameters of the reservoir was also determined in relation to the distribution of the zooplankton. Physico-chemical ...

  16. Study on zooplankton distributions in Mahin Lagoon within ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Distributions of zooplankton were studied in Mahin Lagoon within the transgressive mud coastal zone, Southwest Nigeria. Zooplankton samples were collected at fifteen stations along the stretch of the lagoon and analysed using standard methods for four months (October 2013, 2014, March 2014 and 2015). In each of the ...

  17. Composition, Abundance and Seasonality of Zooplankton in Mida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daisy Ouya

    Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute, P.O. Box 81651, Mombasa, Kenya. Key words: zooplankton, phytoplankton, composition, ... Information on the marine zooplankton of the. Eastern Coast of Africa is scanty, except for the .... Chaetognatha, Foraminifera, Caridea larvae and. Pisces (fish eggs and larvae).

  18. Dynamics of the zooplankton assemblage of Ojirami Reservoir, Edo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zooplankton form an important trophic link between phytoplankton and fish in the aquatic food chain. Investigation was carried out on the zooplankton community of Ojirami, Reservoir, Nigeria, to document the composition, abundance and distribution and their interactions with the physico-chemical conditions. Surface water ...

  19. Effect of Organic Fertilizers on Zooplankton Production | Orji ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Organic Fertilizers on Zooplankton Production. ... Journal of Agriculture and Food Sciences ... The aquaria were thoroughly washed, filled with 20litres of bore-hole water, fertilized with the respective organic manures after 4 days fermentation and inoculated with zooplankton samples collected from an earthen fish ...

  20. Zooplankton community structure and dynamics during the transition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Canonical Correspondence Analysis was used to determine correlation between the physicochemical parameters and the zooplankton species abundance. The transition from ... Zooplankton community structure showed that species diversity and abundance decreased during the transition from 24 in March to 16 in June.

  1. Impact of physicochemical factors on zooplankton species richness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was significant negative correlation between zooplankton abundance and temperature, pH and TDS at. P.0.05. This study revealed that physicochemical fluctuations was negative impact on the zooplankton species richness and abundance, thus, the need for the government to establish catchment management ...

  2. Seasonal dynamics of zooplankton composition and abundance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seasonal dynamics of zooplankton composition and abundance as influenced by physicochemical parameters of Thomas Dam were studied between January and October, 2016. Zooplankton and water samples for physicochemical parameters were collected and analyzed fortnightly between 8:00 – 10:00 am using ...

  3. Zooplankton as bioindicators ofwater quality in Jakara dam, Kano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among the zooplankton, Rotifers were the dominant, contributing 27.10% of the total fauna composition. Cladocerans constituted 26.99%, Cyclopoida 16.15%, Calanoida 15.08%, and Protozoans 14.68%. However, a combined total of 36 zooplankton species were encountered, Rotifers had 10, Cladocerans 10, Cyclopoida ...

  4. Assessment of Zooplankton Community Structure of the Bahir Dar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The zooplankton composition of the Bahir Dar gulf of Lake Tana was studied in June and July, 2007. A total of forty four zooplankton species made up of 16 species of rotifers, 16 species of cladocerans and 12 species of copepods and their developing stages were recorded in the following order of dominance; Rotifera ...

  5. Summer and winter differences in zooplankton biomass, distribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zooplankton biomass in each size class was significantly, negatively related to sea surface temperature and integrated nitrate, but positively related to surface chlorophyll a and dissolved oxygen. Zooplankton biomass was significantly related to bottom depth, with greatest total biomass located inshore (<50 m). Distribution ...

  6. Spatial patterns of zooplankton distribution and abundance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatial patterns and abundance of zooplankton in aquatic habitats are important determinants for production of fish species, invertebrates and availability of phytoplankton. Weekly monitoring for zooplankton abundance was conducted in Shirati Bay, Lake Victoria, to explore their spatial patterns in relation to phytoplankton, ...

  7. Wet season spatial occurrence of phytoplankton and zooplankton in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation into the spatial occurrence of wet season phytoplankton and zooplankton in Lagos lagoon, Nigeria was carried out in October, 2008 in 12 stations. A total of 36 species of phytoplankton from 21 genera, 20 zooplankton species from 17 genera and 10 juvenile forms were recorded for the study. The results ...

  8. Biochemical composition of Antarctic zooplankton from the Indian Ocean sector

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Zooplankton samples were analysed for faunal composition, organic carbon, protein, carbohydrate and lipid content. Total zooplankton biomass (as displacement volume) varied from 0.032 to 0.500 ml.m sup(-3) (x = 0.23 + or - 0.14) in upper 200 m...

  9. Response of Cyprinus carpio hatchlings artemia, mixed zooplankton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiments were conducted on the response of Cyprinus carpio to Artemia nauplii, mixed zooplankton and Yeast (single cell protein). The fish was fed two quantities of each diet, 100 and 150 ml artemia; 50-100 ml and 150-200 ml zooplankton; and 185 -195 and 200-250 ml yeast. They were fed twice daily There was no ...

  10. Effect of pig dung fertilizer on zooplankton production

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2014-12-29

    Dec 29, 2014 ... Effect of pig dung fertilizer on zooplankton production. 7665. Effect of pig dung fertilizer on zooplankton production. Hervé H. AKODOGBO1*, Clément A. BONOU2 & Emile D. FIOGBE1. 1Research Laboratory on Wetlands (LRZH), Department of Zoology, Faculty of Sciences and Technics, University of.

  11. Zooplankton from Lake Magelungen, Central Sweden 1960-1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almquist, Elisabeth

    1970-11-15

    The investigation of the zooplankton of Lake Magelungen, Central Sweden, was carried out over a period of three years. The aim of the investigation was to illustrate the qualitative and quantitative composition of the zooplankton before the release of waste water from the Aagesta Heat and Power Station began. Vertical sampling series were collected once a month at three different stations in the lake. The highest volumes of zooplankton were obtained in the summer. The ciliates predominated when the conditions were unfavourable for other zooplankton, as in winter just below the ice. The rotifers dominated during and immediately after the spring circulation. With one exception the crustaceans reached their peak volume values in August or September. The composition of the zooplankton indicates that Lake Magelungen is highly eutrophic

  12. Fine-scale spatial and temporal plankton distributions in the Southern California Bight: lessons from in situ microscopes and broadband echosounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briseno-Avena, Christian

    Phytoplankton and zooplankton are important components of marine ecosystems, and play a major role in the biological pump, affecting carbon transport in the global oceans. Their dynamic heterogeneous spatial and temporal distributions require special tools for observing them at the ecological scales relevant to the individual organisms. In this work, I used optic and acoustic methods to study plankton organisms at spatial scales of meters and temporal scales ranging from minutes to months. Using two in situ microscopes I described the fine-scale vertical distribution of phytoplankton and several zooplankton taxa in a coastal location in the Southern California Bight. Highly resolved spatial observations revealed cryptic maxima of fluorescent particles not observed with traditional fluorometers. Furthermore, this high sampling resolution revealed that water density, and not depth, regulated the vertical position, and interactions between observed phytoplankton and zooplankton distributions. Underwater acoustic echosounders can be powerful tools to observe in situ plankton distributions. Interpreting the acoustic echoes, however, requires highly calibrated instruments and ground-truthing experiments to identify the source of acoustic signals. This work presents the description of a novel combination of a broadband, high-frequency (1.5-2.5 MHz) echosounder and a stereoscopic camera --combined, these systems can localize the echo produced by an individual target while simultaneously providing visual identification of the target. This work has provided one of the first comparisons of in situ measured broadband target strength (BTS) and the expected signal using a physical model. The results of this experiment revealed unexpected, important differences between measured and modeled BTS. This system was also used to make in situ observations of individual fragile gelatinous organisms, marine snow particles and phytoplankton, providing evidence of their significant acoustic

  13. Coastal Vertical Land motion in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Matthias; Fenoglio, Luciana; Reckeweg, Florian

    2017-04-01

    In the framework of the ESA Sea Level Climate Change Initiative (CCI) we analyse a set of GNSS equipped tide gauges at the German Bight. Main goals are the determination of tropospheric zenith delay corrections for altimetric observations, precise coordinates in ITRF2008 and vertical land motion (VLM) rates of the tide gauge stations. These are to be used for georeferencing the tide gauges and the correction of tide gauge observations for VLM. The set of stations includes 38 GNSS stations. 19 stations are in the German Bight, where 15 of them belong to the Bundesanstalt für Gewässerkunde, 3 to EUREF and 1 to GREF. These stations are collocated with tide gauges (TGs). The other 19 GNSS stations in the network belong to EUREF, IGS and GREF. We analyse data in the time span from 2008 till the end of 2016 with the Bernese PPP processing approach. Data are partly rather noisy and disturbed by offsets and data gaps at the coastal TG sites. Special effort is therefore put into a proper estimation of the VLM. We use FODITS (Ostini2012), HECTOR (Bos et al, 2013), CATS (Williams, 2003) and the MIDAS approach of Blewitt (2016) to robustly derive rates and realistic error estimates. The results are compared to those published by the European Permanent Network (EPN), ITRF and the Système d'Observation du Niveau des Eaux Littorales (SONEL) for common stations. Vertical motion is small in general, at the -1 to -2 mm/yr level for most coastal stations. A comparison of the standard deviations of the velocity differences to EPN with the mean values of the estimated velocity standard deviations for our solution shows a very good agreement of the estimated velocities and their standard deviations with the reference solution from EPN. In the comparison with results by SONEL the standard deviation of the differences is slightly higher. The discrepancies may arise from differences in the time span analyzed and gaps, offsets and data preprocessing. The combined estimation of functional

  14. Dead zone or oasis in the open ocean? Zooplankton distribution and migration in low-oxygen modewater eddies

    OpenAIRE

    Hauss Helena; Christiansen Svenja; Schütte Florian; Kiko Rainer; Edvam Lima M; Rodrigues Elizandro; Karstensen Johannes; Löscher Carolin R; Körtzinger Arne; Fiedler Björn

    2015-01-01

    The eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) features a mesopelagic oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) at approximately 300–600 m depth. Here, oxygen concentrations rarely fall below 40 µmol O2 kg−1, but are expected to decline under future projections of global warming. The recent discovery of mesoscale eddies that harbour a shallow suboxic (< 5 µmol O2 kg−1) OMZ just below the mixed layer could serve to identify zooplankton groups that may be negatively or positively affected b...

  15. Sediment trap and water column chemistry, Baltimore Canyon, U.S. Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Time-series of sediment chemistry, including organic biomarker composition and bulk inorganic geochemical analytes, from samples collected over a one-year period in...

  16. Zooplankton Distribution in Four Western Norwegian Fjords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsky, G.; Flood, P. R.; Youngbluth, M.; Picheral, M.; Grisoni, J.-M.

    2000-01-01

    A multi-instrumental array constructed in the Laboratoire d'Ecologie du Plancton Marin in Villefranche sur mer, France, named the Underwater Video Profiler (UVP), was used to investigate the vertical distribution of zooplankton in four western Norwegian fjords in the summer 1996. Six distinct zoological groups were monitored. The fauna included: (a) small crustaceans (mainly copepods), (b) ctenophores (mainly lobates), (c) siphonophores (mainly physonects), (d) a scyphomedusa Periphylla periphylla, (e) chaetognaths and (f) appendicularians. The use of the non-disturbing video technique demonstrated that the distribution of large zooplankton is heterogeneous vertically and geographically. Furthermore, the abundance of non-migrating filter feeders in the deep basins of the fjords indicates that there is enough food (living and non-living particulate organic matter) to support their dietary needs. This adaptation may be considered as a strategy for survival in fjords. Specifically, living in dark, deep water reduces visual predation and population loss encountered in the upper layer due to advective processes.

  17. A novel approach reveals high zooplankton standing stock deep in the sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vereshchaka

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In a changing ocean there is a critical need to understand global biogeochemical cycling, particularly regarding carbon. We have made strides in understanding upper ocean dynamics, but the deep ocean interior (> 1000 m is still largely unknown, despite representing the overwhelming majority of Earth's biosphere. Here we present a method for estimating deep-pelagic zooplankton biomass on an ocean-basin scale. We have made several new discoveries about the Atlantic, which likely apply to the world ocean. First, multivariate analysis showed that depth and Chl were the basic factors affecting the wet biomass of the main plankton groups. Wet biomass of all major groups was significantly correlated with Chl. Second, zooplankton biomass in the upper bathypelagic domain is higher than expected. Third, the majority of this biomass comprises macroplanktonic shrimps, which have been historically underestimated. These findings, coupled with recent findings of increased global deep-pelagic fish biomass, suggest that the contribution of the deep-ocean pelagic fauna for biogeochemical cycles may be more important than previously thought.

  18. Impact of climate change on zooplankton communities, seabird populations and arctic terrestrial ecosystem—A scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempniewicz, Lech; Błachowiak-Samołyk, Katarzyna; Węsławski, Jan M.

    2007-11-01

    Many arctic terrestrial ecosystems suffer from a permanent deficiency of nutrients. Marine birds that forage at sea and breed on land can transport organic matter from the sea to land, and thus help to initiate and sustain terrestrial ecosystems. This organic matter initiates the emergence of local tundra communities, increasing primary and secondary production and species diversity. Climate change will influence ocean circulation and the hydrologic regime, which will consequently lead to a restructuring of zooplankton communities between cold arctic waters, with a dominance of large zooplankton species, and Atlantic waters in which small species predominate. The dominance of large zooplankton favours plankton-eating seabirds, such as the little auk ( Alle alle), while the presence of small zooplankton redirects the food chain to plankton-eating fish, up through to fish-eating birds (e.g., guillemots Uria sp.). Thus, in regions where the two water masses compete for dominance, such as in the Barents Sea, plankton-eating birds should dominate the avifauna in cold periods and recess in warmer periods, when fish-eaters should prevail. Therefore under future anthropogenic climate scenarios, there could be serious consequences for the structure and functioning of the terrestrial part of arctic ecosystems, due in part to changes in the arctic marine avifauna. Large colonies of plankton-eating little auks are located on mild mountain slopes, usually a few kilometres from the shore, whereas colonies of fish-eating guillemots are situated on rocky cliffs at the coast. The impact of guillemots on the terrestrial ecosystems is therefore much smaller than for little auks because of the rapid washing-out to sea of the guano deposited on the seabird cliffs. These characteristics of seabird nesting sites dramatically limit the range of occurrence of ornithogenic soils, and the accompanying flora and fauna, to locations where talus-breeding species occur. As a result of climate

  19. Zooplankton data collected from zooplankton net casts in Coastal Waters of Washington / Oregon; 01 January 1969 to 31 December 1972 (NODC Accession 9800078)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using zooplankton net casts in Coastal Waters of Washington / Oregon. Data were collected from 01 January 1969 to 31 December 1972 by...

  20. Zooplankton data collected by ELTANIN in Southern Oceans from zooplankton net casts; 13 October 1963 to 06 June 1968 (NODC Accession 9500111)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using zooplankton net casts from ELTANIN in the Southern Oceans. Data were collected from 13 October 1963 to 06 June 1968 by National...

  1. The Paternal Landscape along the Bight of Benin - Testing Regional Representativeness of West-African Population Samples Using Y-Chromosomal Markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten H D Larmuseau

    Full Text Available Patterns of genetic variation in human populations across the African continent are still not well studied in comparison with Eurasia and America, despite the high genetic and cultural diversity among African populations. In population and forensic genetic studies a single sample is often used to represent a complete African region. In such a scenario, inappropriate sampling strategies and/or the use of local, isolated populations may bias interpretations and pose questions of representativeness at a macrogeographic-scale. The non-recombining region of the Y-chromosome (NRY has great potential to reveal the regional representation of a sample due to its powerful phylogeographic information content. An area poorly characterized for Y-chromosomal data is the West-African region along the Bight of Benin, despite its important history in the trans-Atlantic slave trade and its large number of ethnic groups, languages and lifestyles. In this study, Y-chromosomal haplotypes from four Beninese populations were determined and a global meta-analysis with available Y-SNP and Y-STR data from populations along the Bight of Benin and surrounding areas was performed. A thorough methodology was developed allowing comparison of population samples using Y-chromosomal lineage data based on different Y-SNP panels and phylogenies. Geographic proximity turned out to be the best predictor of genetic affinity between populations along the Bight of Benin. Nevertheless, based on Y-chromosomal data from the literature two population samples differed strongly from others from the same or neighbouring areas and are not regionally representative within large-scale studies. Furthermore, the analysis of the HapMap sample YRI of a Yoruban population from South-western Nigeria based on Y-SNPs and Y-STR data showed for the first time its regional representativeness, a result which is important for standard population and forensic genetic applications using the YRI sample

  2. Diurnal variation of zooplankton in Malad creek, Bombay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gajbhiye, S.N.; Nair, V.R.; Desai, B.N.

    Variation in zooplankton biomass and composition in relation to the prevailing hydrographical conditions was studied for 24 h in Malad Creek, Bombay, Maharashtra, India, which was highly polluted by sewage. The adverse effect of pollution was more...

  3. Zooplankton ecology of the mangrove habitats of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.

    and fish larvae constituted bulk of zooplankton. Majority of these organisms were stragglers. The zooplankters showing better eco-physiological adaptations colonized in pools surroundEd. by thick mangroves vegetation...

  4. Zooplankton composition of the Kalpeni and Agatti atolls, Lakshadweep archiplago

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, S.R.S.; Haridas, P.; Madhupratap, M.

    Composition of zooplankton in the lagoons was quite different from that of the sea and to a large extent, was independent of oceanic influence While copepods were dominant in the sea, meroplankton, particularly brachyuran zoeae constituted...

  5. Understanding cyanobacteria-zooplankton interactions in a more eutrophic world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ger, K.A.; Hansson, L.; Lurling, M.F.L.L.W.

    2014-01-01

    1.We review and update recent observations of cyanobacteria–zooplankton interactions, identify theoretical and methodological limitations and evaluate approaches necessary for understanding the effects of increasing cyanobacterial blooms on plankton dynamics. 2.The emphasis on oversimplified studies

  6. Understanding cyanobacteria-zooplankton interactions in a more eutrophic world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ger, K.A.; Hansson, L-A.; Lurling, M.

    2014-01-01

    1.We review and update recent observations of cyanobacteria–zooplankton interactions, identify theoretical and methodological limitations and evaluate approaches necessary for understanding the effects of increasing cyanobacterial blooms on plankton dynamics. The emphasis on oversimplified studies

  7. Zooplankton composition in Dharamtar creek adjoining Bombay harbour

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tiwari, L.R.; Nair, V.R.

    bedoti was the true inhabitant. In general zooplankton production indicated 1.5 fold increase towards the upper reaches of the creek where salinity variations were drastic. A more diversified faunal assemblage of oceanic and neritic species characterised...

  8. Zooplankton community of Bhayandar and Thane salt pans around Bombay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mustafa, S.; Nair, V.R.; Govindan, K.

    The zooplankton community of the salt pans of Bhayandar and Thane was studied based on the contribution of microzooplankton and meso-macrozooplankton. Population of microzooplankton was about 4 times more in Bhayandar as compared to Thane salt pan...

  9. Studies on abundance of zooplanktons in lakes of Mysore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitha, N; Yamakanamardi, Sadanand M

    2012-11-01

    This is the first comprehensive ecological study on the abundance of zooplankton in Kalale, Alanahalli and Dalvoy lakes of Mysore. The abundance of zooplankton as well as their relation with physico-chemical parameters was analyzed, every month in these lakes from June 2008-May 2010. The mean abundance of Rotifer (281 Org (l-1)), Cladocerans (27 Org l(-1)) and total abundance of zooplankton (343 Org l(-1)) were more and significantly different in Dalvoy lake; whereas, in Kalale lake the mean abundance of Rotifer (19 Org l(-1)), Cladocerans (3 Org l(-1)) and total abundance of zooplankton (79 Org l(-1)) and in Alanahalli lake the mean abundance of Rotifer (84 Org l(-1)), Cladocerans (9 Org l(-1)) and total abundance of zooplankton (149 Org l(-1)) were significantly less. However, the abundance of Copepods and Ostracods was similar in all the three lakes studied. The water bodies of Kalale lake were less polluted when compared toAlanahalli and Dalvoy lakes. The increases in conductivity, Chl a, turbidity, phosphate, carbon-di-oxide and total anions in Alanahalli and Dalvoy lakes may be attributed to the various anthropogenic activities in the catchment areas. Interrelationships between zooplankton variables and physico-chemical parameters were calculated using Pearson's correlation co-efficient (r) which revealed (25) significant (P lake and moderate (7) in Alanahalli and Kalale lakes). The stepwise multiple regression analysis (r2) showed out of 21 physico-chemical parameters studied, as many as 12 were positively controlling the abundance of zooplankton, where as the phosphate and chloride were negatively controlling the total abundance of zooplankton and the abundance of ostracods respectively. The results obtained have been discussed in the light of the present literature available in the field of aquatic microbial ecology.

  10. Correspondence between zooplankton assemblages and the Estuary Environment Classification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena-Moya, Paloma; Duggan, Ian C.

    2017-01-01

    We tested whether variability in zooplankton assemblages was consistent with the categories of estuarine environments proposed by the 'Estuary Environment Classification' system (EEC) (Hume et al., 2007) across a variety of North Island, New Zealand, estuaries. The EEC classifies estuaries in to eight categories (A to F) based primarily on a combination of three abiotic controlling factors: ocean forcing, river forcing and basin morphometry. Additionally, we tested whether Remane's curve, which predicts higher diversities of benthic macrofauna and high and low salinities, can be applied to zooplankton assemblages. We focused on three of the eight EEC categories (B, D and F), which covered the range of estuaries with river inputs dominating (B) to ocean influence dominating (F). Additionally, we included samples from river (FW) and sea (MW) to encompass the entire salinity range. Zooplankton assemblages varied across the categories examined in accordance with a salinity gradient predicted by the EEC. Three groups of zooplankton were distinguishable: the first formed by the most freshwater categories, FW and B, and dominated by rotifers (primarily Bdelloidea) and estuarine copepods (Gladioferans pectinatus), a second group formed by categories D and F, of intermediate salinity, dominated by copepods (Euterpina acutifrons), and a final group including the purely marine category MW and dominated also by E. acutifrons along with other marine taxa. Zooplankton diversity responded to the salinity gradient in a manner expected from Remane's curve. The results of this study support others which have shown salinity to be the main factor driving zooplankton community composition and diversity.

  11. Can microcystins affect zooplankton structure community in tropical eutrophic reservoirs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. S. V. Paes

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of our study was to assess whether cyanotoxins (microcystins can affect the composition of the zooplankton community, leading to domination of microzooplankton forms (protozoans and rotifers. Temporal variations in concentrations of microcystins and zooplankton biomass were analyzed in three eutrophic reservoirs in the semi-arid northeast region of Brazil. The concentration of microcystins in water proved to be correlated with the cyanobacterial biovolume, indicating the contributions from colonial forms such as Microcystis in the production of cyanotoxins. At the community level, the total biomass of zooplankton was not correlated with the concentration of microcystin (r2 = 0.00; P > 0.001, but in a population-level analysis, the biomass of rotifers and cladocerans showed a weak positive correlation. Cyclopoid copepods, which are considered to be relatively inefficient in ingesting cyanobacteria, were negatively correlated (r2 = – 0.01; P > 0.01 with the concentration of cyanotoxins. Surprisingly, the biomass of calanoid copepods was positively correlated with the microcystin concentration (r2 = 0.44; P > 0.001. The results indicate that allelopathic control mechanisms (negative effects of microcystin on zooplankton biomass do not seem to substantially affect the composition of mesozooplankton, which showed a constant and high biomass compared to the microzooplankton (rotifers. These results may be important to better understand the trophic interactions between zooplankton and cyanobacteria and the potential effects of allelopathic compounds on zooplankton.

  12. A system-level modelling perspective of the KwaZulu-Natal Bight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Requirements to take the hydrodynamic, biogeochemical and first ecosystem modelling efforts towards a meaningful predictive capability are discussed. The importance of adopting a system-level view of the bight and its connected systems for realistic exploration of global change scenarios is highlighted. Keywords: ...

  13. Sediment waves with a biogenic twist in Pleistocene cool water carbonates, Great Australian Bight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Surlyk, Finn; Huuse, Mads

    2010-01-01

    Sediment waves composed of fine-grained carbonate ooze with in-place bryozoans are a characteristic element of the Pleistocene of the Great Australian Bight (GAB). The low-amplitude and strongly elongate sediment waves are up to 10 km long, 1 km wide, 40 m high, and oriented sub-parallel to conto...

  14. Influence of Salinity on the Coastal Turbidity Maximum in the Southern Bight of the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, D.; Vanlede, J.D.S.M.; de Maerschalck, B

    2017-01-01

    In the Southern Bight of the North Sea, a Coastal Turbidity Maximum (CTM) can be observed in the Belgian coastal area around the port of Zeebrugge. Understanding the dynamics of this turbidity maximum is of great importance in coastal zone management. Our research studies the CTM with a numerical

  15. Circulation of shelf waters in the KwaZulu-Natal Bight, South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ship-based acoustic Doppler current profiler (S-ADCP) technology, used in survey mode, has enabled nearsynoptic views of the in situ 3-D current field in the KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Bight to be elucidated for the first time. Data acquired by the research vessels RS Africana and RS Algoa in June 2005, September 2007, March ...

  16. Phytoplankton biomass and primary production in Delagoa Bight Mozambique: Application of remote sensing

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kyewalyanga, M.S.; Naik, R.; Hegde, S.; Raman, M.; Barlow, R.; Roberts, M.

    .5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 433and Shelf Science 74 (2007) 429e436 Bight, as a spin-offs from the pole-ward flow of currents Ruijter et al., 2004). These upwelling cells could pump nutri- ents into the euphotic zone, resulting in increased chlorophyll a...

  17. Summary of marine mammal and seabird surveys of the Southern California Bight area, 1975-1978. Volume III - investigators' reports. Part II - cetacea of the Southern California Bight. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohl, T.P.; Norris, K.S.; Guess, R.C.; Bryant, J.D.; Honig, M.W.

    1981-04-01

    This volume contains the findings of a three year study of the cetacea of the Southern California Bight (SCB) area. The distribution, abundance, movements, seasonality and reproductive status of cetacea of the SCB are discussed.

  18. Dispersal of river sediment in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, J.A.; Farnsworth, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    (greater than 0.1) that should allow for violent auto-suspending gravity currents. In light of this, only one shelf setting-the Santa Clara and Ventura-has considerable Holocene sediment accumulation (exceeding 60 m), and here we show that the morphology of this shelf is very similar to an equilibrium shape predicted by gravity-current sediment transport. Thus, we conclude that a wide distribution of river-shelf settings occur in the Southern California Bight, which will directly influence sediment dispersal processes-both dilute suspended and gravity-current transport-and sediment-accumulation patterns. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  19. Invasion of Asian tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon Fabricius, 1798, in the western north Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Pam L.; Knott, David M.; Kingsley-Smith, Peter R.; Morris, James A.; Buckel, Christine A.; Hunter, Margaret E.; Hartman, Leslie D.

    2014-01-01

    After going unreported in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean for 18 years (1988 to 2006), the Asian tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, has recently reappeared in the South Atlantic Bight and, for the first time ever, in the Gulf of Mexico. Potential vectors and sources of this recent invader include: 1) discharged ballast water from its native range in Asia or other areas where it has become established; 2) transport of larvae from established non-native populations in the Caribbean or South America via ocean currents; or 3) escape and subsequent migration from active aquaculture facilities in the western Atlantic. This paper documents recent collections of P. monodon from the South Atlantic Bight and the Gulf of Mexico, reporting demographic and preliminary phylogenetic information for specimens collected between North Carolina and Texas from 2006 through 2012. The increased number of reports in 2011 and 2012, ranging from 102 mm to 298 mm total length, indicates that an adult population is present in densities sufficient for breeding, which is indicative of incipient establishment. Based on these reports of P. monodon, its successful invasion elsewhere, and its life history, we believe that this species will become common in the South Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Mexico in less than 10 years. Penaeus monodon is an aggressive predator in its native range and, if established, may prey on native shrimps, crabs, and bivalves. The impacts of an established P. monodon population are potentially widespread (e.g., alterations in local commercial fisheries, direct and indirect pressures on native shrimp, crab and bivalve populations, and subsequent impacts on the populations of other predators of those organisms) and should be considered by resource managers. The impacts of P. monodon on native fauna and the source(s) or vector(s) of the invasion, however, remain unknown at this time.

  20. Significant habitats and habitat complexes of the New York Bight watershed from 1971 to 1996 (NODC Accession 0071981)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report focuses on the identification and description of essential habitats of key species inhabiting the New York Bight watershed study area. The study area...

  1. Potential retention effect at fish farms boosts zooplankton abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Jover, D.; Toledo-Guedes, K.; Valero-Rodríguez, J. M.; Fernandez-Gonzalez, V.; Sanchez-Jerez, P.

    2016-11-01

    Coastal aquaculture activities influence wild macrofauna in natural environments due to the introduction of artificial structures, such as floating cages, that provide structural complexity in the pelagic system. This alters the abundance and distribution of the affected species and also their feeding behaviour and diet. Despite this, the effects of coastal aquaculture on zooplankton assemblages and the potential changes in their abundance and distribution remain largely unstudied. Traditional plankton sampling hauls between the farm mooring systems entail some practical difficulties. As an alternative, light traps were deployed at 2 farms in the SW Mediterranean during a whole warm season. Total zooplankton capture by traps at farms was higher than at control locations on every sampling night. It ranged from 3 to 10 times higher for the taxonomic groups: bivalvia, cladocera, cumacea, fish early-life-stages, gastropoda, polychaeta and tanaidacea; 10-20 times higher for amphipoda, chaetognatha, isopoda, mysidacea and ostracoda, and 22 times higher for copepoda and the crustacean juvenile stages zoea and megalopa. Permutational analysis showed significant differences for the most abundant zooplankton groups (copepoda, crustacean larvae, chaetognatha, cladocera, mysidacea and polychaeta). This marked incremental increase in zooplankton taxa at farms was consistent, irrespective of the changing environmental variables registered every night. Reasons for the greater abundance of zooplankton at farms are discussed, although results suggest a retention effect caused by cage structures rather than active attraction through physical or chemical cues.

  2. Diurnal variation in zooplankton in the Zuari Estuary, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Padmavati, G.; Goswami, S.C.; Vidya, P.S.

    Variations in zooplankton biomass and population density in relation to the prevailing hydrographical conditions were studied in Zuari Estuary, Goa. The physico-chemical parameters showed limited variations. Zooplankton biomass was relatively more...

  3. Extracoelenteric zooplankton feeding is a key mechanism of nutrient acquisition for the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijgerde, T.H.M.; Diantari, R.; Lewaru, M.W.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Osinga, R.

    2011-01-01

    Internal and external feeding on zooplankton may provide scleractinian corals with important nutrients. However, the latter process has never been properly quantified. To quantify the dynamics of zooplankton capture, digestion and release for a scleractinian coral, we performed detailed video

  4. Zooplankton Biomass Data from Prince William Sound, Icy Bay and Yakutat Bay, Alaska 2010-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes zooplankton biomass from Prince William Sound, Icy Bay and Yakutat Bay, Alaska. Zooplankton were sampled with a ring net (0.6 m diameter with...

  5. A study on the zooplankton of the Burhabalanga Estuary, Orissa Coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, Neelam; Chatterji, A.; Madhupratap, M.

    Annual variations in the zooplankton biomass and composition during 1991-92 were studied from the inshore, mouth and upstream regions of the Burhabalanga Estuary located in the Orissa Coast (India). Zooplankton biomass was maximum at all...

  6. Production and associations of zooplankton in estuarine and nearshore waters of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.

    Zooplankton production in the Zuari and Mandovi estuaries indicated 2 peaks-one in November and another in March/April. In the nearshore waters very high value of zooplankton biomass was observed in April associated with Trichodesmium bloom. Mean...

  7. Edges and Overlaps in Northwest Atlantic Phylogeography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Byers

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available As marine environments change, the greatest ecological shifts—including resource usage and species interactions—are likely to take place in or near regions of biogeographic and phylogeographic transition. However, our understanding of where these transitional regions exist depends on the defining criteria. Here we evaluate phylogeographic transitions using a bootstrapping procedure that allows us to focus on either the strongest genetic transitions between a pair of contiguous populations, versus evaluation of transitions inclusive of the entire overlap between two intraspecific genetic lineages. We compiled data for the Atlantic coast of the United States, and evaluate taxa with short- and long-dispersing larval phases separately. Our results are largely concordant with previous biogeographic and phylogeographic analyses, indicating strong biotic change associated with the regions near Cape Cod, the Delmarva Peninsula, and eastern Florida. However, inclusive analysis of the entire range of sympatry for intraspecific lineages suggests that broad regions—the Mid-Atlantic Bight and eastern Florida–already harbor divergent intraspecific lineages, suggesting the potential for ecological evaluation of resource use between these lineages. This study establishes baseline information for tracking how such patterns change as predicted environmental changes take place.

  8. The influence of the Brazil and Malvinas Currents on the Southwestern Atlantic Shelf circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Matano

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The oceanic circulation over the southwestern Atlantic shelf is influenced by large tidal amplitudes, substantial freshwater discharges, high wind speeds and – most importantly – by its proximity to two of the largest western boundary currents of the world ocean: the Brazil and Malvinas currents. This review article aims to discriminate the dynamical processes controlling the interaction between this extensive shelf region and the deep-ocean. The discussion is focused on two broad regions: the South Brazil Bight to the north, and Patagonia to the south. The exchanges between the Brazil Current and the South Brazil Bight are characterized by the intermittent development of eddies and meanders of the Brazil Current at the shelfbreak. However, it is argued that this is not the only – nor the most important – influence of the Brazil Current on the shelf. Numerical simulations show that the thermohaline structure of the South Brazil Bight can be entirely ascribed to steady state, bottom boundary layer interactions between the shelf and the Brazil Current. The Malvinas Current does not show the development of eddies and meanders, but its influence on the Patagonian shelf is not less important. Models and observations indicate that the Malvinas Current not only controls the shelfbreak dynamics and cross-shelf exchanges but also influences the circulation in the shelf's interior.

  9. Zooplankton and zoobenthos of national natural monument Pastvisko (Pasture land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Sukop

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the year 2002 the seasonal dynamic of zooplankton and zoobenthos in six localities of the national natural monument Pastvisko was observed. The localities belong to the lower Podyjí region, wetlands of international importance. This area was included to Ramsar convention in 1993. Pastvisko is a significant ornithological locality. Besides of birds are represented here also rare water plants as arrowhead (Sagittaria sagittifolia, bladderwort (Utricularia australis, water meal (Wolffia arrhiza, rare water invertebrates for example leech (Hirudo medicinalis, dragonfly (Epitheca bimaculata, water beetle (Hydrophilus piceus. The aim of the study was to evaluace the species composition of zooplankton and zoobenthos and a seasonal dynamic of these animal communities. Zooplankton samples were collected by water net (mesh 45 μm, zoobenthos samples were collected by sieve (mesh 0.5 mm.

