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Sample records for asymmetric waveform ion

  1. Decreased Gap Width in a Cylindrical High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Device Improves Protein Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Kristian E; Winget, Jason M; Hoopmann, Michael R; Kusebauch, Ulrike; Moritz, Robert L

    2015-12-15

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an atmospheric pressure ion mobility technique that separates gas phase ions according to their characteristic dependence of ion mobility on electric field strength. FAIMS can be implemented as a means of automated gas-phase fractionation in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experiments. We modified a commercially available cylindrical FAIMS device by enlarging the inner electrode, thereby narrowing the gap and increasing the effective field strength. This modification provided a nearly 4-fold increase in FAIMS peak capacity over the optimally configured unmodified device. We employed the modified FAIMS device for on-line fractionation in a proteomic analysis of a complex sample and observed major increases in protein discovery. NanoLC-FAIMS-MS/MS of an unfractionated yeast tryptic digest using the modified FAIMS device identified 53% more proteins than were identified using an unmodified FAIMS device and 98% more proteins than were identified with unaided nanoLC-MS/MS. We describe here the development of a nanoLC-FAIMS-MS/MS protocol that provides automated gas-phase fractionation for proteomic analysis of complex protein digests. We compare this protocol against prefractionation of peptides with isoelectric focusing and demonstrate that FAIMS fractionation yields comparable protein recovery while significantly reducing the amount of sample required and eliminating the need for additional sample handling. PMID:26560994

  2. Enhancement of mass spectrometry performance for proteomic analyses using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneil, Eric; Pfammatter, Sibylle; Thibault, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    Remarkable advances in mass spectrometry sensitivity and resolution have been accomplished over the past two decades to enhance the depth and coverage of proteome analyses. As these technological developments expanded the detection capability of mass spectrometers, they also revealed an increasing complexity of low abundance peptides, solvent clusters and sample contaminants that can confound protein identification. Separation techniques that are complementary and can be used in combination with liquid chromatography are often sought to improve mass spectrometry sensitivity for proteomics applications. In this context, high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), a form of ion mobility that exploits ion separation at low and high electric fields, has shown significant advantages by focusing and separating multiply charged peptide ions from singly charged interferences. This paper examines the analytical benefits of FAIMS in proteomics to separate co-eluting peptide isomers and to enhance peptide detection and quantitative measurements of protein digests via native peptides (label-free) or isotopically labeled peptides from metabolic labeling or chemical tagging experiments. PMID:26505763

  3. Analysis of Supramolecular Complexes of 3-Methylxanthine with Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Combined with Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Kayleigh L.; Eiceman, Gary A.; Reynolds, James C.; Creaser, Colin S.

    2016-05-01

    Miniaturised field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), combined with mass spectrometry (MS), has been applied to the study of self-assembling, noncovalent supramolecular complexes of 3-methylxanthine (3-MX) in the gas phase. 3-MX forms stable tetrameric complexes around an alkali metal (Na+, K+) or ammonium cation, to generate a diverse array of complexes with single and multiple charge states. Complexes of (3-MX)n observed include: singly charged complexes where n = 1-8 and 12 and doubly charged complexes where n = 12-24. The most intense ions are those associated with multiples of tetrameric units, where n = 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24. The effect of dispersion field on the ion intensities of the self-assembled complexes indicates some fragmentation of higher order complexes within the FAIMS electrodes (in-FAIMS dissociation), as well as in-source collision induced dissociation within the mass spectrometer. FAIMS-MS enables charge state separation of supramolecular complexes of 3-MX and is shown to be capable of separating species with overlapping mass-to-charge ratios. FAIMS selected transmission also results in an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio for low intensity complexes and enables the visualization of species undetectable without FAIMS.

