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Sample records for asymptomatic bariatric candidates

  1. Nutritional Status of Bariatric Surgery Candidates.

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    Al-Mutawa, Aliaa; Anderson, Alfred Kojo; Alsabah, Salman; Al-Mutawa, Mohammad

    2018-01-11

    Obesity is a global epidemic affecting populations globally. Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for morbid obesity, and has increased dramatically. Bariatric surgery candidates frequently have pre-existing nutritional deficiencies that might exacerbate post-surgery. To provide better health care management pre- and post-bariatric surgery, it is imperative to establish the nutritional status of prospective patients before surgery. The aim of this study was to assess and provide baseline data on the nutritional status of bariatric candidates. A retrospective study was conducted on obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery from 2008 to 2015. The medical records of 1538 patients were reviewed for this study. Pre-operatively, the most commonly observed vitamin deficiencies were Vitamin D (76%) and Vitamin B 12 (16%). Anemia and iron status parameters were low in a considerable number of patients before surgery, as follows: hemoglobin 20%, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) 48%, ferritin 28%, serum iron 51%, and transferrin saturation 60%. Albumin and transferrin were found to be low in 10% and 9% of the patients, respectively, prior to surgery. In addition to deficiencies, a great number of patients had hypervitaminosis pre-operatively. Excess levels of Vitamin B₆ (24%) was the most remarkable. The findings in this study advocate a close monitoring and tailored supplementation pre- and post-bariatric surgery.

  2. A Prospective Study of the Conservative Management of Asymptomatic Preoperative and Postoperative Gallbladder Disease in Bariatric Surgery.

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    Pineda, Omar; Maydón, Hernán G; Amado, Mónica; Sepúlveda, Elisa M; Guilbert, Lizbeth; Espinosa, Omar; Zerrweck, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapy for weight loss in patients with morbid obesity. One of the most common long-term complications includes cholelithiasis. There is not a clear consensus in how to treat an asymptomatic gallbladder disease before and after bariatric surgery. Prospective study with every patient submitted to bariatric surgery from 2012 to 2014. The gallbladder status was assessed with an ultrasound before and after surgery (12 months), and a conservative management was conducted for patients with asymptomatic disease (preoperative and de novo); the need for delayed cholecystectomy was reported. Secondarily, an analysis of weight loss (%EWL) and gallbladder status was performed. Two-hundred and two bariatric surgeries were performed. The global incidence of preoperative gallbladder disease was 34.3 %, with 14.2 % presenting sludge, 20.1 % asymptomatic gallstones, and 2.3 % symptomatic gallstones. The final analysis was based on 146 patients; female sex comprised 81.1 % of cases with a mean age of 38.5 years. After 12 months, de novo gallbladder disease was observed in 21.2 %. The overall rate of cholecystectomy because of symptomatic disease after 12 months was 3.4 % (2 % developed acute cholecystitis). There were no differences in %EWL between patients with de novo gallbladder disease and those without. Conservative management of asymptomatic gallbladder disease in candidates to bariatric surgery is safe and can be offered in every case, based on the low percentage of patients requiring further cholecystectomy after 12 months. Also, a conservative management can be offered to patients developing de novo sludge/cholelithiasis without related symptoms.

  3. Ethical issues in the psychosocial assessment of bariatric surgery candidates.

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    Rouleau, Codie R; Rash, Joshua A; Mothersill, Kerry J

    2016-07-01

    Psychosocial evaluation is recommended prior to bariatric surgery. Practice guidelines have been published on assessment methods for bariatric surgery candidates, but they have not emphasized ethical issues with this population. This review outlines ethical and professional considerations for behavioral healthcare providers who conduct pre-surgical assessments of bariatric surgery candidates by merging ethical principles for mental health professionals with current practices in pre-surgical assessments. Issues discussed include the following: (a) establishing and maintaining competence, (b) obtaining informed consent, (c) respecting confidentiality, (d) avoiding bias and discrimination, (e) avoiding and addressing dual roles, (f) selecting and using psychological tests, and (g) acknowledging limitations of psychosocial assessments. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Exercise Testing Reveals Everyday Physical Challenges of Bariatric Surgery Candidates.

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    Creel, David B; Schuh, Leslie M; Newton, Robert L; Stote, Joseph J; Cacucci, Brenda M

    2017-10-12

    Few studies have quantified cardiorespiratory fitness among individuals seeking bariatric surgery. Treadmill testing allows researchers to determine exercise capacity through metabolic equivalents. These findings can assist clinicians in understanding patients' capabilities to carry out various activities of daily living. The purpose of this study was to determine exercise tolerance and the variables associated with fitness, among individuals seeking bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery candidates completed submaximal treadmill testing and provided ratings of perceived exertion. Each participant also completed questionnaires related to history of exercise, mood, and perceived barriers/benefits of exercise. Over half of participants reported that exercise was "hard to very hard" before reaching 70% of heart rate reserve, and one-third of participants reported that exercise was "moderately hard" at less than 3 metabolic equivalents (light activity). Body mass index and age accounted for the majority of the variance in exercise tolerance, but athletic history, employment status, and perceived health benefits also contributed. Perceived benefit scores were higher than barrier scores. Categories commonly used to describe moderate-intensity exercise (3-6 metabolic equivalents) do not coincide with perceptions of intensity among many bariatric surgery candidates, especially those with a body mass index of 50 or more.

  5. Unrealistic weight loss expectations in candidates for bariatric surgery.

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    Kaly, Perry; Orellana, Susan; Torrella, Tracy; Takagishi, Curtis; Saff-Koche, Lisa; Murr, Michel M

    2008-01-01

    Unrealistic expectations of weight loss are prevalent in obese patients and can negatively affect their adherence to dietary and health goals. We sought to examine the expectations and perceived notions about weight loss in candidates for bariatric surgery. A total of 284 consecutive and prospective bariatric patients were surveyed using a validated Goals and Relative Weights questionnaire before an educational seminar. The participants categorized their weight loss expectations as "dream," "happy," "acceptable," and "disappointed" and rated the effect of surgically-induced weight loss on 21 indicators of health, quality of life, social functioning, and self-image on a 1-10 scale. The data are presented as the mean +/- standard deviation. Of the 284 patients, 230 were women and 54 were men (age 45 +/- 10 years; body mass index 50 +/- 8 kg/m(2)). These patients stated that their "dream" weight would be 89% +/- 8% excess body weight loss and that 77% +/- 9%, 67% +/- 10%, 49% +/- 14% excess body weight loss would be their "happy," "acceptable," and "disappointed" weight, respectively. Participants ranked health, fitness, body image, work performance, and self-confidence as the most important benefits of bariatric surgery. Women had greater "happy" and "acceptable" weight loss expectations and put more emphasis on physical presence (r = .17-.33, P realistic expectations is an important aspect of the preoperative evaluation and education, especially for younger women.

  6. FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF OLDER OBESE PATIENTS CANDIDATES FOR BARIATRIC SURGERY

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    Denis PAJECKI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Obesity in the elderly is associated with exacerbation of functional decline (dependency, that occurs with aging, because of decreased muscle mass and strength, and increased joint dysfunction. Consequently, there is progressive loss of independence, autonomy, chronic pain and impaired quality of life. The weight loss can bring benefits in all these aspects, especially when accompanied by exercises. Elderly patients with morbid obesity may be submitted to surgical treatment, taking into account that the massive weight loss, eventually caused by bariatric surgery, may exacerbate the loss of muscle mass and nutritional complications that may bring harm to the overall health and quality of life of these patients. The functional assessment of elderly patients, candidates for bariatric surgery and the extent to which surgery can bring benefits to the patients, in the field of functionality, has still to be determined. Objective To describe profile functionality in obese elderly referred to a bariatric surgery program. Methods Patients with age ≥60 and BMI ≥35 underwent comprehensive geriatric assessment that evaluates co morbidities, medication use, ability to perform basic activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, and the “Timedupandgo” test to evaluate mobility, whose cut-off point was ≤10 seconds. Statistical analysis was performed in order to see if there is a positive correlation of dependency with BMI and age (over or under 65 years. Results Forty subjects have completed evaluation. The mean age was 64.1 years (60-72 and 75% were women. They had an average weight of 121.1 kg (72.7-204 and a mean BMI of 47.2 kg/m2 (35.8-68.9. 16 patients (40% have shown dependency for activities of daily living, 19 (47,5% for instrumental activities of daily living and 20 patients (50% had a “Timedupandgo” test over 10 seconds. Statistical analysis (t-Student, Mann-Whitney, Binary Logistic Regression has shown

  7. Examination of the Beck Depression Inventory-II Factor Structure Among Bariatric Surgery Candidates.

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    Hayes, Sharon; Stoeckel, Nina; Napolitano, Melissa A; Collins, Charlotte; Wood, G Craig; Seiler, Jamie; Grunwald, Heidi E; Foster, Gary D; Still, Christopher D

    2015-07-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is frequently used to evaluate bariatric patients in clinical and research settings; yet, there are limited data regarding the factor structure of the BDI-II with a bariatric surgery population. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using principal axis factoring with oblimin rotation was employed with data from 1228 consecutive presurgical bariatric candidates. Independent t tests were used to examine potential differences between sexes. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted with the next 383 consecutive presurgical patients to evaluate the proposed model based on EFA results. EFA revealed three factors: negative perceptions, diminished vigor, and cognitive dysregulation, each with adequate internal consistency. Six BDI-II items did not load significantly on any of the three factors. CFA results largely supported the proposed model. Results suggest that dimensions of depression for presurgical bariatric candidates vary from other populations and raise important caveats regarding the utility of the BDI-II in bariatric research.

  8. Physical activity and cognitive function in bariatric surgery candidates.

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    Galioto, Rachel; King, Wendy C; Bond, Dale S; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D; Mitchell, James E; Gunstad, John

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in severe obesity. Lack of physical activity is a likely contributor to impairment in this population, as many obese persons are inactive and physical activity has been positively and independently associated with cognitive function in healthy and medically-ill samples. This study investigated whether physical activity, measured by self-report of aerobic physical activity in 85 bariatric surgery candidates, was associated with cognitive function. A subset of 31 participants also completed objective activity monitoring. Steps/d and high-cadence min/week, representative of ambulatory moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), were calculated. Approximately one quarter of participants self-reported at least 30 min/d of aerobic MVPA, at least 5 d/week. Median steps/d was 7949 (IQR = 4572) and median MVPA min/week was 105 (IQR = 123). Cognitive deficits were found in 32% of participants (29% memory, 10% executive function, 13% language, 10% attention). Controlling for demographic and medical factors, self-reported aerobic physical activity was weakly correlated with lower attention (r = -0.21, p = 0.04) and executive function (r = -0.27, p activity and objectively-determined MVPA min/week were negatively correlated with memory (r = -0.20, p = 0.04; r = -0.46; p = 0.02, respectively). No other correlations between physical activity measures and cognitive function were significant. Contrary to expectations, greater levels of physical activity were not associated with better cognitive functioning. Such findings encourage future studies to clarify the association among cognitive function and physical activity in obese persons.

  9. Bariatric surgery: the challenges with candidate selection, individualizing treatment and clinical outcomes

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    2013-01-01

    Obesity is recognized as a global health crisis. Bariatric surgery offers a treatment that can reduce weight, induce remission of obesity-related diseases, and improve the quality of life. In this article, we outline the different options in bariatric surgery and summarize the recommendations for selecting and assessing potential candidates before proceeding to surgery. We present current data on post-surgical outcomes and evaluate the psychosocial and economic effects of bariatric surgery. Finally, we evaluate the complication rates and present recommendations for post-operative care. PMID:23302153

  10. Maladaptive eating behavior assessment among bariatric surgery candidates: Evaluation of the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale.

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    Williams, Gail A; Hawkins, Misty A W; Duncan, Jennifer; Rummell, Christina M; Perkins, Shannon; Crowther, Janis H

    2017-07-01

    Eating pathology among bariatric surgery candidates is common and associated with adverse outcomes. However, its assessment is complicated by the inconsistent use of standardized measures. We addressed this by examining the use of the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (EDDS) in a large bariatric sample (N = 343). To evaluate the EDDS among bariatric surgery candidates via examination of: (1) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, text revision (DSM-IV-TR) and fifth edition (DSM-5) rates of binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, and maladaptive eating behaviors, and (2) the relationship between response biases and self-reported eating disorder symptoms. Participants were bariatric surgery candidates at a large public hospital in the Midwest. As part of a larger preoperative evaluation, 343 patients seeking bariatric surgery completed the EDDS and measures of problematic response bias. Approximately 16% of the sample met full threshold criteria for binge eating disorder using DSM-5 criteria. Using the DSM-IV-TR, rates were lower but still substantial at 13%. Rates for bulimia nervosa were 8% (DSM-5) and 6% (DSM-IV-TR). The majority (66.1%) of participants reported at least one binge-eating episode per week. The most commonly used compensatory behavior was fasting (20.4%), followed by excessive exercise (11.7%), laxative use (5.6%), and vomiting (1.8%). An inverse relationship between severity of the eating symptomatology and problematic response bias emerged. The EDDS shows promise as a screening tool that uses diagnostic criteria to provide rates of binge eating and eating psychopathology among surgical candidates. Our findings suggest that subsequent validation studies of this measure are needed, should address potential response bias concerns, and should employ clear definitions of binge eating to promote standardization of eating pathology assessment in the bariatric population. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric

  11. Candidates for Bariatric Surgery: Morbidly Obese Patients with Pulmonary Dysfunction

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    Yu-Feng Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a well-known major risk factor of cardiovascular disease and is associated with various comorbidities. The impact of obesity on pulmonary function remains unclear. Reductions in chest wall compliance and respiratory muscle strength due to a high percent body fat and localized fat distribution contributes to impaired pulmonary function and the occurrence of adverse respiratory symptoms. Dietary modifications and pharmaceutical agents are not effective in the long-term treatment of obesity. Treatment of morbidly obese patients using bariatric surgery has increased each year, especially after the introduction of video laparoscopic techniques. Effective weight loss after bariatric surgery may improve cardiovascular disease risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, inflammation, chronic kidney disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Bariatric surgery has also been associated with significantly improved respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function. We currently present a review of principal studies that evaluated the effects of obesity on pulmonary function and the identification of anthropometric factors of obesity that correspond to the reversal of respiratory symptoms and impaired pulmonary function after bariatric surgery.

  12. New look at nutritional care for obese patient candidates for bariatric surgery.

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    Nicoletti, Carolina F; Lima, Tatiana P; Donadelli, Simara P; Salgado, Wilson; Marchini, Júlio S; Nonino, Carla Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    The combination of preoperative deficiencies and the restrictions and malabsorption possibly induced by bariatric surgery could lead patients to experience important nutritional deficits during the late postoperative period. Our objective was to characterize the eating, anthropometric, and biochemical profiles of obese candidates for bariatric surgery at a bariatric surgery center of a university hospital. A retrospective study with the analysis of medical records of candidates for bariatric surgery from 2007 to 2008 was performed. A total of 80 adult patients, aged 45 ± 11 years, were included in the present study. The mean patient weight was 145 ± 24 kg, and the mean body mass index was 54 ± 8 kg/m(2). Of the 80 patients, 78% had ≥1 co-morbidities related to obesity. The reported daily energy intake before surgery was 1981 ± 882 kcal, with 48% ± 11% consisting of carbohydrate, 29% ± 8% of lipids, and 23% ± 8% of protein. The mean number of daily meals was 4 ± 1. Patients with a greater body mass index ingested a smaller amount of calories per kilogram of current weight. The occurrence of hyperglycemia, hyperuricemia, and dyslipidemia and of nutritional deficiencies, among them magnesium (19%), vitamin A (15%), vitamin C (16%), iron (9%), β-carotene (3%), and vitamin B12 (3%), was high. The high occurrence of micronutrient deficiency detected by biochemical analysis in morbidly obese candidates for bariatric surgery, representing a disabsorptive process, might involve a poorer prognosis during the late postoperative period. A preoperative evaluation of the nutritional parameters and the food intake pattern is recommended for these patients, together with the necessary interventions. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bariatric Surgery Candidates' Peer and Romantic Relationships and Associations with Health Behaviors.

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    Pratt, Keeley J; Balk, Elizabeth K; Ferriby, Megan; Wallace, Lorraine; Noria, Sabrena; Needleman, Bradley

    2016-11-01

    The aim was to assess the romantic and peer relationships of bariatric surgery candidates and associations with health behaviors. Adults seeking bariatric surgery (N = 120) completed surveys addressing health behaviors and social relationships at information sessions. Analysis was done to compare male/female differences in peer and romantic relationships and associations with health behaviors. Previously published reference (REF) data on the Relationship Structures questionnaire was used for comparison, and to split our sample into those ≤ or > REF mean for relationship anxiety and avoidance. Our sample reported higher avoidance and lower anxiety in their close friendships and romantic relationships compared to the REF sample. Men in our sample had higher peer and romantic relationships avoidance compared to the REF sample and had significantly higher close friendship avoidance than women in our sample. Participants with lower anxiety in their romantic relationships (≤ REF) had higher uncontrolled eating and physical activity; those with more anxiety in their romantic relationships (> REF) had a higher BMI. Our findings highlight the potential influence that social relationships may have on health behaviors within the bariatric surgery population. Further investigation is warranted to explore male bariatric surgery candidates' relationships to inform understanding and intervention development.

  14. Problematic eating behaviors among bariatric surgical candidates: a psychometric investigation and factor analytic approach.

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    Gelinas, Bethany L; Delparte, Chelsea A; Wright, Kristi D; Hart, Regan

    2015-01-01

    Psychological factors (e.g., anxiety, depression) are routinely assessed in bariatric pre-surgical programs, as high levels of psychopathology are consistently related to poor program outcomes (e.g., failure to lose significant weight pre-surgery, weight regain post-surgery). Behavioral factors related to poor program outcomes and ways in which behavioral and psychological factors interact, have received little attention in bariatric research and practice. Potentially problematic behavioral factors are queried by Section H of the Weight and Lifestyle Inventory (WALI-H), in which respondents indicate the relevance of certain eating behaviors to obesity. A factor analytic investigation of the WALI-H serves to improve the way in which this assessment tool is interpreted and used among bariatric surgical candidates, and subsequent moderation analyses serve to demonstrate potential compounding influences of psychopathology on eating behavior factors. Bariatric surgical candidates (n =362) completed several measures of psychopathology and the WALI-H. Item responses from the WALI-H were subjected to principal axis factoring with oblique rotation. Results revealed a three-factor model including: (1) eating in response to negative affect, (2) overeating/desirability of food, and (3) eating in response to positive affect/social cues. All three behavioral factors of the WALI-H were significantly associated with measures of depression and anxiety. Moderation analyses revealed that depression did not moderate the relationship between anxiety and any eating behavior factor. Although single forms of psychopathology are related to eating behaviors, the combination of psychopathology does not appear to influence these problematic behaviors. Recommendations for pre-surgical assessment and treatment of bariatric surgical candidates are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pulmonary function tests in obese people candidate to bariatric surgery

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    C. Guimarães

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is considered one of the most serious public health problems of the modern world. Because it alters the relationship between the lungs, chest wall and diaphragm, it is to be expected that it impacts on the respiratory function. In Portugal, there is not much data about the relationship between obesity and pulmonary function.The aim of this study was to characterize respiratory function in morbidly obese patients and to evaluate whether weight loss in patients submitted to bariatric surgery affects pulmonary function tests (PFT.We conducted a retrospective study with 36 morbidly obese patients submitted to bariatric surgery, with a mean age of 40.6 years, 64% female and with a mean body mass index (BMI of 49.7 kg/m2. All patients were clinical and functionally evaluated before surgery and after their weight had stabilized following surgery. They underwent a complete pulmonary function testing with spirometry, lung volumes, carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO, maximum respiratory pressures and arterial blood gases analysis. Prior to surgery almost all the patients had functional respiratory changes, 34 had a decrease in functional residual capacity (FRC 6 of whom a restrictive syndrome. Only 2 patients did not show any functional or arterial blood gas change. After bariatric surgery, BMI decreased to 34 kg/m2 and there was a significant improvement in almost all functional parameters with resolution of restrictive disorders. Nevertheless, in 13 patients the FRC remained decreased.After weight loss, the only correlation found was between reduction of BMI and increased FRC (r = −0.371; p = 0.028. This study suggests a relationship between obesity and pulmonary restriction and a positive impact of bariatric surgery in PFT. Resumo: A obesidade é considerada um problema de saúde pública da atualidade. Devido ao facto de alterar a relação entre pulmões, parede torácica e diafragma, a obesidade tem

  16. Beliefs, Barriers and Facilitators to Physical Activity in Bariatric Surgery Candidates.

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    Zabatiero, Juliana; Hill, Kylie; Gucciardi, Daniel F; Hamdorf, Jeffrey M; Taylor, Susan F; Hagger, Martin S; Smith, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Bariatric surgery candidates engage in less physical activity (PA) and spend longer periods in sedentary behaviour (SB) when compared to the general adult population. The aim of this study was to explore the beliefs about PA and perceived barriers and facilitators to PA in obese adults scheduled for bariatric surgery. Nineteen obese adults (15 females), with a mean (SD) age of 41.6 (12.1) years, weight of 119.2 (20.5) kg and body mass index of 41.6 (6.7) kg/m(2) participated in a one-on-one in-depth qualitative interview before undergoing bariatric surgery. Data were analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Most participants believed that engaging in regular PA confers important health benefits, however reported insufficient PA levels to obtain those benefits. The perceived barriers to PA reported by participants were both obesity related (e.g. bodily pain, physical limitation and self-presentational concerns) and non-obesity related (e.g. lack of motivation, environment and restricted resources). All participants stated weight loss to be the main perceived facilitator to PA, together with social factors, better time management and access to financial resources. In bariatric surgery candidates, many of the perceived barriers and facilitators to PA are not obesity related and are therefore unlikely to change as a result of bariatric surgery. This may explain why earlier research shows little change in PA or SB following surgery. It is likely that an approach that aims to address the barriers and facilitators identified in this study is needed to change the inactive lifestyle adopted in this population.

  17. Disinhibited eating mediates differences in attachment insecurity between bariatric surgery candidates/recipients and lean controls.

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    Wilkinson, L L; Rowe, A C; Sheldon, C; Johnson, A; Brunstrom, J M

    2017-07-05

    Previous research has shown that attachment anxiety is a good predictor of body mass index. This relationship is significantly mediated by disinhibited (over-) eating and is likely to reflect a specific form of affect regulation. This study explored whether obese bariatric surgery candidates (BSC; N=34) and bariatric surgery recipients (BSR; N=15) would show higher levels of attachment insecurity (higher attachment anxiety and/or higher attachment avoidance) than a group of age and gender-matched lean controls (N=54). Mediation analyses showed that compared to lean controls (M=2.96, SE=0.1), both BSC (M=3.5, SE=0.2) and BSR (M=3.4, SE=0.2) groups had a more insecure attachment orientation. These relationships were significantly mediated by disinhibited eating (BSC: lower limit confidence interval (LLCI)=0.06 and upper limit confidence interval (ULCI)=0.62; BSR: LLCI=0.02 and ULCI=0.76). There was no such relationship when the BSC and BSR groups were compared (LLCI=-0.15 &ULCI=0.3). These observations suggest that attachment insecurity may be a risk factor for obesity and bariatric surgery because of associated disinhibited eating. Moreover, these factors may be important to consider when bariatric surgery results in poor outcomes.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 8 August 2017; doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.157.

  18. Influences of general self-efficacy and weight bias internalization on physical activity in bariatric surgery candidates.

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    Hübner, Claudia; Baldofski, Sabrina; Zenger, Markus; Tigges, Wolfgang; Herbig, Beate; Jurowich, Christian; Kaiser, Stefan; Dietrich, Arne; Hilbert, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) seems to be important for long-term weight loss after bariatric surgery; however, studies provide evidence for insufficient PA levels in bariatric patients. Research found self-efficacy to be associated with PA and weight bias internalization, for which an influence on mental and physical health has been shown in recent studies. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of general self-efficacy on PA, mediated by weight bias internalization. In 179 bariatric surgery candidates, general self-efficacy, weight bias internalization, and different intensities of PA were assessed by self-report questionnaires. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the assumed mediational relationship. After controlling for sociodemographic variables, weight bias internalization fully mediated the association between general self-efficacy and moderate-intense as well as vigorous-intense PA. Lower general self-efficacy predicted greater weight bias internalization, which in turn predicted lower levels of moderate-intense and vigorous-intense PA. The results suggest an influence of weight bias internalization on preoperative PA in bariatric surgery candidates. Subsequently, implementation of interventions addressing weight bias internalization in the usual treatment of bariatric surgery candidates might enhance patients' preoperative PA, while longitudinal analyses are needed to further examine its predictive value on PA after bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Attachment style and emotional eating in bariatric surgery candidates: The mediating role of difficulties in emotion regulation.

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    Taube-Schiff, Marlene; Van Exan, Jessica; Tanaka, Rika; Wnuk, Susan; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2015-08-01

    Difficulties with emotion regulation is a hypothesized mechanism through which attachment insecurity may affect emotional eating. No studies have yet investigated this effect in the bariatric population. Because many obese individuals engage in emotional eating, difficulty regulating emotion may be an important underlying mechanism through which attachment insecurity is linked to emotional eating in bariatric surgery candidates. In this cross-sectional study, 1393 adult bariatric surgery candidates from the Toronto Western Hospital were recruited to complete the Emotional Eating Scale (EES), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ9), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD7), Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q), and the Experiences for Close Relationships 16-item Scale (ECR-16) in order to explore the mediating role of emotion regulation on the relationship between attachment insecurity and emotional eating. Path analysis within a structural equation modeling framework examined direct and indirect effects of attachment insecurity on emotional eating. The indices of this overall model indicated that the specified set of direct and indirect pathways and corresponding correlations were a good fit with the data (RMSEAemotional eating were significant. Findings suggest that difficulties in emotion regulation may be an important mechanism to consider when examining the association between attachment insecurity and emotional eating in adult bariatric surgery candidates. Although causality cannot be concluded, these results shed light on the important role that emotion regulation may have in predicting problematic eating in bariatric patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Health and Nutritional Status of Vegetarian Candidates for Bariatric Surgery and Practical Recommendations.

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    Sherf-Dagan, Shiri; Hod, Keren; Buch, Assaf; Mardy-Tilbor, Limor; Regev, Ziva; Ben-Porat, Tair; Sakran, Nasser; Goitein, David; Raziel, Asnat

    2018-01-01

    Data on vegetarianism and bariatric surgery (BS) are scarce. We herein describe the health and nutritional status of vegetarian patients who plan to undergo BS and propose combined recommendations for vegetarian patients who undergo BS, based on our clinical experience and current scientific literature in both nutrition fields. Cross-sectional analysis of a prospectively maintained database of all primary laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomies (LSG) performed at a bariatric center of excellence between January 2014 and November 2016 was carried out querying patients who declared a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle before surgery. Preoperative data collected included demographics, anthropometrics, dietary patterns, supplementation use, physical activity, smoking habits, co-morbidities, and blood tests. Each vegetarian was matched to five different omnivores based on age, gender, and BMI. During the study period, 1470 patients underwent primary LSG surgery (63.7% females). Twenty-one declared a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle (1.4%) pre-surgery. Most were classified as lacto-ovo (57.1%) and were driven from ethical reasons (85.7%). No differences were found between vegetarian and omnivore LSG candidates regarding co-morbidities and nutritional deficiencies, except for lower prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (14.3 vs. 47.1%;P = 0.007), lower ferritin levels (54.3 ± 50.5 vs. 96.8 ± 121.8 ng/ml; P = 0.052) and higher transferrin levels (313.9 ± 42.7 vs. 278.4 ± 40.4 mg/dl; P = 0.009) among the vegetarian cohort. Preoperative use of vitamin B12 and iron supplementation was higher among vegetarian LSG candidates than their omnivore counterparts (57.1 vs. 6.7%;P Vegetarians have comparable health status and nutritional deficiencies, lower iron stores, and higher supplementation use before surgery compared to omnivore LSG candidates.

  1. [Upper endoscopy findings in obese morbid patients candidates for bariatric surgery].

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    Díez-Rodríguez, Rubén; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D; Vivas-Alegre, Santiago; Barrientos-Castañeda, Ana; González-de Francisco, Tomás; Olcoz-Goñi, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Body mass index has been associated with the presence and severity of various gastrointestinal symptoms. The aim of the study was to analyze the endoscopic findings and gastric histology of morbidly obese candidates for bariatric surgery. We retrospectively included patients undergoing bariatric surgery at the Hospital de León from March 2005 to April 2013. The findings of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and antral histology were collected. The relationship of body mass index (BMI) with gastroscopy findings and the presence of Helicobacter pylori were assessed. A total of 194 patients were included. An abnormality on endoscopy or antral biopsy was found in 48.7% and 78.9% of the patients, respectively. Three patients had gastric peptic ulcer, and consequently the intervention was postponed until healing. H.pylori infection was found in 63.9% of the patients. The presence of H.pylori and endoscopic findings were not related to BMI. Gastroesophageal disease is common in morbidly obese patients and approximately half of the patients had some kind of alteration on endoscopy. Gastroscopy and H.pylori testing prior to surgery is required to rule out disease that could delay or contraindicate surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessing psychosocial functioning of bariatric surgery candidates with the Minnesota multiphasic personality inventory-2 restructured form (MMPI-2-RF).

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    Marek, Ryan J; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Windover, Amy; Tarescavage, Anthony M; Merrell, Julie; Ashton, Kathleen; Lavery, Megan; Heinberg, Leslie J

    2013-11-01

    Psychological comorbidity is common in bariatric surgery candidates. Many multidisciplinary teams incorporate psychometric testing to screen for psychological factors that, if left unattended, may negatively impact surgical results. Here, we report descriptive findings and empirical correlates of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scales among of bariatric surgery candidates undergoing a pre-surgical psychological evaluation. The sample consisted of male (n = 324) and female (n = 658) patients seeking bariatric surgery who were administered the MMPI-2-RF at their psychological evaluation. Psychosocial and medical variables were retrospectively coded from the patients' medical records. These criteria included history/current mental health diagnoses and treatments, maladaptive eating behaviors/diagnoses, past/current substance use, abuse history, sleep apnea, and denial of surgery. Descriptive analyses demonstrated similar findings for male and female candidates and replicated previous reports. MMPI-2-RF scales measuring emotional dysfunction were associated with maladaptive eating patterns, a history of Major Depressive Disorder, and previous suicide attempts. Scale scores measuring behavioral dysfunction were associated with current/past substance use and previous physical abuse. MMPI-2-RF scale scores measuring somatic problems were associated with a higher BMI at the time of surgery, sleep apnea diagnosis/adherence, physical/sexual abuse history, active mood disorder, previous mental health diagnoses, and maladaptive eating patterns. The MMPI-2-RF can aid in identifying a broad range of psychological comorbidity among bariatric surgery candidates. When used in conjunction with a pre-surgical psychological interview, it can aid in the assessment of psychological factors relevant to pre-surgical psychological assessment of bariatric surgery candidates.

  3. Use of the MMPI-2-RF suicidal/death ideation and substance abuse scales in screening bariatric surgery candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Windover, Amy; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Boutacoff, Lana I; Marek, Ryan J; Ashton, Kathleen; Merrell, Julie; Lavery, Megan; Heinberg, Leslie J

    2013-12-01

    Bariatric surgery patients are at increased risk for suicide and lifetime substance abuse problems, and these risks are surgical contraindications. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) has scales to screen for these risks factors, among others. We seek to evaluate the classification accuracy of the MMPI-2-RF Suicidal/Death Ideation (SUI) and Substance Abuse (SUB) scales to optimize their use in bariatric surgery settings. Data were collected from 1,311 (72.1% female; 65.5% Caucasian) bariatric surgery candidates from the Cleveland Clinic as well as 295 (94.1% female; 85.9% Caucasian) bariatric surgery candidates from a private practice in St. Paul, Minnesota. Classification accuracies were calculated at original and revised SUI and SUB interpretative cutoffs in the Cleveland Clinic sample and replicated in the St. Paul sample. Significant and meaningful classification accuracy gains were demonstrated by excluding a death ideation item from the SUI scale and lowering the interpretive cutoff on the SUB scale. Practical implications and study limitations are discussed. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. MASTICATORY FUNCTION OF OBESE CANDIDATES TO BARIATRIC SURGERY FROM DISTINCT SOCIOECONOMIC CLASSES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeri, Celso Roberto; Andrade, Jacira Alves Caracik de Camargo; Tomal, Karla Thaíza; Pracucho, Eduardo Marcucci; Campos, Livia Paschoalino de; Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome can be labeled as worldwide outbreak; thus, both have led to serious public health problem. Oral health can be worsened by both, obesity and metabolic syndrome. Tooth loss harms masticatory function, essential status to whom will be submitted to bariatric surgery. Assess masticatory function of obese candidates to bariatric surgery, who belong to distinct socioeconomic class range, in order to recognize hazard factors and the bias of socioeconomic factor in this context. Observational cross-section study, with samples comprised by two groups of patients, with distinct socioeconomic class range, one of them belonging to public health system (SUSG) and the other to private clinic (CPG), candidates to bariatric surgery. Were assessed anthropometric data, comorbidities and medicines usage, blood tests, habits and the number of dental functional units. The groups SUSG and CPG were homogeneous taking into account gender (p=0,890) and age range (p=0,170). The number of dental functional units was higher in the private group (pmasticatory function was rather present among public group (pmasticatory function: belong to public service (OR: 8.420, p=0.003), higher age (OR: 1.186, pmasticatory function of female SUSG were worse, highlighting the socioeconomic condition as hazard factor. Obesidade e síndrome metabólica são graves problemas de saúde pública, com características de epidemia mundial. A saúde bucal é agravada por ambas as condições. Perda dentária prejudica função mastigatória, condição essencial para o paciente que será submetido à cirurgia bariátrica. Avaliar a função mastigatória de pacientes obesos candidatos à cirurgia bariátrica pertencentes a dois serviços de saúde com padrões socioeconômicos distintos, afim de identificar fatores de risco e a influência do fator socioeconômico nesta condição. Estudo observacional transversal, com amostra constituída por dois grupos de pacientes obesos, com

  5. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Beck Depression Inventory-II in Bariatric Surgery Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian J.; Hood, Megan M.; Nackers, Lisa M.; Azarbad, Leila; Ivan, Iulia; Corsica, Joyce

    2013-01-01

    Screening for depression is an integral part of psychological evaluations conducted prior to bariatric surgery. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is the most commonly used measure of depression in these treatment evaluations. The reliability and validity of the BDI-II has not yet been evaluated within bariatric surgery-seeking samples,…

  6. Lung function and left ventricular hypertrophy in morbidly obese candidates for bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo de Tarso Müller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To look for correlations between lung function and cardiac dimension variables in morbidly obese patients, in order to test the hypothesis that the relative size of the small airways is independently correlated with left ventricular hypertrophy. Methods: This was a retrospective study involving 192 medical records containing a clinical protocol employed in candidates for bariatric surgery between January of 2006 and December of 2010. Results: Of the 192 patients evaluated, 39 (10 males and 29 females met the inclusion criteria. The mean BMI of the patients was 49.2 ± 7.6 kg/m2, and the mean age was 35.5 ± 7.7 years. The FEF25-75/FVC, % correlated significantly with left ventricular posterior wall thickness and relative left ventricular posterior wall thickness, those correlations remaining statistically significant (r = −0.355 and r = −0.349, respectively after adjustment for weight, gender, and history of systemic arterial hypertension. Stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis showed that FVC and FEV1 were the major determinants of left ventricular mass (in grams or indexed to body surface area. Conclusions: A reduction in the relative size of the small airways appears to be independently correlated with obesity-related cardiac hypertrophy, regardless of factors affecting respiratory mechanics (BMI and weight, gender, or history of systemic arterial hypertension. However, FEV1 and FVC might be important predictors of left ventricular mass in morbidly obese individuals.

  7. BINGE EATING DISORDER AND QUALITY OF LIFE OF CANDIDATES TO BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ana Júlia Rosa Barcelos; Pinto, Sônia Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Obesity decreases the quality of life, which is aggravated by the association of comorbidities, and the binge eating disorder is directly related to body image and predisposes to overweight. Evaluate association between the presence and the level of binge eating disorder and the quality of life of the obese candidates for bariatric surgery. Cross-sectional study analyzing anthropometric data (weight and height) and socioeconomics (age, sex, marital status, education and income). The application of Binge Eating Scale was held for diagnosis of Binge Eating Disorder and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-From Health Survey to assess the quality of life. Total sample studied was 96 patients, mean age 38.15±9.6 years, 80.2% female, 67.7% married, 41% with complete and incomplete higher education, 77.1% with lower income or equal to four the minimum salary, 59.3% with grade III obesity. Binge eating disorder was observed in 44.2% of patients (29.9% moderate and 14.3% severe), and these had the worst scores in all domains of quality of life SF36 scale; however, this difference was not statistically significant. Only the nutritional status presented significant statistically association with the presence of binge eating disorder. High prevalence of patients with binge eating disorder was found and they presented the worst scores in all domains of quality of life.

  8. Psychiatric symptoms and leptin in obese patients who were bariatric surgery candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changchien TC

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Te-Chang Changchien,1 Chi-Ming Tai,2 Chih-Kun Huang,3 Chia-Chang Chien,1 Yung-Chieh Yen1,4 1Department of Psychiatry, E-Da Hospital, 2Department of Internal Medicine, E-Da Hospital, 3Bariatric and Metabolic International Surgery Center, E-Da Hospital, 4School of Medicine, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Objective: There is a significant relationship between obesity and common mental symptoms (depression and anxiety symptoms. But the association between depression (or anxiety symptoms and serum leptin is still unclear and controversial, despite the growing body of evidence supporting the existence of “leptin resistance” in obese persons. So we investigated whether common mental symptoms, obesity, and the interactive effect of these two factors have a relationship with leptin in obese patients who were candidates for bariatric surgery.Methods: In all, 139 participants (mean age: 31.4 years, standard deviation: 9.3 years, 73.4% female were enrolled at an obesity treatment center in southern Taiwan. Serum leptin levels and body mass index (BMI were measured. The Chinese Health Questionnaire and Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire were administered. Results: The mean BMI of our participants was 39.4 kg/m2 (±6.8, and the mean leptin level was 24.5 ng/mL (±9.4. In the multivariate regression models, Chinese Health Questionnaire-by-BMI and Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire-by-BMI interaction terms remained significant predictors of leptin level (β=0.16, P<0.0001; β=0.04, P<0.0001, respectively, after adjustment for age, sex, and history of hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia, despite the inverse correlation between Chinese Health Questionnaire (or Taiwanese Depression Questionnaire and leptin. In addition, female patients had significantly higher leptin levels than male patients.Conclusion: The present findings confirmed that the relationship between common mental symptoms and leptin is modulated by obesity in severely obese

  9. Validity of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory – 2 – Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scores as a function of gender, ethnicity, and age of bariatric surgery candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Ryan J; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Sellbom, Martin; McNulty, John L; Heinberg, Leslie J

    2015-01-01

    Presurgical psychological screening is used to identify factors that may impact postoperative adherence and surgical outcomes in bariatric surgery candidates. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory - 2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) findings have demonstrated utility for this task. To explore whether there are clinically meaningful gender, ethnicity, or age differences in presurgical MMPI-2-RF scores and the validity of these scores in bariatric surgery candidates. The sample was composed of 872 men and 2337 women. Ethnicity/race groups included 2,204 Caucasian, 744 African American, and 96 Hispanic individuals. A sample of 165 were not included in the ethnicity/race analyses because they were of another descent. Ages groups included 18-35 year olds (n = 454), 36-49 year olds (n = 1154), 50-64 year olds, (n = 1246), and 65 years old or older (n = 355). Validity data, obtained via a retrospective chart review, were available for a subset patients (n = 1,268) who were similarly distributed. Step-down hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to assess for differential validity. Bariatric surgery candidates produced comparable MMPI-2-RF scores in all subsamples, indicating that the test norms generalize across demographic groups. Validity findings were also generally comparable, indicating that MMPI-2-RF scores have the same interpretive implications in demographically diverse subgroups of bariatric surgery candidates. The MMPI-2-RF can assist in presurgical psychological screening of demographically diverse bariatric surgery candidates. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Validity of the Beck Depression Inventory as a screening tool for a clinical mood disorder in bariatric surgery candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Melissa J; Brown, Wendy A; Brennan, Leah; O'Brien, Paul E

    2012-11-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is one of the most commonly used instruments to assess depression in persons with obesity. While it has been validated in normal and psychiatric populations, in obese populations, its validity remains uncertain. This study aimed to investigate the validity and reliability of the BDI-IA and BDI-II in severely obese bariatric surgery candidates. Consecutive new candidates at a bariatric surgery clinic were invited to participate in the study by their consulting surgeon. All candidates were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders (SCID-I); 118 completed the BDI-IA and 83 completed the BDI-II. Two hundred one patients (response rate, 88 %) participated in the study. The current sample (82 % female) had an average body mass index of 42.83 ± 6.34 and an average age of 45 ± 12 years. Based on the SCID-I, 54 candidates (26.9 %) met the criteria for a mood disorder, with 37 meeting the criteria for current major depressive disorder. Individuals diagnosed with a clinical mood disorder had significantly higher scores on the BDI (BDI-IA, 23.59 ± 9.69 vs. 12.76 ± 8.29; BDI-II, 22.93 ± 5.22 vs. 11.25 ± 8.44). Our results indicated that, as a screening tool for a clinical mood disorder, the BDI-II had an optimal cutoff of 13, with a sensitivity of 100 and specificity of 67.75. Results indicated that the BDI-IA should not be used as a tool to measure depressive symptomatology in obese bariatric surgery candidates. No cutoff was identified with adequate sensitivity and specificity, and over 20 % of patients were misclassified. As a screening tool for a clinical mood disorder, the BDI-II was adequate; however, prevalence rates were significantly overestimated.

  11. Controlled attenuation parameter for diagnosing steatosis in bariatric surgery candidates with suspected nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveau, Sylvie; Voican, Cosmin S; Lebrun, Amandine; Gaillard, Martin; Lamouri, Karima; Njiké-Nakseu, Micheline; Courie, Rodi; Tranchart, Hadrien; Balian, Axel; Prévot, Sophie; Dagher, Ibrahim; Perlemuter, Gabriel

    2017-09-01

    Steatosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is often benign, but may progress to fibrosis. The accurate diagnosis of hepatic steatosis is therefore important for clinical decision-making and prognostic assessments. The controlled attenuation parameter (CAP), a noninvasive measurement obtained with Fibro-Scan, has been developed for liver steatosis assessment. CAP performs poorly in patients with high BMI. The XL probe was initially developed for measuring liver stiffness in overweight patients. We assessed the diagnostic value of CAP in candidates for bariatric surgery with suspected NAFLD examined with the XL probe. For the retrospective group, raw ultrasonic radiofrequency signals were stored prospectively in the Fibro-Scan examination file for offline CAP calculation in 194 consecutive obese patients undergoing liver stiffness measurement in the 15 days before liver biopsy. For the prospective group, CAP was calculated automatically and prospectively from the XL probe in 123 obese patients. In the retrospective group, the diagnostic accuracy of CAP was satisfactory for differentiating S3 from S0-S1-S2 (0.79±0.03; 95% confidence interval: 0.71-0.84) and S3 from S0 (0.85±0.05; 95% confidence interval: 0.73-0.92). The Obuchowski measure demonstrated a very good discriminatory performance: 0.87±0.02 in the retrospective group and 0.91±0.02 in the prospective group. CAP calculations from XL probe measurements efficiently detected severe steatosis in morbidly obese patients with suspected NAFLD. However, the cutoff values should now be confirmed in a larger prospective cohort.

  12. Who seeks bariatric surgery? Psychosocial functioning among adolescent candidates, other treatment-seeking adolescents with obesity and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, C C; Devlin, M J; Fennoy, I; Zitsman, J L; Walsh, B T; Sysko, R

    2017-12-01

    Limited data are available on the characteristics of adolescents with obesity who seek bariatric surgery. Existing data suggest that adolescent surgery candidates have a higher body mass index (BMI) than comparison adolescents with obesity, but the limited findings regarding psychosocial functioning are mixed. This study aimed to compare BMI and psychosocial functioning among adolescent bariatric surgery candidates, outpatient medical-treatment-seeking adolescents with obesity (receiving lifestyle modification), and adolescents in the normal-weight range. All adolescents completed self-report measures of impulsivity, delay discounting, depression, anxiety, stress, eating pathology, family functioning and quality of life, and had their height and weight measured. Adolescent surgical candidates had higher BMIs than both comparison groups. Surgical candidates did not differ from medical-treatment-seeking adolescents with obesity on any measure of psychosocial functioning, but both groups of adolescents with obesity reported greater anxiety and eating pathology and poorer quality of life than normal-weight adolescents. Quality of life no longer differed across groups after controlling for BMI, suggesting that it is highly related to weight status. Adolescents with obesity may experience greater anxiety, eating pathology, and quality of life impairments than their peers in the normal-weight range regardless of whether they are seeking surgery or outpatient medical treatment. Clinical implications and directions for future research are discussed. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  13. Assessing the obese diabetic patient for bariatric surgery: which candidate do I choose?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaelli M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Marco Raffaelli,1 Luca Sessa,1 Geltrude Mingrone,2 Rocco Bellantone1 1Division of Endocrine and Metabolic Surgery, 2Division of Obesity Diseases, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy Abstract: The worldwide prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rising in association with an increasing frequency of overweight and obesity. Bariatric-metabolic procedures are considered as additional therapeutic options, allowing improved diabetes control in most patients. Multiple factors play in concert to achieve the improvements in diabetic remission observed after bariatric-metabolic surgery. Several studies have demonstrated that bariatric-metabolic surgery is an effective treatment for type 2 diabetes when compared with conventional nonsurgical medical treatment. Because the best results are achievable in patients with a relatively short history of diabetes and less advanced controlled disease, the surgical option could be considered early, especially in morbid obese subjects (BMI ≥35 kg/m2 after failure of medical treatment. Patients with extensive weight loss are more likely to achieve type 2 diabetes remission after bariatric surgery. At present, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass seems the surgical procedure of choice because it has fewer risks than biliopancreatic diversion, and it is associated with higher weight loss and metabolic improvements compared with adjustable gastric banding. Recent evidences regarding the effectiveness of sleeve gastrectomy in diabetes remission have to be confirmed by controlled trials with longer follow-up. Keywords: bariatric surgery, metabolic surgery, diabetes, morbid obesity

  14. Psychological intervention to candidates for surgery Bariatric in a public hospital in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Mensorio, Marinna; CAPES Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brasil. Brasília, Brasil. Facultad de Psicología, Universitat de Valéncia. Valencia, España.; Costa-Júnior, Áderson; CAPES Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brasil. Brasília, Brasil. Facultad de Psicología, Universitat de Valéncia. Valencia, España. Instituto de Psicologia, Universidade de Brasília. Brasília, Brasil

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated a psychological intervention program to patients eligible for bariatric surgery, performing lifting coping strategies, anxiety manifestations and lifestyle changes, comparing them to obese patients without exposure to the intervention. The cognitive-behavioral program consists of 12 group sessions, in which they are addressed issues relevant to the process of habit change and preparation for surgery. The comparison of pre and post-intervention and between groups showed improvemen...

  15. Axis I psychopathology in bariatric surgery candidates with and without binge eating disorder: results of structured clinical interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Corneille, LaShanda R; Wadden, Thomas A; Sarwer, David B; Faulconbridge, Lucy F; Fabricatore, Anthony N; Stack, Rebecca M; Cottrell, Faith A; Pulcini, Melissa E; Webb, Victoria L; Williams, Noel N

    2012-03-01

    Prior studies have reached contradictory conclusions concerning whether binge eating disorder (BED) is associated with greater psychopathology in extremely obese patients who seek bariatric surgery. This study used the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Diagnoses (SCID) to compare rates of axis I psychopathology in surgery candidates who were determined to have BED or to be currently free of eating disorders. The relationship of BED to other psychosocial functioning and weight loss goals also was examined. One hundred ninety five bariatric surgery patients completed the Weight and Lifestyle Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and were later administered the Eating Disorder Examination. Of these 195, 44 who were diagnosed with BED, and 61 who were currently free of eating pathology, completed a telephone-administered SCID. Significantly more BED than non-BED participants had a current mood disorder (27.3% vs. 4.9%, p = 0.002) as well as a lifetime history of this condition (52.3% vs. 23.0%, p = 0.003). More BED than non-BED participants also had a current anxiety disorder (27.3% vs. 8.2%, p = 0.014) and lifetime anxiety disorder (36.4% vs. 16.4%, p = 0.019). BED also was associated with greater symptoms of depression, as measured by the BDI-II, as well as with lower self-esteem. BED and non-BED groups, however, did not differ in their desired weight loss goals following surgery. The present findings indicate that the presence of BED, in patients who seek bariatric surgery, is associated with an increased prevalence of axis I psychopathology, beyond the already elevated rate observed with severe (i.e., class III) obesity.

  16. Coping with obesity stigma affects depressed mood in African-American and white candidates for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettich, Karla C; Chen, Eunice Y

    2012-05-01

    Depressed mood in severely obese, bariatric surgery-seeking candidates is influenced by obesity stigma, yet the strategies for coping with this stigma are less well understood. This study hypothesized that coping strategies are significantly associated with depressed mood above and beyond demographic factors and frequency of weight-related stigma, with specific coping strategies differing between racial groups. Severely obese, bariatric surgery-seeking adults (N = 234; 91 African Americans) completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Stigmatizing Situations Inventory (SSI). Two hierarchical linear regressions were conducted separately for African Americans and whites. For both racial groups, age, sex, BMI, years overweight, annual income, and education level did not account for a significant portion of the variance in BDI scores. The frequency of stigmatizing situations and coping strategies significantly explained 16.4% and 33.2%, respectively, of the variance for whites, and 25.9% and 25%, respectively, for African Americans (P coping strategies. This suggests that efforts to reduce the deleterious effects of weight-related stigma need to focus both on reducing the frequency of stigmatization and on teaching effective coping strategies. These efforts also need to take into account the client's racial background.

  17. Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy in morbidity obese candidates for bariatric surgery with and without binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abilés, V; Rodríguez-Ruiz, S; Abilés, J; Obispo, A; Gandara, N; Luna, V; Fernández-Santaella, M C

    2013-01-01

    To analyze changes in the general and specific psychopathology of morbidly obese bariatric surgery (BS) candidates after cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and assess differences between patients with and without binge eating disorder (BED) and between patients with obesity grades III and IV, studying their influence on weight loss. 110 consecutive morbidly obese BS candidates [77 females; aged 41 ± 9 yrs; body mass index 49.1 ± 9.0 kg/m²] entered a three-month CBT program (12 two-hour sessions) before BS. Participants were assessed with general and specific psychopathology tests pre- and post-CBT. Data were analyzed according to the degree of obesity and presence/ absence of BED. At baseline, BED patients were more anxious and depressive with lower self-esteem and quality of life versus non-BED patients (p obesity. At 1 yr post-CBT, weight loss versus baseline (before CTT) was > 10% in 61%, with no intergroup differences. CBT is effective to treat psychological comorbidity in BS candidates, regardless of the presence of BED and degree of obesity. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  18. Body mass index, depression, and suicidality: The role of self-esteem in bariatric surgery candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufov, Miryam; Dalrymple, Kristy; Bernstein, Michael H; Walsh, Emily; Rosenstein, Lia; Chelminski, Iwona; Zimmerman, Mark

    2017-01-15

    Previous research suggests a relationship between weight and depression/suicidality, although few studies have examined the mechanisms underlying this association. This study examined the mediating role of self-esteem in the relationship between BMI and depression/suicidality, as well as the moderating role of gender in the mediated pathways. As part of a screening process in consideration for bariatric surgery, 3,101 adults (81.4% female, 18.6% male) were assessed one time. Five univariate mediation and five univariate moderated-mediation models were hypothesized and analyzed. For the mediation models, we entered five outcome variables separately: 1) severity of depressed mood, 2) diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder, 3) lifetime history of suicide attempts, 4) suicidal ideation at the time of evaluation, and 5) severity of suicidality, BMI as the independent variable, and self-esteem as the mediator. For the moderated-mediated models, gender was examined as a moderator to examine whether self-esteem was a stronger mediator for one gender, compared to the other. Findings supported the mediating role of self-esteem across all five outcomes. Further, the mediated effect was moderated by gender, such that the mediation effect was stronger for males, compared to females. The majority of the sample consisted of White females, limiting broad applicability of findings. All variables were assessed simultaneously, at baseline, limiting the ability to make causal attributions. Study findings suggest that self-esteem may help explain the relationship between BMI and depression/suicidality, particularly for men. Thus, interventions targeting self-esteem may be useful for improving psychological outcomes among those presenting for bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Bariatric Surgery September 2017 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Durga ... Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery MedlinePlus What is bariatric surgery? Bariatric surgery helps people who are very obese ...

  20. Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Loss Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Bariatric Surgery September 2017 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Durga ... for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery MedlinePlus What is bariatric surgery? Bariatric surgery helps people who are very obese ...

  1. Reliability, validity, and utility of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) in assessments of bariatric surgery candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Wygant, Dustin B; Boutacoff, Lana I; Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2013-12-01

    In the current study, we examined the reliability, validity, and clinical utility of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2011) scores in a sample of 759 bariatric surgery candidates. We provide descriptives for all scales, internal consistency and standard error of measurement estimates for all substantive scales, external correlates of substantive scales using chart review and self-report criteria, and relative risk ratios to assess the clinical utility of the instrument. Results generally support the reliability, validity, and clinical utility of MMPI-2-RF scale scores in the psychological evaluation of bariatric surgery candidates. Limitations, future directions, and practical application of these results are discussed. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Psychologists' Evaluation of Bariatric Surgery Candidates Influenced by Patients' Attachment Representations and Symptoms of Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Floor; Hinnen, Chris; Gerdes, Victor E. A.; Acherman, Yair; Brandjes, Dees P. M.

    This study examines whether patients self-reported attachment representations and levels of depression and anxiety influenced psychologists' evaluations of morbidly obese patients applying for bariatric surgery. A sample of 250 patients (mean age 44, 84 % female) who were referred for bariatric

  3. Subjective well-being, body image, and functional capacity in people candidate for or undergoing bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Juliana Galvis-Aparicio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two studies that aimed (1 at assessing and comparing the subjective well-being (SWB, and functional capacity and body image of people with morbid obesity, candidate for or undergoing bariatric surgery (BS, and (2 at identifying the relationship among the components of SWB, BMI, functional capacity, and body image. The sample was composed by 48 patients in pre-surgery period, and 29 in post-surgery. Instruments used were the Life Satisfaction Scale, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, WHODAS 2.0, the Brazilian scale of figures and silhouettes, and thebateria fatorial da personalidade. Statistically significant differences were found between both groups in all the variables, except positive affect, comprehension and communication, and relationships with others. FC was correlated to all the components of SWB and contributed to explaining the variance of life satisfaction and negative affect. Personality traits turned out to be more important than other variables for explaining the variance of positive affect.

  4. Post-bariatric surgery weight regain: evaluation of nutritional profile of candidate patients for endoscopic argon plasma coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambi, Maria Paula Carlini; Marchesini, Simone Dallegrave; Baretta, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is effective treatment for weight loss, but demand continuous nutritional care and physical activity. They regain weight happens with inadequate diets, physical inactivity and high alcohol consumption. To investigate in patients undergoing Roux-Y-of gastroplasty weight regain, nutritional deficiencies, candidates for the treatment with endoscopic argon plasma, the diameter of the gastrojejunostomy and the size of the gastric pouch at the time of treatment with plasma. A prospective 59 patients non-randomized study with no control group undergoing gastroplasty with recurrence of weight and candidates for the endoscopic procedure of argon plasma was realized. The surgical evaluation consisted of investigation of complications in the digestive system and verification of the increased diameter of the gastrojejunostomy. Nutritional evaluation was based on body mass index at the time of operation, in the minimum BMI achieved after and in which BMI was when making the procedure with plasma. The laboratory tests included hemoglobin, erythrocyte volume, ferritin, vitamin D, B12, iron, calcium, zinc and serum albumin. Clinical analysis was based on scheduled follow-up. Of the 59 selected, five were men and 51 women; were included 49 people (four men and 44 women) with all the complete data. The exclusion was due to the lack of some of the laboratory tests. Of this total 19 patients (38.7%) had a restrictive ring, while 30 (61.2%) did not. Iron deficiency anemia was common; 30 patients (61.2%) were below 30 with ferritin (unit); 35 (71.4%) with vitamin B12 were below 300 pg/ml; vitamin D3 deficiency occurred in more than 90%; there were no cases of deficiency of protein, calcium and zinc; glucose levels were above 99 mg/dl in three patients (6.12%). Clinically all had complaints of labile memory, irritability and poor concentration. All reported that they stopped treatment with the multidisciplinary team in the first year after the operation. The profile of

  5. To eat or not to eat; is that really the question? An evaluation of problematic eating behaviors and mental health among bariatric surgery candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Matero, Lisa Renee; Armstrong, Rachel; McCulloch, Katherine; Hyde-Nolan, Maren; Eshelman, Anne; Genaw, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Problematic eating behaviors, such as emotional eating, and food addiction, may affect weight; however, little is known about these eating behaviors, especially among those seeking bariatric surgery. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of problematic eating behaviors and to investigate their relationship with other eating behaviors, body mass index (BMI), and psychiatric symptoms. There were 142 patients who completed a required psychiatric evaluation prior to bariatric surgery. Of these, 16.9 % met criteria for a food addiction and 25.4-40.7 % endorsed emotional eating, depending on type of emotional eating. The number of food addiction symptoms endorsed was related to emotional eating. Both food addiction and emotional eating were related to anxiety and depressive symptoms. However, surprisingly, BMI was not related to a food addiction diagnosis, emotional eating scores, or psychiatric symptoms. Results from this study suggest that problematic eating behaviors are occurring among bariatric surgery candidates. Furthermore, this study may help to address the conflicting research regarding the effects of psychiatric symptoms on weight-loss outcomes. Perhaps it is the problematic eating behaviors (e.g., food addiction and emotional eating) that are associated with psychiatric symptoms that could be influencing outcomes. Future research should evaluate treatments for problematic eating behaviors and whether treatments improve weight-loss success.

  6. Impact of using DSM-5 criteria for diagnosing binge eating disorder in bariatric surgery candidates: change in prevalence rate, demographic characteristics, and scores on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory--2 restructured form (MMPI-2-RF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Ryan J; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Ashton, Kathleen; Heinberg, Leslie J

    2014-07-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) was recently included in the DSM-5. The prevalence rate for BED using the DSM-IV-TR research criteria tends to be higher in bariatric surgery candidates than the normative population; however, no studies have examined how many more bariatric surgery candidates will meet the new, less conservative criteria of DSM-5. We explore the current BED prevalence rate change in a sample of bariatric surgery candidates. Data were obtained for 1,283 bariatric surgery candidates. 84 men and 213 women were diagnosed with current BED using DSM-IV-TR research criteria. A semi-structured interview, the binge eating scale (BES), and a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) were given to every patient as part of standard procedures mandated by the facility. An additional 3.43% (p MMPI-2-RF and BES scores when compared with patients who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for BED. Thus, the current investigation indicates that individuals meeting BED criteria based on DSM-5 are similar to those meeting the more conservative diagnostic threshold outlined in DSM-IV-TR in a sample of bariatric surgery candidates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Minnesota multiphasic personality inventory-2 restructured form (MMPI-2-RF) scale score differences in bariatric surgery candidates diagnosed with binge eating disorder versus BMI-matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Ryan J; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Ashton, Kathleen; Heinberg, Leslie J

    2014-04-01

    Binge Eating Disorder (BED) is among the most common psychiatric disorders in bariatric surgery candidates. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) is a broadband, psychological test that includes measures of emotional and behavioral dysfunction, which have been associated with BED behaviors in bariatric surgery candidates; however these studies have lacked appropriate controls. In the current study, we compared MMPI-2-RF scale scores of bariatric surgery patients diagnosed with BED (BED+) with BMI-matched controls without BED (BED-). Three-hundred and seven BED+ participants (72.64% female and 67.87% Caucasian; mean BMI of 51.36 kg/m(2) [SD = 11.94]) were drawn from a large, database (N = 1304). Three-hundred and seven BED- participants were matched on BMI and demographics (72.64% female, 68.63% Caucasian, and mean BMI of 51.30 kg/m(2) [SD = 11.70]). The BED+ group scored significantly higher on measures of Demoralization, Low Positive Emotions, and Dysfunctional Negative Emotions and scored lower on measures of Antisocial Behaviors, reflecting behavioral constraint. Optimal T-Score cutoffs were below the traditional 65 T score for several MMPI-2-RF scales. MMPI-2-RF externalizing measures also added incrementally to differentiating between the groups beyond the Binge Eating Scale (BES). BED+ individuals produced greater elevations on a number of MMPI-2-RF internalizing scales and externalizing scales. Use of the test in conjunction with a clinical interview and other self-report data can further aid the clinician in guiding patients to appropriate treatment to optimize outcome. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Psychiatric aspects of bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yung-Chieh; Huang, Chih-Kuan; Tai, Chi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Bariatric surgery has been consistently shown to be effective in long-term marked weight loss and in bringing significant improvement to medical comorbidities such as metabolic syndrome. Empirical data suggest a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders among bariatric surgery candidates. In this review, we focus on the studies published recently with a high impact on our understanding of the role of psychiatry in bariatric surgery. Recent findings This article reviews the specific psychopathologies before surgery, changes in psychopathologies after surgery, suicide risk related to bariatric surgery, factors associated with weight loss, and recommendations for presurgical and postsurgical assessment and management. Research indicates a decrease in certain psychiatric symptoms after weight loss with bariatric surgery. However, the risk of suicide and unsuccessful weight loss in some bariatric surgery patients make monitoring following surgery as important as careful assessment and management before surgery. Specific considerations for youth and older populations and future potential research foci are discussed. Summary Recent publications suggest new directions for psychiatric evaluation and interventions for bariatric surgery patients. Future research on outcomes of specific populations, effectiveness of psychopharmacotherapy, and underlying pathophysiology are warranted for the advancement of treating bariatric surgery patients. PMID:25036421

  9. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Access to Care Toolkit EHB Access Toolkit Bariatric Surgery Procedures Bariatric surgical procedures cause weight loss by ... minimally invasive techniques (laparoscopic surgery). The most common bariatric surgery procedures are gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, adjustable gastric ...

  10. Bariatric Surgery and Kidney-Related Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alex R; Grams, Morgan E; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of severe obesity in both the general and the chronic kidney disease (CKD) populations continues to rise, with more than one-fifth of CKD patients in the United States having a body mass index of ≥35 kg/m 2 . Severe obesity has significant renal consequences, including increased risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and nephrolithiasis. Bariatric surgery represents an effective method for achieving sustained weight loss, and evidence from randomized controlled trials suggests that bariatric surgery is also effective in improving blood pressure, reducing hyperglycemia, and even inducing diabetes remission. There is also observational evidence suggesting that bariatric surgery may diminish the long-term risk of kidney function decline and ESRD. Bariatric surgery appears to be relatively safe in patients with CKD, with postoperative complications only slightly higher than in the general bariatric surgery population. The use of bariatric surgery in patients with CKD might help prevent progression to ESRD or enable selected ESRD patients with severe obesity to become candidates for kidney transplantation. However, there are also renal risks in bariatric surgery, namely, acute kidney injury, nephrolithiasis, and, in rare cases, oxalate nephropathy, particularly in types of surgery involving higher degrees of malabsorption. Although bariatric surgery may improve long-term kidney outcomes, this potential benefit remains unproved and must be balanced with potential adverse events.

  11. Predicting one and three month postoperative Somatic Concerns, Psychological Distress, and Maladaptive Eating Behaviors in bariatric surgery candidates with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Ryan J; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Merrell, Julie; Ashton, Kathleen; Heinberg, Leslie J

    2014-04-01

    Presurgical psychological screening of bariatric surgery candidates includes some form of standardized psychological assessment. However, associations between presurgical psychological screening and postoperative outcome have not been extensively studied. Here, we explore associations between presurgical Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) scores and early postoperative Somatic Concerns, Psychological Distress, and Maladaptive Eating Behaviors. The sample consisted of male (n = 238) and female (n = 621) patients who were administered the MMPI-2-RF at their presurgical psychological evaluation and received bariatric surgery. Patients were evaluated at their 1- and 3-month postoperative appointments. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that three latent constructs-somatic concerns, psychological distress, and maladaptive eating behaviors-were represented by responses to a postoperative assessment and that these constructs could be measured consistently over time. Presurgical scores on MMPI-2-RF scales measuring internalizing dysfunction were associated with more psychological distress at postoperative follow-ups, scores on scales measuring somatization were associated with more postoperative somatic concerns, and scores on scales assessing emotional/internalizing, behavioral/externalizing, cognitive complaints, and thought dysfunction prior to surgery were associated with maladaptive eating behaviors after surgery. In conjunction with a presurgical psychological interview, the MMPI-2-RF provides information that can assist in anticipating postoperative outcomes and inform efforts to prevent them.