  10. High mortality of Red Sea zooplankton under ambient solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali M; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen M O; Satheesh, Sathianeson; Mantha, Gopikrishna; Agustī, Susana; Carreja, Beatriz; Duarte, Carlos M

    2014-01-01

    High solar radiation along with extreme transparency leads to high penetration of solar radiation in the Red Sea, potentially harmful to biota inhabiting the upper water column, including zooplankton. Here we show, based on experimental assessments of solar radiation dose-mortality curves on eight common taxa, the mortality of zooplankton in the oligotrophic waters of the Red Sea to increase steeply with ambient levels of solar radiation in the Red Sea. Responses curves linking solar radiation doses with zooplankton mortality were evaluated by exposing organisms, enclosed in quartz bottles, allowing all the wavelengths of solar radiation to penetrate, to five different levels of ambient solar radiation (100%, 21.6%, 7.2%, 3.2% and 0% of solar radiation). The maximum mortality rates under ambient solar radiation levels averaged (±standard error of the mean, SEM) 18.4±5.8% h(-1), five-fold greater than the average mortality in the dark for the eight taxa tested. The UV-B radiation required for mortality rates to reach ½ of maximum values averaged (±SEM) 12±5.6 h(-1)% of incident UVB radiation, equivalent to the UV-B dose at 19.2±2.7 m depth in open coastal Red Sea waters. These results confirm that Red Sea zooplankton are highly vulnerable to ambient solar radiation, as a consequence of the combination of high incident radiation and high water transparency allowing deep penetration of damaging UV-B radiation. These results provide evidence of the significance of ambient solar radiation levels as a stressor of marine zooplankton communities in tropical, oligotrophic waters. Because the oligotrophic ocean extends across 70% of the ocean surface, solar radiation can be a globally-significant stressor for the ocean ecosystem, by constraining zooplankton use of the upper levels of the water column and, therefore, the efficiency of food transfer up the food web in the oligotrophic ocean.

  11. Predictive models for monitoring and analysis of the total zooplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović Milica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, modeling and prediction of total zooplankton abundance have been performed by various tools and techniques, among which data mining tools have been less frequent. The purpose of this paper is to automatically determine the dependency degree and the influence of physical, chemical and biological parameters on the total zooplankton abundance, through design of the specific data mining models. For this purpose, the analysis of key influencers was used. The analysis is based on the data obtained from the SeLaR information system - specifically, the data from the two reservoirs (Gruža and Grošnica with different morphometric characteristics and trophic state. The data is transformed into optimal structure for data analysis, upon which, data mining model based on the Naïve Bayes algorithm is constructed. The results of the analysis imply that in both reservoirs, parameters of groups and species of zooplankton have the greatest influence on the total zooplankton abundance. If these inputs (group and zooplankton species are left out, differences in the impact of physical, chemical and other biological parameters in dependences of reservoirs can be noted. In the Grošnica reservoir, analysis showed that the temporal dimension (months, nitrates, water temperature, chemical oxygen demand, chlorophyll and chlorides, had the key influence with strong relative impact. In the Gruža reservoir, key influence parameters for total zooplankton are: spatial dimension (location, water temperature and physiological groups of bacteria. The results show that the presented data mining model is usable on any kind of aquatic ecosystem and can also serve for the detection of inputs which could be the basis for the future analysis and modeling.

  12. Synoptic thermal and oceanographic parameter distributions in the New York Bight Apex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. W.; Bahn, G. S.; Thomas, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Concurrent surface water measurements made from a moving oceanographic research vessel were used to calibrate and interpret remotely sensed data collected over a plume in the New York Bight Apex on 23 June 1977. Multiple regression techniques were used to develop equations to map synoptic distributions of chlorophyll a and total suspended matter in the remotely sensed scene. Thermal (which did not have surface calibration values) and water quality parameter distributions indicated a cold mass of water in the Bight Apex with an overflowing nutrient-rich warm water plume that originated in the Sandy Hook Bay and flowed south near the New Jersey shoreline. Data analysis indicates that remotely sensed data may be particularly useful for studying physical and biological processes in the top several metres of surface water at plume boundaries.

  13. Synoptic thermal and oceanographic parameter distribution in the New York Bight Apex on June 23, 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. W.; Bahn, G. S.; Thomas, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    Concurrent surface water measurements made from a moving oceanographic research vessel were used to calibrate and interpret remotely sensed data collected over a plume in the New York Bight Apex on June 23, 1977. Multiple regression techniques were used to develop equations to subsequently map synoptic distributions of water quality parameters, chlorophyll A and total suspended matter, in the remotely sensed scene. Thermal (which did not have surface calibration values) and water quality parameter distributions indicated a cold mass of upwelled water in the Bight Apex with an overflowing nutrient-rich warm water plume that originated in the Sandy Hook Bay and flowed south near the New Jersey shoreline. Additional comparison of remotely sensed thermal and optical properties of the water with shipboard measurements indicated that remotely sensed data may be particularly useful for studying physical and biological processes in the top several meters of surface water at the plume boundaries.

  14. ZOOPLANKTON DIVERSITY RECORDED AT HAMIRSAR LAKE, BHUJ, KACHCHH, GUJARAT

    OpenAIRE

    NAVINKUMAR K. GUPTE

    2014-01-01

    In  this  paper  we  have  tried  to  study  the  micro  fauna  of  the  Himirsar  lake situated at Bhuj, Kachchh, India. The Lake supports diverse forms of Biota in itself. One can find diversity of Zooplanktons and Phytoplanktons in the lake. We have studied the samples of water that were collected from the Hamirsar to identify the zooplankton diversity.

  15. Tritium as a Tracer for the Discrimination of Water Bodies in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerjürgens, Jens; Badewien, Thomas; Sültenfuß, Jürgen; Zielinski, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    Tritium (3H) in the atmosphere has declined to natural levels, after above ground nuclear weapon tests ended five decades ago. Currently tritium is present in the marine environment of the North Sea mainly due to liquid discharges from nuclear reprocessing plants (NRP) in La Hague (France) and Sellafield (UK) and different nuclear power plants (NPP) discharging their effluent to the English Channel or directly into the North Sea. This work deals with seawater samples collected in the German Bight in October 2014 onboard the research vessel Heincke that were analyzed for tritium activity concentration. The major research question of this study is the characterization of different water masses due to their tritium activity concentration. Tritium activity concentration in the coastal area is very high compared to samples taken in the central German Bight. Especially samples from the estuaries of the Elbe, Weser and Ems show high tritium activity concentrations. In correlation with salinity values, riverine freshwater masses were discriminated from oceanic influenced water masses. Activity concentrations from the coastal areas to the central bight are characterized by an exponentially decreasing gradient. It is shown that tritium can be utilized as a tracer for the discrimination of riverine freshwater from oceanic water masses.

  16. Stress of life at the ocean's surface: Latitudinal patterns of UV sunscreens in plankton across the Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fileman, Elaine S.; White, Daniel A.; Harmer, Rachel A.; Aytan, Ülgen; Tarran, Glen A.; Smyth, Tim; Atkinson, Angus

    2017-11-01

    The near-surface layer of the ocean is a habitat in which plankton are subjected to very different stresses to those in deeper layers. These include high turbulence and illumination, allowing increased visibility to predators, and exposure to harmful UV radiation. To provide insights into stress caused by UV, we examined the occurrence of protective UV-absorbing compounds called mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) in seston and zooplankton along an Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT) between 45°S and 50°N. Seston contained most MAAs per unit phytoplankton carbon in the northern Atlantic gyre and equatorial region and this coincided with distribution of the nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium spp. and increased UV transparency but not irradiance. Asterina-330 was the most abundant MAA in the seston. MAAs were detected in a third of the zooplankton tested and these taxa varied greatly both in the amount and diversity of the MAAs that they contained with copepods in temperate regions containing highest concentration of MAAs. Most commonly found MAAs in zooplankton were palythine and shinorine. Juvenile copepods were found not to contain any MAAs. We determined abundance and richness of zooplankton inhabiting the top 50 cm of the ocean. Zooplankton abundance and genera richness was low in the surface waters in contrast to the dome-shaped latitudinal trend in genera richness commonly found from depth-integrated zooplankton sampling. The lack of any measurable MAA compounds in nauplii across the whole transect was concomitant with their severe (3-6-fold) reduction in nauplii densities in the near-surface layer, as compared to the underlying water column. Overall we suggest that the UV stress on life near the surface, particularly in the warmer, oligotrophic and brightly-lit low latitudes, imposes radically different pressures on zooplankton communities compared to the rest of the epipelagic.

  17. DAMPAK KONSENTRASI FE DAN PB TERHADAP MORFOLOGI ZOOPLANKTON DI TAMBAK SOCAH BANGKALAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apri Arisandi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Zooplankton dalam mata rantai antara produsen primer dengan karnivora besar dan kecil dapat mempengaruhi kompleksitas rantai makanan dalam ekosistem perairan. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui dampak konsentrasi Fe dan Pb terhadap morfologi zooplankton  di Tambak Socah. Morfologi zooplankton diamati menggunakan mikroskop dengan metode sensus melalui 3 kali ulangan. Konsentrasi Fe dan Pb di ukur menggunakan spektrofotometer. Zooplankton yang terdapat di tambak socah adalah jenis Copepoda, Nitzchia dan Nauplius. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa konsentrasi Fe dan Pb berada pada kisaran yang normal sehingga tidak mempengaruhi morfologi plankton. Kata kunci: Fe, Pb, zooplankton

  18. Population Dynamics and Diet of the Madamango Sea Catfish Cathorops spixii (Agassiz, 1829) (Siluriformes: Ariidae) in a Tropical Bight in Southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Márcia; Pombo, Maíra; Santos, Flávia Borges; Bessa, Eduardo; Ferreira, Adriana; Turra, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The madamango sea catfish, Cathorops spixii (Siluriformes: Ariidae), is often among the most abundant fishes on the South American Atlantic coast. In the present study, conducted in shallow, non-estuarine coastal areas of Caraguatatuba Bight in southeastern Brazil, collections of this species, the most abundant member of the ichthyofauna, included primarily medium-sized individuals, indicating that the area may play a specific role in their development. Although studies of the local ichthyofauna have been much neglected, the area is economically important and its ecological significance is undervalued. This study primarily treats habitat use by C. spixii, assessing certain population parameters and the dietary composition. Monthly samples were taken from August 2003 through October 2004, with three trawls in two areas, corresponding to depths of about 1 to 4 m. The catfish showed two main peaks of abundance in the area, in April/May and July 2004. A mode around 9 cm SL persisted through time, and the entrance of younger recruits peaked from January to April. The low estimate for body-growth parameters (K = 0.16) corroborates some K-strategist characteristics of the species. The asymptotic length was 27.3 cm SL and total mortality (Z) was 1.01 yr−1. Cathorops spixii showed an omnivorous feeding habit, preying mainly upon polychaetes, copepods and bivalves, with considerable seasonality in its diet. PMID:24282575

  19. Population dynamics and diet of the madamango Sea catfish Cathorops spixii (Agassiz, 1829 (Siluriformes: Ariidae in a tropical bight in Southeastern Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Denadai

    Full Text Available The madamango sea catfish, Cathorops spixii (Siluriformes: Ariidae, is often among the most abundant fishes on the South American Atlantic coast. In the present study, conducted in shallow, non-estuarine coastal areas of Caraguatatuba Bight in southeastern Brazil, collections of this species, the most abundant member of the ichthyofauna, included primarily medium-sized individuals, indicating that the area may play a specific role in their development. Although studies of the local ichthyofauna have been much neglected, the area is economically important and its ecological significance is undervalued. This study primarily treats habitat use by C. spixii, assessing certain population parameters and the dietary composition. Monthly samples were taken from August 2003 through October 2004, with three trawls in two areas, corresponding to depths of about 1 to 4 m. The catfish showed two main peaks of abundance in the area, in April/May and July 2004. A mode around 9 cm SL persisted through time, and the entrance of younger recruits peaked from January to April. The low estimate for body-growth parameters (K = 0.16 corroborates some K-strategist characteristics of the species. The asymptotic length was 27.3 cm SL and total mortality (Z was 1.01 yr(-1. Cathorops spixii showed an omnivorous feeding habit, preying mainly upon polychaetes, copepods and bivalves, with considerable seasonality in its diet.

  20. Population dynamics and diet of the madamango Sea catfish Cathorops spixii (Agassiz, 1829) (Siluriformes: Ariidae) in a tropical bight in Southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Márcia; Pombo, Maíra; Santos, Flávia Borges; Bessa, Eduardo; Ferreira, Adriana; Turra, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The madamango sea catfish, Cathorops spixii (Siluriformes: Ariidae), is often among the most abundant fishes on the South American Atlantic coast. In the present study, conducted in shallow, non-estuarine coastal areas of Caraguatatuba Bight in southeastern Brazil, collections of this species, the most abundant member of the ichthyofauna, included primarily medium-sized individuals, indicating that the area may play a specific role in their development. Although studies of the local ichthyofauna have been much neglected, the area is economically important and its ecological significance is undervalued. This study primarily treats habitat use by C. spixii, assessing certain population parameters and the dietary composition. Monthly samples were taken from August 2003 through October 2004, with three trawls in two areas, corresponding to depths of about 1 to 4 m. The catfish showed two main peaks of abundance in the area, in April/May and July 2004. A mode around 9 cm SL persisted through time, and the entrance of younger recruits peaked from January to April. The low estimate for body-growth parameters (K = 0.16) corroborates some K-strategist characteristics of the species. The asymptotic length was 27.3 cm SL and total mortality (Z) was 1.01 yr(-1). Cathorops spixii showed an omnivorous feeding habit, preying mainly upon polychaetes, copepods and bivalves, with considerable seasonality in its diet.

  1. Polarization sensitivity as a contrast enhancer in pelagic predators: lessons from in situ polarization imaging of transparent zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Sönke; Marshall, N Justin; Widder, Edith A

    2011-03-12

    Because light in the pelagic environment is partially polarized, it has been suggested that the polarization sensitivity found in certain pelagic species may serve to enhance the contrast of their transparent zooplankton prey. We examined its potential during cruises in the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean and at a field station on the Great Barrier Reef. First, we collected various species of transparent zooplankton and micronekton and photographed them between crossed polarizers. Many groups, particularly the cephalopods, pelagic snails, salps and ctenophores, were found to have ciliary, muscular or connective tissues with striking birefringence. In situ polarization imagery of the same species showed that, while the degree of underwater polarization was fairly high (approx. 30% in horizontal lines of sight), tissue birefringence played little to no role in increasing visibility. This is most likely due to the low radiance of the horizontal background light when compared with the downwelling irradiance. In fact, the dominant radiance and polarization contrasts are due to unpolarized downwelling light that has been scattered from the animal viewed against the darker and polarized horizontal background light. We show that relatively simple algorithms can use this negative polarization contrast to increase visibility substantially.

  2. Composition, Abundance and Seasonality of Zooplankton in Mida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daisy Ouya

    temperature ranges between 24o C in July and 32o. C in February. Mida creek forms an important nature conservation site, as it is part of the Watamu. Marine National Park and Reserve under the management of Kenya Wildlife Service. In order to obtain a comparative account of zooplankton from the different biotopes, four.

  3. Composition, Abundance and Seasonality of Zooplankton in Mida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sampling also included measurement of salinity and temperature. Peaks in phytoplankton abundance occurred in May and January, following the long rains in April–May and the short rains in November–December. Zooplankton densities followed the phytoplankton peaks with the main peak occurring in February after the ...

  4. A survey of zooplankton diversity of Challawa river, Kano and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results revealed that the minimum and maximum temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, secchi disc transparency, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand and ... Although the river generally had low zooplankton diversity, perhaps due to low transparency among other factors that limit phytoplankton growth, the ...

  5. Local and regional factors influencing zooplankton communities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-02-19

    Feb 19, 2010 ... Associations between zooplankton community structure and abiotic (temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, nutriments) and biotic factors (chlorophyll a and phytoplankton community) were examined, in Kasseb Reservoir, northern Tunisia. Samples were taken bimonthly from July to December 2002 at 3 ...

  6. Recovery dynamics of zooplankton following mouth-breaching in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the zooplankton in the various reaches did not recover in synchrony after mouth closure, because abiotic factors and food availability were different in the three estuarine reaches. Keywords: artificial breaching, diversity indexes, eutrophication, intermittently open systems, Pseudodiaptomus hessei. African Journal ...

  7. Survey of Zooplanktons and Macro-Invertebrates of Gbedikere Lake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zooplankton and macro-invertebrates samples were collected weekly from three sampling stations at the Gbedikere Lake, Bassa Local Government Area, Kogi state, Nigeria from July to September 2008. Prior to sampling, Temperature of surface water, Secchi disc transparency, pH and dissolved oxygen concentration were ...

  8. Variations in zooplankton diversity and abundance in five research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zooplankton diversity, abundance and some selected environmental parameters of water quality were monitored in five aquaculture research ponds between December 2007 and June 2008 in North West Amhara region of Ethiopia. Bichena-I and Bichena-II fish ponds which received sub-surface water showed significantly ...

  9. 1 An Analysis of Zooplankton Fauna Associated with Mangrove and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-18

    Feb 18, 2015 ... for zooplankton abundance, diversity and community structure along the south- east coast of ... microbial loop and nutrient cycling (Harris et al. 2002). ... Freshwater influx comes from the river 'Rivière des Creoles'. The substratum is muddy and rich in mangrove detritus. The brackish water is very turbid.

  10. 1 An Analysis of Zooplankton Fauna Associated with Mangrove and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-18

    Feb 18, 2015 ... Zooplankton are important components of marine food webs, yet very few studies exist on the ... health of coastal ecosystems since pollution can reduce species diversity and abundance and may ... Blue Bay rich coral ecosystem. ..... association with Reef Watch Consultancy LTD, Mauritius and Dr. Michael ...

  11. Aging of microplastics promotes their ingestion by marine zooplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroom, Renske J.E.; Koelmans, Bart; Besseling, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Microplastics (<5 mm) are ubiquitous in the marine environment and are ingested by zooplankton with possible negative effects on survival, feeding, and fecundity. The majority of laboratory studies has used new and pristine microplastics to test their impacts, while aging processes such as

  12. Effects of liming and fertilization on zooplankton production and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    5kg) and organic fertilizer (poultry droppings) (0.5, 1.5, 2.5 kg) were used in the ponds to assess their effects on zooplankton production, pond productivity and C. gariepinus fry maturation. The fry ... The present research recommends an application of lime and fertilizers at the above rates for effective production of fish foods.

  13. An Analysis of Zooplankton Fauna Associated with Mangrove and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyclopoid Oithona was the most abundant zooplankton in the two mangrove ecosystems with densities of 964 Organisms m-3 and 7760 Organisms m-3 while Foraminiferan Globigerina (329 Organisms m-3) was the most abundant organism in the non-mangrove one. Mangrove sites were found to be more diverse ...

  14. Material properties of zooplankton and nekton from the California current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kaylyn

    This study measured the material properties of zooplankton, Pacific hake (Merluccius productus), Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas), and two species of myctophids (Symbolophorus californiensis and Diaphus theta) collected from the California Current ecosystem. The density contrast (g) was measured for euphausiids, decapods (Sergestes similis), amphipods (Primno macropa, Phronima sp., and Hyperiid spp.), siphonophore bracts, chaetognaths, larval fish, crab megalopae, larval squid, and medusae. Morphometric data (length, width, and height) were collected for these taxa. Density contrasts varied within and between zooplankton taxa. The mean and standard deviation for euphausiid density contrast were 1.059 +/- 0.009. Relationships between zooplankton density contrast and morphometric measurements, geographic location, and environmental conditions were investigated. Site had a significant effect on euphausiid density contrast. Density contrasts of euphausiids collected in the same geographic area approximately 4-10 days apart were significantly higher (p nekton density contrast were investigated. The sound speed contrast (h) was measured for Pacific hake flesh, myctophid flesh, Humboldt squid mantle, and Humboldt squid braincase. Sound speed varied within and between nekton taxa. The material properties reported in this study can be used to improve target strength estimates from acoustic scattering models which would increase the accuracy of biomass estimates from acoustic surveys for these zooplankton and nekton.

  15. The zooplankton of Mgazana, a mangrove estuary in Transkei ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The zooplankton of Mgazana, a mangrove estuary in Transkei, Southern Africa. T Wooldridge. Abstract. Mgazana, a mangrove estuary inTranskei, was investigated from May 1972 to March 1973 at six-week intervals. Salinities were consistently above 25 parts per thousand in the middle and lower estuary. In the upper ...

  16. Meso-zooplankton movement through the newly constructed Mfolozi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 53 zooplankton taxa were recorded in the channel. Of these, one had never been recorded in St Lucia before, namely the gastropod Pterotrachea cf. hippocampus. Additionally, the ctenophore Pleurobrachia cf. pileus and the mysid Gastrosaccus gordonae were again recorded for the first time since the late 1970s.

  17. An Updated Zooplankton Biodiversity of Turkish Inland Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ruşen USTAOĞLU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, zooplankton biodiversity in Turkish inland waters is updated by literature review. In 2004, a total of 427 taxa belong to 229 rotifers, 92 cladocerans and 106 copepods have determined in a zooplankton checklist (Ustaoğlu 2004. Between 2004 and 2011, rotifer biodiversity raised from 229 to 341 taxa in the checklist (Ustaoğlu et al. 2012. By the increasing studies on the subject in recent years and as a consequence of reviewing 263 literature from the studies; 5 new genera (Ceratotrocha, Donneria, Octotrocha, Otostephanos, Stephanoceros and 76 taxa from rotifer fauna; 1 new genus (Kurzia and 11 taxa from cladoceran fauna; 13 new genera (Calacalanus, Mecynocera, Paracalanus, Lernaea, Oithona, Echinocamptus, Maraenobiotus, Leptocaris, Harpacticus, Heterolaophonte, Metis, Phyllognathopu, Kinnecaris and 35 taxa from copepod fauna have been added to the zooplankton fauna. As a result, the recent checklist of inland waters zooplankton of Turkey has 661 taxa which include 417 rotifers, 103 cladocerans and 141 copepods namely.

  18. diel vertical migration of zooplankton in a hypertrophic shallow

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT: Zooplankton as important links in the food web of aquatic ecosystems have been studied extensively. In current literature ... food web as links between the primary producers and the vast spectrum of invertebrate and .... This was operated from a centrally located station (9 m deep) at five different depths of 0 m, 2 ...

  19. Local and regional factors influencing zooplankton communities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-02-19

    Feb 19, 2010 ... and local conditions determine zooplankton community composi- tion in artificially connected ponds. Aquat. Biol. 10 47-55. DUSSART B (1969) Les copépodes des eaux continentales d'Europe occidentale. Tome II : Cyclopoides et biologie quantitative. N. Boubée et Cie, Paris. 292 pp. EDMONDSON WT ...

  20. Diversity and seasonal variation of zooplankton of Lake Hlan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2016-06-30

    Jun 30, 2016 ... The zooplankton diversity founded was composed of 45 species (33 rotifers, 6 cladocera and 6 copepods). The community was highly diversified and characteristic of balanced ecosystem. The Shannon diversity index values were ranged between 4.4 bit.ind-1 and 5.1 bit.ind-1. The taxonomic composition ...

  1. Lake St. Clair zooplankton: Evidence for post-Dreissena changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Katherine A.; Davis, Bruce M.; Hunter, R. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    We surveyed the zooplankton of Lake St. Clair at 12 sites over ten dates from May to October 2000. Mean zooplankton density by site and date was 168.6 individuals/L, with Dreissena spp. veligers the most abundant taxon at 122.7 individuals/L. Rotifers, copepods, and cladocerans were far lower in mean abundance than in the early 1970s (rotifers, 20.9/L; copepods, 18.1/L; and cladocerans, 6.8/L). Species richness of zooplankton taxa in 2000 was 147, which was virtually unchanged from that of the first reported survey in 1894. Overall, the decline in abundance was greatest for rotifers (-90%) and about equal for cladocerans (-69%) and copepods (-66%). The decrease in abundance of Daphnia spp. was especially dramatic in Canadian waters. The decline in the southeastern region was significant for all three major groups of zooplankton, whereas in the northwestern region the decline was significant only for rotifers. From June to August 2000, Lake St. Clair open waters were numerically dominated by Dreissena spp. veligers, with a reduced abundance of rotifers and crustaceans compared to pre-Dreissena spp. surveys. Mean nutrient concentrations were not different from the 1970s, but Secchi depth (greater) and chlorophyll a concentration (lower) were. Disproportionate reduction in rotifer abundance is consistent with hypotheses implicating direct consumption by settled Dreissena spp. Reduction of crustaceans is likely due to more complex interactions including removal of nauplii as well as resource competition for phytoplankton.

  2. Effect of lead on zooplankton dynamics in Challawa River, Kano ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mean zooplankton density ranged between 3.09 Org/L and 10.26 Org/L. Only five protozoan, two insect, four copepod (plus one naplius I), one cladoceran and five rotifer species were identified during the study. The river quality decreased down stream, with least plankton recovery of 4 species at the industrial effluent ...

  3. Species composition and biomass estimates of zooplankton in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three stations were sampled from each water body using a plankton net (40 µm mesh size) hauled vertically through the water column. The zooplankton community comprised mainly crustacea and rotifers. The results show that the number of species collected during the wet and dry seasons was 31 species and 28 species ...

  4. Narcotisation, fixation and preservation experiments with marine zooplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyman, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    In this report narcotisation, fixation and preservation experiments with marine zooplankton are described. Narcotisation turns out to be useless for mixed plankton samples. M.S. 222 works well as narcotisation medium for organisms to be photographed. Fixation with 4% formalin proved to be a

  5. Zooplankton composition and community structure in Lake Tiga ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 54 species of zooplankton was recorded, comprising two species of Protozoa, 26 species of Rotifera, eight species of Copepoda, 11 species of Cladocera, four species of Ostracoda and three species of insect larvae. Species occurrence and abundance were both higher in the dry season than in the rainy season.

  6. Global biodiversity patterns of marine phytoplankton and zooplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, J.; Irigoien, X.; Harris, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    Although the oceans cover 70% of the Earth's surface, our knowledge of biodiversity patterns in marine phytoplankton and zooplankton is very limited compared to that of the biodiversity of plants and herbivores in the terrestrial world. Here, we present biodiversity data for marine plankton

  7. Biochemical composition of zooplankton from the Andaman Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.; Rao, T.S.S.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    Protein was the dominant constituent in mixed zooplankton major planktonic groups and some common species collected from the Andaman Sea. Overall mean values, calculated as a percentage of dry weight, were 45,14 protein, 10.6 lipid, 4.2 carbohydrate...

  8. Zooplankton biomass to chlorophyll ratios in relation to trophic status ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-09-05

    Sep 5, 2011 ... rising chlorophyll within most individual reservoirs, a trend that is partly .... ate contributions of chlorophyll to mass (see above), the proxy measure of ZB/Chl ..... COETZEE L (2010) Personal communication with Ms Leanne Z. Coetzee, 4 Oct .... to resource utilization and zooplankton succession. J. Plankton ...

  9. Evaluation of Zooplankton in Hatchery Diets for Channel Catfish Fry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The efficacy of zooplankton as a supplemental hatchery diet for fry of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus was evaluated. When a commercial diet is used as a reference, fry fed exclusively on zooplankton–either live or dried–performed poorly in their growth rate. However, when live or dried zooplan...

  10. Zooplankton abundance and diversity of fishponds exposed to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was based on three sets of fishponds with regards to fertilization practice and water flow regime. These include non flow-through ponds that received organic and inorganic fertilizers (FNF); flow-through ponds that received organic and inorganic fertilizers (FF) and unfertilized flowthrough ponds. The zooplankton ...

  11. The zooplankton community of Richards Bay Harbour and adjacent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During construction of the current Richards Bay Harbour in the early 1970s, the original shallow Mhlathuze Estuary was divided into two separate systems: a new estuary and a deep-water harbour. This study compares the zooplankton communities of the current systems with reference to that of the original, before harbour ...

  12. Coprophagy in copepods and in a natural zooplankton community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Louise K.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    Sediment trap studies have revealed that often only a minor fraction of the zooplankton fecal pellet production leave the upper ocean, and it has been suggested that copepod grazing on pellets (coprophagy) is the reason for this. A simple model is here used to estimate rate of coprophagy from lab...

  13. DINAMIKA SPASIAL DAN TEMPORAL STRUKTUR KOMUNITAS ZOOPLANKTON DI TELUK JAKARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masykhur Abdul Kadir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Study of spatial and temporal dynamics of zooplankton community structure in the Jakarta Bay. The purpose are analyzing the abundance, distribution, diversity, and dominance index with indicators of water quality spatial and temporal waters of Jakarta Bay. The research was conducted from July-October 2013. Sampling was done four times (July, August, September, and October. The water quality was analysed by Laboratory Productivity and Water Environment at Department of Resources Management, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, Bogor Agricultural University. Zooplankton were analyzed using the method of enumeration (census SRC, in Micro Biology Laboratory Faculty. Based on the distribution patterns were its indicates that the landward dissolved oxygen (DO is increasingly high, especially in August, September, and October, and increase the abundance of zooplankton as much as 1.3106 Ind/m3. DO with a high spatial concentration value reaches the range of 6.2-14.5 mg/L in Muara Marunda (Station 10, and increase the abundance of zooplankton as much as 5.1106 Ind/m3, with a majority composition of crustacea. Results of classification was diversity moderate, stable uniformity, and high dominance index.

  14. The crustacean zooplankton assemblage of a relatively pristine Utor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The water quality and crustacean zooplankton of Utor River, a relatively pristine freshwater body in Edo State, Nigeria was investigated at four stations. The Utor River is slightly acidic, well oxygenated, oligotrophic and low in solids, conductivity, cations and heavy metals. A total of 380 individuals comprising eleven taxa ...

  15. wet season spatial occurrence of phytoplankton and zooplankton in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Onyema (2007) on a tidal creek (Abule-elude creek) and Onyema. &Ojo (2008) on the lower Ogun river (Agboyi creek). The aim of this work is to investigate the spatial occurrence of phytoplankton and zooplankton in the wet season in relation to environmental characteristics. MATERIALS AND METHODS. The Study Area: ...

  16. Pilot Study on Potential Impacts of Fisheries-Induced Changes in Zooplankton Mortality on Marine Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getzlaff, Julia; Oschlies, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    In this pilot study we link the yield of industrial fisheries to changes in the zooplankton mortality in an idealized way accounting for different target species (planktivorous fish—decreased zooplankton mortality; large predators—increased zooplankton mortality). This indirect approach is used in a global coupled biogeochemistry circulation model to estimate the range of the potential impact of industrial fisheries on marine biogeochemistry. The simulated globally integrated response on phytoplankton and primary production is in line with expectations—a high (low) zooplankton mortality results in a decrease (increase) of zooplankton and an increase (decrease) of phytoplankton. In contrast, the local response of zooplankton and phytoplankton depends on the region under consideration: In nutrient-limited regions, an increase (decrease) in zooplankton mortality leads to a decrease (increase) in both zooplankton and phytoplankton biomass. In contrast, in nutrient-replete regions, such as upwelling regions, we find an opposing response: an increase (decrease) of the zooplankton mortality leads to an increase (decrease) in both zooplankton and phytoplankton biomass. The results are further evaluated by relating the potential fisheries-induced changes in zooplankton mortality to those driven by CO2 emissions in a business-as-usual 21st century emission scenario. In our idealized case, the potential fisheries-induced impact can be of similar size as warming-induced changes in marine biogeochemistry.

  17. Large bio-geographical shifts in the north-eastern Atlantic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hátún, Hjálmar; Payne, Mark; Beaugrand, G.

    2009-01-01

    and persistent bottom-up bio-physical link is demonstrated using a numerical ocean general circulation model and data on four trophically connected levels in the food chain – phytoplankton, zooplankton, blue whiting, and pilot whales. The plankton data give a unique basin-scale depiction of these changes...... water masses in the north-eastern North Atlantic Ocean, associated with changes in the strength and extent of the subpolar gyre. These exchanges lead to variations in the influence exerted by the subarctic or Lusitanian biomes on the intermediate faunistic zone in the north-eastern Atlantic. This strong...

  18. The Dynamics of the North Atlantic Subpolar Gyre Introduces Predictability to the Breeding Success of Kittiwakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjálmar Hátún

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the open-ocean subpolar Atlantic is amongst the most predictable regions in the world, our results hold promise for predicting the general production to seabird populations over a large geographical region adjacent to the northern North Atlantic and the Arctic Mediterranean. Colonies of black-legged kittiwakes Rissa tridactyla in the North Atlantic have declined markedly since the mid-1990s, partly due to repeatedly failing breeding seasons. We show a close link between the breeding success of a kittiwake colony in the Faroe Islands and the subpolar gyre index. Successful breeding follows winters with an expanded subpolar gyre and, by inference, increased zooplankton abundances southwest of Iceland. The environmental conditions in the northwestern Atlantic during the non-breeding and pre-breeding seasons might therefore be important. Furthermore, the subpolar gyre dynamics might influence the local food abundance on the Faroe shelf during the breeding season.

  19. A Note on Coastally Trapped Waves Generated by the Wind at the Northern Bight of Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    incrementando el nivel del mar en mis de 10 cm y generando, a su paso, corrientes costeras superficiales de mAs de 50 cm/s. La ocurrencia de la onda atrapada a...la costa es validada con observaciones costeras de nivel del mar. ABSTRACT An operational version of the Navy Layered Ocean Model is used to study the...Abarca del Rio, 2003. On the seasonal circulation within the Panama Bight derived from satellite observations of wind, altimetry and sea surface tem

  20. A population study of the shrimp Crangon allmanni in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blahudka, Sabine; Türkay, Michael

    2002-09-01

    The only reproducing population of Crangon allmanni within the German Bight is in the Helgoland Trench (HTR), a depression of more than 50 m depth south of Helgoland. In coastal and shallower offshore waters the shrimp is much rarer and is recorded in higher numbers only in early spring when the water is still cold. The life cycle of the HTR population lasts for about 1.5 years maximum. Recruitment takes place in summer, and these recruits form the reproducing population of the next year. The shrimps are sensitive to environmental stress and are therefore good indicators of environmental changes.

  1. Acoustically measured seasonal patterns of Zooplankton in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, R. E.; McGehee, D. E.; Greenlaw, C. F.; Holliday, D. V.

    Zooplankton biovolumes and sizes were determined from high-frequency acoustical measurements taken from an undulating SeaSoar vehicle on three cruises in the northern Arabian Sea. Cruises in 1994 and 1995 encompassed the periods of the winter Northeast Monsoon (November 28-December 17, 1994), the summer Southwest Monsoon (June 21 to July 13, 1995), and the Fall Intermonsoon (September 18 to October 11, 1995). Data are discussed from three sampling grids and their interconnecting transects in offshore waters. Zooplankton biovolumes varied seasonally, with lowest biovolumes during the summer Southwest Monsoon, intermediate during the Fall Intermonsoon and highest during the winter Northeast Monsoon. Biovolumes were highest near the surface and decreased with increasing depth. The smallest size-class (0.05-0.16 mm equivalent spherical radius) dominated the biovolume throughout most of the water column. Larger size-classes sometimes dominated the near-surface layers. Mesoscale variability was consistently observed in all areas on all cruises.