  4. Nontarget analysis of urine by electrospray ionization-high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Daniel G; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2011-12-01

    Nearly a decade after first commercialization, high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) has yet to find its place in routine chemical analysis. Prototypes have been used to demonstrate the utility of this separation technique combined with mass spectrometry (MS). Unfortunately, first generation commercial FAIMS instruments have gone practically unused by early adopters. Here, we show this to be due to poor ion transmission in the FAIMS-MS source interface. We present simple instrumental modifications and optimization of experimental conditions to achieve good performance from the first generation commercial FAIMS device (the Ionalytics Selectra) coupled to a high resolution Q-TOF-MS. In combination with nanospray ionization, we demonstrate for the first time the nontarget analysis of urine by FAIMS with minimal sample preparation. We show the unique suitability of electrospray ionization (ESI)-FAIMS-MS for identification of low abundance species such as urinary biomarkers of damage of nucleic acids in a complex biological matrix. The elimination of electrospray noise and matrix components by FAIMS and the continuous flow of analytes through FAIMS for accurate and tandem mass analysis produce high quality spectral data suitable for structural identification of unknowns. These characteristics make ESI-FAIMS-MS ideal for nontarget identification, even when compared to high efficiency LC-ESI-MS. PMID:21978137

  5. Asymmetric ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs

  6. Determination of Hazardous Chemicals by Microchip-based Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometric Technology%芯片级高场非对称波形离子迁移谱技术检测危险品

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洁; 李灵锋; 郭大鹏; 张媛; 王琦; 李鹏; 汪小知

    2013-01-01

    An in-situ analytical procedure employing silicon chip based ultra high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry(FAIMS) via direct sniffing was developed.The sample introduction temperature was 50 ℃.The carrier gas flow rate and the sample flow rate were 1500 mL/min and 100 mL/min respectively.Ten listed hazardous chemicals,which were prohibited for public transportation in China,were selected to verify the procedure in terms of validity,sensitivity and selectivity.Recognition algorithm was also developed for the FAIMS fingerprint spectral.Ten chemicals were resolved with high reproducibility at the concentration from 0.1 to 20 mg/L.In comparison with current competing instruments,the microchip-based FAIMS instrument,which features its simplicity,high sensitivity and selectivity,fast response and free of sample pretreatment,opens up new applications in the field of public security and homeland security.%建立了吸气法-芯片级高场非对称波形离子迁移谱(FAIMS)技术,设置进样温度为50℃,载气与样品气流量分别为1500和100 mL/min时,测定了10种国家交通部门规定严禁携带的易燃易爆危险品.实验结果表明,利用FAIMS技术可以有效检测多种危险品.实验得到了10种危险品的FAIMS图谱,并对其进行了指纹识别.利用扩散管辅助技术得到10种物质的检测浓度范围约为0.1 ~20 mg/L.此方法方便快速,灵敏度高,具有很好的应用前景.

  7. Capacitively coupled hydrogen plasmas sustained by tailored voltage waveforms: excitation dynamics and ion flux asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, B.; Diomede, P.; Economou, D. J.; Longo, S.; Gans, T.; O’Connell, D.; Greb, A.; Johnson, E.; Booth, J.-P.

    2016-08-01

    Parallel plate capacitively coupled plasmas in hydrogen at relatively high pressure (~1 Torr) are excited with tailored voltage waveforms containing up to five frequencies. Predictions of a hybrid model combining a particle-in-cell simulation with Monte Carlo collisions and a fluid model are compared to phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy measurements, yielding information on the dynamics of the excitation rate in these discharges. When the discharge is excited with amplitude asymmetric waveforms, the discharge becomes electrically asymmetric, with different ion energies at each of the two electrodes. Unexpectedly, large differences in the \\text{H}2+ fluxes to each of the two electrodes are caused by the different \\text{H}3+ energies. When the discharge is excited with slope asymmetric waveforms, only weak electrical asymmetry of the discharge is observed. In this case, electron power absorption due to fast sheath expansion at one electrode is balanced by electron power absorption at the opposite electrode due to a strong electric field reversal.

  8. Arbitrary Waveform Generator for Quantum Information Processing with Trapped Ions

    OpenAIRE

    R. Bowler; Warring, U.; Britton, J. W.; Sawyer, B. C.; Amini, J.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic ions confined in multi-electrode traps have been proposed as a basis for scalable quantum information processing. This scheme involves transporting ions between spatially distinct locations by use of time-varying electric potentials combined with laser or microwave pulses for quantum logic in specific locations. We report the development of a fast multi-channel arbitrary waveform generator for applying the time-varying electric potentials used for transport and for shaping quantum logi...

  9. Arbitrary waveform generator for quantum information processing with trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, R.; Warring, U.; Britton, J. W.; Sawyer, B. C.; Amini, J.