  12. Development of a Pilot Telehealth Bariatric Surgery Support Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Carin K.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States continues to grow. Bariatric surgery is becoming more common and accepted in the treatment of obesity. Clinical candidates for bariatric surgery should have a BMI > 40 kg/m[superscript 2] alone, or a BMI > 35 kg/m[superscript 2] plus one comorbidity. A trend is emerging in the literature showing…

  13. Perceptions of obesity and cancer risk in female bariatric surgery candidates: highlighting the need for physician action for unsuspectingly obese and high risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henretta, Melissa S; Copeland, Amy R; Kelley, Sarah L; Hallowell, Peter T; Modesitt, Susan C

    2014-04-01

    To determine: 1) whether obese women perceive themselves to be obese or at risk for malignancy, 2) perceived impact of obesity on cancer risks, 3) compliance with cancer screening, and 4) rates of menstrual dysfunction. Surveys were administered to female patients presenting for bariatric weight loss surgery. Demographics, gynecologic history, perception of cancer risk, and screening history were collected/analyzed. Women were categorized as obese (BMI: 30-39kg/m(2)), morbidly obese (40-49kg/m(2)), super obese (≥50kg/m(2)) and compared. Ninety-three women (mean age: 44.9 years, mean BMI: 48.7kg/m(2)) participated and 45.7% felt they were in 'good', 'very good', or 'excellent' health despite frequent medical comorbidities. As BMI increased, women were more likely to correctly identify themselves as obese (23% of obese vs. 77% of morbidly obese vs. 85% of super obese; pobesity as a risk factor for uterine cancer, yet 48% of those retaining a uterus perceived that it was "not likely/not possible" to develop uterine cancer. Menstrual irregularities were common as was evaluation and interventions for the same; 32% had prior hysterectomy. Participation in cancer screening was robust. Women presenting for bariatric surgery have high rates of menstrual dysfunction. While they perceive that obesity increases uterine cancer risk, they often do not perceive themselves to be at risk. This disconnect may stem from the fact that many failed to identify themselves as obese perhaps because overweight/obesity has become the norm in U.S. society. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Comparative physiogenomic analyses of weight loss in response to 2 modes of bariatric surgery: demonstration with candidate neuropsychiatric and cardiometabolic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seip, Richard L; Papasavas, Pavlos; Stone, Andrea; Thompson, Stephen; Ng, Janet; Tishler, Darren S; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2016-02-01

    American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Obesidade em pacientes candidatos a cirurgia bariátrica Obesidad en pacientes candidatos a cirugía bariátrica Obesity in candidates for bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Christina Charbel Costa

    2009-02-01

    femenino y el 19,84% del masculino; el promedio de edad fue de 36,07±10,16 años; en cuanto a la etnia el 86,53% eran blancos, el 8,57% pardos y el 4,90% negros; hubo predominio de las comorbidades: hipertensión arterial (63,49%, disnea (55,56%, várices de miembros inferiores (45,63% y depresión (36,51%. CONCLUSIÓN: Se observa que la enfermedad de mayor ocurrencia en la obesidad es la hipertensión arterial, siendo necesario que el paciente sea acompañado por un equipo multidisciplinario.OBJECTIVE: To identify the demographic and clinical profile of individuals with severe obesity who were candidates for bariatric surgery. METHODS: This was a descriptive study. Data were extracted from 252 medical records of candidates for bariatric surgery in the Hospital of the Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul from 2004 through 2007. RESULTS: The prevalence of obesity was associated with other chronic diseases related to the eating habits. The majority of candidates for bariatric surgery were whites (86.53% and female (80.15%. The mean age of the candidates was 36.07±10.16 years. The most common commorbidities included high blood pressure (63.49%, dyspnea (55.56%, varicose veins (45.63%, and depression (36.51%. CONCLUSION: The major comorbidity associated with obesity is high blood pressure; individuals need be followed by a multidisciplinary team of health care providers.

  16. A comparison of revisional and primary bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Courtney; Sheppard, Caroline; Birch, Daniel; Karmali, Shazeer; de Gara, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Revisional surgery is an important component of addressing weight regain and complications following primary bariatric surgery. Owing to provincial need and the complexity of this patient population, a specialized multidisciplinary revision clinic was developed. We sought to characterize patients who undergo revision surgery and compare their outcomes with primary bariatric surgery clinic data. We completed a retrospective chart review of bariatric revision clinic patients compared with primary bariatric surgery patients from December 2009 to June 2014. We reviewed the charts of 2769 primary bariatric clinic patients, 886 of whom had bariatric surgery, and 534 revision bariatric clinic patients, 83 of whom had revision surgery. Fewer revision clinic patients underwent surgery than primary clinic patients (22% v. 32%). The mean preoperative body mass index (BMI) was 44.7 ± 9.5 in revision patients compared with 45.7 ± 7.6 in primary bariatric surgery patients. Most revision patients had a prior vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG; 48%) or a laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB; 24%). Bands were removed in 36% of all LAGB patients presenting to clinic. Of the 134 procedures performed in the revision clinic, 83 were bariatric weight loss surgeries, and 51 were band removals. Revision clinic patients experienced a significant decrease in BMI (from 44.7 ± 9.5 to 33.8 ± 7.5, p bariatric revision clinic manages a wide variety of complex patients distinct from those seen in a primary clinic. Operative candidates at the revision clinic are chosen based on favourable medical, anatomic and psychosocial factors, keeping in mind the resource constraints of a public health care system.

  17. Adolescent bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibele, Anna R; Mattar, Samer G

    2011-12-01

    Obesity has become an increasingly serious problem in pediatric and adolescent populations in the United States. Although bariatric surgery has been offered to morbidly obese adolescents for the past several decades, it remains controversial. However, the benefits of weight loss surgery in this population have been realized, particularly its long-term physical and emotional effects on adolescents. This article reviews the demographics and health implications of adolescent obesity, describes the most common adolescent bariatric surgical procedures and their outcomes, discusses the ethical issues involved in elective surgery in this population, and outlines the key components of an adolescent bariatric surgical program. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pursuing bariatric surgery in an urban area: Gender and racial disparities and risk for psychiatric symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Matero, Lisa Renee; Tobin, Erin T; Clark, Shannon; Eshelman, Anne; Genaw, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is effective for weight loss; however, only a small percentage of those who qualify choose to pursue it. Additionally, although psychiatric symptoms appear to be common among candidates, the risk factors for symptoms are not known. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of those who are pursuing bariatric surgery in an urban area, whether demographic disparities continue to exist, and identify characteristics of those who may be at higher risk for experiencing psychiatric symptoms. There were 424 bariatric candidates who completed a required psychological evaluation prior to bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery candidates tended to be middle-aged, Caucasian females, which was unexpected when compared to the rates of obesity among these groups. Therefore, it appears that there are disparities in who chooses to seek out bariatric surgery compared to those who may qualify due to their obesity status. Cultural factors may play a role in why males and African Americans seek out bariatric surgery less frequently. Psychiatric symptoms among candidates are also common, with depression symptoms increasing with age and BMI. Perhaps the compounding effects of medical comorbidities over time are contributing to greater depressive symptoms in the older patients. Findings from this study suggest that we may need to explore ways of encouraging younger patients, males, and ethnic minorities to pursue bariatric surgery to increase weight loss success and decrease medical comorbidities. Copyright © 2015 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Bariatric surgery in Denmark.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch-Jensen, P.; Iversen, M.G.; Kehlet, H.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2005 the National Board of Health (NBH) published guidelines on bariatric surgery in Denmark. The aim of the present study was to shed light on the national bariatric effort in relation to these guidelines. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The analysis is based on extraction of the following......, a tendency which was attributable to the activities of one of the private clinics. CONCLUSION: The frequency with which bariatric surgery is performed follows a strongly increasing trend and the procedures are only performed at the public departments selected by the National Board of Health...... data from the National Patient Registry in the period from 2005 through 2007: annual number of operations, type of operation, laparoscopic versus open procedure. Furthermore, the centres were compared. RESULTS: A total of 2,098 bariatric procedures were performed in the years 2005 to 2007. Apart from...

  20. Asymptomatic dystrophinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrone, A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Florence (Italy); Hoffman, E.P.; Hoop, R.C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-31

    A 4-year-old girl was referred for evaluation for a mild but persistent serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) elevation detected incidentally during routine blood screening for a skin infection. Serum creatine kinase activity was found to be increased. Immuno-histochemical study for dystrophin in her muscle biopsy showed results consistent with a carrier state for muscular dystrophy. Molecular work-up showed the proposita to be a carrier of a deletion mutation of exon 48 of the dystrophin gene. Four male relatives also had the deletion mutation, yet showed no clinical symptoms of muscular dystrophy (age range 8-58 yrs). Linkage analysis of the dystrophin gene in the family showed a spontaneous change of an STR45 allele, which could be due to either an intragenic double recombination event, or CA repeat length mutation leading to identical size alleles. To our knowledge, this is the first documentation of an asymptomatic dystrophinopathy in multiple males of advanced age. Based on molecular findings, this family would be given a diagnosis of Becker muscular dystrophy. This diagnosis implies the development of clinical symptoms, even though this family is clearly asymptomatic. This report underscores the caution which must be exercised when giving presymptomatic diagnoses based on molecular studies. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Nutrient Deficiencies Are Common Prior to Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame-Peterson, Leigh A; Megill, Robin D; Carobrese, Suzanne; Schweitzer, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Obesity, defined as a body mass index >30 kg/m2, is a growing worldwide epidemic currently effecting 1 in 10 adults, with rates as high as 40% in the United States. The only proven long-term treatment of severe obesity on a population level is surgical modification of the gastrointestinal anatomy to induce weight loss, termed bariatric surgery. With adequate physician guidance and appropriate candidate criteria, bariatric surgery is an option for effective long-term treatment of obesity and its related comorbidities. Complications of bariatric surgery can be seen in patients who are not compliant to the recommended lifestyle and dietary changes required following bariatric surgery, including nausea, vomiting, dumping syndrome, acid reflux, and nutrition deficiencies. Despite caloric density, the diet of patients prior to bariatric surgery is often of poor nutrition quality and does not meet recommended dietary guidelines for micronutrient intake, making this an at-risk population for micronutrient malnutrition. Currently, improvements are needed in standardization of nutrition assessment as well as micronutrient cutoffs for deficiency and insufficiency. In the meantime, utilizing our current tools to conduct nutrition assessment at baseline and implement supplementation where necessary may improve the nutrition status of patients undergoing bariatric surgery, both before and after surgery, which may improve their surgical outcomes.

  2. Micronutrient deficiencies in the pre-bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Karla Vanessa Gomes; Costa, Maria José de Carvalho; Gonçalves, Maria da Conceição Rodrigues; Sousa, Bruno Soares

    2013-01-01

    Data already demonstrated the increased prevalence of obesity in various segments of the population. In this context, bariatric surgery is accepted nowadays as the most effective tool in the treatment and control of morbid obesity. Several studies have evaluated the nutritional status after bariatric surgery, especially mixed by detecting a reduction in food intake of protein, vitamins and minerals. However, other studies have investigated the presence of nutritional deficiencies prior to surgery, which may be aggravated by the surgical procedure, resulting in serious postoperative complications. To analyze the literature in relationship to micronutrient deficiencies in obese patients before bariatric surgery. Was carried out a systematic review in several electronic databases, such as PubMed/ Medline, Scielo, Lilacs and Bireme. The following keywords were used alone or in combination: bariatric surgery, obesity, preoperative, gastric bypass, vitamin deficiencies, deficiencies and mineral nutrient absorption. Were included 40 review and original articles published between 2005 to 2012. There were consensus on the combination of preoperative nutritional deficiencies, restrictions and malabsorption, possibly induced by bariatric surgery that can lead patients to experience significant nutritional deficits during the late postoperative period, especially of micronutrients, resulting in serious complications. The high occurrence of micronutrient deficiencies preoperatively detected in morbidly obese candidates for bariatric surgery, plus a malabsorptive procedure, may involve worse prognosis during the late postoperative period. Preoperative evaluation of nutritional parameters and food intake is recommended in conjunction with surgical interventions.

  3. Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) KidsHealth / For Parents / Weight Loss Surgery (Bariatric Surgery) ... or bariatric surgery might be an option. About Bariatric Surgery Bariatric surgery had its beginnings in the 1960s, ...

  4. Development of Bariatric and Metabolic Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Han Li

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Bariatric and metabolic endoscopy would help obese people lose weight or prepare for bariatric surgery and hopefully alleviate some of the complications of bariatric procedures. Adequate studies and data are still needed for the new endoscopic devices.

  5. Prevalência e gravidade de asma brônquica em adultos obesos com indicação de cirurgia bariátrica Prevalence and severity of asthma in obese adult candidates for bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo Maia Davila Melo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência de asma em um grupo de adultos obesos, candidatos a cirurgia bariátrica e avaliar a gravidade da asma neste grupo de pacientes. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal, envolvendo 363 pacientes obesos adultos (índice de massa corpórea > 35 kg/m² avaliados por um médico pneumologista, utilizando a avaliação clínica como instrumento diagnóstico de asma. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos à avaliação clínica e espirometria e foram divididos em dois grupos (asma e controle. Os pacientes com asma foram classificados conforme a gravidade da doença. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de asma na população de obesos estudada foi de 18,5% (IC95%: 14,5-22,4. Essa prevalência nas mulheres e nos homens foi de 20,4% (IC95%: 16,2-24,5 e 13,7% (IC95%: 10,1-17,2, respectivamente. Havia sintomas de asma nos últimos doze meses em 8,0% (IC95%: 5,2-10,7, e houve manifestação inicial dos sintomas de asma na infância/adolescência em 17,4% (IC95%: 13,5-21,3. No grupo asma, asma intermitente estava presente em 29 pacientes (43,3%; asma persistente leve, em 7 (10,4%; asma moderada, em 25 (37,3%; e asma persistente grave, em 6 (9,0%. CONCLUSÕES: A prevalência de asma neste grupo de adultos obesos, utilizando-se a avaliação clínica como critério diagnóstico, mostrou-se elevada, com predomínio no sexo feminino e com manifestação inicial dos sintomas de asma na infância/adolescência. A gravidade da asma neste grupo de obesos adultos esteve entre os valores médios estimados para a população geral, com uma maior proporção de asma intermitente, asma persistente leve e asma persistente moderadaOBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of asthma in a group of obese adult candidates for bariatric surgery and to evaluate the severity of asthma in this group of patients. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 363 obese adults (body mass index > 35 kg/m² evaluated by a pulmonologist, using clinical evaluation as a

  6. Depression and infertility in women seeking bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrell, Julie; Lavery, Megan; Ashton, Kathleen; Heinberg, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with abnormalities in reproductive functioning and fertility in women. A number of potential mechanisms have been identified, including neuroendocrine functioning and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Associations between infertility, depression, and anxiety have been found in nonobese populations; however, the relationship between depression and infertility in women pursuing bariatric surgery has not been examined. This study sought to explore potential psychosocial correlates of infertility in a female bariatric population. Data were analyzed from female patients of childbearing age (n = 88; 70.5% Caucasian; mean age 36.2; mean education 14.3 years; mean body mass index [BMI] 47.9 kg/m(2)) psychologically evaluated for bariatric surgery. Participants were dichotomized as Infertility+(n = 43) or Infertility-(n = 45) based on a medical history self-report questionnaire. Medical records were reviewed for demographic characteristics, BMI, physical and/or sexual abuse history, psychiatric medication usage, outpatient behavioral health treatment, and psychiatric diagnoses. Women identified as Infertility+were more likely to have been diagnosed with a depressive disorder not otherwise specified or a major depressive disorder (χ(2) = 3.71, PInfertility-women. However, Infertility+women were less likely to be involved in outpatient behavioral health treatment (χ(2) = 5.65, PWomen struggling with infertility may be more psychiatrically vulnerable than other bariatric surgery candidates and less likely to have received mental health treatment. Additional research on the association between fertility, depression, behavioral health treatment, and obesity is warranted. Future research should consider whether this potential relationship changes after bariatric surgery. © 2013 American Society for Bariatric Surgery Published by American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery All rights reserved.

  7. Young adult women's experiences of body image after bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Janet F; Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Larsen, Tine B

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To understand the lived experience of body image in young women after obesity surgery. BACKGROUND: Quantitative studies have documented that health-related quality of life and body image are improved after bariatric surgery, probably due to significant weight loss. Female obesity surgery...... candidates are likely to be motivated by dissatisfaction regarding physical appearance. However, little is known about the experience of the individual woman, leaving little understanding of the association between bariatric surgery and changes in health-related quality of life and body image. DESIGN......: A qualitative descriptive phenomenological study. METHODS: Data were collected over 4 months during 2010. Selection for interview was carried out through purposeful sampling. The participants were five young women who underwent bariatric surgery (range: 1-12 months). In-depth, semi-structured interviews were...

  8. [Pregnancy after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Franco; DE Luca, Francesco; Stracquadanio, Mariagrazia; Garraffo, Claudia; Santonocito, Veronica C; Privitera, Agata

    2017-04-01

    Pregnancy after bariatric surgery has some peculiarities related to obesity, type of surgery, amount of weight loss, time elapsed from the surgery and adherence to medical prescriptions. Pregnant woman is at risk of nutritional deficiencies and it is unclear whether there is an increased incidence of intestinal complications during pregnancy after bariatric surgery and whether this kind of complications are more frequent during cesarean section. The fetus is at high risk of prematurity and fetal growth restriction, but they seem not at increased risk of birth defects (DTN) except in individual cases of folic acid deficiency (DTN) or vitamin K defect (similar abnormalities in patients receiving oral anticoagulants). In addition, the incidence of gestational diabetes and hypertension results to be decreased. Other postnatal outcomes from possible epigenetic modifications need to be evaluated in the long-term postnatal follow-up.

  9. The bariatric surgery patient for non-bariatric surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0. The bariatric surgery patient for non-bariatric surgery. B Dayaa*. aSpecialist Anaesthesiologist, Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital, Durban. *Corresponding author: Bhavika Daya, e-mail: bhavikadaya@gmail.com. Table II: Co-morbidities frequently found in obese patients.

  10. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000682.htm Asymptomatic HIV infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asymptomatic HIV infection is a phase of HIV/AIDS during which ...

  11. Is Elective Gastroscopy Prior to Bariatric Surgery in an Asian Cohort Worthwhile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Jing Yu; Cheng, Anton K S; Kim, Guowei; Kong, Lucy W C; Soe, Khin T; Lomanto, Davide; So, Jimmy B Y; Shabbir, Asim

    2016-09-01

    The preoperative use of gastroscopy for patients undergoing bariatric surgery remains controversial. We aim to evaluate the diagnostic yield of gastroscopy and the clinical significance in asymptomatic individuals undergoing bariatric surgery in Asia. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients undergoing gastroscopy prior to bariatric surgery at the National University Hospital and Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore, between Jan 2006 and June 2013. Gastroscopy findings were classified into four groups: group 1 (normal study), group 2 (abnormal findings that do not modify surgical approach), group 3 (abnormal findings that modify surgical approach) and group 4 (absolute contraindications to immediate surgery). During the study period, 208 asymptomatic individuals were evaluated by gastroscopy prior to bariatric surgery. Gastroscopy was normal in 70 (33.6 %). Group 2 comprised 67 (32.2 %) patients with mild gastritis or oesophagitis. Group 3 included 69 (33.2 %) patients diagnosed with erosive gastritis or oesophagitis, peptic ulcer disease, hiatal hernia or mass lesions. There were 2 patients (1.0 %) in group 4. One patient had a gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma, and 1 had a gastrointestinal stroma tumour. In group 3, modification of surgical approach included concurrent hiatal hernia repair, institution of medical therapy with delay in surgery, further evaluation of mass lesions and change in choice of surgical procedures. Routine gastroscopy for asymptomatic bariatric patients has a high diagnostic yield. Given the high percentage of patients with clinically important lesions, our current experience supports the use of routine preoperative gastroscopy prior to bariatric surgery in Singapore.

  12. Bariatric surgery in individuals with liver cirrhosis: A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Cazzo

    Full Text Available Summary Introduction: Bariatric surgery has become the gold standard treatment for morbid obesity, but there is no consensus regarding its safety and efficacy among individuals with chronic liver diseases. Objective: To critically evaluate the existing evidence on literature about bariatric surgery in individuals with liver cirrhosis. Method: Narrative review performed by means of an online search in the MEDLINE and LILACS databases. Results: Bariatric surgery is safe and effective in individuals with chronic liver disease without clinical decompensation or significant portal hypertension. Individuals with severe liver function impairment present significantly higher surgical morbidity and mortality. Among candidates to liver transplantation, surgery may be performed before, after and even during transplantation, and there is a predominant trend to perform it after. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy seems to be the most adequate technique in this group of subjects. Conclusion: Bariatric surgery is safe and effective in individuals with compensated cirrhosis without significant portal hypertension, but presents higher morbidity. Among candidates to liver transplantation and/or individuals with severe portal hypertension, morbidity and mortality are significantly higher.

  13. Endoscopic management of erosion after banded bariatric procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Matthew D; Aher, Chetan V; English, Wayne J; Williams, D Brandon

    2017-11-01

    Prosthetic materials wrapped around a portion of the stomach have been used to provide gastric restriction in bariatric surgery for many years. Intraluminal erosion of adjustable and nonadjustable gastric bands typically occurs many years after placement and results in various symptoms. Endoscopic management of gastric band erosion has been described and allows for optimal patient outcomes. We will describe our methods and experience with endoscopic management of intraluminal gastric band erosions after bariatric procedures. University hospital in the United States. A retrospective review of our bariatric surgery database identified patients undergoing removal of gastric bands. A chart review was then undertaken to confirm erosion of prosthetic material into the gastrointestinal tract. Baseline characteristics, operative reports, and follow-up data were analyzed. Sixteen patients were identified with an eroded gastric band: 11 after banded gastric bypass, 3 after laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB), and 2 after vertical banded gastroplasty. All patients were successfully treated with endoscopic removal of the prosthetic materials using either endoscopic scissors or ligation of the banding material with off-label use of a mechanical lithotripter device. Complications included a postoperative gastrointestinal bleed requiring repeat endoscopy, 1 patient with asymptomatic pneumoperitoneum requiring observation, and 1 with seroma at the site of LAGB port removal. Endoscopic management of intraluminal prosthetic erosion after gastric banded bariatric procedures can be safe and effective and should be considered when treating this complication. Erosion of the prosthetic materials inside the gastric lumen allows for potential endoscopic removal without free intraabdominal perforation. Endoscopic devices designed for dividing eroded LAGBs may help standardize and increase utilization of this approach. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery

  14. Bariatric Surgery and Precision Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina F. Nicoletti

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a literature overview of new findings relating nutritional genomics and bariatric surgery. It also describes the importance of nutritional genomics concepts in personalized bariatric management. It includes a discussion of the potential role bariatric surgery plays in altering the three pillars of nutritional genomics: nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics, and epigenetics. We present studies that show the effect of each patient’s genetic and epigenetic variables on the response to surgical weight loss treatment. We include investigations that demonstrate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with obesity phenotypes and their influence on weight loss after bariatric surgery. We also present reports on how significant weight loss induced by bariatric surgery impacts telomere length, and we discuss studies on the existence of an epigenetic signature associated with surgery outcomes and specific gene methylation profile, which may help to predict weight loss after a surgical procedure. Finally, we show articles which evidence that bariatric surgery may affect expression of numerous genes involved in different metabolic pathways and consequently induce functional and taxonomic changes in gut microbial communities. The role nutritional genomics plays in responses to weight loss after bariatric surgery is evident. Better understanding of the molecular pathways involved in this process is necessary for successful weight management and maintenance.

  15. Bariatric Surgery and Precision Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Carolina F; Cortes-Oliveira, Cristiana; Pinhel, Marcela A S; Nonino, Carla B

    2017-09-06

    This review provides a literature overview of new findings relating nutritional genomics and bariatric surgery. It also describes the importance of nutritional genomics concepts in personalized bariatric management. It includes a discussion of the potential role bariatric surgery plays in altering the three pillars of nutritional genomics: nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics, and epigenetics. We present studies that show the effect of each patient's genetic and epigenetic variables on the response to surgical weight loss treatment. We include investigations that demonstrate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with obesity phenotypes and their influence on weight loss after bariatric surgery. We also present reports on how significant weight loss induced by bariatric surgery impacts telomere length, and we discuss studies on the existence of an epigenetic signature associated with surgery outcomes and specific gene methylation profile, which may help to predict weight loss after a surgical procedure. Finally, we show articles which evidence that bariatric surgery may affect expression of numerous genes involved in different metabolic pathways and consequently induce functional and taxonomic changes in gut microbial communities. The role nutritional genomics plays in responses to weight loss after bariatric surgery is evident. Better understanding of the molecular pathways involved in this process is necessary for successful weight management and maintenance.

  16. Sexual satisfaction following bariatric surgery: A prospective exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Márquez, Manuel; Pomares-Callejón, María Ángeles; Fernández-Agis, Inmaculada; Belda-Lozano, Ricardo; Vidaña-Márquez, Elisabet; Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto

    2017-11-01

    Bariatric surgery improves sexual function in obese individuals, although the extent to which sexual satisfaction is improved following surgery is unknown. The aims of this study were 1) to describe sexual satisfaction in severely/morbidly obese men and women candidates for bariatric surgery; 2) to assess the effects of bariatric surgery on sexual satisfaction at 12-months follow-up; and 3) to assess whether weight changes at follow-up following bariatric surgery are associated with changes in sexual satisfaction. We conducted a prospective observational study from February 2011 to June 2014. A total of 44 patients with severe/morbid obesity participated in the study. Sexual satisfaction was assessed (at baseline and 12-months follow-up) through the Index of Sexual Satisfaction (ISS) questionnaire. Of 44 patients who completed the ISS at baseline (mean age 40.3 [SD=9.4] years and BMI 46.9 [SD=6.2] kg/m 2 ), 17 were lost to follow-up. The baseline ISS total scores were 32.0 (SD=20.1) in women and 24.4 (SD=16.0) in men (P>0.05). The proportion of sexually satisfied men and women at baseline was 62.5% and 46.4%, respectively (P=0.360). At follow-up, sexual satisfaction improved significantly in women (average difference 13.7 units; P=0.032) but not in men (average difference 3.6 units; P=0.717). The percentage of women with sexual satisfaction problems was reduced by 33% at follow-up (P=0.038). A relatively large percentage of severely/morbidly obese women and men present clinically significant sexual satisfaction problems before undergoing bariatric surgery. Sexual satisfaction improves significantly 12 months following bariatric surgery, particularly in women. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. [Peripheral neuropathies after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippi, N; Vinzio, S; Collongues, N; Vix, M; Boehm, N; Tranchant, C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies sometimes complicate bariatric surgery. We report the detailed clinical, electrophysiological, biological and histological characteristics of five patients who developed peripheral neuropathy after bariatric surgery. Three patients presented with small fiber neuropathy, one presented with axonal polyneuropathy, and one with demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. All patients had in common prominent neuropathic pain, massive weight loss, and multiple nutritional deficiencies. The pathophysiology of postbariatric surgery polyneuropathies is complex and involves nutritional, infectious and dysimmune mechanisms. The spectrum of peripheral neuropathies complicating bariatric surgery is wide, and includes pure small fiber neuropathy, axonal polyneuropathy, and demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Treatment is mainly preventive, but sometimes surgical revision is needed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Innovations in Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Catherine; Pryor, Aurora D

    2015-11-01

    Surgery has consistently been demonstrated to be the most effective long-term therapy for the treatment of obesity. However, despite excellent outcomes with current procedures, most patients with obesity- and weight-related comorbidities who meet criteria for surgical treatment choose not to pursue surgery out of fear of operative risks and complications or concerns about high costs. Novel minimally invasive procedures and devices may offer alternative solutions for patients who are hesitant to pursue standard surgical approaches. These procedures may be used for primary treatment of obesity, early intervention for patients approaching morbid obesity, temporary management prior to bariatric surgery, or revision of bypass surgery associated with weight regain. Novel bariatric procedures can in general be divided into four categories: endoluminal space-occupying devices, gastric suturing and restrictive devices, absorption-limiting devices, and neural-hormonal modulating devices. Many of these are only approved as short-term interventions, but these devices may be effective for patients desiring low-risk procedures or a transient effect. We will see the expansion of indications and alternatives for metabolic surgery as these techniques gain approval.

  19. Bariatric Surgery and Stone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieske, John C.; Kumar, Rajiv

    2008-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment strategy for patients with morbid obesity that can result in effective weight loss, resolution of diabetes mellitus and other weight related complications, and even improved mortality. However, it also appears that hyperoxaluria is common after modern bariatric surgery, perhaps occurring in up to 50% of patients after Rouxen-Y gastric bypass. Although increasing numbers of patients are being seen with calcium oxalate kidney stones after bariatric surgery, and even a few with oxalosis and renal failure, the true risk of these outcomes remains unknown. The mechanisms that contribute to this enteric hyperoxaluria are also incompletely defined, although fat malabsorption may be an important component. Since increasing numbers of these procedures are likely to be performed in the coming years, further study regarding the prevalence and mechanisms of hyperoxaluria and kidney stones after bariatric surgery is needed to devise effective methods of treatment in order to prevent such complications.

  20. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Al-Humaidi

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: We found a high prevalence of myocardial perfusion abnormalities in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients. Perfusion abnormalities on myocardial perfusion SPECT images were associated with disease duration, insulin use, nephropathy, and neuropathy. Asymptomatic diabetic patients might be candidates with CAD abnormalities that can be studied using myocardial perfusion SPECT.

  1. Oral Contraceptives after Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Joël Schlatter

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Bariatric surgery offers a highly effective mode of treatment for obese patients. Some procedures such as bypass cause an alteration in normal gastrointestinal tract with possible consequences for the uptake of orally administered drugs. Methods: We assessed the literature to ascertain whether the use of oral drugs and especially oral contraceptives is effective and adequate after bariatric surgery. Results: The bioavailability of drugs could be affected by the solubility and pH of...

  2. Laparoscopic revolution in bariatric surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sundbom, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    The history of bariatric surgery is investigational. Dedicated surgeons have continuously sought for an ideal procedure to relieve morbidly obese patients from their burden of comorbid conditions, reduced life expectancy and low quality of life. The ideal procedure must have low complication risk, both in short- and long term, as well as minimal impact on daily life. The revolution of laparoscopic techniques in bariatric surgery is described in this summary. Advances in minimal invasive techn...

  3. [Nutritional deficiencies in bariatric surgery patients: prevention, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Chaya; Keidar, Andrei

    2010-11-01

    The number of people suffering from surgery and obesity in the western world is constantly growing. In 1997 the World Health Organization (WHO) defined obesity as a plague and one of greatest public health hazards of our time. The National Institution of Health (NIH) declared that surgery is the only long-term solution for obesity. Today there are four different types of bariatric surgery. Each variation has different implications on the nutritional status of bariatric surgery patients. Bariatric surgery candidates are at risk of developing vitamin and mineral nutritional deficiencies in the post-operative stage, due to vomiting, decrease in food intake, food intolerance, diminution of gastric secretions and bypass of absorption area. It is easier and more efficient to treat nutritional deficiencies in the preoperative stage. Therefore, preoperative detection and correction are crucial. Blood tests before surgery to detect and treat nutritional deficiencies are crucial. In the postoperative period, blood tests should be conducted every 3 months in the first year after operation, every six months in the second year and annually thereafter. Multivitamin is recommended to prevent nutritional deficiencies in all bariatric surgery patients. Furthermore, iron, calcium, Vitamin D and B12 are additionally recommended for Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass patients. Patients with Biliopancreatic diversion and Duodenal Switch should also take fat soluble vitamins.

  4. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Change You can help ASMBS bring coverage for bariatric surgery to all states in America through ObesityPAC Read ... and as a leader in the field of bariatric surgery. Take the IH Compensation Survey Please complete this ...

  5. Bariatric surgery in hypothalamic obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eBingham

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Craniopharyngiomas (CP are epithelial neoplasms generally found in the area of the pituitary and hypothalamus. Despite benign histology, these tumors and/or their treatment often result in significant, debilitating disorders of endocrine, neurological, behavioral, and metabolic systems. Severe obesity is observed in a high percentage of patients with CP resulting in significant comorbidities and negatively impacting quality of life. Obesity occurs as a result of hypothalamic damage and disruption of normal homeostatic mechanisms regulating energy balance. Such pathological weight gain, termed hypothalamic obesity (HyOb, is often severe and refractory to therapy.Unfortunately, neither lifestyle intervention nor pharmacotherapy has proven truly effective in the treatment of CP-HyOb. Given the limited choices and poor results of these treatments, several groups have examined bariatric surgery as a treatment alternative for patients with CP-HyOb. While a large body of evidence exists supporting the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of exogenous obesity and its comorbidities, its role in the treatment of HyOb has yet to be well defined. To date, the existing literature on bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb is largely limited to case reports and series with short term follow-up. Here we review the current reports on the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of CP-HyOb. We also compare these results to those reported for other populations of HyOb, including Prader-Willi Syndrome and patients with melanocortin signaling defects. While initial reports of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb are promising, their limited scope makes it difficult to draw any substantial conclusions as to the long term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb. There continues to be a need for more robust, controlled, prospective trials with long term follow-up in order to better define the role of bariatric surgery in the treatment of all types of hypothalamic

  6. Unmet need for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Kate N; Finucane, Francis M; le Roux, Carel W; Fitzgerald, Anthony P; Kearney, Patricia M

    2017-06-01

    With the rising prevalence of severe obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), bariatric surgery offers a clinical and cost-effective treatment for carefully selected patients. Despite this, the provision of surgical services varies significantly between countries. To inform health service planning by estimating the number of people who would potentially benefit from bariatric surgery. Nationally representative sample of community-dwelling older adults. We applied two separate evidence-based criteria sets for eligibility for bariatric surgery. For the first set of criteria, we considered those with body mass index≥40 kg/m2 or≥35 kg/m2 and one or more of the following: T2D, hypertension, previous myocardial infarction, or sleep apnea. For the second set of criteria, we considered patients with T2D and body mass index≥35 kg/m2, with one or more of the following: previous myocardial infarction, elevated urine albumin-creatinine ratio, retinopathy, neuropathy, or peripheral vascular disease. Prevalence estimates were applied to census figures for 2011, estimating absolute numbers meeting the criteria. Among adults aged≥50 years, 7.97% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.23, 8.78), representing 92,573 people (95% CI: 83,978, 101,981), met criteria one and 0.97% (95% CI: 0.73, 1.28), representing 11,231 people (95% CI: 8471, 14,890), met criteria two. With fewer than 1/100,000 population publicly funded surgeries taking place annually, current service provision meets much less than 0.1% of the need. While many adults who fulfill the eligibility criteria for bariatric surgery may not want or require it, the current level of need for bariatric surgical services is not being met. A strategy to develop and expand the provision of bariatric care is urgently needed. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Halitosis in obese patients and those undergoing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupim Souza, Ana Carolina; Franco, Carolina F; Pataro, André L; Guerra, Tadeu; de Oliveira Costa, Fernando; da Costa, José Eustáquio

    2013-01-01

    Patients undergoing bariatric surgery often complain of bad breath. However, the relationship between bariatric surgery and halitosis is relatively unknown. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare the occurrence of halitosis among patients before and after a specific type of bariatric surgery, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and its relationship with the tongue coating index, plaque index, and salivary flow rate. A total of 62 patients with good oral health and in treatment for obesity at the walk-in clinic of Santa Casa Hospital, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, were selected. Of this sample, 31 were bariatric surgery candidates (control group) and 31 had already undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (case group). After completing a questionnaire, all patients underwent an oral clinical examination. Halitosis was measured using an organoleptic scale and a portable sulfide monitor. The Spearman correlation demonstrated a strong positive relation between the organoleptic rates and the concentration of volatile sulfur compounds determined using the sulfide monitor (rs = .58; P = .0001). No difference was found in the prevalence of halitosis between the 2 groups (P = .48). Only the salivary flow rate was significantly reduced in the control group compared with the case group (P = .02). In the case group, the concentration of volatile sulfur compounds correlated negatively with the salivary flow rate (P = .04) and positively with the tongue coating index (P = .005). The tongue coating index was significantly increased in those patients who did not brush the tongue (P halitosis and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. However, they do highlight the possible effect of this surgery on the oral cavity. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Preoperative lifestyle intervention in bariatric surgery: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalarchian, Melissa A; Marcus, Marsha D; Courcoulas, Anita P; Cheng, Yu; Levine, Michele D

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the impact of presurgery weight loss and lifestyle preparation on outcomes following bariatric surgery are needed. To evaluate whether a presurgery behavioral lifestyle intervention improves weight loss through a 24-month postsurgery period. Bariatric Center of Excellence at a large, urban medical center. Candidates for bariatric surgery were randomized to a 6-month behavioral lifestyle intervention or to 6 months of usual presurgical care. The lifestyle intervention consisted of 8 weekly face-to-face sessions, followed by 16 weeks of face-to-face and telephone sessions before surgery; the intervention also included 3 monthly telephone contacts after surgery. Assessments were conducted 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Participants who underwent surgery (n = 143) were 90.2% female and 86.7% White. Average age was 44.9 years, and average body mass index was 47.5 kg/m(2) at study enrollment. At follow-up, 131 (91.6%), 126 (88.1%), 117 (81.8%) patients participated in the 6-, 12-, and 24-month assessments, respectively. Percent weight loss from study enrollment to 6 and 12 months after surgery was comparable for both groups, but at 24 months after surgery, the lifestyle group had significantly smaller percent weight loss compared with the usual care group (26.5% versus 29.5%, respectively, P = .02). Presurgery lifestyle intervention did not improve weight loss at 24 months after surgery. The findings from this study raise questions about the utility and timing of adjunctive lifestyle interventions for bariatric surgery patients. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Oral Contraceptives after Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Schlatter

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bariatric surgery offers a highly effective mode of treatment for obese patients. Some procedures such as bypass cause an alteration in normal gastrointestinal tract with possible consequences for the uptake of orally administered drugs. Methods: We assessed the literature to ascertain whether the use of oral drugs and especially oral contraceptives is effective and adequate after bariatric surgery. Results: The bioavailability of drugs could be affected by the solubility and pH of the modified medium after bariatric surgery and by the loss of gastrointestinal transporters. Bariatric surgery could potentially result in a transient change in the absorption of drugs such as analgesics, antibiotics, antiarrhythmics, anticoagulants, psychotropic, and oral contraceptive drugs. Effective contraception is especially critical in the postoperative period, and implants might be representing a safe contraceptive method in women undergoing bariatric surgery. Conclusion: Each drug will have to be evaluated with respect to its site of absorption and its mechanism of absorption, with special attention on parameters influencing the effectiveness of the absorption processes.

  10. Laparoscopic revolution in bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundbom, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    The history of bariatric surgery is investigational. Dedicated surgeons have continuously sought for an ideal procedure to relieve morbidly obese patients from their burden of comorbid conditions, reduced life expectancy and low quality of life. The ideal procedure must have low complication risk, both in short- and long term, as well as minimal impact on daily life. The revolution of laparoscopic techniques in bariatric surgery is described in this summary. Advances in minimal invasive techniques have contributed to reduced operative time, length of stay, and complications. The development in bariatric surgery has been exceptional, resulting in a dramatic increase of the number of procedures performed world wide during the last decades. Although, a complex bariatric procedure can be performed with operative mortality no greater than cholecystectomy, specific procedure-related complications and other drawbacks must be taken into account. The evolution of laparoscopy will be the legacy of the 21st century and at present, day-care surgery and further reduction of the operative trauma is in focus. The impressive effects on comorbid conditions have prompted the adoption of minimal invasive bariatric procedures into the field of metabolic surgery. PMID:25386062

  11. Nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Bikram S; Finelli, Frederick C; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2012-09-01

    Lifestyle intervention programmes often produce insufficient weight loss and poor weight loss maintenance. As a result, an increasing number of patients with obesity and related comorbidities undergo bariatric surgery, which includes approaches such as the adjustable gastric band or the 'divided' Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This Review summarizes the current knowledge on nutrient deficiencies that can develop after bariatric surgery and highlights follow-up and treatment options for bariatric surgery patients who develop a micronutrient deficiency. The major macronutrient deficiency after bariatric surgery is protein malnutrition. Deficiencies in micronutrients, which include trace elements, essential minerals, and water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins, are common before bariatric surgery and often persist postoperatively, despite universal recommendations on multivitamin and mineral supplements. Other disorders, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, can promote micronutrient deficiencies, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus. Recognition of the clinical presentations of micronutrient deficiencies is important, both to enable early intervention and to minimize long-term adverse effects. A major clinical concern is the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the development of metabolic bone diseases, such as osteoporosis or osteomalacia; metabolic bone diseases may explain the increased risk of hip fracture in patients after RYGB. Further studies are required to determine the optimal levels of nutrient supplementation and whether postoperative laboratory monitoring effectively detects nutrient deficiencies. In the absence of such data, clinicians should inquire about and treat symptoms that suggest nutrient deficiencies.

  12. Cardiovascular effects of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamish, Andrew J; Olbers, Torsten; Kelly, Aaron S; Inge, Thomas H

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is a major global health problem, and its multisystem effects are inextricably linked with elevated cardiovascular risk and adverse outcomes. The cardiovascular benefits of reversing obesity in adults are well-established. Compared with other weight-loss strategies, programmes that incorporate bariatric surgery for weight loss are beneficial for sustained BMI reduction. A marked improvement in cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidaemia, inflammation, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, has been observed after bariatric surgery. This broad improvement in cardiovascular risk profile has led to substantial reductions in the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and death. As with all procedures, the benefits of bariatric surgery must be weighed against its potential risks. Modern bariatric surgery has an excellent safety profile, but important limitations remain, including the potential for surgical complications and nutritional deficiencies, and the lifelong requirement for nutritional supplementation. Surgery should be considered in patients with severe obesity, especially those with cardiovascular comorbidities. In this Review, we summarize the current management options for patients with obesity, and discuss the effects of bariatric surgery on cardiovascular risk factors and outcomes.

  13. Bone Metabolism after Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Elaine W.

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is a popular and effective treatment for severe obesity, but may have negative effects on the skeleton. This review summarizes changes in bone density and bone metabolism from animal and clinical studies of bariatric surgery, with specific attention to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), adjustable gastric banding (AGB), and sleeve gastrectomy (SG). Skeletal imaging artifacts from obesity and weight loss are also considered. Despite challenges in bone density imaging, the preponderance of evidence suggests that bariatric surgery procedures have negative skeletal effects that persist beyond the first year of surgery, and that these effects vary by surgical type. The long-term clinical implications and current clinical recommendations are presented. Further study is required to determine mechanisms of bone loss after bariatric surgery. Although early studies focused on calcium/vitamin D metabolism and mechanical unloading of the skeleton, it seems likely that surgically-induced changes in the hormonal and metabolic profile may be responsible for the skeletal phenotypes observed after bariatric surgery. PMID:24677277

  14. Bariatric operative reporting: Quality assessment and perceptions among bariatric surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogryn, Shannon; Hardy, Krista; Vergis, Ashley

    2017-03-01

    The quality of narrative operative notes is poor. No investigation has previously addressed operative reporting specifically in bariatric surgery. To evaluate surgeons' perceptions of the quality of operative reporting in bariatric surgery and compare this to an audit of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) narrative reports using validated quality indicators. University hospital, Canada. A Web-based survey was distributed to bariatric surgeons across Canada. Perceptions regarding the quality of reporting were gathered using a Likert scale (modified Structured Assessment Format for Evaluating Operative Reports) and free text fields. Forty RYGB narrative reports were analyzed against established quality indicators and compared to respondent's perceptions based on themes. Twenty-four of 34 bariatric surgeons (71%) completed the survey. The most commonly performed procedures were RYGB and sleeve gastrectomy (96% and 100%, respectively). Currently, 70.8% perform a traditional narrative report. The average Structured Assessment Format for Evaluating Operative Reports score for narrative dictations by bariatric surgeons was neutral (27.9/40). The lowest scoring items were the "description of indications" (2.9/5) and "succinctness" (3.3/5). Opinions reflected a need for an immediately generated, standardized, template-based report to improve the quality and accessibility of operative documentation. The quality audit reinforced respondents' perceptions. Reports included only 62.0%±6.6% of quality indicators, with the lowest scoring areas being "patient details," "preoperative events," and "postoperative details" (41.1%, 32.4%, and 31.7%, respectively). This survey revealed a perception of mediocre quality of narrative dictations. This was reinforced by an audit of RYGB operative reports. Future investigations should focus on improving this form of operative communication. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Medical tourism in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Daniel W; Vu, Lan; Karmali, Shahzeer; Stoklossa, Carlene Johnson; Sharma, Arya M

    2010-05-01

    The number of Canadians who self-refer for bariatric surgery outside of Canada or to private clinics within Canada remains undefined. The outcomes from this questionable practice have not been evaluated systematically to date. We completed a chart review of known cases referred to our center for complications related to medical tourism and bariatric surgery. We present a series of patients who have experienced complications because of medical tourism for bariatric surgery and required urgent surgical management at a tertiary care center within Canada. Complications have resulted from 3 commonly used procedures: adjustable gastric banding, gastric sleeve resection, and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Because of this review, we propose that a medical tourism approach to the surgical management of obesity-a chronic disease-is inappropriate and raises clear ethical and moral issues. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  17. Bariatric Surgery as a Bridge to Renal Transplantation in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bahri, Shadi; Fakhry, Tannous K; Gonzalvo, John Paul; Murr, Michel M

    2017-11-01

    Obesity is a relative contraindication to organ transplantation. Preliminary reports suggest that bariatric surgery may be used as a bridge to transplantation in patients who are not eligible for transplantation because of morbid obesity. The Bariatric Center at Tampa General Hospital, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. We reviewed the outcomes of 16 consecutive patients on hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who underwent bariatric surgery from 1998 to 2016. Demographics, comorbidities, weight loss, as well as transplant status were reported. Data is mean ± SD. Six men and ten women aged 43-66 years (median = 54 years) underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB, n = 12), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB, n = 3), or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG, n = 1). Preoperative BMI was 48 ± 8 kg/m 2 . Follow-up to date was 1-10 years (median = 2.8 years); postoperative BMI was 31 ± 7 kg/m 2 ; %EBWL was 62 ± 24. Four patients underwent renal transplantation (25%) between 2.5-5 years after bariatric surgery. Five patients are currently listed for transplantation. Five patients were not listed for transplantation due to persistent comorbidities; two of these patients died as a consequence of their comorbidities (12.5%) more than 1 year after bariatric surgery. Two patients were lost to follow-up (12.5%). Bariatric surgery is effective in patients with ESRD and improves access to renal transplantation. Bariatric surgery offers a safe approach to weight loss and improvement in comorbidities in the majority of patients. Referrals of transplant candidates with obesity for bariatric surgery should be considered early in the course of ESRD.

  18. Asymptomatic Primary Hyperparathyroidism

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    Silverberg, Shonni J.; Walker, Marcella D.; Bilezikian, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The clinical profile of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) as it is seen in the United States and most Western countries has evolved significantly over the past half century. The introduction of the multichannel serum autoanalyzer in the 1970s led to the recognition of a cohort of individuals with asymptomatic hypercalcemia, in whom evaluation led to the diagnosis of PHPT. The term “asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism” was introduced to describe patients who lack obvious signs and symptoms referable to either excess calcium or parathyroid hormone. Although it was expected that asymptomatic patients would eventually develop classical symptoms of PHPT, observational data suggest that most patients do not evolve over time to become overtly symptomatic. In most parts of the world, the asymptomatic phenotype of PHPT has replaced classical PHPT. This report is a selective review of data on asymptomatic PHPT: its demographic features, presentation and natural history, as well as biochemical, skeletal, neuromuscular, psychological, and cardiovascular manifestations. In addition, we will summarize available information on treatment indications and options for those with asymptomatic disease. PMID:23374736

  19. Factors Associated with Suicide Ideation in Severely Obese Bariatric Surgery-Seeking Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eunice Y.; Fettich, Karla C.; Tierney, Megan; Cummings, Hakeemah; Berona, Johnny; Weissman, Jessica; Ward, Amanda; Christensen, Kara; Southward, Matthew; Gordon, Kathryn H.; Mitchell, James; Coccaro, Emil

    2012-01-01

    There are high rates of suicide ideation and/or behavior in severely obese individuals. The potential contributors to suicide ideation in a sample of 334 severely obese bariatric surgery candidates was explored. Lack of college education, a history of suicide ideation and/or behavior, psychological distress, hopelessness, loneliness, history of…

  20. Enhanced recovery after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Adrian; Goudra, Basavana G; Singh, Preet Mohinder

    2017-02-01

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) methodology has demonstrated consistent benefits in patients undergoing colorectal, urological and thoracic surgeries. Principles of these protocols and their advantages are expected to extend into other surgical specialties such as bariatric surgery. In this review, we summarize the components of ERAS protocols for bariatric surgery and present the evidence on the emerging role of ERAS principles in obese patients. Many recent trials have evaluated ERAS protocols for bariatric surgery. Most of these protocols originate from modifications within the individual hospital-based conventional perioperative care strategies. Studies demonstrate that 'ERAS based' care requires evidence-based modifications in all preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative phase. Despite a lack of standardization in protocols at present, benefits such as decreased length of hospital stay, rapid patient turnover, shorter operating room times and lower healthcare costs have been well demonstrated repeatedly. ERAS for bariatric surgery is in its early phase. Nevertheless, literature supports its role in improving perioperative outcomes compared with conventional care in this scenario. Evidence-based protocols, multidisciplinary teamwork and meticulous audit seem to be the key factors for success in ERAS methodology.

  1. Nutritional consequences of bariatric surgery.

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    Xanthakos, Stavra A; Inge, Thomas H

    2006-07-01

    Bariatric surgery is being increasingly used to help treat morbidly obese adults and adolescents. As a greater percentage of this population faces a lifetime of living with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology, increased awareness of the nutritional consequences is critical for all health care practitioners, as many of these patients may be lost to follow-up and can present with significant nutritional complications years after surgery. Nutritional deficiencies can occur after bariatric surgery, although to a lesser degree after restrictive procedures. Risk may increase over time, perhaps due to poor compliance with supplementation, continued inadequate intake and/or ongoing malabsorption. Adolescent patients may be at greater risk due to poor compliance and longer life span. Nutritional monitoring and supplementation among bariatric programs has been widely variable and few prospective studies of outcomes exist. Bariatric surgery can carry significant risk of nutritional complications. Compliance with dietary recommendations should be monitored and encouraged, with annual screening for selected deficiencies. Prospective longitudinal research is needed to identify the true prevalence and significance of nutritional deficiency in these patients and to determine optimum dietary recommendations.

  2. Iron deficiency and bariatric surgery.

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    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2013-05-15

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life after bariatric surgery. The treatment of perioperative anaemia and nutrient deficiencies has been shown to improve patients' outcomes and quality of life. All patients should undergo an appropriate nutritional evaluation, including selective micronutrient measurements (e.g., iron), before any bariatric surgical procedure. In comparison with purely restrictive procedures, more extensive perioperative nutritional evaluations are required for malabsorptive procedures due to their nutritional consequences. The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese patients and those that commonly appear after bariatric surgery, specifically iron deficiencies and their consequences. As a result, some recommendations for screening and supplementation are presented.

  3. [Pregnancy shortly after bariatric surgery].

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    Skogøy, Kristin; Laurini, Ricardo; Aasheim, Erlend Tuseth

    2009-03-12

    Bariatric surgery is increasingly used to treat morbidly obese patients. Fertility in women may be enhanced after these procedures, owing to substantial weight loss and possibly a decreased absorption of oral contraceptives. We report a pregnancy that occurred two months after biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch in a 32-year-old woman. She subsequently developed haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets count (HELLP) syndrome and had a weight loss of 43 kg (from the bariatric procedure) until the infant was delivered preterm by caesarean section (due to low activity). The infant was small in relation to the gestational age, with a weight of less than 50 % of the expected (780 g at 29.6 weeks). Histological examination demonstrated a small placenta with insufficient spiral artery trophoblast infiltration, possibly caused either by severe preeclampsia or by maternal nutritional deficiencies. Severe metabolic aberrations may complicate pregnancies after malabsorptive bariatric surgery. Patient preparations before weight-loss operations should include information on fertility and birth control in the postoperative period. Protocols for monitoring of patients that become pregnant after bariatric surgery are needed.

  4. Cardiovascular benefits of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Glenn K; Cha, Yong-Mei

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing in the United States and worldwide, bringing with it an excess of morbidity and premature death. Obesity is strongly associated with both traditional cardiovascular risk factors as well as direct effects on hemodynamics and cardiovascular structure and function. In fact, cardiovascular disease is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in obese patients. Often, lifestyle and pharmacological weight-loss interventions are of limited efficacy in severely obese patients. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be a feasible option to achieve substantial and sustained weight loss in this group of patients. It is a safe procedure with low in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates even in groups that are considered higher risk for surgery (e.g., the elderly), especially if performed in high-volume centers. There is observational evidence that bariatric surgery in severely obese patients is associated with both a reduction of traditional cardiovascular risk factors as well as improvement in cardiac structure and function. Marked decreases in the levels of inflammatory and prothrombotic markers, as well as markers of subclinical atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction, are seen after bariatric surgery. This article summarizes the existing evidence regarding the cardiovascular benefits in patients following bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

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    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life after bariatric surgery. The treatment of perioperative anaemia and nutrient deficiencies has been shown to improve patients’ outcomes and quality of life. All patients should undergo an appropriate nutritional evaluation, including selective micronutrient measurements (e.g., iron, before any bariatric surgical procedure. In comparison with purely restrictive procedures, more extensive perioperative nutritional evaluations are required for malabsorptive procedures due to their nutritional consequences. The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese patients and those that commonly appear after bariatric surgery, specifically iron deficiencies and their consequences. As a result, some recommendations for screening and supplementation are presented.

  6. Esophageal Carcinoma Following Bariatric Procedures

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    Leeman, Matthew F.; Richardson, J. David

    2004-01-01

    Background: The long-term success of bariatric operations for weight reduction has been well documented, but their potential effects on the risk of esophageal cancer have not been evaluated. Methods: We performed operations on 3 patients for esophageal cancer following bariatric operations: 2 had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and 1 underwent vertical banded gastroplasty. All of these patients had adenocarcinoma at the gastroesophageal junction; 1 involved the entire intrathoracic esophagus. Results: The intervals between the weight-loss operations and cancer diagnoses were 21, 16, and 14 years. All 3 patients had symptoms of reflux for many years before dysphagia developed and cancer was diagnosed. We performed a limited esophagogastrectomy, a classic IvorLewis procedure, and a total esophagectomy with jejunal free-tissue transfer from stomach to cervical esophagus. Two patients had positive lymph nodes. One patient is alive at 6 years; 2 died at 13 and 15 months after undergoing operation for recurrent cancer. Conclusion: The effect of bariatric operations on gastroesophageal reflux is not known, although gastric bypass has been advocated as the “ultimate antireflux procedure.” The presence of esophageal cancer in these 3 patients years after the weight loss operation is worrisome. We believe that patients who develop new symptoms should have endoscopic evaluation and that epidemiologic studies on the incidence of esophageal cancer occurring years after bariatric operation should be performed. PMID:15554284

  7. Perioperative Mortality Following Bariatric Surgery in Australia.

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    Davis, Sean; Babidge, Wendy; Kiermeier, Andreas; Aitken, Robert; Maddern, Guy

    2017-11-06

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective method of sustainable weight loss for the treatment of morbid obesity. Low mortality associated with these procedures has been reported internationally; however, Australian outcomes are yet to be published. Despite its efficacy, limited access to bariatric surgery exists in Australian public hospitals. This retrospective data analysis was conducted for two reasons. Firstly, to determine the perioperative mortality rate (POMR) associated with bariatric procedures in Australia, and secondly, to compare public and private hospital bariatric surgery admission demographics and outcomes. A retrospective review of de-identified patient data from the National Hospital Morbidity Database, held by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), was conducted using codes relating to bariatric procedures. POMR calculations were established using AIHW admission data from 1 July 2005 to 30 June 2013. From 1 July 2005 to 30 June 2013, 113,929 patient admissions occurred for patients undergoing a bariatric procedure. Thirty-nine deaths occurred nationally, with an overall average POMR of 0.03%. A higher POMR was associated with public admissions and secondary procedures. A higher proportion of secondary procedures were performed in public hospitals. Primary bariatric procedure incidence increased throughout the study period while secondary bariatric procedure incidence decreased. This study demonstrates the Australian bariatric procedure POMR to be substantially lower than internationally reported figures. Public hospitals were shown to perform far fewer bariatric procedures at a higher POMR than private hospitals. Public hospitals performed a higher proportion of secondary revision procedures.

  8. Asymptomatic inhaled foreign body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Muhammad U.; Asghar, Asif; Tareen, Irum; Azhar, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    It is very rare to have a big foreign body in the lungs without any complications or symptoms for 2 years. A 14-year-old male with episodes of minor hemoptysis for 4 weeks had a history of inhalation of a bullet 2 years earlier. He had asymptomatic for lung complications for 2 years. The bullet was removed by right thoracotomy and non-anatomical wedge stapled resection, and he followed an uneventful recovery. An aspirated foreign body although big can remain asymptomatic for a long time, especially if it has migrated to the periphery. PMID:27652366

  9. Pregnancy after Bariatric Surgery: A Review

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    N. L. Hezelgrave

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal obesity is a major cause of obstetric morbidity and mortality. With surgical procedures to facilitate weight loss becoming more widely available and demanded and increasing number of women becoming pregnant after undergoing bariatric surgery, it is important and timely to consider the outcome of pregnancy following bariatric surgery. This paper aims to synthesize the current evidence regarding pregnancy outcomes after bariatric surgery. It concludes that bariatric surgery appears to have positive effects on fertility and reduces the risk of gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. Moreover, there appears to be a reduced incidence of fetal macrosomia post-bariatric procedure, although there remains uncertainty about the increased rates of small-for-gestational age and intrauterine growth restricted infants, as well as premature rupture of membranes in this group. A number of case reports highlight that pregnancy following bariatric surgery is not without complications and it must be managed as high risk by the multidisciplinary team.

  10. Preoperative Lifestyle Intervention in Bariatric Surgery: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalarchian, Melissa A.; Marcus, Marsha D.; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Cheng, Yu; Levine, Michele D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies of the impact of pre-surgery weight loss and lifestyle preparation on outcomes following bariatric surgery are needed. Objective To evaluate whether a pre-surgery behavioral lifestyle intervention improves weight loss through 24-months post-surgery. Setting Bariatric Center of Excellence at a large, urban medical center. Methods Candidates for bariatric surgery were randomized to a 6-month behavioral lifestyle intervention or to 6 months of usual pre-surgical care. The lifestyle intervention consisted of 8 weekly face-to-face sessions followed by 16 weeks of face-to-face and telephone sessions prior to surgery; the intervention also included 3 monthly telephone contacts after surgery. Assessments were conducted at 6-, 12- and 24-months post-surgery. Results Participants who underwent surgery (n = 143) were 90.2% female and 86.7% White. Average age was 44.9 years, and average BMI was 47.5 kg/m2 at study enrollment. At follow-up, 131 (91.6%), 126 (88.1%), 117 (81.8%) patients participated in the 6-, 12- and 24 month assessments, respectively. Percent weight loss from study enrollment to 6- and 12-months post-surgery was comparable for both groups, but at 24-months post-surgery, the lifestyle group had significantly smaller percent weight loss than the usual care group (26.5% vs. 29.5%, respectively, p = 0.02). Conclusions Pre-surgery lifestyle intervention did not improve weight loss at 24 months post-surgery. Findings raise questions about the utility and timing of adjunctive lifestyle interventions for bariatric surgery patients. PMID:26410538

  11. 40 years of advances in Bariatric Surgery

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    Aniceto Baltasar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bariatric surgical practice changes in the community setting may be under-reported. We present the developments in a Spanish bariatric surgical practice in the community setting of Alcoy from 1977 through the present. Methods: Bariatric surgical techniques employed in a country community setting over the course of nearly four decades were reviewed retrospectively and qualitatively. Results: Surgeons and medical professionals from Alcoy, Spain were involved in the evolution of bariatric surgery patient management and surgical technique from 1977s through 2017. During the last 40 years, 1,495 patients were treated in our clinics. Spanish bariatric surgeons contributed to advances in gastric bypass (GBP in the 1970s, vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG in the 1980s, bilio-pancreatic diversion/duodenal switch (BPD/DS in the 1990s, and innovations associated with laparoscopy from the 1990s onward. Outcomes and approaches to prevention and treatment of bariatric surgical complications are reviewed from a community perspective. Contributions to the bariatric surgical nomenclature and weight-loss reporting are noted. Conclusions: The practice of bariatric surgery in the community hospital and private clinic must be updated continuously, as in any human and surgical endeavor. Medical professionals in community bariatric practices should contribute their experiences to the field through all avenues of scientific interaction and publication.

  12. Asymptomatic ocular sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Guilherme Azevedo de Freitas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is an idiopathic systemic granulomatous disease. It commonly affects the skin, lungs, kidneys, and central nervous system. In the eyes it primarily affects the uveal tract, conjunctiva, lacrimal glands and optic nerve. Here in we describe the case of a patient with systemic sarcoidosis and asymptomatic eye inflammation.

  13. Food consumption in patients referred for bariatric surgery with and without binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Jaqueline Driemeyer Correia; Kops, Natália Luiza; de Castro, Mariana Laitano Dias; Friedman, Rogério

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of Binge Eating Disorder (BED) is high in obese patients referred to bariatric surgery. Although the total energy intake is increased, the risk of nutritional deficiencies in these patients is unknown. This study proposes to evaluate and compare the intakes of candidate patients for bariatric surgery with and without BED, using for this purpose the Dietary Reference Intakes. 116 patients referred for bariatric surgery were submitted to nutritional, laboratory and psychological assessments. Among the patients, 46.6% had BED, of these, 25.9% had the severe form. The patients with current depression (31.9%) were more compulsive than those without depression (p eat more carbohydrates and have larger mid-upper arm circumference in the face of similar body weight, suggesting a higher percentage of fat mass.

  14. The Anatomy of a Weight Recidivism and Revision Bariatric Surgical Clinic

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    C. J. de Gara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Weight recidivism in bariatric surgery failure is multifactorial. It ranges from inappropriate patient selection for primary surgery to technical/anatomic issues related to the original surgery. Most bariatric surgeons and centers focus on primary bariatric surgery while weight recidivism and its complications are very much secondary concerns. Methods. We report on our initial experience having established a dedicated weight recidivism and revisional bariatric surgery clinic. A single surgeon, dedicated nursing, dieticians, and psychologist developed care maps, goals of care, nonsurgical candidate rules, and discharge planning strategies. Results. A single year audit (2012 of clinical activity revealed 137 patients, with a mean age 49 ± 10.1 years (6 years older on average than in our primary clinic, 75% of whom were women with BMI 47 ± 11.5. Over three quarters had undergone a vertical band gastroplasty while 15% had had a laparoscopic adjustable gastric band. Only 27% of those attending clinic required further surgery. As for primary surgery, the role of the obesity expert clinical psychologist was a key component to achieving successful revision outcomes. Conclusion. With an exponential rise in obesity and a concomitant major increase in bariatric surgery, an inevitable increase in revisional surgery is becoming a reality. Anticipating this increase in activity, Alberta Health Services, Alberta, Canada, has established a unique and dedicated clinic whose early results are promising.

  15. Psychological and health comorbidities before and after bariatric surgery: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Sofia Pereira da Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Morbid obesity has multiple implications for psychological and physical health. Bariatric surgery has been selected as the treatment of choice for this chronic disease, despite the controversial impact of the surgery on psychosocial health. The objective of this study was to describe candidates for bariatric surgery and analyze changes in weight, psychopathology, personality, and health problems and complaints at 6- and 12- month follow-up assessments. METHODS: Thirty obese patients (20 women and 10 men with a mean age of 39.17±8.81 years were evaluated in different dimensions before surgery and 6 and 12 months after the procedure. RESULTS: Six and 12 months after bariatric surgery, patients reported significant weight loss and a significant reduction in the number of health problems and complaints. The rates of self-reported psychopathology were low before surgery, and there were no statistically significant changes over time. The conscientiousness, extraversion, and agreeableness dimensions increased, but neuroticism and openness remained unchanged. All changes had a medium effect size. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that patients experience significant health improvements and some positive personality changes after bariatric surgery. Even though these findings underscore the role of bariatric surgery as a relevant treatment for morbid obesity, more in-depth longitudinal studies are needed to elucidate the evolution of patients after the procedure.

  16. Bariatric surgery in patients with bipolar spectrum disorders: Selection factors, postoperative visit attendance, and weight outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Kelli E; Applegate, Katherine; Portenier, Dana; McVay, Megan A

    2017-04-01

    As many as 3% of bariatric surgery candidates are diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder. 1) To describe differences between patients with bipolar spectrum disorders who are approved and not approved for surgery by the mental health evaluator and 2) to examine surgical outcomes of patients with bipolar spectrum disorders. Academic medical center, United States. A retrospective record review was conducted of consecutive patients who applied for bariatric surgery between 2004 and 2009. Patients diagnosed with bipolar spectrum disorders who were approved for surgery (n = 42) were compared with patients with a bipolar spectrum disorder who were not approved (n = 31) and to matched control surgical patients without a bipolar spectrum diagnosis (n = 29) on a variety of characteristics and surgical outcomes. Of bariatric surgery candidates diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder who applied for surgery, 57% were approved by the psychologist and 48% ultimately had surgery. Patients with a bipolar spectrum disorder who were approved for surgery were less likely to have had a previous psychiatric hospitalization than those who were not approved for surgery. Bariatric surgery patients diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder were less likely to attend follow-up care appointments 2 or more years postsurgery compared to matched patients without bipolar disorder. Among patients with available data, those with a bipolar spectrum disorder and matched patients had similar weight loss at 12 months (n = 21 for bipolar; n = 24 for matched controls) and at 2 or more years (mean = 51 mo; n = 11 for bipolar; n = 20 for matched controls). Patients diagnosed with a bipolar spectrum disorder have a high rate of delay/denial for bariatric surgery based on the psychosocial evaluation and are less likely to attend medical follow-up care 2 or more years postsurgery. Carefully screened patients with bipolar disorder who engage in long-term follow-up care may benefit from bariatric

  17. Parkinsonism as a Complication of Bariatric Surgery

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    Walaa A. Kamel

    2015-11-01

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that with the increasing popularity of bariatric surgery, clinicians will need to recognize and manage neurologic complications that may appear soon after or years to decades later. Thorough evaluation is essential for any patient who has undergone bariatric surgery and develops neurologic symptoms.