  2. Reaction of fresh water zooplankton community to chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipov, D.; Pryakhin, E. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine - URCRM (Russian Federation); Ivanov, I. [FSUE Mayak PA (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The characteristic features of ecological community as a whole and cenosis of zooplankton organisms as part of it determine the intensity of the processes of self-purification of water and the formation of a particular body of water. Identifying features of the structure and composition of the zooplankton community of aquatic ecosystems exposed to different levels of radiation exposure, it is necessary to identify patterns of changes in zooplankton and hydro-biocenosis as a whole. Industrial reservoirs, the storage of liquid low-level radioactive waste 'Mayak' for decades, have high radiation load. A large range of levels of radioactive contamination (total volume beta-activity in water varies from 2.2x10{sup 3} to 2.3x10{sup 7} Bq/l, total volume alpha-activity - from 2.6x10{sup -1} to 3.1x10{sup 3} Bq/l) provides a unique opportunity to study ecosystems in a number of reservoirs with increasing impact of radiation factor. We studied five reservoirs that were used as the storage of low-and intermediate-level liquid radioactive waste pond and one comparison water body. In parallel with zooplankton sampling water samples were collected for hydro-chemical analysis. 41 indicators were analysed in order to assess the water chemistry. To determine the content of radionuclides in the various components of the ecosystem samples were collected from water, bottom sediments and plankton. Sampling of zooplankton for the quantitative analysis was performed using the method of weighted average auto bathometer. Apshteyn's plankton net of the surface horizon was used for qualitative analysis of the species composition of zooplankton. Software package ERICA Assessment Tool 2012 was used for the calculation of the absorbed dose rate. Species diversity and biomass of zooplankton, the share of rotifers in the number of species, abundance and biomass decrease with the increase of the absorbed dose rate and salinity. The number of species in a sample decreases with the

  3. Ingestion of Microplastics by Zooplankton in the Northeast Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desforges, Jean-Pierre W; Galbraith, Moira; Ross, Peter S

    2015-10-01

    Microplastics are increasingly recognized as being widespread in the world's oceans, but relatively little is known about ingestion by marine biota. In light of the potential for microplastic fibers and fragments to be taken up by small marine organisms, we examined plastic ingestion by two foundation species near the base of North Pacific marine food webs, the calanoid copepod Neocalanus cristatus and the euphausiid Euphausia pacifia. We developed an acid digestion method to assess plastic ingestion by individual zooplankton and detected microplastics in both species. Encounter rates resulting from ingestion were 1 particle/every 34 copepods and 1/every 17 euphausiids (euphausiids > copepods; p = 0.01). Consistent with differences in the size selection of food between these two zooplankton species, the ingested particle size was greater in euphausiids (816 ± 108 μm) than in copepods (556 ± 149 μm) (p = 0.014). The contribution of ingested microplastic fibres to total plastic decreased with distance from shore in euphausiids (r (2) = 70, p = 0.003), corresponding to patterns in our previous observations of microplastics in seawater samples from the same locations. This first evidence of microplastic ingestion by marine zooplankton indicate that species at lower trophic levels of the marine food web are mistaking plastic for food, which raises fundamental questions about potential risks to higher trophic level species. One concern is risk to salmon: We estimate that consumption of microplastic-containing zooplankton will lead to the ingestion of 2-7 microplastic particles/day by individual juvenile salmon in coastal British Columbia, and ≤91 microplastic particles/day in returning adults.

  4. Flow disturbances generated by feeding and swimming zooplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Jiang, Haisong; Goncalves, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between planktonic organisms, such as detection of prey, predators, and mates, are often mediated by fluid signals. Consequently, many plankton predators perceive their prey from the fluid disturbances that it generates when it feeds and swims. Zooplankton should therefore seek to mi....... These patterns transcend differences in size and taxonomy and have thus evolved multiple times, suggesting a strong selective pressure to minimize predation risk....

  5. Trophic conditions govern summer zooplankton production variability along the SE Spanish coast (SW Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yebra, Lidia; Putzeys, Sébastien; Cortés, Dolores; Mercado, Jesús M.; Gómez-Jakobsen, Francisco; León, Pablo; Salles, Soluna; Herrera, Inma

    2017-03-01

    The influence of hydrochemistry and trophic conditions on the coastal zooplankton community metabolic rates was investigated along the southeastern Spanish coast, from Algeciras to Cartagena. Zooplankton metabolism was assessed from measurements of gut fluorescence (GF), electron transport system (ETS) and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARS) activities. Zooplankton had higher biomass-specific respiration and growth rates in the Mediterranean stations to the East, driven by warmer seawater temperatures. However, zooplankton biomass and abundance were significantly higher in the Alboran Sea and, consequently, the zooplankton community in these coastal waters presented the highest production rates of the study area and among the highest of the Mediterranean Sea. We observed that summer zooplankton production variability was driven by the trophic conditions rather than by the hydrological variability.

  6. Specificity of zooplankton distribution in meteorite crater ponds (Morasko, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuczyńska-Kippen N.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to define the most important factors responsible for the zooplankton community structure inhabiting four meteorite crater ponds, located near the city of Poznań (Poland. The functioning of the meteorite craters resembled that of other small water bodies, where seasonality, physical-chemical features (mainly chlorophyll a concentration, pH and conductivity or biological parameters (lack of fish structured zooplankton assemblages. Rotifer species richness and abundance were highest in the autumn (12 species and 5107 ind L-1 on average, while crustaceans prevailed in the summer (12 and 201, respectively. The dominating structure also depended on the season, with pelagic species occurring in the spring and autumn and mainly littoral species in the summer. Moreover, the temporary nature of the craters caused great differentiation in zooplankton among ponds and favoured organisms adapted to living in astatic reservoirs, e.g. bdelloids, Daphnia pulex or Macrocyclops viridis. The co-occurrence of a variable community of small crustaceans with large daphnids indicated the existence of an additional ecological niche – a thick layer of sediments. Despite the occurrence of adverse living conditions (oxygen deficiencies and periodic drying and the eutrophic character of the waters, these ponds were a source of many rare species (e.g. Keratella paludosa, even in the status of dominants. Protective measures (a nature reserve allowed the area of meteorite fall to remain quite natural, despite its location close to an urban area.

  7. Zooplankton structure in two interconnected ponds: similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špoljar Maria

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The research of zooplankton diversity, abundance and trophic structure was conducted during the summer period in pelagial zone on the longitudinal profile of the Sutla River Backwater. Investigated site consists of two interconnected basins: transparent Upper Basin with submerged macrophytes and turbid Lower Basin without macrophytes in the littoral zone. In the Upper Basin, abundance and diversity of zooplankton in the pelagial was higher in comparison to the Lower Basin, with prevailing species of genus Keratella as microfilter-feeder, and genera of Polyartha and Trihocerca as macrofilter-feeder rotifers. On the contrary, in the Lower Basin, crustaceans dominated in abundance. Microfilter-feeder cladoceran (Bosmina longirostris and larval and adult stages of macrofilter-feeder copepod (Macrocyclops albidus prevailed in the Lower Basin. Fish predation pressure was more pronounced in the pelagial of the Upper Basin, indicated by low cladoceran abundance in the surface layer. Although the studied basins were interconnected, results indicate significant (Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.05 differences in the zooplankton structure as a potential result of the macrophyte impact on environmental conditions and fish predation pressure.

  8. SEAPODYM-LTL: a parsimonious zooplankton dynamic biomass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conchon, Anna; Lehodey, Patrick; Gehlen, Marion; Titaud, Olivier; Senina, Inna; Séférian, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Mesozooplankton organisms are of critical importance for the understanding of early life history of most fish stocks, as well as the nutrient cycles in the ocean. Ongoing climate change and the need for improved approaches to the management of living marine resources has driven recent advances in zooplankton modelling. The classical modeling approach tends to describe the whole biogeochemical and plankton cycle with increasing complexity. We propose here a different and parsimonious zooplankton dynamic biomass model (SEAPODYM-LTL) that is cost efficient and can be advantageously coupled with primary production estimated either from satellite derived ocean color data or biogeochemical models. In addition, the adjoint code of the model is developed allowing a robust optimization approach for estimating the few parameters of the model. In this study, we run the first optimization experiments using a global database of climatological zooplankton biomass data and we make a comparative analysis to assess the importance of resolution and primary production inputs on model fit to observations. We also compare SEAPODYM-LTL outputs to those produced by a more complex biogeochemical model (PISCES) but sharing the same physical forcings.

  9. Zooplankton community of Parnaíba River, Northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmilla Cavalcanti Antunes Lucena

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim:The objective of the present work is to present a list of species of zooplankton (Rotifera, Cladocera and Copepoda from the Parnaíba River. Additionally, we provide comments on their distribution along the river, and between dry and wet seasons.MethodsZooplankton was collected with a plankton net (60 µm mesh and concentrated into a volume of 80 mL for further analysis, during the dry (October 2010 and wet (April 2011 seasons. Sampling was restricted to the marginal areas at depths between 80 and 150 cm.ResultsA total of 132 species was recorded among the three zooplankton groups studied. During the dry season a total of 82 species was registered and 102 species was registered for the wet season. Rotifera contributed with 66.7% of the species, followed by Cladocera (26.5% and Copepoda (6.8%.ConclusionsThe richness of species observed was high compared to other large rivers in Brazil. In the context of current policies for water management and river diversions in northeastern Brazil, the present study highlights the importance of this river system for biodiversity conservation.

  10. Studies on the zooplankton of the deep subalpine Lake Garda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi NASELLI-FLORES

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The specific composition and seasonal dynamics of the zooplankton of Lake Garda have been studied through monthly surveys in two annual cycles (December 1994-November 1995 and January-December 1997. The assemblage is largely dominated by Copipodiaptomus steueri, a typical calanoid presently identified in deep (Garda, Iseo and shallow lakes of NE Italy and in the hinterland of the central Adriatic region (Dalmatia and Marche Region. Cladocerans and the smaller rotifers represent a significant component of the zooplankton from spring to autumn. A re-examination of the results obtained in previous studies does not seem to demonstrate substantial shifts in the composition of the dominant species. The only documentable and consolidated differences are constituted by the disappearance of Sida crystallina since the '50s and the appearance of new rotifers since the '70s and the '80s. It is stressed that, owing to the fragmentation of the available studies and the use of different methodologies, the qualitative and quantitative modifications of the zooplankton should be interpreted with special caution, requiring further in-depth and continuous monitoring for the meaning they could have as possible signs of modifications of the trophic structure of the lake. However, the results of the comparison of the different investigations do not seem to contrast with the substantial stability of the oligo-mesotrophic character of the lake formally documented since the '70s.

  11. Considerations on the biochemical composition of some freshwater zooplankton species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta RICCARDI

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The mean elemental (C, H, N and biochemical composition (lipids, carbohydrates and proteins of some abundant crustacean zooplankton species of Italian insubric lakes has been estimated by the analysis of samples collected at different seasons from various environments (Lake Maggiore, Lake Varese, Lake Comabbio, Lake Monate. From each sample an adequate number of specimens of each abundant species was sorted and analyzed by a CHN elemental analyzer. The percentage of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins and the calorific content were calculated from the elemental composition according to Gnaiger & Bitterlich (1984. Inter- and intraspecific variability of biochemical composition was quite high, while elemental composition and calorific content were less variable. An estimate of the mean elemental and biochemical composition of each species was obtained by pooling the data. These mean values have been used to estimate the pools of elements and compounds in the crustacean zooplankton of Lake Comabbio to provide an example of the importance of a multiple approach in zooplankton studies.

  12. Structure and function of zooplankton colonization in twelve new experimental ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, David Glenn

    1990-01-01

    This study examined the structural and functional development of zooplankton communities in 12 new experimental ponds for one year and tested four predictions derived from the Random Placement Hypothesis (Coleman 1981). Physico-chemistry, zooplankton colonization dynamics, zooplankton community structure and function were analyzed every two weeks from 5 February 1988 to 10 February 1989. Ponds varied in physico-chemistry at points in time but followed similar patter...

  13. An overview of Southern Ocean zooplankton data: abundance, biomass, feeding and functional relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, Angus; Ward, Peter; Hunt, B.P.V.; Pakhomov, E.A.; Hosie,G.W.

    2012-01-01

    There is an enormous amount of data on Southern Ocean (SO) zooplankton, mostly on their distribution with a minority addressing rate processes. This review aims to summarise these data and show where it resides, to assist SO food-web modellers or those with limited specialist knowledge of SO zooplankton. First, a brief overview is provided of the diversity and basic biology of SO zooplankton, with an emphasis on abundance, distribution and feeding. Second, advice is provided on the uses, stre...

  14. Zooplankton diversity analysis through single-gene sequencing of a community sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Mutsumi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oceans cover more than 70% of the earth's surface and are critical for the homeostasis of the environment. Among the components of the ocean ecosystem, zooplankton play vital roles in energy and matter transfer through the system. Despite their importance, understanding of zooplankton biodiversity is limited because of their fragile nature, small body size, and the large number of species from various taxonomic phyla. Here we present the results of single-gene zooplankton community analysis using a method that determines a large number of mitochondrial COI gene sequences from a bulk zooplankton sample. This approach will enable us to estimate the species richness of almost the entire zooplankton community. Results A sample was collected from a depth of 721 m to the surface in the western equatorial Pacific off Pohnpei Island, Micronesia, with a plankton net equipped with a 2-m2 mouth opening. A total of 1,336 mitochondrial COI gene sequences were determined from the cDNA library made from the sample. From the determined sequences, the occurrence of 189 species of zooplankton was estimated. BLASTN search results showed high degrees of similarity (>98% between the query and database for 10 species, including holozooplankton and merozooplankton. Conclusion In conjunction with the Census of Marine Zooplankton and Barcode of Life projects, single-gene zooplankton community analysis will be a powerful tool for estimating the species richness of zooplankton communities.

  15. Diel variations in zooplankton and their biochemical composition from Vengurla to Ratnagiri, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.; KrishnaKumari, L.; Shrivastava, Y.

    and exhibit vertical migration. Diel variations in the distribution of estuarine zooplankton1-5 and the biochemical composition of zooplankton from the oceanic waters have been reported6,7. However information on the diel variations of zooplankton... waters from Vengurla to Ratnagiri, west coast of India. Horizontal zooplankton samples were collected from 4 stations (Fig. 1) during R V Gaveshani cruise 239 using a Heron-Tranter net (mouth area 0.25 m2, mesh size 330 ?m). At each station the net...

  16. SUCCESSION OF LITTORAL ZOOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES OF THE BAKSHALYNSKE RESERVOIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Trokhymets

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The most pressing current environmental issues of scientific research include the studies of ecosystems altered by human impact. Aquatic ecosystems are important for the stable functioning of communal, industrial, agricultural and energy sectors. One of the typical examples of human impact on aquatic ecosystems is the transformation of river systems in the cascades of reservoirs. In southern Ukraine, there is a South Ukrainian energy complex, for the optimization of functioning of which the lower part of the Bakshala river was transformed into the Bakshalinske reservoir. The aim of this work was to study the succession of changes that occur in the reservoir using the littoral zooplankton communities as an example. These aquatic organisms are basic ecological group, sensitive to changes in their habitats. Methodology. When collecting and preserving samples of littoral zooplankton and its subsequent processing and analysis in the laboratory, we used both the standard methods and an original method of the standardization of the selection of monitoring stations depending on the type and size of the reservoir. Findings. The paper examines the peculiarities of succession processes in a small canyon-shaped Bakshalynske reservoir at different stages of the formation and functioning of its biota. The peculiarities of the succession of zooplanktonic cenoses in this reservoir were investigated by analyzing the changes in species diversity, faunal, ecological and trophic spectra, quantitative indicators, dominant communities and complexes of littoral zooplanktonic species. Originality. The data on zooplankton and other groups of aquatic organisms for the Bakshalynske reservoir are absent, so all provided data are original and have a scientific novelty. In addition, when collecting the material, we used new methodological approaches regarding the standardization of the selection of monitoring stations depending on the type and size of the reservoir

  17. Heavy-Metal and Antibiotic Resistance in the Bacterial Flora of Sediments of New York Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoney, J. F.; Port, Jennifer; Giles, Janis; Spanier, J.

    1978-01-01

    The New York Bight extends seaward some 80 to 100 miles (ca. 129 to 161 km) from the Long Island and New Jersey shorelines to the edge of the continental shelf. Over 14 × 106 m3 of sewage sludge, dredge spoils, acid wastes, and cellar dirt are discharged into this area each year. Large populations of Bacillus sp. resistant to 20 μg of mercury per ml were observed in Bight sediments contaminated by these wastes. Resistant Bacillus populations were much greater in sediments containing high concentrations of Hg and other heavy metals than in sediments from areas further offshore where dumping has never been practiced and where heavy-metal concentrations were found to be low. Ampicillin resistance due mainly to β-lactamase production was significantly (P sludge dump site than in similar Bacillus populations from control sediments. Bacillus strains with combined ampicillin and Hg resistances were almost six times as frequent at the sludge dump site as in control sediments. This observation suggests that genes for Hg resistance and β-lactamase production are simultaneously selected for in Bacillus and that heavy-metal contamination of an ecosystem can result in a selection pressure for antibiotic resistance in bacteria in that system. Also, Hg resistance was frequently linked with other heavy-metal resistances and, in a substantial proportion of Bacillus strains, involved reduction to volatile metallic Hg (Hg°). PMID:727779

  18. Zooplankton and zoobenthos of the Mokra Sura river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yakovenko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study the spatial distribution of structural and functional indicators of zooplankton and zoobenthos during the period of maximum development of hydrobiocenosis in the contaminated and conditionally clean sites of the Mokra Sura river being under antropogenic pressure. Methodology. During the collection and subsequent laboratory processing of zooplankton and zoobenthos samples, we used the standard conventional hydrobiological methods. In order to rank the studied river sites, we used the combined index of the community state (CICS based on the structural-functional indicators of zoobenthos. Findings. The research results have shown that the species composition of zoobenthos and zooplankton of the Mokra Sura river included many saprobiontic species such as oligochaetes, chironomids and rotifers, which were developed significantly in some sites under the effect of eutrophication and silt accumulation in the presence of anthropogenic pollution. The above-mentioned processes cause inhibition of the life activity of such filter feeders as mollusks and crustaceans being the most powerful zooplanktonic and zoobenthic agents of self-cleaning. The highest numbers of zooplankton and zoobenthos development were recorded in front of the point of the emergency discharge of right-bank sewage water (stimulating effect of organic pollution while the lowest numbers were registered near the tire plant (combined effect of both chemical sewage pollution and silt accumulation. In the «Dnipro - Zaporizhzhia highway» site, low numbers of zooplankton development were the result of silt accumulation, whereas the zoobenthos biomass turned out to be the highest due to the intensive development of oligochaetes. Planktonic saprobiontic rotifers dominated in the site located in front of the sewage discharge whereas bdelloid rotifers dominated in the upstream sites of the river. The dominance of planktonic and benthic saprobiontic rotifers caused the highest

  19. Zooplankton data collected from zooplankton net casts from RESEARCHER I and other platforms in TOGA Area of Pacific Ocean; 16 March 1968 to 02 July 1970 (NODC Accession 9500141)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton species identities and other data were collected using zooplankton casts in the TOGA Area of Pacific Ocean from RESEARCHER I and other platforms. Data...

  20. Planktivory in the changing Lake Huron zooplankton community: Bythotrephes consumption exceeds that of Mysis and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, D.B.; Hunter, R. Douglas; Warner, D.M.; Chriscinske, M.A.; Roseman, E.F.

    2011-01-01

    Oligotrophic lakes are generally dominated by calanoid copepods because of their competitive advantage over cladocerans at low prey densities. Planktivory also can alter zooplankton community structure. We sought to understand the role of planktivory in driving recent changes to the zooplankton community of Lake Huron, a large oligotrophic lake on the border of Canada and the United States. We tested the hypothesis that excessive predation by fish (rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, bloater Coregonus hoyi) and invertebrates (Mysis relicta, Bythotrephes longimanus) had driven observed declines in cladoceran and cyclopoid copepod biomass between 2002 and 2007. We used a field sampling and bioenergetics modelling approach to generate estimates of daily consumption by planktivores at two 91-m depth sites in northern Lake Huron, U.S.A., for each month, May-October 2007. Daily consumption was compared to daily zooplankton production. Bythotrephes was the dominant planktivore and estimated to have eaten 78% of all zooplankton consumed. Bythotrephes consumption exceeded total zooplankton production between July and October. Mysis consumed 19% of all the zooplankton consumed and exceeded zooplankton production in October. Consumption by fish was relatively unimportant - eating only 3% of all zooplankton consumed. Because Bythotrephes was so important, we explored other consumption estimation methods that predict lower Bythotrephes consumption. Under this scenario, Mysis was the most important planktivore, and Bythotrephes consumption exceeded zooplankton production only in August. Our results provide no support for the hypothesis that excessive fish consumption directly contributed to the decline of cladocerans and cyclopoid copepods in Lake Huron. Rather, they highlight the importance of invertebrate planktivores in structuring zooplankton communities, especially for those foods webs that have both Bythotrephes and Mysis. Together, these species occupy the epi-, meta- and

  1. Numerical Investigation of the Middle Atlantic Bight Shelfbreak Frontal Circulation Using a High-Resolution Ocean Hindcast Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    shoreward portions of the shelfbreak front is about 2:1. The shelfbreak ageostrophic circulation is largely controlled by the viscosity in the boundary...does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 12 DEC 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4...comparisons with FIG. 3. The bimonthly mean temperature transect comparison between (left two columns) the model solutions and (right) the clima - tology of

  2. Environmental survey of two interim dumpsites, Middle Atlantic Bight from 05 November 1973 to 10 November 1973 (NODC Accession 7501280)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A second oceanographic survey cruise was made to an interim municipal sludge dumpsite and initially to an interim dumpsite for the disposal of industrial acid waste...

  3. Surface Current and Wave Validation of a Nested Regional HF Radar Network in the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-22

    these are direction finding systems, the wave measurements are an average of the wave lb field over a measurement arc . The CODAR system has and 2... Electrique . 74, 54-59. [5] Lipa, B.J. and D.E. Barrick. 1983: Least-squares methods for the extraction of surface currents from CODAR cross-loop data

  4. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Plan Curvature of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Plan Curvature GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  5. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Rugosity of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Rugosity GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  6. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Multibeam Backscatter for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Multibeam Backscatter GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the geomorphology of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  7. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Depth of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Depth GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  8. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Slope of Slope for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Slope of Slope GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  9. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Mean Depth of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Mean Depth GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  10. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Depth Range of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Depth Range GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  11. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Curvature of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Curvature GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  12. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Profile Curvature of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Profile Curvature GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off...

  13. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Sun Illuminated Bathymetry for Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Sun Illuminated Bathymetry GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the...

  14. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Bathymetric Slope of Red Snapper Research Areas in the South Atlantic Bight, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains unified Bathymetric Slope GeoTiffs with 4x4 meter cell resolution describing the topography of 15 areas along the shelf edge off the South...

  15. Export of a Winter Shelf Phytoplankton Bloom at the Shelf Margin of Long Bay (South Atlantic Bight, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J.; Seim, H.; Edwards, C. R.; Lockhart, S.; Moore, T.; Robertson, C. Y.; Amft, J.

    2016-02-01

    A winter 2012 field study off Long Bay (seaward of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina) investigated exchange processes along the shelf margin. Topics addressed included mechanisms of nutrient input (upper slope to outer shelf), phytoplankton blooms and community characteristics (mid-to-outer shelf), and possible export of shelf bloom material (transport to and across the shelf break to the upper slope). Observations utilized three moorings (mid-shelf, shelf break, upper slope), two gliders and ship operations (repeat cruises with profiling, water sampling and towed body surveys) along with satellite SST and ocean color imagery and near-by NOAA buoy records. Here we focus on the late January to early February period, when a mid-shelf bloom of Phaeocystis globosa (which forms large gelatinous colonies) was transported to the shelf break. The presence of Phaeocystis colonies resulted in strong spiking in chlorophyll (chl) fluorescence profiles. A partitioning approach was adapted to estimate chl in colonies (spikes) and small forms (baseline signal) and to account for an apparent difference in measured in vivo fluorescence per unit chl (lower in colonies). Up to 40-50% of chl in the bloom (surface to bottom on the mid-shelf) was estimated to be in the colonies. In late January, there a pronounced seaward slumping of relatively dense mid-shelf water along the bottom under warmer surface water derived from the inshore edge of a broad jet of Gulf Stream water flowing southwestward along the upper slope. We describe the evolution of this event and the conditions which set up this mechanism for episodic near-bed transport of fresh bloom material produced on the shelf to the upper slope off Long Bay. Down-slope transport may have been enhanced in this case by the high phytoplankton biomass in gelatinous colonies, which appeared to be settling in the water column on the shelf prior to the transport event.

  16. Zooplankton data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in Arabian Sea; 18 September 1994 to 27 December 1995 (NODC Accession 9800077)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using zooplankton net casts in Arabian Sea from THOMAS G. THOMPSON. Data were collected from 18 September 1994 to 27 December 1995 by...

  17. Secondary production and zooplankton abundance in the coastal waters from Vengurla to Malpe, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.

    Secondary production and zooplankton abundance in surface and vertical hauls at different stations along 7 transects from Vengurla to Malpe, Maharashtra, India were studied. Zooplankton production varied with the depth of sampling station and type...

  18. Zooplankton standing and diversity in the Gulf of Kachchh with special reference to larvae of decapoda and pisces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paulinose, V.T.; Devi, C.B.L.; Nair, V.R.; Ramaiah, Neelam; Gajbhiye, S.N.

    Zooplankton characteristics of the Gulf of Kachchh including the major creek systems of Nakti, Kandla and Hansthal were studied for monsoon, postmonsoon and pre- monsoon periods. Zooplankton collections were made at 7 locations. The area was very...

  19. Data collected in the Southern California Bight in order to understand the coastal waters ecological systems, 1977 - 1999 (NODC Accession 0001162)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemistry, fish species, atmospheric pollutants, and temperature profile were collected using CTD casts and other collection methods in the Southern California Bight...

  20. Mechanisms underlying recovery of zooplankton in Lake Orta after liming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Piscia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to improve the understanding of the large-scale mechanisms underlying the recovery of the zooplankton of Lake Orta from historical contamination, following reduced input of ammonia and metals and the subsequent 1989/90 liming intervention. The industrial pollution had been severe and long-lasting (1929-1990. Zooplankton biodiversity has improved, but most of the new taxa appearing in our counts are rotifers, while many calanoids and the large cladoceran predators (Bythotrephes and Leptodora that are common in the nearby Lake Maggiore, were still absent from Lake Orta 17 years after liming. To aid understanding of the large-scale mechanisms controlling changes in annual richness, we assessed the annual persistence (P of Crustacea and Rotifera taxa as an estimator of whether propagules that survived introduction, as result of the natural recolonization process, also thrived. We found that the rate of introduction of zooplankton colonists and their persistence in the water column of Lake Orta changed from 1971 to 2007. New rotifer taxa appeared in the lake after the mid-1980s, when discharge of toxic substances decreased, but their annual persistence was low (P<0.5 until the turn of the century. The numerical values of rotifer and crustacean persistence in Lake Orta were unexpectedly high in 2001 and 2007 (0.55 and 0.72 for rotifers, 0.85 and 0.86 for crustacean, respectively, much higher than in limed lakes in Sudbury, Canada, and in adjacent Lake Maggiore. We hypothesize this could be related to the lack of Cladoceran predators and zooplanktivorous fish in the pelagic waters of Lake Orta.

  1. a Three-Dimensional Acoustical Imaging System for Zooplankton Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGehee, Duncan Ewell

    This dissertation describes the design, testing, and use of a three-dimensional acoustical imaging system, called Fish TV, or FTV, for tracking zooplankton swimming in situ. There is an increasing recognition that three -dimensional tracks of individual plankters are needed for some studies in behavioral ecology including, for example, the role of individual behavior in patch formation and maintenance. Fish TV was developed in part to provide a means of examining zooplankton swimming behavior in a non-invasive way. The system works by forming a set of 64 acoustic beams in an 8 by 8 pattern, each beam 2 ^circ by 2^circ , for a total coverage of 16^circ by 16^circ. The 8 by 8 beams form two dimensions of the image; range provides the third dimension. The system described in the thesis produces three-dimensional images at the rate of approximately one per second. A set of laboratory and field experiments is described that demonstrates the capabilities of the system. The final field experiment was the in situ observation of zooplankton swimming behavior at a site in the San Diego Trough, 15 nautical miles southwest of San Diego. 314 plankters were tracked for one minute. It was observed that there was no connection between the acoustic size of the animals and their repertoire of swimming behaviors. Other contributions of the dissertation include the development of two novel methods for generating acoustic beams with low side lobes. The first is the method of dense random arrays. The second is the optimum mean square quantized aperture method. Both methods were developed originally as ways to "build a better beam pattern" for Fish TV, but also have general significance with respect to aperture theory.

  2. Zooplankton Gut Passage Mobilizes Lithogenic Iron for Ocean Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Katrin; Schlosser, Christian; Atkinson, Angus; Fielding, Sophie; Venables, Hugh J; Waluda, Claire M; Achterberg, Eric P

    2016-10-10

    Iron is an essential nutrient for phytoplankton, but low concentrations limit primary production and associated atmospheric carbon drawdown in large parts of the world's oceans [1, 2]. Lithogenic particles deriving from aeolian dust deposition, glacial runoff, or river discharges can form an important source if the attached iron becomes dissolved and therefore bioavailable [3-5]. Acidic digestion by zooplankton is a potential mechanism for iron mobilization [6], but evidence is lacking. Here we show that Antarctic krill sampled near glacial outlets at the island of South Georgia (Southern Ocean) ingest large amounts of lithogenic particles and contain 3-fold higher iron concentrations in their muscle than specimens from offshore, which confirms mineral dissolution in their guts. About 90% of the lithogenic and biogenic iron ingested by krill is passed into their fecal pellets, which contain ∼5-fold higher proportions of labile (reactive) iron than intact diatoms. The mobilized iron can be released in dissolved form directly from krill or via multiple pathways involving microbes, other zooplankton, and krill predators. This can deliver substantial amounts of bioavailable iron and contribute to the fertilization of coastal waters and the ocean beyond. In line with our findings, phytoplankton blooms downstream of South Georgia are more intensive and longer lasting during years with high krill abundance on-shelf. Thus, krill crop phytoplankton but boost new production via their nutrient supply. Understanding and quantifying iron mobilization by zooplankton is essential to predict ocean productivity in a warming climate where lithogenic iron inputs from deserts, glaciers, and rivers are increasing [7-10]. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Zooplankton standing stock and composition in coastal waters of Goa, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.

    Temporal and spatial variability in standing stock and zooplankton composition at 5 stations along the Goa Coast, India during 1975-76 were studied. Standing stock values ranged from 22.81 to 53.65 mg C.m/3. Zooplankton community was diverse...

  4. Zooplankton standing stock, community structure and diversity in the northern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.; Srivastava, Y.

    The effects of large scale oil spill, which occurred during the Gulf War in 1991 on zooplankton standing stock, community structure and diversity in the northern Arabian Sea were studied. Surface (1-0 m) and vertical zooplankton hauls (200-0 m, 250...

  5. A new sensitive tracer for the determination of zooplankton grazing activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwint, R.L J; Kramer, K.J M

    A new tracer compound is presented for determining zooplankton grazing activity. The gut content in zooplankton is measured as beta-dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP), which can be measured even in individual copepods. Species specific DMSP/Chl-a ratios allow applications in, for example, prey

  6. Swimming in turbulence: zooplankton fitness in terms of foraging efficiency and predation risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre; Mariani, Patrizio; Pigolotti, Simone

    2009-01-01

    Turbulence impacts zooplankton fitness in opposing manners, by increasing contacts with prey but at the same time increasing contacts with predators. We investigate the fitness of individual zooplankton in terms of a trade-off between energetic gains and costs, and risk of predation. Through...

  7. Distribution of toxic metals, Hg, Cd and Pb in zooplankton along the Indian coasts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sengupta, R.; Kureishy, T.W.

    Distribution of toxic metals such as Hg, Cd and Pb in zooplankton is assessed with a view to correlate it with the prevalent environmental conditions along the Indian coast. While Hg could not be detected in zooplankton the concentrations of Cd...

  8. PCR-Based Assessment of Freshwater Zooplankton Feeding on Edible and "Inedible" Prey In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejstgaard, J. C.; Belyaeva, M.; Van den Wyngaert, S.; Berger, S. A.; Grossart, H. P.; Kasprzak, P.

    2016-02-01

    Microbiota in pelagic ecosystems can affect zooplankton nutrition in several ways that are not readily assessable in situ, using classical approaches. In contrast to classical food web models identifying phytoplankton as the dominant food source for crustacean zooplankton, recent findings increasingly suggest that zooplankton may derive a significant part of the diet from a wide variety of taxa including ciliates, aquatic fungi, bacteria and small metazoan zooplankton (e.g. rotifers), in both marine and freshwaters. Direct quantification of soft-bodied and non-pigmented prey in zooplankton guts as well as symbionts and parasites on the prey and zooplankton itself has so far been impeded by the lack of appropriate methodology. We aim to establish molecular approaches to quantify these yet-understudied interactions in lake food webs. As a first step we have validated the qPCR detection method in laboratory experiments with cladoceran, calanoid and cyclopoid predators and algal prey species (Cryptomonas sp.). We plan to apply the method to study the dietary contribution of aquatic fungi - chytrids, which are parasites on inedible phytoplankton species, thus aiming to provide insights into the Mycoloop - energy transfer from inedible phytoplankton to zooplankton via fungal parasites. The quantitative PCR method, when validated for key zooplankton species and specific prey or parasite groups, has a potential for a broad range of applications in food web research.

  9. PHYTOPLANKTON AND ZOOPLANKTON SEASONAL DYNAMICS IN A SUBTROPICAL ESTUARY: IMPORTANCE OF CYANOBACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, Michael C. and Emile M. Lores. 2004. Phytoplankton and Zooplankton Seasonal Dynamics in a Subtropical Estuary: Importance of Cyanobacteria. J. Plankton Res. 26(3):371-382. (ERL,GB 1190). A seasonal study of phytoplankton and zooplankton was conducted from 1999-20...

  10. effect of lead on zooplankton dynamics in challawa river, kano state

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2008-12-01

    Dec 1, 2008 ... Likewise, the low zooplankton diversity and density in this river could largely be attributed to its poor physico- chemical status that had detrimental effect on them especially at the industrial effluent inflow site. Key words: Challawa River, lead, zooplankton dynamics, pollution, Kano-Nigeria. INTRODUCTION.

  11. Comparative account on zooplankton in polluted and unpolluted estuaries of Gujarat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, B.N.; Gajbhiye, S.N.; JiyalalRam, M.J.; Nair, V.R.