    2013-03-01

    Atomic ions confined in multi-electrode traps have been proposed as a basis for scalable quantum information processing. This scheme involves transporting ions between spatially distinct locations by use of time-varying electric potentials combined with laser or microwave pulses for quantum logic in specific locations. We report the development of a fast multi-channel arbitrary waveform generator for applying the time-varying electric potentials used for transport and for shaping quantum logic pulses. The generator is based on a field-programmable gate array controlled ensemble of 16-bit digital-to-analog converters with an update frequency of 50 MHz and an output range of ±10 V. The update rate of the waveform generator is much faster than relevant motional frequencies of the confined ions in our experiments, allowing diabatic control of the ion motion. Numerous pre-loaded sets of time-varying voltages can be selected with 40 ns latency conditioned on real-time signals. Here we describe the device and demonstrate some of its uses in ion-based quantum information experiments, including speed-up of ion transport and the shaping of laser and microwave pulses.

  10. Detection, identification, and occurrence of thiotetronic acids in drinking water from underground sources by electrospray ionization-high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyczko, Jadwiga; Beach, Daniel; Gabryelski, Wojciech

    2015-10-01

    This paper demonstrates that electrospray ionization (ESI) with differential ion mobility spectroscopy (FAIMS) and "soft" mass spectrometry (MS) provide unique analytical capabilities that led to the discovery of sulfur-containing polar congeners of thiotetronic acid (TA) in drinking water from underground sources in Canada and the United States. Polar TAs accumulate in underground aquifers and appear to be the most abundant class of organic compounds in bottled water but cannot be detected by conventional mass spectrometry methods. We show that normally stable TAs are converted into very reactive ions in ESI which have to be analyzed using special conditions in ESI-FAIMS-MS to avoid extensive dissociation and ion/molecule reactions. De novo identification of 10 TAs was accomplished by the comparative tandem mass spectrometry analysis of authentic TA derivatives from groundwater samples and synthetic TA analogues prepared for this study. We present highlights of gas phase ion chemistry of polar TAs to explain their unique properties and reactivity. TA derivatives were originally isolated from soil bacteria and are of interest in the pharmaceutical industry due to their potent activity against a broad spectrum of pathogenic bacteria and negligible toxicity to mammals. We suspect that TAs are natural disinfection agents protecting groundwater from bacterial contamination, but these compound undergo modifications or decompose during an ozonation water treatment. PMID:26340067

  11. Voltage waveform to achieve a desired ion energy distribution on a substrate in contact with plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology is developed to determine the bias voltage waveform needed to achieve a desired (pre-selected) ion energy distribution (IED) on a substrate in contact with plasma. The approach is applicable to collisionless sheaths at all radio frequencies. It combines a circuit model with an equation for a 'damped' sheath potential to which ions respond. The methodology is demonstrated by computing the rf voltage waveform required to achieve a Gaussian IED with specified mean energy and energy spread on an electrode biased through a blocking capacitor. This inverse problem has multiple solutions, i.e. there exists a multitude of waveforms all producing the same IED.

  12. Solitary waves in asymmetric electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ding; Li, Zi-Liang; Xie, Bai-Song

    2015-10-01

    > By solving the coupled equations of the electromagnetic field and electrostatic potential, we investigate solitary waves in an asymmetric electron-positron plasma and/or electron-positron-ion plasmas with delicate features. It is found that the solutions of the coupled equations can capture multipeak structures of solitary waves in the case of cold plasma, which are left out by using the long-wavelength approximation. By considering the effect of ion motion with respect to non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic temperature plasmas, we find that the ions' mobility can lead to larger-amplitude solitary waves; especially, this becomes more obvious for a high-temperature plasma. The effects of asymmetric temperature between electrons and positrons and the ion fraction on the solitary waves are also studied and presented. It is shown that the amplitudes of solitary waves decrease with positron temperature in asymmetric temperature electron-positron plasmas and decrease also with ion concentration.