  18. ABSI (A Body Shape Index) and ARI (Anthropometric Risk Indicator) in Bariatric Surgery. First Application on a Bariatric Cohort and Possible Clinical Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consalvo, Vincenzo; Krakauer, Jesse C; Krakauer, Nir Y; Canero, Antonio; Romano, Mafalda; Salsano, Vincenzo

    2018-01-29

    BMI (body mass index) is used to identify candidates for bariatric surgery, with a criterion of BMI ≥ 40. For lesser degrees of obesity, BMI 35-39.9, comorbidities are also considered. A Body Shape Index (ABSI) was derived to correct WC (waist circumference) for BMI and height. ABSI has been shown to be a linear predictor of long-term mortality across the range of BMI. Anthropometric risk indicator (ARI) combines the complementary contributions of BMI and ABSI and further improves mortality hazard prediction. We report for the first time ABSI and ARI for a bariatric surgical cohort at baseline and with 3-year follow-up. ABSI and BMI were calculated for 101 subjects from our bariatric surgery center database at baseline and after 3 years of follow-up. Raw values for BMI and ABSI were converted to Z scores and ARI values based on sex- and age-specific normals and risk associations from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III sample of the US general population. Baseline scores for the anthropometric variables BMI and ABSI and the corresponding ARI were all higher than for the NHANES population sample. At 3-year post surgery, all three measures decreased significantly. While baseline BMI did not predict the change in mortality risk by ARI, baseline ABSI did (r = - 0.73), as did baseline ARI (r = - 0.94). Sleeve gastrectomy lowers ABSI and the associated mortality risk estimated from population studies after 3 years of follow-up. Considering our results, bariatric surgical candidates with BMI in the range of 35 to 39.9 with an increased ABSI-related mortality risk may have considerable survival benefit from bariatric surgery, even in the absence of qualifying comorbidities. 2814.

  19. Ethical issues in pediatric bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniano, Donna A

    2009-08-01

    Performance of bariatric surgery in pediatric patients carries profound ethical burdens for all stakeholders: morbidly obese children and adolescents, their parents and families, pediatric physicians and surgeons, pediatric health care institutions, and society. The decision to proceed with a bariatric intervention should be made only after it is established that the patient's comorbidities could not be treated with less invasive means, the patient has a favorable risk/benefit profile, the patient and her/his family have received extensive preoperative counseling and given informed consent, and the pediatric bariatric team has a comprehensive system of short- and long-term care. The patient and her/his family should be counseled about the innovative aspects of the bariatric intervention, in which sustained weight loss and potential complications are unknown. The pediatric surgeons and their respective institutions that offer bariatric surgery should be enrolled in clinical research endeavors that assess outcomes and seek optimal treatment protocols.

  20. Overview of bariatric surgery for the physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hng, Keng Ngee; Ang, Yeng S

    2012-10-01

    The worldwide pandemic of obesity carries alarming health and socioeconomic implications. Bariatric surgery is currently the only effective treatment for severe obesity. It is safe, with mortality comparable to that of cholecystectomy, and effective in producing substantial and sustainable weight loss, along with high rates of resolution of associated comorbidities, including type 2 diabetes. For this reason, indications for bariatric surgery are being widened. In addition to volume restriction and malabsorption, bariatric surgery brings about neurohormonal changes that affect satiety and glucose homeostasis. Increased understanding of these mechanisms will help realise therapeutic benefits by pharmacological means. Bariatric surgery improves long-term mortality but can cause long-term nutritional deficiencies. The safety of pregnancy after bariatric surgery is still being elucidated.

  1. Bariatric surgery: nutritional considerations for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickers, Lisa; McSherry, Ciara

    Nutritional deficiencies are common in patients who are obese and therefore individuals considering bariatric surgery may require dietary supplementation with multivitamins and minerals before surgery. Nutritional deficiencies following bariatric surgery are often proportional to the degree of malabsorption created by the surgical procedure or the extent of weight loss. Eating habits often contribute to nutritional deficiencies, so appropriate dietary and lifestyle counselling are essential following bariatric procedures to ensure appropriate macronutrient and micronutrient status. Nutritional supplementation following bariatric surgery commonly includes calcium with vitamin D, iron and vitamin B12 in addition to a daily multivitamin and mineral tablet. Although general guidelines exist, individual monitoring and tailoring are frequently required. This article provides an update of guidelines regarding the most common nutritional concerns and myths surrounding bariatric surgery.

  2. Vitamin B12 deficiency in patients undergoing bariatric surgery: preventive strategies and key recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Soriano, Jose; Louie Cruz, Allan; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2013-01-01

    Advances in bariatric surgery have brought about a paradigm shift in the management of obesity, with benefits extending beyond weight loss. However, nutritional deficiencies are an inherent problem in the postoperative period and often require lifelong supplementation. Vitamin B12, also referred to as cobalamin, is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies affecting this population. This review explores the pathophysiology of cobalamin deficiency in patients undergoing bariatric surgery and provides an overview of the effectiveness of various available vitamin B12 formulations. To identify the relevant literature, a systematic review of MEDLINE was conducted from the earliest dates through September 2012 for English-language articles describing the prevention and management of vitamin B12 deficiency in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Intramuscular vitamin B12 continues to be the gold standard of therapy for vitamin B12 deficiency, especially in symptomatic patients. In select patients with asymptomatic vitamin B12 deficiency after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), high-dose oral cyanocobalamin should be given a consideration, especially when there are concerns with the adherence to intramuscular therapy or if compliance comes into question. Unlike patients post-RYGB, those undergoing restrictive procedures such as gastric banding and sleeve gastrectomy may be maintained postoperatively on a lower-dose daily vitamin B12 supplementation. Efficacy data of nasal and sublingual routes for maintenance therapy is currently awaited. Patients undergoing bariatric surgery must be continuously educated on proper nutrition, the risk of developing significant vitamin B12 deficiency, and the role of supplements in avoiding catastrophic consequences. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Gargantua and digestive bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, M A

    1997-01-01

    Morbid obesity significantly reduces life span and is associated with much co-morbid pathology. Diet, behavioral therapy and drugs therapy are largely unsuccessful, however the surgical treatment offers the best hope. This historic review about the bariatric surgery summarizes the jejuno ileal by-pass and the gastric surgery as the gastric bypass and the horizontal or vertical gastroplasties. Procedures that reduce gastric capacity and dietary in take are now considered preferable to those that alter food absorption as they are associated with fewer side-effects. The vertical banded gastroplasty is probably, the best operation for modern Gargantua's men.

  4. [Follow-up after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofsø, Dag; Aasheim, Erlend T; Søvik, Torgeir T; Jakobsen, Gunn Signe; Johnson, Line Kristin; Sandbu, Rune; Aas, Alf Tore; Kristinsson, Jon; Hjelmesæth, Jøran

    2011-10-04

    The number of bariatric surgical procedures in Norway is increasing. Patients who undergo bariatric surgery may experience surgical, medical and nutritional complications. Follow-up of these patients is therefore important. The article is based on non-systematic literature searches in PubMed and on the clinical experience of the authors. Bariatric surgery induces significant and sustained weight loss and improves obesity-related disorders. Gastric bypass is the most commonly performed bariatric procedure in Norway. This procedure is associated with a 30-day mortality of below 0.5 %, while severe complications occur in approximately 5 % of patients. Late complications include internal herniation, intestinal ulcers and gallbladder disease. After surgery all patients are given iron, vitamin D/calcium and vitamin B12 supplements to prevent vitamin and mineral deficiencies. Gastrointestinal symptoms and postprandial hypoglycaemia after surgery can be improved by dietary modifications, and the need for anti-diabetic and blood pressure lowering medications is reduced. Dose adjustment of other medications may also be necessary. Pregnancy is not recommended during the first year after bariatric surgery. Many patients need plastic surgery after the operation. Complications after bariatric surgery may manifest in the long term. Regular follow-up is required. General practitioners should be responsible for follow-up in the long term, and should be familiar with common and serious complications as well as normal symptomatology after bariatric surgery.

  5. An examination of the mechanisms and personality traits underlying food addiction among individuals with severe obesity awaiting bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Anne-Sophie; Rodrigue, Christopher; Lemieux, Simone; Tchernof, André; Biertho, Laurent; Bégin, Catherine

    2017-12-01

    The aetiology underlying addiction has often been investigated to shed more light on the factors contributing to the development and maintenance of various disorders. In the field of addictive eating behaviours, data on the aetiological factors related to food addiction (FA) in the bariatric context remain scarce. The present study aimed to explore mechanisms and variables underlying FA among individuals suffering from severe obesity and awaiting bariatric surgery. Participants (N = 146) were recruited at the Quebec Heart and Lung Institute during their pre-operative visit and were invited to complete questionnaires. Participants with and without FA were compared on reward sensitivity, impulsivity, emotion dysregulation, and personality traits. Findings showed that bariatric candidates with FA (16%) presented more emotion dysregulation, more harm avoidance, and less self-directedness. Further exploration showed that the association between harm avoidance and the number of FA criteria endorsed was mediated by emotion dysregulation, while the association between self-directedness and the number of FA criteria endorsed was mediated by reward sensitivity. These results indicate that an inability to regulate affect by strategies other than eating highly palatable food, in a context where negative affect and long-term goals can hardly be sustained, underlies a diagnostic of FA among bariatric candidates. From a clinical standpoint, the presence of a double vulnerability leading to FA symptomatology could help design better-targeted interventions to maximise weight loss maintenance in the bariatric context. Level V, descriptive study.

  6. Fasting Circulating Glicentin Increases After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffort, Juliette; Panaïa-Ferrari, Patricia; Lareyre, Fabien; Bayer, Pascale; Staccini, Pascal; Fénichel, Patrick; Chinetti, Giulia

    2017-06-01

    Bariatric surgery including the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and the laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a well-established therapeutic option for patients with morbid or severe obesity. Metabolic modifications observed after bariatric surgery are thought to be, at least partly, linked to hormonal changes. While variation of several proglucagon-derived peptides during bariatric surgery is well documented, little is known about glicentin. The aim of this study was to investigate circulating glicentin variations after bariatric surgery. Thirty patients eligible for bariatric surgery (18 RYGB and 12 LSG procedures) were prospectively included in the University Hospital of Nice. Clinical data and fasting biological parameters were recorded preoperatively, at 3, 6, and 12 months after bariatric surgery. The median age of patients was 51 years (35-56) with 33.3% men. Fasting glicentin concentration increased progressively after bariatric surgery from 6 months and was more marked at 12 months (14 ± 3.6 pmol/L at baseline vs 19.7 ± 2.7 pmol/L at 12 months for RYGB and 12.5 ± 1.4 vs 16.4 ± 1.8 pmol/L for LSG, respectively). Compared to preoperative values, the fold increase of glicentin at 12 months was 2 ± 0.2 in the RYGB group and 1.6 ± 0.3 in the LSG group. Glicentin variation after surgery did not correlate with anthropometric, glycemic, or lipid parameter modifications. Fasting glicentin level increases after bariatric surgery suggesting the potential interest of this peptide as a player and/or a marker of physiological changes after bariatric surgery.

  7. [An asymptomatic chronic hypokalaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Marie-Pierre; Cheminel, Valérie; Crevon, Lionel; Dubourg, Laurence; Hadj-Aissa, Aoumeur; Mounier, Chantal; Prevosto, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic patient presenting a severe chronic renal hypokalaemia. Once being sure of no diuretics use, two hypothesis can be mentioned for a normotensive patient presenting an hypokalaemia associated with a metabolic alcalosis: Bartter syndrome or Gitelman syndrome. The highlighting of low magnesaemia and hypocalciuria strongly concentrates the diagnosis on Gitelman syndrome. First, this has been strengthened by the results of renal function tests and later it has confirmed by molecular diagnosis with the identification of a known homozygous mutation on SLC12A3 gene. In the patient family, the same chromosomal abnormality has been found in the young sister. For these two patients the treatment ordered is an antikaliuretic diuretic, magnesium and potassium supplements. This case shows the difficulty to diagnose Gitelman syndrome: it is frequently mistaken for Bartter syndrome. The main differences between these two syndromes are magnesaemia and calciuria. Furthemore , patients with Gitelman syndrome are often asymptomatic, this explains why prevalence of this illness is probably underestimated.

  8. Short-term changes in affective, behavioral, and cognitive components of body image after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gail A; Hudson, Danae L; Whisenhunt, Brooke L; Stone, Megan; Heinberg, Leslie J; Crowther, Janis H

    2018-01-06

    Many bariatric surgery candidates report body image concerns before surgery. Research has reported post-surgical improvements in body satisfaction, which may be associated with weight loss. However, research has failed to comprehensively examine changes in affective, behavioral, and cognitive body image. This research examined (1) short-term changes in affective, behavioral, and cognitive components of body image from pre-surgery to 1- and 6-months after bariatric surgery, and (2) the association between percent weight loss and these changes. Participants were recruited from a private hospital in the midwestern United States. Eighty-eight females (original N = 123; lost to follow-up: n = 15 at 1-month and n = 20 at 6-months post-surgery) completed a questionnaire battery, including the Body Attitudes Questionnaire, Body Checking Questionnaire, Body Image Avoidance Questionnaire, and Body Shape Questionnaire, and weights were obtained from patients' medical records before and at 1- and 6-months post-surgery. Results indicated significant decreases in body dissatisfaction, feelings of fatness, and body image avoidance at 1- and 6-months after bariatric surgery, with the greatest magnitude of change occurring for body image avoidance. Change in feelings of fatness was significantly correlated with percent weight loss at 6-months, but not 1-month, post-surgery. These findings highlight the importance of examining short-term changes in body image from a multidimensional perspective in the effort to improve postsurgical outcomes. Unique contributions include the findings regarding the behavioral component of body image, as body image avoidance emerges as a particularly salient concern that changes over time among bariatric surgery candidates. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Changes in physical activity after bariatric surgery: using objective and self-reported measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Sorena; Seymour, Keith; Kelly, Seamus B; Woodcock, Sean; van Hees, Vincent T; Mathers, John C

    2017-03-01

    Many studies using self-reported physical activity (PA) assessment tools have suggested there is an increase in PA after bariatric surgery. Our aim was to assess PA and sedentary behavior before bariatric surgery and at 6 months after, using subjective and objective tools. Bariatric surgery candidates were recruited from a single center. Demographic data, medical history, current medications, and anthropometric measurements were recorded. Participants were asked to complete a PA and lifestyle questionnaire and to wear an accelerometer on their nondominant wrist. Data were collected before and at 6 months after surgery. Twenty-two participants were included (17 gastric bypass; 4 sleeve gastrectomy; 1 intragastric balloon). Mean age was 46 years and the majority were female (72%). At a median of 6.3 months follow-up, there were significant reductions in measures of body fatness with a mean reduction of 27 kg in weight. The majority of daytime (12.5±1.1 out of 16 h) was spent in sedentary behavior presurgery with little change postsurgery (12.2±1.2; P = .186). Objectively measured mean moderate-vigorous PA did not change significantly from pre- to postsurgery (mean 11.5±13.9 and 11.6±13.1 min/d, respectively; P = .971). Self-reported total nonoccupational PA did not change significantly (P = .390). The majority of bariatric surgery candidates were physically inactive presurgery, and there was no significant change in either subjectively or objectively measured PA at follow-up. This patient group may benefit from objective PA assessment and interventions aimed at increasing PA. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Endocrine and Nutritional Management After Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... malabsorptive procedures. Weight loss depends on following a strict diet. • Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). RYGB ... index.cfm). www.hormone.org Endocrine and Nutritional Management After Bariatric Surgery Patient Guide November 2010

  11. Body esteem improves after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Atul K; Beech, Bettina M; Tichansky, David S

    2008-03-01

    Body esteem is an issue for the morbidly obese. Although the primary goal of bariatric surgery is to improve, cure, and prevent medical comorbidities, the psychological aspect of bariatric surgery is just as important. Few studies have investigated the body esteem of patients after laparoscopic gastric bypass. This investigation tested the hypothesis that body esteem improves after bariatric surgery. Preoperative and postoperative patients were asked to fill out an institutional review board-exempted survey that included the Body-Esteem Scale for Adolescents and Adults (BESAA). The subscales include Appearance, Weight, and Attribution. Postoperative patients were told to fill the BESAA as they felt currently and as they felt before surgery. They felt that they had better scores currently than before surgery. Preoperative patients had worse scores than postoperative patients. As in many medical issues, body esteem improves after bariatric surgery. When discussing its benefits, psychological aspects of body esteem should be touted as well.

  12. [Obesity, bariatric surgery and future fertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsur, Abraham; Machtinger, Ronit; Segal-Lieberman, Gabriella; Orvieto, R

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is an increasingly widespread health problem. In addition to comorbidities such as diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease, obesity has a significant impact on reproductive life, including infertility, miscarriages and high prevalence of pregnancy complications. The present review describes the possible benefits of bariatric surgery regarding fertility and pregnancy outcome. It is well established that bariatric surgery leads to regular ovulatory cycles and improves spontaneous conception rates in obese women. While pregnancy after bariatric surgery is safe and associated with reduced pregnancy complications, pregnant women following bariatric surgery are still at high risk for preterm births and small dimensions of gestational age offsprings. The optimal interval that should be kept between surgery and subsequent pregnancy is controversial, with recent studies emphasizing the importance of nutritional balance rather than the time from surgery to conception as being the most important determinant. Strict peri-conceptional surveillance is mandatory in order to prevent nutritional deficiencies and for the early diagnosis of abnormal fetal growth.

  13. Nutritional deficiencies associated with bariatric surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Folope, Vanessa; Coëffier, Moïse; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    .... After bariatric surgery, these deficiencies may increase and others can appear, especially because of the limitation of food intake in gastric reduction surgery and of malabsorption in by-pass procedures...

  14. [Bariatric surgery: how and why to supplement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordalo, Livia Azevedo; Teixeira, Tatiana Fiche Sales; Bressan, Josefina; Mourão, Denise Machado

    2011-01-01

    Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery are at increased risk of developing nutritional deficiencies from limited food intake and absorption of different nutrients. A systematic review of several database websites (PubMed and ISI Web of Science) was conducted from September 1983 to April 2010 to identify literature related to micronutrient deficiencies occurring after bariatric surgery. Keywords used individually or in various combinations in the search were bariatric surgery, obesity, vitamin/mineral deficiencies, protein deficiency, nutrient absorption and nutrient supplementation. Literature suggests that to prevent or treat nutritional deficiencies resulting from anatomical changes due to surgical techniques nutritional supplementation is usually necessary. The success of oral nutritional supplementation to correct or prevent nutritional deficiencies depends on several factors. Thus, to understand how nutrients can be administered is very important for clinical practice. This review aims to provide help for the best selection of nutrients to ensure an adequate replacement of nutrients in patients who have undergone bariatric surgery.

  15. Urinary Incontinence Before and After Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subak, Leslee L.; King, Wendy C.; Belle, Steven H.; Chen, Jia-Yuh; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Ebel, Faith E.; Flum, David R.; Khandelwal, Saurabh; Pender, John R.; Pierson, Sheila K.; Pories, Walter J.; Steffen, Kristine J.; Strain, Gladys W.; Wolfe, Bruce M.; Huang, Alison J.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Among women and men with severe obesity, evidence for improvement in urinary incontinence beyond the first year after bariatric surgery–induced weight loss is lacking. Objectives To examine change in urinary incontinence before and after bariatric surgery and to identify factors associated with improvement and remission among women and men in the first 3 years after bariatric surgery. Design, Setting, and Participants The Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery 2 is an observational cohort study at 10 US hospitals in 6 geographically diverse clinical centers. Participants were recruited between February 21, 2005, and February 17, 2009. Adults undergoing first-time bariatric surgical procedures as part of clinical care by participating surgeons between March 14, 2006, and April 24, 2009, were followed up for 3 years (through October 24, 2012). Intervention Participants undergoing bariatric surgery completed research assessments before the procedure and annually thereafter. Main outcomes and measures The frequency and type of urinary incontinence episodes in the past 3 months were assessed using a validated questionnaire. Prevalent urinary incontinence was defined as at least weekly urinary incontinence episodes, and remission was defined as change from prevalent urinary incontinence at baseline to less than weekly urinary incontinence episodes at follow-up. Results Of 2458 participants, 1987 (80.8%) completed baseline and follow-up assessments. At baseline, the median age was 47 years (age range, 18-78 years), the median body mass index was 46 kg/m2 (range, 34-94 kg/m2), and 1565 of 1987 (78.8%) were women. Urinary incontinence was more prevalent among women (49.3%; 95% CI, 46.9%-51.9%) than men (21.8%; 95% CI, 18.2%-26.1%) (P bariatric surgery was associated with substantially reduced urinary incontinence over 3 years. Improvement in urinary incontinence may be an important benefit of bariatric surgery. PMID:26098620

  16. Robotic bariatric surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourman, Matthew M; Saber, Alan A

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a nationwide epidemic, and the only evidence-based, durable treatment of this disease is bariatric surgery. This field has evolved drastically during the past decade. One of the latest advances has been the increased use of robotics within this field. The goal of our study was to perform a systematic review of the recent data to determine the safety and efficacy of robotic bariatric surgery. The setting was the University Hospitals Case Medical Center (Cleveland, OH). A PubMed search was performed for robotic bariatric surgery from 2005 to 2011. The inclusion criteria were English language, original research, human, and bariatric surgical procedures. Perioperative data were then collected from each study and recorded. A total of 18 studies were included in our review. The results of our systematic review showed that bariatric surgery, when performed with the use of robotics, had similar or lower complication rates compared with traditional laparoscopy. Two studies showed shorter operative times using the robot for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, but 4 studies showed longer operative times in the robotic arm. In addition, the learning curve appears to be shorter when robotic gastric bypass is compared with the traditional laparoscopic approach. Most investigators agreed that robotic laparoscopic surgery provides superior imaging and freedom of movement compared with traditional laparoscopy. The application of robotics appears to be a safe option within the realm of bariatric surgery. Prospective randomized trials comparing robotic and laparoscopic outcomes are needed to further define the role of robotics within the field of bariatric surgery. Longer follow-up times would also help elucidate any long-term outcomes differences with the use of robotics versus traditional laparoscopy. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. All rights reserved.

  17. Aortic rupture during reoperative bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Hostiuc

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Morbid obesity has become a very common problem worldwide, causing severe health-related consequences including cardiovascular or metabolic diseases, arthritis, sleep apnea, or an increased risk of cancer. Bariatric surgery was shown to be the only way to achieve sustainable weight loss and to decrease the frequency and severity of metabolic and cardiovascular comorbidities. The purpose of this article is to present a case of bariatric surgery complicated with lesion of the aorta with a lethal outcome.

  18. Bariatric Surgery and Infertility: A Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consalvo, Vincenzo; Canero, Antonio; Salsano, Vincenzo

    2017-12-22

    Obesity is a worldwide disease affecting 13% of the world's adult female population. The reasons and the fetal risk are still unclear. The effect of weight loss as a result of bariatric surgery seems to induce an improvement in fertility in obese women. The main purpose of this prospective study is to demonstrate if there is an association between bariatric surgery-induced weight loss and an improvement in the fertility of women at reproductive age. From June 2013 to April 2016, all bariatric female patients from our institutes were prospectively evaluated for suitability in this study. A pool of 52 eligible patients was extracted from our database in the recruitment period. Of these, 28 underwent bariatric surgery and 24 did not. Both groups were observed for two-year follow-up. During follow-up, anthropometrics parameters, blood analysis, and comorbidities were checked and a gynaecological consultation was prescribed. Fifty participants were studied. Twenty-seven successfully underwent bariatric surgery with a percentage of excess weight loss (EWL) >70% at 24 months, while 23 accepted the observation and control for 24 months as an integral part of the pre-surgical bariatric program. The contingency table analysis showed an extremely significant association (Pbariatric surgery) and event (pregnancy), with a relative risk (RR) = 15.33 and confidence interval (CI) 95%=2.213 to 106.26. Bariatric surgery improves fertility in obese women at two years' postoperative. Every obese woman with difficulties becoming pregnant should undergo a bariatric surgery consultation. Further studies are necessary to confirm our results.

  19. Does bariatric surgery decrease gastric cancer risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Pablo; Padilla, David; Villarejo, Pedro; Menéndez, Jose M; Lora, David

    2012-01-01

    In the attempt to establish the different incidence between cancer in anatomically whole stomachs and cancer in patients who have undergone a surgical procedure for morbid obesity, a review on the epidemiology of bariatric surgery and stomach cancer and a correlation with the global incidence of stomach cancer (comparing it with the median age of patients who developed neoplasms after bariatric surgery) have been conducted. This was a descriptive study of the gastric neoplasms located at the gastric pouch, bypassed stomach or in the esophagogastric junction, following bariatric surgery described in the medical literature. Twenty-one cases of gastric neoplasm located at the gastric pouch, in the bypassed stomach or in the esophagogastric junction were described after bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery seems to produce a decrease in the incidence of cancer when comparing obese patients who were operated and obese patients who have not, so additional studies are needed to compare the cancer incidence between the general population and patients undergoing bariatric surgery. New studies will determine if it is necessary to focus on the early detection of pathological processes at the excluded digestive tract.

  20. Cost-Utility Analysis of Bariatric Surgery in Italy: Results of Decision-Analytic Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Lucchese

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery in Italy from a third-party payer perspective over a medium-term (10 years and a long-term (lifetime horizon. Methods: A state-transition Markov model was developed, in which patients may experience surgery, post-surgery complications, diabetes mellitus type 2, cardiovascular diseases or die. Transition probabilities, costs, and utilities were obtained from the Italian and international literature. Three types of surgeries were considered: gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, and adjustable gastric banding. A base-case analysis was performed for the population, the characteristics of which were obtained from surgery candidates in Italy. Results: In the base-case analysis, over 10 years, bariatric surgery led to cost increment of EUR 2,661 and generated additional 1.1 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs. Over a lifetime, surgery led to savings of EUR 8,649, additional 0.5 life years and 3.2 QALYs. Bariatric surgery was cost-effective at 10 years with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of EUR 2,412/QALY and dominant over conservative management over a lifetime. Conclusion: In a comprehensive decision analytic model, a current mix of surgical methods for bariatric surgery was cost-effective at 10 years and cost-saving over the lifetime of the Italian patient cohort considered in this analysis.

  1. Cost-Utility Analysis of Bariatric Surgery in Italy: Results of Decision-Analytic Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchese, Marcello; Borisenko, Oleg; Mantovani, Lorenzo Giovanni; Cortesi, Paolo Angelo; Cesana, Giancarlo; Adam, Daniel; Burdukova, Elisabeth; Lukyanov, Vasily; Di Lorenzo, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery in Italy from a third-party payer perspective over a medium-term (10 years) and a long-term (lifetime) horizon. A state-transition Markov model was developed, in which patients may experience surgery, post-surgery complications, diabetes mellitus type 2, cardiovascular diseases or die. Transition probabilities, costs, and utilities were obtained from the Italian and international literature. Three types of surgeries were considered: gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, and adjustable gastric banding. A base-case analysis was performed for the population, the characteristics of which were obtained from surgery candidates in Italy. In the base-case analysis, over 10 years, bariatric surgery led to cost increment of EUR 2,661 and generated additional 1.1 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Over a lifetime, surgery led to savings of EUR 8,649, additional 0.5 life years and 3.2 QALYs. Bariatric surgery was cost-effective at 10 years with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of EUR 2,412/QALY and dominant over conservative management over a lifetime. In a comprehensive decision analytic model, a current mix of surgical methods for bariatric surgery was cost-effective at 10 years and cost-saving over the lifetime of the Italian patient cohort considered in this analysis. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  2. Predicting postoperative complications after bariatric surgery: the Bariatric Surgery Index for Complications, BASIC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coblijn, U.K. (Usha K.); J. Karres (Julian); de Raaff, C.A.L. (Christel A. L.); S.M.M. de Castro (Steve); S.M. Lagarde (Sjoerd); W.F. van Tets (Willem); H.J. Bonjer (H. Jaap); B.A. van Wagensveld (Bart)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Around 20% of bariatric surgery patients develop a short- or long-term complication. Objective: Aim of this study was to develop a risk model predicting complications: the Bariatric Surgery Index for Complications (BASIC). Setting: The Obesity Center Amsterdam, located in a

  3. Personality characteristics and bariatric surgery outcomes: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelen Bordignon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Numerous studies have focused on psychological assessment of bariatric surgery candidates, aiming to identify which psychological variables, including personality characteristics, are related to successful surgical prognosis. Objective: To analyze, by means of a systematic literature review, longitudinal studies that investigated personality traits and disorders as possible predictors of outcomes in bariatric surgery. Method: PsycInfo, PubMed, and Scopus databases were searched for studies published between 2005 and 2015, using the keywords “bariatric” AND “personality.” Quantitative longitudinal studies in English, Portuguese, or Spanish were selected for review if they assessed personality as an outcome predictor of BS in people aged 18 years or older. Results: Sixteen articles were analyzed. The results of this review suggest that externalizing dysfunctions might be associated with less weight reduction, while internalizing dysfunctions appear to be associated with somatic concerns and psychological distress. The persistence dimension (of temperament in Cloninger's model was positively associated with greater weight loss, while neuroticism (Five Factor Model and the occurrence of personality disorders were not predictive of weight loss. Furthermore, the results indicate a tendency towards a reduction in personality disorders and neuroticism scores, and an increase in extroversion scores, after BS. Conclusions: Assessment of personality characteristics, whether to identify their predictive power or to detect changes during the BS process, is important since it can provide grounds for estimating surgical prognosis and for development of interventions targeting this population.

  4. VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY AND THROMBOEMBOLIC DISEASE IN BARIATRIC SURGERY PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonno van BELLEN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Morbid obesity is associated with various co-morbidities, including chronic venous insufficiency. Bariatric surgery is the only effective treatment for morbid obesity, but with potential risks and possible complications, including venous thromboembolism. Objective To determine the prevalence of clinical and ultrasonographic signs of chronic venous insufficiency in morbid obese patients in preparation for bariatric surgery and the incidence of post-operative venous thromboembolic disease. Methods Patients on work-up for bariatric surgery of Centro Terapêutico Especializado em Fígado (CETEFI and Pro-Gastro surgical teams of the Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo were included. The analysed data were pre-operative findings for venous insufficiency (CEAP - clinical, etiological, anatomical, physiopathologic - classification and venous ultrassonographic findings, type of surgery (open or laparoscopic, abdominal circumference, body mass index (BMI and post-operative ultrassonography search for venous insufficiency and deep venous thrombosis. Results Between March 2007 and December 2009, 95 patients candidates for bariatric surgery had clinical and duplex scan evaluation of the lower limbs venous system. Of the 95 patients, 53 were submitted to the surgical procedure. There was a predominance of women (77.9%, the average age was 38.5 years, average preoperative weight 124.6 kg and average BMI of 45.5 kg/m2. Regarding obesity, 16.8% were obese, and 83.1% were morbidly obese. In relation to the venous findings, 86.3% of the patients did fit CEAP classification less than 3 and 13.7% greater than or equal to 3. Among the post-operative complications, there were four cases of wound infection. Three patients developed post-operative distal venous thrombosis (7.5%, but no one had clinically manifested pulmonary embolism. Conclusion No relation between BMI, CEAP classification and venous ultrassonographic findings were found. Although

  5. [Choice of bariatric and metabolic surgical procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui; Lin, Shibo; Guan, Wei

    2017-04-25

    Bariatric and metabolic surgery has become the clinical hot topic of the treatment of metabolic syndromes including obesity and diabetes mellitus, but how to choose the appropriate surgical procedure remains the difficult problem in clinical practice. Clinical guidelines of American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery(ASMBS)(version 2013) introduced the procedures of bariatric and metabolic surgery mainly including biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch(BPD-DS), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy(LSG). To choose the appropriate bariatric and metabolic procedure, the surgeons should firstly understand the indications and the contraindications of each procedure. Procedure choice should also consider personal condition (body mass index, comorbidities and severity of diabetes), family and socioeconomic status (postoperative follow-up attendance, understanding of potential surgical risk of gastrectomy and patient's will), family and disease history (patients with high risk of gastric cancer should avoid LRYGB; patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease should avoid LSG) and associated personal factors of surgeons. With the practice of bariatric and metabolic surgery, the defects, especially long-term complications, of different procedures were found. For example, LRYGB resulted in higher incidence of postoperative anemia and marginal ulcer, high risk of gastric cancer as well as the requirement of vitamin supplementation and regular follow-up. Though LSG has lower surgical risk, its efficacy of diabetes mellitus remission and long-term weight loss are inferior to the LRYGB. These results pose challenges to the surgeons to balance the benefits and risks of the bariatric procedures. A lot of factors can affect the choice of bariatric and metabolic procedure. Surgeons should choose the procedure according to patient's condition with the consideration of the

  6. The risk of adverse pregnancy outcome after bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Mette Karie Mandrup; Lauenborg, Jeannet; Breum, Birger Michael

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the risk of adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome after bariatric surgery.......The aim of this study was to describe the risk of adverse obstetric and neonatal outcome after bariatric surgery....

  7. Estimate of Bariatric Surgery Numbers, 2011-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Care Toolkit EHB Access Toolkit Estimate of Bariatric Surgery Numbers, 2011-2016 Published July 2016 2011 2012 ... Resources Access and Insurance Additional Resources Estimate of Bariatric Surgery Numbers Fact Sheets Governing Documents Guidelines Low BMI ...

  8. Through Thick and Thin: Identifying Barriers to Bariatric Surgery, Weight Loss Maintenance, and Tailoring Obesity Treatment for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donevan Westerveld

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available More than one-third of the adults in the United States are obese. This complex metabolic disorder is associated with multiple comorbidities and increased all-cause mortality. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be more effective than medical therapy and has been associated with weight loss maintenance and decreased mortality. In spite of these well-established benefits, less than 1% of candidates undergo surgery due to multiple factors, such as patient and physician perceptions and attitudes, patient-physician interaction, lack of resources, and cost burden. Furthermore, even in patients who do undergo bariatric surgery and/or alternate weight loss interventions, long-term weight control is associated with high-risk failure and weight regain. In this review, we highlight some of the current barriers to bariatric surgery and long-term weight loss maintenance and underscore the importance of an individualized multidisciplinary longitudinal strategy for the treatment of obesity.

  9. Bariatric Surgery Prior to Total Joint Arthroplasty May Not Provide Dramatic Improvements In Post Arthroplasty Surgical Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Elizabeth W.; Fisher, David; Li, Robert A.; Barber, Thomas C.; Singh, Jasvinder A.

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the total joint arthroplasty (TJA) surgical outcomes of patients who had bariatric surgery prior to TJA to TJA patients who were candidates but did not have bariatric surgery. Patients were retrospectively grouped into: Group 1 (n=69), those with bariatric surgery >2 years prior to TJA, Group 2 (n=102), those with surgery within 2 years of TJA, and Group 3 (n=11,032), those without bariatric surgery. In Group 1, 2.9% (95%CI 0.0–6.9%) had complications within 1 year compared to 5.9% (95%CI 1.3–10.4%) in Group 2, and 4.1% (95%CI 3.8–4.5%) in Group 3. 90-day readmission (7.2%, 95%CI 1.1–13.4%) and revision density (3.4/100 years of observation) was highest in Group 1. Bariatric surgery prior to TJA may not provide dramatic improvements in post-operative TJA surgical outcomes. PMID:24674730

  10. Assessing Sexual Abuse/Attack Histories with Bariatric Surgery Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, David

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed sexual abuse/attack histories in 537 bariatric surgery patients using the PsyBari. The prevalence rates found were lower (15.5%, 19.3% of women, 5.2% of men) than other studies that used bariatric surgery patients but consistent with studies that used nonbariatric obese subjects. Furthermore, bariatric surgery patients who…

  11. Diarrhea after bariatric procedures: Diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbély, Yves M; Osterwalder, Alice; Kröll, Dino; Nett, Philipp C; Inglin, Roman A

    2017-07-14

    Diarrhea after bariatric procedures, mainly those with malabsorptive elements including Roux-Y Gastric Bypass and Biliopancreatic Diversion, is common and an essential determinant of quality of life and micro- and macronutrient deficiencies. Bariatric surgery is the only sustainably successful method to address morbid obesity and its comorbidities, particularly gaining more and more importance in the specific treatment of diabetic patients. Approximately half a million procedures are annually performed around the world, with numbers expected to rise drastically in the near future. A multitude of factors exert their influence on bowel habits; preoperative comorbidities and procedure-related aspects are intertwined with postoperative nutritional habits. Diagnosis may be challenging owing to the characteristics of post-bariatric surgery anatomy with hindered accessibility of excluded segments of the small bowel and restriction at the gastric level. Conventional testing measures, if available, generally yield low accuracy and are usually not validated in this specific population. Limited trials of empiric treatment are a practical alternative and oftentimes an indispensable part of the diagnostic process. This review provides an overview of causes for chronic post-bariatric surgery diarrhea and details the particularities of its diagnosis and treatment in this specific patient population. Topics of current interest such as the impact of gut microbiota and the influence of bile acids on morbid obesity and especially their role in diarrhea are highlighted in order to provide a better understanding of the specific problems and chances of future treatment in post-bariatric surgery patients.

  12. Recommended nutritional supplements for bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Margaret

    2008-12-01

    To review nutritional supplements commonly required after bariatric surgery to provide a practical guide and reference source for generalist healthcare providers. A PubMed literature search (1988-July 2008) was conducted, using the search term nutritional deficiency after bariatric surgery, and was limited to English-language literature on adult (aged >19 y) human subjects. Additional references from the selected literature were also included. Data were extracted from large clinical series and practice guidelines whenever possible. Case reports were used only when they were the sole information source. Nutritional deficiencies that occur after bariatric surgery depend significantly on the type of surgery performed. Restrictive procedures such as gastric banding are the least likely to cause nutritional deficits, since none of the intestine is bypassed. Malabsorptive procedures such as biliopancreatic diversion or mixed restrictive/malabsorptive procedures (eg, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass) can result in serious nutritional problems when patients do not take required supplements after surgery. Vitamins and minerals that are commonly deficient in this circumstance include vitamin B(12), calcium, vitamin D, thiamine, folic acid, iron, zinc, and magnesium. Rare ocular complications have been reported with hypovitaminosis A. Healthcare professionals, especially those who practice outside large bariatric centers, must be aware of the supplements required by patients who have had bariatric surgery. Many patients fail to follow up with the surgery centers and are managed by their primary care teams and community pharmacists, especially in the selection of multivitamin and nutritional supplements.

  13. [Impact of bariatric surgery on obstetric prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumery, L; Pigeyre, M; Fournier, C; Arnalsteen, L; Rivaux, G; Subtil, D; Deruelle, P

    2013-03-01

    Assessment of pregnancy outcomes after bariatric surgery and analysis of follow-up particularities of such pregnancies. A retrospective study of 63 post-bariatric surgery pregnancies compared to 259 pregnancies of obese un-operated patients. Pregnancy outcomes, neonatal datas, delay influence between surgery and pregnancy beginning, bariatric surgery type and gastric banding (GB) loosening consequences were analysed. In the surgical brand were developed less gestational diabetes (DG) (P=0,05), deliveries were more often normal (P=0,004) and births shown less macrosomias and small for gestational age newborns (P=0,04). Neonatal state was improved among operated patients: less Apgar scores less than 7 at 1 minute (P=0,05) and less cord blood pH less than 7,2 (P=0,03). They gained more weight during the pregnancy (P=0,0003) and only 53% had a nutritional management and assessment. Patients with GB loosening gained more weight (P=0,0003). Lastly, there were no difference due to the different bariatric surgery techniques or nutritional follow-up in the pregnancy course and neonatal state. Bariatric surgery improves obstetric and neonatal prognosis. Improvements have to be developed in the multidisciplinary follow-up in order to avoid nutritional deficiencies or important weight gain pregnancy in case of GB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of liquid ingestion after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Oliveira Dantas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment for obesity; however, after surgery the patient may have difficulty in swallowing liquid and solid foods. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate liquid ingestion in patients who had undergone bariatric surgery. METHOD: We studied 43 volunteers with normal body mass index (BMI (BMI: 18.5-24.9 kg/m², 55 subjects with class III obesity (BMI: >40.0 kg/m², and 48 subjects with bariatric surgery for treatment of class III obesity. The method chosen for evaluation was the water swallowing test. The subjects drank in triplicate 50 mL of water while being precisely timed and the number of swallows were counted. RESULTS: There was no difference between subjects with normal BMI and subjects with class III obesity. During the first 2 months after bariatric surgery the patients showed an increase in the time needed to drink the entire volume, in the number of swallows, and in the inter-swallow interval, and a decrease in the volume swallowing capacity (volume/swallowing and swallowing flow rate (volume swallowed/second. After 2 months, the results of the swallowing measurements moved in the direction of normal values. CONCLUSION: Bariatric surgery may cause more intense alterations of liquid bolus swallowing within 2 months after the procedure, which moved to normal values after this time.

  15. Bariatric surgery: assessing opportunities for value innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, David P; Smith, Darlene B

    2005-03-01

    Obesity has been increasing over the past two decades, and the amount of medical and media attention given to bariatric surgery as a promising option for morbidly obese individuals is growing. The growth of bariatric surgery also has been attributed to improved surgical technique, the increase in surgeons trained in laparoscopic procedures, as well increased public awareness with celebrities having successfully undergone surgery. The number of surgeons and hospitals offering bariatric services is increasing. How then does a surgeon or a hospital develop a competitive strategy? The first step is to understand the health-care industry. The key forces are rivalry among present competitors, and the bargaining power of suppliers and buyers. While bariatric surgery currently is in a growth phase, time and competition will force practitioners to compete on the basis of price, unless they find true competitive advantage. Value innovation, is a means of creating new marketing space by looking across the conventionally defined boundaries of business--across substitute industries, across strategic groups, across buyer groups, across complementary product and service offerings, and across the functional-emotional orientation of an industry. One can compete by offering similar services focusing primarily on cost efficiencies as the key to profitability. Alternatively, one can break free from the pack by innovating and focusing on delivering superior value to the customer. As the market for bariatric surgery becomes increasingly overcrowded, profitable growth is not sustainable without developing a clear differential advantage in the market. Value innovation allows you to develop that advantage.

  16. Single-incision laparoscopic bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chih-Kun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bariatric surgery has been established as the best option of treatment for morbid obesity. In recent years single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS has emerged as another modality of carrying out the bariatric procedures. While SILS represents an advance, its application in morbid obesity at present is limited. In this article, we review the technique and results of SILS in bariatric surgery. Methods: The PubMed database was searched and totally 11 series reporting SILS in bariatric surgery were identified and analyzed. The case reports were excluded. Since 2008, 114 morbidly obese patients receiving SILS bariatric surgeries were reported. Results: The procedures performed included SILS gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass. No mortality was reported in the literatures. Sixteen patients (14.05% needed an additional incision for a liver retractor, a trocar or for conversion. Only one complication of wound infection was reported in these series. All the surgeons reported that the patients were highly satisfied with the scar. Conclusion: Because of abundant visceral and subcutaneous fat and multiple comorbidities in morbid obesity, it is more challenging for surgeons to perform the procedures with SILS. It is clear that extensive development of new instruments and technical aspects of these procedures as well as randomized studies to compare them with traditional laparoscopy are essential before these procedures can be utilized in day-to-day clinical practice.

  17. Asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women

    OpenAIRE

    Sudha Biradar Kerure; Rajeshwari Surpur; Sheela S. Sagarad; Sneha Hegadi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infections during pregnancy. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is a major risk factor for the development of urinary tract infections during pregnancy and with further risk of preterm birth & pyelonephritis if untreated. Aims & Objectives: This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in pregnant women & to isolate, identify and establish antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens....

  18. Ocularhaemodynamics parameters of asymptomatic HAART ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Vmax of blood flow in central retinal artery (CRA) of asymptomatic HAART - experienced HIV infected children was 12.2cm/s while that of seronegative children was 13.4 cm/s. The PI and RI of blood flow in CRA of asymptomatic HAARTexperienced HIV-infected children were 0.8 and 0.5 respectively while those of ...

  19. Bariatric surgery, a risk factor for rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, M L; Campillo-Soto, A; Martín-Lorenzo, J G; Torralba-Martínez, J A; Lirón-Ruiz, R; Aguayo-Albasini, J L

    2013-11-01

    Rhabdomyolysis has been increasingly recognized as a complication of bariatric surgery. We report a case of this complication and its consequences, in a patient who had undergone bariatric surgery, with a very high creatine kinase (CK) concentration, and whose renal function failed. Obesity causes a range of effects on all major organ systems. Knowledge of these effects and issues specific to the intensive care unit care of bariatric patients can help to predict and manage this underestimated complication in this population in which early diagnosis can alter the outcome. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of bariatric surgery on bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebelhart, Brigitte

    2016-05-01

    Bariatric surgery currently relies on combinations of restrictive and malabsorptive procedures. Early decreases in bone mineral density (BMD) have been reported. However, the accuracy of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry used to measure BMD can be diminished by the major weight loss, whereas quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measurements are less affected. The nutritional deficiencies induced by mixed bariatric surgery procedures, together with changes in hormones produced by adipocytes and/or the gastrointestinal tract, are often associated with elevations in serum levels of bone resorption markers. Although the data are limited, the incidence of fractures does not seem higher after bariatric surgery than in non-operated obese patients. Copyright © 2016 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Potential Hormone Mechanisms of Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Randeva, Manpal S; Miras, Alexander D

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, the role of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in energy homeostasis through modulation of the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates and the production of incretin hormones is well recognized. Bariatric surgery for obesity has been a very effective method in substantially improving weight, and numerous studies have focused on intestinal adaptation after bariatric procedures. A number of structural and functional changes in the GI tract have been reported postsurgery, which could be responsible for the altered hormonal responses. Furthermore, the change in food absorption rate and the intestinal regions exposed to carbohydrates may affect blood glucose response. This review hopes to give new insights into the direct role of gut hormones, by summarising the metabolic effects of bariatric surgery.

  2. Value of routine polysomnography in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Raaff, Christel A L; Pierik, Annouk S; Coblijn, Usha K; de Vries, Nico; Bonjer, H Jaap; van Wagensveld, Bart A

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), present in 60-70 % of bariatric surgery patients, is a potentially life-threatening condition when not detected and managed appropriately. The best available method to identify the severity of OSA is polysomnography. However, routine polysomnography measurements have not been accepted as standard modality in bariatric surgery. We report our experience with routine polysomnography in a cohort of patients undergoing bariatric surgery to determine the true prevalence of OSA with respect to the different severity levels as determined by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). AHI data were retrospectively collected from all patients who underwent bariatric surgery from 2012 onward, when the performance of preoperative polysomnography became mandatory. Mild, moderate and severe OSA were defined as an AHI ≥5, ≥15 and ≥30/h, respectively. Prevalence and number needed to screen (NNS) were calculated for all OSA severity levels. A total of 1358 patients were included. OSA was detected in 813 (59.9 %; NNS: 2) patients. Moreover, 405 (29.8 %; NNS: 4) patients were diagnosed with an AHI ≥15/h and 213 (15.7 %; NNS: 7) with severe OSA (AHI ≥30/h). Extreme AHI thresholds of ≥60 and ≥90/h were detected in 79 (5.8 %; NNS: 18) and 17 (1.3 %; NNS: 77) patients, respectively. One-third of the bariatric surgery patients have an AHI ≥15/h and would benefit from continuous positive airway pressure therapy. In order to increase perioperative safety and avoid the preventable risk of perioperative complications, we recommend mandatory P(S)G prior to bariatric surgery.

  3. Should bariatric surgery be performed in adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamish, Andrew J; Reinehr, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Adolescent obesity has markedly increased worldwide in both its extent and prevalence in recent decades and obesity prevention strategies are failing. As a result, effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. As behavioral and pharmacological treatment approaches have only moderate effects in severe obesity, bariatric surgery has begun to emerge as a treatment option. In this debate article, we offer arguments opposing and supporting bariatric surgery in the treatment of severe obesity in adolescents. Bariatric surgery has superior therapeutic outcomes with respect to weight loss and resolution of comorbid diseases over other existing treatments. However, long-term outcomes after bariatric surgery in adolescents are only just beginning to emerge. Furthermore, the procedures are generally considered irreversible, apart from gastric banding. Most importantly, not all adolescents seem to benefit greatly from bariatric surgery and we are not yet able to reliably identify those who stand to gain the greatest benefit. The authors agree that adolescent bariatric surgery should be offered exclusively within formal adolescent obesity programs, delivered by specialist multidisciplinary child/adolescent obesity teams, and within specialist centers, in order to optimize outcomes and minimize potential detrimental effects. Patients and their family/carers must be educated regarding the benefits and risks, potential side effects, expected changes in eating behavior and the lifelong requirement for regular medical follow-up after surgery. Before embarking upon a surgical treatment pathway in adolescents with severe obesity, it may also be beneficial to ensure compliance to treatment is demonstrated, in order to minimize the risk of nutritional deficiencies and associated potential complications. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  4. Predictors of Vitamin Adherence After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, Supreet; Santiago, Vincent A; Gougeon, Lorraine; Warwick, Katie; Okrainec, Allan; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-02-01

    Vitamin supplementation in bariatric aftercare is essential to prevent nutrient deficiencies; however, rates of vitamin adherence have been as low as 30 % 6 months post-surgery. Preliminary literature suggests non-adherence to prescribed treatments can be linked to demographic and psychological factors. We aimed to determine the relationship between these factors to vitamin adherence in post-bariatric surgery patients. A total of 92 bariatric patients were assessed 6 months post-surgery. Patients were administered a questionnaire collecting demographic information, psychological scores, and self-reported adherence. Nutrient deficiencies were analyzed through serum vitamin levels measured 3 and 6 months after surgery. Wilcoxon rank-sum and chi-square tests were used for analysis. Non-adherence was associated with male sex and full-time employment (p = 0.027, p = 0.015). There were no differences with respect to living situation, education level, or relationship type. Non-adherent patients did not have significantly higher scores for generalized anxiety, depressive symptoms, or avoidant behaviors. However, non-adherent patients displayed greater attachment anxiety than their adherent counterparts (p = 0.0186). Non-adherence was also associated with lower vitamin B12 levels 6 months post-surgery (p = 0.001). Male gender and full-time work have previously been shown to be associated with non-adherence. This is the first study to demonstrate that attachment anxiety is associated with poor multivitamin adherence in the post-surgical bariatric population. This result is concordant with recent literature that has demonstrated attachment anxiety is associated with poor adherence to dietary recommendations in bariatric patients 6 months postoperatively. Presurgical screening for attachment anxiety could facilitate early interventions to promote better bariatric aftercare in this group.

  5. Difficulties of Bariatric Surgery after Abdominoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bora Karip

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During laparoscopy, the main problems of patients who have undergone previous abdominoplasty are inadequate pneumoperitoneum secondary to fibrosis and reconstructed anatomic landmarks for trocar placement. In this study, we present our laparoscopic bariatric experience in two patients with previous abdominoplasty. The procedures were a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and a robotic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Both operations were done successfully by an abdominal wall traction technique, cutting fibrotic tissue and choosing new landmarks. We conclude that after abdominoplasty bariatric surgery can be performed safely either using conventional laparoscopic technique or robotically.

  6. Plastic surgery in bariatric patients: a nationwide study of 17,000 patients on the national administrative database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzati, Andrea; Katsahian, Sandrine; Maladry, David; Gerard, Emma; Gaucher, Sonia

    2018-01-12

    Bariatric patients are often candidates for plastic surgery. However, the rate of postbariatric procedures is not known. The aim of this study was to analyze the rate of plastic surgery, and factors related to surgery, in bariatric patients. University hospital, France. This was a cohort study based on administrative data. All adult patients who received bariatric surgery in France between 2007 and 2013 were included to estimate the rate of plastic surgery and related predictive factors. Data are reported according to the reporting of studies conducted using observational routinely collected data guidelines for observational studies on administrative data. Among the 183,514 patients who underwent bariatric surgery in the study period, 23,120 plastic surgeries were performed on 17,695 patients, including abdominoplasty (62%), dermolipectomy of the upper or lower limbs (25%), and reconstruction of the breast (14%). The rates of plastic surgery were 13%, 18%, and 21% at 3, 5, and 7 years post-bariatric surgery, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that patients who had a biliopancreatic diversion or a gastric bypass had a hazard ratio of 2.67 and 2.67 for subsequent plastic surgery, respectively, compared with patients who had adjustable gastric banding. Women had a 2-fold probability of surgery compared with men (hazard ratio 2.02). Important variability in the rate of surgery was found among different hospitals; rates ranged from 6.1% to 41.3% at 5 years. This study showed that 21% of bariatric patients undergo plastic surgery. Large variability exists among hospitals, suggesting that several unmeasured factors may limit access to contouring surgery. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Revisional bariatric surgery in a transplant patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Al Sabah

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Bariatric surgery is a safe and effective procedure to assist renal transplant patients in losing weight. In addition, it has proven to be effective in the management of the co-morbidities that are associated with renal failure. Our study was also able to prove that converting form an SG to a bypass in a transplant patient is a safe and feasible option.

  8. Bariatric Surgery, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, and Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Butterworth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the commonest cause of female infertility. Visceral obesity and insulin resistance are key pathophysiological mechanisms behind PCOS. Women suffering from this syndrome and infertility often seek bariatric surgery hoping that they would be able to conceive postoperatively. Objective. At present, there is no consensus on the role of bariatric surgery in the management of PCOS-associated infertility within the medical community, making it difficult to give specific advice to these women, so a review of the literature was necessary. Results. A detailed review of the literature was performed. Only 6 manuscripts were relevant and contained quantitative data. They demonstrated that bariatric surgery results in postoperative conception rates varying from 33% to 100%. Surgery is also associated with amelioration of menstrual irregularities, hormonal abnormalities, and hirsutism that are associated with PCOS. These studies were retrospective and only had a small number of participants with infertility. Conclusions. Bariatric surgery has been shown to conclusively improve life expectancy, quality of life, and comorbidities like type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea. However, further research is required to identify whether weight loss surgery results in significant improvement in fertility of women with PCOS and to investigate which operation has the best results.

  9. Bariatric Surgery and the Neuro-Ophthalmologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    Background As the prevalence of obesity increases, so are the prevalences of weight related diseases and the incidence of surgical procedures to promote weight loss. It is important for neuro-ophthalmologists to be familiar with these procedures and possible downstream effects on afferent and efferent visual function. Evidence acquisition Review of ophthalmology, neurology, general surgery, obesity, endocrinology, nutrition, psychiatry and neurosurgery literature. Results Bariatric surgery is a safe and effective treatment for weight loss in obese individuals. There is level IV evidence that it is associated with improvement in idiopathic intracranial hypertension(IIH). Laboratory nutrient deficiencies are common following some types of bariatric procedures. Symptomatic deficiencies are less common but can be devastating. Thiamine deficiency can cause nystagmus and other symptoms in weeks to months following surgery, B12 or copper deficiency can cause optic neuropathy in the years to decades following bariatric surgery. Conclusions Bariatric surgery may be a treatment for IIH. Postoperative vitamin deficiencies may present with nystagmus, optic neuropathy, nyctalopia and/or ophthalmoparesis weeks to years after surgery. PMID:26764529

  10. Postprandial Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia in Bariatric Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heide, L. J.M.; Emous, M.; van Beek, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Postprandial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (PHH) is a complication of bariatric surgery, especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The true incidence is not known as the definition of PHH is not clear. Continuous glucose monitoring shows a prevalence of hypoglycemia in 75% of patients, with only 1 in 5

  11. Value of routine polysomnography in bariatric surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Raaff, C.A.L.; Pierik, A.S.; Coblijn, U.K.; de Vries, N.; Bonjer, H.J.; van Wagensveld, B.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), present in 60–70 % of bariatric surgery patients, is a potentially life-threatening condition when not detected and managed appropriately. The best available method to identify the severity of OSA is polysomnography. However, routine polysomnography

  12. Bariatric Surgery and the Neuro-Ophthalmologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Heather E

    2016-03-01

    As the prevalence of obesity increases, so, too, do the prevalences of weight-related diseases and surgical procedures to promote weight loss. It is important for neuro-ophthalmologists to be familiar with these procedures and possible downstream effects on afferent and efferent visual function. Review of ophthalmology, neurology, general surgery, obesity, endocrinology, nutrition, psychiatry, and neurosurgery literature. Bariatric surgery is a safe and effective treatment for weight loss in obese individuals. There is Level IV evidence that it is associated with improvement in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Laboratory nutrient deficiencies are common following some types of bariatric procedures. Symptomatic deficiencies are less common but can be devastating. Thiamine deficiency can cause nystagmus and other symptoms in weeks to months after surgery, whereas B12 or copper deficiency can cause optic neuropathy in years to decades following bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery is a potential treatment for IIH. Postoperative vitamin deficiencies may cause nystagmus, optic neuropathy, nyctalopia, and/or ophthalmoparesis weeks to years after surgery.

  13. Mammography before and after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Tara E; Rosas, Ulysses S; Downey, John R; Miyake, Kanae K; Ikeda, Debra M; Morton, John M

    2017-03-01

    Morbidly obese women are at increased risk for breast cancer, and the majority of surgical weight-loss patients are older than 40 years old. The purpose of the present study was to determine the technical and interpretive changes in mammography following bariatric surgery. Accredited Academic Hospital. Two breast-imaging radiologists reviewed screening mammograms performed on 10 morbidly obese women undergoing bariatric surgery both pre- and postoperatively. American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (ACR BI-RADS) density, imaging quality measurements, compression force, breast thickness, pectoral nipple line (PNL) length, and x-ray beam kilovoltage (kVp) and miliamperes per second (mAs) were recorded. The average patient age was 56 years old, with mean age at menarche of 13 years old; 70% of patients were postmenopausal (average age 49 years at menopause) and 50% had a family history of breast cancer. There was a significant reduction in both BMI (-13.2 kg/m2, Pbariatric surgery. There was a significant reduction in breast thickness (-23.8 mm), reduction in PNL length (-1.9 cm), reduction in kVp (-1.2), and reduction in mAs (-16.7) even though there was no compression force change in pre- and postoperative mammograms detected. All breast densities were fatty or scattered though there were more scattered and fewer fatty images after surgery (P = .002). Morbidly obese women can undergo quality mammograms before and after bariatric surgery; however, weight loss after bariatric surgery leads to only slightly denser mammograms. Furthermore, weight loss reduces mammographic radiation doses. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bariatric Nutrition Guidelines for the Indian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedios, Carlyne; Bhasker, Aparna Govil; Dhulla, Neha; Dhar, Shilpa; Lakdawala, Muffazal

    2016-05-01

    Bariatric surgery numbers have seen a sharp rise in India in the last decade. A country known for its undernourished population has seen economic growth and with it, greater influence of western culture and foods. The obesity epidemic is on the rise here and India is one of the 10 most obese nations of the world being second only to China in the number of type 2 diabetes. Nutritionists in India often rely on recommendations and guidelines meant for the Caucasian population. Religious and cultural practices influence the dietary habits and patterns of the Indian population to a great extent; because of which the nutritional requirements are very different. This document was put together with an aim to provide nutritionists with recommendations on how to manage the Indian bariatric patient. A bariatric nutrition round table meeting was initiated by the Centre for Obesity and Digestive Surgery (CODS) to bring together experts in the field of bariatric nutrition to review current data on nutritional deficiencies in the morbid obese and existing post-operative deficiencies and to formulate nutritional recommendations for bariatric/metabolic surgery specific to patients from India. Percentage of nutritional deficiencies and reasons for the same were identified among the Indian population and recommendations were made to suit this particular population. It is recommended that all patients undergo compulsory pre-operative nutritional counseling and nutritional investigations and that nutritional follow-up be continued lifelong. In addition, long-term implications like hypoglycemia, dumping syndrome, sugar cravings, and weight regain, need to be picked up and managed efficiently. Most importantly, post-operative supplementation is a must irrespective of type of surgery.

  15. Dental manifestations in bariatric patients: review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Silveira Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of bariatric surgery has significantly risen in the past decade as an increasing prevalence of extreme obesity can be observed. Although bariatric surgery is an effective therapeutic modality for extreme obesity, it is associated with risk factors affecting also oral health. Based on an overview of the current literature, this paper presents a summary of dental manifestations in bariatric patients. Bariatric surgeries are associated with an increased risk for gastro-esophageal reflux which in turn might account for the higher amount of carious and erosive lesions observed in bariatric patients. As a result, also dentin hypersensitivity might be observed more frequently. The current data indicate that recommended postsurgical meal patterns and gastric reflux might increase the risk for dental lesions, particularly in the presence of other risk factors, such as consumption of sweet-tasting foods and acidic beverages. Further research is needed to evaluate the correlation of bariatric surgery and the development of dental diseases.

  16. Robotic bariatric surgery: A general review of the current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minoa K; Hagen, Monika E; Buchs, Nicolas C; Buehler, Leo H; Morel, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    While conventional laparoscopy is the gold standard for almost all bariatric procedures, robotic assistance holds promise for facilitating complex surgeries and improving clinical outcomes. Since the report of the first robotic-assisted bariatric procedure in 1999, numerous publications, including those reporting comparative trials and meta-analyses across bariatric procedures with a focus on robotic assistance, can be found. This article reviews the current literature and portrays the perspectives of robotic bariatric surgery. While there are substantial reports on robotic bariatric surgery currently in publication, most studies suffer from low levels of evidence. As such, although robotics technology is without a doubt superior to conventional laparoscopy, the precise role of robotics in bariatric surgery is not yet clear. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Primary care physician decision making regarding referral for bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolberg, Charlotte Røn; Hepp, Nicola; Juhl, Anna Julie Aavild

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity. It results in significant and sustained weight loss and reduces obesity-related co-morbidities. Despite an increasing prevalence of severe obesity, the number of bariatric operations performed in Denmark has decreased...... during the past years. This is only partly explained by changes in the national guidelines for bariatric surgery. The purpose of the cross-sectional study is to investigate referral patterns and possible reservations regarding bariatric surgery among Danish primary care physicians (PCPs). Setting......: Primary care physicians in Denmark. Methods: A total of 300 Danish PCPs were invited to participate in a questionnaire survey regarding experiences with bariatric surgery, reservations about bariatric surgery, attitudes to specific patient cases, and the future treatment of severe obesity. Most questions...

  18. Nutritional alterations after very low-calorie diet before bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennasar Remolar, M Ángeles; Martínez Ramos, David; Ortega Serrano, Joaquín; Salvador Sanchís, José Luis

    2016-03-01

    There has been an alarming worldwide increase of obese people in recent years. Currently, there is no consensus on whether patients that are scheduled to undergo bariatric surgery should lose weight before the intervention. The objective of this research is to analyse the influence of pre-surgery loss of weight in the nutritional parameters of patients. Fifty patients that were scheduled to undergo bariatric surgery followed a very low caloric diet during 4 weeks prior to the surgery. The nutritional parameters were analysed at 3 specific moments: before starting the diet, at the moment of surgery (when the diet was concluded) and one month after the surgery. Average values for hemoglobin, albumina and lymphocytes were kept within the range of normal values at all moments, even though the decrease of those parameters was statistically significant throughout the study (P<.05). By following the very low caloric diet, less than 9.5% of the sample suffered anaemia. Loss of weight prior to surgery does not have a significant influence in the nutritional parameters of the patient. These results would support the indication of losing weight for patients that are considered candidates for bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. PRE- AND POSTOPERATIVE IN BARIATRIC SURGERY: SOME BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES

    OpenAIRE

    TEDESCO, Amanda Kaseker; BIAZOTTO, Rafaela; GEBARA, Telma Souza e Silva; CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The bariatric surgery may cause some nutritional deficiencies. Aim: To compare the serum levels of biochemical markers, in iimmediate post-surgical patients who were submitted to bariatric surgery. Methods: Non-concurrent prospective cross-sectional study. The analysis investigated data in medical charts of pre-surgical and immediate post-surgical patients who were submitted to bariatric surgery, focusing total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerid...

  20. Relevance of Adipose Tissue Stiffness Evaluated by Transient Elastography (AdipoScan™) in Morbidly Obese Patients before Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, Magali; Abdennour, Meriem; Liu, Yuejun; Hazrak, Hecham; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Le Naour, Gilles; Bedossa, Pierre; Torjman, Joan; Clément, Karine; Miette, Véronique

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue (scAT) in human obesity undergoes severe alteration such as fibrosis which is related to metabolic alterations and to less efficiency in losing weight after bariatric surgery. There is currently no non-invasive tool to assess fibrosis in scAT. Vibration Controlled Transient Elastography (VCTE) using FibroScan® is widely used to assess liver fibrosis in clinical practice. A novel device named AdipoScan™ which is based on VCTE has been developed by Echosens (Paris) so as to assess scAT. The objective of this study is to show the first AdipoScan clinical results. AdipoScan™ was assessed in vivo on 73 morbidly obese patients candidate for bariatric surgery who were enrolled in the Pitié Salpêtrière hospital. scAT shear wave speed measured by AdipoScan™ is significantly associated with scAT fibrosis, gender, hypertension status, total body fat mass assessed by DXA, hypertension status, glycemic, lipid, hepatic parameters and adiponectin. Results suggest that scAT evaluation before bariatric surgery can be useful in clinical practice since it is related to scAT fibrosis -who plays in role in weight loss resistance after bariatric surgery- and to obesity induced co-morbidities such as diabetes, hypertension liver dysfunction.