    . The extent of variability in the distribution of zooplankton was in accordance with the intensity of pollution. In the unpolluted estuary zooplankton biomass varied from 1.8 to 10.06 ml/100 m@u3@@ and mean secondary production amounted to 80 mg C/100 m@u3...

  12. Changing climate cues differentially alter zooplankton dormancy dynamics across latitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Natalie T; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    In seasonal climates, dormancy is a common strategy that structures biodiversity and is necessary for the persistence of many species. Climate change will likely alter dormancy dynamics in zooplankton, the basis of aquatic food webs, by altering two important hatching cues: mean temperatures during the ice-free season, and mean day length when lakes become ice free. Theory suggests that these changes could alter diversity, hatchling abundances and phenology within lakes, and that these responses may diverge across latitudes due to differences in optimal hatching cues and strategies. To examine the role of temperature and day length on hatching dynamics, we collected sediment from 25 lakes across a 1800 km latitudinal gradient and exposed sediment samples to a factorial combination of two photoperiods (12 and 16 h) and two temperatures (8 and 12 °C) representative of historical southern (short photoperiod, warm) and northern (long photoperiod, cool) lake conditions. We tested whether sensitivity to these hatching cues varies by latitudinal origin and differs among taxa. Higher temperatures advanced phenology for all taxa, and these advances were greatest for cladocerans followed by copepods and rotifers. Although phenology differed among taxa, the effect of temperature did not vary with latitude. The latitudinal origin of the egg bank influenced egg abundance and hatchling abundance and diversity, with these latter effects varying with taxa, temperature and photoperiod. Copepod hatchling abundances peaked at mid-latitudes in the high temperature and long photoperiod treatments, whereas hatchling abundances of other zooplankton were greatest at low latitudes and high temperature. The overall diversity of crustacean zooplankton (copepods and cladocerans) also reflected distinct responses of each taxa to our treatments, with the greatest diversity occurring at mid-latitudes (~56 °N) in the shorter photoperiod treatment. Our results demonstrate that hatching cues

  13. Micro-zooplankton and its abundance relative to the larger zooplankton and other seston components, 08 February 1967 to 27 February 1967 (NODC Accession 0000916)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Micro-zooplankton populations in the upper 100 m were sampled from 5 marine environments in the northeast Pacific Ocean extending from slope waters off San Diego to...

  14. Zooplankton community analysis in the Changjiang River estuary by single-gene-targeted metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fangping; Wang, Minxiao; Li, Chaolun; Sun, Song

    2014-07-01

    DNA barcoding provides accurate identification of zooplankton species through all life stages. Single-gene-targeted metagenomic analysis based on DNA barcode databases can facilitate longterm monitoring of zooplankton communities. With the help of the available zooplankton databases, the zooplankton community of the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary was studied using a single-gene-targeted metagenomic method to estimate the species richness of this community. A total of 856 mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene sequences were determined. The environmental barcodes were clustered into 70 molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs). Forty-two MOTUs matched barcoded marine organisms with more than 90% similarity and were assigned to either the species (similarity>96%) or genus level (similaritymetagenomic analysis is a useful tool for zooplankton studies, with which specimens from all life history stages can be identified quickly and effectively with a comprehensive database.

  15. The effect of salinity levels on the structure of zooplankton communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paturej Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the qualitative and quantitative structure of zooplankton communities in the Vistula Lagoon and to establish whether zooplankton abundance and biodiversity are affected by salinity levels. Samples for biological analyses were collected in the summer (June-September of 2007-2011 at eleven sampling sites. Statistical analysis revealed a significant correlation between salinity levels and the number of species (r= -0.2020, abundance (r= 0.1967 and biomass (r= 0.3139 of zooplankton. No significant correlations were found between salinity and the biodiversity of zooplankton. The results of the study suggest that salinity affects the abundance and structure, but not the diversity of zooplankton communities in the Vistula Lagoon.

  16. Age and residence time of terrestrial source water in the northwest Atlantic shelf seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, R.; Todd, A. C.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal river mouths and bays are the junctions where terrestrial-source water meets and mixes with water from the open ocean. Once the riverine water reaches the coastal ocean, its eventual fate is largely unknown and difficult to trace. Rivers that flow into the ocean may contain high levels of nutrients and organic matter, so understanding the fate of terrestrial source water is important for a variety of biogeochemical processes that occur in the shelf seas. The fate of this terrestrial source water may be described in terms of its mean age (the time since it reached the ocean) and its residence time (the time it remains on the continental shelf). Using a high-resolution ocean model, we apply the constituent-oriented age and residence time (CART) theory to a large region encompassing the northwest Atlantic shelf seas to calculate the mean age of terrestrial source water and its residence time. For this application, 196 river mouths are used as sources of terrestrial water from South America to Nova Scotia. We investigate the spatial and seasonal variability of the water's mean age and compute the residence time within four different shelf regions: the Carribean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico, the South Atlantic Bight, and the Mid-Atlantic Bight/Gulf of Maine. From the estimates of mean age and residence time, we describe the impact of the coastal circulation on the eventual fate of terrestrial waters, and provide conjecture on how varying transport time scales may affect the general biogeochemical processes in the coastal ocean.

  17. Atlantic Coastal Experiment III: R/V KNORR cruise 68, 4-30 August 1977; FRV ALBATROSS IV cruise 77-07, 1-4, 16-31 August 1977. Data report, volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judkins, D.C.; von Bock, K.

    1983-03-01

    Data are reported from KNORR cruise 68, the major investigation of the third Atlantic Coastal Experiment (ACE), conducted during a period of pro-nounced water-column stratification. One hundred fifty-five stations, including 6 time-series sitings, were occupied within the shelf and shelf- break regimes of New York Bight. Measurements were made to assess water-mass characterization, nutrient cycling, carbon/nitrogen assimilation, bio-mass distribution and diel dynamics and benthic/water-column interfacial exchange. Data are also included from the cruise of ALBATROSS IV carried out contemporaneously with the KNORR investigations, in an area ranging from Nantucket Shoals to the upper reaches of the Gulf of Maine. 20 hydrographic stations were used to augment underway mapping in order to elucidate surface-layer chlorophyll and nutrient distributions occurring at an impor-tant boundary of the New York Bight.

  18. Analyzing the effects of four submerged macrophytes with two contrasting architectures on zooplankton: A mesocosm experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zeng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Increases in the structural complexity of submerged macrophytes are often shown to be linked to higher invertebrate abundance and diversity, but a number of studies have demonstrated, however, that this is not always the case. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of four macrophyte species with two contrasting architectures (simple architecture with broad leaves: Vallisneria spiralis L. and Potamogeton malaianus Miq. and complex architecture with finely dissected leaves: Ceratophyllum demersum L. and Myriophyllum verticillatum L. on zooplanktons. We hypothesized that structurally more complex macrophytes would support more zooplanktons and higher diversity, species richness, abundance and biomass, and to test our hypotheses, zooplankton samples within the above-mentioned macrophytes were collected to analyze the variances at different times. Contrary to our expectations, we found that the zooplankton’ responses were independent to the macrophyte architecture. Specially, although finely dissected M. verticillatum could significantly increase total zooplanktons, diversity, species richness, rotifers and cladocerans than the other three macrophytes, the effects of finely dissected C. demersum on these parameters exhibited no significant differences compared to two broad leaved macrophytes (V. spiralis and P. malaianus. Moreover, broad leaved macrophytes even increased more abundance zooplanktons than finely dissected C. demersum. In addition, the effects of macrophytes on zooplanktons also varied with zooplankton species. For example, the four tested macrophytes could significantly increase cladoceran abundance and biomass. Yet for copepods, the density was significantly increased in presence of V. spiralis and C. demersum, but P. malaianus and M. verticillatum did not show significant effects on copepod density. Moreover, all the tested macrophytes except for V. spiralis even significantly suppress copepod biomass. Therefore

  19. OSL dating of mixed coastal sediment (Sylt, German Bight, North Sea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Tony; Lindhorst, Sebastian; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2012-01-01

    and 10–40% for single-grains.We show that the burial ages of the contaminated swash-bar samples resulting from the maximum age populations from equivalent dose distributions measured using small aliquots are consistent with the stratigraphy and with ages obtained from uncontaminated samples. © 2012......As part of a study on coastal sedimentary processes this paper presents the OSL dating of mixed coastal sediment samples from the southern North Sea island of Sylt (German Bight). During coring of the swash-bar (beach) sediments, five samples were presumably contaminated by younger overwash...... and aeolian sediments because of the sampling method employed. To obtain reliable burial ages for these swash-bar sediments, single-grain and small aliquot measurements were used together with the Finite Mixture Model (FMM) proposed by Roberts et al. (2000) to identify the grain population containing...

  20. Cephalopods and cetaceans as indicators of offshore bioavailability of cadmium off Central South Brazil Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorneles, Paulo Renato [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil) and Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: dorneles@biof.ufrj.br; Lailson-Brito, Jose [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil) and Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: lailson@uerj.br; Aguiar dos Santos, Roberta [Centro de Pesquisa e Gestao de Recursos Pesqueiros do Litoral Sudeste e Sul, IBAMA, 88301-700 Itajai, SC (Brazil)]. E-mail: gibteuthis@yahoo.com.br; Silva da Costa, Paulo Alberto [Laboratorio de Dinamica de Populacoes Marinhas, UNIRIO, 22290-240 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: pauloascosta@uol.com.br; Malm, Olaf [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: olaf@biof.ufrj.br; Azevedo, Alexandre Freitas [Laboratorio de Mamiferos Aquaticos, Dept. Oceanografia, UERJ, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: azevedo.alex@uol.com.br; Machado Torres, Joao Paulo [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos Eduardo Penna Franca, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), 21941-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: jptorres@biof.ufrj.br

    2007-07-15

    Regarding Brazilian coast, industrial and urban developments are concentrated along Central South Brazil Bight. Samples from inshore and offshore species from the concerned area were analyzed, comprising 24 cetaceans (9 species) and 32 squids (2 species). Cadmium was determined by GFAAS and our results were in agreement with certified values (DOLT-2, NRCC). Mean cadmium concentration (in {mu}g/g, wet weight) observed in the digestive gland of sexually mature Argentine short-finned squids (Illex argentinus) was 1002.9. To our knowledge this is the highest cadmium level ever reported for a cephalopod. Concerning cetaceans, our results include one of the highest renal cadmium concentrations described for striped dolphins (71.29 {mu}g/g, wet weight). Anthropogenic action, upwelling and cannibalism of Argentine short-finned squid on the studied area are possible reasons for such remarkable cadmium concentrations. - Cd levels in ommastrephid squids from Brazil are the highest ever reported for cephalopods.

  1. Occurrence and distribution of triclosan in the German Bight (North Sea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Zhiyong [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Max-Planck Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Institute of Ecology and Environmental Chemistry, University of Lueneburg, Scharnhorststrasse 1, D-21335 Lueneburg (Germany)], E-mail: zhiyong.xie@gkss.de; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Floeser, Goetz; Caba, Armando [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht, Institute for Coastal Research, Max-Planck Strasse 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Ruck, Wolfgang [Institute of Ecology and Environmental Chemistry, University of Lueneburg, Scharnhorststrasse 1, D-21335 Lueneburg (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    The potential of triclosan (TCS) acting as an endocrine disruptor has led to growing concern about the presence of TCS in the environment. In this study, seawater samples were collected from the German Bight during sampling campaigns conducted with the German research ships Gauss and Ludwig Prandtl. TCS was determined both in the dissolved phase and in the suspended particulate matters with concentrations ranging 0.8-6870 pg L{sup -1} and <1-95 pg L{sup -1}, respectively. High concentrations of TCS were present in the estuaries of the Elbe and the Weser, indicating significant input of TCS by the river discharge. The correlation coefficient (R{sup 2}) between the dissolved concentration and salinity was 0.79 for the data obtained from the Gauss cruise, showing an obvious declining trend from the coast to the open sea. - Investigation with coastal survey reveals distribution of triclosan in marine waters.

  2. Sources of sediment to the coastal waters of the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, J.A.; Farnsworth, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    The sources of sediment to the Southern California Bight were investigated with new calculations and published records of sediment fluxes, both natural and anthropogenic. We find that rivers are by far the largest source of sediment, producing over 10 ?? 106 t/yr on average, or over 80% of the sediment input to the Bight. This river flux is variable, however, over both space and time. The rivers draining the Transverse Ranges produce sediment at rates approximately an order of magnitude greater than the Peninsular Ranges (600-1500 t/km2/yr versus rivers represent only 23% of the total Southern California watershed drainage area, they are responsible for over 75% of the total sediment flux. River sediment flux is ephemeral and highly pulsed due to the semiarid climate and the influence of infrequent large storms. For more than 90% of the time, negligible amounts of sediment are discharged from the region's rivers, and over half of the post-1900 sediment load has been discharged during events with recurrence intervals greater than 10 yr. These rare, yet important, events are related to the El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and the majority of sediment flux occurs during ENSO periods. Temporal trends in sediment discharge due to land-use changes and river damming are also observed. We estimate that there has been a 45% reduction in suspended-sediment flux due to the construction of dams. However, pre-dam sediment loads were likely artificially high due to the massive land-use changes of coastal California to rangeland during the nineteenth century. This increase in sediment production is observed in estuarine deposits throughout coastal California, which reveal that sedimentation rates were two to ten times higher during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries than during pre-European colonization. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  3. Synchronous dynamics of zooplankton competitors prevail in temperate lake ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, David A.; Fox, Jeremy W.; Gonzalez, Andrew; Adrian, Rita; Beisner, Beatrix E.; Helmus, Matthew R.; Johnson, Catherine; Kratina, Pavel; Kremer, Colin; de Mazancourt, Claire; Miller, Elizabeth; Nelson, William A.; Paterson, Michael; Rusak, James A.; Shurin, Jonathan B.; Steiner, Christopher F.

    2014-01-01

    Although competing species are expected to exhibit compensatory dynamics (negative temporal covariation), empirical work has demonstrated that competitive communities often exhibit synchronous dynamics (positive temporal covariation). This has led to the suggestion that environmental forcing dominates species dynamics; however, synchronous and compensatory dynamics may appear at different length scales and/or at different times, making it challenging to identify their relative importance. We compiled 58 long-term datasets of zooplankton abundance in north-temperate and sub-tropical lakes and used wavelet analysis to quantify general patterns in the times and scales at which synchronous/compensatory dynamics dominated zooplankton communities in different regions and across the entire dataset. Synchronous dynamics were far more prevalent at all scales and times and were ubiquitous at the annual scale. Although we found compensatory dynamics in approximately 14% of all combinations of time period/scale/lake, there were no consistent scales or time periods during which compensatory dynamics were apparent across different regions. Our results suggest that the processes driving compensatory dynamics may be local in their extent, while those generating synchronous dynamics operate at much larger scales. This highlights an important gap in our understanding of the interaction between environmental and biotic forces that structure communities. PMID:24966312

  4. 2005 Atlantic Hurricanes Poster

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2005 Atlantic Hurricanes poster features high quality satellite images of 15 hurricanes which formed in the Atlantic Basin (includes Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean...

  5. South Atlantic Shrimp System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SEFSC, in cooperation with the South Atlantic states, collects South Atlantic shrimp data from dealers and fishermen. These data are collected to provide catch,...

  6. Zooplankton structure and vertical migration: Using acoustics and biomass to compare stratified and mixed fjord systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Astudillo, Macarena; Cáceres, Mario A.; Landaeta, Mauricio F.

    2017-09-01

    The patterns of abundance, composition, biomass and vertical migration of zooplankton in short-time scales (ADCP device mounted on the hull of a ship were used to obtain vertical profiles of current velocity data and intensity of the backscattered acoustic signal, which was used to study the migratory strategies and to relate the echo intensity with zooplankton biomass. Repeated vertical profiles of temperature, salinity and density were obtained with a CTD instrument to describe the density patterns during both experiments. Zooplankton were sampled every 3 h using a Bongo net to determine abundance, composition and biomass. Migrations were diel in the stratified station, semi-diel in the mixed station, and controlled by light in both locations, with large and significant differences in zooplankton abundance and biomass between day and night samples. No migration pattern associated with the effect of tides was found. The depth of maximum backscatter strength showed differences of approximately 30 m between stations and was deeper in the mixed station. The relation between mean volume backscattering strength (dB) computed from echo intensity and log10 of total dry weight (mg m-3) of zooplankton biomass was moderate but significant in both locations. Biomass estimated from biological samples was higher in the mixed station and determined by euphausiids. Copepods were the most abundant group in both stations. Acoustic methods were a useful technique to understand the detailed patterns of migratory strategies of zooplankton and to help estimate zooplankton biomass and abundance in the inner waters of southern Chile.

  7. Struktur Komunitas Zooplankton di Bendungan Telaga Tunjung, Kabupaten Tabanan-Bali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Wayan Desy Wahyudiati

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Zooplankton are the heterotroph aquatic organisms and has a week swimming. Zooplankton acts as the first consumer in the waters, which utilize phytoplankton as their food. This research located in Telaga Tunjung reservoir, Timpag Village, Kerambitan Subdistrict, Tabanan Regency. The reservoir is used for industry, irrigation and tourism development. The aim of the research was to determine the community structure of zooplankton in Telaga Tunjung reservoir. This research was conducted from January to February 2016. Water sampling was conducted twice with a sampling interval of 2 weeks in 4 stations. There was a total of 23 species of zooplankton found, consisting of 6 classes: Eurotatoria (8 genera, Ciliatea (1 genera, Branchiopoda (4 genera, Monogononta (1 genera, Tubulinea (1 genera and Maxillopoda (3 genera. The most common species of zooplankton found in the sampling station were Polyarthra vulgaris (3.04 ind/l, Anuraeopsis coelata (1.28 ind/l, Keratella valga (0.43 ind/l, Vorticella sp. (0.49 ind/l, Diaphanosoma brachyurum (0.28 ind/l, Nauplius sp. (0.16 ind/l and Megacyclops viridis (1.16 ind/l. The average abundance of zooplankton was 9.38 ind/l. Based on the abundance of zooplankton, the trophic status of Telaga Tunjung reservoir is mesotrophic.

  8. Zooplankton in Ancient and Oligotrophic Lake Ohrid (Europe in Association with Environmental Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasevska Orhideja

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Zooplankton is studied in the ancient, tectonic, oligomictic and oligotrophic Lake Ohrid (Macedonia, South Eastern Europe. The main aim of this study was to assess the seasonal and spatial patterns of the zooplankton functional feeding guilds in relation to the environmental conditions. Metalimnion of the lake was detected as the most productive environment, where biomass of the phytoplankton and abundance of the zooplankton reached their maxima. Pelagial zooplankton of low abundance (25 ± 22 ind. L−1 consisted of 16 species including two endemic copepods, Arctodiaptomus steindachneri (Richard, 1897 and Cyclops ochridanus (Kiefer, 1932. Copepods obtained remarkable share (60% in the zooplankton assemblage. Microphagous zooplankton was mainly comprised of the most abundant rotifer Kellicottia longispina (Kellicott, 1879 in summer, and copepod nauplii during the spring Eudiaptomus gracilis (Sars, 1862 and C.ochridanus, and autumn C.ochridanus. Due to their requirements for the bacterio-detritus suspension, this microphagous zooplankton occupied aphotic hypolimnion during the entire study period. Raptorials were typically represented by copepodites and adult copepods in the metalimnion, and were significantly and positively affected by temperature (r = 0.417, p = 0.001, dissolved oxygen (r = 0.463, p = 0.0001 and, particularly, phytoplankton biomass (r = 0.708, p < 0.00001. This is the first study in which the link between the lower and higher trophic levels is investigated in Lake Ohrid.

  9. Enhanced Primary Production, and Altered Biogeochemical Patterns in the German Bight in Response to the Extreme June 2013 Elbe Flood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voynova, Y. G.; Petersen, W.; Brix, H.

    2016-02-01

    Due to a number of well documented and unusual atmospheric conditions, the late-spring of 2013 in Central and Eastern Europe was colder and wetter than usual, with saturated soils and higher than average cumulative precipitation. Additional precipitation at the end of May, and beginning of June 2013, caused widespread floods within the Danube and Elbe Rivers, and billions of euros in damages. Within the Elbe watershed, the discharge generated under these conditions was the largest among all summer floods and the second largest on record over the last 140 years (based on daily discharges). The high-frequency monitoring network of the Coastal Observing System for Northern and Arctic Seas (COSYNA) captured the influence of this major freshwater influx on the German Bight. Data from an Elbe Estuary (Cuxhaven) monitoring station, and from a FerryBox aboard a ferry travelling between Büsum and Helgoland, documented the salinity changes in the German Bight, which persisted for a month after the peak river discharge. The flood generated a large influx of dissolved and particulate organic carbon, associated with the freshwater plume, while surface dissolved oxygen between Büsum and Helgoland became undersaturated (not typical for the summer). The Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency (BSH) also reported unusually high nutrient concentrations in the German Bight caused by the flood. These conditions subsequently generated a month-long chlorophyll bloom, prolonged dissolved oxygen supersaturation, and higher than usual surface water pH within the German Bight. In the context of predicted increase in frequency of extreme discharge events due to climate change, the June 2013 flood-related biogeochemical changes could become more ubiquitous in the future, and should be considered in management and modeling efforts.

  10. Stable isotope and signature fatty acid analyses suggest reef manta rays feed on demersal zooplankton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydie I E Couturier

    Full Text Available Assessing the trophic role and interaction of an animal is key to understanding its general ecology and dynamics. Conventional techniques used to elucidate diet, such as stomach content analysis, are not suitable for large threatened marine species. Non-lethal sampling combined with biochemical methods provides a practical alternative for investigating the feeding ecology of these species. Stable isotope and signature fatty acid analyses of muscle tissue were used for the first time to examine assimilated diet of the reef manta ray Manta alfredi, and were compared with different zooplankton functional groups (i.e. near-surface zooplankton collected during manta ray feeding events and non-feeding periods, epipelagic zooplankton, demersal zooplankton and several different zooplankton taxa. Stable isotope δ(15N values confirmed that the reef manta ray is a secondary consumer. This species had relatively high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA indicating a flagellate-based food source in the diet, which likely reflects feeding on DHA-rich near-surface and epipelagic zooplankton. However, high levels of ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and slightly enriched δ(13C values in reef manta ray tissue suggest that they do not feed solely on pelagic zooplankton, but rather obtain part of their diet from another origin. The closest match was with demersal zooplankton, suggesting it is an important component of the reef manta ray diet. The ability to feed on demersal zooplankton is likely linked to the horizontal and vertical movement patterns of this giant planktivore. These new insights into the habitat use and feeding ecology of the reef manta ray will assist in the effective evaluation of its conservation needs.

  11. Metabarcoding Reveals Seasonal and Temperature-Dependent Succession of Zooplankton Communities in the Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Casas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Very little is known about the composition and the annual cycle of zooplankton assemblages in the Red Sea, a confined water body characterized by a high biodiversity and endemism but at the same time one of the most understudied areas in the world in terms of marine biodiversity. This high diversity together with the lack of references for several of the groups poses a problem in obtaining basic information on zooplankton seasonal patterns. In the present work, we used high throughput sequencing to examine the temporal and spatial distribution of the zooplankton communities inhabiting the epipelagic zone in the central Red Sea. The analysis of zooplankton assemblages collected at two sites—coastal and offshore—twice a month at several depth strata by using MANTA, Bongo and WP2 nets provides baseline information of the seasonal patterns of the zooplankton community over 1 year. We show that the seasonal fluctuation of zooplankton communities living in the upper 100 m of the water column is driven mainly by the annual changes in seawater temperature. The 18S rRNA gene was used for metabarcoding of zooplankton assemblages revealing 630 metazoan OTUs (97% similarity in five phyla, highlighting the richness of the Red Sea community. During colder months, communities were characterized by lower richness and higher biomass than communities found during the hot season. Throughout the year the zooplankton communities were dominated by the class Maxillopoda, mainly represented by copepods and class Hydrozoa. The rise in the water temperature favors the appearance of classes Malacostraca, Cephalopoda, Gastropoda, and Saggitoidea. The present study provides essential baseline information for future monitoring and improves our knowledge of the marine ecosystem in the Red Sea while reporting the main environmental variable structuring zooplankton assemblages in this region.

  12. Horizontal distribution of Fukushima-derived radiocesium in zooplankton in the northwestern Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kitamura

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude of the 9.0 Tohoku earthquake and the ensuing tsunami on 11 March 2011, inflicted heavy damage on the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FNPP1. Fission products were emitted, falling over a broad range in the Northern Hemisphere, and water contaminated with radionuclides leaked into the ocean. In this study, we described the horizontal distribution of the Fukushima-derived radiocesium in zooplankton and in seawater in the western North Pacific Ocean (500–2100 km from the FNPP1 10 months after the accident. 134Cs and 137Cs were detected in zooplankton and seawater from all the stations. Because of its short half-life, the 134Cs detected in our samples could only be derived from the FNPP1 accident. The highest 137Cs activity in zooplankton was the same order of magnitude as it was one month after the accident, and average activity was one or two orders of magnitude higher than 137Cs activities observed before the accident around Japan. Horizontally, the radiocesium activity concentrations in zooplankton were high at around 25° N while those in surface seawater were high at around the transition area between the Kuroshio and the Oyashio currents (36–40° N. We observed subsurface radiocesium maxima in density range of the North Pacific Subtropical Mode Water and the occurrence of many diel vertical migratory zooplankton. These suggested that the high activity concentrations in the subtropical zooplankton at around 25° N were connected to the subsurface radiocesium and active vertical migration of zooplankton. However, the high activity concentrations of radiocesium in subsurface seawater did not necessarily correlate with the higher radiocesium activity in zooplankton. Activity concentrations of radiocesium in zooplankton might be influenced not only by the environmental radiocesium activity concentrations but also by other factors, which are still unknown.

  13. Metabarcoding Reveals Seasonal and Temperature-Dependent Succession of Zooplankton Communities in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Casas, Laura

    2017-08-02

    Very little is known about the composition and the annual cycle of zooplankton assemblages in the Red Sea, a confined water body characterized by a high biodiversity and endemism but at the same time one of the most understudied areas in the world in terms of marine biodiversity. This high diversity together with the lack of references for several of the groups poses a problem in obtaining basic information on zooplankton seasonal patterns. In the present work, we used high throughput sequencing to examine the temporal and spatial distribution of the zooplankton communities inhabiting the epipelagic zone in the central Red Sea. The analysis of zooplankton assemblages collected at two sites—coastal and offshore—twice a month at several depth strata by using MANTA, Bongo and WP2 nets provides baseline information of the seasonal patterns of the zooplankton community over 1 year. We show that the seasonal fluctuation of zooplankton communities living in the upper 100 m of the water column is driven mainly by the annual changes in seawater temperature. The 18S rRNA gene was used for metabarcoding of zooplankton assemblages revealing 630 metazoan OTUs (97% similarity) in five phyla, highlighting the richness of the Red Sea community. During colder months, communities were characterized by lower richness and higher biomass than communities found during the hot season. Throughout the year the zooplankton communities were dominated by the class Maxillopoda, mainly represented by copepods and class Hydrozoa. The rise in the water temperature favors the appearance of classes Malacostraca, Cephalopoda, Gastropoda, and Saggitoidea. The present study provides essential baseline information for future monitoring and improves our knowledge of the marine ecosystem in the Red Sea while reporting the main environmental variable structuring zooplankton assemblages in this region.

  14. Dispersal routes and habitat utilization of juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, tracked with mini PSAT and archival tags.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Galuardi

    Full Text Available Between 2005 and 2009, we deployed 58 miniature pop-up satellite archival tags (PSAT and 132 implanted archival tags on juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna (age 2-5 in the northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data returned from these efforts (n = 26 PSATs, 1 archival tag revealed their dispersal routes, horizontal and vertical movements and habitat utilization. All of the tagged bluefin tuna remained in the northwest Atlantic for the duration observed, and in summer months exhibited core-use of coastal seas extending from Maryland to Cape Cod, MA, (USA out to the shelf break. Their winter distributions were more spatially disaggregated, ranging south to the South Atlantic Bight, northern Bahamas and Gulf Stream. Vertical habitat patterns showed that juvenile bluefin tuna mainly occupied shallow depths (mean= 5-12 m, sd = 15-23.7 m and relatively warm water masses in summer (mean= 17.9-20.9°C, sd= 4.2-2.6°C and had deeper and more variable depth patterns in winter (mean= 41-58 m, sd= 48.9-62.2 m. Our tagging results reveal annual dispersal patterns, behavior and oceanographic associations of juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna that were only surmised in earlier studies. Fishery independent profiling from electronic tagging also provide spatially and temporally explicit information for evaluating dispersals rates, population structure and fisheries catch patterns.

  15. Dispersal routes and habitat utilization of juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, tracked with mini PSAT and archival tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galuardi, Benjamin; Lutcavage, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Between 2005 and 2009, we deployed 58 miniature pop-up satellite archival tags (PSAT) and 132 implanted archival tags on juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna (age 2-5) in the northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data returned from these efforts (n = 26 PSATs, 1 archival tag) revealed their dispersal routes, horizontal and vertical movements and habitat utilization. All of the tagged bluefin tuna remained in the northwest Atlantic for the duration observed, and in summer months exhibited core-use of coastal seas extending from Maryland to Cape Cod, MA, (USA) out to the shelf break. Their winter distributions were more spatially disaggregated, ranging south to the South Atlantic Bight, northern Bahamas and Gulf Stream. Vertical habitat patterns showed that juvenile bluefin tuna mainly occupied shallow depths (mean= 5-12 m, sd = 15-23.7 m) and relatively warm water masses in summer (mean= 17.9-20.9°C, sd= 4.2-2.6°C) and had deeper and more variable depth patterns in winter (mean= 41-58 m, sd= 48.9-62.2 m). Our tagging results reveal annual dispersal patterns, behavior and oceanographic associations of juvenile Atlantic bluefin tuna that were only surmised in earlier studies. Fishery independent profiling from electronic tagging also provide spatially and temporally explicit information for evaluating dispersals rates, population structure and fisheries catch patterns.

  16. Dead zone or oasis in the open ocean? Zooplankton distribution and migration in low-oxygen modewater eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauss, Helena; Christiansen, Svenja; Schütte, Florian; Kiko, Rainer; Edvam Lima, Miryam; Rodrigues, Elizandro; Karstensen, Johannes; Löscher, Carolin R.; Körtzinger, Arne; Fiedler, Björn

    2016-04-01

    The eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) features a mesopelagic oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) at approximately 300-600 m depth. Here, oxygen concentrations rarely fall below 40 µmol O2 kg-1, but are expected to decline under future projections of global warming. The recent discovery of mesoscale eddies that harbour a shallow suboxic (ocean deoxygenation. In spring 2014, a detailed survey of a suboxic anticyclonic modewater eddy (ACME) was carried out near the Cape Verde Ocean Observatory (CVOO), combining acoustic and optical profiling methods with stratified multinet hauls and hydrography. The multinet data revealed that the eddy was characterized by an approximately 1.5-fold increase in total area-integrated zooplankton abundance. At nighttime, when a large proportion of acoustic scatterers is ascending into the upper 150 m, a drastic reduction in mean volume backscattering (Sv) at 75 kHz (shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler, ADCP) within the shallow OMZ of the eddy was evident compared to the nighttime distribution outside the eddy. Acoustic scatterers avoided the depth range between approximately 85 to 120 m, where oxygen concentrations were lower than approximately 20 µmol O2 kg-1, indicating habitat compression to the oxygenated surface layer. This observation is confirmed by time series observations of a moored ADCP (upward looking, 300 kHz) during an ACME transit at the CVOO mooring in 2010. Nevertheless, part of the diurnal vertical migration (DVM) from the surface layer to the mesopelagic continued through the shallow OMZ. Based upon vertically stratified multinet hauls, Underwater Vision Profiler (UVP5) and ADCP data, four strategies followed by zooplankton in response to in response to the eddy OMZ have been identified: (i) shallow OMZ avoidance and compression at the surface (e.g. most calanoid copepods, euphausiids); (ii) migration to the shallow OMZ core during daytime, but paying O2 debt at the surface at nighttime (e.g. siphonophores

  17. Aging of microplastics promotes their ingestion by marine zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroom, Renske J E; Koelmans, Albert A; Besseling, Ellen; Halsband, Claudia

    2017-12-01

    Microplastics (microplastics to test their impacts, while aging processes such as weathering and biofouling alter the characteristics of plastic particles in the marine environment. We investigated zooplankton ingestion of polystyrene beads (15 and 30 μm) and fragments (≤30 μm), and tested the hypothesis that microplastics previously exposed to marine conditions (aged) are ingested at higher rates than pristine microplastics. Polystyrene beads were aged by soaking in natural local seawater for three weeks. Three zooplankton taxa ingested microplastics, excluding the copepod Pseudocalanus spp., but the proportions of individuals ingesting plastic and the number of particles ingested were taxon and life stage specific and dependent on plastic size. All stages of Calanus finmarchicus ingested polystyrene fragments. Aged microbeads were preferred over pristine ones by females of Acartia longiremis as well as juvenile copepodites CV and adults of Calanus finmarchicus. The preference for aged microplastics may be attributed to the formation of a biofilm. Such a coating, made up of natural microbes, may contain similar prey as the copepods feed on in the water column and secrete chemical exudates that aid chemodetection and thus increase the attractiveness of the particles as food items. Much of the ingested plastic was, however, egested within a short time period (2-4 h) and the survival of adult Calanus females was not affected in an 11-day exposure. Negative effects of microplastics ingestion were thus limited. Our findings emphasize, however, that aging plays an important role in the transformation of microplastics at sea and ingestion by grazers, and should thus be considered in future microplastics ingestion studies and estimates of microplastics transfer into the marine food web. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Monitoring shipping emissions in the German Bight using MAX-DOAS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyler, André; Wittrock, Folkard; Kattner, Lisa; Mathieu-Üffing, Barbara; Peters, Enno; Richter, Andreas; Schmolke, Stefan; Burrows, John P.