  13. Study of flow in asymmetric heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azimuthal anisotropy is a key tool to study the strongly interacting medium produced in relativistic heavy ion collisions. This observable is sensitive to the equation of state of the system formed in the heavy-ion collisions. Recently, it has been proposed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, to carry out a program of asymmetric heavy-ion collisions. Among other physics possibilities, it is believed to provide insight on the initial conditions through study of event-by-event fluctuation in the measure of the azimuthal anisotropy. Knowing the initial condition is vital for any theoretical calculations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

  14. Elliptic and triangular flow in asymmetric heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a study of the elliptic (v2) and triangular (v3) flow and their corresponding eccentricity fluctuations for asymmetric (Au+Ag, Au+Cu, and Au+Si) collisions at √(sNN) = 200 GeV. These are compared to the corresponding results from symmetric (Au+Au and Cu+Cu) collisions at the same energy. The study which is carried out using a multiphase transport (AMPT) model shows that triangularity (ε3), fluctuations in triangularity and v3 do not show much variation for the different colliding ion sizes studied. However the eccentricity (ε2), fluctuations in eccentricity and v2, shows a strong dependence on colliding ion size for a given number of participating nucleons. Our study thus indicates that asymmetric heavy-ion collisions could be used to constrain models dealing with flow fluctuations in heavy-ion collisions.

  15. Elliptic and Triangular flow in asymmetric heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Haque, Md Rihan; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the elliptic (v2) and triangular (v3) flow and their corresponding eccentricity fluctuations for asymmetric (Au+Ag, Au+Cu and Au+Si) collisions at \\sqrt_NN = 200 GeV. These are compared to the corresponding results from symmetric (Au+Au and Cu+Cu) collisions at the same energy. The study which is carried out using a multi-phase transport (AMPT) model shows that triangularity (\\epsilon_3), fluctuations in triangularity and v3 do not show much variation for the different colliding ion sizes studied. However the eccentricity (\\epsilon_2), fluctuations in eccentricity and v2 shows a strong dependence on colliding ion size for a given number of participating nucleons. Our study thus indicates that asymmetric heavy-ion collisions could be used to constrain models dealing with flow fluctuations in heavy-ion collisions.

  16. Customized ion flux-energy distribution functions in capacitively coupled plasmas by voltage waveform tailoring

    CERN Document Server

    Schuengel, E; Hartmann, P; Derzsi, A; Korolov, I; Schulze, J

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method to generate a single peak at a distinct energy in the ion flux-energy distribution function (IDF) at the electrode surfaces in capacitively coupled plasmas. The technique is based on the tailoring of the driving voltage waveform, i.e. adjusting the phases and amplitudes of the applied harmonics, to optimize the accumulation of ions created by charge exchange collisions and their subsequent acceleration by the sheath electric field. The position of the peak (i.e. the ion energy) and the flux of the ions within the peak of the IDF can be controlled in a wide domain by tuning the parameters of the applied RF voltage waveform, allowing optimization of various applications where surface reactions are induced at particular ion energies.

  17. Ion pumping in nanochannels using an asymmetric electrode array

    OpenAIRE

    Sparreboom, W.; Cucu, C.F.; Eijkel, J.C.T.; Berg, van den, T.J.T.P.; Locascio, L.E.; Gaitan, M.; Paegel, B.M.; Ross, D J; Vreeland, W. N.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate an ion pump, consisting of a nanochannel with an AC driven asymmetric electrode array. Our system enables us to actively pump ions using a low driving voltage. In all experiments the electrical double layers are overlapping. Via viscous coupling ion pumping is accompanied by liquid pumping. Actuation below 500 mV at 10 Hz results in a liquid velocity of ~10 μm/s, corresponding to an electrical ion current of ~400 fA. Finite element simulations support the experimental data.

  18. Beam emittance and output waveforms of high-flux laser ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laser ion source with short drift distance has been developed for a driver of heavy ion fusion (HIF). It supplies a copper ion beam of 200 mA (255 mA/cm2) with duration of 400 ns and beam emittance is about 0.8π mm·mrad. Moreover it has fast rising (30 ns), flat-top current waveform and a potential to deliver pure charge states between 1+ - 3+. Experimental results indicate that the laser ion source is a good candidate for the HIF driver. (author)