  1. Socioeconomic deprivation remains a significant barrier in the choice of bariatric surgery even when full medical expense coverage is present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fysekidis, Marinos; Catheline, Jean Marc; Kouacou, Narcisse; Bihan, Hélène; Cohen, Regis

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing in the socioeconomically deprived sector of the French population. Our objective was to assess whether the presence of a socioeconomic gradient could affect access to bariatric surgery in a publicly funded healthcare system with full medical expense coverage. The study was conducted at a general hospital and a health examination center. We prospectively included 100 patients who were admitted to the hospital for a preoperative bariatric surgery evaluation. As a reference group, we included 578 patients from the same area with body mass index (BMI) values≥35 kg/m² who visited the health center for regular medical, cardiovascular checkups. The patients were required to complete the Evaluation of Precariousness and Health Inequalities in Health Examination Centers (EPICES) questionnaire to investigate deprivation (deprivation cutoff≥30.17). A total of 94 patients had complete data, with a mean EPICES score of 37.7±19.1 (Pbariatric surgery candidates exhibited lower levels of deprivation. The presence not only of material (e.g., coverage for medical expenses) but also social support is an important step toward the acceptance of bariatric surgery by morbidly obese patients. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cognitive function and nonfood-related impulsivity in post-bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadou, Ekaterini; Gruner-Labitzke, Kerstin; Köhler, Hinrich; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2014-01-01

    Initial evidence that cognitive function improves after bariatric surgery exists. The post-surgery increase in cognitive control might correspond with a decrease of impulsive symptoms after surgery. The present study investigated cognitive function and nonfood-related impulsivity in patients with substantial weight loss due to bariatric surgery by using a comparative cross-sectional design. Fifty post-bariatric surgery patients (postBS group) who had significant percent weight loss (M = 75.94, SD = 18.09) after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (body mass index, BMI M post = 30.54 kg/m(2), SDpost = 5.14) were compared with 50 age and gender matched bariatric surgery candidates (preBS group; BMI M pre = 48.01 kg/m(2), SDpre = 6.56). To measure cognitive function the following computer-assisted behavioral tasks were utilized: Iowa Gambling Task, Tower of Hanoi, Stroop Test, Trail Making Test-Part B, and Corsi Block Tapping Test. Impulsive symptoms and behaviors were assessed using impulsivity questionnaires and a structured interview for impulse control disorders (ICDs). No group differences were found with regard to performance-based cognitive control, self-reported impulsive symptoms, and ICDs. The results indicate that the general tendency to react impulsively does not differ between pre-surgery and post-surgery patients. The question of whether nonfood-related impulsivity in morbidly obese patients changes post-surgery should be addressed in longitudinal studies given that impulsive symptoms can be considered potential targets for pre- as well post-surgery interventions.

  3. Cognitive function and nonfood-related impulsivity in post-bariatric surgery patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterini eGeorgiadou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Initial evidence that cognitive function improves after bariatric surgery exists. The post-surgery increase in cognitive control might correspond with a decrease of impulsive symptoms after surgery. The present study investigated cognitive function and nonfood-related impulsivity in patients with substantial weight loss due to bariatric surgery by using a comparative cross-sectional design. Fifty post-bariatric surgery patients (postBS group who had significant percent weight loss (M = 75.94, SD = 18.09 after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (body mass index, BMI Mpost = 30.54 kg/m2, SDpost = 5.14 were compared with 50 age and gender matched bariatric surgery candidates (preBS group (BMI Mpre = 48.01 kg/m2, SDpre = 6.56. To measure cognitive function the following computer-assisted behavioral tasks were utilized: Iowa Gambling Task, Tower of Hanoi, Stroop Test, Trail Making Test-Part B, and Corsi Block Tapping Test. Impulsive symptoms and behaviors were assessed using impulsivity questionnaires and a structured interview for impulse control disorders. No group differences were found with regard to performance-based cognitive control, self-reported impulsive symptoms and impulse control disorders. The results indicate that the general tendency to react impulsively does not differ between pre-surgery and post-surgery patients. The question of whether nonfood-related impulsivity in morbidly obese patients changes post-surgery should be addressed in longitudinal studies given that impulsive symptoms should be considered potential targets for pre- as well post-surgery interventions.

  4. The medicalization of obesity, bariatric surgery, and population health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Selena E; Kawachi, Ichiro; Boyce, Angie M

    2017-09-01

    This article examines how the medicalization of obesity validates the use of bariatric surgery to treat obesity in the United States and how expansions in access to bariatric surgery normalize surgical procedures as disease treatment and prevention tools. Building on this discussion, the article poses two questions for population health regarding health technology: (1) to what extent does bariatric surgery treat obesity in the United States while diverting attention away from the ultimate drivers of the epidemic and (2) to what extent does bariatric surgery improve outcomes for some groups in the US population while simultaneously generating disparities? We conduct a brief, historical analysis of the American Medical Association's decision to reclassify obesity as a disease through internal documents, peer-reviewed expert reports, and major media coverage. We use medicalization theory to show how this decision by the American Medical Association channels increased focus on obesity into the realm of medical intervention, particularly bariatric surgery, and use this evidence to review research trends on bariatric surgery. We propose research questions that investigate the population health dimensions of bariatric surgery in the United States and note key areas of future research. Our objective is to generate a discourse that considers bariatric surgery beyond the medical realm to better understand how technological interventions might work collectively with population-level obesity prevention efforts and how, in turn, population health approaches may improve bariatric surgery outcomes.

  5. Bariatric emergencies: current evidence and strategies of management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand for bariatric surgery is increasing and the postoperative complications are seen more frequently. The aim of this paper is to review the current outcomes of bariatric surgery emergencies and to formulate a pathway of safe management. Methods The PubMed and Google search for English literatures relevant to emergencies of bariatric surgery was made, 6358 articles were found and 90 papers were selected based on relevance, power of the study, recent papers and laparoscopic workload. The pooled data was collected from these articles that were addressing the complications and emergency treatment of bariatric patients. 830,998 patients were included in this review. Results Bariatric emergencies were increasingly seen in the Accident and Emergency departments, the serious outcomes were reported following complex operations like gastric bypass but also after gastric band and the causes were technical errors, suboptimal evaluation, failure of effective communication with bariatric teams who performed the initial operation, patients factors, and delay in the presentation. The mortality ranged from 0.14%-2.2% and increased for revisional surgery to 6.5% (p = 0.002). Inspite of this, mortality following bariatric surgery is still less than that of control group of obese patients (p = value 0.01). Conclusions Most mortality and catastrophic outcomes following bariatric surgery are preventable. The awareness of bariatric emergencies and its effective management are the gold standards for best outcomes. An algorithm is suggested and needs further evaluation. PMID:24373182

  6. Health Disparities in Adolescent Bariatric Surgery: Nationwide Outcomes and Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez Lopez, Omar; Jupiter, Daniel C; Bohanon, Fredrick J; Radhakrishnan, Ravi S; Bowen-Jallow, Kanika A

    2017-11-01

    Bariatric surgery represents an appropriate treatment for adolescent severe obesity, but its utilization remains low in this patient population. We studied the impact of race and sex on preoperative characteristics, outcomes, and utilization of adolescent bariatric surgery. Retrospective analysis (2007-2014) of adolescent bariatric surgery using the Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database, a national database that collects bariatric surgical care data. We assessed the relationships between baseline characteristics and outcomes (weight loss and remission of obesity-related conditions [ORCs]). Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and U.S. census data, we calculated the ratio of severe obesity and bariatric procedures among races and determined the ratio of ratios to assess for disparities. About 1,539 adolescents underwent bariatric surgery. Males had higher preoperative body mass index (BMI; 51.8 ± 10.5 vs. 47.1 ± 8.7, p bariatric surgery at a higher proportion than blacks and Hispanics (2.5 and 2.3 times higher, respectively). Preoperative characteristics vary according to race and sex. Race and sex do not impact 12-month weight loss or ORC's remission rates. Minority adolescents undergo bariatric surgery at lower-than-expected rates. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence and pattern of asymptomatic bacteriuria among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most of the cultured organism (89%) were sensitive to Nitrofurantoin. Conclusion: The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women at the UPTH is high. The most prevalent organism was Klebsiella. Keywords: Asymptomatic bacteriuria, Prevalence, Pattern, Klebsiella, Nitrofurantion, Morbidity ...

  8. Managing Malnourishment in Pregnancy after Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Rachel K; Berkelhammer, Charles; Suarez, Victor; Kay, Helen H

    2017-09-01

    Little information exists to guide monitoring and treatment of malnourishment during pregnancy after bariatric surgery. Here we present a case with severe deficiencies and recommendations for testing and treatment. Our patient underwent a duodenal switch procedure resulting in significant weight loss and numerous deficiencies. She then experienced a neonatal demise with multiple congenital abnormalities, including diaphragmatic hernia, possibly related to severe vitamin A deficiency. After high doses of oral and parenteral replacement, pancreatic enzymes, and total parenteral nutrition, she delivered an anatomically normal but growth-restricted neonate in a subsequent pregnancy. Bariatric procedures may result in nutritional deficiencies that affect pregnancy outcome. Women with severe deficiencies require pre-pregnancy counselling, monitoring, aggressive treatment, and a multidisciplinary approach to care. Copyright © 2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bariatric surgery, gut morphology and enteroendocrine cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carl Frederik

    Considering that obesity and diabetes are some of the most important health problems in the world today, a lot studies have investigated the powerful effects of bariatric surgery on weight loss and diabetes remission during the past decade. An increased release of gut hormones is believed...... in response to surgical interventions. The increase in the number of endocrine cells is probably a mechanism involved in the enhanced blood levels of gut hormones following bariatric surgery....... to contribute to the positive effects of bariatic surgery but the mechanisms remain largely unknown. The endocrine cells of the gastrointestinal tract that produce and secrete hormones are difficult to examine as they are distributed as single cells. Several types of endocrine cells together produce more than...

  10. Asymptomatic schwannoma of the heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Maria

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of an asymptomatic right atrial mass detected on a screening ECHO. Pre-operative imaging and intraoperative frozen section suggested an atrial myxoma, but the extracardiac nature of the mass and its adherence to the right superior pulmonary vein and interatrial septum were inconsistent with this. Detailed histological assessment confirmed the diagnosis of atrial schwannoma. Limited case reports have shown complete resection is curative.

  11. Effects of a Physical Activity Program on Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Pulmonary Function in Obese Women after Bariatric Surgery: a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofre, Tatiana; Carlos, Renata; Oliver, Nicole; Felismino, Amanda; Fialho, Davi; Corte, Renata; da Silva, Eliane Pereira; Godoy, Eudes; Bruno, Selma

    2017-08-01

    In severely obese individuals, reducing body weight induced by bariatric surgery is able to promote a reduction in comorbidities and improve respiratory symptoms. However, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) reflected by peak oxygen uptake (VO 2peak ) may not improve in individuals who remain sedentary post-surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of a physical training program on CRF and pulmonary function in obese women after bariatric surgery, and to compare them to a control group. Twelve obese female candidates for bariatric surgery were evaluated in the preoperative, 3 months postoperative (3MPO), and 6 months postoperative (6MPO) periods through anthropometry, spirometry, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX). In the 3MPO period, patients were divided into control group (CG, n = 6) and intervention group (IG, n = 6). CG received only general guidelines while IG underwent a structured and supervised physical training program involving aerobic and resistance exercises, lasting 12 weeks. All patients had a significant reduction in anthropometric measurements and an increase in lung function after surgery, with no difference between groups. However, only IG presented a significant increase (p bariatric surgery could promote a significant increase in CRF only in the trained group, yet also showing that bariatric surgery alone caused an improvement in the lung function of both groups.

  12. Trends in Bariatric Surgery in Spain in the Twenty-First Century: Baseline Results and 1-Month Follow Up of the RICIBA, a National Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecube, Albert; de Hollanda, Ana; Calañas, Alfonso; Vilarrasa, Núria; Rubio, Miguel Angel; Breton, Irene; Goday, Albert; Vidal, Josep; Iglesias, Paloma; Fernández-Soto, María Luisa; Pellitero, Silvia; de Cos, Ana Isabel; Morales, María José; Campos, Cristina; Masmiquel, Lluís; Tinahones, Francisco; Pujante, Pedro; García-Luna, Pedro P; Bueno, Marta; Cámara, Rosa; Bandrés, Orosia; Caixàs, Assumpta

    2016-08-01

    Specific data is needed to safely expand bariatric surgery and to preserve good surgical outcomes in response to the non-stop increase in obesity prevalence worldwide. The aims of this study are to provide an overview of the baseline characteristics, type of surgery, and 30-day postoperative morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing bariatric surgery in Spanish public hospitals, and evaluate changes throughout the 2000-2014 period. This is a descriptive study using data from the RICIBA, a computerized multicenter and multidisciplinary registry created by the Obesity Group of the Endocrinology and Nutrition Spanish Society. Three periods according to the date of surgery were created: January 2000 to December 2004 (G1), January 2005 to December 2009 (G2), and January 2010 to December 2014 (G3). Data from 3843 patients were available (44.8 ± 10.5 years, a 3:1 female-to-male ratio, 46.9 ± 8.2 kg/m(2)). Throughout the 15-year period assessed, candidate patients for bariatric surgery were progressively older and less obese, with an increase in associated comorbidities and in the prevalence of men. The global trend also showed a progressive decrease in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the most performed bariatric procedure (75.1 % in G1, 69.3 % in G2, and 42.6 % in G3; p bariatric surgery in response to increasing demand.

  13. Psychosocial predictors of quality of life and weight loss two years after bariatric surgery: Results from the Toronto Bari-PSYCH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Hawa, Raed; Wnuk, Susan; Santiago, Vincent; Kowgier, Matthew; Jackson, Timothy; Okrainec, Allan; Cassin, Stephanie

    2017-07-01

    Studies exploring the impact of pre-surgery psychiatric status as a predictor of health related quality of life (QOL) after bariatric surgery have been limited to short-term follow-up and variable use of psychosocial measures. We examined the effect of pre-operative psychiatric factors on QOL and weight loss 2-years after surgery. 156 patients participated in this prospective cohort study, the Toronto Bariatric Psychosocial Cohort Study, between 2010 and 2014. Patients were assessed pre-surgery for demographic factors, weight, psychiatric diagnosis using the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview and symptom measures for QOL, depression and anxiety at pre-surgery and at 1 and 2years post-surgery. At 2-years post-bariatric surgery, patients experienced a significant decrease in mean weight (-48.43kg, 95% [-51.1, -45.76]) and an increase only in physical QOL (+18.91, 95% [17.01, 20.82]) scores as compared to pre-surgery. Multivariate regression analysis identified pre-surgery physical QOL score (psurgery weight (psurgery. Bariatric surgery had a sustained impact on physical QOL but not mental QOL at 2-years post-surgery. A history of mood disorder unexpectedly increased physical QOL scores and weight loss following surgery. Further research is needed to determine if these results are due to bariatric surgery candidate selection within this program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of nutrient deficiencies in bariatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Seok Yee; Zarshenas, Nazy; Jorgensen, John

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of nutrient deficiencies in patients who present for bariatric surgery, assess nutritional status after surgery, and compare these with preoperative levels. A retrospective study was conducted to identify preoperative and 1-year postoperative nutrition deficiencies in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The screening included serum ferritin, vitamin D, vitamin B(12), homocysteine, folate, red blood cell folate, and hemoglobin. Results were available for 232 patients preoperatively and 149 patients postoperatively. Two-tailed chi(2) tests and paired-sample t tests were used. Preoperatively, vitamin D deficiency was noted at 57%. The prevalence of abnormalities 1 year after roux-en-Y gastric bypass was higher compared with preoperative levels (P After surgery, anemia was detected in 17%, elevated homocysteine levels (women only) in 29%, low ferritin in 15%, low vitamin B(12) in 11%, and low RBC folate in 12%. Mean hemoglobin, ferritin, and RBC folate levels deteriorated significantly but remained well within normal ranges. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiencies decreased, but not significantly. In sleeve gastrectomy patients, mean ferritin levels decreased (P deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is common among morbidly obese patients seeking bariatric surgery. Because the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies persists or worsens postoperatively, routine nutrition screening, recommendation of appropriate supplements, and monitoring adherence are imperative in this population.

  15. Nutritional and psychological considerations after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Angela; Fernstrom, Madelyn H

    2008-01-01

    The anatomic and physiological changes resulting from bariatric surgery can affect both nutrition and psychological attitudes. Modifications of the gastrointestinal tract lead to a diminished ability to absorb nutrients, electrolytes, and bile salts, as well as deficiencies in iron, calcium, and other vitamins and minerals. Dehydration, lactose intolerance, and protein calorie malnutrition are other common sequelae. Alterations in bone metabolism increase long-term risk for osteopenia and osteoporosis. Noncompliance with postsurgical nutritional regimens has been estimated to occur in from one third to almost two thirds of cases and can exacerbate these complications. Psychological issues are often present in patients with morbid obesity and can affect surgical outcomes. These issues include mood and personality disorders, destructive eating behaviors, and poor body image. Nearly one third of patients undergoing bariatric surgery also have a history of substance abuse disorder. The literature suggests that although the mental health of patients improves as a result of bariatric surgery, the benefits may be transient, and problems such as negative personality profiles, detrimental eating patterns, and negative body image persist to some extent. Identification of presurgical psychiatric problems can help identify those patients more likely to achieve lasting weight loss when surgery is combined with long-term follow-up to minimize medical and psychological complications.

  16. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Facial Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardan Papoian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBariatric surgeries performed in the USA has increased twelve-fold in the past two decades. The effects of rapid weight loss on facial features has not been previously studied. We hypothesized that bariatric surgery will mimic the effects of aging thus giving the patient an older and less attractive appearance.MethodsConsecutive patients were enrolled from the bariatric surgical clinic at our institution. Pre and post weight loss photographs were taken and used to generate two surveys. The surveys were distributed through social media to assess the difference between the preoperative and postoperative facial photos, in terms of patients' perceived age and overall attractiveness. 102 respondents completed the first survey and 95 respondents completed the second survey.ResultsOf the 14 patients, five showed statistically significant change in perceived age (three more likely to be perceived older and two less likely to be perceived older. The patients were assessed to be more attractive postoperatively, which showed statistical significance.ConclusionsWeight loss does affect facial aesthetics. Mild weight loss is perceived by survey respondents to give the appearance of a younger but less attractive patient, while substantial weight loss is perceived to give the appearance of an older but more attractive patient.

  17. [Conversional and endoscopic procedures following bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorron, R; Bothe, C; Junghans, T; Pratschke, J; Benzing, C; Krenzien, F

    2016-10-01

    The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is the therapy of choice in bariatric surgery. Sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding are showing higher rates of treatment failure, reducing obesity-associated morbidity and body weight insufficiently. Moreover, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can occur refractory to medication. Therefore, a laparoscopic conversion to RYGB can be reasonable as long as specific conditions are fulfilled.Endoscopic procedures are currently being applied to revise bariatric procedures. Therapy failure following RYGB occurs in up to 20 % of cases. Transoral outlet reduction is the minimally invasive method of choice to reduce gastrojejunal anastomosis of the alimentary limb. The diameter of a gastric sleeve can be unwantedly enlarged as well; that can be reduced by placement of a longitudinal full-thickness suture.Severe hypoglycemic episodes can be present in patients following RYGB. Hypoglycemic episodes have to be diagnosed first and can be treated conventionally. Alternatively, a laparoscopic approach according to Branco-Zorron can be used for non-responders. Hypoglycemic episodes can thus be prevented and body weight reduction can be assured.Conversional and endoscopic procedures can be used in patients with treatment failure following bariatric surgery. Note that non-invasive approaches should have been applied intensively before a revisional procedure is performed.

  18. Does bariatric surgery improve adipose tissue function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frikke-Schmidt, H.; O’Rourke, R. W.; Lumeng, C. N.; Sandoval, D. A.; Seeley, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for obesity. Not only do these types of surgeries produce significant weight loss but also they improve insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolic function. The aim of this review is to explore how altered physiology of adipose tissue may contribute to the potent metabolic effects of some of these procedures. This includes specific effects on various fat depots, the function of individual adipocytes and the interaction between adipose tissue and other key metabolic tissues. Besides a dramatic loss of fat mass, bariatric surgery shifts the distribution of fat from visceral to the subcutaneous compartment favoring metabolic improvement. The sensitivity towards lipolysis controlled by insulin and catecholamines is improved, adipokine secretion is altered and local adipose inflammation as well as systemic inflammatory markers decreases. Some of these changes have been shown to be weight loss independent, and novel hypothesis for these effects includes include changes in bile acid metabolism, gut microbiota and central regulation of metabolism. In conclusion bariatric surgery is capable of improving aspects of adipose tissue function and do so in some cases in ways that are not entirely explained by the potent effect of surgery. PMID:27272117

  19. Bariatric Surgery Significantly Improves Body Proportion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Thomas; Wooldridge, James; Periou, Laura; Richardson, William S.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is well known that bariatric surgery provides excellent weight loss and resolution of comorbid conditions. We propose an additional benefit: Because body proportion is an independent predictor of diabetes and cardiovascular risk, we hypothesize that bariatric surgery results in improved body proportion and may thus improve health risk independent of overall weight loss and resolution of comorbid conditions. Methods A total of 168 patients underwent laparoscopic bariatric surgery at our institution from December 2006 to September 2009. Prospective data gathered preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively included body mass index (BMI); excess weight loss (EWL); waist-hip ratio (WHR); and discontinuation of hypertensive, hyperlipidemic, and diabetic medications. Results Of the 168 patients, 122 underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 40 gastric band, and 6 gastric sleeve procedures. Mean preoperative BMI was 48.6 kg/m2 (SD  =  7.8 kg/m2). Mean EWL was 33.7 lbs (SD  =  11.9 lbs) at 3 months, 46.35 lbs (SD  =  15.58 lbs) at 6 months, and 52.48 lbs (SD  =  24.19 lbs) at 1 year. Mean WHR was 0.91 (SD  =  0.1) preoperatively, 0.87 (SD  =  0.1) at 3 months (P < .0001), 0.87 (SD  =  0.09) at 6 months (P < .0001), and 0.86 (SD  =  0.1) at 1 year (P  =  .0006). At 1-year follow-up, 52% of patients had discontinued hypertensive medications, 64% had discontinued diabetic medications, and 56% had discontinued hyperlipidemic medications. Conclusions Along with well-known improvements in overall weight and comorbid conditions, bariatric surgery significantly improves body proportion, which may decrease health risk. Continued follow-up will determine if this change is long term or if patients will revert to preoperative WHRs. Future studies with sufficient power to study individual bariatric procedures will determine which procedures, if any, provide patients with the greatest

  20. The effect of the Ontario Bariatric Network on health services utilization after bariatric surgery: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnahas, Ahmad; Jackson, Timothy D; Okrainec, Allan; Austin, Peter C; Bell, Chaim M; Urbach, David R

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, the Ontario Bariatric Network was established to address the exploding demand by Ontario residents for bariatric surgery services outside Canada. We compared the use of postoperative hospital services between out-of-country surgery recipients and patients within the Ontario Bariatric Network. We conducted a population-based, comparative study using administrative data held at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. We included Ontario residents who underwent bariatric surgery between 2007 and 2012 either outside the country or at one of the Ontario Bariatric Network's designated centres of excellence. The primary outcome was use of hospital services in Ontario within 1 year after surgery. A total of 4852 patients received bariatric surgery out of country, and 5179 patients underwent surgery through the Ontario Bariatric Network. After adjustment, surgery at a network centre was associated with a significantly lower utilization rate of postoperative hospital services than surgery out of country (rate ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84 to 0.97). No statistically significant differences were found with respect to time in critical care or mortality. However, the physician assessment and reoperation rates were significantly higher among patients who received surgery at a network centre than among those who had bariatric surgery out of country (rate ratio 4.10, 95% CI 3.69 to 4.56, and rate ratio 1.84, 95% CI 1.34 to 2.53, respectively). The implementation of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary provincial program to replace outsourcing of bariatric surgical services was associated with less use of postoperative hospital services by Ontario residents undergoing bariatric surgery. Future research should include an economic evaluation to determine the costs and benefits of the Ontario Bariatric Network.

  1. Influence of obesity and bariatric surgery on gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Anna Carolina Batista; Santo, Marco Aurelio; de Cleva, Roberto; Sallum, Rubens Antônio Aissar; Cecconello, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancer (GC) are related to obesity and bariatric surgery. Risk factors, such as gastroesophageal reflux and Helicobacter pylori, must be investigated and treated in obese population. After surgery, GC reports are anecdotal and treatment is not standardized. This review aims to discuss GC related to obesity before and after bariatric surgery.

  2. Influence of obesity and bariatric surgery on gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dantas, Anna Carolina Batista; SANTO,Marco Aurelio; Cleva,Roberto de; Sallum, Rubens Ant?nio Aissar; Ivan CECCONELLO

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancer (GC) are related to obesity and bariatric surgery. Risk factors, such as gastroesophageal reflux and Helicobacter pylori, must be investigated and treated in obese population. After surgery, GC reports are anecdotal and treatment is not standardized. This review aims to discuss GC related to obesity before and after bariatric surgery.

  3. Body Contouring Surgery in Post-Bariatric Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, E.S.J. van der

    2015-01-01

    The dramatic rise of morbid obesity worldwide and the success of bariatric surgery results in a significant rise in the demand for post-bariatric body contouring surgery, a new field in plastic surgery. This makes a national clinical guideline for patient selection and treatment mandatory. In

  4. Bone loss after bariatric surgery: causes, consequences, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Emily M; Silverberg, Shonni J

    2014-02-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective and increasingly common treatment for severe obesity and its many comorbidities. The side-effects of bariatric surgery can include detrimental effects on bone and mineral metabolism. Bone disease in patients who have had bariatric surgery is affected by preoperative abnormalities in bone and mineral metabolism related to severe obesity. Changes that arise after bariatric surgery are specific to procedure type: the most pronounced abnormalities in calciotropic hormones and bone loss are noted after procedures that result in the most malabsorption. The most consistent site for bone loss after all bariatric procedures is at the hip. There are limitations of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry technology in this population, including artefact introduced by adipose tissue itself. Bone loss after bariatric surgery is probably multifactorial. Proposed mechanisms include skeletal unloading, abnormalities in calciotropic hormones, and changes in gut hormones. Few data for fracture risk in the bariatric population are available, and this is a crucial area for additional research. Treatment should be geared toward correction of nutritional deficiencies and study of bone mineral density in high-risk patients. We explore the skeletal response to bariatric surgery, potential mechanisms for changes, and strategies for management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Earliest signs and management of leakage after bariatric surgeries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed Bekheit

    2012-10-25

    Oct 25, 2012 ... Abstract Background: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical presentation and out- comes of treatment in patients who develop gastrointestinal leaks after different bariatric surgeries. Methods: Retrospective review of 632 consecutive bariatric surgical procedures performed from. 1999–2009 in ...

  6. Earliest signs and management of leakage after bariatric surgeries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical presentation and outcomes of treatment in patients who develop gastrointestinal leaks after different bariatric surgeries. Methods: Retrospective review of 632 consecutive bariatric surgical procedures performed from 1999–2009 in Alexandria University Hospital, ...

  7. Influence of bariatric surgery on the use of medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yska, Jan Peter; van der Meer, Douwe H.; Dreijer, Albert R.; Eilander, Willeke; Apers, Jan A.; Emous, Marloes; Totte, Erik R. E.; Wilffert, Bob; van Roon, Eric N.

    PURPOSE: Bariatric surgery can influence the prevalence and incidence of comorbidities, as well as the pharmacokinetics of drugs. This might lead to changes in the use of drugs. This study aimed to assess the influence of bariatric surgery on the use of medication in patients before and after

  8. [Long-term implication of bariatric surgery: beyond deficiencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, L

    2014-03-26

    Bariatric surgery frequently leads to several nutritional deficiencies that are well reported in the literature. However, numerous other aspects of the patients' life are concerned by bariatric interventions, so that the follow-up of these patients after bariatric surgery does not only encompass a mere correction of the well-known nutritional deficiencies. Only a thorough knowledge of all possible consequences of bariatric interventions permits an adequate follow-up of these patients. Overtly addressing all these issues with the patients before performing a bariatric intervention is the best way for them to be prepared for the intervention itself and to understand the need of a life-long follow-up thereafter.

  9. Postoperative metabolic and nutritional complications of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Timothy R; Finelli, Frederick C

    2010-03-01

    Bariatric surgery has become an increasingly important method for management of medically complicated obesity. In patients who have undergone bariatric surgery, up to 87% with type 2 diabetes mellitus develop improvement or resolution of their disease postoperatively. Bariatric surgery can reduce the number of absorbed calories through performance of either a restrictive or a malabsorptive procedure. Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery require indefinite, regular follow-up care by physicians who need to follow laboratory parameters of macronutrient as well as micronutrient malnutrition. Physicians who care for patients after bariatric surgery need to be familiar with common postoperative syndromes that result from specific nutrient deficiencies. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery - a review of benefits and risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Mette Karie Mandrup; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    Background. When other weight loss attempts have failed, bariatric surgery offers a successful alternative against obesity. Since operations are performed during women´s reproductive years, the number of pregnant women with prior bariatric surgery is increasing. Bariatric surgery results...... in restriction of food intake and/or malabsorption leading to weight loss, but may induce a risk for malnutrition and pregnancy complications. Method. Systematically conducted review addressing pregnancy after bariatric surgery using the PubMed and Cochrane databases. Main Outcome Measures. Birthweight......, gestational age, birth defects, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, and mode of delivery. Results. We included 17 articles in English, comparing pregnancies in women with prior bariatric surgery to pregnancies in a control group without this. There was considerable heterogeneity in study design...

  11. Bariatric surgery: A review of normal postoperative anatomy and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, S., E-mail: shaun.quigley@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [Radiology Department, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Colledge, J. [Radiology Department, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Mukherjee, S. [Bariatric Surgery Unit, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Patel, K. [Radiology Department, Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    The number of bariatric surgery procedures performed is increasing every year. Patients may be referred for radiological investigations to exclude complications not only in the early postoperative period but many months later. Radiologists who do not work in bariatric centres are therefore required to have an understanding of the complex normal anatomy and complications associated with bariatric surgery to interpret imaging studies correctly. The purpose of this article is to describe the surgical techniques and normal anatomy of the four bariatric operations performed today, review the most common problems encountered in this patient group, and to describe the imaging findings that allow the accurate diagnosis of complications. In particular, we focus on identification of the internal hernia, a grave complication of bariatric surgery often missed by radiologists.

  12. A pilot randomized controlled trial of telephone-based cognitive behavioural therapy for preoperative bariatric surgery patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassin, Stephanie E.; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Du, Chau; Wnuk, Susan; Hawa, Raed; Parikh, Sagar V.

    2017-01-01

    Background Psychosocial interventions can improve eating behaviours and psychosocial functioning in bariatric surgery candidates. However, those that involve face-to-face sessions are problematic for individuals with severe obesity due to mobility issues and practical barriers. Objective To examine the efficacy of a pre-operative telephone-based cognitive behavioural therapy (Tele-CBT) intervention versus standard pre-operative care for improving eating psychopathology and psychosocial functioning. Methods Preoperative bariatric surgery patients (N = 47) were randomly assigned to receive standard preoperative care (n = 24) or 6 sessions of Tele-CBT (n = 23). Results Retention was 74.5% at post-intervention. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated that the Tele-CBT group reported significant improvements on the Binge Eating Scale (BES), t (22) = 2.81, p = .01, Emotional Eating Scale (EES), t (22) = 3.44, p = .002, and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), t (22) = 2.71, p = .01, whereas the standard care control group actually reported significant increases on the EES, t (23) = 4.86, p bariatric surgery candidates. PMID:26990279

  13. A pilot randomized controlled trial of telephone-based cognitive behavioural therapy for preoperative bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassin, Stephanie E; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Du, Chau; Wnuk, Susan; Hawa, Raed; Parikh, Sagar V

    2016-05-01

    Psychosocial interventions can improve eating behaviours and psychosocial functioning in bariatric surgery candidates. However, those that involve face-to-face sessions are problematic for individuals with severe obesity due to mobility issues and practical barriers. To examine the efficacy of a pre-operative telephone-based cognitive behavioural therapy (Tele-CBT) intervention versus standard pre-operative care for improving eating psychopathology and psychosocial functioning. Preoperative bariatric surgery patients (N = 47) were randomly assigned to receive standard preoperative care (n = 24) or 6 sessions of Tele-CBT (n = 23). Retention was 74.5% at post-intervention. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated that the Tele-CBT group reported significant improvements on the Binge Eating Scale (BES), t (22) = 2.81, p = .01, Emotional Eating Scale (EES), t (22) = 3.44, p = .002, and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), t (22) = 2.71, p = .01, whereas the standard care control group actually reported significant increases on the EES, t (23) = 4.86, p bariatric surgery candidates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, E.M.; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect millions of people each year. Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) in humans. Persons affected by ABU may carry a particular E. coli strain for extended periods of time without any symptoms. In contrast...... to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) that cause symptomatic UTI, very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the urinary tract. Here, we have investigated the growth characteristics in human urine as well as adhesin repertoire of nine ABU strains; the ability of ABU strains to compete...

  15. Expanded indications for bariatric surgery: should patients on chronic steroids be offered bariatric procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Jennifer A; Schecter, Samuel C; Rogers, Stanley J; Lin, Matthew Y C; Posselt, Andrew M; Carter, Jonathan T

    2017-01-01

    Patients who take chronic corticosteroids are increasingly referred for bariatric surgery. Little is known about their clinical outcomes. Determine whether chronic steroid use is associated with increased morbidity and mortality after stapled bariatric procedures. American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database. All patients who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy or laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and were reported to the ACS-NSQIP from 2011 to 2013 were reviewed. Patients were grouped based on type of surgery and history of chronic steroid use. Primary outcome measures were mortality and serious morbidity in the first 30 days. Regression analyses were used to determine predictors of outcome. Of 23,798 patients who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and 38,184 who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 385 (1.6%) and 430 (1.1%), respectively, were on chronic steroids. Patients on chronic steroids had a 3.4 times increased likelihood of dying within 30 days (95% confidence interval 1.4-8.1, P = .007), and 2-fold increased odds of serious complications (95% confidence interval 1.2-2.3, P = .008), regardless of surgery type. In multivariate regression, steroid usage remained an independent predictor of mortality and serious complications. In a large, nationally representative patient database, steroid use independently predicted mortality and serious postoperative complications after stapled bariatric procedures. Surgeons should be cautious about offering stapled bariatric procedures to patients on chronic steroids. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk for hospital readmission following bariatric surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert B Dorman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Complications resulting in hospital readmission are important concerns for those considering bariatric surgery, yet present understanding of the risk for these events is limited to a small number of patient factors. We sought to identify demographic characteristics, concomitant morbidities, and perioperative factors associated with hospital readmission following bariatric surgery. METHODS: We report on a prospective observational study of 24,662 patients undergoing primary RYGB and 26,002 patients undergoing primary AGB at 249 and 317 Bariatric Surgery Centers of Excellence (BSCOE, respectively, in the United States from January 2007 to August 2009. Data were collected using standardized assessments of demographic factors and comorbidities, as well as longitudinal records of hospital readmissions, complications, and mortality. RESULTS: The readmission rate was 5.8% for RYGB and 1.2% for AGB patients 30 days after discharge. The greatest predictors for readmission following RYGB were prolonged length of stay (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-2.7, open surgery (OR, 1.8; CI, 1.4-2.2, and pseudotumor cerebri (OR, 1.6; CI, 1.1-2.4. Prolonged length of stay (OR, 2.3; CI, 1.6-3.3, history of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism (OR, 2.1; CI, 1.3-3.3, asthma (OR, 1.5; CI, 1.1-2.1, and obstructive sleep apnea (OR, 1.5; CI, 1.1-1.9 were associated with the greatest increases in readmission risk for AGB. The 30-day mortality rate was 0.14% for RYGB and 0.02% for AGB. CONCLUSION: Readmission rates are low and mortality is very rare following bariatric surgery, but risk for both is significantly higher after RYGB. Predictors of readmission were disparate for the two procedures. Results do not support excluding patients with certain comorbidities since any reductions in overall readmission rates would be very small on the absolute risk scale. Future research should evaluate the efficacy of

  17. Depressive Symptoms in Bariatric Surgery Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Carolyn J; Heinberg, Leslie J; Lapin, Brittany; Aminian, Ali; Sullivan, Amy B

    2017-10-30

    Bariatric surgery has been shown to be a safe and effective intervention for patients with comorbid obesity and multiple sclerosis (MS); however, this sub-population may be at heightened risk for pre- and postoperative depressive symptoms. This current exploratory study aims to describe the prevalence and nature of depressive symptoms in a sample of patients with MS who undergo bariatric surgery. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients who received bariatric surgery and had a diagnosis of MS (n = 31) and a control sample of non-surgical MS patients with severe obesity (n = 828). Longitudinal outcome measures included the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and Multiple Sclerosis Performance Scale (MSPS). There were no significant differences in PHQ-9 total and item scores between groups at baseline. PHQ-9 scores significantly improved at years 1 (p bariatric surgery when compared to non-surgical controls. Higher BMI (p = 0.03) and worse overall quality of life (p bariatric group. When compared to controls, the bariatric group demonstrated improved MSPS scores on a trend level 1 year post-surgery (p = 0.08). Consistent with the literature on more general bariatric surgery populations, current findings highlight the possible early benefits of bariatric surgery for reducing depressive symptoms in this population when compared to controls. Importantly, results should be viewed as preliminary and additional research is needed to examine bariatric surgery and associations with depressive symptoms and performance in the MS population.

  18. Bariatric surgery: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    To conduct an evidence-based analysis of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery. Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of at last 30 kg/m(2).() Morbid obesity is defined as a BMI of at least 40 kg/m(2) or at least 35 kg/m(2) with comorbid conditions. Comorbid conditions associated with obesity include diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemias, obstructive sleep apnea, weight-related arthropathies, and stress urinary incontinence. It is also associated with depression, and cancers of the breast, uterus, prostate, and colon, and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Obesity is also associated with higher all-cause mortality at any age, even after adjusting for potential confounding factors like smoking. A person with a BMI of 30 kg/m(2) has about a 50% higher risk of dying than does someone with a healthy BMI. The risk more than doubles at a BMI of 35 kg/m(2). An expert estimated that about 160,000 people are morbidly obese in Ontario. In the United States, the prevalence of morbid obesity is 4.7% (1999-2000). In Ontario, the 2004 Chief Medical Officer of Health Report said that in 2003, almost one-half of Ontario adults were overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m(2)) or obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). About 57% of Ontario men and 42% of Ontario women were overweight or obese. The proportion of the population that was overweight or obese increased gradually from 44% in 1990 to 49% in 2000, and it appears to have stabilized at 49% in 2003. The report also noted that the tendency to be overweight and obese increases with age up to 64 years. BMI should be used cautiously for people aged 65 years and older, because the "normal" range may begin at slightly above 18.5 kg/m(2) and extend into the "overweight" range. The Chief Medical Officer of Health cautioned that these data may underestimate the true extent of the problem, because they were based on self reports, and people tend to over-report their height and under-report their weight

  19. The impact of bariatric surgery on esophageal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolone, Salvatore; Savarino, Edoardo; Yates, Robert B

    2016-10-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic. There is increasing evidence that obesity is associated with benign gastroesophageal disease, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal dysmotility. Bariatric surgery-including sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass, and adjustable gastric band placement-can effectively result in weight loss and control of obesity-related conditions, including GERD. However, there is increasing evidence that bariatric surgery itself can have a deleterious effect on esophageal function. In this review, we address the effect of obesity and bariatric surgery on esophageal dysfunction. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  20. The Inequity of Bariatric Surgery: Publicly Insured Patients Undergo Lower Rates of Bariatric Surgery with Worse Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, Dietric L; Baimas-George, Maria; Al-Quarayshi, Zaid; Moore, Rachel; Kandil, Emad; DuCoin, Christopher G

    2018-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has been shown to be the most effective method of achieving weight loss and alleviating obesity-related comorbidities. Yet, it is not being used equitably. This study seeks to identify if there is a disparity in payer status of patients undergoing bariatric surgery and what factors are associated with this disparity. We performed a case-control analysis of National Inpatient Sample. We identified adults with body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 25 kg/m 2 who underwent bariatric surgery and matched them with overweight inpatient adult controls not undergoing surgery. The sample was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression. We identified 132,342 cases, in which the majority had private insurance (72.8%). Bariatric patients were significantly more likely to be privately insured than any other payer status; Medicare- and Medicaid-covered patients accounted for a low percentage of cases (Medicare 5.1%, OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.29-0.37, p bariatric surgery had an increased risk of complications compared to privately insured patients. Publicly insured patients are significantly less likely to undergo bariatric surgery. As a group, these patients experience higher rates of obesity and related complications and thus are most in need of bariatric surgery.

  1. Breast milk macronutrient composition after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Goele; Matthys, Christophe; Lannoo, Matthias; Van der Schueren, Bart; Devlieger, Roland

    2015-05-01

    Breast milk samples from 12 lactating women with bariatric surgery were investigated by comparing the macronutrient and energy content with samples from 36 non-surgical controls. Samples were analyzed with the Human Milk Analyzer and the maternal diet 24 h prior to sampling with a food record. A higher fat, energy, and a slightly higher carbohydrate milk content was found in the surgical group compared to the non-surgical group (3.0 ± 0.7 versus 2.2 ± 0.9 g/100 ml, P = 0.008; 61.0 ± 7.2 versus 51.7 ± 9 kcal/100 ml, P = 0.002; and 6.6 ± 0.6 versus 6.3 ± 0.4 g/100 ml, P = 0.045, respectively). No correlations and no strong explanatory variance were found between milk macronutrient composition and corresponding maternal dietary intake. The nutritional value of breast milk after bariatric surgery appears to be at least as high as in non-surgical controls.

  2. Nutritional management of patients after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Emmy

    2006-04-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective method of sustainable weight loss among morbidly obese patients. The types of bariatric surgeries can be divided into three categories: restrictive procedures, malabsorptive procedures, and combination (restrictive and malabsorption) procedures. In general, patients undergoing restrictive procedures have the least risk for long-term diet-related complications, whereas patients undergoing malabsorptive procedures have the highest risk. For many patients, the benefits of weight loss, such as decreased blood glucose, lipids, and blood pressure and increased mobility, will outweigh the risks of surgical complications. Most diet-related surgical complications can be prevented by adhering to strict eating behavior guidelines and supplement prescriptions. Eating behavior guidelines include restricting portion sizes, chewing foods slowly and completely, eating and drinking separately, and avoiding foods that are poorly tolerated. Supplement prescriptions vary among practitioners and usually involve at least a multivitamin with minerals. Some practitioners may add other supplements only as needed for diagnosed deficiencies; others may prescribe additional prophylactic supplements. The most common nutrient deficiencies are of iron, folate, and vitamin B12. However, deficiencies of fat-soluble vitamins have been reported in patients with malabsorption procedures, and thiamin deficiency has been reported among patients with very poor intake and/or nausea and vomiting. Frequent monitoring of nutrition status for all patients can aid in preventing severe clinical deficiencies.

  3. [Nutritional deficiencies associated with bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folope, Vanessa; Coëffier, Moïse; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2007-04-01

    Morbidly obese patients often have nutritional deficiencies, particularly in fat-soluble vitamins, folic acid and zinc. After bariatric surgery, these deficiencies may increase and others can appear, especially because of the limitation of food intake in gastric reduction surgery and of malabsorption in by-pass procedures. The latter result in more important weight loss but also increase the risk of more severe deficiencies. The protein deficiency associated with a decrease in the fat-free mass has been described in both procedures. It can sometimes require an enteral or parenteral support. Anemia can be secondary to iron deficiency, folic acid deficiency and even to vitamin B12 deficiency. Neurological disorders such as Gayet-Wernicke encephalopathy due to thiamine deficiency, or peripheral neuropathies may also be observed. Malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins and other nutrients, especially if diagnosed after by-pass surgery, rarely cause clinical symptoms. However, some complications have been reported such as bone demineralization due to vitamin D deficiency, hair loss secondary to zinc deficiency or hemeralopia from vitamin A deficiency. A careful nutritional follow-up should be performed during pregnancy after obesity surgery, because possible deficiencies can affect the health of both the mother and child. In conclusion, increased awareness of the risk of deficiency and the systematic dosage of micronutrients are needed in the pre- and postoperative period in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The case by case correction of these deficiencies is mandatory, and their systematic prevention should be evaluated.

  4. Bariatric Endocrinology: Principles of Medical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael Gonzalez-Campoy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, is a chronic, biological, preventable, and treatable disease. The accumulation of fat mass causes physical changes (adiposity, metabolic and hormonal changes due to adipose tissue dysfunction (adiposopathy, and psychological changes. Bariatric endocrinology was conceived from the need to address the neuro-endocrinological derangements that are associated with adiposopathy, and from the need to broaden the scope of the management of its complications. In addition to the well-established metabolic complications of overweight and obesity, adiposopathy leads to hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia, hypoadiponectinemia, dysregulation of gut peptides including GLP-1 and ghrelin, the development of an inflammatory milieu, and the strong risk of vascular disease. Therapy for adiposopathy hinges on effectively lowering the ratio of orexigenic to anorexigenic signals reaching the the hypothalamus and other relevant brain regions, favoring a lower caloric intake. Adiposopathy, overweight and obesity should be treated indefinitely with the specific aims to reduce fat mass for the adiposity complications, and to normalize adipose tissue function for the adiposopathic complications. This paper defines the principles of medical practice in bariatric endocrinology—the treatment of overweight and obesity as means to treat adiposopathy and its accompanying metabolic and hormonal derangements.

  5. Imaging of patients treated with bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemanowicz, Adam; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Summary Over the past few years, obesity has become a major clinical and population concern in the majority of developed countries. Obesity leads to significant systemic disorders, such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, and also increases the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke), metabolic diseases (type 2 diabetes), certain types of cancer, and degenerative bone disorders (osteoarthritis). Health hazards associated with epidemic of obesity and potential benefits of weight loss have spurred interest in new treatment methods. Bariatric surgical procedures constitute a recognized alternative in cases where conservative management of obesity fails. Several bariatric operations can be distinguished: restrictive procedures, such as adjustable gastric band (AGB) and vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG); predominantly malabsorptive procedures, such as biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), and a combination of both methods, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The adverse consequences of surgical treatment of obesity include i.a.: intestinal anastomotic leakage, impaired intestinal permeability and internal hernia, dilatation of the stomach, gastrointestinal anastomotic stenosis, marginal ulceration, incisional hernia. Basic knowledge of procedures in the surgical treatment of obesity is of vital importance for the radiologist during evaluation of upper gastrointestinal tract in the early and late postoperative period, allowing correct interpretation of acquired images as well as recognition of typical complications. PMID:24497896

  6. Epidemiological Study Of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria Among Nursery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bateriuria in preschool children of different age and sex groups and to isolate the organisms responsible for asymptomatic bacteriuria and determine their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. A total of 475 children from 17 nurseries in Ahvaz city, Iran ...

  7. Sleep study, respiratory mechanics, chemosensitive response and quality of life in morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery: a prospective, randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitao Filho Fernando SS

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a major public health problem in both developed and developing countries alike and leads to a series of changes in respiratory physiology. There is a strong correlation between obesity and cardiopulmonary sleep disorders. Weight loss among such patients leads to a reduction in these alterations in respiratory physiology, but clinical treatment is not effective for a long period of time. Thus, bariatric surgery is a viable option. Methods/Design The present study involves patients with morbid obesity (BMI of 40 kg/m2 or 35 kg/m2 to 39.9 kg/m2 with comorbidities, candidates for bariatric surgery, screened at the Santa Casa de Misericórdia Hospital in the city of Sao Paulo (Brazil. The inclusion criteria are grade III morbid obesity, an indication for bariatric surgery, agreement to participate in the study and a signed term of informed consent. The exclusion criteria are BMI above 55 kg/m2, clinically significant or unstable mental health concerns, an unrealistic postoperative target weight and/or unrealistic expectations of surgical treatment. Bariatric surgery candidates who meet the inclusion criteria will be referred to Santa Casa de Misericórdia Hospital and will be reviewed again 30, 90 and 360 days following surgery. Data collection will involve patient records, personal data collection, objective assessment of HR, BP, neck circumference, chest and abdomen, collection and analysis of clinical preoperative findings, polysomnography, pulmonary function test and a questionnaire on sleepiness. Discussion This paper describes a randomised controlled trial of morbidly obese patients. Polysomnography, respiratory mechanics, chemosensitive response and quality of life will be assessed in patients undergoing or not undergoing bariatric surgery. Trial Registration The protocol for this study is registered with the Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials - ReBEC (RBR-9k9hhv.

  8. Influence of obesity and bariatric surgery on gastric cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anna Carolina Batista Dantas Marco Aurelio Santo Roberto de Cleva Rubens Antbnio Aissar Sallum Ivan Cecconello

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancer (GC) are related to obesity and bariatric surgery. Risk factors, such as gastroesophageal reflux and Helicobacter pylori, must be investigated and treated in obese population...

  9. Bariatric surgery - effects on obesity and related co-morbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Maria Saur; Madsbad, Sten

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) are the three most commonly performed bariatric procedures. Obesity responds well to bariatric surgery, with major long-lasting weight loss that is most pronounced...... hormone responses, especially a 10-fold increase in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which improves insulin secretion. After gastric banding, the remission of diabetes depends more on weight loss. Bariatric surgery reduces cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, lipid disturbances, non......-alcoholic fatty liver, musculoskeletal pain and reduces mortality of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Bariatric surgery also improves quality of life. The acute complications of surgery are infection, bleeding and anastomotic leak. Long-term complications are nutritional deficiencies, including...

  10. Monitoring of Diabetic Retinopathy in relation to Bariatric Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brynskov, Troels; Laugesen, Caroline Schmidt; Svenningsen, Annette Lykke

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To investigate the need for closer perioperative monitoring of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing bariatric surgery. METHODS: Prospective observational clinical study of 56 patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing bariatric surgery. The patients were...... examined with 7-field fundus images and optical coherence tomography scans 2 weeks before and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after bariatric surgery. Worsening was defined as a two-step change in the Wisconsin Epidemiologic Study of Diabetic Retinopathy scale or appearance or worsening of macular edema...... preoperatively where HbA1c was 6.4 ± 1.9 %. CONCLUSIONS: Diabetic retinopathy was clinically stable after bariatric surgery, and none of the observed changes would have resulted in a changed screening interval at our center. This supports adherence to regular diabetic retinopathy screening guidelines following...

  11. Metabolic Bone Disease in the Bariatric Surgery Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E. Williams

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery has proven to be a life-saving measure for some, but for others it has precipitated a plethora of metabolic complications ranging from mild to life-threatening, sometimes to the point of requiring surgical revision. Obesity was previously thought to be bone protective, but this is indeed not the case. Morbidly obese individuals are at risk for metabolic bone disease (MBD due to chronic vitamin D deficiency, inadequate calcium intake, sedentary lifestyle, chronic dieting, underlying chronic diseases, and the use of certain medications used to treat those diseases. After bariatric surgery, the risk for bone-related problems is even greater, owing to severely restricted intake, malabsorption, poor compliance with prescribed supplements, and dramatic weight loss. Patients presenting for bariatric surgery should be evaluated for MBD and receive appropriate presurgical interventions. Furthermore, every patient who has undergone bariatric surgery should receive meticulous lifetime monitoring, as the risk for developing MBD remains ever present.

  12. Complications of staple line and anastomoses following laparoscopic bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silecchia, Gianfranco; Iossa, Angelo

    2018-01-01

    With over 600 million people being obese, and given the scientific demonstration of the advantages of surgical treatment, bariatric surgery is on the rise. The promising long-term results in terms of weight loss, and particularly in relation to comorbidities and the control/cure rate, mean that the number of procedures performed in all countries remains high. However, the risk of potentially complex or fatal complications, though small, is present and is related to the procedures per se. This review is a guide for bariatric and/or general surgeons, offering a complete overview of the pathogenesis of anastomosis and staple line following the most common laparoscopic bariatric procedures: sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass, and mini-gastric bypass. The review is divided according to the procedure and the complications (leak, bleeding and stenosis), and evaluates all the factors that can potentially improve or worsen the complication rate, representing a “unicum” in the present literature on bariatric surgery. PMID:29333067

  13. Bariatric surgery – An update for the endocrinologist

    OpenAIRE

    Mancini, Marcio C.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem, is associated with increased rates of mortality risk and of developing several comorbidities, and lessens life expectancy. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for morbidly obese patients, reducing risk of developing new comorbidities, health care utilization and mortality. The establishment of centers of excellence with interdisciplinary staff in bariatric surgery has been reducing operative mortality in the course of time, improving sur...

  14. Examination of bariatric surgery Facebook support groups: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koball, Afton M; Jester, Dylan J; Domoff, Sarah E; Kallies, Kara J; Grothe, Karen B; Kothari, Shanu N

    2017-08-01

    Support following bariatric surgery is vital to ensure long-term postoperative success. Many individuals undergoing bariatric surgery are turning to online modalities, especially the popular social media platform Facebook, to access support groups and pages. Despite evidence suggesting that the majority of patients considering bariatric surgery are utilizing online groups, little is known about the actual content of these groups. The purpose of the present study was to conduct a content analysis of bariatric surgery support groups and pages on Facebook. Online via Facebook, independent academic medical center, United States. Data from bariatric surgery-related Facebook support groups and pages were extracted over a 1-month period in 2016. Salient content themes (e.g., progress posts, depression content, eating behaviors) were coded reliably (all κ> .70). More than 6,800 posts and replies were coded. Results indicated that seeking recommendations (11%), providing information or recommendations (53%), commenting on changes since surgery (19%), and lending support to other members (32%) were the most common types of posts. Content surrounding anxiety, eating behaviors, depression, body image, weight bias, and alcohol was found less frequently. Online bariatric surgery groups can be used to receive support, celebrate physical and emotional accomplishments, provide anecdotal accounts of the "bariatric lifestyle" for preoperative patients, and comment on challenges with mental health and experiences of weight bias. Providers should become acquainted with the content commonly found in online groups and exercise caution in recommending these platforms to information-seeking patients. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficiency of preoperative esophagogastroduodenoscopy in identifying operable hiatal hernia for bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Ricardo; Fei, Patrick; Phu, John; Asai, Megumi; Antanavicius, Gintaras

    2017-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) is a symptom frequently found in obese patients, and often is related to the presence of a hiatal hernia (HH). Surgeons may evaluate for the presence of HH on esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). However, preoperative endoscopic presence or absence of a significant HH does not always correlate with intraoperative findings. To compare the rate of detection of repairable HH between clinical, endoscopic, and intraoperative methods SETTING: Independent, university-affiliated teaching hospital METHODS: A retrospective chart review of all consecutive patients who had undergone a primary bariatric procedure sleeve gastrectomy, gastric bypass, or biliopancreatic diversion/duodenal switch with routine preoperative EGD in a single institution from 2009-2013 was performed. Data points included the diagnosis of GERD/heartburn/proton pump inhibitor or histamine antagonist from history, the diagnosis of HH from preoperative EGD, and the diagnosis of HH intraoperatively that merited repair. 1570 consecutive patients were included in the study. Eight hundred fifty-seven (55%) had diagnosis of GERD or heartburn, and 713 (45%) were asymptomatic (negative for GERD or heartburn). Hiatal hernia repair was performed in 153 (18%) patients with the diagnosis of GERD or heartburn and in 107 (15%) patients without the diagnosis of GERD and or heartburn. In all, 434 (28%) out of 1570 patients had a finding of HH on EGD; 204 (47%) were repaired. On endoscopy, 326 (75%) were defined as small, 87 (20%) as moderate, and 21(5%) as large HH. Of these, repairs were done on 128 (39%), 60 (70%), and 16 (76%). The sensitivity of detecting repairable HH by clinical indicators such as GERD or heartburn was 55% (P = .123) and sensitivity of EGD findings was 78% (P = .000). Specificity was 46% and 82%, respectively. Small HH are over-diagnosed with EGD, as most do not require repair. However, moderate and large HH are accurately detected. Copyright © 2017 American Society for

  16. The portrayal of bariatric surgery in the UK print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, J M L; Rink, J A; Hewin, D H

    2012-11-01

    Bariatric and metabolic surgery is a recent introduction into mainstream surgical practice. It has been shown to have a beneficial effect on the health of an individual and a positive economic impact for society. Nonetheless, bariatric surgery faces a problem of perception from both the public and healthcare commissioners. The media functions as an interface between the medical community, government and the public. It therefore plays a critical role in shaping public opinion regarding health issues. Articles relating to bariatric surgery in the ten most frequently read UK daily newspapers were assessed over a 24-month period (January 2010-December 2011). Each article was rated via a five-point scale from very negative (1) to very positive (5) by two independent assessors to produce an average score. A total of 197 relevant articles were identified and analysed for content. Sixty-four (33 %) of all articles were negatively slanted (mean score 1-2.5), 105 (53 %) were positive (mean score 3.5-5) and 28 (14 %) were neutral (mean score 2.5-3.5). The average score of all articles was 3.3 (neutral, but slightly positive). The print media will influence public perceptions of bariatric surgery. There is huge variation in how bariatric surgery is reported, but overall the coverage is neutral. We feel that negative reportage distorts the overall awareness of bariatric surgery and may affect both how and when the obese seek medical intervention.

  17. Bariatric surgery, bone loss, obesity and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowska, M M; Sainsbury, A; Eisman, J A; Baldock, P A; Center, J R

    2013-01-01

    Bariatric surgery remains the most effective treatment for severely obese patients. However, the potential long-term effects of bariatric surgical procedures on health, including bone health, are only partially understood. The goal of this review was to present data on the impact of bariatric surgery on bone metabolism and to analyse possible reasons for the loss of bone mass that frequently occurs after bariatric surgery. Such factors include nutritional deficiencies, rapid weight loss per se, effects of fat-derived adipokines and gut-derived appetite-regulatory hormones. However, the relative roles of these factors in skeletal regulation and the mechanisms by which they work are not yet fully defined. Our review was focussed on the complex relationship between body weight, fat mass and bone mass, as well as peripheral and central mediators potentially involved in the dual regulation of both energy and bone homeostasis. We also review the data on the inverse relationship between central obesity, bone marrow fat and osteoporosis. As the number of bariatric operations increases, it is imperative to recognize mechanisms responsible for bariatric surgery-induced bone loss, with careful monitoring of bone health including long-term fracture incidence in patients undergoing these procedures. © 2012 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  18. Bariatric surgery and long-term nutritional issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupoli, Roberta; Lembo, Erminia; Saldalamacchia, Gennaro; Avola, Claudia Kesia; Angrisani, Luigi; Capaldo, Brunella

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is recognized as a highly effective therapy for obesity since it accomplishes sustained weight loss, reduction of obesity-related comorbidities and mortality, and improvement of quality of life. Overall, bariatric surgery is associated with a 42% reduction of the cardiovascular risk and 30% reduction of all-cause mortality. This review focuses on some nutritional consequences that can occur in bariatric patients that could potentially hinder the clinical benefits of this therapeutic option. All bariatric procedures, to variable degrees, alter the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal tract; this alteration makes these patients more susceptible to developing nutritional complications, namely, deficiencies of macro- and micro-nutrients, which could lead to disabling diseases such as anemia, osteoporosis, protein malnutrition. Of note is the evidence that most obese patients present a number of nutritional deficits already prior to surgery, the most important being vitamin D and iron deficiencies. This finding prompts the need for a complete nutritional assessment and, eventually, an adequate correction of pre-existing deficits before surgery. Another critical issue that follows bariatric surgery is post-operative weight regain, which is commonly associated with the relapse of obesity-related co-morbidities. Nu-tritional complications associated with bariatric surgery can be prevented by life-long nutritional monitoring with the administration of multi-vitamins and mineral supplements according to the patient’s needs. PMID:29204255

  19. Advanced laparoscopic bariatric surgery Is safe in general surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckelman, John; Bingham, Jason; Barron, Morgan; Lallemand, Michael; Martin, Matthew; Sohn, Vance

    2017-05-01

    Bariatric surgery makes up an increasing percentage of general surgery training. The safety of resident involvement in these complex cases has been questioned. We evaluated patient outcomes in resident performed laparoscopic bariatric procedures. Retrospective review of patients undergoing a laparoscopic bariatric procedure over seven years at a tertiary care single center. Procedures were primarily performed by a general surgery resident and proctored by an attending surgeon. Primary outcomes included operative volume, operative time and leak rate with perioperative outcomes evaluated as secondary outcomes. A total of 1649 bariatric procedures were evaluated. Operations included laparoscopic bypass (690) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (959). Average operating time was 136 min. Eighteen leaks (0.67%) were identified. Graduating residents performed an average of 89 laparoscopic bariatric cases during their training. There were no significant differences between resident levels with concern to operative time or leak rate (p 0.97 and p = 0.54). General surgery residents can safely perform laparoscopic bariatric surgery. When proctored by a staff surgeon, a resident's level of training does not significantly impact leak rate. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Matthew A; Mauck, Karen F; Daniels, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgical procedures are now a common method of obesity treatment with established effectiveness. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) events, which include deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, are an important source of postoperative morbidity and mortality among bariatric surgery patients. Due to an understanding of the frequency and seriousness of these complications, bariatric surgery patients typically receive some method of VTE prophylaxis with lower extremity compression, pharmacologic prophylaxis, or both. However, the optimal approach in these patients is unclear, with multiple open questions. In particular, strategies of adjusted-dose heparins, postdischarge anticoagulant prophylaxis, and the role of vena cava filters have been evaluated, but only to a limited extent. In contrast to other types of operations, the literature regarding VTE prophylaxis in bariatric surgery is notable for a dearth of prospective, randomized clinical trials, and current professional guidelines reflect the uncertainties in this literature. Herein, we summarize the available evidence after systematic review of the literature regarding approaches to VTE prevention in bariatric surgery. Identification of risk factors for VTE in the bariatric surgery population, analysis of the effectiveness of methods used for prophylaxis, and an overview of published guidelines are presented. PMID:26316771

  1. Comparison Between Marital Satisfaction and Self-Esteem Before and After Bariatric Surgery in Patients With Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Lotfi, Tahereh; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Mazaheri Meybod, Azadeh; Soheilipour, Fahimeh; Jesmi, Fatemeh

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is one of the most common chronic diseases with important medical effects, as well as mental and social health problems. Bariatric surgery is one of the most effective treatments of morbid obesity. Because of the possible psychological changes, and its effects on weight loss after surgery, the current study aimed to compare marital satisfaction and self-confidence in patients with obesity before and after bariatric surgery in Rasoul-e-Akram hospital in 2013. This prospective observational study was conducted on 69 candidates for bariatric surgery. Marital satisfaction and self-confidence were assessed before and six months after the surgery by Enrich marital satisfaction scale and Coopersmith self-esteem inventory. Descriptive statistics and T-tests were utilized to analyze data. Values of P ≤ 0.01 were considered statistically significant. Despite the improvement of sexual relationship, marital satisfaction scores significantly decreased from141.26 ± 12.75 to 139.42 ± 12.52 six months after the surgery (P = 0.002). Satisfaction in scales of conflict resolution and communication showed a descending pattern (P self-esteem before and after the surgery (P = 0.321). Weight loss after bariatric surgery did not improve self-esteem and marital satisfaction six months post operatively; therefore, psychiatric assessment of patients before and after the surgery is crucial; since even if they are not associated with prognosis of the surgery, it is important to provide treatment for psychiatric problems. Prospective studies are recommended to assess post-operative changes of other psychological aspects.

  2. [Intraoperative nursing in bariatric surgery: integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Renata Tavares Franco; Lacerda, Rúbia Aparecida; Leite, Rita Burgos; Graziano, Kazuko Uchikawa; Padilha, Katia Grillo

    2012-10-01

    Integrative review of scientific literature study to identify and analyze the production of knowledge about clinical advances in security needs of patients during the intraoperative period of bariatric surgery. It was based on 12 selected studies in electronic databases, with descriptors previously defined. Except for two studies, the specific content of this production was composed of the general context of perioperative care. The studies highlight the possible state of the art of nursing activities on these needs, which are well established, including recommendations by several guidelines. However, they are fundamentally based on the science of traditional clinical practice through the development of rational judgments issued by experts. It concludes for the relevance of primary studies to evaluate the impact and resolution of the identified resources to answer those needs, as well as improving or generating other innovative features and identification of new needs.

  3. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery estimation of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in the United States in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Wayne J; DeMaria, Eric J; Brethauer, Stacy A; Mattar, Samer G; Rosenthal, Raul J; Morton, John M

    2017-12-16

    Bariatric surgery, despite being the most successful long-lasting treatment for morbid obesity, remains underused as only approximately 1% of all patients who qualify for surgery actually undergo surgery. To determine if patients in need are receiving appropriate therapy, the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery created a Numbers Taskforce to specify annual rate of use for obesity treatment interventions. The objective of this study was to determine metabolic and bariatric procedure trends since 2011 and to provide the best estimate of the number of procedures performed in the United States in 2016. United States. We reviewed data from the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program, National Surgical Quality Improvement Program, Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database, and Nationwide Inpatient Sample. In addition, data from industry and outpatient centers were used to estimate outpatient center activity. Data from 2016 were compared with the previous 5 years of data. Compared with 2015, the total number of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in 2016 increased from approximately 196,000 to 216,000. The sleeve gastrectomy trend is increasing, and it continues to be the most common procedure. The gastric bypass and gastric band trends continued to decrease as seen in previous years. The percentage of revision procedures and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch procedures increased slightly. Finally, intragastric balloons placement emerged as a significant contributor to the cumulative total number of procedures performed. There is increasing use of metabolic and bariatric procedures performed in the United States from 2011 to 2016, with a nearly 10% increase noted from 2015 to 2016. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Critical role for GLP-1 in symptomatic post-bariatric hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craig, Colleen M; Liu, Li-Fen; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Post-bariatric hypoglycaemia (PBH) is a rare, but severe, metabolic disorder arising months to years after bariatric surgery. It is characterised by symptomatic postprandial hypoglycaemia, with inappropriately elevated insulin concentrations. The relative contribution...