    2017-09-01

    A 3-year time series of ground-based multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of NO2 and SO2 on the island Neuwerk has been analyzed for contributions from shipping emissions. The island is located in the German Bight, close to the main shipping lane (at a distance of 6-7 km) into the river Elbe towards the harbor of Hamburg. Measurements of individual ship plumes as well as of background pollution are possible from this location. A simple approach using the column amounts of the oxygen molecule dimer or collision complex, O4, for the determination of the horizontal light path length has been applied to retrieve path-averaged volume mixing ratios. An excellent agreement between mixing ratios determined from NO2 retrievals in the UV and visible parts of the spectrum has been found, showing the validity of the approach. Obtained mixing ratios of NO2 and SO2 are compared to co-located in situ measurements showing good correlation on average but also a systematic underestimation by the MAX-DOAS O4 scaling approach. Comparing data before and after the introduction of stricter fuel sulfur content limits (from 1 to 0.1 %) on 1 January 2015 in the North Sea Emission Control Area (ECA), a significant reduction in SO2 levels is observed. For situations with wind from the open North Sea, where ships are the only local source of air pollution, the average mixing ratio of SO2 decreased by a factor of 8, while for NO2 in the whole time series from 2013 to 2016, no significant change in emissions was observed. More than 2000 individual ship emission plumes have been identified in the data and analyzed for the emission ratio of SO2 to NO2, yielding an average ratio of 0.3 for the years 2013/2014 and decreasing significantly, presumably due to lower fuel sulfur content, in 2015/2016. By sorting measurements according to the prevailing wind direction and selecting two angular reference sectors representative for wind from the open North Sea and

  19. Monitoring shipping emissions in the German Bight using MAX-DOAS measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Seyler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year time series of ground-based multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS measurements of NO2 and SO2 on the island Neuwerk has been analyzed for contributions from shipping emissions. The island is located in the German Bight, close to the main shipping lane (at a distance of 6–7 km into the river Elbe towards the harbor of Hamburg. Measurements of individual ship plumes as well as of background pollution are possible from this location. A simple approach using the column amounts of the oxygen molecule dimer or collision complex, O4, for the determination of the horizontal light path length has been applied to retrieve path-averaged volume mixing ratios. An excellent agreement between mixing ratios determined from NO2 retrievals in the UV and visible parts of the spectrum has been found, showing the validity of the approach. Obtained mixing ratios of NO2 and SO2 are compared to co-located in situ measurements showing good correlation on average but also a systematic underestimation by the MAX-DOAS O4 scaling approach. Comparing data before and after the introduction of stricter fuel sulfur content limits (from 1 to 0.1 % on 1 January 2015 in the North Sea Emission Control Area (ECA, a significant reduction in SO2 levels is observed. For situations with wind from the open North Sea, where ships are the only local source of air pollution, the average mixing ratio of SO2 decreased by a factor of 8, while for NO2 in the whole time series from 2013 to 2016, no significant change in emissions was observed. More than 2000 individual ship emission plumes have been identified in the data and analyzed for the emission ratio of SO2 to NO2, yielding an average ratio of 0.3 for the years 2013/2014 and decreasing significantly, presumably due to lower fuel sulfur content, in 2015/2016. By sorting measurements according to the prevailing wind direction and selecting two angular reference sectors representative for wind

  20. Development and validation of hydroacoustic monitoring concepts for the coastal German Bight (SE North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielck, Finn; Hass, H. Christian; Holler, Peter; Bartholomä, Alexander; Neumann, Andreas; Kröncke, Ingrid; Reimers, Hans-Christian; Capperucci, Ruggero

    2016-04-01

    The joint research project WIMO (Wissenschaftliche Monitoringkonzepte für die Deutsche Bucht/Scientific Monitoring Concepts for the German Bight, NE North Sea) aims at providing methods for detection and analysis of seabed habitats using modern remote sensing techniques. Our subproject focuses on hydroacoustic techniques in order to gain information about seafloor environments and sediment dynamics. In a timeframe of four years, several key areas in the German Bight were repeatedly observed using different hydroacoustic gear (i. e. sidescan sonars, single/multibeam echo sounders and sub-bottom profilers). In order to ground-truth the acoustic data, hundreds of grab samples and underwater videos were taken. With these techniques it is possible to distinguish between different seafloor habitats, which range from muddy to sandy seafloors (esp. near the barrier islands) to rugged or vegetated/populated reefs around Helgoland. The conducted monitoring program revealed seasonal changes regarding the abundance of the sand mason worm (Lanice conchilega) and the brittle star (Amphiora filiformis) as well as ongoing sedimentary processes driven by tidal currents and wind/storms. It was also possible to determine relationships between sediment characteristics and benthos in some key areas. An essential part of our project included a comparison between the datasets obtained with different hydroacoustic devices, configurations, and evaluation methods in the same study areas. The investigation reveals that there could be distinct differences in interpreting the data and hence in the determination of prevailing seafloor habitats, especially in very heterogeneous areas and at transition zones between the habitats. Therefore, it is recommended to employ more than one hydroacoustic system (preferably a singlebeam device combined with a wide-swath sonar system) synchronously during a survey in order to gain more reliable and detailed information about the seafloor environments. The

  1. High Resolution Quaternary Seismic Stratigraphy of the New York Bight Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, William C.; Denny, J.F.; Foster, D.S.; Lotto, L.L.; Allison, M.A.; Uchupi, E.; Swift, B.A.; Danforth, W.W.; Thieler, E.R.; Butman, Bradford

    2003-01-01

    A principal focus for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (marine.usgs.gov) is regional reconnaissance mapping of inner-continental shelf areas, with initial emphasis on heavily used areas of the sea floor near major population centers. The objectives are to develop a detailed regional synthesis of the sea-floor geology in order to provide information for a wide range of management decisions and to form a basis for further investigations of marine geological processes. In 1995, the USGS, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACOE), New York District, began to generate reconnaissance maps of the continental shelf seaward of the New York - New Jersey metropolitan area. This mapping encompassed the New York Bight inner-continental shelf, one of the most heavily trafficked and exploited coastal regions in the United States. Contiguous areas of the Hudson Shelf Valley, the largest physiographic feature on this segment of the continental shelf, also were mapped as part of a USGS study of contaminated sediments (Buchholtz ten Brink and others, 1994; 1996). The goal of the reconnaissance mapping was to provide a regional synthesis of the sea-floor geology in the New York Bight area, including: (a) a description of sea-floor morphology; (b) a map of sea-floor sedimentary lithotypes; (c) the geometry and structure of the Cretaceous strata and Quaternary deposits; and (d) the geologic history of the region. Pursuing the course of this mapping effort, we obtained sidescan-sonar images of 100 % of the sea floor in the study area. Initial interpretations of these sidescan data were presented by Schwab and others, (1997a, 1997b, 2000a). High-resolution seismic-reflection profiles collected along each sidescan-sonar line used multiple acoustic sources (e.g., watergun, CHIRP, Geopulse). Multibeam swath-bathymetry data also were obtained for a portion of the study area (Butman and others, 1998;). In this report, we present a series

  2. Spatial and temporal patterns in oxygen and nutrient fluxes in sediment of German Bight (North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Andreas; Friedrich, Jana; van Beusekom, Justus; Naderipour, Céline

    2016-04-01

    The German Bight in the southern North Sea is affected by intensive anthropogenic exploitation. Over a century of intensive use by shipping, fishery, and input by polluted rivers has pushed the coastal ecosystem far from its pristine state. The nutrient load reached a maximum in the early 1990s (Amann et al. 2012), and implementation of environmental protection policies substantially decreased the riverine nutrient load. While the riverine input of pollutants has constantly reduced since then, new forms of sea exploitation emerge. The most noticeable example is the installation of more than 600 wind turbines over the past few years in the German EEZ, and additionally 1,200 are already planned. The impact of these installations on hydrology and biogeochemical cycles is largely unclear. In a series of monitoring cruises we repeatedly sampled the sediment at a set of monitoring stations, which represent all typical habitats of the German Bight. We deployed benthic landers for in-situ chamber incubations and performed ex-situ whole-core incubations to investigate the benthic fluxes of oxygen and nutrients, and their spatial and temporal variability. Our first results indicate that benthic nutrient recycling is more intense during summer than during winter, which suggests that biological processes contribute substantially to the recycling of nutrients. The fluxes of reactive nitrogen appear lower than observations from 1992 (Lohse et al. 1993), when riverine N loads were at their maximum (Amann et al. 2012). The comparison of our recent measurements with observations from the past decades will enable us to assess the effect of decreasing nutrient discharge into the coastal North Sea. Our results will further set a baseline for elucidating the impact of the massive installation of wind turbines in the near future. This study contributes to the NOAH project (North Sea; Observation and Assessment of Habitats). References Amann T., A. Weiss, and J. Hartmann (2012): Carbon

  3. Impacts of stormwater runoff in the Southern California Bight: Relationships among plume constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifel, K.M.; Johnson, S.C.; DiGiacomo, P.M.; Mengel, M.J.; Nezlin, N.P.; Warrick, J.A.; Jones, B.H.

    2009-01-01

    The effects from two winter rain storms on the coastal ocean of the Southern California Bight were examined as part of the Bight '03 program during February 2004 and February-March 2005. The impacts of stormwater from fecal indicator bacteria, water column toxicity, and nutrients were evaluated for five major river discharges: the Santa Clara River, Ballona Creek, the San Pedro Shelf (including the Los Angeles, San Gabriel, and Santa Ana Rivers), the San Diego River, and the Tijuana River. Exceedances of bacterial standards were observed in most of the systems. However, the areas of impact were generally spatially limited, and contaminant concentrations decreased below California Ocean Plan standards typically within 2-3 days. The largest bacterial concentrations occurred in the Tijuana River system where exceedances of fecal indicator bacteria were noted well away from the river mouth. Maximum nitrate concentrations (~40 ??M) occurred in the San Pedro Shelf region near the mouth of the Los Angeles River. Based on the results of general linear models, individual sources of stormwater differ in both nutrient concentrations and the concentration and composition of fecal indicator bacteria. While nutrients appeared to decrease in plume waters due to simple mixing and dilution, the concentration of fecal indicator bacteria in plumes depends on more than loading and dilution rates. The relationships between contaminants (nutrients and fecal indicator bacteria) and plume indicators (salinity and total suspended solids) were not strong indicating the presence of other potentially important sources and/or sinks of both nutrients and fecal indicator bacteria. California Ocean Plan standards were often exceeded in waters containing greater than 10% stormwater (coliforms and Enterococcus spp. and in the 28-30 salinity range (10-16% stormwater) for fecal coliforms. Nutrients showed a similar pattern with the highest median concentrations in water with greater than 10

  4. Biomass and biochemical composition of zooplankton from northwest Bay of Bengal during January 1990

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumari, L.; Goswami, S.C.

    Biomass, proximate composition, organic carbon and calorie content of assorted zooplankton from the surface waters were studied. Day and night stations revealed significant difference in biomass (displacement volume, dry wt and organic carbon...

  5. Trace metal dynamics in zooplankton from the Bay of Bengal during summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rejomon, G.; DineshKumar, P.K.; Nair, M.; Muraleedharan, K.R.

    of trace metal uptake was apparent within the Bay of Bengal zooplankton. There was a distinct spatial heterogeneity of metals, with highest concentrations in the upwelling zones of the southeast coast, moderate concentrations in the cyclonic eddy...

  6. Elemental (C, H, N) composition of zooplankton from north Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Matondkar, S.G.P.; Bhat, K.L.; Ansari, Z.A.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Zooplankton samples collected from north Arabian Sea during March 1992 were analysed for elemental (C,H,N) composition. Estimated carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen concentrations displayed variations among different groups but their ratios were nearly...

  7. Cost of reproduction in selected species of zooplankton (rotifers and cladocerans)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarma, S.S.S.; Nandini, S.; Gulati, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    Reproduction is an energetically costly biological process. Among the freshwater zooplankton, rotifers and cladocerans reproduce parthenogenetically and the cost of reproduction can be estimated using the life table data from demographic studies. Reduced probability of future survival or future

  8. Zooplankton standing stock assessment and fishery resources in the indian seas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.; Sarupria, J.S.; Bhargava, R.M.S.

    Based on data from 1864 samples collected over a period of 12 years (1976-88), an assessment of zooplankton standing stock (biomass), secondary production and potential fishery resources has been made. The areas studied included Arabian Sea, Bay...

  9. Zooplankton Composition and Abundance as Indicators of Eutrophication in Two Small Man-made Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Azma Hanim; Adnan, Anis Amalina Mohd

    2016-11-01

    The distribution and abundance of zooplankton species of Harapan and Aman Lakes were investigated in relation to physical parameters and chlorophyll- a content. Both lakes were characterised by the occurrence of algal bloom problem. The composition of zooplankton was collected at monthly intervals from November 2013 to February 2014. The total number of taxa in Harapan and Aman Lakes were 23 and 27, respectively. Rotifera was the highest abundance group represent 64% of the total species recorded followed by Copepoda (29%) and Cladocera (7%). Three dominant zooplankton that been recorded in both the lakes are Brachionus forficula , Brachionus nilsoni, and Trichocerca sp. High abundance of these species indicates that the lakes are eutrophic water bodies. Overall, zooplankton species distribution and abundance in the study sites are influenced by various environmental factors such as water transparency and chlorophyll- a content.

  10. Production of certain hydrolytic enzymes by psychrophilic bacteria from the Antarctic krill, zooplankton and seawater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.

    . Presence of different enzymes was examined from about 500 of these strains. Bacterial numbers were the highest in the krill gut samples; moderate on zooplankton surfaces and low in water and the ice samples. Pseudomonas, Vibrio, Chromobacterium, Aeromonas...

  11. Nutrient supply, surface currents, and plankton dynamics predict zooplankton hotspots in coastal upwelling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messié, Monique; Chavez, Francisco P.

    2017-09-01

    A simple combination of wind-driven nutrient upwelling, surface currents, and plankton growth/grazing equations generates zooplankton patchiness and hotspots in coastal upwelling regions. Starting with an initial input of nitrate from coastal upwelling, growth and grazing equations evolve phytoplankton and zooplankton over time and space following surface currents. The model simulates the transition from coastal (large phytoplankton, e.g., diatoms) to offshore (picophytoplankton and microzooplankton) communities, and in between generates a large zooplankton maximum. The method was applied to four major upwelling systems (California, Peru, Northwest Africa, and Benguela) using latitudinal estimates of wind-driven nitrate supply and satellite-based surface currents. The resulting zooplankton simulations are patchy in nature; areas of high concentrations coincide with previously documented copepod and krill hotspots. The exercise highlights the importance of the upwelling process and surface currents in shaping plankton communities.

  12. Studies on the associates and parasites of zooplankton from southwest and southeast coasts of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Santhakumari, V.

    Associates and parasites of zooplankton from southwest and southeast coasts of India were studied. Among the epizoic forms two species of ciliates infesting copepods were new records from Indian waters. Eight species of suctorians were found epizoic...

  13. Zooplankton communities of inter-connected sections of lower River Oder (NW Poland)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Czerniawski, Robert; Pilecka-Rapacz, Małgorzata; Domagała, Józef

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was the determination and comparative analysis of the zooplankton communities between the inter-connected sections of the lower Oder river in relation to physicochemical factors...

  14. Biomass and composition of zooplankton in Auranga, Ambika, Purna and Mindola estuaries of south Gujarat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.; Gajbhiye, S.N.; JiyalalRam, M.J.; Desai, B.N.

    super(3))/1]. High biomass observed along the nearshore water during the premonsoon period shifted towards the offshore area with the advent of the monsoon. Zooplankton production was maximum in the postmonsoon season. Mean rate of secondary production...

  15. Biomass and composition of zooplankton in the nearshore waters of Thal, Maharashtra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.; Gajbhiye, S.N.; Krishnakumari, L.; Desai, B.N.

    super(3))/1]. High biomass observed along the nearshore water during the premonsoon period shifted towards the offshore area with the advent of the monsoon. Zooplankton production was maximum in the postmonsoon season. Mean rate of secondary production...

  16. Biomass and composition of zooplankton in and around Gulf of Kutch

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Govindan, K.; Kasinathan, R.; Desai, B.N.

    super(3))/1]. High biomass observed along the nearshore water during the premonsoon period shifted towards the offshore area with the advent of the monsoon. Zooplankton production was maximum in the postmonsoon season. Mean rate of secondary production...

  17. Role of zooplankton dynamics for Southern Ocean phytoplankton biomass and global biogeochemical cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Quéré, Corinne; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Moriarty, Róisín

    2016-01-01

    zooplankton community, despite iron limitation of phytoplankton community growth rates. This result has implications for the representation of global biogeochemical cycles in models as zooplankton faecal pellets sink rapidly and partly control the carbon export to the intermediate and deep ocean.......Global ocean biogeochemistry models currently employed in climate change projections use highly simplified representations of pelagic food webs. These food webs do not necessarily include critical pathways by which ecosystems interact with ocean biogeochemistry and climate. Here we present a global...... biogeochemical model which incorporates ecosystem dynamics based on the representation of ten plankton functional types (PFTs): six types of phytoplankton, three types of zooplankton, and heterotrophic procaryotes. We improved the representation of zooplankton dynamics in our model through (a) the explicit...

  18. Zooplankton studies in Visakhapatnam harbour and nearshore waters, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rathod, V.; Sarma, V.V.

    Distribution of zooplankton biomass in the waters studied showed remarkable variations. The faunal composition was very diverse and the number of species present was more especially during late pre- and post-monsoon seasons with conspicuous decrease...

  19. Biochemical studies on some zooplankton off the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.; Rao, T.S.S.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    Proximate biochemical analyses on twelve zooplankton species showed that protein was the predominant biochemical component followed by lipid. Carbohydrate content was very low especially in species with high water content or calcareous shell...

  20. Zooplankton production, composition and diversity in the coastal waters of Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.; Padmavati, G.

    , siphonophores, chaetognaths and fish eggs were the other common taxa. Zooplankton population was never dominated by a single group. Swarms of copepods (Temora turbinata), cladocerans (Evadne tergestina), and pteropods (Creseis acicula) occurred in the nutrient...

  1. Effect of tide on the variability of zooplankton in the nearshore waters of Thal, Maharashtra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gajbhiye, S.N.; Nair, V.R.; Krishnakumari, L.; Desai, B.N.

    in the representation of common groups of zooplankton for the flood and ebb periods was distinct. Copepods and decapods sustained higher population during the ebb period. Group like chaetognaths and molluscs were caught in appreciable numbers during the flood period...

  2. Foraging mode and prey size spectra of suspension-feeding copepods and other zooplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Prey size spectra of suspension-feeding zooplankton may be predicted from foraging mode and a mechanistic understanding of prey perception and capture. I examine this for suspension-feeding copepods where 2 foraging modes can be distinguished: ambush feeding and active (i.e. cruising and feeding-...... the prediction. I also make qualitative predictions of food size spectra in zooplankton with other prey perception mechanisms that accord with observations....

  3. Dredged Material Evaluations: Review of Zooplankton Toxicity Test Methods for Marine Water Quality Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    for elutriate toxicity tests are fish, invertebrates ( crustaceans ), and zooplankton. Freshwater evaluations (following CWA regulations) use standard...one species each representative of phytoplankton or zooplankton, crustacean or mollusk, and fish species chosen from ERDC TN-DOER-R24 September...Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and ASTM. Much of this work has focused on full life-cycle testing of the epibenthic

  4. The interaction between cyanobacteria and zooplankton in a more eutrophic world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ger, Kemal Ali; Urrutia-Cordero, Pablo; Frost, Paul C; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Sarnelle, Orlando; Wilson, Alan E; Lürling, Miquel

    2016-04-01

    As blooms of cyanobacteria expand and intensify in freshwater systems globally, there is increasing interest in their ecological effects. In addition to being public health hazards, cyanobacteria have long been considered a poor quality food for key zooplankton grazers that link phytoplankton to higher trophic levels. While past laboratory studies have found negative effects of nutritional constraints and defensive traits (i.e., toxicity and colonial or filamentous morphology) on the fitness of large generalist grazers (i.e., Daphnia), cyanobacterial blooms often co-exist with high biomass of small-bodied zooplankton in nature. Indeed, recent studies highlight the remarkable diversity and flexibility in zooplankton responses to cyanobacterial prey. Reviewed here are results from a wide range of laboratory and field experiments examining the interaction of cyanobacteria and a diverse zooplankton taxa including cladocerans, copepods, and heterotrophic protists from temperate to tropical freshwater systems. This synthesis shows that longer exposure to cyanobacteria can shift zooplankton communities toward better-adapted species, select for more tolerant genotypes within a species, and induce traits within the lifetime of individual zooplankton. In turn, the function of bloom-dominated plankton ecosystems, the coupling between primary producers and grazers, the stability of blooms, and the potential to use top down biomanipulation for controlling cyanobacteria depend largely on the species, abundance, and traits of interacting cyanobacteria and zooplankton. Understanding the drivers and consequences of zooplankton traits, such as physiological detoxification and selective vs. generalist grazing behavior, are therefore of major importance for future studies. Ultimately, co-evolutionary dynamics between cyanobacteria and their grazers may emerge as a critical regulator of blooms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Biotic and abiotic factors influencing zooplankton vertical distribution in Lake Huron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicki, Carly J.; Bunnell, David B.; Armenio, Patricia M.; Warner, David M.; Vanderploeg, Henry A.; Cavaletto, Joann F.; Mayer, Christine M.; Adams, Jean V.

    2017-01-01

    The vertical distribution of zooplankton can have substantial influence on trophic structure in freshwater systems, particularly by determining spatial overlap for predator/prey dynamics and influencing energy transfer. The zooplankton community in some of the Laurentian Great Lakes has undergone changes in composition and declines in total biomass, especially after 2003. Mechanisms underlying these zooplankton changes remain poorly understood, in part, because few studies have described their vertical distributions during daytime and nighttime conditions or evaluated the extent to which predation, resources, or environmental conditions could explain their distribution patterns. Within multiple 24-h periods during July through October 2012 in Lake Huron, we conducted daytime and nighttime sampling of zooplankton, and measured food (chlorophyll-a), temperature, light (Secchi disk depth), and planktivory (biomass of Bythotrephes longimanus and Mysis diluviana). We used linear mixed models to determine whether the densities for 22 zooplankton taxa varied between day and night in the epi-, meta-, and hypolimnion. For eight taxa, higher epilimnetic densities were observed at night than during the day; general linear models revealed these patterns were best explained by Mysis diluviana (four taxa), Secchi disk depth (three taxa), epilimnetic water temperature (three taxa), chlorophyll (one taxon), and biomass of Bythotrephes longimanus (one taxon). By investigating the potential effects of both biotic and abiotic variables on the vertical distribution of crustacean zooplankton and rotifers, we provide descriptions of the Lake Huron zooplankton community and discuss how future changes in food web dynamics or climate change may alter zooplankton distribution in freshwater environments.

  6. Spatio-temporal variations of zooplankton community in the hypersaline lagoon of Bardawil, North Sinai, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Mageed, A.A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Bardawil Lagoon is a shallow oligotrophic hypersaline lake, located at the northern periphery of Sinai peninsula-Egypt, connected to SE Mediterranean Sea through two main openings known as Boughazes. Distribution of zooplankton in Bardawil Lagoon during 2004 was studied, not only in space and time but also with reference to species assemblages and environmental factors. Copepoda, Protozoa, and Mollusca were dominating the lagoon zooplankton community during the period of study with 58 identif...

  7. Role of zooplankton dynamics for Southern Ocean phytoplankton biomass and global biogeochemical cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Quéré, Corinne; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Moriarty, Róisín

    2016-01-01

    Global ocean biogeochemistry models currently employed in climate change projections use highly simplified representations of pelagic food webs. These food webs do not necessarily include critical pathways by which ecosystems interact with ocean biogeochemistry and climate. Here we present a global...... zooplankton community, despite iron limitation of phytoplankton community growth rates. This result has implications for the representation of global biogeochemical cycles in models as zooplankton faecal pellets sink rapidly and partly control the carbon export to the intermediate and deep ocean....

  8. Persistence of an unusual pelagic zooplankton assemblage in a clear, mountain lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, G.L.; Hoffman, R.L.; C. David, McIntire

    2002-01-01

    The planktonic zooplankton assemblage in Mowich Lake, Mount Rainier National Park (MORA), was composed almost entirely of rotifers in 1966 and 1967. Adult pelagic crustacean taxa were rare. Their paucity was attributed to predation by kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), which had been stocked in 1961. During a park-wide survey of 24 lakes in 1988, Mowich Lake was the only one that did not contain at least one planktonic crustacean species. Given the apparent persistence of the unusual pelagic zooplankton assemblage in Mowich Lake, the first objective of this study was to document the interannual variation in the taxonomic structure of the zooplankton assemblages in the lake from 1988 through 1999. A second objective was to determine if it was possible to predict the taxonomic composition of the pelagic crustacean zooplankton assemblage in Mowich Lake prior to the stocking of kokanee salmon. The Mowich Lake zooplankton assemblages in 1988-1999 were consistent with those in 1966 and 1967. Crustacean taxa were extremely rare, but they included most of the primary taxa collected from 23 MORA lakes surveyed in 1988. Nonetheless, the 1988 collections showed that the September rotifer assemblage in Mowich Lake was similar to 10 of the 24 lakes sampled. Seven of the 10 lakes were dominated by cladocerans, primarily Daphnia rosea and Holopedium gibberum. Therefore, it appeared that either one or both of these species may have numerically dominated the crustacean zooplankton assemblage in the lake prior to 1961.

  9. Zooplankton assemblages in montane lakes and ponds of Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, G.L.; Hoffman, R.; McIntire, C.D.; Lienkaemper, G.; Samora, B.

    2009-01-01

    Water quality and zooplankton samples were collected during the ice-free periods between 1988 and 2005 from 103 oligotrophic montane lakes and ponds located in low forest to alpine vegetation zones in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA. Collectively, 45 rotifer and 44 crustacean taxa were identified. Most of the numerically dominant taxa appeared to have wide niche breadths. The average number of taxa per lake decreased with elevation and generally increased as maximum lake depths increased (especially for rotifers). With one exception, fish presence/absence did not explain the taxonomic compositions of crustacean zooplankton assemblages. Many rotifer species were common members of zooplankton assemblages in montane lakes and ponds in western North America, whereas the crustacean taxa were common to some areas of the west, but not others. Constraints of the environmental variables did not appear to provide strong gradients to separate the distributions of most zooplankton species. This suggests that interspecific competitive interactions and stochastic processes regulate the taxonomic structures of the zooplankton assemblages at the landscape level. Crustacean species that had broad niche breadths were associated with different rotifer taxa across the environmental gradients. Studies of zooplankton assemblages need to address both crustacean and rotifer taxa, not one or the other.

  10. Zooplankton-based assessment of the trophic state of a tropical forest river in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imoobe T.O.T.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we explore the usefulness of zooplankton as a tool for assessing the trophic status of a Nigerian forest river. The river was sampled monthly and investigated for water physico-chemistry and zooplankton community structure using basic statistical measurement of diversity indices to characterize the zooplankton fauna. The trophic sta­tus of the river evaluated from its physico-chemical parameters indicates that the river is oligotrophic. The zooplankton composition was typical of a tropical freshwater river, with a total of 40 species, made up of 16 rotifers, 12 cladocerans, and 12 copepods and their developing stages in the following order of dominance: Rotifera > Cladocera > Cyclopoida > Calanoida. There were strong correlations between the lake's trophic status and its zooplankton communities. The zoo­plankton community was dominated by numerous species of rotifers and crustaceans, which are typical of oligotrophic to mesotrophic systems, such species including Conochilus dossuarius and Synchaeta longipes. However, the most dominant zooplankton species in West African freshwater ecosystems, viz., Keratella tropica, Keratella quadrata, Brachionus angularis, Trichocerca pusilla, Filinia longiseta, Pompholyx sulcata, and Proales sp., and others that are indicator species of high trophic levels, were not recorded in the river. The river is very clear and can be used for all manner of recreational activities.

  11. Net-zooplankton abundance and biomass from Annaba Bay (SW Mediterranean Sea under estuarine influences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. OUNISSI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zooplankton samples were collected in Annaba Bay (Algeria from January 2009-March 2011 at three coastal sites differently affected by estuarine plumes and external currents. Aim of this survey was to analyze zooplankton composition, abundance and biomass and compare the results with previous studies to reveal possible populations and environmental changes. The mean zooplankton abundance varied between 1,200-6,000 ind. m-3 and biomass 6.70-25.70 mg DW m-3, according to the site. Copepods constituted the main fraction of zooplankton community, and Oithona similis and Paracalanus indicus successively dominated during autumn-winter and spring-summer. The dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans was one of the major zooplankton components, and developed high numbers during February-April, becoming common in neritic and coastal regions. The singularity of the zooplankton from Annaba Bay is the prevalence of P. indicus throughout the entire bay and the decrease in Acartia discaudata and A. clausi (with respect to previous years, possibly replaced by A. negligens. Additionally, Oithona nana abundance markedly decreased with the large development of O. similis. Annaba Bay also differs from other similar Mediterranean coastal areas by the large development of Centropages ponticus populations during the warm period. Among the identified copepod species, the alien species Pseudodiaptomus australiensis and P. arabicus are reported for the first time in the Mediterranean Sea. The occurrence of copepodid V stages of P. australiensis suggests that this species survives and reproduces in Annaba Bay, but so far without developing an abundant population.

  12. Distribution and analysis of selected economic heavy mineral species within the inner New York Bight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drucker, B.S.

    1983-05-01

    Ninety-two surficial sand samples from the inner New York Bight have been analyzed to determine weight percents of eight economic mineral species relative to their respective total heavy mineral assemblages. Particular attention has been focused on delineating areas of significant ilmenite concentration. Total heavy mineral weight percents are highest in the northern portion of the study area and decrease southward. The greatest diversity of economic mineral species is present within the northern portion and three zones within this area where total heavy mineral percentage exceeds 3 percent have been analyzed for potential resources. It is estimated that these three zones contain a minimum of approximately 8 million dry tons of economic mineral species, the bulk of which is zircon. Three zones of significant ilmenite concentration have been delineated within the central portion of the study area. Although total heavy mineral weight percentage ranges from an average of 1.52 to 1.67 percent, ilmenite accounts for an average of 34 to 57 percent of the total weight of the heavies. A minimum of approximately 7 million dry tons of ilmenite is believed to be present within these three zones. However, accessory economic mineral content is extremely low and sewer and dumpsite spoilage may have degraded the quality of the deposits within one of the zones. Until more detailed economic, exploratory, and chemical studies are undertaken, these six zones should be regarded as indicated potential resource zones.

  13. Habitat of calling blue and fin whales in the Southern California Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirovic, A.; Chou, E.; Roch, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Northeast Pacific blue whale B calls and fin whale 20 Hz calls were detected from passive acoustic data collected over seven years at 16 sites in the Southern California Bight (SCB). Calling blue whales were most common in the coastal areas, during the summer and fall months. Fin whales began calling in fall and continued through winter, in the southcentral SCB. These data were used to develop habitat models of calling blue and fin whales in areas of high and low abundance in the SCB, using remotely sensed variables such as sea surface temperature, sea surface height, chlorophyll a, and primary productivity as model covariates. A random forest framework was used for variable selection and generalized additive models were developed to explain functional relationships, evaluate relative contribution of each significant variable, and investigate predictive abilities of models of calling whales. Seasonal component was an important feature of all models. Additionally, areas of high calling blue and fin whale abundance both had a positive relationship with the sea surface temperature. In areas of lower abundance, chlorophyll a concentration and primary productivity were important variables for blue whale models and sea surface height and primary productivity were significant covariates in fin whale models. Predictive models were generally better for predicting general trends than absolute values, but there was a large degree of variation in year-to-year predictability across different sites.

  14. Radiocarbon geochronology of the sediments of the Sao Paulo bight (Southern Brazilian upper margin)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahiques, Michel M.; Sousa, Silvia H.M.; Burone, Leticia; Nagai, Renata H.; Silveira, Ilson C.A.; Figueira, Rubens C.L.; Soutelino, Rafael G.; Ponsoni, Leandro; Klein, Daniel A., E-mail: mahiques@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. Oceanografico

    2011-09-15

    The aim of this work was to generate an inventory of the data on radiocarbon dating obtained from sediments of the Sao Paulo bight (southern Brazilian upper margin) and to analyze the data in terms of Late Quaternary sedimentary processes and sedimentation rates. A total of 238 radiocarbon dating from materials collected using different sampling procedures was considered for this work. The sedimentation rates varied from less than 2 to 68 cm.kyr{sup -1}. The highest sedimentation rate values were found in a low-energy (ria type) coastal system as well as in the upwelling zones of Santa Catarina and Cabo Frio. The lowest rates were found on the outer shelf and upper slopes. Our results confirm the strong dependency of the shelf currents, with an emphasis to the terrigenous input from the Rio de La Plata outflow which is transported via the Brazilian coastal current, as well as of the coupled Brazil Current - Intermediate Western Boundary Current (BC-IWBC) dynamics on the sedimentary processes. At least three indicators of the paleo sea level were found at 12200 yr BP (conventional radiocarbon age) (103 meters below sea level - mbsl), 8300-8800 cal yr BP (13 mbsl) and 7700-8100 cal yr BP (6 mbsl). (author)

  15. Mapping benthic habitats in the Sylt-Rømø Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Lasse; Papenmeier, Svenja; Michaelis, Rune; Mielck, Finn; Hass, H. Christian

    2017-04-01

    Maps are a valuable source of information for the public, institutions and scientists alike. However, obtaining base data for tidal landscapes is by many regards a challenging task due to the transitional, dynamic and diverse character of the environment. Sensors are working at their limits and surveys have in the past been restricted to either the supra- and intertidal areas, or the deeper channels. We here present preliminary results from an interdisciplinary approach combining classic terrestrial and marine sensors to obtain spatially discrete and continuous data for the 450 km2 large Sylt-Rømø Bight. The area is located on the eastern seaboard of the North Sea and characterized by a narrow tidal inlet, a branching channel network and vast areas of sandy tidal flats. Data from a small research vessel (MBES, SSS, RoxAnn, Biosonics, grab samples) are combined with information from remote and proximal sensing platforms (Landsat, high resolution aerial images) to obtain a seamless dataset. The aim of the project is to gather information on the spatial patterns of landforms, bedforms, sediment properties and the structure of habitats, in order to increase our knowledge on the dynamics of life and landscapes in a large tidal basin of the Wadden Sea.

  16. Categorisation of Meteorological Conditions for Storm Tide Episodes in the German Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Gerber

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The German North Sea coast is exposed to storm surges induced by typical weather situations. For this study, the weather situations of all observed storm tides between January 1949 and April 2012 were investigated. An overall number of 366 cases were identified, analysed and assigned to three categories: the North-West Type (NWT, the West and South-West Type (W+SWT and the Iceland Gale Type (IGT. The number of occurrences of NWT situations was slightly smaller than that of W+SWT cases, and there were only a small number of IGT. Severe storm tides were induced in 51 of all cases. The investigation showed slightly more NWT than W+SWT cases, and no IGT case. Severe storm tides hit in almost every case all parts of the German North Sea coast. Storm tides affected more frequently the eastern part of German Bight than the southern part by a small amount. There were three storm surge seasons (September to April without a storm tide and three with the maximum of ten episodes. On average, five storm tide episodes occurred per season. All time series of the frequencies of the specific weather types show a high inter-annual and decadal variability. Therefore, the detection of long-term trends is problematic in view of the relatively short length of time series of only 63 years.

  17. Distribution and mass inventory of total dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene in the water column of the southern California bight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Eddy Y; Tsukada, David; Diehl, Dario W; Peng, Jian; Schiff, Kenneth; Noblet, James A; Maruya, Keith A

    2005-11-01

    A large-scale survey on the area and depth stratified distribution of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT; mainly p,p'- and o,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE)) contamination in the water column of the Southern California Bight (SCB) was conducted in 2003-2004 using a solid-phase microextraction-based sampling technique. Dissolved-phase DDEs were clearly widespread, with the central SCB containing the highest levels, and the Palos Verdes Shelf sediments have remained the dominant source of DDT compounds to the SCB. The p,p'- and o,p'-DDE concentrations ranged from Verdes Shelf to other areas via a repeated process of sediment resuspension/deposition and short-range advection. Total mass inventories were estimated at 14 and 0.86 kg for p,p'- and o,p'-DDE, respectively, for the sampled area, resulting in p,p'- and o,p'-DDE mass inventories for the entire SCB of 230 and 14 kg, respectively. Furthermore, total fluxes of p,p'-DDE were estimated to be in the range of 0.8 to 2.3 metric tons per year. These results suggest that the SCB has been and continues to be a significant source of DDT contamination to the global oceans.