  19. Electron heating and control of ion properties in capacitive discharges driven by customized voltage waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the electron heating dynamics in capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas driven by customized voltage waveforms and study the effects of modifying this waveform and the secondary electron emission coefficient of the electrodes on the spatio-temporal ionization dynamics by particle-in-cell simulations. We demonstrate that changes in the electron heating dynamics induced by voltage waveform tailoring strongly affect the dc self-bias, the ion flux, Γi, and the mean ion energy, 〈Ei〉, at the electrodes. The driving voltage waveform is customized by adding N consecutive harmonics (N ⩽ 4) of 13.56 MHz with specific harmonics' amplitudes and phases. The total voltage amplitude is kept constant, while modifying the number of harmonics and their phases. In an argon plasma, we find a dc self-bias, η, to be generated via the electrical asymmetry effect for N ⩾ 2. η can be controlled by adjusting the harmonics' phases and is enhanced by adding more consecutive harmonics. At a low pressure of 3 Pa, the discharge is operated in the α-mode and 〈Ei〉 can be controlled by adjusting the phases at constant Γi. The ion flux can be increased by adding more harmonics due to the enhanced electron-sheath heating. 〈Ei〉 does not remain constant as a function of N at both electrodes due to a change in η. These findings verify previous results of Lafleur et al. At a high pressure of 100 Pa and using a high secondary electron emission coefficient of γ = 0.4, the discharge is operated in the γ-mode and mode transitions are induced by changing the driving voltage waveform. Due to these mode transitions and the specific ionization dynamics in the γ-mode, Γi is no longer constant as a function of the harmonics' phases and decreases with increasing N. (paper)

  20. Controlling the shape of the ion energy distribution at constant ion flux and constant mean ion energy with tailored voltage waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, Bastien; Lafleur, Trevor; Booth, Jean-Paul; Johnson, Erik

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the excitation of a capacitively coupled plasma using a non-sinusoidal voltage waveform whose amplitude- and slope-asymmetry varies continuously with a period which is a multiple of the fundamental RF period. We call this period the ‘beating’ period. Through particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we show that such waveforms cause oscillation of the self-bias at this beating frequency, corresponding to the charging and discharging of the external capacitor. The amplitude of this self-bias oscillation depends on the beating period, the value of the external capacitor, and the ion flux to the electrodes. This self-bias oscillation causes temporal modulation of the ion flux distribution function (IFDF), albeit at a constant ion flux and constant mean ion energy, and allows the energy width of the IFDF (averaged over the beating period) to be varied in a controlled fashion.

  1. Selective injection and isolation of ions in quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry using notched waveforms created using the inverse Fourier transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, M.H.; Cooks, R.G. (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States))

    1994-08-01

    Broad-band excitation of ions is accomplished in the quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer using notched waveforms created by the SWIFT (stored waveform inverse Fourier transform) technique. A series of notched SWIFT pulses are applied during the period of ion injection from an external Cs[sup +] source to resonantly eject all ions whose resonance frequencies fall within the frequency range of the pulse while injecting only those analyte ions whose resonance frequencies fall within the limits of the notch. This allows selective injection and accumulation of the ions of interest and continuous ejection of the unwanted ions. This is shown to result in significant improvement in S/N ratio, resolution, and sensitivity for the analyte ions of interest. Selective ion injection is demonstrated by injecting the protonated molecules of peptides VSV and gramicidin S and the intact cation of l-carnitine hydrochloride, using singly notched SWIFT pulses. Multiply notched SWIFT pulses are used to simultaneously inject ions of different m/z values of l-carnitine hydrochloride into the ion trap. A new coarse/fine ion isolation procedure, which employs a doubly notched SWIFT pulse, is demonstrated for isolating ions of a single m/z value of 4-bromobiphenyl from a population of trapped ions. 36 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Intrinsic potential of cell membranes: opposite effects of lipid transmembrane asymmetry and asymmetric salt ion distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    Using atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we consider the intrinsic cell membrane potential that is found to originate from a subtle interplay between lipid transmembrane asymmetry and the asymmetric distribution of monovalent salt ions on the two sides of the cell membrane. It turns out...... that both the asymmetric distribution of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipids across a membrane and the asymmetric distribution of NaCl and KCl induce nonzero drops in the transmembrane potential. However, these potential drops are opposite in sign. As the PC leaflet faces...

  3. Ion track symmetric and asymmetric nanopores in polyethylene terephthalate foils for versatile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, P. Yu.; Blonskaya, I. V.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Orelovich, O. L.; Sartowska, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this report we present several fabrication methods which allow production of ion track nanopore membranes with different pore configurations. Polymer foils, typically polyethylene terephthalate with a thickness of 5-23 μm, are irradiated with accelerated heavy ions (energy of 1-10 MeV/u) and then subjected to different physico-chemical treatments. Depending on the procedure, symmetric or asymmetric pores with nanoscale-sized narrowing are obtained. The asymmetric configurations include conical, funnel-like and bullet-like shapes. In electrolyte solutions the asymmetric nanopores exhibit diode-like properties which strongly depend on the pore shape. The peculiar features of such pores provide a basis for various applications.