  5. Diabetes and Nutritional Screening in Post-Bariatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Maria E; Newaz, Trisha B

    2017-01-01

    With the rise of obesity there has been a concomitant increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). As a result, the term "diabesity" has become a popular disease entity in the past several years. When lifestyle modification and pharmacotherapy fail to achieve successful weight loss and diabetes control, bariatric surgery is a recommended treatment option. Bariatric surgery has been shown to promote sustained T2DM remission in 30-63% of patients and improve other components of metabolic syndrome; thus a preferred term has been "metabolic surgery". As the practice of bariatric surgery for the treatment of T2DM increases, so will the number of patients with T2DM not achieving remission or with T2DM recurrence. There are currently no clear evidence-based guidelines delineating the proper management of T2DM in post-bariatric surgery patients. The focus of this review is to discuss current data on the efficacy of bariatric surgery in promoting T2DM remission, factors that predict T2DM remission and recurrence, and current treatment options for persistent hyperglycemia in post-bariatric surgery patients. To increase long-term T2DM remission and prevent or delay recurrence, post-bariatric surgery patients need close follow up to encourage adherence to healthy nutrition and lifestyle practices that will lead to sustained weight loss. In addition to this, patients need adequate nutritional supplementation and periodic screening for vitamin, mineral and protein deficiencies. Therefore, we will conclude with a brief review of current recommendations for nutritional deficiency screening and supplementation. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Bariatric Surgery and Endoluminal Procedures: IFSO Worldwide Survey 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrisani, L; Santonicola, A; Iovino, P; Vitiello, A; Zundel, N; Buchwald, H; Scopinaro, N

    2017-09-01

    Several bariatric surgery worldwide surveys have been previously published to illustrate the evolution of bariatric surgery in the last decades. The aim of this survey is to report an updated overview of all bariatric procedures performed in 2014.For the first time, a special section on endoluminal techniques was added. The 2014 International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders (IFSO) survey form evaluating the number and the type of surgical and endoluminal bariatric procedures was emailed to all IFSO societies. Trend analyses from 2011 to 2014 were also performed. There were 56/60 (93.3%) responders. The total number of bariatric/metabolic procedures performed in 2014 consisted of 579,517 (97.6%) surgical operations and 14,725 (2.4%) endoluminal procedures. The most commonly performed procedure in the world was sleeve gastrectomy (SG) that reached 45.9%, followed by Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) (39.6%), and adjustable gastric banding (AGB) (7.4%). The annual percentage changes from 2013 revealed the increase of SG and decrease of RYGB in all the IFSO regions (USA/Canada, Europe, and Asia/Pacific) with the exception of Latin/South America, where SG decreased and RYGB represented the most frequent procedure. There was a further increase in the total number of bariatric/metabolic procedures in 2014 and SG is currently the most frequent surgical procedure in the world. This is the first survey that describes the endoluminal procedures, but the accuracy of provided data should be hopefully improved in the next future. We encourage the creation of further national registries and their continuous updates taking into account all new bariatric procedures including the endoscopic procedures that will obtain increasing importance in the near future.

  7. The Socio-economic Impact of Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Arendse Tange; Højgaard, Betina; Ibsen, Rikke; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2017-07-22

    A recurring argument for bariatric surgery is cost savings due to sustained weight loss and reductions in comorbidities. However, studies prompting this argument tend to focus only on health care costs, and in some of them, cost changes after surgery have been modelled. The aim of this study was to generate real-world evidence on the socio-economic impact of bariatric surgery, by evaluating the effect on both direct and indirect costs. Using real-world data from national registries, predictions of health care costs, social transfer payments and income were performed for a surgically treated individual and compared to those for a similar but non-surgically treated individual 3 years before and after surgery. Secondly, the relative risks for health care costs, social transfer payments and income of a surgical group compared with a non-surgical group were estimated. The non-surgical group was defined as being eligible for bariatric surgery but not undergoing it. Bariatric surgery was associated with higher, but insignificantly so, health care costs, primarily due to an increase in somatic inpatient services. A significant decrease in costs of drugs was seen, especially for anti-diabetic medication. Bariatric surgery had a slight positive effect on social transfer payments and no significant effect on income. There are no cost savings of bariatric surgery in the short run. Further real-world evidence over a longer period of time is needed to examine whether the higher health care costs will eventually be counterbalanced, making bariatric surgery a profitable intervention in a socio-economic perspective.

  8. Reoperative bariatric surgery for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jingliang; Cohen, Ricardo; Aminian, Ali

    2017-08-01

    Primary bariatric surgery has been proven to be effective in weight loss and improvement of weight-related metabolic co-morbidities. However, a small proportion of patients after bariatric surgery either have persistent hyperglycemia or relapse after initial remission of their metabolic disease. Revisional bariatric surgery has been evaluated extensively for weight recidivism and postoperative complications. However, there has not been any high-level evidence validating the utility of revisional bariatric surgery on recurrent metabolic diseases, especially diabetes. In this review of 30 studies, we aimed to summarize the evidence and determine whether revisional surgery can have a positive impact on metabolic diseases that were not reversed by initial bariatric intervention. Overall, 14-38% of patients had residual diabetes at the time of revisional surgery. Depending on the index surgery and subsequent reconstruction, revisions induced 20-80% additional excess weight loss, or further decrease of body mass index by 10-30%. Improvement of diabetes was seen in 65-100% of patients. Specifically, conversion to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) yielded improvement of diabetes in 79%, 72%, and 62% of patients who previously had vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG), adjustable gastric banding (AGB), or sleeve gastrectomy (SG), respectively. Converting AGB to SG improved diabetes in 65% of patients, and SG to duodenal switch improved diabetes in 79% of patients. Revision of the gastric pouch or stoma in RYGB yielded improvement of diabetes in 79% of patients. Further clinical and mechanistic research is needed to better delineate the role of revisional bariatric surgery in patients with residual metabolic disease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Path to bariatric nurse certification: the practice analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Nanette K; Carr, Jamie J; Erickson, Janelle; Gourash, William F; Muenzen, Patricia; Smolenak, Laura; Tea, Christine G; Thomas, Karen

    2010-01-01

    In 2005, the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) nursing membership embarked on a journey to develop a specialty certification program for nurses caring for morbidly obese and bariatric surgical patients. In keeping with the certification industry best practices, a practice analysis study was conducted to create an empirically sound foundation for the new nursing specialty certification examination. Task force meetings, subject-matter expert interviews, and an external review process were implemented to create a definition of the specialty in terms of 4 domains of practice, 45 nursing tasks, and 54 knowledge areas. The definition encompassed the work of bariatric nurse coordinators, bariatric program directors, and floor nurses caring for morbidly obese and bariatric surgical patients. A survey was administered to 1084 nurses practicing in the specialty to validate the domains, tasks, and knowledge. Some differences in the time spent in each of the domains and tasks were noted for the survey respondents in the different job roles. Nevertheless, the respondents for all job roles rated the domains and tasks moderately or highly important in optimizing the outcomes for morbidly obese and bariatric surgery patients. In addition, most respondents agreed that the 54 knowledge areas were acquired during the first 2 years of practice in the specialty. The survey results validated a specialized body of nursing knowledge rooted in the tasks that define professional practice. The results are being used to guide the development of a certification program for nurses practicing in the specialty and to provide guidance for education and training initiatives. Copyright 2010 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mandatory Risk Assessment Reduces Venous Thromboembolism in Bariatric Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimeri, Abdelrahman A; Bautista, Jejomar; Ibrahim, Maha; Philip, Ruby; Al Shaban, Talat; Maasher, Ahmed; Altinoz, Ajda

    2018-02-01

    Bariatric surgery patients are at high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE), and chemoprophylaxis is recommended. Sheikh Khalifa Medical City (SKMC) is an American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) member since 2009. We report the rates of VTE in bariatric surgery patients from 2010 to 2016 compared to ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery programs before and after switching from heparin to low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), initiating mandatory risk assessment using Caprini scoring for VTE and adopting an aggressive strategy for high-risk patients regarding dosage of LMWH and chemoprophylaxis after discharge. During the study period, there were 1152 cases (laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) 625 and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) 527) at Bariatric & Metabolic Institute (BMI) Abu Dhabi compared to 65,693 cases (LRYGB 32,130 and LSG 33,563) at ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery programs. VTE rates remained stable at ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery programs from 2010 to 2016 (0.45, 0.45, 0.45, 0.25, 0.35, 0.3, and 0.3%). In contrast, VTE rates at BMI Abu Dhabi decreased from 2.2% in 2011 to 0.35% after we adopted an aggressive strategy to VTE without an increase in bleeding complications. LRYGB patients with VTE had higher OR time, leak, collection, and mortality at ACS NSQIP hospitals compared to those at BMI Abu Dhabi. In contrast, rates were similar in LSG patients with VTE. Changing our approach to VTE management led our VTE rates to decrease and become like those of ACS NSQIP bariatric surgery patients in LSG and LRYGB.

  11. [Asymptomatic kidney stones: active surveillance vs. treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neisius, A; Thomas, C; Roos, F C; Hampel, C; Fritsche, H-M; Bach, T; Thüroff, J W; Knoll, T

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of kidney stones is increasing worldwide. Asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones are increasingly detected as an incidental finding on radiologic imaging, which has been performed more frequently over the last decades. Beside the current interventional treatment modalities such as extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL), ureterorenoscopy (URS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL), active surveillance of asymptomatic kidney stones has been a focus of discussion lately, not only for attending physicians, but even more so for patients. The current German and European guidelines recommend active surveillance for patients with asymptomatic kidney stones if no interventional therapy is mandatory because of pain or medical factors. Herein we review the current literature on risks and benefits of active surveillance of asymptomatic non-obstructing kidney stones. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Asymptomatic Plasmodium spp. infection in Tierralta, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucunubá, Zulma Milena; Guerra, Angela Patricia; Rahirant, Sonia Judith; Rivera, Jorge Alonso; Cortés, Liliana Jazmín; Nicholls, Rubén Santiago

    2008-11-01

    With the aim of determining the prevalence of asymptomatic Plasmodium spp. infection by thick smear and PCR and its association with demographic and epidemiological characteristics in the village of Nuevo Tay, Tierralta, Córdoba, Colombia, a cross-sectional population study was carried out, using random probabilistic sampling. Venous blood samples were taken from 212 people on day 0 for thick smear and PCR. Clinical follow-up and thick smears were carried out on days 14 and 28. The prevalence of Plasmodium spp. infection was 17.9% (38/212; 95% CI: 12.5-23.3%) and the prevalence of asymptomatic Plasmodiumspp. infection was 14.6% (31/212; 95% CI: 9.6-19.6%). Plasmodium vivax was found more frequently (20/31; 64.5%) than Plasmodium falciparum (9/31; 29%) and mixed infections (2/31; 6.5%). A significantly higher prevalence of asymptomatic infection was found in men (19.30%) than in women (9.18%) (prevalence ratio: 2.10; 95% CI: 1.01-4.34%; p = 0.02). People who developed symptoms had a significantly higher parasitemia on day 0 than those who remained asymptomatic, of 1,881.5 +/- 3,759 versus 79 +/- 106.9 (p = 0.008). PCR detected 50% more infections than the thick smears. The presence of asymptomatic Plasmodium spp. infection highlights the importance of carrying out active searches amongst asymptomatic populations residing in endemic areas.

  13. Criteria for Inclusion of Newer Bariatric and Metabolic Procedures into the Mainstream: a Survey of 396 Bariatric Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahawar, Kamal K; Borg, Cynthia-Michelle; Agarwal, Sanjay; Riebeiro, Rui; De Luca, Maurizio; Small, Peter K

    2017-04-01

    There is currently no consensus on the criteria for inclusion of new bariatric procedures into routine clinical practice. This study canvasses bariatric surgeons in an attempt to define these criteria. Bariatric Surgeons from around the world were invited to participate in a questionnaire-based survey on SurveyMonkey ®. 396 bariatric surgeons, 337 International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders (IFSO) members, took the survey. Five clinical studies conducted under the strict monitoring of an Institutional Review Board would satisfy most surgeons (67.7 %, n = 266). When asked regarding the number of patients in these studies, a cumulative number of 500 patients would satisfy 64.5 % (n = 255) of the surgeons. Most respondents regarded endorsement by their national society and IFSO as 'very important' or 'extremely important'. An overwhelming 74.4 % (n = 294) felt that every new procedure should undergo a randomized comparison against one of the established alternatives like Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass or Sleeve Gastrectomy. Evaluation of a new bariatric procedure in at least 5 adequately supervised clinical studies (four of which must be randomized comparisons with one of the existing alternatives) reporting at least 5 years results on a minimum of 500 patients would satisfy majority of bariatric surgeons for the inclusion of a new bariatric procedure into clinical practice. The findings of this survey are simply aimed at starting a discussion on this topic and cannot be used to influence the ground reality until an international consensus can be reached amongst experts.

  14. Glucose regulation and cognitive function after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galioto, Rachel; Alosco, Michael L; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Strain, Gladys; Devlin, Michael; Cohen, Ronald; Crosby, Ross D; Mitchell, James E; Gunstad, John

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with cognitive impairment, and bariatric surgery has been shown to improve cognitive functioning. Rapid improvements in glycemic control are common after bariatric surgery and likely contribute to these cognitive gains. We examined whether improvements in glucose regulation are associated with better cognitive function following bariatric surgery. A total of 85 adult bariatric surgery patients underwent computerized cognitive testing and fasting blood draw for glucose, insulin, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) at baseline and 12 months postoperatively. Significant improvements in both cognitive function and glycemic control were observed among patients. After controlling for baseline factors, 12-month homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance HOMA-IR predicted 12-month digits backward (β = -.253, p working memory, psychomotor speed, and cognitive flexibility improved. Decreases in HbA1c were not associated with postoperative cognitive improvements. After controlling for baseline cognitive test performance, changes in body mass index (BMI) were also not associated with 12-month cognitive function. Small effects of improved glycemic control on improved aspects of attention and executive function were observed following bariatric surgery among severely obese individuals. Future research is needed to identify the underlying mechanisms for the neurocognitive benefits of these procedures.

  15. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and bariatric surgery: a comprehensive review

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    Everton Cazzo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has been increasingly diagnosed worldwide and is now recognized as a source of public health concern. It comprises a wide spectrum of histological features that range from simple steatosis to severe forms of fibrosis, steatohepatitis and even cirrhosis. The impact of bariatric surgery on the course of NAFLD in individuals with obesity has been extensively studied. DESIGN AND SETTING: Narrative review; public university hospital. METHODS: A comprehensive review was conducted based on an online search on the electronic databases MEDLINE and LILACS using the MeSH terms “fatty liver” and “bariatric surgery”. RESULTS: The exact mechanisms that lead to improvement in NAFLD following bariatric surgery are not completely understood. Since Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB is the bariatric surgical procedure most performed worldwide, it is also the one from which the effects on NAFLD have been most studied, although there is also consistent evidence regarding the effects from gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy and biliopancreatic diversions. CONCLUSION: According to the currently available evidence, bariatric surgery leads to significant improvement in NAFLD. Further research, especially by means of randomized controlled trials enrolling larger cohorts of individuals, is needed to determine the optimal procedure for this group of subjects.

  16. The use of contraception for patients after bariatric surgery.

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    Ostrowska, Lucyna; Lech, Medard; Stefańska, Ewa; Jastrzębska-Mierzyńska, Marta; Smarkusz, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Obesity in women of reproductive age is a serious concern regarding reproductive health. In many cases of infertility in obese women, reduction of body weight may lead to spontaneous pregnancy, without the need for more specific methods of treatment. Bariatric surgery is safe and is the most effective method for body weight reduction in obese and very obese patients. In practice there are two bariatric techniques; gastric banding, which leads to weight loss through intake restriction, and gastric bypass, leads to weight loss through food malabsorption. Gastric bypass surgery (the more frequently performed procedure), in most cases, leads to changes in eating habits and may result in vomiting, diarrhea and rapid body mass reduction. There are reliable data describing the continuous increase in the number of women who are trying to conceive, or are already pregnant, following bariatric surgery. Most medical specialists advise women to avoid pregnancy within 12-18 months after bariatric surgery. This allows for time to recover sufficiency from the decreased absorption of nutrients caused by the bariatric surgery. During this period there is a need for the use of reliable contraception. As there is a risk for malabsorption of hormones taken orally, the combined and progestogen-only pills are contraindicated, and displaced by non-oral hormonal contraception or non-hormonal methods, including intrauterine devices and condoms.

  17. Need for Intensive Nutrition Care After Bariatric Surgery.

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    Bétry, Cécile; Disse, Emmanuel; Chambrier, Cécile; Barnoud, Didier; Gelas, Patrick; Baubet, Sandrine; Laville, Martine; Pelascini, Elise; Robert, Maud

    2017-02-01

    Severe nutrition complications after bariatric surgery remain poorly described. The aim of this case series was to identify specific factors associated with nutrition complications after bariatric surgery and to characterize their nutrition disorders. We retrospectively reviewed all people referred to the clinical nutrition intensive care unit of our university hospital after bariatric surgery from January 2013 to June 2015. Twelve persons who required artificial nutrition supplies (ie, enteral nutrition or parenteral nutrition) were identified. Seven persons underwent a "one-anastomosis gastric bypass" (OAGB) or "mini gastric bypass," 2 underwent a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 2 had a sleeve gastrectomy, and 1 had an adjustable gastric band. This case series suggests that OAGB could overexpose subjects to severe nutrition complications requiring intensive nutrition care and therefore cannot be considered a "mini" bariatric surgery. Even if OAGB is often considered a simplified surgical technique, it obviously requires as the other standard bariatric procedures a close follow-up by experimented teams aware of its specific complications.

  18. DOES BARIATRIC SURGERY AFFECT SEXUALITY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

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    Dilek Aygin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity affects sexual health negatively due to several reasons such as impaired body image, psychological disorders and hormonal changes. Bariatric surgery is frequently used in the treatment of obesity. Besides positive effects such as an increase in physical activity due to weight loss and hormonal changes after surgery, there are some adverse effects of bariatric surgery such as sagging and wrinkling of skin due to rapid weight loss. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of bariatric surgery on sexual function. The literature between 2004 and 2015 was reviewed by searching Scopus, Science Direct, PubMed, Ebsco, Coochrane, Medline Complete, Ovid, Springer Link, Google Scholar, Taylor & Francis, PsychInfo databases, national thesis center and Ulakbim databases; ten studies appropriate to the criteria were included in the study. A total of 524 patients (152 males underwent bariatric surgery were included in study. Sexual function has been found to improve in all the studies. Also weight loss has been shown to have positive effects on reproductive hormones in both sexes. Bariatric surgery has positive effects on weight-loss and consequently on sexual function and reproductive hormones. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(3.000: 284-296

  19. Constructing a competency-based bariatric surgery fellowship training curriculum.

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    McBride, Corrigan L; Rosenthal, Raul J; Brethauer, Stacy; DeMaria, Eric; Kelly, John J; Morton, John M; Lo Menzo, Emanuele; Moore, Rachel; Pomp, Alfons; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2017-03-01

    Bariatric fellowship training after general surgery has historically been time based and competence was determined at completion based on a minimum number of cases during the fellowship. Graduate medical education is moving toward competency-based medical education where learners are evaluated during the course of their training and competence assessment occurs throughout. The Executive Council of the American Society of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) at the direction of the American Board of Surgery wanted to transition the bariatric surgery fellowship curriculum from its traditional format to a competency-based curriculum using competency-based medical education principles. The ASMBS Education and Training Committee established a task force of 9 members to create a new curriculum and all of the necessary evaluation tools to support the curriculum, and initiate a pilot program. A competency-based curriculum consisting of 6 modules with cognitive and technical milestones, and the innovative evaluation tools needed to evaluate the learners, was created. A pilot program consisting of 10 programs and 19 fellows has been undertaken for the 2016-2017 academic year. The Education Committee of the ASMBS is leading the charge in curriculum development for competency-based medical education for bariatric fellowship. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A psychiatric perspective view of bariatric surgery patients

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    Isabel Brandão

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bariatric surgery is the only procedure that has significant results in weight loss and improvements in medical comorbidities in morbid obese patients. Severely obese patients are also associated with a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders and poor quality of life. Objective To evaluate specific areas of psychopathology in individuals undergoing bariatric surgery. Methods A review of the literature was conducted from January 2002 to March 2014 by researching PubMed database using the following query: “morbid AND obesity AND bariatric AND surgery AND (psychiatry OR psychology”. Results Overall improvements in eating behaviors, mood disorders and body image are reported after bariatric surgery, and the mechanism is not enlightened. Risk of suicide and consumption of substances of abuse, especially alcohol, after gastric bypass surgery are problems that clinicians must be aware. Discussion Bariatric patients should be monitored after surgery to identify who did not show the expected benefits postoperatively and the ones who develop psychiatric symptoms after an initial positive response.

  1. Food quality in the late postoperative period of bariatric surgery: an evaluation using the bariatric food pyramid.

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    Soares, Fernando Lucas; Bissoni de Sousa, Larissa; Corradi-Perini, Carla; Ramos da Cruz, Magda Rosa; Nunes, Mario Gilberto Jesus; Branco-Filho, Alcides José

    2014-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective intervention in the treatment of obesity, but lifestyle and diet should be monitored after this procedure to ensure success. The Bariatric Food Pyramid was created basing on long-term nutritional care that proposes a standard of healthy living and eating habits considering gastric capacity and specific nutritional needs. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate the life habits and diet quality of patients who have undergone bariatric surgery (who have been recovering for at least 6 months) based on the specific food pyramid. Retrospective data analysis was performed using medical records of patients who had been followed for at least 6 months after bariatric surgery. The following data were collected from patient records: age, gender, education level (years), BMI (preoperative and postoperative), percentage of excess weight loss (EWL) relative to the time of surgery, frequency of physical activity, use of nutritional supplements, usual dietary intake history, and fluid intake. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. We evaluated 172 patient records. In this study, there was a low prevalence of physical activity, use of vitamin-mineral supplements, and water intake. There also was low consumption of protein, fruit, vegetables, and vegetable oils. In addition, intake of carbohydrates, sugars, and fats were higher than the recommendations established by the pyramid. The results indicate that patients who have undergone bariatric surgery have an inadequate diet according to food evaluation with the specific pyramid. In the long term, this may lead to weight gain and vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

  2. Regression of Left Ventricular Mass After Bariatric Surgery.

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    Le Jemtel, Thierry H; Samson, Rohan; Jaiswal, Abhishek; Lewine, Eliza B; Oparil, Suzanne

    2017-09-01

    Notwithstanding the presence of hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, or both, obesity is associated with increased left ventricular (LV) mass. The effects of bariatric surgery on LV mass have been sparsely investigated by M-mode and two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography. Overall, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, adjustable gastric banding, and sleeve gastrectomy reduce LV mass. However, the reduction in LV mass is extremely variable. Besides duration and severity of obesity, presence of hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea or both, and type of surgical procedures, the inaccuracy of M-mode and 2D echocardiography for assessment of LV mass contributes to the variable effects of bariatric surgery on LV mass. Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography may obviate the limitations of M-mode 2D echocardiography for assessment of LV mass and allow an accurate appraisal of the effects of bariatric surgery on LV mass.

  3. Nutrition Care for Patients with Weight Regain after Bariatric Surgery

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    Carlene Johnson Stoklossa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving optimal weight outcomes for patients with obesity is important to the management of their chronic disease. All interventions present risks for weight regain. Bariatric surgery is the most efficacious treatment, producing greater weight losses that are sustained over more time compared to lifestyle interventions. However, approximately 20–30% of patients do not achieve successful weight outcomes, and patients may experience a regain of 20–25% of their lost weight. This paper reviews several factors that influence weight regain after bariatric surgery, including type of surgery, food tolerance, energy requirements, drivers to eat, errors in estimating intake, adherence, food and beverage choices, and patient knowledge. A comprehensive multidisciplinary approach can provide the best care for patients with weight regain. Nutrition care by a registered dietitian is recommended for all bariatric surgery patients. Nutrition diagnoses and interventions are discussed. Regular monitoring of weight status and early intervention may help prevent significant weight regain.

  4. Preparing for and managing a pregnancy after bariatric surgery.

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    Kominiarek, Michelle A

    2011-12-01

    The number of bariatric surgeries performed in the United States has increased exponentially. Given that most patients are female and of reproductive age, it is important for clinicians who manage women's health issues to be aware of the surgery, its long-term goals, and the potential effect on future pregnancies. Most pregnancies after bariatric surgery have successful outcomes with decreased occurrences of gestational diabetes and hypertension and lower birth weight compared with control patients. Following nutritional guidelines and supplementation in the event of deficiencies are critical in the provision of prenatal care to this unique population. Other important issues include a multidisciplinary team management, a different approach to screening for gestational diabetes, careful evaluation of any gastrointestinal complaints, and appropriate counseling for gravidas who still remain obese during pregnancy. Further research should investigate the long-term maternal outcomes in pregnancies after bariatric surgery as well as the effect on the offspring. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery: why they happen?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordalo, Lívia A; Mourão, Denise Machado; Bressan, Josefina

    2011-12-01

    Nutritional deficiencies following bariatric surgery are commonly reported in scientific literature on surgery and nutrition. It has been estimated that approximately 400,000 large obeses underwent bariatric surgery in 2010. The surgery technique and consequent altered gastrointestinal function done will particularly imply in variations on those deficiencies and health complications. A systematic review of several database was done from 1978 until 2010, using as keywords protein and micronutrients deficiencies, related to bariatric surgery. The better understand of these studies can provide an important improvement on this obese therapy, assuring a successful and health weight loss maintenance for long term. Therefore, this review provides a significant contribution about this topic, pointing several ways on the nutritional intervention and management of those patients.

  6. Nutritional deficiencies in obesity and after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthakos, Stavra A

    2009-10-01

    The presence of nutritional deficiencies in overweight and obesity may seem paradoxical in light of excess caloric intake, but several micronutrient deficiencies appear to be higher in prevalence in overweight and obese adults and children. Causes are multifactorial and include decreased consumption of fruits and vegetables, increased intake of high-calorie, but nutritionally poor-quality foods, and increased adiposity, which may influence the storage and availability of some nutrients. As the obesity epidemic continues unabated and the popularity of bariatric surgery rises for severely obese adults and adolescents, medical practitioners must be aware of pre-existing nutritional deficiencies in overweight and obese patients and appropriately recognize and treat common and rare nutritional deficiencies that may arise or worsen following bariatric surgery. This article reviews current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese and overweight individuals and those that commonly present after bariatric surgery and summarizes current recommendations for screening and supplementation.

  7. Inpatient Glycemic Protocol for Patients with Diabetes Undergoing Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machnica, Karolina; Pannain, Silvana; Schulwolf, Elizabeth; Bartfield, Jessica; Emanuele, Mary Ann

    2015-11-01

    Bariatric surgery is a recommended treatment for diabetes in severely obese patients. Their immediate post-operative anti-hyperglycemic requirements differ from other hospitalized diabetics, yet no standardized protocols addressing glycemic control for this group exist. We aimed to create a safe, easily implemented protocol for immediate post-operative glycemic control, which we defined as the first 30 days. The protocol was designed by an interdisciplinary workgroup using review of available literature, approved institutional glycemic guidelines, and team members' experience with caring for bariatric surgery patients. Patients are offered post-discharge recommendations using the inpatient glycemic protocol. We designed a protocol with low risk of hypoglycemia that addresses the unique glycemic needs of diabetic bariatric population in the immediate post-operative period.

  8. NHS litigation in bariatric surgery over a ten year period.

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    Ratnasingham, Kumaran; Knight, James; Liu, Mamie; Karatsai, Eleni; Humadi, Samer; Irukulla, Shashi

    2017-04-01

    Negligence claims in the UK NHS has increased over the last 30 years. The aim of this present study was determine the number of claims and the cost of litigation in Bariatric Surgery and compare it to similar other specialties. Data was received from NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA) in response to Freedom of Information data request. There was a total of 7 claims, of which 4 were successful. The total pay out sum was £210,000 in 10 years. This is a very low amount compared to other surgical specialties. This low level of litigation probably indicates that the current bariatric surgical services in the NHS are delivering safe care with good patient satisfaction. This needs to be carefully considered prior to changing the payment tariffs for bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-09-16

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early ( 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications.

  10. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: FULL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2 part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents the contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on published data through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2 part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the full report of part 1. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  11. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2-part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on data published through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2-part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on cardiovascular disease; and finally (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the executive summary of part 1. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of Bariatric Surgery on Remission of Type 2 Diabetes

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    Paweł Nalepa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The plague of obesity afflicts an increasing group of people. Moreover type 2 diabetes, which is the most serious illness accompanying excessive weight, is becoming more and more common. Traditional methods of obesity treatment, such as diet and physical exercise, fail. This applies especially to people with class III obesity. The only successful way of treating obesity in their case is bariatric surgery. There are three types of bariatric surgery: restrictive procedures (reducing stomach volume, malabsorptive procedures, and mixed procedures, which combine both methods. In spite of the risk connected with the surgery and complications after it, bariatric procedures are advised to patients with class III obesity and class II with an accompanying illness which increases the probability of death. It has been proved that bariatric surgery not only eliminates obesity but also very frequently (in 90�0of cases leads to the remission of type 2 diabetes. Moreover, the remission occurs very fast – it takes place a long time before the patients reduce their weight, even within a few days after surgery. Detailed studies have shown that the remission of diabetes is caused mostly by the change of the gastro-intestinal hormones’ profile, resulting from the surgery. These hormones include GLP-1, GIP, peptide YY, ghrelin and oxyntomodulin. Additionally, the change of the amount of adipose tissue after the surgery influences the level of adipokines, i.e. the hormones of the adipose tissue, among which the most important are leptin, adiponectin and resistin. Thus, bariatric surgery not only changes the shape of the gastrointestinal tract but it also modulates the hormonal activity. Bariatric surgery is considered as therapy not only for the obese but also for diabetic patients.

  13. Adolescent bariatric surgery: a systematic review of recommendation documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childerhose, Janet E; Alsamawi, Amal; Mehta, Tanvi; Smith, Judith E; Woolford, Susan; Tarini, Beth A

    2017-10-01

    Bariatric surgery has been performed on adolescents since the 1970s, but little is known about the guidance offered to providers in recommendation documents published in the United States. A systematic review was conducted to generate a complete record of all US recommendation documents and describe variability across the documents. This study had 3 aims: to identify the developers, examine selection criteria, and document reasons why developers have recommended this intervention for adolescents. Four databases (MEDLINE, National Guidelines Clearinghouse, Trip, and Embase) ertr searched, followed by a hand search. Documents were eligible for inclusion if they satisfied 5 criteria: written in the English language; developed and published by a US organization; comprised a clinical practice guideline, position statement, or consensus statement; offered a minimum 1-sentence recommendation on bariatric surgery for the treatment of obesity or related co-morbidities; and offered a minimum 1-sentence recommendation on bariatric surgery for children, adolescents, or both. No date limits were applied. Sixteen recommendation documents published between 1991 and 2013 met our inclusion criteria: 10 clinical practice guidelines, 4 position statements, and 2 consensus statements. Nine were produced by medical organizations, 3 by surgical organizations, and 4 by public health/governmental bodies. One document recommended against bariatric surgery for minors, and 15 endorsed the intervention for this population. Body mass index (a measure of obesity calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters) thresholds were the selection criteria most often provided. Minimum age varied widely. Of the 15 endorsing documents, 10 provided a reason for performing bariatric surgery on minors, most often to treat obesity-related co-morbidities that threaten the health of the adolescent. We make 3 suggestions to improve the quality of future recommendation documents

  14. Correlation between the Beck Depression Inventory and bariatric surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayloo, Subhashini; Thompson, Kara; Choudhury, Nabajit; Sheriffdeen, Raiyah

    2015-01-01

    The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) is a psychosocial screen for depression in obese patients seeking bariatric surgery. Gastric bypass improves postsurgical BDI scores due to weight loss, which predicts future weight loss. The effect of different bariatric procedures with differences in weight loss on BDI scores is unknown. To evaluate the relationship between different bariatric procedures and changes in the BDI scores, adjusting for the initial BDI score, and to consider the impact of psychosocial variables. The secondary objective was to assess the relationship between changes in BDI scores and weight loss at 6 to 12 months. University Hospital, United States. Bariatric surgical patients were prospectively enrolled and retrospectively reviewed. We assessed changes in BDI after adjusting for the presurgical BDI and analyzed the relationship between patient demographic characteristics/psychological disorders and changes in BDI. We enrolled 137 patients who underwent a gastric band procedure, sleeve gastrectomy, or gastric bypass. We found a significant decrease in BMI and BDI scores across the full sample. Unlike BDI, change in BMI varied with procedure. Normalizing for baseline BDI, change in BDI did not significantly correlate with change in BMI. Patients who were employed and those without psychiatric history experienced even greater improvement in BDI scores. No statistically significant correlation was found between the change in BDI and weight loss at 6-12 months. BDI scores were independent of the type of bariatric procedure and the amount of weight loss. Advantageous psychosocial parameters were associated with greater improvement in BDI scores. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Bariatric Surgery for Morbid Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsumali, Adnan; Eguale, Tewodros; Bairdain, Sigrid; Samnaliev, Mihail

    2018-01-15

    In the USA, three types of bariatric surgeries are widely performed, including laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB), and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). However, few economic evaluations of bariatric surgery are published. There is also scarcity of studies focusing on the LSG alone. Therefore, this study is evaluating the cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery using LRYGB, LAGB, and LSG as treatment for morbid obesity. A microsimulation model was developed over a lifetime horizon to simulate weight change, health consequences, and costs of bariatric surgery for morbid obesity. US health care prospective was used. A model was propagated based on a report from the first report of the American College of Surgeons. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) in terms of cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained were used in the model. Model parameters were estimated from publicly available databases and published literature. LRYGB was cost-effective with higher QALYs (17.07) and cost ($138,632) than LSG (16.56 QALYs; $138,925), LAGB (16.10 QALYs; $135,923), and no surgery (15.17 QALYs; $128,284). Sensitivity analysis showed initial cost of surgery and weight regain assumption were very sensitive to the variation in overall model parameters. Across patient groups, LRYGB remained the optimal bariatric technique, except that with morbid obesity 1 (BMI 35-39.9 kg/m2) patients, LSG was the optimal choice. LRYGB is the optimal bariatric technique, being the most cost-effective compared to LSG, LAGB, and no surgery options for most subgroups. However, LSG was the most cost-effective choice when initial BMI ranged between 35 and 39.9 kg/m2.

  16. NSAID Use after Bariatric Surgery: a Randomized Controlled Intervention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yska, Jan Peter; Gertsen, Sanneke; Flapper, Gerbrich; Emous, Marloes; Wilffert, Bob; van Roon, Eric N

    2016-12-01

    Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be avoided in bariatric surgery patients. If use of an NSAID is inevitable, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) should also be used. To determine the effect of an, compared to care-as-usual, additional intervention to reduce NSAID use in patients who underwent bariatric surgery, and to determine the use of PPIs in patients who use NSAIDs after bariatric surgery. A randomized controlled intervention study in patients after bariatric surgery. Patients were randomized to an intervention or a control group. The intervention consisted of sending a letter to patients and their general practitioners on the risks of use of NSAIDs after bariatric surgery and the importance of avoiding NSAID use. The control group received care-as-usual. Dispensing data of NSAIDs and PPIs were collected from patients' pharmacies: from a period of 6 months before and from 3 until 9 months after the intervention. Two hundred forty-eight patients were included (intervention group: 124; control group: 124). The number of users of NSAIDs decreased from 22 to 18 % in the intervention group and increased from 20 to 21 % in the control group (NS). The use of a PPI with an NSAID rose from 52 to 55 % in the intervention group, and from 52 to 69 % in the control group (NS). Informing patients and their general practitioners by letter, in addition to care-as-usual, is not an effective intervention to reduce the use of NSAIDs after bariatric surgery (trial number NTR3665).

  17. Vitamin D alteration associated with obesity and bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lespessailles, Eric; Toumi, Hechmi

    2017-05-01

    Obesity and severe obesity constitute growing serious health problems reaching epidemic proportion in most countries. Interactions and relationships between obesity and bone tissue and its metabolism are complex but are more and more studied and recognized. Obesity is associated with an altered hormonal profile including particularly bone-regulating hormones like vitamin D. Bariatric surgery procedures, thanks to their effectiveness to achieve therapeutic endpoints for comorbidities associated with obesity, have had an increasing success. However, these surgeries by producing mechanical restriction and or malabsorption syndrome lead to nutritional deficiencies including vitamin D. In this review, we aim to (1) discuss the nutritional deficiency of vitamin D in the obese, (2) to summarize the different surgical options in bariatric surgery and to present the evidence concerning these procedures and their associated profile in vitamin D post-operative insufficiency, (3) to present the different recommendations in clinical practice to prevent or treat vitamin D deficiencies or insufficiencies in patients treated by bariatric surgery and finally to introduce emerging assumptions on the relationship between vitamin D, microbiota composition and circulating bile acids. Impact statement Obesity and severe obesity constitute growing serious health problems reaching epidemic proportion in most countries with a prevalence increasing from 6.4 in 1975 to 14.9% in 2014. This present review summarizes currently available data on vitamin D deficiencies in the obese population before and after bariatric surgery. The important evidence emerging from our evaluation confirms that obese patients are at risk of multiple nutritional deficiencies, especially vitamin D deficiency, before bariatric surgery. Our survey confirms that the precise role of the gut microbiome and its associated changes on the vitamin D metabolism after the different bariatric surgery procedures has not yet been

  18. Bariatric surgery in elderly patients: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Giordano,1 Mikael Victorzon2,3 1Department of Plastic and General Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Turku, 2Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vaasa Central Hospital, Vaasa, 3University of Turku, Turku, Finland Abstract: Controversy exists regarding the effectiveness and safety of bariatric/metabolic surgery in elderly patients. We performed a systematic review on this issue in patients aged 60 years or older. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched until August 2015 for studies on outcomes of bariatric surgery in elderly patients. The results were expressed as pooled proportions (% with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity across the studies was evaluated by the I2 test, and a random-effects model was used. Twenty-six articles encompassing 8,149 patients were pertinent with this issue and included data on bariatric surgery outcomes in elderly population. Fourteen patients died during the 30-day postoperative period, with a pooled mortality of 0.01%. Pooled overall complication rate was 14.7%. At 1-year follow-up, pooled mean excess weight loss was 53.77%, pooled diabetes resolution was 54.5%, and pooled hypertension resolution was 42.5%, while pooled lipid disorder resolution was 41.2%. Outcomes and complication rates of bariatric surgery in patients older than 60 years are comparable to those in a younger population, independent of the type of procedure performed. Patients should not be denied bariatric surgery because of their age alone. Keywords: morbid obesity, bariatric surgery, elderly, gastric bypass, weight loss, laparoscopy

  19. Health Care Institutions Volume Is Significantly Associated with Postoperative Outcomes in Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunaud, Laurent; Polazzi, Stephanie; Lifante, Jean-Christophe; Pascal, Lea; Nocca, David; Duclos, Antoine

    2017-10-16

    The volume of bariatric surgery has significantly increased over the past decade with concomitant postoperative outcomes improvement. The goal of this nationwide study was to estimate the volume-outcome relationship in bariatric surgery at the hospital level. A cross-sectional analysis of all patients who underwent bariatric surgery procedure in France from January 2011 to December 2014 was designed. Volume-outcome relationship was analyzed using generalized estimating equations. We identified 184,332 inpatient stays for bariatric surgical procedures performed in 606 hospitals. Health care institutions performing more than 200 bariatric cases per year were significantly associated with shorter average length of stay (p bariatric surgery that reoperation rate after gastric bypass or sleeve significantly increased at 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Health care institutions performing more than 200 bariatric cases per year were significantly associated with improved postoperative outcomes and less frequent need for reoperation.

  20. [Multidisciplinary management of dumping syndromes after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vetta, Véronique; Heller, Aline; Pralong, François; Favre, Lucie

    2017-03-22

    Dumping syndromes are a frequent complication of gastric or bariatric surgery and include early and late dumping. Early dumping is a consequence of rapid delivery of hyperosmolar nutrients into the bowel. Late dumping is the result of a reactive hypoglycemia induced by a hyperinsulinemic response. These syndromes are becoming increasingly prevalent with the rising incidence of bariatric surgery. Effective management of these complications requires multidisciplinary collaboration. First line management of early and late dumping syndrome involves specific dietary and behavioral modifications which generally improve the quality of life of patients.

  1. Psychological predictors of weight loss after bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wimmelmann, Cathrine Lawaetz; Dela, Flemming; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Background: Morbid obesity is the fastest growing BMI group in the U.S. and the prevalence of morbid obesity worldwide has never been higher. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe forms of obesity especially with regardto a sustained long-term weight loss. Psychological...... of surgical weight loss.Methods: We searched PubMed, PsycInfo and Web of Science, for original prospectivestudies with a sample size >30 and at least one year follow-up, using a combina-tion of search terms such as ‘bariatric surgery’, ‘morbid obesity’, ‘psychologicalpredictors’, and ‘weight loss’. Only...

  2. Gastric Cancer After Restrictive Bariatric Surgery: A Clinical Pitfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scozzari, Gitana; Balmativola, Davide; Trapani, Renza; Toppino, Mauro; Morino, Mario

    2014-08-01

    Although vertical banded gastroplasty is rarely performed at present, most bariatric surgery departments continue to follow up patients who underwent this procedure in the past few decades. In view of this, it is advisable for bariatric and general surgeons to know how to diagnose the very rare event of the development of a gastric cancer after this restrictive procedure. In this report, 2 cases of gastric cancer occurring years after vertical banded gastroplasty are presented, and clinical presentation and diagnostic difficulties are discussed. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence and Associations in a Bariatric Surgery Cohort from the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Faith; Smith, Mark D.; Berk, Paul D.; Courcoulas, Anita P.; Inabnet, William B.; King, Wendy C.; Pender, John; Pomp, Alfons; Raum, William J.; Schrope, Beth; Steffen, Kristine J.; Wolfe, Bruce M.; Patterson, Emma J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Metabolic syndrome is associated with higher risk for cardiovascular disease, sleep apnea, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, all common conditions in patients referred for bariatric surgery, and it may predict early postoperative complications. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, defined using updated National Cholesterol Education Program criteria, in adults undergoing bariatric surgery and compare the prevalence of baseline co-morbid conditions and select operative and 30-day postoperative outcomes by metabolic syndrome status. Methods: Complete metabolic syndrome data were available for 2275 of 2458 participants enrolled in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-2 (LABS-2), an observational cohort study designed to evaluate long-term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in obese adults. Results: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 79.9%. Compared to those without metabolic syndrome, those with metabolic syndrome were significantly more likely to be men, to have a higher prevalence of diabetes and prior cardiac events, to have enlarged livers and higher median levels of liver enzymes, a history of sleep apnea, and a longer length of stay after surgery following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and gastric sleeves but not open RYGB or laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. Metabolic syndrome status was not significantly related to duration of surgery or rates of composite end points of intraoperative events and 30-day major adverse surgical outcomes. Conclusions: Nearly four in five participants undergoing bariatric surgery presented with metabolic syndrome. Establishing a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in bariatric surgery patients may identify a high-risk patient profile, but does not in itself confer a higher risk for short-term adverse postsurgery outcomes. PMID:24380645

  4. Effects of bariatric surgery on urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbuller, Nurullah; Habibi, Mani; Yuksel, Mustafa; Ozener, Onur; Oruc, Mehmet Tahir; Oner, Osman Zekai; Kazak, Mehmet Altug

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is an important modifiable etiological factor associated with several diseases. There is strong evidence that urinary incontinence (UI) is positively correlated with body mass index (BMI). One of the many benefits experienced by obese patients after bariatric surgery is decrease in UI. To investigate this correlation, we aimed to examine the effects of weight loss on UI in female patients who had undergone laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Obese female patients (n=120), ≥18 years of age, and planning to undergo LSG were included in this prospective study. We administered the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence-Short Form (ICIQ-UI-SF) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) to the patients prior to surgery and 6 months after the surgery. Using the collected data, we determined the incidence of UI and examined the relationship between the preoperative and postoperative BMI and UI values. The mean age of the patients was 39.19 (standard deviation [SD] =9.94) years and the mean preoperative BMI was 46.17 (SD =5.35). Of the 120 patients, 72 (60%) complained of UI preoperatively. Among these 72 patients, 23 (31.95%) described urge incontinence, 18 (25%) stress incontinence, and 31 (43.05%) mixed-type incontinence. At 6 months postoperatively, the percentage of excess weight loss was 70.33% (SD =14.84%). For all three UI subtypes, the 6-month postoperative ICIQ-UI-SF and IIQ-7 scores decreased significantly compared to the preoperative scores (P<0.05). LSG results in a clinically significant improvement in most common types of UI, regardless of patient reproductive history, existence of comorbid conditions, and smoking status.

  5. INTESTINAL MALROTATION IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Eduardo Arevalo; Rendon, Francisco Abarca; Zambrano, Trino Andrade; García, Yudoco Andrade; Viteri, Mario Ferrin; Campos, Josemberg Marins; Ramos, Manoela Galvão; Ramos, Almino Cardoso

    Intestinal malrotation is a rare congenital anomaly. In adults is very difficult to recognize due to the lack of symptoms. Diagnosis is usually incidental during surgical procedures or at autopsy. To review the occurrence and recognition of uneventful intestinal malrotation discovered during regular cases of bariatric surgeries. Were retrospectively reviewed the medical registry of 20,000 cases undergoing bariatric surgery, from January 2002 to January 2016, looking for the occurrence of intestinal malrotation and consequences in the intraoperative technique and immediate evolution of the patients. Five cases (0,025%) of intestinal malrotation were found. All of them were males, aging 45, 49, 37,52 and 39 years; BMI 35, 42, 49, 47 and 52 kg/m2, all of them with a past medical history of morbid obesity. The patient with BMI 35 kg/m2 suffered from type 2 diabetes also. All procedures were completed by laparoscopic approach, with no conversions. In one patient was not possible to move the jejunum to the upper abdomen in order to establish the gastrojejunostomy and a sleeve gastrectomy was performed. In another patient was not possible to fully recognize the anatomy due to bowel adhesions and a single anastomosis gastric bypass was preferred. No leaks or bleeding were identified. There were no perioperative complications. All patients were discharged 72 h after the procedure and no immediate 30-day complications were reported. Patients with malrotation can successfully undergo laparoscopic bariatric surgery. May be necessary changes in the surgical original strategy regarding the malrotation. Surgeons must check full abdominal anatomical condition prior to start the division of the stomach. Má-rotação intestinal é rara anomalia congênita em adultos de difícil reconhecimento devido à falta de sintomas. O diagnóstico é feito geralmente incidentalmente durante procedimentos cirúrgicos ou durante autópsia. Verificar a ocorrência e reconhecimento não eventual

  6. Clinical Challenges in Upper Gastrointestinal Malignancies after Bariatric Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.W. Tse (Win Hou W); H.M. Kroon (Herman); J.J.B. van Lanschot (Jan)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground/Aims: The incidence of morbid obesity has exponentially increased over the last decades. Bariatric surgery (BS) has been proven effective in inducing weight loss and resolving comorbidities associated with morbid obesity. However, BS can also lead to major diagnostic and

  7. [Beginnings of bariatric and metabolic surgery in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltasar, Aniceto; Domínguez-Adame, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    When bariatric and metabolic surgery initially began in Spain, it was a subject of debate, due to not knowing exactly who were the first surgeons to perform it. A study has revealed the authors of the first interventions. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Bariatric surgery: risks and recommendations for the prevention of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bariatric surgery: risks and recommendations for the prevention of perioperative thromboembolism. A Murphy, M-T Van der Merwe. Abstract. No Abstract. Key words: obesity; DVT; prophylaxis; surgery. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  9. [Severe hypoglycaemia and dumping syndrome after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Joan Bach; Møller, Dorthe; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2014-04-22

    In parallel with the increasing incidence of obesity there has been an increase in the number of bariatric surgery procedures performed, and as a consequence we have seen an increasing prevalence of medical and nutritional complications in recent years. Some of the important complications are dumping syndrome and reactive hypoglycaemia, and these conditions are described in this case report.

  10. Is Bariatric Surgery a Prophylaxis for Pelvic Floor Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomian, Andrzej; Majkusiak, Wojciech; Lisik, Wojciech; Tomasik, Paweł; Horosz, Edyta; Zwierzchowska, Aneta; Kociszewski, Jacek; Barcz, Ewa

    2017-12-18

    Obesity is one of the well-documented risk factors of pelvic floor disorders (PFDs). The PFDs include urinary and fecal incontinence (UI, FI) and pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Surgery-induced weight loss improves different kinds of incontinence as well as POP symptoms. However, there is a lack of evidence how bariatric surgery influences pelvic floor anatomy and function in women without previous PFDs and whether it may be concerned as PFD prophylaxis tool. The present analysis is a prospective, non-randomized case-control study from January 2014 to September 2017. Participants underwent pelvic floor ultrasound examination with bladder neck position estimation at rest, during levator ani tension, and at Valsalva maneuver before surgery and 12-18 months after. Pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POPQ) > 2 stage and PFD complaints were the exclusion criteria. Fifty-nine patients underwent bariatric surgery (57 sleeve gastrectomy and 2 gastric bypass). Mean BMI decreased from 43.8 ± 5.9 to 29 ± 4.6 kg/m 2 after surgery (p elevation at tension after weight loss. Bariatric surgery is associated with a betterment of bladder neck position at rest, tension, and Valsalva maneuver in women without PFDs. We postulate that bariatric surgery may be a tool for PFD prevention. It does not improve levator ani function and does not limit bladder neck mobility, which implicates that it has no influence on preexisting pelvic dysfunction.

  11. Patient travel for bariatric surgery: does distance matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehaffey, J Hunter; Michaels, Alex D; Mullen, Mathew G; Meneveau, Max O; Pender, John R; Hallowell, Peter T

    2017-12-01

    Increasingly, patients are faced with greater travel distances to undergo bariatric surgery at high-volume centers. This study sought to evaluate the impact of travel distance on access to care and outcomes after bariatric surgery. Patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass at an academic bariatric surgery center from 1985 to 2004 were examined and stratified by patient travel distance. Univariate analyses were performed for preoperative risk factors, 30-day complications, and long-term (10-yr) weight loss between "local," defined as1 hour of travel time. Survival analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. A total of 650 patients underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, of whom 316 (48.6%) traveled1 hour. Median body mass index was equivalent between the groups (local, 52.9 kg/m2; regional, 53.2 kg/m2; P = .76). Patients who traveled longer distances had higher rates of preoperative co-morbidities, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and sleep apnea (all P1 hour. Despite longer travel time for care, 30-day complications and long-term weight loss were equivalent with that of local patients. As expected, patients who lived in close proximity were more likely to adhere to yearly follow-up in surgery clinic. Travel time was an independent predictor of risk-adjusted reduced long-term survival. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bariatric surgery for obesity and metabolic conditions in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arterburn, David E; Courcoulas, Anita P

    2014-08-27

    This review summarizes recent evidence related to the safety, efficacy, and metabolic outcomes of bariatric surgery to guide clinical decision making. Several short term randomized controlled trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of bariatric procedures for inducing weight loss and initial remission of type 2 diabetes. Observational studies have linked bariatric procedures with long term improvements in body weight, type 2 diabetes, survival, cardiovascular events, incident cancer, and quality of life. Perioperative mortality for the average patient is low but varies greatly across subgroups. The incidence of major complications after surgery also varies widely, and emerging data show that some procedures are associated with a greater risk of substance misuse disorders, suicide, and nutritional deficiencies. More research is needed to enable long term outcomes to be compared across various procedures and subpopulations, and to identify those most likely to benefit from surgical intervention. Given uncertainties about the balance between the risks and benefits of bariatric surgery in the long term, the decision to undergo surgery should be based on a high quality shared decision making process. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd 2014.

  13. Pregnancy Following Bariatric Surgery-Medical Complications and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ram Prakash; Syed, Akheel A

    2016-10-01

    Bariatric surgery is most commonly carried out in women of childbearing age. Whilst fertility rates are improved, pregnancy following bariatric surgery poses several challenges. Whilst rates of many adverse maternal and foetal outcomes in obese women are reduced after bariatric surgery, pregnancy is best avoided for 12-24 months to reduce the potential risk of intrauterine growth retardation. Dumping syndromes are common after bariatric surgery and can present diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in pregnancy. Early dumping occurs due to osmotic fluid shifts resulting from rapid gastrointestinal food transit, whilst late dumping is characterized by a hyperinsulinemic response to rapid absorption of simple carbohydrates. Dietary measures are the mainstay of management of dumping syndromes but pharmacotherapy may sometimes become necessary. Acarbose is the least hazardous pharmacological option for the management of postprandial hypoglycemia in pregnancy. Nutrient deficiencies may vary depending on the type of surgery; it is important to optimize the nutritional status of women prior to and during pregnancy. Dietary management should include adequate protein and calorie intake and supplementation of vitamins and micronutrients. A high clinical index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis of surgical complications of prior weight loss procedures during pregnancy, including small bowel obstruction, internal hernias, gastric band erosion or migration and cholelithiasis.

  14. Bariatric surgery - effects on obesity and related co-morbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svane, Maria Saur; Madsbad, Sten

    2014-05-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) are the three most commonly performed bariatric procedures. Obesity responds well to bariatric surgery, with major long-lasting weight loss that is most pronounced after RYGB and SG, where the mean weight loss is about 40 kg or 15 body mass index (BMI) units. Some of the benefits after RYGB and SG are independent of weight loss, and the remission of type 2 diabetes is observed a few days after the operation; this depends on changes in insulin sensitivity and gut hormone responses, especially a 10-fold increase in glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), which improves insulin secretion. After gastric banding, the remission of diabetes depends more on weight loss. Bariatric surgery reduces cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, lipid disturbances, non-alcoholic fatty liver, musculoskeletal pain and reduces mortality of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Bariatric surgery also improves quality of life. The acute complications of surgery are infection, bleeding and anastomotic leak. Long-term complications are nutritional deficiencies, including vitamins and minerals, and anemia. Some patients have dumping after meals, and a few patients will develop postprandial hypoglycemia after RYGB. About 25% of patients require plastic surgery to provide relief from excessive skin tissue.

  15. Bariatric surgery, addictive-like eating behaviour and obesity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    behaviour.6 Although pharmacological and nutritional weight loss programs have assisted people with obesity to lose weight, typically 30-35% of weight lost is regained during the first year after treatment.7 This observation has led to the rise in popularity of bariatric surgery as an effective and relatively safe procedure.

  16. NSAID Use after Bariatric Surgery : a Randomized Controlled Intervention Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yska, Jan Peter; Gertsen, Sanneke; Flapper, Gerbrich; Emous, Marloes; Wilffert, Bob; van Roon, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be avoided in bariatric surgery patients. If use of an NSAID is inevitable, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) should also be used. Aim To determine the effect of an, compared to care-as-usual, additional intervention to reduce NSAID

  17. Energetic adaptations persist after bariatric surgery in severely obese adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energetic adaptations induced by bariatric surgery have not been studied in adolescents or for extended periods postsurgery. Energetic, metabolic, and neuroendocrine responses to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery were investigated in extremely obese adolescents. At baseline and at 1.5, 6, and...

  18. Current knowledge and perception of bariatric surgery among Greek doctors living in Thessaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharoulis, Dimitris; Bakalis, Vissarion; Zachari, Eleni; Sioka, Eleni; Tsimpida, Dialecthi; Magouliotis, Dimitrios; Tasiopoulou, Vasiliki; Chatedaki, Christina; Tzovaras, George

    2017-11-03

    The purpose of this study was to assess doctors' knowledge, current conceptions, and clinical practice regarding obesity and bariatric surgery. A self-administered survey was administered to 500 doctors with varying medical specialties in public and private practice. The response rate was 60%. Most participants (77.3%) were in private practice. Although almost half of the participants could define morbid obesity and obesity-related comorbidities, only 8.7% felt educated about bariatric surgery. Participants had little knowledge of various types of bariatric procedures. A minority of doctors (24.7%) knew of the existence of a bariatric center in their area. Only 21.3% of doctors had referred a patient to a bariatric center. Reasons for non-referral included lack of interest in bariatric surgery (37.3%), patient refusal (35.3%), increased operative fees (17.3%), lack of confidence in bariatric surgery (6.3%), and lack of access to a nearby bariatric center (3.7%). The majority of doctors were interested in learning more about bariatric surgery and related guidelines, but they remained reluctant to conduct patients' postoperative follow-ups. The penetration of bariatric surgery in the medical community remains limited, despite its proven effectiveness in facilitating sustained weight loss and resolving several obesity-related comorbidities. A great effort should be made to inform health-care providers about the evolution of bariatric procedures, the potential benefits they offer, and the existence of certified bariatric centers. This will allow doctors to provide optimum health care to patients who could benefit from bariatric surgery. © 2017 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Perception and Awareness of Bariatric Surgery in Canada: a National Survey of General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirpara, Dhruvin H; Cleghorn, Michelle C; Kwong, Josephine; Saleh, Fady; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Quereshy, Fayez A; Okrainec, Allan; Jackson, Timothy D

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess Canadian general surgeons' knowledge of bariatric surgery and perceived availability of resources to manage bariatric surgery patients. A self-administered questionnaire was developed using a focus group of general surgeons. The questionnaire was distributed at two large general surgery conferences in September and November 2012. The survey was also disseminated via membership association electronic newsletters in November and December 2012. One hundred sixty-seven questionnaires were completed (104 practicing surgeons, 63 general surgery trainees). Twenty respondents were bariatric surgeons. Among 84 non-bariatric surgeons, 68.3 % referred a patient in the last year for bariatric surgery, 79 % agreed that bariatric surgery resulted in sustained weight loss, and 81.7 % would consider referring a family member. Knowledge gaps were identified in estimates of mortality and morbidity associated with bariatric procedures. The majority of surgeons surveyed have encountered patients with complications from bariatric surgery in the last year. Over 50 % of surgeons who do not perform bariatric procedures reported not feeling confident to manage complications, 35.4 % reported having adequate resources and equipment to manage morbidly obese patients, and few are able to transfer patients to a bariatric center. Of the respondents, 73.3 % reported residency training provided inadequate exposure to bariatric surgery, and 85.3 % felt that additional continuing medical education resources would be useful. There appears to be support for bariatric surgery among Canadian general surgeons participating in this survey. Knowledge gaps identified indicate the need for more education and resources to support general surgeons managing bariatric surgical patients.

  20. Carcinoid Tumor in Accidental, Asymptomatic Meckel's Diverticulum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although Meckel's diverticulum is the most common congenital gastrointestinal disorder, it is controversial whether asymptomatic diverticula in adults should be respected. The authors report the case of a patient who was operated due to ileus caused by adhesions and a Meckel's diverticulum without any sign of ...

  1. Asymptomatic carotid arterial stenosis - population based screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in the general population is discussed in many countries because of the benefits of carotid endarterectomy in the three trials. Many factors influence the cost-effectiveness of screening. These factors are the prevalence of carotid stenosis, the

  2. Microbial aetiology and sensitivity of asymptomatic bacteriuria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Twenty nine (13.3%) of the samples had significant bacterial growth and E.coli was the commonest isolate (51.2%). There was a high level (20- 62%) of anti-bacterial resistance to the commonly used antibiotics. Conclusion: Asymptomatic bacteriuria is common among ante-natal mothers in Mulago. E. Coli that is ...

  3. Prevalence of Asymptomatic Genital Infection among Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the isolates except Streptococcus faecalis were resistant to ampicillin. These results show a high rate of asymptomatic genital tract infections among pregnant women in Benin City, which have implications for adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. (Afr J Reprod Health 2002; 6[3]: 93-97) Résumé Prévalence de ...

  4. Detecting asymptomatic coronary artery disease using routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-01

    Sep 1, 1990 ... ECG-monitored exercise testing has been proposed as a relatively inexpensive and effective means of screening for asymptomatic coronary artery disease in patients presenting for peripheral vascular surgery. Despite the fact that exercise thallium scintigraphy is also dependent on the patient's ability.

  5. Detecting asymptomatic coronary artery disease using routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ECG-monitored exercise testing has been proposed as a relatively inexpensive and effective means of screening for asymptomatic coronary artery disease in patients presenting for peripheral vascular surgery. Despite the fact that exercise thallium scintigraphy is also dependent on the patient's ability to exercise, using this ...

  6. Pulmonary Performance In Asymptomatic Young Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pulmonary Performance In Asymptomatic Young Nigerian Population Following The Administration Of Ascorbic Acid And Salbutamol. ... Ascorbic acid was given orally at a dose of 1.50 mg /kg body weight; and salbutamol at a dose of 70 μg/kg body weight, orally. Measurements ... http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/njps.v19i1.32635.

  7. pulmonary performance in asymptomatic young nigerian population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioline

    1. PULMONARY PERFORMANCE IN ASYMPTOMATIC YOUNG NIGERIAN. POPULATION FOLLOWING THE ADMINISTRATION OF ASCORBIC. ACID AND SALBUTAMOL. S. O. ODEH1, I. E. AGABA2, A. M. SABO 1, and R. A. ODANAOGUN 1. 1 Department of Human Physiology, 2 Department of Medicine and Radiology,.

  8. Prevalence of malaria parasitaemia amongst asymptomatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Statistical analysis was done using IBM-SPSS Windows version 20. Results: The mean age of study participants was 26.7 ± 5.1 years and the age range was 17- 42 years. The prevalence of asymptomatic malaria parasitaemia was 49.6%. Nulliparity and anaemia (PCV <30%) were associated with increased prevalence of ...

  9. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in pregnant women attending antenatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The susceptibility rate of bacterial isolate was highest for levofloxacin (83.6%), followed by nalidixic acid (64.2%) and nitrofurantoin (62.7%). The pathogens were least susceptible to co-trimoxazole (8.3%), ampilcillin (8.8%) and amoxicillin (10.4%) Conclusion: The prevalence of asymptomatic bacteria among the pregnant ...

  10. Tetanus toxoid antibody level in asymptomatic Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to investigate if the presence of asymptomatic malaria parasiteamia in pregnant women will compromise their ability to respond to full dose of tetanus toxoid immunization during their antenatal clinic visits. Hence, 90 apparently healthy pregnant women who had completed the tetanus toxoid ...

  11. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria among Pregnant Women Attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The apparent decline in immunity of pregnant women appears to promote the growth of both com-mensal and non-commensal microorganisms. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnant women visiting the University hospital, Ku-masi. This prospective ...

  12. Asymptomatic body packers should be treated conservatively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glovinski, Peter V; Lauritsen, Morten L; Bay-Nielsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Body packing takes advantage of the human storage capacity within the alimentary tract. Body packing is used for the smuggling of drugs such as heroin, cocaine, amphetamine, hashish and ecstasy. Most body packers are asymptomatic. However, packets may rupture or obstruct the alimentary tract...

  13. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in HIV Positive Nigerian Children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in HIV positive children and to identify the causative organisms. We studied 155 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected children aged 10 months to 17 years attending the Paediatric HIV clinics of the University of Benin Teaching ...

  14. Prevalence and Parasite Density of Asymptomatic Malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malaria in pregnancy has contributed significantly to maternal morbidity and mortality in our environment. Aim: This study was aimed at determining the prevalence, and parasite density of asymptomatic malaria parasitemia among unbooked paturients at Federal Teaching Hospital Abakaliki. Subjects and ...

  15. asymptomatic bacteriuria in hiv positive nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    children with sickle cell anemia in steady state, overall prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in children aged 2 ... continued depletion of CD4 cells. This immune deficient state predisposes to a wide variety of infections, ... DNA PCR in the children younger than. 18months and by serology for children older than 18 months.

  16. Prevalence and Parasite Density of Asymptomatic Malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effective use of insecticide treated nets and intermittent prophylaxis therapy for malaria during pregnancy. KEY WORDS: Asymptomatic malaria parasitemia, Nigeria, prevalence, unbooked paturients. INTRODUCTION. Malaria is a parasitic disease of humans especially in the sub‑Saharan Africa, where about 90% of deaths ...