  18. RNA-Based Assessment of Diversity and Composition of Active Archaeal Communities in the German Bight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Wemheuer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Archaea play an important role in various biogeochemical cycles. They are known extremophiles inhabiting environments such as thermal springs or hydrothermal vents. Recent studies have revealed a significant abundance of Archaea in moderate environments, for example, temperate sea water. Nevertheless, the composition and ecosystem function of these marine archaeal communities is largely unknown. To assess diversity and composition of active archaeal communities in the German Bight, seven marine water samples were taken and studied by RNA-based analysis of ribosomal 16S rRNA. For this purpose, total RNA was extracted from the samples and converted to cDNA. Archaeal community structures were investigated by pyrosequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons generated from cDNA. To our knowledge, this is the first study combining next-generation sequencing and metatranscriptomics to study archaeal communities in marine habitats. The pyrosequencing-derived dataset comprised 62,045 archaeal 16S rRNA sequences. We identified Halobacteria as the predominant archaeal group across all samples with increased abundance in algal blooms. Thermoplasmatales (Euryarchaeota and the Marine Group I (Thaumarchaeota were identified in minor abundances. It is indicated that archaeal community patterns were influenced by environmental conditions.

  19. Marine zooplankton studies in Brazil: a brief evaluation and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens M. Lopes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine zooplankton research in Brazil has been primarily descriptive, with most studies focusing on community structure analysis and related issues. The composition and spatial distribution of several taxonomic groups are currently well known, although less-abundant and small-sized taxa as well as initial stages of almost all species have received little attention. Some numerically important taxa such as heterotrophic protists, ctenophores, acoel turbellarians and ostracods remain virtually unstudied. Large sectors of the continental shelf have not been sampled in detail, particularly those areas influenced by the North Brazil Current (5ºN-15ºS. Zooplankton abundance and biomass in offshore waters have seldom been quantified, and information on the distribution and vertical migration of meso- and bathypelagic species are lacking. Additional faunistic assessments must target those less-studied taxa and geographical locations. However, priority in ecological studies should be given to process-oriented investigations aimed at understanding the mechanisms controlling zooplankton distribution, trophic interactions within pelagic food webs and production cycles in relation to the physical environment. An effort should be made to incorporate state-of-the-art sampling technology and analytical methods into future research projects.As pesquisas sobre o zooplâncton marinho no Brasil têm sido primariamente descritivas, com a maioria dos estudos enfocando a análise da estrutura da comunidade e assuntos relacionados. A composição e a distribuição espacial de muitos grupos taxonômicos encontram-se bem estudadas, embora os táxons menos abundantes e de menores dimensões, assimcomo os estágios iniciais do ciclo de vida da maioria das espécies, tenham recebido pouca atenção. Alguns táxons numericamenteimportantes encontram-se pouco estudados, como no caso dos protistas heterotróficos, ctenóforos, turbelários acelos e ostrácodes. Amplos

  20. Zooplankton Responses In A Tropical System With Environmental Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Javier Aranguren Riaño

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Processes of environmental transformation that currently occur in the climatic change context generate changes in ecosystems and biological communities. ¿How populations respond to these stressors? ¿what effects could occur on taxonomic and ecological diversity? The taxonomic composition and structure of the zooplankton was analyzed with relationship to environmental changes in a tropical water reservoir located at 6º02`18``N and 73º29`16`` W. During four months, samples were taken weekly covering stations of low, medium, and high precipitation. A high degree of temporal variability was established, it associated with a short hydraulic retention time estimated at 8 days.  Nine species were collected, of which Keratella tropica tropica and Thermocyclops decipiens were the two most abundant and constant species. Found values of H’ diversity and S richness were considered low, corresponding to a little mature community associated with a fluctuating physical environment and supported by high variation coefficients of electrical conductivity and Sechhi disk transparency. Drastic variations on the system volume in short time lapses generate important changes in the physical expression of system with a direct effect on composition and structure of the zooplankton. In general, the response model of the zooplankton in the reservoir according to the statement by the intermediate disturbance hypothesis.  RESPUESTAS DEL ZOOPLANCTON EN UN SISTEMA TROPICAL CON ALTA TENSIÓN AMBIENTAL Los procesos de transformación ambiental que se dan en la actualidad, en un marco de cambio climático, generan modificaciones en los ecosistemas y comunidades biológicas, ¿Cómo responden las poblaciones a estos factores de tensión? ¿Qué efectos se darían sobre la diversidad taxonómica y ecológica? Se analizó la variación de la composición taxonómica y estructura del zooplancton en función de los cambios ambientales en un reservorio tropical ubicado a 6º

  1. Beech forests in the Ruhr and in the Westphalian Bight. A comparative study. Buchenwaelder im Ruhrgebiet und in der Westfaelischen Bucht. Eine vergleichende Untersuchung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittig, R. (Frankfurt Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Fachbereich 16 - Biologie); Werner, W. (Trier Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Fachbereich 3 - Geographie/Geowissenschaften, Geschichte, Politikwissenschaft, Klassische Archaeologie, Aegyptologie, Kunstgeschichte, Papyrologie)

    1989-01-01

    The Ruhr district, one of the most industrialized and most densely populated regions of Germany, is part of the Westphalian Bight. The potential natural vegetation of the Ruhrgebiet are loess beech forests (Milio-Fagetum), which are also common in other parts of the Westphalian Bight. However, a comparison of the beech forests of the Ruhrgebiet with the Milio-Fagetum stands of other areas of the Westphalian Bight shows distinct differences in floristic composition of the herb layer as well as in C/N ratio and heavy metal contents of the upper 4 cm of the mineral soil. The differences can only be explained by the former long lasting immission load of the Ruhrdistrict. (orig.).

  2. Identifying zooplankton community changes between shallow and upper-mesophotic reefs on the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef, Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Andradi-Brown, D; Head, CEI; Exton, DA; Hunt, CL; Hendrix, A; Gress, E; Rogers, AD

    2017-01-01

    Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs, reefs 30-150 m) are understudied, yet the limited research conducted has been biased towards large sessile taxa, such as scleractinian corals and sponges, or mobile taxa such as fishes. Here we investigate zooplankton communities on shallow reefs and MCEs around Utila on the southern Mesoamerican Barrier Reef using planktonic light traps. Zooplankton samples were sorted into broad taxonomic groups. Our results indicate similar taxonomic zooplankton richness ...

  3. Spatial variation of the zooplankton community in the western tropical Pacific Ocean during the summer of 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Li, Chaolun; Wang, Yanqing; Wang, Xiaocheng; Dai, Luping; Tao, Zhencheng; Ji, Peng

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of the zooplankton community in the western tropical Pacific Ocean is poor compared to that of the communities in the central and eastern Pacific Ocean. The zooplankton composition, abundance, biomass and community structure in the western Pacific Ocean were studied based on data collected during a synoptic cruise (August-September 2014). Four zooplankton communities were determined via cluster analysis, and these four clusters were mainly spatially related to four different currents: the Luzon Current (LC), Subtropical Countercurrent (STCC), North Equatorial Current (NEC) and North Equatorial Countercurrent (NECC). The estimated mean abundance and biomass of the zooplankton for the whole surveyed area were 146.7±178.1 ind/m3 and 36.9±40.3 mg/m3, respectively. The zooplankton abundance was dominated by small copepods, such as Clausocalanus furcatus, C. pergens, Oncaea mediterranea and Oithona plumifera. The zooplankton abundance and biomass values were lowest in the STCC region and highest in the NECC region. BEST analysis based on surface environmental factors showed that chlorophyll a (chl a), pH, temperature and salinity were the environmental variables that best explained the distribution pattern of the zooplankton community (pw=0.372). The zooplankton abundance was higher south of the salinity front at 16°N, in accordance with the relatively higher nutrient and chl a levels. Maximum zooplankton biomass was found in regions on the periphery of the cyclonic Mindanao Eddy (ME) and anticyclonic Halmahera Eddy (HE).

  4. Offshore Migratory Corridors and Aerial Photogrammetric Body Length Comparisons of Southbound Gray Whales, Eschrichtius robustus, in the Southern California Bight, 1988–1990

    OpenAIRE

    Sumich, James L.; Show, Ivan T.

    2011-01-01

    Through most of their annual migration, gray whales, Eschrichtius robustus, remain within 10 km of shore, but in the Southern California Bight many individuals migrate much farther from shore. This paper summarizes aerial survey and photogrammetric efforts to determine body lengths and temporal and spatial distributions of migratory gray whales in the southern portion of the Southern California Bight. Aerial surveys were flown along 13 east–west transects between lat. 32°35′N and 33°30′N d...

  5. Small zooplankton sensing their environment: feeding, mating, and predator avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihongi, Ai

    2004-03-01

    Since zooplankton play a significant role at the base of the food web in aquatic environments, it is important to understand their feeding behaviors, mating behaviors, and predator avoidance. First, I will present the water flow regime of Daphnia. Using a high-speed video, I filmed how water with algae particles enters and leaves Daphnia, how the water flows within Daphnia and how the appendages of Daphnia work to produce the water flow. Second, I will discuss mate-searching behaviors of freshwater calanoid copepods and Daphnia. Male and female zooplankters have to encounter each other for successful mating in 3D environment. I have observed the behaviors of freshwater calanoid copepods from Lake Michigan. As a result, they showed different behaviors from other species studied. Likewise, I have observed differences in mate-searching behaviors of D. pulex and D. magna. Last, I will show the results of predator-prey interactions in D. pulex with kairomone, a chemical cue, from predatory fish using 3-D near infrared optical system. As experimental conditions, we used the following treatments: (a) no light/ no kairomone, (b) no light/ kairomone, (c) light/ no kairomone, and (d) light/ kairomone. While it appears that light and kairomone have an interactive effect on the swimming behaviors of Daphnia, light seems to be the most influential factor. The observed frequent spinning movements of D. pulex in a darkened tank with a predatory fish, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), were successful predator avoidance maneuvers.

  6. Zooplankton diversity across three Red Sea reefs using pyrosequencing

    KAUST Repository

    Pearman, John K.

    2014-07-30

    Coral reefs are considered among the most diverse ecosystems on Earth, yet little is known about the diversity of plankton in the surrounding water column. Moreover, few studies have utilized genomic methods to investigate zooplankton diversity in any habitat. This study investigated the diversity of taxa by sampling 45 stations around three reef systems in the central/southern Red Sea. The diversity of metazoan plankton was investigated by targeting the 18S rRNA gene and clustering OTUs at 97% sequence similarity. A total of 754 and 854 metazoan OTUs were observed in the data set for the 1380F and 1389F primer sets respectively. The phylum Arthropoda dominated both primer sets accounting for ~60% of reads followed by Cnidaria (~20%). Only about 20% of OTUs were shared between all three reef systems and the relation between geographic distance and Jaccard Similarity measures was not significant. Cluster analysis showed that there was no distinct split between reefs and stations from different reefs clustered together both for metazoans as a whole and for the phyla Arthropoda, Cnidaria and Chordata separately. This suggests that distance may not be a determining factor in the taxonomic composition of stations.

  7. Zooplankton of Lake Orta after liming: an eleven years study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea PASTERIS

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Lake Orta (N. Italy was severely polluted from 1927 by an effluent from a rayon factory, which discharged great amounts of ammonium nitrogen and copper into the lake. In the mid nineteen fifties, some plating factories also started dumping chromium and aluminum. As a result of ammonium oxidation, the lake became very acid and the concentration of metals in the waters reached very high values. Phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish disappeared suddenly from the lake which was by 1930 classified as “sterile”. Later on, about the fifties, a small population of Cyclops abyssorum re-colonised the lake together with some rotifers, in particular Hexarthra fennica. In mid eighties following the introduction of anti-pollution legislation, ammonium loads were greatly reduced and Daphnia obtusa was recorded. The lake waters however were still very acid, prompting the proposal of the Istituto Italiano di Idrobiologia to lime the lake with calcium carbonate to neutralise the excess acidity and reconstruct the alkaline reserve. This was done successfully from May 1989 to June 1990. pH values began to rise and in the same time the metal concentrations decreased, so that at present the lake waters are almost “normal”. In the meantime, due to the increased pH values, D. obtusa was replaced by D. longispina and, as toxic metal concentrations became lower, Megacyclops viridis, Bosmina longirostris, Diaphanosoma brachyurum, Keratella quadrata, Asplanchna priodonta. and other Brachionidae species appeared. Diaptomidae are still absent, except for some specimens of Arctodiaptomus wierzejskii.

  8. Parasitic chytrids sustain zooplankton growth during inedible algal bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasconi, Serena; Grami, Boutheina; Niquil, Nathalie; Jobard, Marlène; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses the quantitative impact of parasitic chytrids on the planktonic food web of two contrasting freshwater lakes during different algal bloom situations. Carbon-based food web models were used to investigate the effects of chytrids during the spring diatom bloom in Lake Pavin (oligo-mesotrophic) and the autumn cyanobacteria bloom in Lake Aydat (eutrophic). Linear inverse modeling was employed to estimate undetermined flows in both lakes. The Monte Carlo Markov chain linear inverse modeling procedure provided estimates of the ranges of model-derived fluxes. Model results confirm recent theories on the impact of parasites on food web function through grazers and recyclers. During blooms of "inedible" algae (unexploited by planktonic herbivores), the epidemic growth of chytrids channeled 19-20% of the primary production in both lakes through the production of grazer exploitable zoospores. The parasitic throughput represented 50% and 57% of the zooplankton diet, respectively, in the oligo-mesotrophic and in the eutrophic lakes. Parasites also affected ecological network properties such as longer carbon path lengths and loop strength, and contributed to increase the stability of the aquatic food web, notably in the oligo-mesotrophic Lake Pavin.

  9. Zooplankton of an urban coastal lagoon: composition and association with environmental factors and summer fish kill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo C. e Souza

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Zooplankton may be regarded as a sensitive tool for monitoring environmental variations in coastal lagoons due to their ability to immediately react to changes in the water column trophic features and salinity levels. As a coastal lagoon with a broad history of anthropic influence, Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil is widely used for water sports and artisanal fishing. The present study aimed to expand the knowledge base about zooplankton in the Rodrigo de Freitas Lagoon by assessing the composition and time-spatial distribution of the major zooplankton groups. Samples were collected fortnightly from at four distinct sampling points August 2001 to July 2002. At each point, salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen and water transparency were measured. During the study period, the lagoon behaved as an spatially homogeneous environment in what regards the abiotic variables. However, all these variables showed significant differences along the time, mainly related to seasonality (air temperature and rainy and dry periods. The zooplankton community showed low taxonomic richness, with the predominance of species commonly found in coastal lagoons, especially with mesohaline conditions, as well as those found in estuaries. An interesting fact was the rise in zooplankton abundance at all sampling points right after a fish kill event. Such increase was caused mainly by the Brachionus plicatilis O.F. Müller 1786 species. Thus, the zooplankton community was affected by physical and chemical factors, mainly by the dissolved oxygen decline event and variations in the influx of seawater into the lagoon. In addition, phytoplankton availability and fish predation pressure were suggested as important regulating factors of the zooplankton community.

  10. Changes in zooplankton community, and seston and zooplankton fatty acid profiles at the freshwater/saltwater interface of the Chowan River, North Carolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Lichti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The variability in zooplankton fatty acid composition may be an indicator of larval fish habitat quality as fatty acids are linked to fish larval growth and survival. We sampled an anadromous fish nursery, the Chowan River, during spring of 2013 in order to determine how the seston fatty acid composition varied in comparison with the zooplankton community composition and fatty acid composition during the period of anadromous larval fish residency. The seston fatty acid profiles showed no distinct pattern in relation to sampling time or location. The mesozooplankton community composition varied spatially and the fatty acid profiles were typical of freshwater species in April. The Chowan River experienced a saltwater intrusion event during May, which resulted in brackish water species dominating the zooplankton community and the fatty acid profile showed an increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, in particular eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. The saltwater intrusion event was followed by an influx of freshwater due to high precipitation levels in June. The zooplankton community composition once again became dominated by freshwater species and the fatty acid profiles shifted to reflect this change; however, EPA levels remained high, particularly in the lower river. We found correlations between the seston, microzooplankton and mesozooplankton fatty acid compositions. Salinity was the main factor correlated to the observed pattern in species composition, and fatty acid changes in the mesozooplankton. These data suggest that anadromous fish nursery habitat likely experiences considerable spatial variability in fatty acid profiles of zooplankton prey and that are correlated to seston community composition and hydrodynamic changes. Our results also suggest that sufficient prey density as well as a diverse fatty acid composition is present in the Chowan River to support larval fish production.

  11. Changes in zooplankton community, and seston and zooplankton fatty acid profiles at the freshwater/saltwater interface of the Chowan River, North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichti, Deborah A; Rinchard, Jacques; Kimmel, David G

    2017-01-01

    The variability in zooplankton fatty acid composition may be an indicator of larval fish habitat quality as fatty acids are linked to fish larval growth and survival. We sampled an anadromous fish nursery, the Chowan River, during spring of 2013 in order to determine how the seston fatty acid composition varied in comparison with the zooplankton community composition and fatty acid composition during the period of anadromous larval fish residency. The seston fatty acid profiles showed no distinct pattern in relation to sampling time or location. The mesozooplankton community composition varied spatially and the fatty acid profiles were typical of freshwater species in April. The Chowan River experienced a saltwater intrusion event during May, which resulted in brackish water species dominating the zooplankton community and the fatty acid profile showed an increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), in particular eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The saltwater intrusion event was followed by an influx of freshwater due to high precipitation levels in June. The zooplankton community composition once again became dominated by freshwater species and the fatty acid profiles shifted to reflect this change; however, EPA levels remained high, particularly in the lower river. We found correlations between the seston, microzooplankton and mesozooplankton fatty acid compositions. Salinity was the main factor correlated to the observed pattern in species composition, and fatty acid changes in the mesozooplankton. These data suggest that anadromous fish nursery habitat likely experiences considerable spatial variability in fatty acid profiles of zooplankton prey and that are correlated to seston community composition and hydrodynamic changes. Our results also suggest that sufficient prey density as well as a diverse fatty acid composition is present in the Chowan River to support larval fish production.

  12. Benthic oxygen flux in permeable sediments of the German Bight calculated with the eddy covariance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Dirk; Ahmerkamp, Soeren; Holtappels, Moritz

    2017-04-01

    Permeable sediments in coastal zones are highly biologically active, contributing to tight recycling of carbon and nutrients between sediments and overlying water. A growing body of literature demonstrates that oxygen flux in these sediments responds dynamically to changes in current velocities and turbulent kinetic energy. As currents interact with bedforms, pressure gradients are created that drive exchange across the sediment-water interface, displacing oxygen-depleted porewaters into surface waters. We used the eddy covariance technique to quantify oxygen flux at three stations in the German Bight. Station 1 (24 m depth) was composed of medium sands with 1-2 cm bedforms and approximately 100 polychaete worms per square meter. Station 2 (24 m depth) was composed of coarse sands with 3-5 cm bedforms and few worms. Station 3 (38 m depth) and was similar to Station 1 but with intermediate worm densities. In each of the sands advection appeared to drive the displacement of hypoxic or anoxic porewater into surface waters, generating net oxygen consumption. The correspondence between the water velocity and oxygen flux was high, with oscillations in tidal currents yielding similar oscillations in benthic oxygen consumption. The tidal current was very similar across sites (mean of 16.5 - 18 cm s-1 measured 30 cm off of the bed). Oxygen consumption was greatest (45 ± 15 mmol m-2 d-1) in Station 1, the medium-grained shallow site with high polychaete worm densities. It was close to equivalent at the other two sites (27 ± 12 mmol m-2 d-1 and 28 ± 10 mmol m-2 d 1). The implications for scaling these rates up will be examined.

  13. Provenance of Holocene calcareous beach-dune sediments, Western Eyre Peninsula, Great Australian Bight, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Noel P.; Bone, Yvonne

    2017-07-01

    Much of western Eyre Peninsula adjacent to the Great Australian Bight is veneered with siliceous and calcareous Quaternary aeolian dunes. The lengthy coastline adjacent to this cool-water carbonate factory is a series of Precambrian crystalline bedrock-Pleistocene aeolianite headlands that separate many long, sweeping, Holocene carbonate sand beaches and their backbeach dunes. Incessant SW waves, rolling swells, and onshore winds have resulted in > 350 km of semi-continuous calcareous strandline aeolian sands. The sediment is composed of quartz grains, Cenozoic limestone clasts, and relict particles (extraclasts) but the deposits are overwhelmingly dominated by contemporaneous biofragments from offshore. These skeletal grains are, in order of relative abundance, molluscs > benthic foraminifers > coralline algae > bryozoans, and echinoids. Benthic foraminifers are mostly small (especially rotaliids and miliolids) but the large relict symbiont-bearing protistMarginopora vertebralis, which grew in the latter stages of MIS 2, is present locally. There are no significant onshore-offshore trends within individual beach-dune complexes. There is, however, a prominent spatial partitioning, with extraclast-rich sediments in the north and biofragment-rich deposits in the south. This areal trend is interpreted to result from more active seafloor carbonate production in the south, an area of conspicuous seasonal nutrient upwelling and profound nektic and benthic biological productivity. The overall system is strikingly similar to Holocene and Pleistocene aeolianites along the inboard margin of the Lacepede Shelf and Bonney Coast some 500 km to the southeast, implying a potential universality to the nature of cool-water carbonate aeolianite deposition. The composition of these cool-water aeolianites is more multifaceted than those formed on warm-water, shallow flat-topped platforms, largely because of the comparatively deep, temperate shelf, the high-energy wave and swell

  14. Diet composition and resource partitioning in two small flatfish species in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schückel, S.; Sell, A.; Kröncke, I.; Reiss, H.

    2011-10-01

    Since the late 1980s, the small-sized non-commercial flatfish species solenette ( Buglossidium luteum) and scaldfish ( Arnoglossus laterna) have increased in abundance in the southern North Sea. Because these species are considered as possible competitors for prey of commercial flatfish, this study aimed at advancing knowledge of their feeding ecology. Between January 2009 and January 2010 stomach contents of solenette and scaldfish and benthic infauna were sampled seasonally in a study area in the German Bight. The objectives were to investigate the seasonal variability of feeding activity and diet composition of both flatfish species related to benthic prey availability. For both flatfish, the highest feeding activity was found in summer, at the same time that the highest prey densities occurred in the study area. A reduced feeding activity was observed during the winter of 2010, but not in the winter of 2009, probably related to higher 2009 water temperatures. In all seasons, diet composition of solenette was dominated by meiofauna, mainly harpacticoid copepods. Macrofauna prey species, namely juveniles of bivalves and echinoderms became important in spring. An increase in amphipods and cumaceans was found in the stomach contents during summer and autumn, simultaneously with their increased abundance in the benthic infauna. In contrast, polychaetes were rarely found in the diet, but dominated the infauna during all seasons. Diet composition of scaldfish was dominated by larger and mobile prey, and, during all seasons, was mainly comprised of crustaceans. Amphipods characterised the diet in both winters, while decapods such as Crangon spp. and Liocarcinus spp. were the dominant prey from spring to autumn. Additionally, juveniles of flatfish (Pleuronectids) and bivalves were found in the scaldfish diet in spring, replaced by cumaceans in summer. No dietary overlap between both flatfish species was found across seasons, indicating partitioning of prey resources

  15. Zooplankton community structure and biomass in a southern African temporarily open/closed estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froneman, P. W.

    2004-05-01

    The zooplankton community structure and biomass in the upper, middle and lower reaches of the temporarily open/closed Kasouga estuary were investigated monthly over a period of one year. Multiple range tests performed after ANOVA indicated that there were no distinct spatial patterns in the physico-chemical and biological variables during the study ( P>0.05). Total chlorophyll- a (chl- a) concentration and zooplankton biomass during the investigation ranged between 0.91 and 5.92 mg chl- a m -3 and between 19.51 and 103.50 mg Dwt m -3, respectively. The highest levels (>3 mg chl- a m -3; >45 mg Dwt m -3) were consistently recorded during summer and the lowest (larvae to the total zooplankton biomass. Hierarchical cluster analysis identified three distinct zooplankton groupings during the study. These groupings corresponded to the summer and winter communities and a community associated with overtopping and breaching events. SIMPER analysis indicated that the differences between the summer and winter communities reflect changes in the relative contributions of the dominants as opposed to the presence/absence of species. The overtopping/breaching group was characterized by the presence of larvae of marine breeding invertebrates and fish. These data indicate that the zooplankton community structure and biomass in the temporarily open/closed Kasouga estuary are determined by the interactive effects of freshwater inflow, water temperature and mouth status.

  16. Eclipse effects on field crops and marine zooplankton: the 29 March 2006 total solar eclipse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, G.; Christou, E. D.; Giannakourou, A.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Georgopoulos, D.; Kotoulas, V.; Lyra, D.; Tsakalis, N.; Tzortziou, M.; Vahamidis, P.; Papathanassiou, E.; Karamanos, A.

    2008-08-01

    Some effects in the biosphere from the Total Solar Eclipse of 29 March 2006 were investigated in field crops and marine zooplankton. Taking into account the decisive role of light on plant life and productivity, measurements of photosynthesis and stomatal behaviour were conducted on seven important field-grown cereal and leguminous crops. A drop in photosynthetic rates, by more than a factor of 5 in some cases, was observed, and the minimum values of photosynthetic rates ranged between 3.13 and 10.13 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. The drop in solar irradiance and the increase in mesophyll CO2-concentration during the eclipse did not induce stomatal closure thus not blocking CO2 uptake by plants. Light effects on the photochemical phase of photosynthesis may be responsible for the observed depression in photosynthetic rates. Field studies addressing the migratory responses of marine zooplankton (micro-zooplankton (ciliates), and meso-zooplankton) due to the rapid changes in underwater light intensity were also performed. The light intensity attenuation was simulated with the use of accurate underwater radiative transfer modeling techniques. Ciliates, responded to the rapid decrease in light intensity during the eclipse adopting night-time behaviour. From the meso-zooplankton assemblage, various vertical migratory behaviours were adopted by different species.

  17. Ingestion of microplastics by natural zooplankton groups in the northern South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoxia; Li, Qingjie; Zhu, Mingliang; Liang, Junhua; Zheng, Shan; Zhao, Yongfang

    2017-02-15

    The ingestion of microplastics by five natural zooplankton groups in the northern South China Sea was studied for the first time and two types of sampling nets (505μm and 160μm in mesh size) were compared. The microplastics were detected in zooplankton sampled from 16 stations, with the fibrous microplastics accounting for the largest proportion (70%). The main component of the found microplastics was polyester. The average length of the microplastics was 125μm and 167μm for Nets I and II, respectively. The encounter rates of microplastics/zooplankton increased with trophic levels. The average encounter rate of microplastics/zooplankton was 5%, 15%, 34%, 49%, and 120% for Net I, and 8%, 21%, 47%, 60%, and 143% for Net II for copepods, chaetognaths, jellyfish, shrimp, and fish larvae, respectively. The average abundance of microplastics that were ingested by zooplankton was 4.1pieces/m 3 for Net I and 131.5pieces/m 3 for Net II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Eclipse effects on field crops and marine zooplankton: the 29 March 2006 total solar eclipse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Economou

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Some effects in the biosphere from the Total Solar Eclipse of 29 March 2006 were investigated in field crops and marine zooplankton. Taking into account the decisive role of light on plant life and productivity, measurements of photosynthesis and stomatal behaviour were conducted on seven important field-grown cereal and leguminous crops. A drop in photosynthetic rates, by more than a factor of 5 in some cases, was observed, and the minimum values of photosynthetic rates ranged between 3.13 and 10.13 μmol CO2 m−2 s−1. The drop in solar irradiance and the increase in mesophyll CO2-concentration during the eclipse did not induce stomatal closure thus not blocking CO2 uptake by plants. Light effects on the photochemical phase of photosynthesis may be responsible for the observed depression in photosynthetic rates. Field studies addressing the migratory responses of marine zooplankton (micro-zooplankton (ciliates, and meso-zooplankton due to the rapid changes in underwater light intensity were also performed. The light intensity attenuation was simulated with the use of accurate underwater radiative transfer modeling techniques. Ciliates, responded to the rapid decrease in light intensity during the eclipse adopting night-time behaviour. From the meso-zooplankton assemblage, various vertical migratory behaviours were adopted by different species.

  19. Zooplankton diversity of a sub-tropical reservoir of Mizoram, Northeast India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma, B.K.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study on zooplankton diversity from the state of Mizoram of northeast India, based on plankton samples collected from Khawiva reservoir during November 2005-October 2007, recorded a total of 46 species. Zooplankton indicated monthly richness ranging between 19-36 and 25-34 species; registered 52.8-88.9 and 60.0-89.3% community similarities (vide Sørensen’s index; and comprised between 31.2±12.7 and 46.7±11.3% of net plankton abundance during two years, respectively. Copepoda and Rotifera, together, influenced zooplankton abundance. Rhizopoda and Cladocera showed limited importance while Nematoda and Ciliata recorded poor densities. Mesocyclops spp. > Keratella tropica are important taxa. Our results are characterized by moderate species diversity, high evenness and low dominance except in some months. Richness, abundance and species diversity followed no definite patterns of monthly variations. Individual abiotic parameters exerted limited influence on zooplankton richness and abundance, and on abundance of its constituent groups. The canonical correspondence analysis with fifteen abiotic parameters explained high cumulative variance (84.8% of zooplankton assemblages along axis 1 and 2 with importance of water temperature, rainfall, free carbon dioxide, conductivity and phosphate. Sladecek’s Q B/T quotient and Shannon’s diversity index reflected mesotrophic nature of Khawiva reservoir.

  20. Dynamics of zooplankton community of Lake Tarasmozero in long-term anthropogenic pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuchko Yaroslav Alexandrovich

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the article the results of zooplankton studies in Lake Tarasmozero (Lizhma river basin are presented. Wastes from the trout-breeding complex "Kedrozero" have been collected in this pond since 1992. The obtained data showed that from 1989 to 2012 a number of changes in zooplankton community take place and it is the evidence of the gradual increase in the trophic status of the reservoir. The average biomass of zooplankton increased from 500 to 1000 mg/m3. According to the trophic index (Myaemets, 1979, Tarasmozero is replaced into the category of mesotrophic water reservoirs (0.5 - 1.0. Saprobity index raised from 0.95 to 1.42. In the composition of the zooplankton there noted such species, as Polyarthra luminosa, Filinia longiseta, Trichocerca insignis, Daphnia longispina, Cyclops kolensis, which serve as indicators of increased trophic level in the conditions of moderate latitudes. After the trout farm started off, Bcrus/Brot indicator considerably decreased indicating to increasing role of rotifers in the formation of the total biomass of the zooplankton. Currently, the dominant species include D. longispina, Bosmina longirostris, Mesocyclops leuckarti, Asplanchna priodonta. In spite of the fact that the current changes are not catastrophic, it is reasonable to monitor regularly the initial links of the trophic chain of the reservoir ecosystem

  1. Some ecological implications of a neem (azadirachtin) insecticide disturbance to zooplankton communities in forest pond enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzweiser, David P; Sutton, Trent M; Back, Richard C; Pangle, Kevin L; Thompson, Dean G

    2004-04-28

    A neem-based insecticide, Neemix 4.5, was applied to forest pond enclosures at concentrations of 10, 17, and 28 microg l(-1) azadirachtin (the active ingredient). At these test concentrations, significant, concentration-dependent reductions in numbers of adult copepods were observed, but immature copepod and cladoceran populations were unaffected. There was no evidence of recovery of adult copepods within the sampling season (May to October). The ecological significance of this disturbance to the zooplankton community was examined by determining biomass as a measure of food availability for higher predators, plankton community respiration, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations, and conductivity as functional indicators of ecosystem stress, and zooplankton food web stability as a measure of effects on trophic structure. The selective removal or reduction of adult copepods was sufficient to measurably reduce total zooplankton biomass for several weeks mid-season. During the period of maximal impact (about 4-9 weeks after the applications), total plankton community respiration was significantly reduced, and this appeared to contribute to significant, concentration-dependent increases in dissolved oxygen and decreases in conductivity among treated enclosures. The reductions in adult copepods resulted in negative effects on zooplankton food web stability through eliminations of a trophic link and reduced interactions and connectance. Comparing the results here to those from a previous study with tebufenozide, which was selectively toxic to cladocerans and had little effect on food web stability, indicates that differential sensitivity among taxa can influence the ecological significance of pesticide effects on zooplankton communities.

  2. Combined effect of predatory zooplankton and allelopathic aquatic macrophytes on algal suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Shengpeng; Wan, Kun; Ma, Sumin

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the combined effects of four typical predatory zooplankton and allelopathic aquatic macrophytes on algal control in a microcosm system. It would determine the effects of diverse species and biological restoration on the growth of harmful water-bloom microalgae in great lakes polluted by excess nutrients. It was found that the mixtures of each zooplankton and the floating plant Nymphoides peltatum had stronger inhibitory effects on harmful water-bloom microalgae than the individual species in clean or eutrophic water bodies. In addition, a community of four zooplankton types had a synergistic effect on algal inhibition. Algal suppression by the zooplankton community was enhanced significantly when the macrophyte was co-cultured in the microcosm. Furthermore, Chlorella pyrenoidosa was more susceptible than Microcystis aeruginosa when exposed to grazing by zooplankton and the allelopathic potential of the macrophyte. Algal inhibition was also weaker in eutrophic conditions compared with the control. These findings indicate that diverse species may enhance algal inhibition. Therefore, it is necessary to restore biological diversity and rebuild an ecologically balanced food chain or web to facilitate the control of harmful algal blooms in eutrophic lakes.

  3. Zooplankton Atlas of the Southern Ocean: The SCAR SO-CPR Survey (1991-2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, David J.; Hosie, Graham W.; Kitchener, John A.; Takahashi, Kunio T.; Hunt, Brian P. V.

    2010-08-01

    The SCAR Southern Ocean Continuous Plankton Recorder (SO-CPR) Survey produces one of the largest and most accessed zooplankton data sets in the world. These data serve as a reference for other Southern Ocean monitoring programmes such as those run by the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) and the developing Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS). It has been instrumental in providing baseline data on zooplankton composition, communities, and distribution patterns on the ocean basin scale. The SO-CPR Survey is publishing the first detailed geographical atlas of the near-surface Southern Ocean zooplankton. This atlas is based on 22,553 CPR samples collected from 1991 to 2008 from voyages operated by Australia, Japan, Germany, New Zealand, USA and Russia. The Atlas documents the distribution and abundance of the 50 most abundant zooplankton taxa amongst the 200+ taxa sampled. The maps are printed in alphabetical order of the genera within each taxon and nomenclature is based on the Register of Antarctic Marine Species (RAMS) developed by the SCAR Marine Biodiversity Information Network (SCAR-MarBIN). The SO-CPR Atlas will operate as a ready reference to researchers interested in the distribution of zooplankton in the Southern Ocean, for example knowing the distribution of grazers in relation to phytoplankton production or the availability of prey for higher predators.

  4. Zooplankton data collected from BUREVESTNIK and other platforms in White Sea; 28 October 1952 to 12 February 1958 (NODC Accession 9900004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using zooplankton net casts in White Sea from BUREVESTNIK and other platforms. Data were collected from 28 October 1952 to 12...

  5. Zooplankton data collected from unidentified platforms in Coastal Waters of Washington / Oregon; 22 May 1979 to 06 August 1980 (NODC Accession 9800143)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using zooplankton net and bottle casts in Coastal Waters of Washington / Oregon from unidentified platforms from Canada. Data were...

  6. Circadian Clock Involvement in Zooplankton Diel Vertical Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfker, N Sören; Meyer, Bettina; Last, Kim S; Pond, David W; Hüppe, Lukas; Teschke, Mathias

    2017-07-24

    Biological clocks are a ubiquitous ancient and adaptive mechanism enabling organisms to anticipate environmental cycles and to regulate behavioral and physiological processes accordingly [1]. Although terrestrial circadian clocks are well understood, knowledge of clocks in marine organisms is still very limited [2-5]. This is particularly true for abundant species displaying large-scale rhythms like diel vertical migration (DVM) that contribute significantly to shaping their respective ecosystems [6]. Here we describe exogenous cycles and endogenous rhythms associated with DVM of the ecologically important and highly abundant planktic copepod Calanus finmarchicus. In the laboratory, C. finmarchicus shows circadian rhythms of DVM, metabolism, and most core circadian clock genes (clock, period1, period2, timeless, cryptochrome2, and clockwork orange). Most of these genes also cycle in animals assessed in the wild, though expression is less rhythmic at depth (50-140 m) relative to shallow-caught animals (0-50 m). Further, peak expressions of clock genes generally occurred at either sunset or sunrise, coinciding with peak migration times. Including one of the first field investigations of clock genes in a marine species [5, 7], this study couples clock gene measurements with laboratory and field data on DVM. While the mechanistic connection remains elusive, our results imply a high degree of causality between clock gene expression and one of the planet's largest daily migrations of biomass. We thus suggest that circadian clocks increase zooplankton fitness by optimizing the temporal trade-off between feeding and predator avoidance, especially when environmental drivers are weak or absent [8]. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Anthropogenic nutrient sources rival natural sources on small scales in the coastal waters of the Southern California Bight

    KAUST Repository

    Howard, Meredith D. A.

    2014-01-26

    Anthropogenic nutrients have been shown to provide significant sources of nitrogen (N) that have been linked to increased primary production and harmful algal blooms worldwide. There is a general perception that in upwelling regions, the flux of anthropogenic nutrient inputs is small relative to upwelling flux, and therefore anthropogenic inputs have relatively little effect on the productivity of coastal waters. To test the hypothesis that natural sources (e.g., upwelling) greatly exceed anthropogenic nutrient sources to the Southern California Bight (SCB), this study compared the source contributions of N from four major nutrient sources: (1) upwelling, (2) treated wastewater effluent discharged to ocean outfalls, (3) riverine runoff, and (4) atmospheric deposition. This comparison was made using large regional data sets combined with modeling on both regional and local scales. At the regional bight-wide spatial scale, upwelling was the largest source of N by an order of magnitude to effluent and two orders of magnitude to riverine runoff. However, at smaller spatial scales, more relevant to algal bloom development, natural and anthropogenic contributions were equivalent. In particular, wastewater effluent and upwelling contributed the same quantity of N in several subregions of the SCB. These findings contradict the currently held perception that in upwelling-dominated regions anthropogenic nutrient inputs are negligible, and suggest that anthropogenic nutrients, mainly wastewater effluent, can provide a significant source of nitrogen for nearshore productivity in Southern California coastal waters.

  8. ZOOPLANKTON DIVERSITY AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PARAMETERS IN MANI RESERVOIR OF WESTERN GHATS, REGION, HOSANAGAR TALUK, SHIVAMOGA DISTRICT KARNATAKA, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Veerendra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on relationship between zooplankton abundance and water quality parameter in Mani reservoir were made between January 2008 and December 2008. In the current investigation, impact of different physico-chemical parameters on zooplankton population was found. Ten genera of zooplankton were identified. The relationship between zooplankton and water quality parameters was varied from place to place depending upon the condition of the reservoir water.

  9. The role of Callionymus lyra (L.) and C. reticulatus in the life cycle of Lernaeocera lusci in Belgian coastal waters (Southern Bight of the North Sea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Damme, P.A.; Maertens, D.; Arrumm, A.; Hamerlynck, O.; Ollevier, F.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of the dragonet Callionymus lyra and the reticulated dragonet C. reticulatus from Belgian coastal waters (Southern Bight of the North Sea) in June 1991 revealed 34% of dragonets infected with 1–7 Lernaeocera lusci. This same parasite infected 9% of the reticulated dragonets (mean intensity

  10. Response of zooplankton to nutrient enrichment and fish in shallow lakes: a pan-European mesocosm experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vakkilainen, K.; Kairesalo, T.; Hietala, J.; Balayla, D.; Bécares, E.; van de Bund, W.; Van Donk, E.; Fernández-Aláez, M.; Gyllström, M.; Hansson, L-A.; Rosa Miracle, M.; Moss, B.; Romo, S.; Rueda, J.; Stephen, D.

    2004-01-01

    1. Responses of zooplankton to nutrient enrichment and fish predation were studied in 1998 and 1999 by carrying out parallel mesocosm experiments in six lakes across Europe. 2. Zooplankton community structure, biomass and responses to nutrient and fish manipulation showed geographical and

  11. Biomass, organic carbon and calorific content of zooplankton from the Arabian Sea off Central West coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumari, L.; Nair, V.R.

    Organic carbon content and calorific values of zooplankton varied from 18.35 to 32.49% (av. 27.8%) and from 2.56 to 4.71 k cal. g-1 dry wt (av. 3.99) respectively. Areawise off Gujarat sustained higher standing stock of zooplankton (77.18 mg m-3...

  12. Dynamical analysis in a bioeconomic phytoplankton zooplankton system with double time delays and environmental stochasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Luping; Zhang, Qingling; Yan, Yun

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a double delayed bioeconomic phytoplankton zooplankton system with commercial harvesting on zooplankton and environmental stochasticity. Maturation delay for toxin producing phytoplankton and gestation delay for zooplankton are considered. Environmental stochasticity is incorporated into the proposed system in form of Gaussian white noises. Some sufficient conditions are derived to show that the proposed system has a unique global positive solution. In absence of double time delays, stochastic stability and existence of stochastic Hopf bifurcation are studied based on invariant measure theory and singular boundary theory of diffusion process for the proposed system. In presence of double time delays, asymptotic behaviors of the interior equilibrium are discussed by constructing some appropriate Lyapunov functions.

  13. The effect of zooplankton on the dynamics and molecular composition ofcarbohydrates during an experimental algal bloom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, J. T.; Søndergaard, M.; Borch, N. H.

    2006-01-01

    The accumulation and degradation of carbohydrates (aldoses) were investigated during diatom blooms in two mesocosms. The effects of macrozooplankton were explored by addition of zooplankton to one mesocosm (+Z). Aldoses accumulated at a steady rate of 4.9 µM C d-1 from day 9 in the mesocosm without...... zooplankton (-Z), while zooplankton induced an increased rate to 10.3 µM C d-1. The surplus of 14 µM dissolved combined carbohydrates (DCCHO) in the +Z mesocosm after 22 days was caused by higher concentrations of arabinose, galactose and rhamnose. The increase was 50, 25 and 25% respectively in the +Z...... the fraction of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) explained by aldoses decreased in the -Z mesocosm while it increased with the presence of grazers. In the +Z mesocosm, two new peaks appeared on the chromatograms and contributed about 4% to the total area of aldoses. It is hypothesised that these two peaks...

  14. Zooplankton composition in five oxbow lakes from the Upper Juruá River, Acre State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Alencar dos Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work was conducted in five oxbow lakes located between Cruzeiro do Sul and Rodrigues Alves counties (Acre State, Brazil, to provide additional information about the composition of zooplankton assemblages in the Upper Juruá River. Samples were collected from May 2009 to May 2010, and fixed with 4% formalina. The numeric density (ind.m -3 was obtained from subsequent sub-samples (1 mL. The study recorded 19 zooplankton families. Rotifers showed higher species richness (81 species, followed by cladocerans (3 species and various forms of copepods and other organisms. Higher zooplankton means of numeric density was found in Novo Lake, with rotifers (1879 ind.m -3, cladocerans (207 ind.m -3, copepods (870 ind.m -3 . Diversity and numeric density were similar to other Neotropical aquatic ecosystems.

  15. Moonlight Drives Ocean-Scale Mass Vertical Migration of Zooplankton during the Arctic Winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Kim S; Hobbs, Laura; Berge, Jørgen; Brierley, Andrew S; Cottier, Finlo

    2016-01-25

    In extreme high-latitude marine environments that are without solar illumination in winter, light-mediated patterns of biological migration have historically been considered non-existent [1]. However, diel vertical migration (DVM) of zooplankton has been shown to occur even during the darkest part of the polar night, when illumination levels are exceptionally low [2, 3]. This paradox is, as yet, unexplained. Here, we present evidence of an unexpected uniform behavior across the entire Arctic, in fjord, shelf, slope and open sea, where vertical migrations of zooplankton are driven by lunar illumination. A shift from solar-day (24-hr period) to lunar-day (24.8-hr period) vertical migration takes place in winter when the moon rises above the horizon. Further, mass sinking of zooplankton from the surface waters and accumulation at a depth of ∼50 m occurs every 29.5 days in winter, coincident with the periods of full moon. Moonlight may enable predation of zooplankton by carnivorous zooplankters, fish, and birds now known to feed during the polar night [4]. Although primary production is almost nil at this time, lunar vertical migration (LVM) may facilitate monthly pulses of carbon remineralization, as they occur continuously in illuminated mesopelagic systems [5], due to community respiration of carnivorous and detritivorous zooplankton. The extent of LVM during the winter suggests that the behavior is highly conserved and adaptive and therefore needs to be considered as "baseline" zooplankton activity in a changing Arctic ocean [6-9]. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Major and trace elements in zooplankton from the Northern Gulf of California during summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentería-Cano, Margarita Elena; Sánchez-Velasco, Laura; Shumilin, Evgueni; Lavín, Miguel F; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Jaime

    2011-09-01

    We report the distribution of major and trace element concentrations in epipelagic zooplankton collected in the Northern Gulf of California in August 2003. The Bray-Curtis index defined three element assemblages in zooplankton: (1) major metals, which included only two elements, Na (3.6-17.0%) and Ca (1.0-4.8%). Na had its highest concentrations in the shallow tidally mixed Upper Gulf, where high salinity, temperature, and zooplankton biomass (dominated by copepods) prevailed. Ca showed its highest concentrations south of Ballenas Channel, characterized by tidal mixing and convergence-induced upwelling, indicated by low sea-surface temperature, salinity, and zooplankton biomass; (2) Six biological essential elements, like Fe (80-9,100 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (20-2,570 mg kg(-1)), were detected in high concentrations in zooplankton collected near Guaymas Basin, which had high surface temperature and chlorophyll a concentrations. (3) Metals of terrigenous origin, such as Sc (0.01-1.4 mg kg(-1)) and Th (0.03-2.3 mg kg(-1)), and redox-sensitive metals, like Co (3-23.8 mg kg(-1)); this was the assemblage with the largest number of elements (15). Both types of elements of assemblage 3 had maximum concentrations in the cyclonic eddy that dominates the summer circulation in the Northern region. We concluded that sediment resuspension by tidal mixing in the Upper Gulf, upwelling south of Ballenas Channel, and the cyclonic eddy were key oceanographic features that affected the element concentrations of epipelagic zooplankton in the Northern Gulf of California. Oceanographic mechanisms such as these may contribute to element incorporation in marine organisms in other seas.

  17. Zooplankton community response to the winter 2013 deep convection process in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, Katty; Carlotti, François; Pagano, Marc; Hunt, Brian P. V.; Escribano, Rubén.; Berline, Léo.

    2017-03-01

    The Gulf of Lion is an important area of deep convection, where intense winter vertical mixing brings nutrients up from deeper layers, promoting the largest bloom in the Mediterranean at the end of winter/early spring. The DEWEX program conducted cruises in February and April 2013 to investigate the ecosystem level impacts of deep water convection. Zooplankton data were collected through net sampling and imaging with an Underwater Vision Profiler. In winter, low zooplankton abundance and biomass were observed in the Deep Convection Zone (DCZ) and higher values on its periphery. In spring, this pattern reversed with high biomass in the DCZ and lower values on the periphery. On average for the whole area, the potential grazing impact was estimated to increase by one order of magnitude from winter to spring. In April, all areas except the DCZ incurred top-down control by zooplankton on the phytoplankton stock. In the DCZ, the chlorophyll-a values remained high despite the high zooplankton biomass and carbon demand, indicating a sustained bottom-up control. The zooplankton community composition was comparable for both periods, typified by high copepod dominance, but with some differences between the DCZ and peripheral regions. In spring the DCZ was characterized by a strong increase in herbivorous species such as Centropages typicus and Calanus helgolandicus, and an increase in the number of large zooplankton individuals. Our study indicates that the DCZ is likely an area of both enhanced energy transfer to higher trophic levels and organic matter export in the North Western Mediterranean Sea.

  18. Atlantic Salmon Telemetry Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Annual telemetry data are collected as part of specific projects (assessments within watersheds) or as opportunistic efforts to characterize Atlantic salmon smolt...

  19. GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) was the first major international experiment of the Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP). It was conducted over...

  20. Emergent and floating-leaved macrophytes as refuge for zooplankton in a eutrophic temperate lake without submerged vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzanelli, Matteo; Perlt, Trine Warming; Christoffersen, Kirsten Seestern

    2008-01-01

    Several studies have shown that submerged macrophytes provide a refuge for zooplankton against fish predation, whereas the role of emergent and floating-leaved species, which are often dominant in eutrophic turbid lakes, is far less investigated. Zooplankton density in open water and amongst...... water, even during periods where the predation pressure was presumably high (during the recruitment of 0+ fish fry). Zooplankton abundance in open water and among vegetation exhibited low values in July and peaked in August. Bosmina and Ceriodaphnia dominated the zooplankton community in the littoral...... modifications in the predation pressure, refuge availability and concentration of cyanobacteria in the lake. It is suggested that emergent and floating-leaved macrophytes may play an important role in enhancing water clarity due to increased grazing pressure by zooplankton migrating into the plant stands...

  1. Identifying zooplankton community changes between shallow and upper-mesophotic reefs on the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef, Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic A. Andradi-Brown

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs, reefs 30–150 m are understudied, yet the limited research conducted has been biased towards large sessile taxa, such as scleractinian corals and sponges, or mobile taxa such as fishes. Here we investigate zooplankton communities on shallow reefs and MCEs around Utila on the southern Mesoamerican Barrier Reef using planktonic light traps. Zooplankton samples were sorted into broad taxonomic groups. Our results indicate similar taxonomic zooplankton richness and overall biomass between shallow reefs and MCEs. However, the abundance of larger bodied (>2 mm zooplanktonic groups, including decapod crab zoea, mysid shrimps and peracarid crustaceans, was higher on MCEs than shallow reefs. Our findings highlight the importance of considering zooplankton when identifying broader reef community shifts across the shallow reef to MCE depth gradient.

  2. Identifying zooplankton community changes between shallow and upper-mesophotic reefs on the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef, Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andradi-Brown, Dominic A; Head, Catherine E I; Exton, Dan A; Hunt, Christina L; Hendrix, Alicia; Gress, Erika; Rogers, Alex D

    2017-01-01

    Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs, reefs 30-150 m) are understudied, yet the limited research conducted has been biased towards large sessile taxa, such as scleractinian corals and sponges, or mobile taxa such as fishes. Here we investigate zooplankton communities on shallow reefs and MCEs around Utila on the southern Mesoamerican Barrier Reef using planktonic light traps. Zooplankton samples were sorted into broad taxonomic groups. Our results indicate similar taxonomic zooplankton richness and overall biomass between shallow reefs and MCEs. However, the abundance of larger bodied (>2 mm) zooplanktonic groups, including decapod crab zoea, mysid shrimps and peracarid crustaceans, was higher on MCEs than shallow reefs. Our findings highlight the importance of considering zooplankton when identifying broader reef community shifts across the shallow reef to MCE depth gradient.

  3. Carbon intake by zooplankton. Importance and role of zooplankton grazing in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayzaud, P.; Tirelli, V.; Errhif, A.; Labat, J. P.; Razouls, S.; Perissinotto, R.

    Ingestion by mesozooplankton and micronekton was monitored during two of the ANTARES cruises in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean in spring and summer. The composition of the mesozooplankton populations varied in space and with season. Copepods always dominated in number and biomass, but salps and pteropods were present in the northern part of the transect in summer. Five species of large copepod ( Calanus simillimus, Calanoides acutus, Rhincalanus gigas, Calanus propinquus and Metridia gerlachei) dominated the biomass with a North-South gradient. Smaller species ( Oithona spp., Ctenocalanus citer, Clausocalanus laticeps) were also present. Biomass showed a definite trend with highest levels towards the polar front zone and permanent open-ocean area. Feeding activity was monitored either for the total population (summer) or specific individuals (spring). In summer, depending on the area considered, grazing rates by mesozooplankton appeared to have a significant impact on phytoplankton primary production. In the northern part of the transect (polar front zone or PFZ), salps and to a minor extent pteropods and copepods contributed mostly to the feeding pressure. Maximum intensity was observed in the Coastal Antarctic Zone (CCSZ) where Euphausia superba (adults and calyptopis larvae) could ingest more than 100% of the daily primary production. In spring, the impact of copepods dominated the zooplankton community. Small calanoids and young stages of large species of copepods rather than adult stages were the dominant contributors to grazing pressure. In summer, respiration rates of the dominant copepod species showed that energy expenditure exceeded by far chlorophyll ingestion. This is generally interpreted as the consequence of ingestion of alternate non-chlorophyll food source. The inverse correlation between the biomass of microzooplankton and the area of maximum difference between grazing and respiration confirmed that in summer the protozoans are strongly

  4. Zooplankton motile behavior: traits and trade-offs in planktonic copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Someren Gréve, Hans

    Research on planktonic copepod ecology is vital to understand the factors controlling marine food web dynamics since copepods are the major components of zooplankton communities and the main link between trophic levels in marine environments. Despite their taxonomic diversity, copepods share...... in zooplankton result in different trade-offs between efficient feeding, mate finding, and predation risk. We experimentally quantified i) swimming behavior, ii) feeding rates on different prey, iii) escape capability and iv) predation risk in various copepod life stages and genders with different motile...

  5. Zooplankton abundance, species composition and ecology of tropical high-mountain crater lake Wonchi, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fasil Degefu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The highlands of Ethiopia represent some of the remnants of undisturbed aquatic ecosystems; they are however highly threatened by significant socio–economic developments and associated anthropogenic impacts. Lake Wonchi is one of the few remaining fairly pristine high–mountain crater lakes in the central highlands and has never been investigated in detail. We present a first study on zooplankton taxa composition, abundance and biomass conducted over more than one year including the underlying environmental drivers. The lake is basic (pH 7.9-8.9, dilute (specific conductivity 185-245 µS cm-1 and oligotrophic with mean trophic status index of 36. The zooplankton community composition showed low species richness comprising a total of fourteen taxa with six cladocerans, one copepod and seven rotifers. Simpson´s index of diversity with values between 0.6 and 0.8 pointed towards a homogenous taxa occurrence within the single sample units. The overall mean (±SD standing biomass of zooplankton was 62.02±25.76 mg dry mass m-3,which is low compared to other highland and rift valley lakes in Ethiopia. Cyclopoid copepods, in particular Thermocyclops ethiopiensis were the most abundant group and contributed 50% to the total zooplankton abundance followed by cladocerans (38% and rotifers (12%. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling resulted in a 3-dimensional model, which revealed similar community composition on successive sampling dates except in December/January and May. Temperature, alkalinity, conductivity and nitrate-N had significant influence on this seasonal pattern. A weak, but significant positive correlation (r=0.482, N=20, P=0.037 between Chlorophyll a and zooplankton biomass mirrors a bottom-up effect of phytoplankton biomass on zooplankton dynamics. The zooplankton of Lake Wonchi displayed some degree of segregation along the epi– and metalimnion during this study, but diel vertical migration was not observed. The results show that fish

  6. Population ecology of nitrifying archaea and bacteria in the Southern California Bight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J Michael; Sachdeva, Rohan; Fuhrman, Jed A

    2010-05-01

    Marine Crenarchaeota are among the most abundant microbial groups in the ocean, and although relatively little is currently known about their biogeochemical roles in marine ecosystems, recognition that Crenarchaeota posses ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes and may act as ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) offers another means of probing the ecology of these microorganisms. Here we use a time series approach combining quantification of archaeal and bacterial ammonia oxidizers with bacterial community fingerprints and biogeochemistry, to explore the population and community ecology of nitrification. At multiple depths (150, 500 and 890 m) in the Southern California Bight sampled monthly from 2003 to 2006, AOA were enumerated via quantitative PCR of archaeal amoA and marine group 1 Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA genes. Based on amoA genes, AOA were highly variable in time - a consistent feature of marine Crenarchaeota- however, average values were similar at different depths and ranged from 2.20 to 2.76 x 10(4) amoA copies ml(-1). Archaeal amoA genes were correlated with Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA genes (r(2) = 0.79) and the slope of this relationship was 1.02, demonstrating that the majority of marine group 1 Crenarchaeota present over the dates and depths sampled possessed amoA. Two AOA clades were specifically quantified and compared with betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (beta-AOB) amoA genes at 150 m; these AOA groups were found to strongly co-vary in time (r(2) = 0.70, P < 0.001) whereas AOA : beta-AOB ratios ranged from 13 to 5630. Increases in the AOA : beta-AOB ratio correlated with the accumulation of nitrite (r(2) = 0.87, P < 0.001), and may be indicative of differences in substrate affinities and activities leading to periodic decoupling between ammonia and nitrite oxidation. These data capture a dynamic nitrogen cycle in which multiple microbial groups appear to be active participants.

  7. Coastal observing and forecasting system for the German Bight – estimates of hydrophysical states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Petersen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A coastal observing system for Northern and Arctic Seas (COSYNA aims at construction of a long-term observatory for the German part of the North Sea, elements of which will be deployed as prototype modules in Arctic coastal waters. At present a coastal prediction system deployed in the area of the German Bight integrates near real-time measurements with numerical models in a pre-operational way and provides continuously state estimates and forecasts of coastal ocean state. The measurement suite contributing to the pre-operational set up includes in situ time series from stationary stations, a High-Frequency (HF radar system measuring surface currents, a FerryBox system and remote sensing data from satellites. The forecasting suite includes nested 3-D hydrodynamic models running in a data-assimilation mode, which are forced with up-to-date meteorological forecast data. This paper reviews the present status of the system and its recent upgrades focusing on developments in the field of coastal data assimilation. Model supported data analysis and state estimates are illustrated using HF radar and FerryBox observations as examples. A new method combining radial surface current measurements from a single HF radar with a priori information from a hydrodynamic model is presented, which optimally relates tidal ellipses parameters of the 2-D current field and the M2 phase and magnitude of the radials. The method presents a robust and helpful first step towards the implementation of a more sophisticated assimilation system and demonstrates that even using only radials from one station can substantially benefit state estimates for surface currents. Assimilation of FerryBox data based on an optimal interpolation approach using a Kalman filter with a stationary background covariance matrix derived from a preliminary model run which was validated against remote sensing and in situ data demonstrated the capabilities of the pre-operational system. Data

  8. Current status of zooplankton in reservoir R-3 of the 'Mayak' production association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipova, O.; Pryakhin, E. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine - URCRM (Russian Federation); Ivanov, I. [FSUE Mayak PA (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    One of the commonly used objects for the study of human influence on aquatic ecosystems is zooplankton. Zooplankton community is a sensitive component of biota in reservoir which can change their functional parameters and species composition in response to exposure to different factors. The role of zooplankton in the transformation of energy and in the biotic cycling of the substance is very important. The study of the responses of this element in the water ecosystem with anthropogenic influences, including radioactive contamination, is an important task. The object of the study was the zooplankton in the reservoir R-3, Chelyabinsk region, Russia. R-3 is located in the buffer zone of the 'Mayak' PA and is the storage for low-level radioactive waste. In addition to the high content of radionuclides (the average specific activity of {sup 90}Sr in water was 2.8 kBq/l, {sup 137}Cs - 0.7 kBq/l), this reservoir is characterized by high values of dichromate oxidizability and phosphate contamination. Previously, the study of the zooplankton of this reservoir was conducted in 1952, regular observations were not organized. Assessment of the current status of the community, more than half a century residing in the conditions of radioactive and chemical contamination, seems highly interesting. Sampling was carried out in 2011-2012 at three stations: in the upper, middle, and near the dam of the reservoir by the method of weighted average of samples with bathometer. Analysis of samples showed that the zooplankton community consists of the following major groups: rotifers and cladocerans and copepods crustaceans. In total in R-3 27 species of zooplankton, including 19 species of rotifers, 3 species of copepod and 3 species of cladocerans, as well as two species of ciliates were discovered. Zooplankton abundance in 2011 was 9±9 million individuals/m{sup 3} (given the mean and standard deviation), in 2012 - 26.0±0.9 million individuals/m{sup 3}. The main contribution

  9. [Distribution of zooplankton community in Mediterranean-climate lakes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherbi, Malika; Lek-Ang, Sithan; Lek, Sovan; Arab, Abdeslem

    2008-09-01

    The sometimes sharp thermal variations and irregular precipitations and force concentrated over short periods characterize the Mediterranean climate. The structure of the zooplanktonic settlement was analyzed during one year in three Algerian reservoirs (lakes) with different geographical and climatic situation, in relation to abiotic factors (temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, suspended matter, carbonates, nitrogenized and phosphorated nutritive salts). A canonical correspondence analysis was used to estimate the influence of the abiotic factors on the temporal distribution. The studied lakes are located, on the one hand, in northern Algeria, in a sub-humid area (Lake Boukourdane) and, on the other hand, in the South of the country, in the arid region (Foum El Ghorza and Djorf Torba). Analysis of the environmental parameters indicates that there is a seasonal variation in the three reservoirs. In Lake Foum El Ghorza, the temperature and hydrology variations, linked with the arid climate, affects the concentration of dissolved oxygen, which strongly decreases (1.5 mg/l), involving a pH reduction; suspended matters are sometimes high, coming from the stripped catchment area, causing a turbidity in this not very deep lake. The study of the distribution of the species allowed us to highlight a seasonal temporal variation. Lake Boukourdane, in the sub-humid zone, has an increased specific richness (SR=13). The various species evolve in alternation during the annual cycle. The representative species of this lake is Copidodiaptomus numidicus, characteristic of the rainy and endemic zone of the western Mediterranean; it is dominant (67%) in the spring. The Stenothermal species Diaphanosoma brachyurum, endemic of hot waters, is common to the two lakes; it evolves particularly in the summer (51.3%) at Boukourdane, whereas it is perennial and dominant (55%) in the spring at Djorf Torba. The specific richness is lower in Djorf Torba (SR=7) and in Foum El Ghorza (SR=6). The

  10. Physical, taxonomic code, and other data from current meter and other instruments in New York Bight from DOLPHIN and other platforms; 14 March 1971 to 03 August 1975 (NODC Accession 7601385)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, taxonomic code, and other data were collected using current meter and other instruments from DOLPHIN and other platforms in New York Bight. Data were...

  11. Summary of marine mammal and seabird surveys of the Southern California Bight area, 1975-1978. Volume III - investigators' reports. Part III. Seabirds - book II. Reproductive ecology and foraging habits of breeding seabirds. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.L. Jr.; Pitman, R.L.; Naughton, M.; Winnett, K.; Newman, A.

    1981-04-01

    This volume contains the findings of a three year study of the breeding seabirds of the Southern California Bight (SCB) area. The distribution, abundance, reproductive ecology, foods and foraging distribution of seabirds breeding in the SCB are discussed.

  12. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the New York Bight as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 10 April 1984 - 31 October 1984 (NODC Accession 8500225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the New York Bight from April 10, 1984 to October 31, 1984. Data were...

  13. HYDROCARBONS - TOTAL RESOLVED, CAS (CHEMICAL ABSTRACTS SERVICE) PARAMETER CODES and PCB, and other data from UNKNOWN in the New York Bight on 1901-01-01 (NODC Accession 8600271)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This submission contains the master data set assembled in a study called "Contaminant Body Burdens, Variability and Monitoring Implications for the New York Bight"....

  14. Hydrographic Conditions At The Carbonate Mound Locations In The NE Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weering, T.; de Hass, H.; White, M.; de Stigter, H.

    As part of the component 5th framework projects that form part of the OMARC clus- ter, hydrographic measurements have been made in the region of the deep water car- bonate mounds provinces of the NE Atlantic. These mounds are located at depths 600-1000m depth along the continental slopes of the Porcupine Sea Bight and Bank and the SE Rockall Bank. These regions correspond to the vertical and horizontal boundaries of the intermediate water masses that occupy the region, providing differ- ent hydrographic regimes between mound locations,. In addition there is a large vari- ability in temperature/salinity conditions and both characteristics have implications for the distribution of mound fauna. The deep water coral associated with carbonate mound structures coincide with strong benthic current activity and this is confirmed from benthic current measurements from landers and current meters at the SE Rockall and NW Porcupine Bank mound loca- tions. Near seabed currents are strong, with a typical mean speed of 20cm/s and a max- imum in excess of 50cm/s. At the SE Rockall Bank site, a mean SW along isobath flow is measured, whilst at the NW Porcupine mound location, a poleward slope current is measured. Bottom Ekman dynamics is apparent with a changes in near seabed verti- cal stratification related to changes to overlying slope current strength. Strong diurnal variability is found at the Rockall Bank site, providing strong cross-slope currents. The diurnal current forcing over both the Rockall and Porcupine Banks may result in enclosed circulation patterns over the banks and retention of organic material supplied to the mounds. In contrast, currents at the Hovland and Magellan mound sites in the northern Porcupine Sea Bight, where there are numerous buried mounds, are relatively low.

  15. Diet of red-throated divers Gavia stellata reflects the seasonal availability of Atlantic herring Clupea harengus in the southwestern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guse, Nils; Garthe, Stefan; Schirmeister, Bernd

    2009-11-01

    Red-throated divers are piscivorous seabirds considered to be opportunistic feeders. The overall knowledge about their diet at sea is scarce. A large sample size of 82 by-caught red-throated divers from two winter (2001-02 and 2002-03) and three spring periods (2003, 2004 and 2005) offered the unique opportunity to analyse their dietary composition in the Pomeranian Bight. This area represents a hot spot in their winter distribution in the southwestern Baltic Sea and a marine protected area has been established due to its importance for the divers and other seabird species. Diet composition was analysed based on stomach and gut contents. The comparison of the different prey species was mainly based on reconstructed biomass using regressions between skeletal hard parts such as otoliths and original fish length and weight. The diet of the divers comprised eleven different fish species and nine different families. No interannual differences in the consumption of the nine most important prey species could be observed. However, in contrast to the other fish species the consumption of Atlantic herring and zander differed significantly between seasons. Herring supplied the majority of prey biomass in all three spring periods and zander in both winter periods. Moreover, the average length of herring consumed differed significantly between seasons. In winter, smaller herring was consumed compared to spring. The distinct seasonal changes in the diet composition were paralleled and most probably evoked by the migration pattern of the Western Baltic spring spawning herring which has its main spawning grounds adjacent to the study area. Based on the habitat requirements of the different prey species it could be inferred that mostly the coastal waters of the bight were used for foraging. Its function as spawning, nursery area and feeding ground with numerous resident and migrating fish species available might explain the important role of the Pomeranian Bight as wintering and

  16. Moving Northward? First Record of Spilocuma Watlingi (Crustacea: Cumacea: Bodotriidae) in Mid-Atlantic Region, Maryland Coastal Bays, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Nunez, A. G.; Chigbu, P.

    2016-02-01

    Spilocuma watlingi is a species of Cumacea that appears to be confined to protected beaches inside of barrier islands. It ranges in distribution from the northern Gulf of Mexico (Alabama) to the South Atlantic Bight (Georgia and North Carolina) on the east coast of the United States. A benthic invertebrate sample collected from Sinepuxent Bay (Maryland) in August 2014, contained one ovigerous female of Spilocuma watlingi which is being reported for the first time in Maryland Coastal Bays (MCBs) and the Mid-Atlantic region. The occurrence of S. watlingi in the MCBs represents a major range extension for the species. The likely vectors for its introduction in the region include ship ballast water and hull fouling. It is also possible that because of climate change S. watlingi has begun to invade temperate waters, or the species was overlooked during previous studies. If so, this underscores the need for more studies on the diversity and abundance of benthic marine invertebrates in the Mid-Atlantic region.

  17. A hybrid numerical-experimental study of fluid transport by migrating zooplankton aggregations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Monica; Dabiri, John; Nawroth, Janna; Gemmell, Brad; Collins, Samantha

    2014-11-01

    Zooplankton aggregations that undergo diel vertical migrations have been hypothesized to play an important role in local nutrient transport and global ocean dynamics. The degree of the contributions of these naturally occurring events ultimately relies on how efficiently fluid is transported and eventually mixed within the water column. By implementing solutions to the Stokes equations, numerical models have successfully captured the time-averaged far-field flow of self-propelled swimmers. However, discrepancies between numerical fluid transport estimates and field measurements of individual jellyfish suggest the need to include near-field effects to assess the impact of biomixing in oceanic processes. Here, we bypass the inherent difficulty of modeling the unsteady flow of active swimmers while including near-field effects by integrating experimental velocity data of zooplankton into our numerical model. Fluid transport is investigated by tracking a sheet of artificial fluid particles during vertical motion of zooplankton. Collective effects are addressed by studying different swimmer configurations within an aggregation from the gathered data for a single swimmer. Moreover, the dependence of animal swimming mode is estimated by using data for different species of zooplankton.

  18. Incorporation of nitrogen from N2 fixation into amino acids of zooplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loick-Wilde, Natalie; Dutz, Jörg; Miltner, Anja

    2012-01-01

    quantified the direct incorporation of 15N tracer from N2-fixing N. spumigena (diazotroph nitrogen) and ammonium-utilizing R. salina into the amino acid nitrogen (AA-N) of zooplankton using complementary gas chromatography– combustion–isotope ratio mass spectrometry, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry...

  19. Zooplankton standing stock and diversity along an oceanic track in the western Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.