  17. Cost-effectiveness of Bariatric Surgery in Adolescents With Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Matthew J; Chhatwal, Jagpreet; Nudel, Jacob D; Corey, Kathleen E; Kaplan, Lee M; Hur, Chin

    2017-02-01

    Severe obesity affects 4% to 6% of US youth and is increasing in prevalence. Bariatric surgery for the treatment of adolescents with severe obesity is becoming more common, but data on cost-effectiveness are limited. To assess the cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery for adolescents with obesity using recently published results from the Teen-Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery study. A state-transition model was constructed to compare 2 strategies: no surgery and bariatric surgery. In the no surgery strategy, patients remained at their initial body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) over time. In the bariatric surgery strategy, patients were subjected to risks of perioperative mortality and complications as well as initial morbidity but also experienced longer-term quality-of-life improvements associated with weight loss. Cohort demographic information-of the 228 patients included, the mean (SD) age was 17 (1.6) years, the mean (range) body mass index was 53 (34-88), and 171 (75.0%) were female-surgery-related outcomes, and base case time horizon (3 years) were based on data from the Teen-Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery study. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), total costs (in US dollars adjusted to 2015-year values using the Consumer Price Index), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). A willingness-to-pay threshold of $100 000 per QALY was used to assess cost-effectiveness. After 3 years, surgery led to a gain of 0.199 QALYs compared with no surgery at an incremental cost of $30 747, yielding an unfavorable ICER of $154 684 per QALY. When the clinical study results were extrapolated to 4 years, the ICER decreased to $114 078 per QALY and became cost-effective by 5 years with an ICER of $91 032 per QALY. Outcomes were robust in most 1-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Bariatric surgery incurs

  18. Physical activity is unrelated to cognitive performance in pre-bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenberg, Svenja; Schulze, Mareike; Bartsch, Merle; Gruner-Labitzke, Kerstin; Pek, Christian; Köhler, Hinrich; Crosby, Ross D; Marschollek, Michael; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between physical activity (PA) and cognitive performance in extreme obesity. Seventy-one bariatric surgery candidates (77.5% women) with a mean body mass index (BMI) of 46.9 kg/m2 (SD=6.0) and a mean age of 41.4 (SD=11.9) years completed SenseWear Pro2 activity monitoring for seven days. Cognitive functioning was assessed by a computerized test battery including tasks of executive function (Iowa Gambling Task), visuospatial short-term memory (Corsi Block Tapping Test) and verbal short-term memory (Auditory-Verbal Learning Test). Questionnaires assessing eating disturbances and depressive symptoms were administered. Somatic comorbidities were assessed by medical chart review. The level of PA was low with mean steps per day within wear time being 7140 (SD=3422). Most patients were categorized as sedentary (31.0%) or low active (26.8%). No significant association between PA estimates and cognitive performance was found. Lower PA was modestly correlated with higher BMI but not with age, somatic comorbidity or depressive symptoms. Moderated regression analyses suggested a significant interaction effect between depression and PA in predicting performance on the Corsi Block Tapping Test. Patients with (29.6%) and without (70.4%) regular binge eating did not differ with respect to PA or cognitive function. The findings indicate no association between daily PA and cognitive performance in morbidly obese patients. Future studies should explore the relationship between the variables with regard to dose-response-questions, a broader BMI range and with respect to potential changes after substantial weight loss due to bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A comparative analysis of Type 2 diabetes and binge eating disorder in a bariatric sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jennifer B; Applegate, Katherine L; Grant, John P

    2011-08-01

    An emerging literature has illuminated an important link between Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and binge eating disorder (BED) within obese cohorts. However, prior work has not examined this relationship specifically in a weight loss surgery (WLS) sample or fully explored potential psychosocial factors associated with this co-occurrence. Therefore, the present investigation sought to identify socio-demographic (i.e. age, education, BMI, ethnicity, gender, age of obesity onset) and psychological (i.e. depressive symptoms, hedonic hunger/food locus of control beliefs, severity of binge eating-related cognitions) correlates of the co-occurrence of Type 2 DM and BED among bariatric surgery candidates. An archival sample of 488 patients seeking surgical treatment for clinical obesity completed a standard battery of pre-operative psychosocial measures. The presence of BED was evaluated using a semi-structured clinical interview based on the DSM-IV TR (APA, 2000) and was further corroborated by responses on the Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns-Revised (QEWP-R; Spitzer, Yanovski, & Marcus, 1993). Results indicated that 8.2% of the sample was classified as having both Type 2 DM and BED concurrently. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that in addition to other psychological (e.g., binge eating-related cognitions, hedonic hunger) and demographic variables (i.e. male gender), African American ethnicity (OR=3.3: 1.41-7.73) was a particularly robust indicator of comorbid status. Findings support and extend previous health disparity research urging greater attention to the needs of traditionally underserved, at-risk populations seeking treatment for obesity complicated by dysregulated eating and metabolism. Additionally, these preliminary results underscore the relevance of considering the potential benefits of providing quality comprehensive pre- and post-operative psychological care among bariatric patients towards optimizing both short- and long

  20. Bariatric Surgery in Moderately Obese Patients: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cerci

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Moderate obesity (BMI 30–35 kg/m2 affects 25% of the western population. The role of bariatric surgery in this context is currently debated, reserved for patients with comorbidity, as an alternative to conservative medical treatment. We describe our experience in moderately obese patients treated with bariatric surgery. Materials and Methods. Between September 2011 and September 2012, 25 patients with grade I obesity and comorbidities underwent bariatric surgery: preoperative mean BMI 33.2 kg/m2, 10 males, mean age 42 years. In presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM (56%, gastric bypass was performed; in cases with hypertension (64% and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA (12%, sleeve gastrectomy was performed. All operations were performed laparoscopically. Results. Mean follow-up was 12.4 months. A postoperative complication occurred: bleeding from the trocar site was resolved with surgery in local anesthesia. Reduction in average BMI was 6 points, with a value of 27.2 kg/m2. Of the 14 patients with T2DM, 12 (86% discontinued medical therapy because of a normalization of glycemia. Of the 16 patients with arterial hypertension, 14 (87% showed remission and 2 (13% improvement. Complete remission was observed in patients with OSAS. Conclusions. The results of our study support the validity of bariatric surgery in patients with BMI 30–35 kg/m2. Our opinion is that, in the future, bariatric surgery could be successful in selected cases of moderately obese patients.

  1. Ethical considerations in bariatric surgery in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puia, Aida; Puia, Ion Cosmin; Cristea, Paul Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is the fastest growing health problem worldwide. Ethical issues linked to obesity are numerous and still under debate even in countries with a long history in obesity treatment. From 2007 to 2015 we performed several types of bariatric surgical approaches on 250 patients with an average body mass index (BMI) of 42. The age range was 12-64 years. No death was recorded. Direct or phone contact was possible with 90% of them during follow-up. Starting from a specific question based approach in ethics we present aspects regarding obesity surgery in Romania. Patients' safety, informed consent, cost cover, the role of bariatric surgery in children and bariatric surgeons' training are discussed. Co-morbidities improved or even disappeared in 90% of our patients. Informed consent is a major problem, due to the lack of public knowledge necessary. The private system in Romania offers bariatric surgery at lower prices than Western Europe but is still out of reach for a person with an average income. Lack of maturity and disharmonic family relations raise a series of challenges in assessing the best interest of children and adolescents. Ethics committees, which operate according to well-defined processes, are more and more active in universities and research centers in Romania, checking that methods and performance of scientific studies meet adequate standards. A detailed informed consent, thorough preoperative patient assessment and method selection are mandatory for good results in obesity surgery. Insufficient financial resources combined with the long time necessary to acquire the expertise for laparoscopic bariatric surgery may represent an additional pressure on both physicians and patients.

  2. Bariatric surgery patients: reasons to visit emergency department after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Sánchez, Juan A; Corujo-Vázquez, Omar; Sahai-Hernández, Mrisa

    2007-01-01

    Morbid obesity prevalence is reaching epidemic proportions in Western society. Long-term weight loss can be achieved by bariatric surgery. This surgery also has a positive impact in the reduction of obesity related co-morbid conditions. The purpose of this study is to determine the reasons that bariatric surgery patients had to visit the emergency department within a three month period after surgery. A retrospective chart review study was performed at the UPR Hospital in Carolina. Patients with the diagnosis of morbid obesity who had bariatric surgery were identified. Of the 283 patients who met the criteria, the following information was obtained: gender, age, height, weight, pre-operative BMI, obesity-related comorbid conditions, post operative length of stay (LOS), and reasons and length of stay of Emergency Department (ED) visits within a 3 month period after surgery. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Program. The same profile of gender and BMI was obtained between the population that had the surgery and the sample that visited the ED, the group of patients between 20-29 years old was more likely to visit the ED. No correlation was found between a longer post operative length of stay and an increased probability of visiting the ED. Of the population, 5% had to visit ED within a three month period. The most common post operative complications were: Abdominal Pain (46.2%), Emesis (38.5%), and Dehydration (30.8%). Other less frequent complications were nausea, DVT, pneumonia, dizziness, gastritis, infected wound and upper GI bleeding. The most common reasons that bariatric surgery patients had to visit the emergency department within a three month period after surgery were: abdominal pain, emesis, dehydration and nausea. These complications could most likely be attributed to patient poor compliance with diet, resulting in the classical symptoms of the dumping syndrome which is common in patients that have undergone

  3. Management of late postoperative complications of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, K; Somers, S; Chand, M

    2011-10-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide and the past decade has witnessed an exponential rise in the number of bariatric operations performed. As a consequence, an increasing number of patients are presenting to non-specialist units with complications following bariatric procedures. This article outlines the management of the most common late postoperative complications that are likely to present to the general surgeon. A search was conducted for late postoperative complications after bariatric surgery using PubMed, Embase, OVID and Google search engines, and combinations of the terms bariatric surgery, gastric bypass, gastric banding or sleeve gastrectomy, and late or delayed complications. Only studies with follow-up longer than 6 months were included. The most common long-term complications after gastric banding include band slippage and erosion. Deflation or removal of the band is often required. Internal hernia, adhesions and anastomotic stenosis are common causes of intestinal obstruction after gastric bypass surgery. Hepatobiliary complications pose a particular challenge because of the altered anatomy. Functional disorders such as reflux and dumping, and nutritional deficiencies are common and should be differentiated from conditions that require urgent investigations and timely surgical intervention. The immediate management of bariatric patients presenting with complications outside the immediate postoperative period requires adherence to basic surgical principles. Accurate diagnosis often relies on high-quality contrast and cross-sectional imaging, and effective surgical intervention necessitates a broad understanding of the altered anatomy, advanced surgical skills and liaison with specialists in the field when necessary. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Bariatric Surgery in China: How Is This New Concept Going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiao; Dai, Ru; Zhou, Hong-Xu; Su, Ming-Lian; Lu, Chen; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Cheng, Zhong

    2016-12-01

    Obesity has become an epidemic in developing countries including China. The use of bariatric surgery to treat obesity has grown in popularity worldwide, but it is still a new concept in China. This study aims to investigate the trends in bariatric surgery in China. An electronic search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure was conducted to select studies for this survey. A total of 7779 bariatric procedures were reported from 2001 to 2015, most of which (89.2 %) were performed in the most recent 5 years. Further, 70.9 % of all procedures were performed to treat obesity and related comorbidities, defined as metabolic surgery. The data showed 89.4 % of all operations were performed laparoscopically. The absolute number of bariatric surgeries increased 148.7 times in the last 5 years compared to the 2001-2005 period. The percentage of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses performed increased from 0 to 62.2 %, and the percentage of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomies from 0 to 12.7 %. The percentage of laparoscopic adjustable gastric bands increased dramatically from 0 to 73.3 % in the 2006-2010 period, but it dropped quickly to 12.9 % in the 2011-2015 period. Most operations (66.7 %) were conducted in the East area, which is the most developed economic region in China. There was limited surgical innovation or original research reported in China. Bariatric surgery is still at an early stage in China, but is now experiencing an explosive growth. A national registry system needs to be established to record and provide precise data.

  5. Treatment of Obesity: Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Bruce M; Kvach, Elizaveta; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-05-27

    This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying, and indications for, bariatric surgery in the reduction of cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as other expected benefits of this intervention. The fundamental basis for bariatric surgery for the purpose of accomplishing weight loss is the determination that severe obesity is a disease associated with multiple adverse effects on health, which can be reversed or improved by successful weight loss in patients who have been unable to sustain weight loss by nonsurgical means. An explanation of possible indications for weight loss surgery as well as specific bariatric surgical procedures is presented, along with review of the safety literature of such procedures. Procedures that are less invasive or those that involve less gastrointestinal rearrangement accomplish considerably less weight loss but have substantially lower perioperative and longer-term risk. The ultimate benefit of weight reduction relates to the reduction of the comorbidities, quality of life, and all-cause mortality. With weight loss being the underlying justification for bariatric surgery in ameliorating CVD risk, current evidence-based research is discussed concerning body fat distribution, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, inflammation, obstructive sleep apnea, and others. The rationale for bariatric surgery reducing CVD events is discussed and juxtaposed with impacts on all-cause mortalities. Given the improvement of established obesity-related CVD risk factors after weight loss, it is reasonable to expect a reduction of CVD events and related mortality after weight loss in populations with obesity. The quality of the current evidence is reviewed, and future research opportunities and summaries are stated. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Treatment of Obesity: Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Bruce M.; Kvach, Elizaveta; Eckel, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying, and indications for, bariatric surgery in the reduction of cardiovascular disease (CVD) as well as other expected benefits of this intervention. The fundamental basis for bariatric surgery for the purpose of accomplishing weight loss is the determination that severe obesity is a disease associated with multiple adverse effects on health which can be reversed or improved by successful weight loss in patients who have been unable to sustain weight loss by non-surgical means. An explanation of possible indications for weight loss surgery as well as specific bariatric surgical procedures is presented, along with review of the safety literature of such procedures. Procedures that are less invasive or those that involve less gastrointestinal rearrangement accomplish considerably less weight loss but have substantially lower perioperative and longer-term risk. The ultimate benefit of weight reduction relates to the reduction of the co-morbidities, quality of life and all-cause mortality. With weight loss being the underlying justification for bariatric surgery in ameliorating CVD risk, current evidence-based research is discussed concerning body fat distribution, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, inflammation, obstructive sleep apnea and others. The rationale for bariatric surgery reducing CVD events is discussed and juxtaposed with impacts on all-cause mortalities. Given the improvement of established obesity-related CVD risk factors following weight loss, it is reasonable to expect a reduction of CVD events and related mortality following weight loss in populations with obesity. The quality of the current evidence is reviewed and future research opportunities and summaries are stated. PMID:27230645

  7. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrazek, Abd Elrazek Mohammad Ali Abd; Elbanna, Abduh Elsayed Mohamed; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major and growing health care concern. Large epidemiologic studies that evaluated the relationship between obesity and mortality, observed that a higher body-mass index (BMI) is associated with increased rate of death from several causes, among them cardiovascular disease; which is particularly true for those with morbid obesity. Being overweight was also associated with decreased survival in several studies. Unfortunately, obese subjects are often exposed to public disapproval because of their fatness which significantly affects their psychosocial behavior. All obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) should receive counseling on diet, lifestyle, exercise and goals for weight management. Individuals with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 and those with BMI > 35 kg/m2 with obesity-related comorbidities; who failed diet, exercise, and drug therapy, should be considered for bariatric surgery. In current review article, we will shed light on important medical principles that each surgeon/gastroenterologist needs to know about bariatric surgical procedure, with special concern to the early post operative period. Additionally, we will explain the common complications that usually follow bariatric surgery and elucidate medical guidelines in their management. For the first 24 h after the bariatric surgery, the postoperative priorities include pain management, leakage, nausea and vomiting, intravenous fluid management, pulmonary hygiene, and ambulation. Patients maintain a low calorie liquid diet for the first few postoperative days that is gradually changed to soft solid food diet within two or three weeks following the bariatric surgery. Later, patients should be monitored for postoperative complications. Hypertension, diabetes, dumping syndrome, gastrointestinal and psychosomatic disorders are among the most important medical conditions discussed in this review. PMID:25429323

  8. Mental Health Support Provided Throughout the Bariatric Surgery Clinical Pathway in French Specialized Care Centers for Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamore, Kristopher; Kaci, Sandra S; Czernichow, Sébastien; Bretault, Marion; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Naudé, Anne-Jeanne; Gribe-Ouaknine, Sandra; Carette, Claire; Flahault, Cécile

    2017-03-01

    Pre-operative psychological assessment is recommended by international guidelines for bariatric surgery candidates. Thereby, service teams caring for bariatric patients should include at least one mental health provider (e.g., a psychologist or psychiatrist). The objective of this study was to evaluate the psychology and psychiatry resources and practices in the 37 specialized obesity centers (CSOs) created by the French Ministry of Health. CSO coordinators were contacted by e-mail to collect general information on the centers (e.g., number of bariatric operations). Secondly, psychologists and psychiatrists of each center completed an anonymous questionnaire assessing their professional practices and their organization of care pathways. The vast majority of CSO coordinators (81%, n = 26/32) answered our survey. These results show significant differences and shortages in terms of the psychology/psychiatry resources available. Most of the psychologists (n = 26/31) and psychiatrists (n = 10/10) stated that they systematically meet new patients only before surgery (56%) or both before and after the operation (30%); however, some psychologists and psychiatrists (14%) do not systematically meet all the patients (before and/or after surgery). Nevertheless, all the professionals provide psychology assessments, and about 75% of them offer a psychological follow-up, indicating a similarity regarding the practices of psychologists and psychiatrists. Our results highlight the place of psychological/psychiatric evaluations in French CSOs and emphasize the absence of mental health providers in several of these services. Post-operative psychological follow-up is not usually provided. It would be appropriate to create clear recommendations for post-operative psychological or psychiatric long-term follow-up.

  9. Routine Liver Biopsy During Bariatric Surgery: an Analysis of Evidence Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahawar, Kamal K; Parmar, Chetan; Graham, Yitka; Abouleid, Ayman; Carr, William R J; Jennings, Neil; Schroeder, Norbert; Small, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis are common in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis can progress to cirrhosis of the liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. Non-invasive methods of diagnosing non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis are not as accurate as liver biopsy, and bariatric surgery presents a unique opportunity to carry out a simultaneous liver biopsy. Routine liver biopsy can help early and accurate diagnosis of obesity-associated liver conditions. This has led some surgeons to argue for routine liver biopsy at the time of bariatric surgery. However, most bariatric surgeons remain unconvinced and liver biopsy is currently not routine practice with bariatric surgery. This review examines published scientific literature to ascertain the usefulness of routine liver biopsy at the time of bariatric surgery.

  10. Preventing Long-term Poor Outcomes in the Bariatric Patient Postoperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Melissa

    The obesity epidemic in America continues to rise. People are desperately trying to find ways to lose weight successfully and keep the weight off, and many people are turning to bariatric surgery as the only remaining option for morbid obesity. Bariatric surgery is considered to be a viable treatment option for morbid obesity. However, long-term data are revealing that many postsurgical bariatric patients are regaining the weight after 5 years. The purpose of lifelong follow-up appointments in the bariatric patient is to prevent weight regain and poor outcomes. A case study is used as an example for a poor outcome in a postsurgical bariatric patient. The author of this article provides definitions related to postsurgical bariatric patients, explains the value of early detection and prevention, provides an example of a poor outcome, and concludes with a discussion of evidence-based practice changes that prevent poor outcomes.

  11. Hearing Loss in Children With Asymptomatic Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzieri, Tatiana M; Chung, Winnie; Flores, Marily; Blum, Peggy; Caviness, A Chantal; Bialek, Stephanie R; Grosse, Scott D; Miller, Jerry A; Demmler-Harrison, Gail

    2017-03-01

    To assess the prevalence, characteristics, and risk of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in children with congenital cytomegalovirus infection identified through hospital-based newborn screening who were asymptomatic at birth compared with uninfected children. We included 92 case-patients and 51 controls assessed by using auditory brainstem response and behavioral audiometry. We used Kaplan-Meier survival analysis to estimate the prevalence of SNHL, defined as ≥25 dB hearing level at any frequency and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses to compare SNHL risk between groups. At age 18 years, SNHL prevalence was 25% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 17%-36%) among case-patients and 8% (95% CI: 3%-22%) in controls (hazard ratio [HR]: 4.0; 95% CI: 1.2-14.5; P = .02). Among children without SNHL by age 5 years, the risk of delayed-onset SNHL was not significantly greater for case-patients than for controls (HR: 1.6; 95% CI: 0.4-6.1; P = .5). Among case-patients, the risk of delayed-onset SNHL was significantly greater among those with unilateral congenital/early-onset hearing loss than those without (HR: 6.9; 95% CI: 2.5-19.1; P < .01). The prevalence of severe to profound bilateral SNHL among case-patients was 2% (95% CI: 1%-9%). Delayed-onset and progression of SNHL among children with asymptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection continued to occur throughout adolescence. However, the risk of developing SNHL after age 5 years among case-patients was not different than in uninfected children. Overall, 2% of case-patients developed SNHL that was severe enough for them to be candidates for cochlear implantation. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Improving Bariatric Patient Transport and Care with Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad D. Gable

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Obesity is prevalent in the United States. Obese patients have physiologic differences from non-obese individuals. Not only does transport and maintenance of these patients require use of specialized equipment, but it also requires a distinct skill set and knowledge base. To date, there is no literature investigating simulation as a model for educating pre-hospital providers in the care of bariatric patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if a 3-hour educational course with simulation could improve paramedics’ knowledge and confidence of bariatric procedures and transport. This study also examined if prior experience with bariatric transport affected training outcomes. Methods: Our study took place in August 2012 during paramedic training sessions. Paramedics completed a pre- and post-test that assessed confidence and knowledge and provided information on previous experience. They had a 30-minute didactic and participated in 2 20-minute hands-on skills portions that reviewed procedural issues in bariatric patients, including airway procedures, peripheral venous and intraosseous access, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Study participants took part in one of two simulated patient encounters. Paramedics were challenged with treating emergent traumatic and/or medical conditions, as well as extricating and transporting bariatric patients. Each group underwent a debriefing of the scenario immediately following their case. We measured confidence using a 5-point Likert-type response scale ranging from 1 (strongly disagree to 5 (strongly agree on a 7-item questionnaire. We assessed knowledge with 12 multiple choice questions. Paired-sample t-tests were used to compare pre- and post-simulation confidence and knowledge with a significance level of p≤0.05. We used analysis of covariance to examine the effect of previous experiences on pre-and post-educational activity confidence and knowledge with a significance level of p

  13. BODY IMAGE, ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION IN WOMEN SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida,Sebastião de Sousa

    2015-01-01

    The impact of overweight and bariatric surgery can lead to psychological complications, such as: anxiety and depression and Body Image disorders. This study evaluated symptoms of anxiety and depression and body image in women submitted to bariatric surgery. Fifty women responded to Beck anxiety inventory (BAI), Beck depression inventory (BDI) and the figure rating scale (FRS) before and four months after bariatric surgery. Anthropometric evaluation was performed to obtain the Body Mass Index ...

  14. Review of family-based approaches to improve postoperative outcomes among bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidot, Denise C; Prado, Guillermo; De La Cruz-Munoz, Nestor; Cuesta, Melissa; Spadola, Christine; Messiah, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery must be partnered with postoperative lifestyle modifications for enduring weight loss and related health effects to be fully appreciated. Little is known about how these lifestyle modifications may be affected by the involvement of other family members living in the household; therefore, this review describes current family-based approaches to improving postoperative outcomes in bariatric surgery patients and their families. A MEDLINE search of publications from 1999 to 2014 was conducted in January 2014. Retrieved titles and abstracts were assessed by 2 authors to determine relevance to the topic surrounding family-based approaches to improve postbariatric surgery outcomes. All study designs except case studies were considered if they included some aspect of family as a predictor in relation to improved health outcomes after surgery. Initial searches yielded 650 publications (bariatric surgery+family, n = 193; bariatric surgery+child, n = 338; bariatric surgery+spouse, n = 4; bariatric surgery+social support, n = 115). Two studies met criteria for a family-based approach to improving metabolic outcomes in bariatric patients. Seven studies discussed the impact of bariatric surgery on families. All other studies were excluded for not discussing family-based approaches. Despite limited documentation of family-based approaches on improving health outcomes in patients who underwent bariatric surgery, evidence suggests that such an approach may be advantageous if planned a priori to occur before, during, and after bariatric surgery. Future studies could test the combination of bariatric surgery and a family-based approach for improved metabolic outcomes in both the patient and involved family member(s). Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Asymptomatic classical hereditary xanthinuria type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubov, Renata; Nir, Vered; Kassem, Eiass; Klein-Kremer, Adi

    2012-06-01

    We report on a girl who was diagnosed with classical hereditary xanthinuria due to an incidental finding of extremely low Levels of uric acid in the blood. The girl is compLetely asymptomatic. Hereditary xanthinuria is a rare autosomal recessive disease that usually causes early urolithiasis but may cause rheumatoid arthritis-like disease and even be associated with defects in the formation of bone, hair and teeth. In Israel it has mostly been described in patients of Bedouin origin. Throughout the world, only about 150 cases have been described; about two thirds of these patients were asymptomatic. Since the clinical presentation and age of symptom appearance are diverse, the case raises questions as to the required follow-up of these patients and as to whether a low oxalate diet should be initiated.

  16. Pregnancy outcomes in women with bariatric surgery as compared with morbidly obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abenhaim, Haim A; Alrowaily, Nouf; Czuzoj-Shulman, Nicholas; Spence, Andrea R; Klam, Stephanie L

    2016-11-01

    Pregnancies among morbidly obese women are associated with serious adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Our study objective is to evaluate the effect of bariatric surgery on obstetrical outcomes. We carried out a retrospective cohort study using the healthcare cost and utilization project - Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2003 to 2011 comparing outcome of births among women who had undergone bariatric surgery with births among women with morbid obesity. Logistic regression was used to estimate the adjusted effect of bariatric surgery on maternal and newborn outcomes. There were 8 475 831 births during the study period (221 580 (2.6%) in morbidly obese women and 9587 (0.1%) in women with bariatric surgery). Women with bariatric surgery were more likely to be Caucasian and ≥35 years old as compared with morbidly obese women. As compared with women with morbid obesity, women with bariatric surgery had lower rates of hypertensive disorders, premature rupture of membrane, chorioamnionitis, cesarean delivery, instrumental delivery, postpartum hemorrhage, and postpartum infection. Induction of labor, postpartum blood transfusions, venous thromboembolisms, and intrauterine fetal growth restriction were more common in the bariatric surgery group. There were no differences observed in preterm births, fetal deaths, or reported congenital anomalies. In general, women who undergo bariatric surgery have improved pregnancy outcomes as compared with morbidly obese women. However, the bariatric surgery group was more likely to have venous thromboembolisms, to require a blood transfusion, to have their labor induced and to experience fetal growth restriction.

  17. Clinical practice guidelines for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient--2013 update: cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, The Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mechanick, Jeffrey I; Youdim, Adrienne; Jones, Daniel B; Garvey, W Timothy; Hurley, Daniel L; McMahon, M Molly; Heinberg, Leslie J; Kushner, Robert; Adams, Ted D; Shikora, Scott; Dixon, John B; Brethauer, Stacy

    2013-01-01

    .... Examples of expanded topics in this update include: the roles of sleeve gastrectomy, bariatric surgery in patients with type-2 diabetes, bariatric surgery for patients with mild obesity, copper deficiency, informed consent, and behavioral issues...

  18. Asymptomatic deer excrete infectious prions in feces

    OpenAIRE

    Tamg?ney, G?ltekin; Miller, Michael W.; Wolfe, Lisa L.; Sirochman, Tracey M.; Glidden, David V.; Palmer, Christina; Lemus, Azucena; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2009-01-01

    Infectious prion diseases 1 ? scrapie of sheep 2 and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of several species in the deer family 3,4 ? are transmitted naturally within affected host populations. Although several possible sources of contagion have been identified in excretions and secretions from symptomatic animals 5?8 , the biological importance of these sources in sustaining epidemics remains unclear. Here we show that asymptomatic CWD-infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) excrete CWD prions in ...

  19. Asymptomatic deer excrete infectious prions in faeces

    OpenAIRE

    Tamgüney, G; Miller, MW; Wolfe, LL; Sirochman, TM; Glidden, DV; Palmer, C; Lemus, A; Dearmond, SJ; Prusiner, SB

    2009-01-01

    Infectious prion diseasesĝ€"scrapie of sheep and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of several species in the deer familyĝ€" are transmitted naturally within affected host populations. Although several possible sources of contagion have been identified in excretions and secretions from symptomatic animals, the biological importance of these sources in sustaining epidemics remains unclear. Here we show that asymptomatic CWD-infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) excrete CWD prions in their faeces...

  20. Asymptomatic atlantoaxial subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Mohammadali Nazarinia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study is conducted to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis patients by plain radiographs and its relation to demographic and clinical characteristics, disease activity measures and medications. 100 rheumatoid arthritis patients (18 male and 82 female were selected randomly, according to the American college of Rheumatology Criteria, who were under follow up in the rheumatology clinic. A complete history was taken, and physical examination has been done with focus on the cervical spine to determine their demographic data, disease duration, age of disease onset, drug history, swollen and tender joint counts, and ESR, Hb, CRP, RF levels. The disease activity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis was measured using the disease activity score 28. Radiographs of the cervical spine included lateral views taken in flexion, extension, neutral position of the neck and anterioposterior and odontoid projection view. Asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation was found in 17 of the 100 patients (17%. The prevalence of, anterior atlantoaxial subluxation, atlantoaxial impaction and subaxial subluxation was 10(10%, 5(5% and 6(6%, respectively. Posterior subluxation was not detected. The only characteristic that showed meaningful relationship with cervical spine subluxation was CRP (P=0.036. Our results showed that patients with RA, who have cervical spine subluxation cannot be distinguished on the basis of symptoms. Cervical spine involvement is common and may be asymptomatic, indicating routine cervical spine imaging is needed in patients with RA.

  1. Detection of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in patients with morbid obesity before bariatric surgery: preliminary evaluation with acoustic radiation force impulse imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Aroca, F.; Reus, M.; Dios Berna-Serna, Juan de [Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Department of of Radiology, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Frutos-Bernal, M.D.; Lujan-Mompean, J.A.; Parrilla, P. [Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Department of Surgery, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain); Bas, A. [Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Department of Pathology, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    To investigate the utility of acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging, with the determination of shear wave velocity (SWV), to differentiate non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in patients with morbid obesity before bariatric surgery. Thirty-two patients with morbid obesity were evaluated with ARFI and conventional ultrasound before bariatric surgery. The ARFI and ultrasound results were compared with liver biopsy findings, which is the reference standard. The patients were classed according to their histological findings into three groups: group A, simple steatosis; group B, inflammation; and group C, fibrosis. The median SWV was 1.57 {+-} 0.79 m/s. Hepatic alterations were observed in the histopathological findings for all the patients in the study (100 %), with the results of the laboratory tests proving normal. Differences in SWV were also observed between groups A, B and C: 1.34 {+-} 0.90 m/s, 1.55 {+-} 0.79 m/s and 1.86 {+-} 0.75 m/s (P < 0.001), respectively. The Az for differentiating NAFLD from NASH or fibrosis was 0.899 (optimal cut-off value 1.3 m/s; sensitivity 85 %; specificity 83.3 %). The ARFI technique is a useful diagnostic tool for differentiating NAFLD from NASH in asymptomatic patients with morbid obesity. (orig.)

  2. [Endoscopic treatment of obesity and complications following bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feisthammel, J; Blüher, M; Mössner, J; Hoffmeister, A

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the population has been increasing for many years. Due to associated comorbidities the treatment of obesity is becoming more important. Conservative treatment alone is often unsuccessful, particularly in cases of severe obesity. In these cases, multimodal therapy in specialized treatment units is warranted. Between conservative treatment and bariatric surgery, interventional endoscopic treatment options also play an increasing role. Nowadays, implantation of gastric balloons and duodenojejunal bypass liners (EndoBarrier) are the most often used endoscopic options. A further typical application of endoscopy in the treatment of obesity is the management of complications after bariatric surgery, such as stenosis and insufficiency. This article gives an overview on the currently available endoscopic options associated with treatment of obesity.

  3. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: More than a restrictive bariatric surgery procedure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaiges, David; Más-Lorenzo, Antonio; Goday, Albert; Ramon, José M; Chillarón, Juan J; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Roux, Juana A Flores-Le

    2015-01-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is a restrictive bariatric surgery technique that was first used as part of restrictive horizontal gastrectomy in the original Scopinaro type biliopancreatic diversion. Its good results as a single technique have led to a rise in its use, and it is currently the second most performed technique worldwide. SG achieves clearly better results than other restrictive techniques and is comparable in some aspects to the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the current gold standard in bariatric surgery. These benefits have been associated with different pathophysiologic mechanisms unrelated to weight loss such as increased gastric emptying and intestinal transit, and activation of hormonal mechanisms such as increased GLP-1 hormone and decreased ghrelin. The aim of this review was to highlight the salient aspects of SG regarding its historical evolution, pathophysiologic mechanisms, main results, clinical applications and perioperative complications. PMID:26557004

  4. Economic considerations for bariatric surgery and morbid obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frezza, Eldo E; Wacthell, Mitchell; Ewing, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is also an economic tragedy. This analysis evaluates the economic effects and the potential to improve the well-being of both individual and societal wealth. Econometric techniques should carefully assess the degree to which obesity affects declines in business output, employment, income, and tax revenues at the regional and national levels. Microeconomics assesses lost productivity and associated wages and profit. Macroeconomics assesses trends associated with employment, inflation, interest rates, money supply, and output. To decrease the adverse economic consequences of the obesity epidemic, policy makers must emphasize bariatric surgery as a cost-effective option for qualified patients. Early intervention, education, and tax rebates for obese individuals who undergo bariatric surgery and for medical centers and doctors would likely have positive economic effects on the whole economy in a few years. PMID:21935309

  5. Benefits of Bariatric Surgery and Perioperative Surgical Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chung Tham

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a worldwide problem with numerous associated health problems. The number of patients eligible for surgery outnumber surgical capacity and so patients need to be prioritised based on their obesity- related health burden and comorbidities. Weight loss as a result of bariatric surgery is significant and maintained in the long term. In addition to weight loss, patient health improves in terms of metabolic, macrovascular, and microvascular disease. As a result, quality of life is better, along with psychosocial wellbeing. Bariatric surgery is associated with a relatively low number of complications and appears to result in a reduction in mortality risk due to the resolution of comorbidities. Hence, surgery can now be routinely considered as an adjunct to medical therapy in the management of obesity.

  6. Communication between the obese patient and bariatric surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Angulo, David; Munitiz, Vicente; Ortiz, M Ángeles; Martínez de Haro, Luisa F; Frutos, M Dolores; Hernández, Antonio; Parrilla, Pascual

    2015-10-01

    Communication between the bariatric surgeon and the obese patient is very important as it influences the expectations of patients with regard to surgery, aim of the surgery and the understanding of the mechanisms of failure of surgery. Furthermore, the incidence of certain psychopathology in these patients makes it necessary for the surgeon to have the ability to communicate to the patient the need for motivation and the maintenance of healthy life habits. Although the topic is subjective, in this article we review several useful recommendations to optimize communication before and after surgery. Finally, we emphasize the need to create workshops to train the bariatric surgeon in these issues that we consider so important. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Peripheral polyneuropathy after bariatric surgery for morbid obesity

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    I-Ching Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient with peripheral polyneuropathy after bariatric surgery for morbid obesity is reported. She suffered from frequent episodes of vomiting and abdominal pain after surgery. Muscle weakness in her lower limbs developed 5 months later and she experienced difficulty in walking and standing. Wrist drop, foot drop, and marked distal limb muscle atrophy were found bilaterally. Electromyography showed the presence of sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy. Nutritional deficiencies may play an important role in pathogenesis. This uncommon neurological complication might be due to rapid weight loss and vitamin deficiency. Physicians who take care for patients after bariatric surgery should have a high index of awareness for the neurologic complications, and routine vitamin supplementation might be useful for these patients.

  8. Post-operative bariatric surgery complications: Deficiency of nutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Abdul Majid Mufaqam1, Soni Dhwani Satishkumar2, Patel Palak Arvindkumar2

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since more than half of the population in America falls under the category of obesity, scientists have discovered a surgical technique to reduce the weight of the obese patients. Bariatric surgery or gastric bypass surgery is a procedure that has been successful in reducing the weight for obese people. This technique requires a permanent gastric bypass (Roux-en-Y where part of the stomach and duodenum is removed. Since the size of the stomach is reduced to 20% of its original size along with the removal of duodenum – this may lead to improper absorption of several vitamins and minerals. This review showed that several vitamins and mineral deficiencies are observed in patients, post-operative bariatric surgery. Thiamin, folate, and B12 deficiencies were most commonly observed, and Vitamin A, D, C and B6 deficiencies were also seen in some cases. Iron and calcium deficiencies were also reported by some of the studies.

  9. ERCP after bariatric surgery - literature review and case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorgulescu, A; Turcu, F; Iordache, N

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is a disease which has become more prevalent in Romania. Bariatric surgical procedures are among the treatment options for obese patients. Obesity and the metabolic disorders induced by it are risk factors for gallstones formation and their complications. ERCP is a minimally invasive therapeutic procedure indicated in the treatment of choledochal lithiasis and its complications. ERCP is generally considered the most difficult endoscopic procedure from the technical point of view. The authors have proposed to consider the possibility of performing therapeutic ERCP in patients who have undergone bariatric procedures. Literature data are reviewed and the case of a patient treated in a minimally invasive (laparoendoscopic) way for cholecyst and choledocholithiasis after longitudinal gastrectomy is presented PMID:25408751

  10. [Treatment of anemia in patients undergoing bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basora Macaya, M

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency in patients with morbid obesity can occur before bariatric surgery due to its inflammatory component and after surgery as the result of implementing the malabsorptive techniques. For patients with morbid obesity, micronutrient deficiencies, such as vitamin B12, iron and folate, should be suspected. Iron deficiency and other hematinics should be corrected, even when anemia has not been established. Normal ferritin levels do not allow us to rule out a possible iron deficiency, given that ferritin can increase due to the chronic inflammatory condition of obesity. After bariatric surgery, patients should take iron supplements; however, these supplements are frequently poorly tolerated. Rapid and effective correction of hemoglobin levels might require the intravenous administration of iron preparations. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Bile Acids, FXR, and Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier F. Noel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Overweight and obesity represent major risk factors for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Obesity is associated with a chronic and progressive inflammatory response leading to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D mellitus, although the precise mechanism mediating this inflammatory process remains poorly understood. The most effective intervention for the treatment of obesity, bariatric surgery, leads to glucose normalization and remission of T2D. Recent work in both clinical studies and animal models supports bile acids (BAs as key mediators of these effects. BAs are involved in lipid and glucose homeostasis primarily via the farnesoid X receptor (FXR transcription factor. BAs are also involved in regulating genes involved in inflammation, obesity, and lipid metabolism. Here, we review the novel role of BAs in bariatric surgery and the intersection between BAs and immune, obesity, weight loss, and lipid metabolism genes.

  12. Nutritional Recommendations for Adult Bariatric Surgery Patients: Clinical Practice12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherf Dagan, Shiri; Goldenshluger, Ariela; Globus, Inbal; Schweiger, Chaya; Kessler, Yafit; Kowen Sandbank, Galit; Ben-Porat, Tair; Sinai, Tali

    2017-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is currently the most effective treatment for morbid obesity and its associated metabolic complications. To ensure long-term postoperative success, patients must be prepared to adopt comprehensive lifestyle changes. This review summarizes the current evidence and expert opinions with regard to nutritional care in the perioperative and long-term postoperative periods. A literature search was performed with the use of different lines of searches for narrative reviews. Nutritional recommendations are divided into 3 main sections: 1) presurgery nutritional evaluation and presurgery diet and supplementation; 2) postsurgery diet progression, eating-related behaviors, and nutritional therapy for common gastrointestinal symptoms; and 3) recommendations for lifelong supplementation and advice for nutritional follow-up. We recognize the need for uniform, evidence-based nutritional guidelines for bariatric patients and summarize recommendations with the aim of optimizing long-term success and preventing complications. PMID:28298280

  13. Economic considerations for bariatric surgery and morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frezza, Eldo E; Wacthell, Mitchell; Ewing, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is also an economic tragedy. This analysis evaluates the economic effects and the potential to improve the well-being of both individual and societal wealth. Econometric techniques should carefully assess the degree to which obesity affects declines in business output, employment, income, and tax revenues at the regional and national levels. Microeconomics assesses lost productivity and associated wages and profit. Macroeconomics assesses trends associated with employment, inflation, interest rates, money supply, and output. To decrease the adverse economic consequences of the obesity epidemic, policy makers must emphasize bariatric surgery as a cost-effective option for qualified patients. Early intervention, education, and tax rebates for obese individuals who undergo bariatric surgery and for medical centers and doctors would likely have positive economic effects on the whole economy in a few years.

  14. Lipids and bariatric procedures Part 2 of 2: scientific statement from the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and Obesity Medicine Association (OMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold; Kothari, Shanu N; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John M; Nguyen, Ninh T; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures generally improve dyslipidemia, sometimes substantially so. Bariatric procedures also improve other major cardiovascular risk factors. This 2-part Scientific Statement examines the lipid effects of bariatric procedures and reflects contributions from authors representing the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and the Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). Part 1 was published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology, and reviewed the impact of bariatric procedures upon adipose tissue endocrine and immune factors, adipose tissue lipid metabolism, as well as the lipid effects of bariatric procedures relative to bile acids and intestinal microbiota. This Part 2 reviews: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies, that may occur after bariatric procedures. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Avaliação ecocardiográfica em obesos graves assintomáticos Echocardiography evaluation for asymptomatic patients with severe obesity

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    Isaura Elaine Gonçalves Moreira Rocha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar a função sistólica e diastólica por meio da ecocardiografia Doppler em pacientes assintomáticos com obesidade grave. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados, por meio de ecocardiograma transtorácico, 30 pacientes candidatos a cirurgia bariátrica, com IMC médio de 49,2±8,8 kg/m², sem história de cardiopatia prévia. RESULTADOS: Observou-se aumento de câmaras esquerdas em 42,9% da amostra, disfunção diastólica em 54,6%, hipertrofia ventricular esquerda em 82,1%, com padrão geométrico do tipo hipertrofia excêntrica em metade dos casos. A indexação da massa ventricular esquerda com a altura diagnosticou significativamente mais hipertrofia do que a indexação com a superfície corpórea (p = 0,0053, sendo esse índice mais apropriado para determinação de hipertrofia ventricular em obesos. Correlações entre hipertrofia ventricular esquerda com tempo de obesidade e níveis pressóricos foram positivas, bem como correlações entre o índice de massa corpórea e indicadores de disfunção diastólica. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo mostrou que o ecocardiograma, realizado em portadores de obesidade grave assintomáticos, revelou alterações cardíacas estruturais comuns na miocardiopatia da obesidade, que podem associar-se ao desenvolvimento de insuficiência cardíaca, arritmias e morte súbita, possibilitando a identificação de pacientes sob maior risco cardiovascular.OBJECTIVE: To study the systolic and diastolic function of asymptomatic patients with severe obesity using a Doppler echocardiography. METHODS: Thirty candidates for bariatric surgery, with an average BMI of 49.2 ± 8.8 Kg/m² and no previous history of heart disease were evaluated through transthoracic echocardiography. RESULTS: Enlarged left chambers were observed in 42.9% of the sample, diastolic dysfunction in 54.6% and left ventricular hypertrophy in 82.1%, of which 50% of the cases presented the geometric pattern of eccentric hypertrophy. Indexation of left

  16. Outcomes of a Third Bariatric Procedure for Inadequate Weight Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminian, Ali; Romero-Talamás, Héctor; Corcelles, Ricard; Mackey, Jennifer; Rogula, Tomasz; Brethauer, Stacy A.; Schauer, Philip R.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The robust volume of bariatric surgical procedures has led to significant numbers of patients requiring reoperative surgery because of undesirable results from primary operations. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety, and outcomes of the third bariatric procedure after previous attempts resulted in inadequate results. Methods: We retrospectively identified patients who underwent a third bariatric procedure for inadequate weight loss or significant weight regain after the second operation. Data were analyzed to establish patient demographic characteristics, perioperative parameters, and postoperative outcomes. Results: A total of 12 patients were identified. Before the first, second, and third procedures, patients had a mean body mass index of 67.1 ± 29.3 kg/m2, 60.9 ± 28.3 kg/m2, and 49.4 ± 19.8 kg/m2, respectively. The third operations (laparoscopic in 10 and open in 2) included Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n = 5), revision of pouch and/or stoma of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n = 3), limb lengthening after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n = 3), and sleeve gastrectomy (n = 1). We encountered 5 early complications in 4 patients, and early reoperative intervention was needed in 2 patients. At 1-year follow-up, the excess weight loss of the cohort was 49.4% ± 33.8%. After a mean follow-up time of 43.0 ± 28.6 months, the body mass index of the cohort reached 39.9 ± 20.8 kg/m2, which corresponded to a mean excess weight loss of 54.4% ± 44.0% from the third operation. At the latest follow-up, 64% of patients had excess weight loss >50% and 45% had excess weight loss >80%. Conclusion: Reoperative bariatric surgery can be carried out successfully (often laparoscopically), even after 2 previous weight loss procedures. PMID:25392664

  17. Changes in neuropsychological tests and brain metabolism after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Emerson Leonildo; Halpern, Alfredo; Corrêa Mancini, Marcio; de Melo, Maria Edna; Horie, Nídia Celeste; Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto; Martins Novaes Coutinho, Artur; Ono, Carla Rachel; Prando, Silvana; Santo, Marco Aurélio; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Fuentes, Daniel; Cercato, Cintia

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms by which obesity alters the cerebral function and the effect of weight loss on the brain have not been completely clarified. The objective of the study was to assess the effect of bariatric surgery on the cognitive function and cerebral metabolism. Seventeen obese women were studied prior to and 24 weeks after bariatric surgery using neuropsychological tests and positron emission tomography. The study was conducted in a reference center for the treatment of obesity of a Brazilian public university. Thirty-three women paired by age and level of education made up two groups: 17 severely obese patients and 16 lean patients. They did not have diabetes mellitus or a family history of dementia. Comparison of performance in neuropsychological tests and cerebral metabolism of the obese women before and after bariatric surgery was measured. The results found at the two moments were compared with those of the women of normal weight. Women with a mean age of 40.5 years and mean body mass index of 50.1 kg/m(2) when compared with women with mean body mass index of 22.3 kg/m(2) showed increased cerebral metabolism, especially in the posterior cingulate gyrus (P < .004). No difference was found between the groups for the neuropsychological tests. After 24 weeks the cerebral metabolism of the obese women was lower, similar to the lean women, and there was an improvement of executive function, accompanying changes of metabolic and inflammatory parameters. Obese women may have increased cerebral metabolism when compared with women of normal weight, and this appears to reverse after weight loss induced by bariatric surgery, accompanied by improved executive function.

  18. Neurologic Manifestations of Vitamin B Deficiency after Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punchai, Suriya; Hanipah, Zubaidah Nor; Meister, Katherine M; Schauer, Philip R; Brethauer, Stacy A; Aminian, Ali

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, clinical presentation, and outcomes of neurologic disorders secondary to vitamin B deficiencies following bariatric surgery. Patients at a single academic institution who underwent bariatric surgery and developed neurologic complications secondary to low levels of vitamins B1, B2, B6, and B12 between the years 2004 and 2015 were studied. In total, 47 (0.7%) bariatric surgical patients (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass n = 36, sleeve gastrectomy n = 9, and duodenal switch n = 2) developed neurologic manifestations secondary to vitamin B deficiencies. Eleven (23%) patients developed postoperative anatomical complications contributed to poor oral intake. Median duration to onset of neurologic manifestation following surgery was 12 months (IQR, 5-32). Vitamin deficiencies reported in the cohort included B1 (n = 30), B2 (n = 1), B6 (n = 12), and B12 (n = 12) deficiency. The most common manifestations were paresthesia (n = 31), muscle weakness (n = 15), abnormal gait (n = 11), and polyneuropathy (n = 7). Four patients were diagnosed with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) which was developed after gastric bypass (n = 3) and sleeve gastrectomy (n = 1). Seven patients required readmission for management of severe vitamin B deficiencies. Overall, resolution of neurologic symptoms with nutritional interventions and pharmacotherapy was noted in 40 patients (85%). The WKS was not reversible, and all four patients had residual mild ataxia and nystagmus at the last follow-up time. Nutritional neurologic disorders secondary to vitamin B deficiency are relatively uncommon after bariatric surgery. While neurologic disorders are reversible in most patients (85%) with vitamin replacements, persistent residual neurologic symptoms are common in patients with WKS.

  19. Bariatric Surgery and Time to Total Joint Arthroplasty: Does It Affect Readmission and Complication Rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Lavery, Jessica A; Hooper, Jessica; Parikh, Manish; Gold, Heather T

    2017-11-22

    Bariatric surgery is frequently recommended prior to total joint arthroplasty (TJA) for morbidly obese patients with end-stage arthropathy. Current published data on the efficacy of bariatric surgery for preoperative medical optimization has yielded mixed results, and the effect of time from bariatric surgery to TJA on the preoperative risk profile is not well defined. Our study evaluated the effect of time from bariatric surgery to TJA on 90-day complication and readmission rates. We utilized the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) California State Inpatient Database (SID) to identify patients who underwent TJA following bariatric surgery between 2007 and 2011. Primary endpoints were 90-day complication rates and all-cause 90-day readmission rates following TJA. We identified 330 cases of bariatric surgery followed by total hip arthroplasty (THA) and 1017 cases followed by total knee arthroplasty (TKA). There were no significant demographic differences among patients who underwent TJA greater than or less than 6 months after bariatric surgery. Patients undergoing THA more than 6 months after bariatric surgery were significantly less likely to be readmitted within 90 days for any cause. There was no association between time from bariatric surgery to THA or TKA and 90-day complications. Delaying THA at least 6 months after bariatric surgery may help reduce the rate of 90-day readmissions in this high-risk patient population. Arthroplasty surgeons recommending bariatric surgery as preoperative risk modification should consider the patient's overall nutritional status, medical comorbidities, and overall response to surgery prior to booking for TJA.

  20. Primary care physician decision making regarding referral for bariatric surgery: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolberg, Charlotte Røn; Hepp, Nicola; Juhl, Anna Julie Aavild; B C, Deepti; Juhl, Claus B

    2017-05-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe obesity. It results in significant and sustained weight loss and reduces obesity-related co-morbidities. Despite an increasing prevalence of severe obesity, the number of bariatric operations performed in Denmark has decreased during the past years. This is only partly explained by changes in the national guidelines for bariatric surgery. The purpose of the cross-sectional study is to investigate referral patterns and possible reservations regarding bariatric surgery among Danish primary care physicians (PCPs). Primary care physicians in Denmark METHODS: A total of 300 Danish PCPs were invited to participate in a questionnaire survey regarding experiences with bariatric surgery, reservations about bariatric surgery, attitudes to specific patient cases, and the future treatment of severe obesity. Most questions required a response on a 5-point Likert scale (strongly disagree, disagree, neither agree nor disagree, agree, and strongly agree) and frequency distributions were calculated. 133 completed questionnaires (44%) were returned. Most physicians found that they had good knowledge about the national referral criteria for bariatric surgery. With respect to the specific patient cases, a remarkably smaller part of physicians would refer patients on their own initiative, compared with the patient's initiative. Fear of postoperative surgical complications and medical complications both influenced markedly the decision to refer patients for surgery. Only 9% of the respondents indicated that bariatric surgery should be the primary treatment option for severe obesity in the future. Danish PCPs express severe concerns about surgical and medical complications following bariatric surgery. This might, in part, result in a low rate of referral to bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Recent advances in bariatric/metabolic surgery: appraisal of clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Jei; Almulaifi, Abdullah

    2015-04-01

    Obesity and associated type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are becoming a serious medical issue worldwide. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be the most effective and durable therapy for the treatment of morbid obese patients. Increasing data indicates bariatric surgery as metabolic surgery is an effective and novel therapy for not well controlled obese T2DM patients. The review of recent developments in bariatric/metabolic surgery covers 4 major fields. 1) Improvement of safety: recent advances in laparoscopic/metabolic surgery has made this minimal invasive surgery more than ten times safer than a decade ago. The safety profile of laparoscopic/metabolic surgery is compatible with that of laparoscopic cholecystectomy now. 2) New bariatric/metabolic surgery: laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is becoming the leading bariatric surgery because of its simplicity and efficacy. Other new procedures, such as gastric plication, banded plication, single anastomosis (mini) gastric bypass and Duodeno-jejunal bypass with sleeve gastrectomy have all been accepted as treatment modalities for bariatric/metabolic surgery. 3) Mechanism of bariatric/metabolic surgery: Restriction is the most important mechanism for bariatric surgery. Weight regain after bariatric surgery is usually associated with loss of restriction. Recent studies demonstrated that gut hormone, microbiota and bile acid changes after bariatric surgery may play an important role in durable weight loss as well as in T2DM remission. However, weight loss is still the cornerstone of T2DM remission after metabolic surgery. 4) PATIENT SELECTION: patients who may benefit most from bariatric surgery was found to be patients with insulin resistance. For Asian T2DM patients, the indication of metabolic surgery has been set to those with not well controlled (HbA1c > 7.5%) disease and with their BMI > 27.5 Kg/m(2). A novel diabetes surgical score, ABCD score, is a simple system for predicting the success of surgical therapy

  2. Bariatric surgery: a viable treatment option for patients with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Sarah R; Labott, Susan; Stout, Rebecca A

    2015-01-01

    Although bariatric surgery has become a recognized treatment for obesity, its utility among patients with severe psychiatric disorders has not been extensively studied. A few studies have reported similar weight loss outcomes in these patients, but psychiatric status after bariatric surgery has been studied only minimally, and it is unknown if exacerbation of the mental illness affects weight loss. The aim of this study was to shed greater light on the issue of serious mental illness and bariatric surgery. Specifically, do patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar I, and bipolar II have poorer weight loss outcomes postbariatric surgery than the general bariatric surgery population? Also, do patients with these diagnoses experience an exacerbation of psychiatric symptoms after bariatric surgery, and if so, is the exacerbation of these disorders linked to poorer weight loss results? Midwest university medical center. A medical record review of approximately 1500 bariatric patients in a Midwest university medical center was conducted to identify those patients with diagnoses of schizophrenia, bipolar I, and bipolar II. Information was gathered on bariatric surgery outcomes and changes in psychiatric status postsurgery. Eighteen patients were identified as undergoing bariatric surgery and having a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar I, or bipolar II. Weight loss in this group was significant and comparable to expected outcomes of absolute weight lost, changes in body mass index, and percentage excess weight loss for patients in the typical bariatric population. Postsurgery psychiatric status was known on 10 patients. All 10 patients experienced some exacerbation of psychiatric problems yet weight loss outcomes were still as expected. Bariatric surgery is a viable obesity treatment option for patients with schizophrenia, bipolar I, and bipolar II disorders. Symptom exacerbations occurred postsurgery, although it is not clear if these were due to the surgery or

  3. Patient and Referring Provider Characteristics Associated With the Likelihood of Undergoing Bariatric Surgery: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Luke M.; Jolles, Sally; Fischer, Laura E.; Voils, Corrine I

    2016-01-01

    Importance Although bariatric surgery is the most cost-effective treatment for severe obesity, less than 1% of severely obese patients undergo it. Reasons for low utilization are unclear. Objectives To identify patient and referring provider characteristics associated with the likelihood of undergoing bariatric surgery. Evidence Review PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane databases were searched for reports published between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2014. Reports were eligible if they presented descriptive data regarding facilitators or barriers to bariatric surgery or if they reported statistical associations between patient or provider characteristics and referral to or receipt of bariatric surgery. Frequency effect sizes were calculated as the proportion of studies reporting a finding. Findings Of the 7,212 reports identified in the initial search, 53 were included in full-text review. Nine reports met our inclusion criteria and were included in analyses. Of those, four included descriptive findings, six reported statistical associations, and one included both. One report included providers as study participants, whereas eight included patients. Four of nine studies identified an association between female gender and a greater willingness to undergo bariatric surgery. Lack of knowledge about bariatric surgery was a barrier in two studies. Five of nine cited patient concerns about the outcomes and safety of bariatric surgery as a barrier to undergoing it. Patients were more likely to pursue bariatric surgery when it was recommended by referring providers. Providers who believed that obesity treatment should be covered by insurance were more likely to recommend bariatric surgery. Conclusions and Relevance Limited patient and referring provider knowledge about the safety and effectiveness of bariatric surgery are important barriers to bariatric surgery utilization. Future efforts focused on improving knowledge and identification of the critical

  4. Severe protein malnutrition in a morbidly obese patient after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Tatiana de Castro Pereira; Duarte, Thaís Castro; Mosca, Etelvina Rocha Tolentino; Pinheiro, Conceição de Fátima; Marçola, Maria Alzira; De-Souza, Daurea Abadia

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical course of a morbidly obese patient who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery and, in the late postoperative period, presented the expected loss of weight, but also presented severe protein malnutrition (PM). A patient with morbid obesity, who in March 2012, presented PM (serum albumin = 2.4 g/dL) 2 y after the completion of RYGB surgery (loss of 52.7% of usual body weight). During the hospitalization, the patient received partial volumes of commercial semi-elemental, high-protein, low-fat diet by tube feeding with gastric positioning, associated with an oral low-fat, low-sodium, and bland-consistency diet. The patient presented a temporary clinical improvement, however, outpatient monitoring identified the need for subsequent hospitalizations due to the recurrence of severe hypoalbuminemia (e.g., 1.39 g/dL), anasarca (increase of 15 kg in 79 d), and normocytic and normochromic anemia (e.g., hemoglobin 9.2 g/dL). In July 2013 the RYGB partial reversal technique was performed with a reduction of 100 cm in the Roux-en-Y arm. Seventy days after surgery, the patient was asymptomatic (albumin 3.7 g/dL), however, she presented rapid and progressive recovery of the body weight (increase of 10.3 kg in 60 d, without edema). The effective treatment of morbid obesity is still a major challenge in clinical practice. Restrictive, malabsorptive bariatric techniques are associated with nutritional deficiencies. Severe PM is rarely reported as a late postoperative complication of RYGB, however, due to the serious consequences associated with this, it requires early diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of intelligence in an adolescent bariatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Thao-Ly T; Curran, Jennifer L; Datto, George A

    2013-01-01

    The use of bariatric surgery as treatment for morbid obesity in adolescents has nearly tripled in recent years. Intelligence is an important component to a patient's assent of surgery and maintenance of a healthy lifestyle. The objective of this study was to describe the intelligence testing performance of a cohort of adolescents seeking laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). Twenty-nine patients (93% female, 62% white) with a mean age of 16 years and mean body mass index (BMI) of 49 kg/m(2) were enrolled in an adolescent bariatric program in the United States. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis, evaluating patient intelligence at a single preoperative time point using the Weschler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV or Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores were analyzed descriptively and in relationship to patient anthropometric measurements and characteristics. Mean IQ was average for age (95, SD 16), although 21% of patients had an IQIQ>120. There was no significant association between IQ and BMI, weight, or waist circumference. Mean IQ was lower in patients who had failed a grade compared with those who had not failed a grade (PIQ was average for age, suggesting capability to understand the procedure and healthy lifestyle concepts. Patients who exhibit deficits in intellect prior to surgery may benefit from educational resources and clinician support tailored to their reasoning abilities. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. NUTRITIONAL REPERCUSSIONS IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    Science.gov (United States)

    SILVEIRA-JÚNIOR, Sérgio; de ALBUQUERQUE, Maurício Mendes; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis; da ROSA, Luisa Salvagni; HYGIDIO, Daniel de Andrade; ZAPELINI, Raphaela Mazon

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies evaluated the association between nutritional disorders, quality of life and weight loss in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Aim To identify nutritional changes in patients undergoing bariatric surgery and correlate them with weight loss, control of comorbidities and quality of life. Method A prospective cohort, analytical and descriptive study involving 59 patients undergoing bariatric surgery was done. Data were collected preoperatively at three and six months postoperatively, evaluating nutritional aspects and outcomes using BAROS questionnaire. The data had a confidence interval of 95%. Results The majority of patients was composed of women, 47 (79.7%), with 55.9% of the series with BMI between 40 to 49.9 kg/m². In the sixth month after surgery scores of quality of life were significantly higher than preoperatively (p<0.05) and 27 (67.5 %) patients had comorbidities resolved, 48 (81.3 %) presented BAROS scores of very good or excellent. After three and six months of surgery 16 and 23 presented some nutritional disorder, respectively. There was no relationship between the loss of excess weight and quality of life among patients with or without nutritional disorders. Conclusions Nutritional disorders are uncommon in the early postoperative period and, when present, have little or no influence on quality of life and loss of excess weight. PMID:25861070

  7. Menstrual concerns and intrauterine contraception among adolescent bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Jennifer B; Miller, Rachel J; Inge, Thomas H

    2011-04-01

    Adolescent obesity has dramatically increased in recent decades, and along with that so have other medical comorbidities, such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and pseudotumor cerebri. Obesity and related comorbidites may be contraindications to hormonal contraception, making contraception counseling of morbidly obese adolescents more challenging. Obese adolescent females seeking bariatric surgery need effective contraception in the postoperative period. This study is designed to determine the acceptance rate of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine device (IUD) and describe common menstrual problems in obese adolescent bariatric surgery patients. This is a historic cohort study of adolescent females who underwent bariatric surgery over a 2-year period at a tertiary referral center for pediatric obesity. Data were systematically abstracted. The percent of patients with menstrual problems and the acceptance rate for the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD were determined. Twenty-five adolescents met inclusion criteria. The mean age was 17.4 years (standard deviation [SD] 2.6), and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 51.4 (SD 6.3) kg/m(2). Eighty-four percent were white. Twenty-eight percent had menorrhagia, 32% had oligomenorrhea, 40% had dysmenorrhea, and 36% had PCOS. Ninety-two percent (23 of 25) underwent IUD placement. There was a high prevalence of menstrual problems among this sample of severely obese adolescent females. The majority accepted the IUD, indicating it is a viable option among this population.

  8. Emergency endoscopy for gastrointestinal bleeding after bariatric surgery. Therapeutic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, María Luisa; Martín-Lorenzo, Juan Gervasio; Torralba-Martínez, José Antonio; Lirón-Ruiz, Ramón; Miguel Perelló, Joana; Flores Pastor, Benito; Pérez Cuadrado, Enrique; Aguayo Albasini, José Luis

    2015-02-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding (GB) is a potential complication after bariatric surgery and its frequency is around 2-4% according to the literature. The aim of this study is to present our experience with GB after bariatric surgery, its presentation and possible treatment options by means of an algorithm. From January 2004 to December 2012, we performed 300 consecutive laparoscopic bariatric surgeries. A total of 280 patients underwent a laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass with creation of a gastrojejunal anastomosis using a circular stapler type CEAA No 21 in 265 patients and with a linear stapler in 15 patients. Demographics, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation and treatment were reviewed. A total of 20 patients underwent a sleeve gastrectomy. Twenty-seven cases (9%) developed GB. Diagnosis and therapeutic endoscopy was required in 13 patients. The onset of bleeding occurred between the 1(st)-6(th) postop days in 10 patients, and the origin was at the gastrojejunostomy staple-lines, and 3 patients had bleeding from an anastomotic ulcer 15-20 days after surgery. All other patients were managed non-operatively. Conservative management of gastrointestinal bleeding is effective in most cases, but endoscopy with therapeutic intent should be considered in patients with severe or recurrent bleeding. Multidisciplinary postoperative follow- up is very important for early detention and treatment of this complication. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Protein intake, body composition, and protein status following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Alba; Moizé, Violeta; Rodríguez, Lucía; Flores, Lilliam; Vidal, Josep

    2010-11-01

    Daily protein intake recommendations have recently been proposed for the bariatric patient. We aimed to evaluate the accomplishment of these recommendations, and the influence of protein intake (PI) on fat free mass (FFM) and protein status changes following bariatric surgery. We examined 101 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic Roux-in-Y gastric gypass (LGBP) or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). Based on 3-day food records, PI from food and supplements were quantified at 4, 8, and 12 months after surgery. The association between PI and body composition (bioelectrical impedance), plasma albumin and pre-albumin was evaluated at all study time points. A PI protein supplementation, supplements were taken only by 63.4, 50.5, and 33.7% of the participants at 4, 8, and 12 months. However, protein supplementation was effective in helping patients to achieve the daily protein intake goal. In linear regression analysis, male gender and weight loss, but not PI, were significantly associated with loss of FFM (p protein supplementation for the achievement of the recommended daily protein intake in the bariatric patient. However, our data does not help to define a PI goal as critical in determining the FFM and protein status changes following LGBP or LSG.

  10. Revisional Bariatric/Metabolic Surgery: What Dictates Its Indications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pearl; Reddy, Subhash; Higa, Kelvin D

    2016-07-01

    Bariatric/metabolic surgery is currently the only effective long-term treatment for morbid obesity- and obesity-related diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, obstructive sleep apnea, and dyslipidemia. In addition, bariatric/metabolic surgery has been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of diabetes and cancer and prolong life when compared to non-surgical therapies. However, as obesity is a chronic disease, recidivism of weight and comorbid conditions can occur. In addition, the surgical construct can lead to long-term consequences such as marginal ulceration, bowel obstruction, reflux, and nutritional deficiencies. Despite these drawbacks, prospective randomized controlled studies and long-term longitudinal population-based comparative studies greatly favor surgical intervention as opposed to traditional lifestyle, diet, and exercise programs. Revisional surgery can be quite complex and technically challenging and may offer the patient a wide variety of solutions for treatment of weight recidivism and complications after primary operations. Given the paucity of high quality published data, we have endeavored to provide indications for revisions after bariatric surgery.

  11. Influence of Weight Loss Attempts on Bariatric Surgery Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sayantan; Voller, Lindsey; Palisch, Chase; Ceja, Omar; Turner, Wes; Rivas, Homero; Morton, John M

    2016-10-01

    Many payors require an additional attempt at nonsurgical weight loss before approval of bariatric procedures. This study evaluates this requirement by characterizing the prior weight loss attempts (WLAs) undergone by bariatric surgery patients and correlating those attempts to postoperative weight loss outcomes. Number and duration of WLAs were obtained from a preoperative clinic assessment. Body mass index (BMI) and percentage of excess weight loss (%EWL) were used to assess weight loss. Kruskal-Wallis and Spearman Correlation tests were performed to analyze data using GraphPad Prism 6. Mean number of WLAs before surgery was 3.5 ± 0.2 attempts, with an average duration of 15.2 ± 1.1 years. There was a significant negative correlation between duration of WLAs and preoperative BMI (r = -0.2637, P = 0.0025). No significant difference was found for preoperative BMI or mean 12-month %EWL among any WLA groups. The number and duration of dietary attempts before surgery do not significantly affect long-term weight loss outcomes after bariatric surgery. Given these data, an additional preoperative WLA may not be efficacious in improving patients' chances at weight loss.

  12. The Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Psychological Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy F. Kubik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with a relatively high prevalence of psychopathological conditions, which may have a significant negative impact on the quality of life. Bariatric surgery is an effective intervention in the morbidly obese to achieve marked weight loss and improve physical comorbidities, yet its impact on psychological health has yet to be determined. A review of the literature identified a trend suggesting improvements in psychological health after bariatric surgery. Majority of mental health gain is likely attributed to weight loss and resultant gains in body image, self-esteem, and self-concept; however, other important factors contributing to postoperative mental health include a patient’s sense of taking control of his/her life and support from health care staff. Preoperative psychological health also plays an important role. In addition, the literature suggests similar benefit in the obese pediatric population. However, not all patients report psychological benefits after bariatric surgery. Some patients continue to struggle with weight loss, maintenance and regain, and resulting body image dissatisfaction. Severe preoperative psychopathology and patient expectation that life will dramatically change after surgery can also negatively impact psychological health after surgery. The health care team must address these issues in the perioperative period to maximize mental health gains after surgery.

  13. Current status of robotic bariatric surgery: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment to obtain weight loss in severely obese patients. The feasibility and safety of bariatric robotic surgery is the topic of this review. Methods A search was performed on PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, BioMed Central, and Web of Science. Results Twenty-two studies were included. Anastomotic leak rate was 8.51% in biliopancreatic diversion. 30-day reoperation rate was 1.14% in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 1.16% in sleeve gastrectomy. Major complication rate in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass resulted higher than in sleeve gastrectomy ( 4,26% vs. 1,2%). The mean hospital stay was longer in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (range 2.6-7.4 days). Conclusions The major limitation of our analysis is due to the small number and the low quality of the studies, the small sample size, heterogeneity of the enrolled patients and the lack of data from metabolic and bariatric outcomes. Despite the use of the robot, the majority of these cases are completed with stapled anastomosis. The assumption that robotic surgery is superior in complex cases is not supported by the available present evidence. The major strength of the robotic surgery is strongly facilitating some of the surgical steps (gastro-jejunostomy and jejunojejunostomy anastomosis in the robotic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or the vertical gastric resection in the robotic sleeve gastrectomy). PMID:24199869

  14. Economic considerations for bariatric surgery and morbid obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldo E Frezza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Eldo E Frezza, Mitchell Wacthell1, Bradley Ewing21Center for Metabolic Disease and Texas Tech University, Department of Pathology, 2Rawls Business School, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USAAbstract: The obesity epidemic is also an economic tragedy. This analysis evaluates the economic effects and the potential to improve the well-being of both individual and societal wealth. Econometric techniques should carefully assess the degree to which obesity affects declines in business output, employment, income, and tax revenues at the regional and national levels. Microeconomics assesses lost productivity and associated wages and profit. Macroeconomics assesses trends associated with employment, inflation, interest rates, money supply, and output. To decrease the adverse economic consequences of the obesity epidemic, policy makers must emphasize bariatric surgery as a cost-effective option for qualified patients. Early intervention, education, and tax rebates for obese individuals who undergo bariatric surgery and for medical centers and doctors would likely have positive economic effects on the whole economy in a few years.Keywords: bariatric surgery, morbid obesity, economics

  15. Evolution of subcutaneous adipose tissue fibrosis after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, K; Gauthier, M-S; Garneau, P Y; Rabasa-Lhoret, R

    2017-04-01

    Obesity is associated with the development of metabolic complications such as insulin resistance (IR). The mechanisms leading to IR remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between adipose tissue fibrosis and IR in obese patients before and after bariatric surgery. Thirty-five obese patients awaiting bariatric surgery (12 with type 2 diabetes) were included in the study. Non-diabetic patients were classified as either insulin-sensitive (n=11) or insulin-resistant (n=12), based on the Matsuda insulin sensitivity index (ISI Matsuda ). Homoeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) was used for longitudinal evaluation of insulin resistance. Fibrosis was quantified by Masson's trichrome staining on microscopy, and mRNA levels of fibrosis-related genes were examined in subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) biopsies collected during and 6 months after bariatric surgery (SAT only). Despite their similar age, body mass index and fat mass, SAT fibrosis was significantly higher in diabetic vs insulin-sensitive patients (Psurgery and significant weight loss, fibrosis levels remained unchanged in SAT, although IR was significantly reduced in all groups (Psurgery. Overall, these results show a significant but, most likely, transient association between SAT fibrosis and IR in obese humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Current challenges in providing bariatric surgery in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czernichow, Sébastien; Paita, Michel; Nocca, David; Msika, Simon; Basdevant, Arnaud; Millat, Bertrand; Fagot-Campagna, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bariatric surgery is a well-accepted procedure for severe and massive obesity management. We aimed to determine trends, geographical variations, and factors influencing bariatric surgery and the choice of procedure in France in a large observational study. The Health Insurance Fund for Salaried Workers (Caisse National Assurance Maladie Travailleurs Salariés) covers about 86% of the French population. The Système National d’Information Inter-régimes de l’Assurance Maladie database contains individualized and anonymized patient data on all reimbursements for healthcare expenditure. All types of primary bariatric procedures (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass [RYGB] or omega loop, adjustable gastric banding [AGB], or longitudinal sleeve gastrectomy [LSG]) performed during 2011 to 2013 were systematically recorded. Surgical techniques performed by region of residence and age-range relative risks with 95% confidence intervals of undergoing LSG or RYGB versus AGB were computed. In 2013, LSG was performed more frequently than RYGB and AGB (57% vs 31% and 13%, respectively). A total of 41,648 patients underwent a bariatric procedure; they were predominantly female (82%) with a mean (±standard deviation) age of 40 (±12) years and a body mass index ≥40 kg/m2 for 68% of them. A total of 114 procedures were performed in patients younger than 18 years and 2381 procedures were performed in patients aged 60 years and older. Beneficiaries of the French universal health insurance coverage for low-income patients were more likely to undergo surgery than the general population. Large nationwide variations were observed in the type choice of bariatric surgical procedures. Significant positive predictors for undergoing RYGB compared to those for undergoing AGB were as follows: referral to a center performing a large number of surgeries or to a public hospital, older age, female gender, body mass index ≥50 kg/m2, and treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

  17. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in adolescents, first morning clean mid-stream urine specimens were obtained from 2500 individuals and examined by dipstick and light microscopy. Adolescents with abnormal screening results were reexamined after two weeks and those who had abnormal results twice were subjected to systemic clinical examination and further clinical and laboratory investigations. Eight hundred and three (32.1% individuals had urinary abnormalities at the first screening, which significantly decreased to 345 (13.8% at the second screening, (P <0.001. Hematuria was the most common urinary abnormalities detected in 245 (9.8% adolescents who had persistent urine abnormalities; 228 (9.1% individuals had non glomerular hematuria. The hematuria was isolated in 150 (6% individuals, combined with leukocyturia in 83 (3.3% individuals, and combined with proteinuria in 12 (0.5% individuals. Leukocyturia was detected in 150 (6% of all studied adolescents; it was isolated in 39 (1.6% individuals and combined with proteinuria in 28 (1.1% of them. Asymp- tomatic bacteriuria was detected in 23 (0.9% of all studied adolescents; all the cases were females. Proteinuria was detected in 65 (2.6% of all the studied adolescents; 45 (1.8% indivi- duals had <0.5 g/day and twenty (0.8% individuals had 0.5-3 g/day. Asymptomatic urinary abnormalities were more common in males than females and adolescents from rural than urban areas (P <0.01 and (P <0.001, respectively. The present study found a high prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents in our population.

  18. Asymptomatic Central Pontine Myelinolysis: A Case Report

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    Syed Omar Shah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Central pontine myelinolysis (CPM is an acquired demyelinating lesion of the basis pontis that typically occurs after rapid correction of hyponatremia. There are only a few reported cases of patients without symptoms that have demonstrated CPM on imaging. Case Presentation: We report the case of a 26-year-old Hispanic male with history of alcohol abuse who was transferred to our medical center for acute onset diffuse abdominal pain. During his work up, a computed tomography scan demonstrated a large pancreatic mass. He underwent an endoscopic guided biopsy which demonstrated a rare and aggressive natural killer T cell lymphoma. His laboratory values were consistent with hyponatremia, which the medical team gently corrected. An MRI was performed for staging purposes which revealed findings consistent with CPM. A full neurological exam demonstrated no deficits. Materials and Methods: We conducted a PubMed search using the following keywords: asymptomatic, central, pontine, and myelinolysis in order to find other case reports of asymptomatic CPM. Results: Of the 29 results, only 6 previous case reports with English language abstracts of asymptomatic CPM were present since 1995. Conclusion: Despite slow correction of hyponatremia, CPM can be an important consequence, especially in patients with chronic alcoholism. Although this patient did not demonstrate any neurological deficits, the fact that there were changes seen on MRI should caution physicians in aggressively treating hyponatremia. Furthermore, if there is a decision to treat, then fluid restriction and reversal of precipitating factors (i.e. diuretics should be used initially, unless there is concern for hypovolemia.

  19. Evaluation of the patient with asymptomatic microscopic hematuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Justin; Guzzo, Thomas J; Ramchandani, Parvati

    2015-08-01

    Asymptomatic microscopic hematuria (AMH) is relatively common in clinical practice but the etiology remains unclear in the majority of patients; it is rarely related to genitourinary malignancies. The 2012 guidelines of the American Urological Association recommend an evaluation after a single positive urinalysis with mandatory upper tract evaluation in all patients, preferably with CT urography (CTU). The likelihood of detecting significant upper track abnormalities, particularly malignancies is low with CTU, while incidental extraurinary abnormalities are often found, the majority of which are not clinically significant. The workup for these incidental findings has significant financial and clinical implications. Primary care physicians, who are most apt to encounter patients with AMH, have a low rate of adherence to the AUA guidelines, possibly as a result of the broadening of criteria for AMH evaluation by the AUA, with resultant uncertainty amongst primary care physicians about the appropriate candidates for such evaluation. Selection of subgroups of patients with risk factors for GU malignancies who may benefit from a complete evaluation is essential, as opposed to evaluation of all patients classified as having AMH. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cognitive behavioral therapy and predictors of weight loss in bariatric surgery patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Linda; van der Heiden, Colin; Hoek, Hans W.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity. However, 20-30% of patients undergoing bariatric surgery experience premature weight stabilization or weight regain postoperatively. We report on the recent literature of predictors of weight loss and the

  1. Exploring Partners' Experiences in Living with Patients Who Undergo Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallwork, Anna; Tremblay, Lynn; Chi, Monica; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is effective in assisting persons with severe obesity in achieving significant weight loss and improved health; however, success depends on one's lifelong commitment to lifestyle modifications post-operatively. Life partners can be essential to the success of bariatric patients as they can serve as a primary resource to patients and healthcare teams. This study aimed to explore bariatric patients' partner's experiences in order to help inform clinical practice in bariatric care to better address patient and partner needs. This study utilized a grounded theory analysis of ten semi-structured interviews of male partners of bariatric surgery patients to form a general explanatory framework of the partner experience. Participants described three interconnected processes of change that followed after their spouses surgeries: (1) effort put forth to engage in the surgical process with their spouses, (2) adoption of the behavioural changes made by their spouses and (3) adjustment to a "new normal". For those who engaged in all three processes, optimism for the future and an enriching and synergistic harmonized lifestyle with their spouse was reached. Bariatric surgery in one partner can impact couples' dietary behaviours, physical and leisure activities, physical and emotional intimacy and relationship quality as a whole. Pursuing bariatric surgery as a couple is a unique process. This study highlights the necessity to approach bariatric care in a way that targets the whole spousal unit as engaging both members in lifestyle modification may improve the quality of both their health and relationship overall.

  2. Influence of Bariatric Surgery on the Use and Pharmacokinetics of Some Major Drug Classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yska, Jan Peter; van der Linde, Susanne; Tapper, Veronique V.; Apers, Jan A.; Emous, Marloes; Totte, Erik R.; Wilffert, Bob; van Roon, Eric N.

    The purpose of this review is to evaluate the influence of bariatric surgery on the use and pharmacokinetics of some frequently used drugs. A PubMed literature search was conducted. Literature was included on influence of bariatric surgery on pharmacoepidemiology and pharmacokinetics. Drug classes

  3. The asymptomatic teenager with an abnormal electrocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder R

    2014-02-01

    Use of medications for attention-deficit hyperkinetic disorder and preparticipation sports physical examination has led to an increase in number of electrocardiograms (ECG) performed during adolescence. Interpreting ECGs in children and young adults must take into account the evolutionary changes with age and the benign variants, which are usually not associated with heart disease. It is crucial for primary-care providers to recognize the changes on ECG associated with heart disease and risk of sudden death. In this article, the significance, sensitivity, specificity, and the diagnostic workup of these findings in the asymptomatic teenager are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The impact of bariatric surgery on obesity-related infertility and in vitro fertilization outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Orkun; Carr, Bruce R

    2012-12-01

    Obesity-related infertility is one of the most common problems of reproductive-age obese women who desire childbearing. The various types of bariatric surgeries have proved effective in controlling excessive weight gain, improving fertility, and preventing certain maternal and fetal complications in these women. This article summarizes the current evidence regarding the impact of bariatric surgery on obesity-related infertility and in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcomes. We have also attempted to draw conclusions about maternal and fetal risks and the benefits of bariatric surgery. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding and Roux-en-Y procedures are the two most commonly performed bariatric surgeries. Bariatric surgery was believed to improve menstrual irregularity and increase ovulation rate in anovulatory obese women, which lead to increased pregnancy rates. Although there are data in the literature suggesting the improvement of both the ovulatory function and the spontaneous pregnancy rates in obese women who lost weight after bariatric surgery, most of these are case-control studies with a small number of patients. The data are insufficient to determine an ideal time interval for pregnancy after bariatric surgery; however, the general consensus is that pregnancy should be delayed 12 to 18 months after bariatric surgery to avoid nutritional deficiencies. Few data exist regarding IVF success rates in women who have undergone bariatric surgery. One pairwise study discussed five patients who underwent bariatric surgery followed by IVF that resulted in three term pregnancies in three patients after the first IVF cycle. Many studies reported reductions in obesity-related pregnancy complications such as gestational diabetes and hypertensive disorders after bariatric surgery. Although data are inconsistent, some studies reported increased rate of preterm delivery and small for gestational age infants after bariatric surgery. Pregnancies after bariatric surgery may be

  5. Stuck in the middle: the many moral challenges with bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2010-12-01

    Bariatric surgery is effective on short- and medium-term weight loss, reduction of comorbidities, and overall mortality. A large and increasing portion of the population is eligible for bariatric surgery, which increases instant health care costs. A review of the literature identifies a series of ethical challenges: unjust distribution of bariatric surgery, autonomy and informed consent, classification of obesity and selecting assessment endpoints, prejudice among health professionals, intervention in people's life-world, and medicalization of appearance. Bariatric surgery is particularly interesting because it uses surgical methods to modify healthy organs, is not curative, but offers symptoms relief for a condition that it is considered to result from lack of self-control and is subject to significant prejudice. Taking the reviewed ethical issues into account is important when meeting persons eligible for bariatric surgery, as well as in the assessment of and decision making on surgery for obesity.

  6. Bariatric Surgery and Liver Cancer in a Consortium of Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baiyu; Yang, Hannah P; Ward, Kristy K; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; McGlynn, Katherine A

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is implicated as an important factor in the rising incidence of liver cancer in the USA. Bariatric surgery is increasingly used for treating morbid obesity and comorbidities. Using administrative data from UHC, a consortium of academic medical centers in the USA, we compared the prevalence of liver cancer among admissions with and without a history of bariatric surgery within a 3-year period. Admissions with a history of bariatric surgery had a 61 % lower prevalence of liver cancer compared to those without a history of bariatric surgery (prevalence ratio 0.39, 95 % confidence interval 0.35-0.44), and these inverse associations persisted within strata of sex, race, and ethnicity. This hospital administrative record-based analysis suggests that bariatric surgery could play a role in liver cancer prevention.

  7. The prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in patients undergoing bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanbhai, M; Dubb, S; Patel, K; Ahmed, A; Richards, T

    2015-01-01

    As bariatric surgery rates continue to climb, anaemia will become an increasing concern. We assessed the prevalence of anaemia and length of hospital stay in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Prospective data (anaemia [haemoglobin bariatric surgery. Results from a prospective database of 1530 patients undergoing elective general surgery were used as a baseline. Fifty-seven patients (14%) were anaemic pre-operatively, of which 98% were females. Median MCV (fL) and overall median ferritin (μg/L) was lower in anaemic patients (83 vs. 86, p=0.001) and (28 vs. 61, psurgery patients, prevalence of anaemia was similar (14% vs. 16%) but absolute iron deficiency was more common in those undergoing bariatric surgery; microcytosis pbariatric surgery. In bariatric patients with anaemia there was an overall increased length of hospital stay. Copyright © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oral Anticoagulant Use After Bariatric Surgery: A Literature Review and Clinical Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Karlyn A; Lee, Craig R; Farrell, Timothy M; Moll, Stephan

    2017-05-01

    Bariatric surgery may alter the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or elimination (disposition) of orally administered drugs via changes to the gastrointestinal tract anatomy, body weight, and adipose tissue composition. As some patients who have undergone bariatric surgery will need therapeutic anticoagulation for various indications, appropriate knowledge is needed regarding anticoagulant drug disposition and resulting efficacy and safety in this population. We review general considerations about oral drug disposition in patients after bariatric surgery, as well as existing literature on oral anticoagulation after bariatric surgery. Overall, available evidence on therapeutic anticoagulation is very limited, and individual drug studies are necessary to learn how to safely and effectively use the direct oral anticoagulants. Given the sparsity of currently available data, it appears most prudent to use warfarin with international normalized ratio monitoring, and not direct oral anticoagulants, when full-dose anticoagulation is needed after bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term follow-up after bariatric surgery in a national cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thereaux, J; Lesuffleur, T; Païta, M; Czernichow, S; Basdevant, A; Msika, S; Millat, B; Fagot-Campagna, A

    2017-09-01

    Lifelong medical follow-up is mandatory after bariatric surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the 5-year follow-up after bariatric surgery in a nationwide cohort of patients. All adult obese patients who had undergone primary bariatric surgery in 2009 in France were included. Data were extracted from the French national health insurance database. Medical follow-up (medical visits, micronutrient supplementation and blood tests) during the first 5 years after bariatric surgery was assessed, and compared with national and international guidelines. Some 16 620 patients were included in the study. The percentage of patients with at least one reimbursement for micronutrient supplements decreased between the first and fifth years for iron (from 27.7 to 24.5 per cent; P bariatric surgery is poor, especially for young men with poor early follow-up. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Coronary risk variables in young asymptomatic smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S B; Dwivedi, S; Prabhu, K M; Singh, G; Kumar, N; Lal, M K

    2005-09-01

    Smoking plays a dominant role in premature atherosclerosis particularly among males in South Asian countries. It initiates and promotes atherosclerosis by altering cardiac haemodynamics, causing dyslipidaemia and producing oxidative damage. Not much information is available from our country. We therefore undertook this study to see the effect of smoking on electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure, lipids, apolipoprotein B level and free radical activity in young asymptomatic male smokers. The study included 100 consecutive male subjects (50 smokers and 50 non smokers) aged 30-40 yr. Smoking profile, detailed cardiovascular assessment including ECG and lipid profile were evaluated in each subject. Of the 50 smokers, 22 (44%) had grade I hypertension as against 5 of 50 non smokers. Sinus tachycardia (10%) and P-pulmonale (8%) were the only notable ECG abnormalities. Dyslipidaemia was detected in 92 per cent smokers and 48 per cent non smokers (Plevels were significantly higher (Psmokers compared to non smokers. LDL-cholesterol was > or =135 mg/dl in 94 per cent dyslipidaemic smokers. However, no significant difference was found in high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. Smokers had significantly higher serum malondialdehyde levels (Pnon smokers. Our data indicate that young asymptomatic male smokers tend to have hypertension, dyslipidaemia and increased production of free oxygen radicals, perhaps by attenuation of oxidative stress by cigarette smoking. This makes them prone for premature coronary artery disease. However, the findings need to be confirmed on a larger sample.

  11. Elective surgery to save my life: rethinking the "choice" in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, Sarah; Benjamin, Tonya

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explicate the processes by which a patient's choice to undergo bariatric surgery is made to feel like a medical necessity, to explore the ways widespread societal stigmatization of weight and bariatric surgery shapes patient and provider discourse about surgery and to discuss patient rationalizations of the choice to have surgery. Severe obesity is currently highly stigmatized. Bariatric surgery has become an increasingly used option for individuals seeking to lose drastic amounts of weight. The surgery itself, however, remains stigmatized across many diverse settings. This research design is centred on an ethnographic study of bariatric surgery patients who undergo surgery at a particular bariatric clinic in the American Southwest. Data collection included repeated ethnographic interviews with 35 individuals enrolled in the bariatric programme over the past 5 years. The interviews were supplemented by extensive participant observation, starting in 2014 to date. Thematic analysis of fieldnotes and transcribed interviews followed. People who have bariatric surgery for weight-loss may trade one type of stigma for another. Thus, individuals who qualify for bariatric surgery based on weight alone may be reluctant to explore the surgery as a viable option. This research also shows that younger women are more likely to face the effects of weight-related stigma, which has an impact on their motivations for undergoing bariatric surgery. Stigma - both weight-related and surgery-related - needs to be addressed at a larger level, in terms of policy and in clinical bariatric programmes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Bariatric surgery interest around the world: what Google Trends can teach us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkov, Faina; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Freese, Kyle E; Ramanathan, Ramesh; Eid, George Michel; Gourash, William

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery may prove an effective weight loss option for those struggling with severe obesity, but it is difficult to determine levels of interest in such procedures at the population level through traditional approaches. Analysis of Google Trend information may give providers and healthcare systems useful information regarding Internet users' interest in bariatric procedures. The objective of this study was to gather Google Trend information on worldwide Internet searches for "bariatric surgery", "gastric bypass", "gastric sleeve", "gastric plication", and "lap band" from 2004-2012 and to explore temporal relationships with relevant media events, economic variations, and policy modifications. Data were collected using Google Trends. Trend analyses were performed using Microsoft Excel Version 14.3.5 and Minitab V.16.0. Trend analyses showed that total search volume for the term "bariatric surgery" has declined roughly 25% since January 2004, although interest increased approximately 5% from 2011 to 2012. Interest in lap band procedures declined 30% over the past 5 years, while "gastric sleeve" has increased 15%. Spikes in search numbers show an association with events such as changing policy and insurance guidelines and media coverage for bariatric procedures. This report illustrates that variations in Internet search volume for terms related to bariatric surgery are multifactorial in origin. Although it is impossible to ascertain if reported Internet search volume is based on interest in potentially undergoing bariatric surgery or simply general interest, this analysis reveals that search volume appears to mirror real world events. Therefore, Google Trends could be a way to supplement understanding about interest in bariatric procedures. © 2013 American Society for Bariatric Surgery Published by American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery All rights reserved.

  13. Factors associated with bone mineral density in women who underwent bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzia Jaeger Hintze

    2014-03-01

    To analyze factors associated with bone mineral density (BMD of candidates and patients admitted to Bariatric Surgery (BS. This study included 61 women who had done or were waiting for BS. Anthropometric variables, body composition and BMD from the femur, femoral neck, lumbar spine and the whole body were measured. The factors associated with changes in BMD, such as smoking, alcohol ingestion, sedentary lifestyle, BS, nutritional supplementation and age were evaluated. The statistical significance was set at 5%. Age and BS were associated with changes in BMD. Among the individuals who had  BS done, the rates of osteopenia/osteoporosis were greater in the femur (OR 3.34; CI [1.52 - 1.83] and femoral neck (OR 3.69; CI [1.34 – 2.08]. Subjects older than 50 years also had greater rates of BMD in the lumbar spine (OR 4.12; CI [2.09 – 22.33], the whole body (OR 4.77; CI [1.34 – 28.14], femur (OR 16.94; CI [2.16 - 124.32] and femoral neck (OR 14.95; CI [1.86 - 110.66]. Patients who have had BS and are over 50 years of age showed higher rates of osteopenia/osteoporosis, which demonstrate the necessity of further studies exploring the effects of BS and its impact on bone metabolism.

  14. Trends in the Prevalence of Severe Obesity and Bariatric Surgery Access: A State-Level Analysis from 2011 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Dana S; Mora-Pinzon, Maria; Remington, Patrick L; Jolles, Sally A; Voils, Corrine I; Gould, Jon C; Kothari, Shanu N; Funk, Luke M

    2017-07-01

    Understanding what proportion of the eligible population is undergoing bariatric surgery at the state level provides critical insight into characterizing bariatric surgery access. We sought to describe statewide trends in severe obesity demographics and report bariatric surgery volume in Wisconsin from 2011 to 2014. Self-reported data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) were used to calculate prevalence rates of severe obesity (class II and III) in Wisconsin. Bariatric surgery volume data were analyzed from the Wisconsin Hospital Association. A survey was sent to all American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery member bariatric surgeons in Wisconsin to assess perspectives on bariatric surgery access, insurance coverage, and referral processes. The prevalence of severe obesity in Wisconsin increased by 30% from 2011 to 2014 (10.4%-13.2%; P = .035); the odds of severe obesity nearly doubled for adults age 20-39 (odds ratio [OR] 1.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-3.0). During this time, the volume of bariatric surgery declined by 4.2%; (1432 to 1372; P bariatric surgery per 1000 persons with severe obesity declined by 25.7% (3.5 to 2.6/1000). A majority (72%) of bariatric surgeon respondents felt bariatric surgery access either worsened or remained the same over the last 4 years. Severe obesity increased significantly in Wisconsin over a 4-year period, whereas bariatric surgery rates among severely obese persons have remained largely unchanged and are substantially below the national average. Combining the state-level obesity survey data and bariatric surgery administrative data may be a useful approach for tracking bariatric surgery access throughout the United States.

  15. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: improving outcomes for mother and child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González I

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Irene González,1 Albert Lecube,2 Miguel Ángel Rubio,3 Pedro Pablo García-Luna4 1Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Huelva, Huelva, Spain; 2Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Arnau de Vilanova University Hospital, Lleida Biomedicine Research Institute (IRB-Lleida, CIBER in Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Disorders (CIBERDEM, Lleida University, Lleida, Spain; 3Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, IDISSC, Madrid, Spain; 4Endocrinology and Nutrition Department, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocío, Seville, Spain Abstract: The significant increase in the prevalence of obesity has led to an increase in the number of obese women who become pregnant. In this setting, in recent years, there has been an exponential rise in the number of bariatric procedures, with approximately half of them performed in women of childbearing age, and a remarkable surge in the number of women who become pregnant after having undergone bariatric surgery (BS. These procedures entail the risk of nutritional deficiencies, and nutrition is a crucial aspect during pregnancy. Therefore, knowledge and awareness of the consequences of these techniques on maternal and fetal outcomes is essential. Current evidence suggests a better overall obstetric outcome after BS, in comparison to morbid obese women managed conservatively, with a reduction in the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus, pregnancy-associated hypertensive disorders, macrosomia, and congenital defects. However, the risk of potential maternal nutritional deficiencies and newborns small for gestational age cannot be overlooked. Results concerning the incidence of preterm delivery and the number of C-sections are less consistent. In this paper, we review the updated evidence regarding the impact of BS on pregnancy. Keywords: bariatric surgery, pregnancy, maternal and fetal outcomes, gestational diabetes mellitus, small for

  16. Cardiorespiratory fitness and short-term complications after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Peter A; Gallagher, Michael J; Dejong, Adam T; Sandberg, Keisha R; Trivax, Justin E; Alexander, Daniel; Kasturi, Gopi; Jafri, Syed M A; Krause, Kevin R; Chengelis, David L; Moy, Jason; Franklin, Barry A

    2006-08-01

    Morbid obesity is associated with reduced functional capacity, multiple comorbidities, and higher overall mortality. The relationship between complications after bariatric surgery and preoperative cardiorespiratory fitness has not been previously studied. We evaluated cardiorespiratory fitness in 109 patients with morbid obesity prior to laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Charts were abstracted using a case report form by reviewers blinded to the cardiorespiratory evaluation results. The mean age (+/- SD) was 46.0 +/- 10.4 years, and 82 patients (75.2%) were female. The mean body mass index (BMI) was 48.7 +/- 7.2 (range, 36.0 to 90.0 kg/m(2)). The composite complication rate, defined as death, unstable angina, myocardial infarction, venous thromboembolism, renal failure, or stroke, occurred in 6 of 37 patients (16.6%) and 2 of 72 patients (2.8%) with peak oxygen consumption (Vo(2)) levels 15.8 mL/kg/min (lowest tertile), respectively (p = 0.02). Hospital lengths of stay and 30-day readmission rates were highest in the lowest tertile of peak Vo(2) (p = 0.005). There were no complications in those with BMI or= 15.8 mL/kg/min. Multivariate analysis adjusting for age and gender found peak Vo(2) was a significant predictor of complications: odds ratio, 1.61 (per unit decrease); 95% confidence interval, 1.19 to 2.18 (p = 0.002). Reduced cardiorespiratory fitness levels were associated with increased, short-term complications after bariatric surgery. Cardiorespiratory fitness should be optimized prior to bariatric surgery to potentially reduce postoperative complications.

  17. Effect of bariatric surgery on systemic and adipose tissue inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Valerie G; Blackledge, Camille; Wijayatunga, Nadeeja; Barlow, Patrick; Mancini, Matthew; Mancini, Gregory; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima

    2016-08-01

    Obese patients are predisposed to developing insulin resistance and associated metabolic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of bariatric surgery on adipose-derived inflammatory cytokines (adipokines), which play a key role in insulin resistance and obesity. We hypothesized that there is a significant increase in serum and tissue anti-inflammatory adiponectin with a decrease in circulating pro-inflammatory TNF-α and MCP-1, leading to reduced inflammation post-bariatric surgery. In this study, we investigated the effects of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) and laparoscopic gastric band on serum and tissue levels of adiponectin and serum levels of MCP-1 and TNF-α. Samples of serum and adipose tissue were collected at the time of surgery, 2 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. Adipokine levels were assayed by ELISA kits. A significant increase in adiponectin levels 2 weeks after surgery was observed in the subcutaneous adipose tissue in both groups combined. Serum adiponectin in LRYGB patients showed an increasing trend, while MCP-1 showed a decreasing trend post-surgery. There was no difference in TNF-α among the groups. The number of patients enrolled did not allow for statistical power to be reached. Our results show significant and rapid increases in subcutaneous adipose adiponectin as early as 2 weeks post-bariatric surgery demonstrating reduced inflammation and possibly reduced insulin resistance. Future studies are warranted in larger cohorts with additional measurements of insulin sensitivity and inflammation.

  18. Bariatric surgery and diabetes remission: Who would have thought it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awadhesh Kumar Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and obesity are increasingly common and major global health problems. The Edmonton obesity staging system clearly pointed towards increased mortality proportionate to the severity of obesity. Obesity itself triggers insulin resistance and thereby poses the risk of T2DM. Both obesity and T2DM have been associated with higher morbidity and mortality and this calls for institution of effective therapies to deal with the rising trend of complications arising out of this dual menace. Although lifestyle changes form the cornerstone of therapy for both the ailments, sustained results from this modalities is far from satisfactory. While Look AHEAD (action for HEAalth in diabetes study showed significant weight loss, reduction in glycated hemoglobin and higher remission rate of T2DM at 1 st year following intensive lifestyle measures; recurrence and relapse rate bounced back in half of subjects at 4 years, thereby indicating that weight loss and glycemic control is difficult to maintain in the long term with lifestyle interventions. Same recurrence phenomenon was also observed with pharmacotherapy with rimonabant, sibutramine and orlistat. Bariatric surgery has been seen to associate with substantial and sustained weight loss in morbidly obese patients. Interestingly, bariatric surgeries also induce higher rates of short and long-term diabetes remission. Although the exact mechanism behinds this diabetes remission are not well understood; improved insulin action, beta-cell function and complex interplay of hormones in the entero-insular axis appears to play a major role. This article reviews the effectiveness of bariatric procedures on remission or improvement in diabetes and put a perspective on its implicated mechanisms.

  19. Medication and nutritional supplement use before and after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charline Fernanda Backes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Bariatric surgery has been an effective alternative treatment for morbid obesity and has resulted in decreased mortality, better control over comorbidities and reduced use of drugs. The objective of this study was to analyze the impact of bariatric surgery on medication drug and nutritional supplement use. DESIGN AND SETTING: Longitudinal study of before-and-after type, on 69 morbidly obese patients in a public hospital in Porto Alegre. METHODS: Through interviews, the presence of comorbidities and use of drugs with and without prescription were evaluated. RESULTS: Among the 69 patients interviewed, 85.5% had comorbidities in the preoperative period, with an average of 2.3 (± 1.5 per patient. The main comorbidities reported were hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia. 84.1% of the patients were using prescribed drugs in the preoperative period. The mean drug use per patient was 4.8, which decreased to 4.4 after the procedure. The surgery enabled significant reduction in use of most antidiabetic (84%, antilipemic (77% and antihypertensive drugs (49.5%. On the other hand, there was a significant increase in use of multivitamins and drugs for disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. The dosages of most of the drugs that continued to be prescribed after surgery were decreased, but not significantly. CONCLUSION: After bariatric surgery, there were increases in the use of vitamins, gastric antisecretory drugs and antianemic drugs. Nevertheless, there was an overall reduction in drug use during this period, caused by suspension of drugs or dose reduction.

  20. Complications of bariatric surgery: Presentation and emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassir, Radwan; Debs, Tarek; Blanc, Pierre; Gugenheim, Jean; Ben Amor, Imed; Boutet, Claire; Tiffet, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The epidemic in obesity has led to an increase in number of so called bariatric procedures. Doctors are less comfortable managing an obese patient after bariatric surgery. Peri-operative mortality is less than 1%. The specific feature in the obese patient is that the classical signs of peritoneal irritation are never present as there is no abdominal wall and therefore no guarding or rigidity. Simple post-operative tachycardia in obese patients should be taken seriously as it is a WARNING SIGNAL. The most common complication after surgery is peritonitis due to anastomotic fistula formation. This occurs typically as an early complication within the first 10 days post-operatively and has an incidence of 1-6% after gastric bypass and 3-7% after sleeve gastrectomy. Post-operative malnutrition is extremely rare after restrictive surgery (ring, sleeve gastrectomy) although may occur after malabsorbative surgery (bypass, biliary pancreatic shunt) and is due to the restriction and change in absorption. Prophylactic cholecystectomy is not routinely carried out during the same procedure as the bypass. Superior mesenteric vein thrombosis after bariatric surgery is a diagnosis which should be considered in the presence of any postoperative abdominal pain. Initially a first etiological assessment is performed (measurement of antithrombin III and of protein C and protein S, testing for activated protein C resistance). If the least doubt is present, a medical or surgical consultation should be requested with a specialist practitioner in the management of obese patients as death rates increase with delayed diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Robotics in advanced gastrointestinal surgery: the bariatric experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keith; Hagen, Monika E; Buffington, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Robotic surgery for laparoscopic procedures such as advanced gastrointestinal surgery and abdominal malignancies is currently on the rise. The first robotic systems have been used since the 1990s with increasing number of clinical cases and broader clinical applications each year. Although high-evidence-level data are scarce, studies suggest that the technical advantages of robotic surgery result in a clinical value for procedures of advanced complexity such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and revisional bariatric surgery. Ultimately, the digital interface of the robotic system with the option to integrate augmented reality and real-time imaging will allow advanced applications particularly in the field of gastrointestinal surgery for malignancies.

  2. Medical Devices for Obesity Treatment: Endoscopic Bariatric Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Eric J; Rizk, Monika; Bazerbachi, Fateh; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K

    2018-01-01

    Endoscopic bariatric therapies (EBTs) are effective tools for the management of obesity. By mimicking restrictive and bypass surgery physiology, they provide a safe and effective treatment option with the added capabilities of reaching a broader population. Multiple efficacious medical devices, such as intragastric balloons, endoscopic suturing/plication devices, and bypass liners, at various stages of development are available in the United States. EBTs represent the newest addition to a multidisciplinary approach in obesity management. This article reviews several devices' safety and efficacy for primary care providers in the era of evolving obesity treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Temperament and Personality in Bariatric Surgery-Resisting Temptations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Laurence; Müller, Astrid

    2015-11-01

    Temperament and personality traits can serve as both risk factors as well as protective factors in the development of morbid obesity. In the present review, we present an overview of studies focusing on the relationship between temperament/personality and morbid obesity in pre-operative and postoperative bariatric surgery patients. We consider studies that focus on both a categorical and dimensional point of view on temperament/personality, as well as studies based on cross-sectional and longitudinal designs. Finally, we will integrate the research findings, discuss the implications for assessment and treatment and formulate suggestions for future research. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  4. Current management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Guerra, L; Fernández-Moreno, M C; Serrano-Rodríguez, L

    2015-05-01

    Asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS) is a common problem in daily clinical practice, and its management is still the subject of controversy. In contrast to symptomatic carotid disease, the main studies on surgical treatment of patients with ACS have shown only a modest benefit in the primary prevention of stroke. In addition, current medical treatment has drastically decreased the risk of stroke in patients with ACS. Selecting patients amenable to endovascular treatment and determining how and when to conduct the ultrasound follow-up of these patients are issues that still need resolving. This article analyzes two new studies underway that provide evidence for better management of ACS in daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  5. Recurrent Parotid Carcinosarcoma in an Asymptomatic Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Mansour MD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present the case of a 52-year-old male with a history of parotid carcinosarcoma with initial diagnosis being 18 months prior. Initial treatment included a combination of gamma knife surgery coupled with high dosage chemotherapy and X-ray radiation therapy. At the time of follow-up, the patient presented with no complaints and had a nearly normal physical exam with the exception of some facial nerve weakness on the same side as the initial surgery. Despite being asymptomatic, the patient had a significant progression of disease that was manifested with intracranial lesions, multiple pathologic fractures, and a dramatic increase in overall tumor burden. Ultimately, the patient decided to pursue comfort measures only and succumbed to the disease peacefully soon thereafter.

  6. [Asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis: a reopened debate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, Stefano; Sadaba, Rafael; de la Cruz, Elena

    2014-05-06

    Aortic stenosis is a complex disease. About 2-7% of the population over 65 years of age is affected by its degenerative form. In patients with severe aortic stenosis presenting with symptoms or left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF)debate. Recent published data show that about one third of these patients present with low left ventricle stroke volume, which may affect survival. For this reason, and considering that aortic valve replacement is in most cases a low risk procedure, early surgery in this subgroup is a strategy that deserves to be taken into account. In this review we report on these recent findings, which allow understanding why patients with asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis should not be considered and treated as a homogenous population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Beneficial Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Cardiac Structure and Function in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sung-Hee; Lee, Yeon Ji; Heo, Yoon-Seok; Park, Sang-Don; Kwon, Sung-Woo; Woo, Seong-Ill; Kim, Dae-Hyeok; Park, Keum-Soo; Kwan, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is being considered as a therapeutic option for morbidly obese patients. Data are accumulating showing that this surgical intervention may improve in major cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the effects of bariatric surgery on left ventricular (LV) structure and function including LV mechanics in obese patients. Thirty-seven patients (age = 36 ± 10 years; male:female = 11:26) undergoing bariatric surgery were enrolled. Echocardiography was performed before and after at least 1 year of bariatric surgery. Conventional echocardiographic parameters, including tissue Doppler measurements, were measured. LV global longitudinal, circumferential, and radial deformations were assessed utilizing 2D speckle tracking software. Patients decreased body mass index by 11.8 ± 4.7 over 15.6 ± 5.5 months. Bariatric surgery led to significant decreases in left ventricular (LV) size and mass (51.0 ± 3.3 to 49.1 ± 3.4 mm, p bariatric surgery was associated with improved LV structure and function in obese patients, suggesting potential favorable effects of bariatric surgery to prevent future cardiovascular events.

  8. Ethnic disparities in rates of publicly funded bariatric surgery in New Zealand (2009-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahiri, Jamie-Lee; Lauti, Mel; Harwood, Matire; MacCormick, Andrew D; Hill, Andrew G

    2017-10-18

    Publicly funded bariatric surgery in New Zealand (NZ) is steadily on the rise to meet the obesity epidemic. Ethnic disparities in obesity rates exist in NZ with Māori and Pacific people having three to five times higher rates than all other ethnic groups within NZ. Ethnic disparities in rates of bariatric surgery have been reported internationally. This research sought to describe rates of publically funded bariatric surgery by self-identified ethnicity in NZ. Using reported census and hospitalization discharge data from Statistics NZ and the NZ Ministry of Health, we calculated estimate rates of publicly funded bariatric surgery in the morbidly obese population from June 2009 to July 2014. The average number of publicly funded bariatric procedures performed per 1000 morbidly obese patients from June 2009 to July 2014 was 3.0 for European, 1.4 for Māori and 0.7 for Pacific ethnicities. While these data should be interpreted cautiously due to data limitations, the estimated rates may indicate that bariatric services are currently being provided inequitably across the major ethnic groups within NZ. We suggest that further studies should be performed to explore potential patient, healthcare provider and system-level factors that may contribute to ethnic disparities in the rates of publicly funded bariatric surgery in NZ. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  9. The Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and the Management of Hypoglycemic Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Mahmoud Attia Mohamed; Durda, Michael Andrew; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Cavus, Omer; Sahin, Levent; Rogers, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies discussed the benefit of bariatric surgery on obese patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Several factors play an essential role in predicting the impact of bariatric surgery on T2DM, such as ABCD score (age, BMI, C-peptide, and duration of the disease), HbA1c, and fasting blood glucose, incretins [glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP)]. DiaRem score known to include factors such as age, HbA1c, medication, and insulin usage used to predict the remission of T2DM, but it has some limitations. An extensive literature search was conducted on PubMed and Google Scholar using keywords such as gastric bypass, T2DM, bariatric surgery, GLP-1, GIP, and post bariatric hypoglycemia. Restrictive-malabsorptive procedures are most effective in treating T2DM patients based on changes induced in appetite through regulation of gastrointestinal hormones, with decreased hunger and increased satiation. We provide a review of bariatric surgery influence on T2DM and management of post-intervention hypoglycemic events. Post-bariatric surgery hypoglycemia is a serious complication especially when patients develop life-threatening neuroglycopenia with loss of consciousness and seizure. The avoidance of this adverse event may be achieved by strict dietary modification including a restriction on carbohydrates as well as foods with high glycemic index. Further research will provide more information on post-bariatric surgery hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia pathophysiology and management.

  10. Food addiction and bariatric surgery: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezaj, V; Wiedemann, A A; Grilo, C M

    2017-12-01

    Emerging research suggests that rates of food addiction are high among individuals seeking bariatric surgery, but little is known about associated features and the prognostic significance of pre-operative food addiction. Thus, this article provides a systematic review and synthesis of the literature on food addiction and bariatric surgery. Articles were identified through PubMed and SCOPUS databases, resulting in a total of 19 studies which assessed food addiction among pre-bariatric and/or post-bariatric surgery patients using the Yale Food Addiction Scale. Most studies were cross-sectional, and only two studies prospectively measured food addiction both pre-operatively and post-operatively. The presence of pre-surgical food addiction was not associated with pre-surgical weight or post-surgical weight outcomes, yet pre-surgical food addiction was related to broad levels of psychopathology. The relationship between food addiction and substance misuse among individuals undergoing bariatric surgery is mixed. In addition, very few studies have attempted to validate the construct of food addiction among bariatric surgery patients. Results should be interpreted with caution due to the methodological limitations and small sample sizes reported in most studies. Future rigorous research with larger and more diverse samples should prospectively examine the clinical utility and validity of the food addiction construct following bariatric surgery. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  11. Predictive Value of Nutritional Markers for Wound Healing Complications in Bariatric Patients Undergoing Panniculectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, John Richard; Iorio, Matthew L; Oh, Christine; Tung, Thomas H; O'Neill, Patrick J

    2015-10-01

    Hypoproteinemia and nutritional deficiencies are common after bariatric surgery, and although massive weight loss (MWL) patients experience increased wound complication rates, the association has not been causatively determined. This study investigated preoperative nutritional parameters and wound complications in MWL patients (postbariatric and diet-controlled) undergoing panniculectomy at 2 academic institutions. One hundred sixty-one consecutive patients undergoing elective panniculectomy after bariatric surgery or diet-controlled weight loss were identified. Patient demographics and nutritional indices (serum protein, albumin, and micronutrient levels) were analyzed. Complications including wound separation, infection, and operative debridements were compared. Post hoc comparisons tested for correlation between complications and nutritional markers. Postbariatric patients lost an average of 151 lb and presented at an average of 32 months after gastric bypass. Diet-controlled weight loss patients lost an average of 124 lb. Despite MWL, albumin levels were higher in the bariatric group (3.8 vs 3.4 g/dL, P bariatric patients experienced increased wound complications (27% vs 14%; P Bariatric patients presenting for elective operations are at risk for protein and micronutrient deficiency. Despite aggressive replacement and normalization of nutritional markers, bariatric patients experience increased wound complications when compared to nonbariatric patients and traditional measures of nutritional evaluation for surgery may be insufficient in bariatric patients.

  12. Psychological predictors of body image concerns 3 months after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pona, Ashleigh A; Heinberg, Leslie J; Lavery, Megan; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Rish, Julie Merrell

    2016-01-01

    Although studies have associated postoperative weight loss with improvement in body image dissatisfaction, some individuals continue to report body image concerns after bariatric surgery. These concerns are linked to increased depressive symptoms and decreased self-esteem in bariatric populations. This study sought to explore preoperative factors that may predict early body image concerns 3 months after bariatric surgery. Academic medical center. Data were analyzed from 229 patients evaluated for bariatric surgery who completed a 3-month postoperative psychology appointment and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, Second Edition, Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF). Scales measuring depression, persecution, self-doubt, and inadequacy were examined. Medical records were reviewed for demographic characteristics, psychotropic medication usage, history of psychological treatment, and current or lifetime depression diagnosis. Patients who preoperatively scored higher on demoralization (F [1, 227] = 35.40, Pself-doubt (F [1, 227] = 27.47, Pbody image concerns 3 months after bariatric surgery. Similarly, body image concerns were more common in patients with a preoperative depression diagnosis (χ(2) = 8.76, Pbody image concerns early after bariatric surgery. Future research is warranted to determine whether this association remains further out from surgery. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Health Services Research Agenda for Bariatric Surgery Within the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, L M; Gunnar, W; Dominitz, J A; Eisenberg, D; Frayne, S; Maggard-Gibbons, M; Kalarchian, M A; Livingston, E; Sanchez, V; Smith, B R; Weidenbacher, H; Maciejewski, Matthew L

    2017-04-01

    In 2016, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) held a Weight Management State of the Art conference to identify evidence gaps and develop a research agenda for population-based weight management for veterans. Included were behavioral, pharmacologic, and bariatric surgery workgroups. This article summarizes the bariatric surgery workgroup (BSWG) findings and recommendations for future research. The BSWG agreed that there is evidence from randomized trials and large observational studies suggesting that bariatric surgery is superior to medical therapy for short- and intermediate-term remission of type 2 diabetes, long-term weight loss, and long-term survival. Priority evidence gaps include long-term comorbidity remission, mental health, substance abuse, and health care costs. Evidence of the role of endoscopic weight loss options is also lacking. The BSWG also noted the limited evidence regarding optimal timing for bariatric surgery referral, barriers to bariatric surgery itself, and management of high-risk bariatric surgery patients. Clinical trials of pre- and post-surgery interventions may help to optimize patient outcomes. A registry of overweight and obese veterans and a workforce assessment to determine the VHA's capacity to increase bariatric surgery access were recommended. These will help inform policy modifications and focus the research agenda to improve the ability of the VHA to deliver population-based weight management.

  14. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Renal Function in Obese Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Zou, Jianan; Ye, Zhibin; Di, Jianzhong; Han, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hongwei; Liu, Weijie; Ren, Qinggui; Zhang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor of development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Data on the benefits of bariatric surgery in obese patients with impaired kidney function have been conflicting. To explore whether there is improvement in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), proteinuria or albuminuria after bariatric surgery. We comprehensively searched the databases of MEDLINE, Embase, web of science and Cochrane for randomized, controlled trials and observational studies that examined bariatric surgery in obese subjects with impaired kidney function. Outcomes included the pre- and post-bariatric surgery GFR, proteinuria and albuminuria. In obese patients with hyperfiltration, we draw conclusions from studies using measured GFR (inulin or iothalamate clearance) unadjusted for BSA only. Study quality was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. 32 observational studies met our inclusion criteria, and 30 studies were included in the meta-analysis. No matter in dichotomous data or in dichotomous data, there were statistically significant reduction in hyperfiltration, albuminuria and proteinuria after bariatric surgery. The main limitation of this meta-analysis is the lack of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Another limitation is the lack of long-term follow-up. Bariatric surgery could prevent further decline in renal function by reducing proteinuria, albuminuria and improving glomerular hyperfiltration in obese patients with impaired renal function. However, whether bariatric surgery reverses CKD or delays ESRD progression is still in question, large, randomized prospective studies with a longer follow-up are needed.

  15. Surgery for small asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filardo, Giovanni; Powell, Janet T; Martinez, Melissa Ashley-Marie; Ballard, David J

    2015-02-08

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an abnormal ballooning of the major abdominal artery. Some AAAs present as emergencies and require surgery; others remain asymptomatic. Treatment of asymptomatic AAAs depends on many factors, but an important one is the size of the aneurysm, as risk of rupture increases with aneurysm size. Large asymptomatic AAAs (greater than 5.5 cm in diameter) are usually repaired surgically; very small AAAs (less than 4.0 cm diameter) are monitored with ultrasonography. Debate continues over the appropriate roles of immediate repair and surveillance with repair on subsequent enlargement in people presenting with asymptomatic AAAs of 4.0 cm to 5.5 cm diameter. This is the third update of the review first published in 1999. To compare mortality, quality of life, and cost effectiveness of immediate surgical repair versus routine ultrasound surveillance in people with asymptomatic AAAs between 4.0 cm and 5.5 cm in diameter. For this update, the Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group Trials Search Co-ordinator searched the Specialised Register (February 2014) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1). We checked reference lists of relevant articles for additional studies. Randomised controlled trials in which men and women with asymptomatic AAAs of diameter 4.0 cm to 5.5 cm were randomly allocated to immediate repair or imaging-based surveillance at least every six months. Outcomes had to include mortality or survival. Three members of the review team independently extracted the data, which were cross-checked by other team members. Risk ratios (RR) (endovascular aneurysm repair only), hazard ratios (HR) (open repair only), and 95% confidence intervals based on Mantel-Haenszel Chi(2) statistic were estimated at one and six years (open repair only) following randomisation. We included all relevant published studies in this review. For this update, four trials with a combined total of 3314 participants

  16. Factors Associated With Achieving a Body Mass Index of Less Than 30 After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varban, Oliver A; Cassidy, Ruth B; Bonham, Aaron; Carlin, Arthur M; Ghaferi, Amir; Finks, Jonathan F

    2017-11-01

    Achieving a body mass index (BMI, calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) of less than 30 is an important goal of bariatric surgery, given the increased risk for weight-related morbidity and mortality with a BMI above this threshold. To identify predictors for achieving a BMI of less than 30 after bariatric surgery. This retrospective study used data from the Michigan Bariatric Surgery Collaborative, a statewide quality improvement collaborative that uses a prospectively gathered clinical data registry. A total of 27 320 adults undergoing primary bariatric surgery between June 2006 and May 2015 at teaching and nonteaching hospitals in Michigan were included. Bariatric surgery. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors for achieving a BMI of less than 30 at 1 year after surgery. Secondary outcome measures included 30-day postoperative complications and 1-year self-reported comorbidity remission. A total of 9713 patients (36%; mean [SD] age, 46.9 [11.3] years; 16.6% male) achieved a BMI of less than 30 at 1 year after bariatric surgery. A significant predictor for achieving this goal was a preoperative BMI of less than 40 (odds ratio [OR], 12.88; 95% CI, 11.71-14.16; P bariatric surgery. Patients who achieved a BMI of less than 30 had significantly higher reported rates of medication discontinuation for hyperlipidemia (60.7% vs 43.2%, P bariatric surgery and are more likely to experience comorbidity remission. Policies and practice patterns that delay bariatric surgery until the BMI is 50 or greater can result in significantly inferior outcomes.

  17. Changes in Weight and Comorbidities among Adolescents Undergoing Bariatric Surgery: 1-Year Results from the Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiah, Sarah E.; Lopez-Mitnik, Gabriela; Winegar, Deborah; Sherif, Bintu; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Reichard, Kirk W.; Michalsky, Marc P.; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Miller, Tracie L.; Livingstone, Alan S.; De La Cruz-Muñoz, Nestor

    2012-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is one of the few effective treatments for morbid obesity but the weight loss and other health related outcomes for this procedure in large, diverse adolescent patient populations are not well characterized. Objective To analyze the prospective Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database (BOLD) to determine the weight loss and health related outcomes in adolescents. Setting BOLD data is collected from 423 surgeons at 360 facilities in the United States. Methods Main outcome measures included anthropometric and comorbidity status at baseline (n=890) and at 3 (n=786), 6 (n=541), and 12 (n=259) months after surgery. Adolescents (75% female; 68% non-Hispanic white, 14% Hispanic, 11% non-Hispanic black, and 6% other) age 11-to-19 years were included in the analyses. Results The overall one year mean weight loss for those who underwent gastric bypass surgery was more than twice that of those who underwent adjustable gastric band surgery (48.6 kg versus 20 kg, P<0.001). Similar results were found for all other anthropometric changes and comparisons over one year between surgery types (P<0.001). In general, gastric bypass patients reported more improvement versus adjustable gastric band patients in comorbidities one year after surgery. There were a total of 45 readmissions among gastric bypass patients and 10 among adjustable gastric band patients with 29 and 8 reoperations required, respectively. Conclusions Weight loss at 3-, 6-, and 12-months after surgery is approximately double in adolescent males and females who underwent gastric bypass surgery versus those who underwent adjustable gastric band surgery. Bariatric surgery can safely and substantially reduce weight and related comorbidities in morbidly obese adolescents for at least 1 year. PMID:22542199

  18. Asymptomatic proteinuria in children in Calabar | Etuk | Global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The urine samples of pupils from 4 Primary schools in Calabar were studied for asymptomatic proteinuria. The aim was to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic proteinuria in children in calabar. For each pupil, two urine samples were tested for proteinuria using the dipstick. The first urine sample was collected at ...

  19. Unholy Screening for Detection of Asymptomatic Haematwria and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ikimalo FE, Elm FU, Nkanginieme KEO, Ikinialo J. Urinary Screening for Detection of. Asymptomatic Haematurla and Pmteinuria in Children in Urban and Periurbaa Schools in Port Harcourt. Nfgeriarrjomalaf Paediatriam 30:1. In order to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic haematuria and proteinuria, a survey was ...

  20. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The global increase in the prevalence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes has brought asymptomatic bacteriuria, one of its complications to the fore. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with type 2 diabetes, identify the bacterial pathogens and their ...

  1. Asymptomatic rheumatic heart disease in South African schoolchildren

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adulthood with good health and no impact on their schooling. The study team also recognised the controversies that exist around: (i) the method of screening for asymptomatic RHD; (ii) the borderline disease entity; and (iii) the prognostic impact of asymptomatic. RHD. [8] The WHF criteria, which represent the only evidence- ...

  2. Prevalence and association of asymptomatic prostatitis with urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The link between prostatitis and urinary tract infections (UTIs) has been acknowledged but documented incidences of asymptomatic prostatitis remains a course for concern. This study therefore, assesses the prevalence and association of asymptomatic prostatitis with urinary tract infections among apparently healthy men in ...

  3. Prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency and prognostic importance of atrial fibrillation (AF) in asymptomatic mild-to-moderate aortic stenosis (AS) has not been well described. METHODS: Clinical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography were obtained in asymptomatic patients with mild-to-moderate A...

  4. Asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy in osogbo with special ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria is a common clinical entity in pregnancy but the prevalence due to S. saprophyticus, an established uro-pathogen in sexually active women, remained largely unknown in Nigeria. The prevalence of asymptomatic significant bacteriuria due to S. saprophyticus was therefore determined among 431 ...

  5. Human rhinovirus infections in symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.N. Camargo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of rhinovirus asymptomatic infections in the transmission among close contacts subjects is unknown. We tested health care workers, a pair of one child and a family member and immunocompromised patients (n =191. HRV were detected on 22.9% symptomatic and 3.6% asymptomatic cases suggesting lower transmission among contacts.

  6. Ultrasound study of the asymptomatic shoulder in patients with a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To document the incidence of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears in patients with a confirmed symptomatic tear in the opposite shoulder, and to identify ultrasound findings that may distinguish symptomatic from asymptomatic tears. Design. When patients are referred for an ultrasound examination for the confirmation ...

  7. An Appraisal of Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Pregnancy-The Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Obstetric care aims at reducing maternal (and perinatal) mortality and morbidity making the identification and management of related risk factors, such as asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy of paramount importance. This study aimed at determining the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria in the booking ...

  8. Alpha-Fetoprotein in Asymptomatic Hepatitis B Virus Infected Subjects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is high in sub-Saharan Africa. A great number of the infected individuals are asymptomatic and are commonly diagnosed by chance. Alpha-fetoprotein and liver function tests were evaluated in asymptomatic hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive subjects to ascertain ...

  9. Prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in pregnancy is associated with obstetric complications including preeclampsia, pyelonephritis, preterm labour, low birth weight and prematurity. Determining the prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria among pregnant women locally is needed to justify routine screening for ASB in ...

  10. Influence of urbanisation on asymptomatic malaria in school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of urbanisation on asymptomatic malaria in school children in Molyko, South Western Cameroon. ... Objective: To determine the impact of urbanisation on the prevalence of asymptomatic malaria in. Molyko ... Results: There was a significant association between axillary temperature and malaria parasitaemia

  11. MRI in clinically asymptomatic neuropathic leprosy feet: a baseline study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, M.; Slim, E. J.; Akkerman, E. M.; Faber, W. R.

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in the clinically asymptomatic neuropathic feet of leprosy patients. Since in the literature no MRI data are available concerning the asymptomatic neuropathic foot in leprosy, the interpretation of MRI examinations in

  12. Bariatric surgery influences the number and quality of oocytes in patients submitted to assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofolini, Juliana; Bianco, Bianca; Santos, Gustavo; Adami, Fernando; Christofolini, Denise; Barbosa, Caio Parente

    2014-03-01

    To determine differences in follicle stimulation, oocyte retrieval, maturation, and fertilization among patients who underwent bariatric surgery, obese patients, and patients with 18 assisted reproduction techniques and check that these patients may have some impairment in ovarian response. The study comprised three groups: GI: 29 patients who had undergone restrictive and/or malabsorptive bariatric surgery; GII: 57 obese patients (BMI > 30 kg/m²); and GIII: 94 patients (18 reproductive process can be impaired. Bariatric surgery appears to have an important impact on the formation of follicles and oocytes. © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  13. Management and Prevention of Surgical and Nutritional Complications After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Eric; Chand, Bipan

    2016-08-01

    Bariatric surgery is well-recognized for its effects on health, beyond weight-loss. It underwent a revolution recently with the growing performance of laparoscopic procedures, leading to enhanced recovery and a reduction in procedural risk. However, surgical complications, although rare, do develop. It is important to recognize the complications, and ideally prevent them from happening. This article reviews the risks of the four most commonly performed bariatric procedures, with an emphasis on technique and management in the intraoperative and postoperative period. The nutritional aspect of bariatric surgery is of the utmost importance, because catastrophic consequences have been linked to malnutrition and vitamin deficiencies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevention of vitamin and mineral deficiencies after bariatric surgery: evidence and algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Dave H; Posthuma, Eduardus F

    2008-11-01

    Bariatric surgery is widely accepted as first-choice treatment of morbid obesity and has also shown promising results in the treatment of diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. The number of operations each year is increasing, as well as, consequently, the urgent need for a coordinated nutritional approach, as micronutrient deficiencies occur frequently in these patients. Official guidelines on chronic use of multivitamins and minerals are, yet, unavailable in bariatric medicine. The current review provides an algorithm that supports bariatric teams to guarantee adequate nutrition after the operation.

  15. Endoscopic Bariatric and Metabolic Therapies: Surgical Analogues and Mechanisms of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirapinyo, Pichamol; Thompson, Christopher C

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a worsening pandemic with numerous related comorbid illnesses. Conservative management including lifestyle modification and medications have limited efficacy. In contradistinction, bariatric surgery is effective, however, with substantial cost and non-negligible morbidity and mortality. As such, a small percentage of eligible patients undergo surgery. Over the past decade, endoscopic bariatric and metabolic therapies have been introduced as a less invasive option for the treatment of obesity and its related comorbid illnesses. This article reviews major endoscopic bariatric and metabolic therapies, their surgical analogues, and proposed mechanisms of action. Clinical trial data for each device also are discussed. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Weight-based bullying and compromised peer relationships in young adult bariatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yufe, Shira J; Taube-Schiff, Marlene; Fergus, Karen D; Sockalingam, Sanjeev

    2017-07-01

    The experience of weight-based bullying in young adult bariatric patients has not yet been examined. Thirteen young adults (age, 18-24) that were seeking or had undergone bariatric surgery participated in semi-structured in-depth interviews. A thematic analysis informed by grounded theory principles was conducted. Analysis revealed the following three major themes: (1) being the biggest kid, (2) coping through avoidance, and (3) compromised peer and intimate relationships. Victims of weight-based bullying often avoid and withdraw socially in response to persistent verbal abuse. The decision to pursue bariatric surgery at a relatively young age adds another dimension of difficulty when navigating peer relationships.

  17. Asymptomatic Moyamoya Disease: Literature Review and Ongoing AMORE Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    KURODA, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of a non-invasive magnetic resonance examination has increased the opportunity to identify asymptomatic patients with moyamoya disease who have experienced no cerebrovascular events. However, their clinical features, prognosis, and treatment strategy are still unclear because of small number of subjects and short follow-up periods. Therefore, we have designed Asymptomatic Moyamoya Registry (AMORE) study in Japan. The objectives of this nation-wide, multi-center prospective study are to clarify long-term prognosis of asymptomatic patients with moyamoya disease and to determine the risk factors that cause ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in them. In this article, we review the published data on asymptomatic moyamoya disease and report the on-going multi-center prospective cohort study, AMORE study. We would like to emphasize the importance to determine the clinical features, prognosis, and treatment strategies of asymptomatic moyamoya disease in very near future. PMID:25739434

  18. Asymptomatic moyamoya disease: literature review and ongoing AMORE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent development of a non-invasive magnetic resonance examination has increased the opportunity to identify asymptomatic patients with moyamoya disease who have experienced no cerebrovascular events. However, their clinical features, prognosis, and treatment strategy are still unclear because of small number of subjects and short follow-up periods. Therefore, we have designed Asymptomatic Moyamoya Registry (AMORE) study in Japan. The objectives of this nation-wide, multi-center prospective study are to clarify long-term prognosis of asymptomatic patients with moyamoya disease and to determine the risk factors that cause ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in them. In this article, we review the published data on asymptomatic moyamoya disease and report the on-going multi-center prospective cohort study, AMORE study. We would like to emphasize the importance to determine the clinical features, prognosis, and treatment strategies of asymptomatic moyamoya disease in very near future.