    Zooplankton samples were collected from 13 stations situated in the oceanic realm between latitudes 8 degrees 49 minutes N and 19 degrees 48 minutes S in January-February, 1981. Standing stock varied between 1.6 and 10.4 ml/100 m@u3...

  20. Biochemical composition and calorific value of zooplankton from northern part of Central Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nandakumar, K.; Bhat, K.L.; Wagh, A.B.

    Average biomass value of zooplankton obtained was 22.69 ml 100 m-3. Average percentages of lipid, carbohydrate, protein and carbon were 6.3, 6.0, 23.6 and 34.62 respectively. Calorific values ranged between 6217 and 24708 J.g-1 dry wt (8082...

  1. Vertical distribution of zooplankton: density dependence and evidence for an ideal free distribution with costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lampert Winfried

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In lakes with a deep-water algal maximum, herbivorous zooplankton are faced with a trade-off between high temperature but low food availability in the surface layers and low temperature but sufficient food in deep layers. It has been suggested that zooplankton (Daphnia faced with this trade-off distribute vertically according to an "Ideal Free Distribution (IFD with Costs". An experiment has been designed to test the density (competition dependence of the vertical distribution as this is a basic assumption of IFD theory. Results Experiments were performed in large, indoor mesocosms (Plankton Towers with a temperature gradient of 10°C and a deep-water algal maximum established below the thermocline. As expected, Daphnia aggregated at the interface between the two different habitats when their density was low. The distribution spread asymmetrically towards the algal maximum when the density increased until 80 % of the population dwelled in the cool, food-rich layers at high densities. Small individuals stayed higher in the water column than large ones, which conformed with the model for unequal competitors. Conclusion The Daphnia distribution mimics the predictions of an IFD with costs model. This concept is useful for the analysis of zooplankton distributions under a large suite of environmental conditions shaping habitat suitability. Fish predation causing diel vertical migrations can be incorporated as additional costs. This is important as the vertical location of grazing zooplankton in a lake affects phytoplankton production and species composition, i.e. ecosystem function.

  2. Heavy metals and zooplankton with special reference to Minamata (Japan) mercury pollution - A case study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gajbhiye, S.N; Hirota, R.

    content was 0.01 to 0.25 mu g g/1 (dry). Among the various groups of zooplankton studied chaetognaths, bivalve, and crustaceans showed higher rate of bioaccumulation. The distribution of other heavy metals was not abnormal and the values were below...

  3. Trace metal concentrations in marine zooplankton from the western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rejomon, G.; Balachandran, K.K.; Nair, M.; Joseph, T.

    Trace metal contents in zooplankton samples were estimated as a part of Marine Research-Living Resource Programme (MRLR) programme at 24 stations to establish the importance of these metals in the Bay of Bengal. The average concentration of Fe, Co...

  4. Trace metal concentrations in zooplankton from the eastern Arabian Sea and western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rejomon, G.; Balachandran, K.K.; Nair, M.; Joseph, T.; DineshKumar, P.K.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, K.K.C.; Pillai, N

    Trace metal contents in zooplankton samples were estimated as a part of the Marine Research-Living Resource program at 24 stations in the Bay of Bengal (November, 2002) and 29 stations in the Arabian Sea (September-October, 2003) during the Cruises...

  5. Richness of Phytoplankton and Zooplankton in Water Streams at Jobolarangan Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WIRYANTO

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Plankton is components of aquatic ecosystem. Phytoplankton play as primary producers, zooplankton play an important role in the higher order in the transfer of energy primary producers, the alga, to the higher order consumers such as aquatic insects, larval fish, and some adult fish. Streams of Jobolarangan forest may show phytoplankton and zooplankton that unique. The objectives of this research were to know diversity of phytoplankton and zooplankton and to determined their density. Plankton were sampled using 25-30 m mesh net, in three location of streams, i.e.: Parkiran (1773 m asl., Mrutu (1875 m asl., and Air Terjun (1600 m asl.. Samples were examined under light microscope for identification, and determined their density/L. Richness of phytoplankton in streams at Jobolarangan forest composed by family of Chlorophyceae, Euglenophyceae (Algae, and Bacillariophyceae. Zooplanktons that were found order of rotifer, cladoceras, and copepods. Allochtonous productivity, low nutrient level, low light level, and flowing water condition caused density of plankton/L in stream at Jobolarangan was low, i.e. 0,064 to 0,232.

  6. Validity of zooplankton biomass estimates and energy equivalent in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dalal, S.G.; Parulekar, A.H.

    , as deduced from the data on biochemical composition and energy content, it is evident that zooplankton of the Indian Ocean contains on an average 2.7% organic carbon, rather than the widely quoted value of 6.5%. The biomass production in terms of organic...

  7. Standing stock and biochemical composition of zooplankton in the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumari, L.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    function as a reserve food in tropical zooplankton. Lipid, carbohydrate, ash, carbon and calorific content did not show much variation. Standing crop was estimated as 352.13 mgC.m super(2) for the upper 50m column of the coastal region, 716.82 mgC.M super(2...

  8. Emergent Macrophytes Support Zooplankton in a Shallow Tropical Lake: A Basis for Wetland Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebrehiwot, Mesfin; Kifle, Demeke; Triest, Ludwig

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the biodiversity value of littoral zones of lakes is a priority for aquatic biodiversity conservation. However, less emphasis has been given to the littoral part of tropical African lakes, with many of the previous researches focusing only on the open water side. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to investigate the impact of the littoral zone of a shallow freshwater tropical lake (Ziway, Ethiopia), dominated by two emergent macrophytes, on zooplankton community structure. We hypothesized that the wetland vegetation serves as a preferred microhabitat for zooplankton communities. A lake with substantial coverage of emergent macrophytes was monitored monthly from January to August, 2016. The monitoring included the measurements of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. Sampling sites were selected to represent areas of the macrophyte vegetation ( Typha latifolia and Phragmites australis) and the open water part of the lake. Sites with macrophyte vegetation were found to be the home of more dense and diverse zooplankton community. However, during the period of high vegetation loss, the density of crustacean zooplankton showed significant reduction within the patches of macrophytes. From biodiversity conservation perspective, it was concluded that the preservation of such small areas of macrophytes covering the littoral zone of lakes could be as important as protecting the whole lake. However, the rapid degradation of wetland vegetation by human activities is a real threat to the lake ecosystem. In the not-too-far future, it could displace and evict riparian vegetation and the biota it supports.

  9. Biochemical composition and caloric potential of zooplankton from Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sreepada, R.A.; Rivonker, C.U.; Parulekar, A.H.

    .62, 4.95, 1.54, 0.43, 4.4 and 4.16 respectively on wet weight basis. A good correlation of caloric potential with protein and lipid indicated to a certain extent that protein and lipid act as metabolic reserves of the zooplankton in the area...

  10. Zooplankton biomass and potential fishery resources of the EEZ of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.

    An assessment of zooplankton biomass, secondary production and potential fishery resources of the EEZ of India was made from the data collected during a period of 15 years from 1976 to 1991. The areas studied included the Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal...

  11. Mercury, cadmium and lead in different tissues of fishes and in zooplankton from the Andaman Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kureishy, T.W.; Sanzgiri, S.; George, M.D.; Braganca, A.

    Several fishes, representing different trophic levels, and some zooplankton samples were analysed for Hg, Cd and Pb There is a wide variation in the concentrations of these elements Hg is quite low in practically all the tissues Cd and Pb show...

  12. Looking inside the Ocean: Toward an Autonomous Imaging System for Monitoring Gelatinous Zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corgnati, Lorenzo; Marini, Simone; Mazzei, Luca; Ottaviani, Ennio; Aliani, Stefano; Conversi, Alessandra; Griffa, Annalisa

    2016-12-14

    Marine plankton abundance and dynamics in the open and interior ocean is still an unknown field. The knowledge of gelatinous zooplankton distribution is especially challenging, because this type of plankton has a very fragile structure and cannot be directly sampled using traditional net based techniques. To overcome this shortcoming, Computer Vision techniques can be successfully used for the automatic monitoring of this group.This paper presents the GUARD1 imaging system, a low-cost stand-alone instrument for underwater image acquisition and recognition of gelatinous zooplankton, and discusses the performance of three different methodologies, Tikhonov Regularization, Support Vector Machines and Genetic Programming, that have been compared in order to select the one to be run onboard the system for the automatic recognition of gelatinous zooplankton. The performance comparison results highlight the high accuracy of the three methods in gelatinous zooplankton identification, showing their good capability in robustly selecting relevant features. In particular, Genetic Programming technique achieves the same performances of the other two methods by using a smaller set of features, thus being the most efficient in avoiding computationally consuming preprocessing stages, that is a crucial requirement for running on an autonomous imaging system designed for long lasting deployments, like the GUARD1. The Genetic Programming algorithm has been installed onboard the system, that has been operationally tested in a two-months survey in the Ligurian Sea, providing satisfactory results in terms of monitoring and recognition performances.

  13. Looking inside the Ocean: Toward an Autonomous Imaging System for Monitoring Gelatinous Zooplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Corgnati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Marine plankton abundance and dynamics in the open and interior ocean is still an unknown field. The knowledge of gelatinous zooplankton distribution is especially challenging, because this type of plankton has a very fragile structure and cannot be directly sampled using traditional net based techniques. To overcome this shortcoming, Computer Vision techniques can be successfully used for the automatic monitoring of this group.This paper presents the GUARD1 imaging system, a low-cost stand-alone instrument for underwater image acquisition and recognition of gelatinous zooplankton, and discusses the performance of three different methodologies, Tikhonov Regularization, Support Vector Machines and Genetic Programming, that have been compared in order to select the one to be run onboard the system for the automatic recognition of gelatinous zooplankton. The performance comparison results highlight the high accuracy of the three methods in gelatinous zooplankton identification, showing their good capability in robustly selecting relevant features. In particular, Genetic Programming technique achieves the same performances of the other two methods by using a smaller set of features, thus being the most efficient in avoiding computationally consuming preprocessing stages, that is a crucial requirement for running on an autonomous imaging system designed for long lasting deployments, like the GUARD1. The Genetic Programming algorithm has been installed onboard the system, that has been operationally tested in a two-months survey in the Ligurian Sea, providing satisfactory results in terms of monitoring and recognition performances.

  14. Spatio-temporal variability in the GDH activity to ammonium excretion ratio in epipelagic marine zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Urruzola, I.; Osma, N.; Packard, T. T.; Maldonado, F.; Gómez, M.

    2016-11-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activities have been widely used in oceanographic research as an index of in situ NH4+ excretion rates (RNH4+) in zooplankton. Here we study the variability in the relationship between the enzymatic rates and the actual rates measured in epipelagic marine zooplankton between several marine ecosystems. Although both measures were significantly correlated across zooplankton assemblages, the regression models yielded different GDH/RNH4+ ratios across ecosystems. Accordingly, the error of a general equation increased up to ±42.5 % when regressing all our data together. Aside from possible interspecific differences, some of the variability was explained by the unequal allometric relation that each rate maintained with protein. Scaling exponents were 1.38 for GDH activities and 0.87 for RNH4+, which would induce uncertainties in the GDH/RNH4+ ratios when organisms with different sizes were considered. Nevertheless, the main factor causing divergence between GDH activities and RNH4+ was the potential prey availability. We compared the excretory metabolism of the zooplankton community at different productivity periods in waters off Gran Canaria, and observed an important decrease in the RNH4+ during stratification. A similar decrease was found in the internal pool of glutamate, which may be critical in the regulation of in vivo rates. Strengthening our knowledge of the relationship between GDH activities and the RNH4+ will lead to more meaningful predictions of phytoplankton regeneration and community nitrogen fluxes across large spatial scales.

  15. Organic carbon content of zooplankton from the nearshore waters of Bombay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.; Gajbhiye, S.N.; Sayed, F.Y.

    Organic carbon content of zooplankton in the Versova Creek and Thana Creek (polluted areas), off Versova and off Mahim, Bombay, India (relatively unpolluted areas) varied respectively from 21.4-30, 13.2-38.4, 21.6-30 and 25.8-39.6% dry weight...

  16. Zooplankton assembly in mountain lentic waters is primarily driven by local processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernini, Silvia; Primicerio, Raul; Rossetti, Giampaolo

    2009-01-01

    The influence of local (i.e. physico-chemical constraints) and regional (i.e. dispersal) processes in determining the structure of zooplankton communities in lentic waters was analysed in a mountain district of 4500 km 2 (northern Apennines, Italy). In the 47 lakes and ponds considered in this study, a total of 139 taxa were found. Surface area (SA) and maximum depth ( Zmax) significantly influenced species richness and nestedness, stressing the importance of habitat availability for zooplankton diversity and composition. Species richness and nestedness did not correlate with site isolation, indicating low influence of dispersal for these community properties. A negative relationship between the similarity in species composition among sites and their mutual geographic distance was also found. The relative importance of different sources of compositional variation was quantified by direct ordination. Local environmental conditions (i.e. Zmax, altitude, pH and conductivity) accounted for 65.9 % of the variation in rotifer assemblages. The importance of environmental constraints in structuring zooplankton communities was best documented by the microcrustacean distribution in the study area, which was mainly correlated (73.4 % of the variation in the species data) with water ionic content, surface area and hydroperiod of the habitats. Although previous studies on processes shaping zooplankton assemblages that operate at different scales have yielded contrasting results, our data provide clear evidence for a major role of local constraints.

  17. Determine Age-structure of Gelatinous Zooplankton Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, H.; Shahrestani, S.; He, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Gelatinous are delicate and transparent by nature, but are conspicuous in many ecosystems when in bloom. Their proliferations are a bothersome and costly nuisance and influencing important food webs and species interactions. More importantly, gelatinous zooplankton respond to climate change rapidly and understanding their upsurge needs information on their recruitment and population dynamics which in turn require their age-structure. However, ageing gelatinous zooplankton is often restricted by the fact that they shrink under unfavorable conditions. In the present study, we examine the potential of using optical coherence tomography (OCT) to age gelatinous zooplankton. OCT is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses light waves to examine 2D or 3D structure of target objects at a resolution of 3-5 µm. We were able to successfully capture both 3D and 2D images of sea nettle muscle fibers. Preliminary results on ctenophores will be discussed. Overall, this non-destructive sampling allows us to scan and capture images of mesoglea from jellyfish cultured in the lab, using the same individual repeatedly through time, documenting its growth which will provide precise measurements to construct an age key that will be applied to gelatinous zooplankton captured in the field. Coupled with information on abundance, we can start to quantify their recruitment timing and success rate.

  18. The interaction between cyanobacteria and zooplankton in a more eutrophic world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ger, Kemal Ali; Urrutia-Cordero, Pablo; Frost, Paul C.; Hansson, Lars Anders; Sarnelle, Orlando; Wilson, Alan E.; Lurling, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    As blooms of cyanobacteria expand and intensify in freshwater systems globally, there is increasing interest in their ecological effects. In addition to being public health hazards, cyanobacteria have long been considered a poor quality food for key zooplankton grazers that link phytoplankton to

  19. Zooplankton diversity of two floodplain lakes (pats of Manipur, northeast India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma, B.K.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Plankton samples collected (November, 2002 – October, 2004 from Waithou and Utra pats, two floodplain lakesin Manipur state of northeast India, revealed species rich zooplankton (121 species with diverse nature of Rotifera (75 species.The individual pats exhibited rich species diversity (110 and 103 species and high monthly richness (68±7 and 61±8 speciesrespectively with higher community similarities. Zooplankton formed important quantitative component (56.0±4.3 % and55.1±5.1 % of net plankton of the two pats; Rotifera dominantly contributed to their abundance while Cladocera > Copepodawere sub-dominant groups. The richness and abundance showed significant variations between pats and between months andfollowed oscillating annual patterns in each pat except for peaks during winter. Zooplankton indicated higher species diversityand evenness, lower dominance, lack of quantitative importance of individual species, low densities and equitable abundance ofthe majority of species in both pats. The richness correlated inversely only with nitrate in Waithou pat and abundance positivelycorrelated with alkalinity only in Utra Pat. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA with abiotic factors explained 55.6 % and61.8% cumulative variance of zooplankton assemblages of Waithou and Utra pats respectively along axis 1 and 2.

  20. Estimates of zooplankton abundance and size distribution with the Optical Plankton Counter (OPC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Kai; Petersen, D.; Schnack, D.

    1997-01-01

    The capability of the Optical Plankton Count er (OPC) to examine the abundance and size distribution of zooplankton was tested in Storfjorden, Norway, in June 1993. Selected material obtained from net sampling was measured with a laboratory version of the OPC and compared with microscope analysis...

  1. Mercury concentration variability in the zooplankton of the southern Baltic coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bełdowska, Magdalena; Mudrak-Cegiołka, Stella

    2017-12-01

    Being a toxic element, mercury is introduced to the human organism through the consumption of fish and seafood, which in turn often feed on zooplankton. The bioaccumulation of Hg by zooplankton is an important factor influencing the magnitude of the mercury load introduced with food into the predator organism. Therefore the present article attempts to identify the processes and factors influencing Hg concentration in the zooplankton of the coastal zone, an area where marine organisms - an attractive food source for humans - thrive. This is particularly important in areas where climate changes influence the species composition and quantity of plankton. The studies were carried out on three test sites in the coastal zone of the southern Baltic Sea in the period from December 2011 to May 2013. The obtained results show that the shorting of the winter season is conducive to Hg increase in zooplankton and, consequently, in the trophic chain. High mercury concentrations were measured in genus Synchaeta and Keratella when Mesodinium rubrum were predominant in phytoplankton, while other sources of this metal in the plankton fauna were epilithon, epiphton and microbenthos. This is of particular importance when it comes to sheltered bays and estuaries with low water dynamics.

  2. The role of climate in shaping zooplankton communities of shallow lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gyllström, M.; Hansson, L-A.; Jeppesen, E.; Bécares, E.; Gross, E.M.; Irvine, K.; Kairesalo, T.; Kornijow, R.; Rosa Miracle, M.; Nykänen, M.; Nõges, T.; Romo, S.; Stephen, D.; Van Donk, E.

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed data from 81 shallow European lakes, which were sampled with standardized methods, for combined effects of climatic, physical, and chemical features of food-web interactions, with a specific focus on zooplankton biomass and community structure. Multiple-regression analysis showed that

  3. Biochemical composition of zooplankton of Bombay High (oil platform) area in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, K.L.; Wagh, A.B.

    Variations in the biochemical constituents and calorific values of zooplankton from an off-shore oil processing platform were estimated. Mean value of biomass was 0.35 ml.m/3 with relatively higher values during post-monsoon period. Copepods formed...

  4. Relative abundance and diel variation of zooplankton from south west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Santhakumari, V.; Peter, K.J.

    the traditional fishing grounds of Kerala Coast. Average biomass values ranged from 45-95 ml 100/m sup(-3). Increase in zooplankton at night was discernible at most of the stations and the highest biomass noticed was 131 ml 100/m sup(-3). Copepods formed the most...

  5. First study on the zooplankton of the Kerid (Kerið Crater Lake, Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesela Evtimova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We studied the qualitative composition of zooplankton of the Kerid Crater Lake. We found 10 taxa from which five rotifers and two lower crustaceans. Three of the recorded species are new to the freshwater fauna of Iceland: the rotifer species Keratella cf. americana Carlin, 1943 and Colurella sulcata (Stenroos, 1898, and the crustacean harpacticoid Bryocamptus (Bryocamptus minutus (Claus, 1863.

  6. Concentration and toxicity of some metals in zooplankton from nearshore waters of Bombay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gajbhiye, S.N.; Nair, V.R.; Narvekar, P.V.; Desai, B.N.

    Zooplankton samples collected from 4 stations located in the nearshore waters of Bombay were analysed for Cu, Co, Mn, Ni and Cd. Concentrations of Co, Mn and Ni were more in copepods and gelatinous organisms than in mysids and decapods. High...

  7. Zooplankton incidence in abnormally high sea surface temperature in the Eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.

    and internal waves may cause zooplankton abundance. Average biomass values in high sea surface temperature areas were higher (0.30 ml.m/3) than at the other stations (0.07 ml.m/3). Crustacean eggs, fish eggs and mysids clustered in pockets of abnormally high...

  8. Marine Mesocosm Model, Development of phyto- and zooplankton under elevated copper concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glorius, S.T.; Kooten, van T.

    2011-01-01

    A ‘minimal’ model was constructed to simulate the development of phyto- and zooplankton communities with and without the presence of elevated copper concentrations and to investigate if there is a food web effect in addition to the direct effect of copper. Data from a mesocosm experiment carried out

  9. Zooplankton ecology in the Mandovi-Zuari estuarine system of Goa, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Padmavati, G.; Goswami, S.C.

    were influenced by the southwest monsoon. Salinity fluctuations were drastic (0.1 to 36.6 x 10 sup(-3)). This appeared to cause variations in plankton production and heterogeneity of various taxa. Zooplankton biomass and total numerical counts varied...

  10. Zooplankton community structure in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea in autumn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongju Chen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Study on zooplankton spatial distribution is essential for understanding food web dynamics in marine ecosystems and fishery management. Here we elucidated the composition and distribution of large mesozooplankton on the continental shelf of the Yellow Sea and East China Sea, and explored the zooplankton community structure in these water masses. Sixty vertical hauls (bottom or 200 m in deep water to surface using a ring net (diameter 0.8 m, 505-μm mesh were exploited in November 2007. The biogeographic patterns of zooplankton communities were investigated using multivariate analysis methods; copepod biodiversity was analyzed using univariate indices. Copepods and protozoans were dominate in the communities. Based on the species composition, we divided the study areas into six station groups. Significant differences in zooplankton assemblages were detected between the Yellow Sea and East China Sea. Species richness was higher in East China Sea groups than those in Yellow Sea, whereas taxonomic distinctness was higher in Yellow Sea than in East China Sea. There was a clear relationship between the species composition and water mass group.

  11. Atlantic menhaden adult tagging study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Atlantic menhaden are a schooling forage fish species, which are subject to a large commercial purse seine fishery. Atlantic menhaden are harvested for reduction...

  12. Spatial patterns of littoral zooplankton assemblages along a salinity gradient in a brackish sea: A functional diversity perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius, Laura K.; Leskinen, Elina; Lehtonen, Hannu; Nurminen, Leena

    2017-11-01

    The distribution patterns and diversity of littoral zooplankton are both key baseline information for understanding the functioning of coastal ecosystems, and for identifying the mechanisms by which the impacts of recently increased eutrophication are transferred through littoral food webs. In this study, zooplankton community structure and diversity along a shallow coastal area of the northern Baltic Sea were determined in terms of horizontal environmental gradients. Spatial heterogeneity of the zooplankton community was examined along the gradient. Altogether 31 sites in shallow sandy bays on the coast of southwest Finland were sampled in the summer periods of 2009 and 2010 for zooplankton and environmental variables (surface water temperature, salinity, turbidity, wave exposure, macrophyte coverage, chlorophyll a and nutrients). Zooplankton diversity was measured as both taxonomic as well as functional diversity, using trait-based classification of planktonic crustaceans. Salinity, and to a lesser extent turbidity and temperature, were found to be the main predictors of the spatial patterns and functional diversity of the zooplankton community. Occurrence of cyclopoid copepods, as well as abundances of the calanoid copepod genus Acartia and the rotifer genus Keratella were found to be key factors in differentiating sites along the gradient. As far as we know, this is the first extensive study of functional diversity in Baltic Sea coastal zooplankton communities.

  13. Deep-water zooplankton in the Mediterranean Sea: Results from a continuous, synchronous sampling over different regions using sediment traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovaro, R.; Carugati, L.; Boldrin, A.; Calafat, A.; Canals, M.; Fabres, J.; Finlay, K.; Heussner, S.; Miserocchi, S.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.

    2017-08-01

    Information on the dynamics of deep-sea biota is extremely scant particularly for long-term time series on deep-sea zooplankton. Here, we present the results of a deep-sea zooplankton investigation over one annual cycle based on samples from sediment trap moorings in three sub-basins along the Mediterranean Sea. Deep-sea zooplankton assemblages were dominated by copepods, as in shallow waters, only in the Adriatic Sea (>60% of total abundance), but not in the deep Ionian Sea, where ostracods represented >80%, neither in the deep Alboran Sea, where polychaetes were >70%. We found that deep-sea zooplankton assemblages: i) are subjected to changes in their abundance and structure over time, ii) are characterized by different dominant taxa in different basins, and iii) display clear taxonomic segregation between shallow and near-bottom waters. Zooplankton biodiversity decreases with increasing water depth, but the equitability increases. We suggest here that variations of zooplankton abundance and assemblage structure are likely influenced by the trophic condition characterizing the basins. Our findings provide new insights on this largely unknown component of the deep ocean, and suggest that changes in the export of organic matter from the photic zone, such as those expected as a consequence of global change, can significantly influence zooplankton assemblages in the largest biome on Earth.

  14. The temporal dynamics of zooplankton communities of different types of water bodies within Ichniansky National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. V. Burian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the influence of anthropogenic impact on aquatic ecosystems has increased. This has led to a restructuring of aquatic ecosystems and affected the structural and functional organization of groups of aquatic organisms, causing qualitative and quantitative changes. Particular attention is drawn to the different types of water bodies of protected areas like IchnyanskyNational Park, which is located in Ichnyansky district of Chernihiv region. This park is a newly created one, so the reduction in intensity of anthropogenic pressure can be traced within its waters. Zooplankton plays an important role in the functioning of trophic networks because it transfers energy from producers and primary consumers to young fish and planktonophagous fish. Therefore, three main groups of zooplankton were chosen as the object of study: rotifers (class Eurotatoria, cladocerans (class Branchiopoda, order Cladocera, different age stages of copepods (class Copepoda, and also ostracods (Class Ostracoda. The zooplankton used as research material was collected in the daytime in spring (April, summer (late July – early August and autumn (late September – early October in the years 2015–2016 from ten experimental stations. During this period 81 species of zooplankton were recorded within heterogeneous reservoirs of IchnianskyNational Park. Monogonont rotifers (subclass Monogononta included 35 species (43% of all species and bdelloid rotifers (subclass Bdelloidea, cladocerns, comprised 28 species (35%, and copepods included 18 species (22%. The faunal range of zooplankton over different years and seasons was characterized by the predominance of the rotator complex in spring, rotator-cladocerans and cladocerans in summer, and of the cladocerans complex in autumn. This was due to the formation during spring and summer of favourable conditions in the waters for filter feeders, which consist generally of rotifers and cladocerans. In autumn the water

  15. Feeding ecology of mesopelagic zooplankton of the subtropical and subarctic North Pacific Ocean determined with fatty acid biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S. E.; Steinberg, D. K.; Chu, F.-L. E.; Bishop, J. K. B.

    2010-10-01

    Mesopelagic zooplankton may meet their nutritional and metabolic requirements in a number of ways including consumption of sinking particles, carnivory, and vertical migration. How these feeding modes change with depth or location, however, is poorly known. We analyzed fatty acid (FA) profiles to characterize zooplankton diet and large particle (>51 μm) composition in the mesopelagic zone (base of euphotic zone -1000 m) at two contrasting time-series sites in the subarctic (station K2) and subtropical (station ALOHA) Pacific Ocean. Total FA concentration was 15.5 times higher in zooplankton tissue at K2, largely due to FA storage by seasonal vertical migrators such as Neocalanus and Eucalanus. FA biomarkers specific to herbivory implied a higher plant-derived food source at mesotrophic K2 than at oligotrophic ALOHA. Zooplankton FA biomarkers specific to dinoflagellates and diatoms indicated that diatoms, and to a lesser extent, dinoflagellates were important food sources at K2. At ALOHA, dinoflagellate FAs were more prominent. Bacteria-specific FA biomarkers in zooplankton tissue were used as an indicator of particle feeding, and peaks were recorded at depths where known particle feeders were present at ALOHA (e.g., ostracods at 100-300 m). In contrast, depth profiles of bacterial FA were relatively constant with depth at K2. Diatom, dinoflagellate, and bacterial biomarkers were found in similar proportions in both zooplankton and particles with depth at both locations, providing additional evidence that mesopelagic zooplankton consume sinking particles. Carnivory indices were higher and increased significantly with depth at ALOHA, and exhibited distinct peaks at K2, representing an increase in dependence on other zooplankton for food in deep waters. Our results indicate that feeding ecology changes with depth as well as by location. These changes in zooplankton feeding ecology from the surface through the mesopelagic zone, and between contrasting environments

  16. Ecological evaluation of proposed reference sites in the New York Bight, Great South Bay, and Ambrose Light, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The current reference site used in evaluations of dredged material proposed for open water disposal in the New York Bight is the Mud Dump Reference Site. The sediment at this reference site is predominantly sand. The US Army Corps of Engineers New York District is considering designation of a new reference site that (1) includes a fine-grained component, believed to be necessary for adequate amphipod survival in laboratory tests, (2) better reflects the physical characteristics of the fine-grained sediment dredged from the New York/New Jersey Harbor and (3) is further removed from the Mud Dump Site than the current Mud Dump Reference Site. The Battelle Marine Science Laboratory was requested to characterize sediment collected from seven candidate reference sites during two study phases. This report presents the results of physical, chemical, and toxicological characterizations of sediment from these sites in comparisons with those of the original Mud Dump Reference Site.

  17. Autotrophic and heterotrophic activity in Arctic first-year sea-ice: Seasonal study from Marlene Bight, SW Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Dorte Haubjerg; Kristensen, Morten; Rysgaard, Søren

    2010-01-01

    in situ in plastic bags with subsequent melting and measurements of changes in total O-2 concentrations. The standard incubations showed that the annual succession followed a distinctive pattern, with a low, almost balancing heterotrophic and autotrophic activity during February and March. This period...... was followed by an algal bloom in late March and April, leading to a net autotrophic community. During February and March, the oxygen level in the bag incubations remained constant, validating the low balanced heterotrophic and autotrophic activity. As the autotrophic activity exceeded the heterotrophic...... activity in late March and April, it resulted in a significant net oxygen accumulation in the bag incubations. Integrated over the entire season, the sea ice of Malene Bight was net autotrophic with an annual net carbon fixation of 220 mg C m(-2), reflecting the net result of a sea ice-related gross...

  18. A global analysis of zooplankton in natural and artificial fresh waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faye L. Merrix-Jones

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Water-body size and location influence zooplankton diversity in freshwaters, but less is known about systematic variations in zooplankton community composition between natural and artificial waters on different continents. We used meta-analysis to assess how zooplankton in artificial water bodies across different biomes might differ from natural water bodies of similar size. Among 79 lakes, ponds and reservoirs (11 artificial and 68 natural, proximity to other water bodies apparently increased species richness in all lake types, probably reflecting dispersal. However, richness did not differ systematically between natural and artificial water bodies of comparable size. In contrast, community composition differed between artificial and natural waters after accounting for depth, productivity, longitude and conductivity, with models explaining up to 50% of the overall variance at genus level. Leptodiaptomus, Chydorus, Cyclops, Acanthocyclops, Skistodiaptomus, Epischura, Limnocalanus, Senecella, Heterocope, Arctodiaptomus and Aglaodiaptomus all occurred more frequently in natural waters, whilst Thermocyclops, Moina and Epischura occurred more frequently in artificial lakes. Rank-occurrence data revealed that Ceriodaphnia, Orthocyclops, Holopedium and Eucyclops were equitably distributed across water bodies of contrasting sizes, depths and climates. Other genera occurred under more specific conditions, typically where they had strong associations with natural lakes (e.g. Limnocalanus, Senecella, Heterocope, Arctodiaptomus and Aglaodiaptomus. These results are among the first to illustrate systematic differences in zooplankton composition between natural and artificial lakes at a global scale. Potential explanations require further evidence, but might include provision for niche specialists in natural lakes versus reduced heterogeneity, management or disturbance effects in artificial lakes; and effects of lake age, stability and habitat naturalness in

  19. Modulation of digestive enzyme activities during ontogeny of Labeo rohita larvae fed ascorbic acid enriched zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Gopa; Mukhopadhyay, P K; Ayyappan, S

    2008-04-01

    The effect of supplementation of ascorbic acid through enriched zooplankton [10%, 20% and 30% ascorbyl palmitate (AP) inclusion in diet of zooplankton] on different digestive enzyme activities during ontogeny of Labeo rohita larvae was studied from 4 day to 15 day post hatch. Ascorbic acid (AA) content in different groups of unenriched (8.6+/-0.71) and enriched zooplankton were, 750+/-29.3, 1409.1+/-45.5, 2009.21+/-199.2 mug/g respectively on dry matter basis with differences (Pdigestive enzyme activities in response to 10%, 20% and 30% AP enriched zooplankton feeding was evidenced from positive correlations between dietary AA content with magnitude of elevation of enzyme activity in different groups. There were 57, 55, 29.2 and 2 fold increases in amylase activity; 7.35, 7.02, 4.43 and 2.73 fold increases in protease activity; 45.636, 41.50, 19.83 and 13.69 fold increases in lipase activity and 6, 5, 3, and 2 fold increases in alkaline phosphatase activity observed in the 15th day post hatch larvae fed 20%, 30%, 10%AP enriched and normal zooplankton respectively, than 4-day post hatch larvae of the respective groups. Enzyme activities were also positively correlated with specific growth rates of wet weight of rohu larvae at the 15th day post hatch. Increased AA might have played an important role in advancing morphological transformation of the digestive tract, protecting gastric mucosa and accelerating growth by the process of tissue formation, which necessitated the requirement of more nutrient thereby, increasing digestive enzyme activity. The regulatory role of AA in the modulation of different digestive enzymes activity and its physiological consequences of nutrient digestibility and utilization during ontogenesis could be extrapolated for better nutrient management of the larvae.

  20. Evaluation of abiotic stresses of temperate estuaries by using resident zooplankton: A community vs. population approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sourav; Wooldridge, Tris; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2016-03-01

    By using permanently resident zooplankton, we assessed the ecological level (i.e. community and or population) that provides more in-depth indication of the stress related to salinity and temperature fluctuations in temperate estuaries. In the semi-arid warm temperate South Africa, the Gamtoos estuary experiences a full salinity gradient maintained by irregular but relatively frequent freshwater pulses, whereas the Kromme estuary is euhaline throughout its extent and receives only occasional freshwater inputs when the storage reservoir six km upstream overtops. Changes in the species evenness index of Pielou and the abundances of estuarine resident zooplankton species were modelled against salinity and temperature variations of respective estuaries. In the Gamtoos estuary, response of individual populations provided more in-depth information regarding zooplankton variability. However the most abundant resident zooplankton i.e. Acartia longipatella a copepod was not the best predictor of the salinity and temperature fluctuations. Conversely, the Kromme estuary study provided insights into the potential vulnerability of the resident estuarine zooplankton community to cold. Further, the population level study exposed responses of specific species against salinity changes. We discuss the pros and cons of designing ecological indicators of abiotic stress based on specific species, targeted to specific ecological level, and needs of considering the frequency and magnitude of fresh water inflow in an estuary. A suggestion is to use specific taxonomic group(s) (e.g. Copepods) to better understand the abiotic stress factors of specific set of estuaries (e.g. freshwater rich/starved) until a 'one size fits all' indicator is found for temperate estuaries.