  19. A decade of bariatric surgery. What have we learned? Outcome in 520 patients from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musella, M; Milone, M; Gaudioso, D; Bianco, P; Palumbo, R; Galloro, G; Bellini, M; Milone, F

    2014-01-01

    Today a variety of bariatric surgical procedures is available and, currently, it is difficult to identify the most effective option based on patient characteristics and comorbidities. Aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the efficacy of four different techniques; Intragastric Balloon (IB), Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB), Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG) and Laparoscopic Mini Gastric Bypass (LMGB), performed in our unit along ten years. Starting from January 2005, 520 patients, 206 men (39.6%) and 314 women (60.4%) were treated at our institution. Among patients candidate to bariatric surgery 145 underwent IB, 120 underwent LAGB, 175 underwent LSG and 80 underwent LMGB. Follow up rate was 93.1% for IB at 6 months; 74.1% and 48% for LAGB at 36 and 60 months respectively; 72.8% and 58.1% for LSG at 36 and 60 months respectively; and 84.2% for LMGB at 36 months. The period 2005-2014 has been considered. Mortality was 1/520 patients (0.19%). The excess weight loss rate (EWL%) has been 32.8 for IB at six months, 53.7 for LAGB and 68.1 for LSG, at 60 months respectively and 79.5 for LMGB at 36 months. Early major postoperative complications requiring surgery were 0.6% for IB and 1.1% for LSG whereas late major postoperative complications were 1.2% for IB, 4.1% for LAGB and 0.5% for LSG. Diabetes resolution rate was 0 for LAGB, 76.9% for LSG and 80% for LMGB at 36 months. If more invasive procedures as LSG or LMGB may entail higher operative and peroperative risks, conversely, in skilled hands their efficacy remains undisputed, especially in the long term, presenting a very low rate of major complications. In general, the efficacy of a bariatric surgery unit seems improved by the capability to offer both different primary procedures and re-do surgery. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Complications of bariatric surgery: dumping syndrome, reflux and vitamin deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Jan; Deloose, Eveline

    2014-08-01

    Bariatric surgical procedure are increasingly and successfully applied in the treatment of morbid obesity. Nevertheless, these procedures are not devoid of potential long-term complications. Dumping syndrome may occur after procedures involving at least partial gastric resection or bypass, including Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy. Diagnosis is based on clinical alertness and glucose tolerance testing. Treatment may involve dietary measures, acarbose and somatostatin analogues, or surgical reintervention for refractory cases. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be aggravated by vertical banded gastroplasty and sleeve gastrectomy procedures, but pre-existing GERD may improve after RYGB and with adjustable gastric banding. Nutrient deficiencies constitute the most important long-term complications of bariatric interventions, as they may lead to haematological, metabolic and especially neurological disorders which are not always reversible. Malabsorptive procedures, poor postoperative nutrient intake, recurrent vomiting and poor compliance with vitamin supplement intake and regular follow-up are important risk factors. Preoperative nutritional assessment and rigourous postoperative follow-up plan with administration of multi-vitamin supplements and assessment of serum levels is recommended in all patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Effect of ethnicity on weight loss after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorgami, Zhamak; Arheart, Kristopher L; Zhang, Chi; Messiah, Sarah E; de la Cruz-Muñoz, Nestor

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported better weight loss after bariatric surgery among non-Hispanic whites (NHW) versus non-Hispanic blacks (NHB) and Hispanics. The majority of these studies took place in areas where NHW are the majority. This study aimed to compare post-surgery weight outcomes by ethnicity in a geographic area where Hispanics are the majority. A retrospective medical chart review of 3268 patients (1561 Hispanic, 660 NHB, and 1047 NHW) who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or Adjustable Gastric Band (AGB) placement from 2002 to 2012 were analyzed. Percentages of excess weight loss (EWL) and body mass index (BMI) changes at 6, 12, and 24 months post-surgery were compared by ethnic group. At 6 months, EWL was significantly different by ethnicity (52.7 ± 15.9 Hispanics, 49.7 ± 15.7 NHW, 43.0 ± 17.3 NHB, P 40 kg/m(2). Up to 2 years after RYGB, mean EWL and BMI reduction patterns are similar among NHW and Hispanics and significantly better than NHB. These patterns were comparable but not as pronounced among patients with AGB surgery. Our findings suggest that social factors may contribute to successful weight loss after bariatric surgery.

  2. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: improving outcomes for mother and child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Irene; Lecube, Albert; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; García-Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The significant increase in the prevalence of obesity has led to an increase in the number of obese women who become pregnant. In this setting, in recent years, there has been an exponential rise in the number of bariatric procedures, with approximately half of them performed in women of childbearing age, and a remarkable surge in the number of women who become pregnant after having undergone bariatric surgery (BS). These procedures entail the risk of nutritional deficiencies, and nutrition is a crucial aspect during pregnancy. Therefore, knowledge and awareness of the consequences of these techniques on maternal and fetal outcomes is essential. Current evidence suggests a better overall obstetric outcome after BS, in comparison to morbid obese women managed conservatively, with a reduction in the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus, pregnancy-associated hypertensive disorders, macrosomia, and congenital defects. However, the risk of potential maternal nutritional deficiencies and newborns small for gestational age cannot be overlooked. Results concerning the incidence of preterm delivery and the number of C-sections are less consistent. In this paper, we review the updated evidence regarding the impact of BS on pregnancy.

  3. [Obesity among women. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: a qualitative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanadys, Wiesław Maciej; Leszczyńska-Gorzelak, Bozena; Oleszczuk, Jan

    2010-03-01

    Bariatric surgery is a safe and most effective method of achieving substantial long-term weight loss. Surgery should be considered in case of all patients with a BMI of more than 40 kg/m2 and for those with a BMI of over 35 kg/m2 with obesity-related co-morbidities, after conventional treatment failure. The most frequently used procedures in surgical treatment of obesity performed mostly laparoscopically are restrictive operations limiting energy intake by reducing gastric capacity (vertical banded gastroplasty adjustable gastric band, sleeve gastrectomy) and restrictive/ malabsorptive surgeries also inducing decreased absorption of nutrients by shortening the functional length of the small intestine (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass). Frequent complications following surgery may include hyperemesis, intragastric band migration, gastric perforation, nutritional deficiencies, anastomotic leak, bleeding, anastomotic stricture, internal hernia, wound infection. It is generally recommended for women after bariatric surgery to wait approximately at least 12 months before becoming pregnant. There exists considerable threat that rapid weight loss (relative starvation phase) may be unhealthy for a mother and a baby. Pregnancy after weight loss surgery is not only safe for the mother and the baby but may also be less risky than pregnancy in morbidly obese patients. Postoperative nutrient supplementation and close supervision before, during, and after pregnancy adjusted to individual requirements of a woman can help to prevent nutrition-related complications such as deficiencies in iron, vitamin A, vitamin B12, vitamin K, folate and calcium, and improve maternal and fetal health.

  4. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery: improving outcomes for mother and child

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Irene; Lecube, Albert; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; García-Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The significant increase in the prevalence of obesity has led to an increase in the number of obese women who become pregnant. In this setting, in recent years, there has been an exponential rise in the number of bariatric procedures, with approximately half of them performed in women of childbearing age, and a remarkable surge in the number of women who become pregnant after having undergone bariatric surgery (BS). These procedures entail the risk of nutritional deficiencies, and nutrition is a crucial aspect during pregnancy. Therefore, knowledge and awareness of the consequences of these techniques on maternal and fetal outcomes is essential. Current evidence suggests a better overall obstetric outcome after BS, in comparison to morbid obese women managed conservatively, with a reduction in the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus, pregnancy-associated hypertensive disorders, macrosomia, and congenital defects. However, the risk of potential maternal nutritional deficiencies and newborns small for gestational age cannot be overlooked. Results concerning the incidence of preterm delivery and the number of C-sections are less consistent. In this paper, we review the updated evidence regarding the impact of BS on pregnancy. PMID:28008286

  5. Bariatric surgery insurance requirements independently predict surgery dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Kaitlin M; Mehaffey, J Hunter; Safavian, Dana; Schirmer, Bruce; Malin, Steven K; Hallowell, Peter T; Kirby, Jennifer L

    2017-05-01

    Many insurance companies have considerable prebariatric surgery requirements despite a lack of evidence for improved clinical outcomes. The hypothesis of this study is that insurance-specific requirements will be associated with a decreased progression to surgery and increased delay in time to surgery. Retrospective data collection was performed for patients undergoing bariatric surgery evaluation from 2010-2015. Patients who underwent surgery (SGY; n = 827; mean body mass index [BMI] 49.1) were compared with those who did not (no-SGY; n = 648; mean BMI: 49.4). Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to identify specific co-morbidity and insurance specific predictors of surgical dropout and time to surgery. A total of 1475 patients using 12 major insurance payors were included. Univariate analysis found insurance requirements associated with surgical drop out included longer median diet duration (no-SGY = 6 mo; SGY = 3 mo; Prequirement (odds ratio [OR] .88, Prequirements were associated with lack of patient progression to surgery in this study. In addition, delays in surgery were associated with preoperative weight gain. Although prospective and multicenter studies are needed, these findings have major policy implications suggesting insurance requirements may need to be reconsidered to improve medical care. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Understanding the role of psychopathology in bariatric surgery outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, R J; Ben-Porath, Y S; Heinberg, L J

    2016-02-01

    Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity; however, a subset of patients who undergo this procedure regain weight or achieve suboptimal weight loss results. A large number of studies have examined whether psychological variables play a role in weight loss surgery outcome. Although presurgical psychopathology has been found to be associated with suboptimal results in some studies, this literature is equivocal. These inconsistent findings are reviewed and considered in the context of contemporary models of psychopathology. More specifically, the review focuses on the limitations of atheoretical, descriptive diagnostic systems and examines whether comorbidity within the mood/anxiety disorders, impulse control/substance use disorders and thought disorders can account for the inconsistent findings reported to date. Contemporary models of psychopathology are highlighted and linked to the Research Domain Criteria, which have been advanced by the National Institute of Health. Means for assessing psychological constructs congruent with these models are reviewed. Recommendations are made for standardizing approaches to investigating how psychopathology contributes to suboptimal bariatric surgery outcomes. © 2015 World Obesity.

  7. Bariatric surgery: an IDF statement for obese Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, J B; Zimmet, P; Alberti, K G; Rubino, F

    2011-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation Taskforce on Epidemiology and Prevention of Diabetes convened a consensus working group of diabetologists, endocrinologists, surgeons and public health experts to review the appropriate role of surgery and other gastrointestinal interventions in the treatment and prevention of Type 2 diabetes. The specific goals were: to develop practical recommendations for clinicians on patient selection; to identify barriers to surgical access and suggest interventions for health policy changes that ensure equitable access to surgery when indicated; and to identify priorities for research. Bariatric surgery can significantly improve glycaemic control in severely obese patients with Type 2 diabetes. It is an effective, safe and cost-effective therapy for obese Type 2 diabetes. Surgery can be considered an appropriate treatment for people with Type 2 diabetes and obesity not achieving recommended treatment targets with medical therapies, especially in the presence of other major co-morbidities. The procedures must be performed within accepted guidelines and require appropriate multidisciplinary assessment for the procedure, comprehensive patient education and ongoing care, as well as safe and standardized surgical procedures. National guidelines for bariatric surgery need to be developed for people with Type 2 diabetes and a BMI of 35 kg/m2 or more. PMID:21480973

  8. Effects of bariatric surgery on the body composition of adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Wally Hartwig

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The most alarming cases are known as morbidly obese. An effective method to change the anthropometric characteristics of this population with excess body weight and high fat mass is bariatric surgery. The objective of this study was to analyze the body composition of morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery in the city of Pelotas, Southern Brazil. In a prospective cohort study, a group of morbidly obese patients was followed up 30 days before and 30 days after surgery. The sample consisted of 123 patients who underwent vertical banded Roux-en-Y gastroplasty between April 2003 and May 2010. Body composition (fat percentage was determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis. The mean age of the patients was 36.1 ± 8.8 years and mean body weight loss was 14.1 ± 6.0 kg (p<0.001. The mean reduction in body mass index (BMI was 5.2 ± 2.1 kg/m2 (p<0.001. Body fat percentage and fat mass were reduced by 2.8% (p<0.001 and 9.7 ± 4.9 kg (p<0.001, respectively. In addition, there was a reduction of 4.4 ± 3.4 kg (p<0.001 in lean mass. We concluded that the surgical procedure significantly reduced body weight, BMI, fat percentage and fat mass and is an alternative when conventional treatments appear ineffective.

  9. Restrictive bariatric surgery techniques: evolution and current trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Musleh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery has proved to be more effective than medical therapy in the treatment for obesity. Multiple techniques have been described and can be divided into three main groups: Restrictive surgery, where the main objective is to decrease the volume of caloric intake; malabsortive surgery, where a portion of the absortive circuit is bypassed and thus limiting the caloric absortion; and a combination of both. Among the restrictive techniques, gastroplasty was one of the first procedures described. First horizontal gastroplasty and then vertical banded gastroplasty showed good short-term results but with poor long-term outcomes. These techniques have been gradually abandoned. Adjustable gastric banding is a minimally invasive technique and has the advantage of being reversible. Weight loss is adequate, but less effective than gastric bypass. Postoperative complications are low at short-term, but increase per year at long-term follow-up. Sleeve gastrectomy is an effective weight loss procedure that can be performed safely as a first stage or primary procedure. This results in excellent weight loss and co-morbidity reduction that exceeds, or is comparable to, that of other accepted bariatric procedures. Gastric plicature is a relatively new procedure and has reported good short-term outcomes in weight loss with few short-term complications. However, long-term outcomes are yet to be demonstrated.

  10. Endoscopic plasma argon coagulation in treatment of weight regain after bariatric surgery: what does the patient think about this?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, Simone Dallegrave; Baretta, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso; Cambi, Maria Paula Carlini; Marchesini, João Batista

    2014-01-01

    Bariatric surgery, especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is an effective treatment for refractory morbid obesity, causing the loss of 75% of initial excess weight. After the surgery, however, weight regain can occur in 10-20% of cases. To help, endoscopic argon plasma coagulation (APC) is used to reduce the anastomotic diameter. Many patients who undergo this treatment, are not always familiar with this procedure and its respective precautions. The aim of this study was to determine how well the candidate for APC understands the procedure and absorbs the information provided by the multidisciplinary team. We prepared a questionnaire with 12 true/false questions to evaluate the knowledge of the patients about the procedure they were to undergo. The questionnaire was administered by the surgeon during consultation in the preoperative period. The patients were invited to fill out the questionnaire. We found out that the majority learned about the procedure through the internet. They knew it was an outpatient treatment, where the anesthesia was similar to that for endoscopy, and that they would have to follow a liquid diet. But none of them knew that the purpose of this diet was to improve local wound healing. Bariatric patients who have a second chance to resume weight loss, need continuous guidance. The internet should be used by the multidisciplinary team to promote awareness that APC will not be sufficient for weight loss and weight-loss maintenance in the long term. Furthermore, there is a need to clarify again the harm of drinking alcohol in the process of weight loss, making its curse widely known.

  11. Discrepancy between ideal and realistic goal weights in three bariatric procedures: who is likely to be unrealistic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinberg, Leslie J; Keating, Kathleen; Simonelli, Laura

    2010-02-01

    Patients choose to undergo bariatric surgery for a variety of medical and psychosocial reasons. However, the majority of bariatric surgery candidates have unrealistic weight loss goals, and certain subgroups within this population may be more likely to endorse such beliefs. This study examines weight loss expectations in patients undergoing three different weight loss procedures (laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy). Between October 2007 and June 2008, 114 patients (81.6% female) underwent weight loss surgery. At entry into the program, patients identified their postsurgical goal weights. "Realistic" weights were calculated based on patients' presurgical excess weights and expected loss based upon their surgical procedure. Patient [mean preoperative body mass index (BMI) = 48.89] weight loss discrepancies were quite variable with "realistic" versus "dream" weight discrepancies ranging from 0.34 to 71.11 kg (M = 28.79 kg; SD = 13.21 kg). The mean was equivalent to losing 106% (SD = 0.15%) of excess body weight. Baseline BMI, female gender, younger age, and Caucasian ethnicity accounted for up to 62% of the variance in discrepancy scores. After controlling for initial BMI, there were no differences in discrepancies based upon type of surgery. Across all three surgery types, women, Caucasians, younger patients, and those with higher initial BMIs were more likely to have unrealistic goals. Informed consent procedures should help patients, particularly those most likely to be unrealistic, understand likely outcomes as part of education on risks and benefits of weight loss surgery.

  12. Management of Asymptomatic Renal Stones in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, David; Locke, James

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Management guidelines were created to screen and manage asymptomatic renal stones in U.S. astronauts. The risks for renal stone formation in astronauts due to bone loss and hypercalcuria are unknown. Astronauts have a stone risk which is about the same as commercial aviation pilots, which is about half that of the general population. However, proper management of this condition is still crucial to mitigate health and mission risks in the spaceflight environment. Methods: An extensive review of the literature and current aeromedical standards for the monitoring and management of renal stones was done. The NASA Flight Medicine Clinic's electronic medical record and Longitudinal Survey of Astronaut Health were also reviewed. Using this work, a screening and management algorithm was created that takes into consideration the unique operational environment of spaceflight. Results: Renal stone screening and management guidelines for astronauts were created based on accepted standards of care, with consideration to the environment of spaceflight. In the proposed algorithm, all astronauts will receive a yearly screening ultrasound for renal calcifications, or mineralized renal material (MRM). Any areas of MRM, 3 millimeters or larger, are considered a positive finding. Three millimeters approaches the detection limit of standard ultrasound, and several studies have shown that any stone that is 3 millimeters or less has an approximately 95 percent chance of spontaneous passage. For mission-assigned astronauts, any positive ultrasound study is followed by low-dose renal computed tomography (CT) scan, and flexible ureteroscopy if CT is positive. Other specific guidelines were also created. Discussion: The term "MRM" is used to account for small areas of calcification that may be outside the renal collecting system, and allows objectivity without otherwise constraining the diagnostic and treatment process for potentially very small calcifications of uncertain

  13. Dietetic recommendations after bariatric procedures in the light of the new guidelines regarding metabolic and bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzębska-Mierzyńska, Marta; Ostrowska, Lucyna; Wasiluk, Diana; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of obesity occurrence is constantly increasing all over the world and becoming global epidemic. Facing the lack of the efficiency of conservative treatment, patients with II and III degree of obesity are qualified for surgical treatment; however, the efficiency of surgical treatment is connected with permanent change of nutritional habits and previous lifestyle of the patient. Modification of the way of nutrition, regardless of the type of bariatric procedure, should especially include the lowering of food energetic value and change of type, consistency and size of consumed food. Nutritional treatment after bariatric procedures is multistage. It includes clear liquid diet, full liquid diet, pureed diet, mechanically altered soft diet and regular diet. Gradual expanding of the diet protects gastrointestinal tract from chemical, mechanical and thermal irritation by the food. It also should prevent nutritional deficiencies. Significant influence on the result of surgical treatment of obesity has also regular intake of food, consuming products with high nutritional value, avoiding confectionery and fat products, consuming proper amounts of protein (60-80 g/day) and vitamin-mineral supplementation.

  14. Does Certification as Bariatric Surgery Center and Volume Influence the Outcome in RYGB-Data Analysis of German Bariatric Surgery Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, Christine; Köckerling, F; Lange, V; Wolff, S; Knoll, C; Bruns, C; Manger, Th

    2017-02-01

    To examine the association between the certification as bariatric surgery center and volume and patient outcome, data collected in the German Bariatric Surgery Registry were evaluated. All data were registered prospectively in cooperation with the Institute of Quality Assurance in Surgery at Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg. Data collection began in 2005 for all bariatric procedures in an online database. Participation in the quality assurance study is required for all certified bariatric surgery centers in Germany. Descriptive evaluation and matched pairs analysis were performed. Patients were matched via propensity score taking into account BMI, age, and incidence of comorbidities. During the period from 2005 to 2013, 3083 male and 10,639 female patients were operated on with the RYGB primary approach. In Centers of Competence (77.2 %) and non-accredited hospitals (76.3 %), the proportion of female patients was significantly lower than in Centers of Reference/Excellence (78.7 %; p = 0.002). The mean age in Centers of Reference/Excellence (41.2 years) was significantly lower than in Centers of Competence (43.2 years; p bariatric surgery centers with higher volume. The study supports the concept of certification. There are different factors which can and cannot be preoperatively modified and influence the perioperative outcome.

  15. Totally changed, yet still the same: patients' lived experiences 5 years beyond bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natvik, Eli; Gjengedal, Eva; Råheim, Målfrid

    2013-09-01

    Bariatric surgery provides sustainable weight loss and increased quality of life for most, but not all patients. To increase the knowledge of this complex patient group and their needs during follow-up, we aimed to describe the essential meaning of bariatric surgery patients' long-term experiences by using a phenomenological lifeworld approach. Eight patients were interviewed between 5 and 7 years after bariatric surgery. Life after bariatric surgery was described as living with tension, ambivalence, and reinforced attention toward one's own body. The tension was related to embodied change and altered relations to the social world. The patients express an ongoing demand for control of health-related habits and practices, and to not lose control over the body again. Surgical weight loss and improved physical function do not necessarily mean changed health-related habits and practices in the long term. Experiencing weight regain is connected with emotional stress, shame, and self-contempt.

  16. The effects of healing touch on pain, nausea, and anxiety following bariatric surgery: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, Joel G; Suchicital, Liliana; Lang, Maria; Kukic, Azra; Mangione, Lucrezia; Swengros, Diane; Fabian, Jennifer; Friesen, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    ... such as Healing Touch. A quasi-experimental study was conducted to determine the feasibility of a Healing Touch intervention for reducing pain, nausea, and anxiety in patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery...

  17. Bariatric surgery for obese children and adolescents: a review of the moral challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hofmann, Bjørn

    2013-01-01

    .... This poses a series of moral challenges, which have to be addressed both when considering bariatric surgery introduced as a health care service and when deciding for treatment for young individuals. A question based (Socratic...

  18. C-Reactive protein level in morbidly obese patients before and after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Rojano-Rodríguez

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: Preoperative CRP had a significant lineal relation to weight and body mass index. Patients who underwent bariatric surgery had a significant decrease in CRP, weight, and fasting glucose at 6 months after surgery.

  19. Potential protective role of bariatric surgery against breast cancer in postmenopausal women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Irina Balescu; Nicolae Bacalbasa

    2017-01-01

    .... Therefore attention was focused on evaluating the role of bariatric surgery in order to offer a better control of the comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension or dyslipidemia...

  20. The psychological profile of bariatric patients with and without type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wimmelmann, Cathrine L; Smith, Evelyn; Lund, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some bariatric patients are referred for surgery with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes while others are referred without co-morbid diabetes, but psychological differences between patients with and without type 2 diabetes undergoing bariatric surgery have not yet been investigated....... The objective of this study was to present the baseline results of the longitudinal GASMITO-PSYC study, and to evaluate the psychological differences between bariatric patients with and without type 2 diabetes. METHODS: A total of 129 Roux-en- Y gastric bypass patients were recruited from the bariatric clinic...... at a hospital in the suburban Copenhagen area. Participants answered questionnaires concerning personality, mental symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), body image, lifestyle, and physical health including diabetes status on average 11 weeks before surgery. Questionnaires were either sent...

  1. Operative Treatments for Reflux After Bariatric Surgery: Current and Emerging Management Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treitl, Daniela; Nieber, Derek; Ben-David, Kfir

    2017-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder that has a well-established connection with obesity. To ameliorate the morbidity associated with obesity, bariatric procedures have become an established pathway to accomplish sustained weight loss. In some procedures, such as with the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, weight loss is also accompanied by the resolution of GERD symptoms. However, other popular bariatric surgeries, such as the sleeve gastrectomy, have a controversial impact on their effect on reflux. Consequently, increased attention has been given to the development of strategies for the management of de novo or recurrent reflux after bariatric surgery. This article aims to discuss medical and surgical strategies for reflux after bariatric surgery, and their outcomes.

  2. The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on the Spectrum of Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan J. Nostedt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is becoming one of the most common causes of liver disease in the western world. The most significant risk factors are obesity and the metabolic syndrome for which bariatric surgery has been shown to be an effective treatment. However, the effects of bariatric surgery on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, specifically liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, are not well established. We review published bariatric surgery outcomes with respect to nonalcoholic liver disease. On the basis of this review we suggest that bariatric surgery may provide a viable treatment option for the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, including patients with fibrosis and compensated cirrhosis, and that this topic should be a target of future investigation.

  3. Asymptomatic deer excrete infectious prions in faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Miller, Michael W; Wolfe, Lisa L; Sirochman, Tracey M; Glidden, David V; Palmer, Christina; Lemus, Azucena; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2009-09-24

    Infectious prion diseases-scrapie of sheep and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of several species in the deer family-are transmitted naturally within affected host populations. Although several possible sources of contagion have been identified in excretions and secretions from symptomatic animals, the biological importance of these sources in sustaining epidemics remains unclear. Here we show that asymptomatic CWD-infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) excrete CWD prions in their faeces long before they develop clinical signs of prion disease. Intracerebral inoculation of irradiated deer faeces into transgenic mice overexpressing cervid prion protein (PrP) revealed infectivity in 14 of 15 faecal samples collected from five deer at 7-11 months before the onset of neurological disease. Although prion concentrations in deer faeces were considerably lower than in brain tissue from the same deer collected at the end of the disease, the estimated total infectious dose excreted in faeces by an infected deer over the disease course may approximate the total contained in a brain. Prolonged faecal prion excretion by infected deer provides a plausible natural mechanism that might explain the high incidence and efficient horizontal transmission of CWD within deer herds, as well as prion transmission among other susceptible cervids.

  4. Asymptomatic deer excrete infectious prions in feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Miller, Michael W.; Wolfe, Lisa L.; Sirochman, Tracey M.; Glidden, David V.; Palmer, Christina; Lemus, Azucena; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious prion diseases 1 – scrapie of sheep 2 and chronic wasting disease (CWD) of several species in the deer family 3,4 – are transmitted naturally within affected host populations. Although several possible sources of contagion have been identified in excretions and secretions from symptomatic animals 5–8, the biological importance of these sources in sustaining epidemics remains unclear. Here we show that asymptomatic CWD-infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) excrete CWD prions in their feces long before they develop clinical signs of prion disease. Intracerebral (i.c.) inoculation of irradiated deer feces into transgenic (Tg) mice overexpressing cervid PrP revealed infectivity in 14 of 15 fecal samples collected from 5 deer at 7–11 months before the onset of neurological disease. Although prion concentrations in deer feces were considerably lower than in brain tissue from the same deer collected at the disease terminus, the estimated total infectious dose excreted in feces by an infected deer over the disease course may approximate the total contained in brain tissue. Prolonged fecal prion excretion by infected deer provides a plausible natural mechanism that might explain the high incidence and efficient horizontal transmission of CWD within deer herds 3,4,9, as well as prion transmission between susceptible deer species. PMID:19741608

  5. Krukenberg tumor after gastric bypass for morbid obesity. Bariatric surgery and gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Pablo; Villarejo, Pedro; Padilla, David

    2013-01-01

    Gastric bypass is one of the most frequently performed surgical procedures in bariatric surgery. A neoplasm within the gastric pouch is a somewhat infrequent complication but with important survival consequences. We present the case of a 51-year-old woman who developed an adenocarcinoma in the bypassed stomach three years after bariatric surgery; the tumour was incidentally discovered after gynaecological surgery for uterine myomas. Various diagnostic modalities for the excluded stomach were analysed.

  6. Krukenberg tumor after gastric bypass for morbid obesity: Bariatric surgery and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Menéndez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastric by-pass is one of the most performed surgical procedure in bariatric surgery. Neoplasm within gastric remnant is a slightly frequent complication (only six cases have been described but with important survival consequences. We present a case of a patient who developed an adenocarcinoma in excluded stomach, after three years of bariatric surgery; the tumor was incidentally discovered after a gynecological surgery for uterine myomas. Different diagnostic modalities for the excluded stomach were analyzed.

  7. Influence of a rural environment on patient access and outcomes for bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Kristie L; Cox, Stephanie J; Tabone, Lawrence E

    2017-04-01

    Despite a higher rate of obesity in rural populations, there is a 23% decrease in performed bariatric procedures. The influence of a rural environment on surgical outcomes and treatment efficacy is unknown. We retrospectively reviewed all bariatric surgeries performed in a large university hospital in West Virginia from September 2012 to September 2014. Patients were categorized based on their rural-urban commuting area codes. Subject demographic characteristics, insurance provider, type of surgery, completion of program, preoperative body mass index (BMI), percent excess weight loss (%EWL), and percent total weight loss (%TWL) at 6 and 12 months postoperatively, and follow-up appointment attendance were collected. Logistic and linear regression analyses were conducted. A total of 122 patients were evaluated with 82 receiving surgery. Of these patients, 77 had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and 5 had Sleeve Gastrectomy. Nine patients out of 82 were lost to follow-up at 6 months (n = 73), and 12 patients out of 62 were lost to follow-up at 12 months (n = 50). Rural patients were .283 times less likely to receive bariatric surgery, (P = .004). However, this relationship was confounded by insurance provider; after controlling for this variable, the relationship between rural status and surgery completion was nonsignificant (P = .066). Rural status did not predict change in BMI, %EWL, or %TWL at 6 months (P = .738; P = .848; P = .334) or 12 months (P = .902; P = .143; P = .195), or compliance for follow-up appointments (P = .232). Rural bariatric patients seem to have decreased success at completing bariatric programs, which is likely confounded by insurance type. Yet, when the rural patient is able to realize the benefits of bariatric surgery, their outcomes are unchanged compared with urban patients. Although the study is limited by sample size, it highlights the need for reducing obstacles for bariatric surgery in an already underserved population, the rural community

  8. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy leads the U.S. utilization of bariatric surgery at academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, J Esteban; Nguyen, Ninh T

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of a recent single state bariatric surgery registry revealed that laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy was the most common bariatric procedure starting in 2012. The objective of this study was to examine the trend in utilization of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy performed at academic medical centers in the United States. Using ICD-9 diagnosis and procedure codes, clinical data obtained from the University HealthSystem Consortium database for all bariatric procedures performed for the treatment of severe obesity between October 1, 2011, and June 30, 2014. Quarterly trends in utilization for the 4 most commonly performed bariatric operations were examined, and comparisons between procedures were performed. A total of 54,953 bariatric procedures were performed. Utilization of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy increased from 23.7% of all bariatric procedures during the fourth quarter of 2011 to 60.7% during the second quarter of 2014 while laparoscopic gastric bypass decreased from 62.2% to 37.0%, respectively. Utilization of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy surpassed that of laparoscopic gastric bypass in the second quarter of 2013 (50.6% versus 45.8%). During the same time period, utilization of open gastric bypass fell from 6.6% to 1.5%, and the use of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding decreased from 7.5% to .8%. Within the context of U.S. academic medical centers, there has been a significant increase in the utilization of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, which has surpassed laparoscopic gastric bypass utilization since 2013. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is now the most commonly performed bariatric procedure at the national level within academic centers. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The risk of kidney stones following bariatric surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Vijayvargiya, Priya; Anthanont, Pimjai; Erickson, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    With rising prevalence of morbid obesity, the number of bariatric surgeries performed each year has been increasing worldwide. The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the risk of kidney stones following bariatric surgery. A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from inception through July 2015. Only studies reporting relative risks, odd ratios or hazard ratios (HRs) to compare risk of kidney stones in patients who underwent bariatric surgery versus no surgery were included. Pooled risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Four studies (One randomized controlled trial and three cohort studies) with 11,348 patients were included in analysis to assess the risk of kidney stones following bariatric surgery. The pooled RR of kidney stones in patients undergoing bariatric surgery was 1.22 (95% CI, 0.63-2.35). The type of bariatric surgery subgroup analysis demonstrated an increased risk of kidney stones in patients following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) with the pooled RR of 1.73 (95% CI, 1.30-2.30) and a decreased risk of kidney stones in patients following restrictive procedures including laparoscopic banding or sleeve gastrectomy with the pooled RR of 0.37 (95% CI, 0.16-0.85). Our meta-analysis demonstrates an association between RYGB and increased risk of kidney stones. Restrictive bariatric surgery, on the other hand, may decrease kidney stone risk. Future study with long-term follow-up data is needed to confirm this potential benefit of restrictive bariatric surgery.

  10. Results of Implementing an Enhanced Recovery After Bariatric Surgery (ERABS) Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Mannaerts, Guido; Mil, Stefanie; Stepaniak, Pieter; Dunkelgrun, Martin; de Quelerij, Marcel; Verbrugge, Serge; Zengerink, Hans; Biter, L. Ulas

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: With the increasing prevalence of morbid obesity and healthcare costs in general, interest is shown in safe, efficient, and cost-effective bariatric care. This study describes an Enhanced Recovery After Bariatric Surgery (ERABS) protocol and the results of implementing such protocol on procedural times, length of stay in hospital (LOS), and the number of complications, such as readmissions and reoperations. Methods: Results of implementing an ERABS protocol were analyz...

  11. Current practices of obesity pharmacotherapy, bariatric surgery referral and coding for counselling by healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Petrin, Christine; Kahan, Scott; Turner, M.; Gallagher, C.; Dietz, W. H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction Rates of obesity pharmacotherapy use, bariatric surgery and intensive behavioural counselling have been extremely low. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to survey healthcare provider beliefs, practice and knowledge regarding obesity management. Methods Primary care physicians (PCPs), OB?GYN physicians and nurse practitioners (NPs) responded to a web?based survey related to drug therapy practice, bariatric surgery referral and reimbursement coding practice...

  12. Country of origin and bariatric surgery in Sweden during 2001-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarian, Ensieh; Sundquist, Kristina; Calling, Susanna; Sundquist, Jan; Li, Xinjun

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity, as well as use of bariatric surgery, has increased worldwide. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential differences in the use of bariatric surgery among Swedes and immigrants in Sweden and whether the hypothesized differences remain after adjustment for socioeconomic factors. A closed cohort of all individuals aged 20-64 years was followed during 2001-2010. Further analyses were performed in 2 periods separately (2001-2005 and 2006-2010). Age-standardized cumulative incidence rates (CR) of bariatric surgery were compared between Swedes and immigrants considering individual variables. Cox proportional hazards models were used in univariate and multivariate models for males and females. A total of 12,791 Swedes and 2060 immigrants underwent bariatric surgery. The lowest rates of bariatric surgery were found in immigrant men. The largest difference in CR between Swedes and immigrants was observed among low-income individuals (3.4 and 2.3 per 1000 individuals, respectively). Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were lower for all immigrants compared with Swedes in the second period. The highest HRs were observed among immigrants from Chile and Lebanon and the lowest among immigrants from Bosnia. Except for Nordic countries, immigrants from all other European countries had a lower HR compared with Swedes. Men in general and some immigrant groups had a lower HR of bariatric surgery. Moreover, the difference between Swedes and immigrants was more pronounced in individuals with low socioeconomic status (income). It is unclear if underlying barriers to receive bariatric surgery are due to patients' preferences/lack of knowledge or healthcare structures. Future studies are needed to examine potential causes behind these differences. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Which postoperative complications matter most after bariatric surgery? Prioritizing quality improvement efforts to improve national outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Christopher R; Brethauer, Stacy A; Tu, Chao; Petrick, Anthony T; Morton, John M; Schauer, Philip R; Aminian, Ali

    2018-01-12

    National quality programs have been implemented to decrease the burden of adverse events on key outcomes in bariatric surgery. However, it is not well understood which complications have the most impact on patient health. To quantify the impact of specific bariatric surgery complications on key clinical outcomes. The Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQIP) database. Data from patients who underwent primary bariatric procedures were retrieved from the MBSAQIP 2015 participant use file. The impact of 8 specific complications (bleeding, venous thromboembolism [VTE], leak, wound infection, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, myocardial infarction, and stroke) on 5 main 30-day outcomes (end-organ dysfunction, reoperation, intensive care unit admission, readmission, and mortality) was estimated using risk-adjusted population attributable fractions. The population attributable fraction is a calculated measure taking into account the prevalence and severity of each complication. The population attributable fractions represents the percentage reduction in a given outcome that would occur if that complication were eliminated. In total, 135,413 patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy (67%), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (29%), adjustable gastric banding (3%), and duodenal switch (1%) were included. The most common complications were bleeding (.7%), wound infection (.5%), urinary tract infection (.3%), VTE (.3%), and leak (.2%). Bleeding and leak were the largest contributors to 3 of 5 examined outcomes. VTE had the greatest effect on readmission and mortality. This study quantifies the impact of specific complications on key surgical outcomes after bariatric surgery. Bleeding and leak were the complications with the largest overall effect on end-organ dysfunction, reoperation, and intensive care unit admission after bariatric surgery. Furthermore, our findings suggest that an initiative targeting reduction of post-bariatric surgery

  14. Major Increase in Microbiota-Dependent Proatherogenic Metabolite TMAO One Year After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trøseid, Marius; Hov, Johannes R; Nestvold, Torunn Kristin; Thoresen, Hanne; Berge, Rolf K; Svardal, Asbjørn; Lappegård, Knut Tore

    2016-05-01

    Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) is formed in the liver from trimethylamine (TMA), a product exclusively generated by the gut microbiota from dietary phosphatidylcholine and carnitine. An alternative pathway of TMAO formation from carnitine is via the microbiota-dependent intermediate γ-butyrobetaine (γBB). Elevated TMAO levels are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but little is known about TMAO in obesity. Given the proposed contribution of microbiota alterations in obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D), we investigated the potential impact of obesity, lifestyle-induced weight loss, and bariatric surgery on plasma levels of TMAO, its microbiota-dependent intermediate γBB, and its diet-dependent precursors carnitine and choline. TMAO, γBB, carnitine, and choline were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography in 34 obese individuals (17 with and 17 without T2D) undergoing bariatric surgery and 17 controls. TMAO was not elevated in obese patients or reduced by lifestyle interventions but increased approximately twofold after bariatric surgery. Similar to TMAO, plasma levels of γBB were not influenced by lifestyle interventions but increased moderately after bariatric surgery. In contrast, carnitine and choline, which are abundant in nutrients, such as in red meat and eggs, and not microbiota dependent, were reduced after lifestyle interventions and rebounded after bariatric surgery. The major increase in TMAO after bariatric surgery was unexpected because high TMAO levels have been linked to CVD, whereas bariatric surgery is known to reduce CVD risk. Prospective studies of gut microbiota composition and related metabolites in relation to long-term cardiovascular risk after bariatric surgery are warranted.

  15. The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Urinary Incontinence in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, C J; O'Sullivan, O E; Shabana, H; Boyce, M; O'Reilly, B A

    2016-07-01

    Little is known regarding the effect of bariatric surgery on urinary incontinence. Between September 2008 and November 2014, 240 female patients underwent bariatric surgery. The prevalence of urinary incontinence preoperatively was 45 % (108). Eighty-two (76 %) completed urinary function questionnaires pre-operatively and post-operatively. Fifty-seven (70 %) underwent laparoscopic gastric bypass, twenty-four (29 %) underwent sleeve gastrectomy and one underwent a banding procedure. Thirty-one (38 %) reported leaking on sneezing or coughing-stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Thirteen (16 %) complained of leaking before reaching the toilet-overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). The remaining thirty-eight (46 %) reported mixed symptoms. The mean pre-operative weight and BMI were 133 (18) kg and 50 (SD = 6.2) kg/m(2) respectively. The mean post-operative BMI drop was 16 (SD = 5.2) kg/m(2). Preoperatively, 61 (75 %) reported moderate to very severe urinary incontinence compared to 30 (37 %) post-operatively (χ (2) = 3.24.67, p = 0.050). Twenty-seven (33 %) patients reported complete resolution of their urinary incontinence. Fifty-one (62 %) patients required incontinence pads on a daily basis pre-operatively, compared to 35 (43 %) post-operatively (χ (2) = 22.211.6, p = 0.00). The mean International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire- Urinary Incontinence short form (ICIQ-UI SF) score was 9.3 (SD = 4.4) pre-operatively compared to 4.9 (SD = 5.3) post-operatively (t = 7.2, p = 0.000). The improvement score post-operatively was 8 (SD = 3). A significant difference in the ICIQ-UI SF was identified between OAB and SUI groups when adjusting for age, number of children, type of delivery and pre-op BMI (t = 1.98, p = 0.05). Bariatric surgery results in a clinically significant improvement in urinary incontinence. However, this is not proportional to pre-operative BMI, weight loss, age, parity and mode

  16. The effects of bariatric surgeries on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoheyan, Tamadar; Hassanain, Mazen; Al-Mulhim, Amnah; Al-Sabhan, Atheer; Al-Amro, Shaden; Bamehriz, Fahad; Al-Khalidi, Hisham

    2017-03-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease and is associated with obesity. Bariatric surgery has been shown to be the most effective method for weight reduction. However, no conclusive data exists on the effects of weight reduction surgery on NAFLD. This study aimed to characterize liver histology, metabolic status, and liver function changes in patients who underwent bariatric surgery, before and after the weight-reduction procedure. This is a phase 1 report of a prospective cohort study of patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Biopsies were obtained at baseline (intraoperatively) and 3 months postoperatively. Clinical characteristics, biochemical profile, and histopathological data [steatosis, NAFLD activity score (NAS), hepatocyte ballooning, lobular inflammation, and degree of fibrosis] were obtained at each time point. Twenty-seven patients were included (9 men and 18 women), and the median age was 35 ± 8 years old. At baseline, 3 patients had dyslipidemia, 4 had diabetes, and 5 patients had hypertension, which did not change at follow-up. The average body mass index decreased from 44.6 ± 7.8 to 34.2 ± 6.3 kg/m2 at follow-up (P < 0.001). On histopathology, 12 of the 18 patients with preoperative steatosis (median score 2) had reduced steatosis scores postoperatively (P = 0.025); fibrosis (median score 1) was also reduced in 17 patients (P = 0.012), and NAS was decreased from 4 (3-5) to 2 (1-3) (P = 0.004). The changes in lobular inflammation and hepatocyte ballooning were not statistically significant on follow-up. The phase 1 results of this study described the histopathological changes following weight reduction surgery and suggested that hepatic steatosis, fibrosis, and NAFLD activity score were reduced 3 months after surgery. This clinical trial is financially supported by the National Plan for Science, Technology and Innovation Program grant number (11-MED1910-02).

  17. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of asymptomatic hyperuricemia and gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, J G; Beltrán, L M; Mejía-Chew, C; Tevar, D; Torres, R J

    2016-12-01

    Sonography has detected urate deposits in 34%-42% of the patients with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. This may prompt reclassification of asymptomatic hyperuricemia into "asymptomatic gout" and consideration of urate lowering therapy (ULT) to resolve urate deposits. In patients with gout and no visible tophi, sonography has detected urate deposits in half of the patients. This may allow diagnosing "tophaceous gout" and influencing the serum urate target level, prophylaxis to avoid acute gout flares during ULT, and clinical follow-up. Current accessibility to sonography may better classify patients with hyperuricemia and gout and contribute to delineate therapeutic objectives and clinical guidance.

  18. Primary and Presidential Candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goddard, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This article looks at primary and presidential candidates in 2008 and 2012. Evidence suggests that voters are less influenced by candidates’ color, gender, or religious observation than previously. Conversely, markers of difference remain salient in the imaginations of pollsters and journalists...

  19. Early Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Urogenital Function in Morbidly Obese Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleid, Maha; Muneer, Asif; Renshaw, Sara; George, Jason; Jenkinson, Andrew D; Adamo, Marco; Elkalaawy, Mohamed; Batterham, Rachel L; Ralph, David J; Hashemi, Majid; Cellek, Selim

    2017-02-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for erectile dysfunction (ED) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Bariatric surgery has been shown to improve erectile function and urinary symptoms in medium- to long-term studies (3- to 12-month postoperative follow-up). To investigate the early effect (1 month postoperatively) of bariatric surgery on ED and LUTS, which has not previously been investigated. Morbidly obese men (body mass index > 35 kg/m2) undergoing bariatric surgery were asked to complete the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaires before surgery and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. The influence of bariatric surgery on urogenital function, body mass index, fasting blood glucose, and glycated hemoglobin were analyzed using parametric and non-parametric tests for paired samples. Of 30 patients who completed the study, 18 reported ED (IIEF score bariatric surgery starting at the 1-month postoperative time point and improvement continued throughout the study in all patients with ED or moderate to severe LUTS. This is the first study showing improvement in erectile and urinary function within 1 month after bariatric surgery, an effect that was parallel to glycemic improvement and weight loss. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. All rights reserved.

  20. What is the role of bariatric surgery in the management of obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteliou, E; Miras, A D

    2017-04-01

    Diet, exercise, cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacotherapy are some of the means of assisting patients to lose weight, with bariatric surgery being the most effective. Over the last two decades, the increased awareness of the systemic benefits of bariatric surgery, as well as the improved safety and the wider use of the laparoscopic approach, has made bariatric surgery flourish. In the United Kingdom, the adjustable gastric band (10%), vertical sleeve gastrectomy (37%) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (45%) are the three most common procedures. Obesity-associated mortality and co-morbidities such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obstructive sleep apnea, renal dysfunction and depression improve significantly with bariatric surgery. The mechanisms of weight loss extend beyond restriction and malabsorption and include changes in hunger and satiety, food preferences, and possibly energy expenditure. Despite its safety and efficacy, bariatric surgery is underutilized as less than 1% of adults with obesity receive it. In view of the evolution of obesity into a global threat, access to bariatric surgery should be increased, whilst developing safer and less invasive weight loss treatments.

  1. Vitamin K1 monitoring in pregnancies after bariatric surgery: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Goele; Guelinckx, Isabelle; Voets, Willy; Galjaard, Sander; Van Haard, Paul M M; Vansant, Greet M; Devlieger, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal intracranial bleedings and birth defects have been reported, possibly related to maternal vitamin K1 deficiency during pregnancy after bariatric surgery. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of screening and supplementation on K1 serum levels in pregnant women with bariatric surgery, and to compare K1 levels and prothrombin time (PT %) in the first trimester with pregnant women without bariatric surgery. A prospective cohort study including 49 pregnant women with bariatric surgery. Nutritional deficiencies were prospectively screened. In case of observed low K1 serum levels, supplementation was provided. K1 serum levels and PT (%) during the first trimester were compared with a nonsurgical control group of 27 women. During the first trimester, most women had low K1 serum levels (surgery group showed a higher mean PT compared to the controls (111.3 versus 98.9%; Pbariatric surgery. Supplementation during pregnancy can restore vitamin K1 in women with bariatric surgery, potentially protecting the fetus and newborn against intracranial hemorrhage. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of bariatric surgery on pelvic floor disorders in obese women: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Wenqing; Zheng, Yiqun; Huang, Hongxing; Chen, Lianghua; Cao, Bin

    2017-08-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for pelvic floor disorders (PFD) but the effects of bariatric surgery on PFD are uncertain. This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effects of bariatric surgery on PFD in obese women. A systematic search of PubMed, Cochrane Library, CNKI and CBM databases up to October 2016 was performed, and studies reporting pre-operative and post-operative outcomes in obese women undergoing bariatric surgery were included. The Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI-20), the Pelvic Floor Incontinence Questionnaire (PFIQ-7), the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire, Female Sexual Function Index and the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Urinary Incontinence short form score were used for evaluating pelvic floor dysfunction after bariatric surgery. Eleven cohort studies were finally included. Pooled results revealed that bariatric surgery was associated with a significant improvement in PFD for obese women on the whole [PFDI-20: SMD = 0.89, 95% CI (0.44, 1.34), P pelvic organ prolapse. However, no significant improvement was found in fecal incontinence and sexual function. Bariatric surgery is associated with significant improvement in urinary incontinence, and has a benefit on pelvic organ prolapse for obese women. However, there is no significant improvement in fecal incontinence and sexual function. Further multi-center, large-scale and longer-term randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm these results.

  3. Bariatric surgery and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: current and potential future treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira eSasaki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH are increasingly common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. The diagnosis of NASH is challenging as most affected patients are symptom-free and the role of routine screening is not clearly established. Most patients with severe obesity who undergo bariatric surgery have NAFLD, which is associated insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, hypertension, and obesity-related dyslipidemia. The effective treatment for NAFLD is weight reduction through lifestyle modifications, antiobesity medication, or bariatric surgery. Among these treatments, bariatric surgery is the most reliable method for achieving substantial, sustained weight loss. This procedure is safe when performed by a skilled surgeon, and the benefits include reduced weight, improved quality of life, decreased obesity-related comorbidities, and increased life expectancy. Further research is urgently needed to determine the best use of bariatric surgery with NAFLD patients at high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and its role in modulating complications of NAFLD, such as T2DM and cardiovascular disease. The current evidence suggests that bariatric surgery for patients with severe obesity decreases the grade of steatosis, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis. However, further long-term studies are required to confirm the true effects before recommending bariatric surgery as a potential treatment for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

  4. Effect of BMI on quality of life and depression levels after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierżantowicz, Regina; Lewko, Jolanta; Hady, Hady Razak; Kirpsza, Bożena; Trochimowicz, Lech; Dadan, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Studies conducted in Poland have found that 1% (~300,000) of Polish adults are obese. The degree of weight loss and reduction of discomfort associated with severe obesity are used to evaluate bariatric surgery outcomes. From the patient's point of view, QoL and mental health are the most important determinants of successful surgery, which is why interest in QoL assessment has increased. To assess the effect of BMI on quality of life and depression levels depending on the type of bariatric surgery. The group included 57 women and 43 men aged 20-60 years (mean age 40 years) with BMI from 36 to 40 (31%) and > 40 (69%). Twelve patients (12%) underwent laparoscopic adjustable gastric binding (LAGB), 58 (58%) sleeve gastrectomy, and 30 (30%) Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB). The Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS) was used to assess QoL. The severity of mood disorders was assessed using the Self-Rating Scale of Depression and Anxiety. Six months or 1 year after bariatric surgery, the number of patients with BMI > 40 had decreased from 69 to 14%. We found that the time since bariatric surgery contributed to a significant (p bariatric surgery, including quality of life. Long-term monitoring will be essential in determining psychological changes and the degree of weight loss.

  5. The impact of a standardized program on short and long-term outcomes in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, Lisa N F; Hong, Dennis; Gmora, Scott; Breau, Ruth; Anvari, Mehran

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there has been an improvement in short- and long-term clinical outcomes since 2010, when the Ontario Bariatric Network led a province-wide initiative to establish a standardized system of care for bariatric patients. The system includes nine bariatric centers, a centralized referral system, and a research registry. Standardization of procedures has progressed yearly, including guidelines for preoperative assessment and perioperative care. Analysis of the OBN registry data was performed by fiscal year between April 2010 and March 2015. Three-month overall postoperative complication rates and 30 day postoperative mortality were calculated. The mean percentage of weight loss at 1, 2, and 3 years postoperative, and regression of obesity-related diseases were calculated. The analysis of continuous and nominal data was performed using ANOVA, Chi-square, and McNemar's testing. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed for factors affecting postoperative complication rate. Eight thousand and forty-three patients were included in the bariatric registry between April 2010 and March 2015. Thirty-day mortality was rare (bariatric care has contributed to improvements in complication rates and supported prolonged weight loss and regression of obesity-related diseases in patients undergoing bariatric surgery in Ontario.

  6. Potential mechanisms mediating improved glycemic control after bariatric/metabolic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kaida, Sachiko; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Murata, Satoshi; Tani, Masaji; Tani, Tohru

    2016-03-01

    Conservative medical treatment for morbid obesity generally fails to sustain weight loss. On the other hand, surgical operations, so-called bariatric surgery, have evolved due to their long-term effects. The global increase in the overweight population and the introduction of laparoscopic surgery have resulted in the use of bariatric surgery spreading quickly worldwide in recent years. Recent clinical evidence suggests that bariatric surgery not only reduces body weight, but also improves secondary serious diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, in so-called metabolic surgery. Moreover, several potential mechanisms mediating the improvement in glycemic control after bariatric/metabolic surgery have been proposed based on the animal and human studies. These mechanisms include changes in the levels of gastrointestinal hormones, bacterial flora, bile acids, intestinal gluconeogenesis and gastrointestinal motility as well as adipose tissue and inflammatory mediators after surgery. The mechanisms underlying improved glycemic control are expected to accelerate the promotion of both metabolic and bariatric surgery. This article describes the current status of bariatric surgery worldwide and in Japan, reviews the accumulated data for weight loss and diabetic improvements after surgery and discusses the potential mechanisms mediating improved glycemic control.

  7. POSTOPERATIVE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY RELATED TO FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY AND RESPIRATORY MUSCLE STRENGTH IN PATIENTS SUBMITTED TO BARIATRIC SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVEIRA, Josélia Jucirema Jarschel de; FREITAS, Alexandre Coutinho Teixeira de; ALMEIDA, Andréa Adriana de

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Respiratory physiotherapy plays an important role preventing complications in bariatric surgery. Aim: To assess the effects of out-patient physiotherapy during post-operative period through respiratory pressures and functional capacity in individuals submitted to bariatric surgery. Method: A prospective longitudinal and controlled study was done in adults with body mass index (BMI) equal or greater than 40 kg/m², who have been submitted to bariatric surgery. They were ...

  8. Accumulation and Changes in Composition of Collagens in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue After Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuejun; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Marcelin, Geneviève; Genser, Laurent; Le Naour, Gilles; Torcivia, Adriana; Bauvois, Brigitte; Bouchet, Sandrine; Pelloux, Véronique; Sasso, Magali; Miette, Véronique; Tordjman, Joan; Clément, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) in sc adipose tissue (scAT) undergoes pathological remodeling during obesity. However, its evolution during weight loss remains poorly explored. The objective of the investigation was to study the histological, transcriptomic, and physical characteristics of scAT ECM remodeling during the first year of bariatric surgery (BS)-induced weight loss and their relationships with metabolic and bioclinical improvements. A total of 118 morbidly obese candidates for BS were recruited and followed up during 1 year after BS. scAT surgical biopsy and needle aspiration as well as scAT stiffness measurement were performed in three subgroups before and after BS. Fourteen nonobese, nondiabetic subjects served as controls. Significantly increased picrosirius-red-stained collagen accumulation in scAT after BS was observed along with fat mass loss, despite metabolic and inflammatory improvements and undetectable changes of scAT stiffness. Collagen accumulation positively associated with M2-macrophages (CD163(+) cells) before BS but negatively afterward. Expression levels of genes encoding ECM components (eg, COL3A1, COL6A1, COL6A2, ELN), cross-linking enzymes (eg, lysyl oxidase [LOX], LOXL4, transglutaminase), metalloproteinases, and their inhibitors were modified 1 year after BS. LOX expression and protein were significantly decreased and associated with decreased fat mass as well as other cross-linking enzymes. Although total collagen I and VI staining decreased 1 year after BS, we found increased degraded collagen I and III in scAT, suggesting increased degradation. After BS-induced weight loss and related metabolic improvements, scAT displays major collagen remodeling with an increased picrosirius-red staining that relates to increased collagen degradation and importantly decreased cross-linking. These features are in agreement with adequate ECM adaptation during fat mass loss.

  9. Prevention and treatment of peripheral neuropathy after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicki, Stacy A

    2010-01-01

    Given the ever-increasing problem of obesity, it is not surprising that the number of patients who undergo bariatric surgery continues to rise. For patients who have gastric banding, the amount of food they can consume is limited, and nausea and vomiting may further limit nutritional intake early on. More extensive procedures, such as the Roux-en-Y or biliopancreatic diversion with or without a duodenal switch, not only restrict intake but also limit absorption in the small intestine. As a result, deficiencies in vitamins, minerals, and trace elements may develop, leading to a variety of neurologic complications. The peripheral neuropathies best described with a clear-cut cause are an acute, frequently painful neuropathy or polyradiculoneuropathy associated with thiamine deficiency, and an isolated neuropathy or myeloneuropathy associated with deficiencies of either vitamin B12 or copper. Thiamine deficiency tends to occur in the first weeks or months after surgery, vitamin B12 deficiency may develop at any time from a few years to many years after surgery, and copper deficiency tends to be a fairly late complication, developing several years to many years following surgery. Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery may also have an increased risk of developing focal neuropathies, though these are less clearly related to specific nutritional deficiencies.Ideally, one would like to prevent these neuropathies, but there is no consensus of opinion as to what vitamins and micronutrients need to be taken following bariatric surgery. In addition, many patients who take supplements early on fail to maintain the regimen even though some of the neuropathies can occur fairly late. Supplements frequently recommended include a multivitamin, iron, vitamin D, folic acid, calcium citrate, and vitamin B12. Although thiamine is typically included in a multivitamin, the amount is fairly small, so I recommend adding 100 mg daily for at least the first year. Some have suggested

  10. Tissue-Specific Effects of Bariatric Surgery Including Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon N. Dankel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the molecular links between obesity and disease is potentially of great benefit for society. In this paper we discuss proposed mechanisms whereby bariatric surgery improves metabolic health, including acute effects on glucose metabolism and long-term effects on metabolic tissues (adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and liver and mitochondrial function. More short-term randomized controlled trials should be performed that include simultaneous measurement of metabolic parameters in different tissues, such as tissue gene expression, protein profile, and lipid content. By directly comparing different surgical procedures using a wider array of metabolic parameters, one may further unravel the mechanisms of aberrant metabolic regulation in obesity and related disorders.

  11. Effect of Health Literacy on Help-seeking Behavior in Morbidly Obese Patients Agreeing to Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayci, Haci Murat; Erdogdu, Umut Eren; Demirci, Hakan; Ardic, Aykut; Topak, Nevruz Yildirim; Taymur, İbrahim

    2018-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of health literacy on agreement for bariatric surgery among morbidly obese patients. The data of 242 morbidly obese patients (body mass index-BMI ≥ 40 kg/m 2 ) were evaluated in a cross-sectional case-control pattern. The patients were classified into two groups as those who were attending the clinic for the purpose of receiving bariatric surgery (n = 138) and those who did not (n = 104). The Turkish version of the European Health Literacy Survey Questionnaire (HLS-EU-Q47), consisting of 47 questions, was used for the health literacy evaluation. It was seen that patients who accepted bariatric surgery were younger and had higher weight and BMI values (p bariatric surgery and 26.04 (8.33:46.88) in the group who did not agree to bariatric surgery, and a statistically significant difference was determined between the two groups (p bariatric surgery and 45.2% of the group who did not (p  25-33) (respectively, 36.2%, 37.5%, p = 0.840). A sufficient level (> 33-42) and a perfect level were higher in the group who agreed to bariatric surgery (respectively, 42.8%, 18.1%, p bariatric surgery in morbidly obese patients. The higher the health literacy level, the more the agreement to bariatric surgery increased.

  12. Wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    My Engström

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was an in-depth investigation of the change process experienced by patients undergoing bariatric surgery. A prospective interview study was performed prior to as well as 1 and 2 years after surgery. Data analyses of the transcribed interviews were performed by means of the Grounded Theory method. A core category was identified: Wishing for deburdening through a sustainable control over eating and weight, comprising three related categories: hoping for deburdening and control through surgery, feeling deburdened and practising control through physical restriction, and feeling deburdened and trying to maintain control by own willpower. Before surgery, the participants experienced little or no control in relation to food and eating and hoped that the bariatric procedure would be the first brick in the building of a foundation that would lead to control in this area. The control thus achieved in turn affected the participants’ relationship to themselves, their roles in society, and the family as well as to health care. One year after surgery they reported established routines regarding eating as well as higher self-esteem due to weight loss. In family and society they set limits and in relation to health care staff they felt their concern and reported satisfaction with the surgery. After 2 years, fear of weight gain resurfaced and their self-image was modified to be more realistic. They were no longer totally self-confident about their condition, but realised that maintaining control was a matter of struggle to obtaining a foundation of sustainable control. Between 1 and 2 years after surgery, the physical control mechanism over eating habits started to more or less fade for all participants. An implication is that when this occurs, health care professionals need to provide interventions that help to maintain the weight loss in order to achieve a good long-term outcome.

  13. Outcome of sleeve gastrectomy as a primary bariatric procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rutte, P W J; Smulders, J F; de Zoete, J P; Nienhuijs, S W

    2014-05-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy is being performed increasingly in Europe. Data on long-term outcome would be helpful in defining the role of sleeve gastrectomy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of sleeve gastrectomy as a primary bariatric procedure. Medical charts of all patients who underwent a primary sleeve gastrectomy at the authors' institution between August 2006 and December 2012 were reviewed retrospectively using a prospective online data registry. For evolution of weight loss and co-morbidity, only patients with follow-up of at least 1 year were included. A subgroup analysis was done to compare patients with an intended stand-alone procedure and those with an intended two-stage procedure. A total of 1041 primary sleeve gastrectomies were performed in the study period. Median duration of surgery was 47 min, and median hospital stay was 2 days. Intra-abdominal bleeding occurred in 27 patients (2·6 per cent) and staple-line leakage in 24 (2.3 per cent). Some 866 patients had at least 1 year of follow-up. Mean excess weight loss was 68.4 per cent after 1 year (P sleeve gastrectomy; reflux or dysphagia was the indication in 34 (48 per cent) of these patients. Sleeve gastrectomy is a safe and effective bariatric procedure. Maximum weight loss was achieved after 4 years. Long-term results regarding weight loss and co-morbidities were satisfactory. © 2014 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Bariatric surgery: is it reasonable before the age of 16?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LILIAN HELENA POLAK MASSABKI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to assess the severity of obesity in children and adolescents through the presence of comorbidities and the potential indication of bariatric surgery. Methods: we conducted a cross-sectional study with clinical and laboratory data of the first consultation of patients at the childhood obesity clinic at a tertiary hospital from 2005 to 2013. We divided the patients into groups with or without potential indication for surgery, and recorded age, gender, birth weight, age of obesity onset, BMI Z score, presence of acanthosis nigricans, blood pressure, total cholesterol and fractions, triglycerides, blood glucose and fasting insulin, HOMA1-IR, CRP and ESR. The group with potential indication for surgery included: BMI > 40 or between 35-40 with comorbidities (Triglycerides >130mg/dl, glucose levels >100mg/dl, HOMA1-IR >3.16, Total Cholesterol >200mg/dl, LDL >130mg/dl and HDL <45mg/dl, regardless of age, epiphysis consolidation and previous treatment. Results: of the 296 patients included in the study, 282 (95.3% were younger than 16 years. The most frequent change was the HDL (63.2%, followed by HOMA1-IR (37.5%. Of the group of 66 patients with potential indication for surgery (22.3%, only ten (15.1% had more than 16 years. Acanthosis nigricans, the average HOMA1-IR, insulin, CRP, ESR, age, BMI Z score and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significant in the group with potential surgical indication. Conclusion: bariatric surgery might be indicated by BMI and comorbidities in children and adolescents under 16 years.

  15. Postoperative marijuana use and disordered eating among bariatric surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidot, Denise C; Prado, Guillermo; De La Cruz-Munoz, Nestor; Spadola, Christine; Cuesta, Melissa; Messiah, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Current literature is scarce in documenting marijuana use after bariatric weight loss surgery (WLS). The objective of this study was to explore the association among marijuana use patterns, disordered eating, and food addiction behaviors in patients 2 years after WLS. A university hospital in the United States. Participants (N = 50, mean age 28 y, standard deviation = 5.8) were administered a structured assessment that included the Addiction Severity Index, Yale Food Addiction Scale, Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire, and Disordered Eating Questionnaire. Marijuana use was defined based on the Addiction Severity Index as current use (within 30 d), recent use (use in last year), and increased use (increased use since surgery). Data were analyzed using Fisher's exact tests and linear regression methods adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, time since surgery, and change in body mass index. The majority of the sample was female (76%) and underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (62%). Eighteen percent (18%) of the sample reported current marijuana use; 38% reported recent use; and 21.4% reported increased use post-WLS. A loss of controlled food intake was associated with current (P = .02) and increased post-WLS use (P = .01). Increased use and/or regular marijuana use predicted higher scores on eating disorder subscales compared with respective counterparts (P<.05). Current use did not significantly predict higher scores on the Yale Food Addiction Scale. Findings indicated marijuana use in post-WLS patients despite recommendations against use. A subgroup of WLS patients may be at risk for disordered eating post-WLS, particularly those who used marijuana before surgery, and should be closely monitored for several years post-WLS. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of alcohol before and after bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Ribeiro de Amorim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess alcohol intake in the bariatric surgery pre and postoperative periods. METHODS: Patients were interviewed atSurgery Clinic of the Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco - HC/UFPE (Brazil from July 2011 to March 2012. We analyzed socioeconomic, anthropometric and clinical variables. We used the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT C. RESULTS: One hundred nineteen patients were enrolled (mean age: 41.23+11.30 years, with a predominance of the female gender (83.2%, non-Caucasian race (55%, married individuals or in a stable union (65.5%, with a high school education (40.3%and active in the job market (37%. Weight and body mass index (BMI were 128.77+25.28Kg and 49.09+9.26Kg/m2,respectively in the preoperative period (class II obesity and 87.19+19.16Kg and 33.04+6.21Kg/m2, respectively in the postoperative period (class I obesity (p<0.001. Hypertension was the most frequent disease in the pre (66.6% and postoperative (36.5% periods. The prevalence of alcohol use was 26.6% in the preoperative period, of which 2.2% of high risk, and 35.1% in the postoperative period, of which 1.4% of probable dependence; this difference did not achieve statistical significance (p=0.337. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of abusive alcohol intake and/or probable dependence was low in both the pre and postoperative periods, with little evidence of risky consumption among the patients submitted to bariatric surgery.

  17. Chalmydia trachomatis infection among asymptomatic males in an infertility clinic

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    Mania - Pramanik J

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis can lead to a variety of complications including tubal infertility. Similarly asymptomatic infection in male partner can also hinder conception. The prevalence of this infection among the infertile female in the Institute′s Infertility Clinic was observed to be 34%. Hence the present study was undertaken to find out these infection among the asymptomatic male partners of these infected women. Fifteen asymptomatic males who were not treated with any antibiotics in recent past were enrolled. First voided urine, semen and blood were collected from each individual for diagnosis of this infection. Chlamydia antigen was detected in 33.3% while Chlamydia antibody was detected in seven (46.7% of these cases. Of these seven, three cases were positive for antigen. This preliminary observation suggests that amongst the infertile couple a sizable percentage (60% of asymptomatic male partners remain infected with Chlamydia trachomatis.

  18. Assessment of Liver and Renal Functions of Asymptomatic Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winniecure), used in our institute for the treatment of Human Immuno Deficiency Virus (HIV) infection, on liver and renal functions of individuals undergoing therapy. A total of 100 asymptomatic Human Immuno Deficiency Virus (HIV) seropositive ...

  19. MOLECULAR DIAGNOSIS OF Guignardia citricarpa IN ASYMPTOMATIC SWEET ORANGE TISSUE

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    FERNANDA DE SILLOS FAGANELLO

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Citrus black spot, a fungal disease caused by the quarantine fungus Guignardia citricarpa, restricts the exportation of fresh fruit to countries in the European Union. The occurrence of latent infections and the time required for diagnosis using conventional methods have brought about the need to validate fast, efficient and reproducible molecular techniques to detect the pathogen in asymptomatic tissue. As such, this study aims to detect G. citricarpa in the symptomatic fruit and asymptomatic leaf tissue of sweet oranges by conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Specificity and limit of detection (LOD were assessed in tissue samples of fruit lesions and asymptomatic leaves. Low concentrations of the fungus were found in asymptomatic leaves. Under these conditions, real-time PCR proved to be viable, reproducible and highly sensitive to detection of the pathogen.