  4. Experimental investigations of electron heating dynamics and ion energy distributions in capacitive discharges driven by customized voltage waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas driven by customized voltage waveforms provide enhanced opportunities to control process-relevant energy distributions of different particle species. Here, we present an experimental investigation of the spatio-temporal electron heating dynamics probed by Phase-Resolved Optical Emission Spectroscopy (PROES) in an argon discharge driven by up to three consecutive harmonics of 13.56 MHz with individually adjustable harmonics' amplitudes and phases. PROES and voltage measurements are performed at fixed total voltage amplitudes as a function of the number of driving harmonics, their relative phases, and pressure to study the effects of changing the applied voltage waveform on the heating dynamics in collisionless and collisional regimes. Additionally, the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) is measured at low pressure. In this collisionless regime, the discharge is operated in the α-mode. The velocity of energetic electron beams generated by the expanding sheaths is found to be affected by the number of driving harmonics and their relative phases. This is understood based on the sheath dynamics obtained from a model that determines sheath voltage waveforms. The formation of the measured IEDFs is understood and found to be directly affected by the observed changes in the electron heating dynamics. It is demonstrated that the mean ion energy can be controlled by adjusting the harmonics' phases. In the collisional regime at higher pressures changing the number of harmonics and their phases at fixed voltage is found to induce heating mode transitions from the α- to the γ-mode. Finally, a method to use PROES as a non-invasive diagnostic to monitor and detect changes of the ion flux to the electrodes is developed

  5. Experimental investigations of electron heating dynamics and ion energy distributions in capacitive discharges driven by customized voltage waveforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Birk [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Institute for Theoretical Electrical Engineering, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Brandt, Steven; Franek, James; Schüngel, Edmund; Koepke, Mark; Schulze, Julian [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Mussenbrock, Thomas [Institute for Theoretical Electrical Engineering, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-12-14

    Capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas driven by customized voltage waveforms provide enhanced opportunities to control process-relevant energy distributions of different particle species. Here, we present an experimental investigation of the spatio-temporal electron heating dynamics probed by Phase-Resolved Optical Emission Spectroscopy (PROES) in an argon discharge driven by up to three consecutive harmonics of 13.56 MHz with individually adjustable harmonics' amplitudes and phases. PROES and voltage measurements are performed at fixed total voltage amplitudes as a function of the number of driving harmonics, their relative phases, and pressure to study the effects of changing the applied voltage waveform on the heating dynamics in collisionless and collisional regimes. Additionally, the ion energy distribution function (IEDF) is measured at low pressure. In this collisionless regime, the discharge is operated in the α-mode. The velocity of energetic electron beams generated by the expanding sheaths is found to be affected by the number of driving harmonics and their relative phases. This is understood based on the sheath dynamics obtained from a model that determines sheath voltage waveforms. The formation of the measured IEDFs is understood and found to be directly affected by the observed changes in the electron heating dynamics. It is demonstrated that the mean ion energy can be controlled by adjusting the harmonics' phases. In the collisional regime at higher pressures changing the number of harmonics and their phases at fixed voltage is found to induce heating mode transitions from the α- to the γ-mode. Finally, a method to use PROES as a non-invasive diagnostic to monitor and detect changes of the ion flux to the electrodes is developed.

  6. Simultaneous measurements of plasma flow and ion temperature using the asymmetric double probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The asymmetric double probe method is extended to measure not only the ion temperature but also plasma flow in the tokamak edge plasma under a strong magnetic field. The plasma flow or the Mach number is determined by the ratio of ion saturation currents of the double probe pins, where the axes of the cylindrical pins are oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field and face up-or downstream. An experiment was performed in the JFT-2M tokamak. (author)

  7. An inversion-asymmetric source function for HBT analysis in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Lianshou, Liu; Shusu, Shi; Jiaxin, Du

    2006-01-01

    The inversion-asymmetry of the emission source in relativistic heavy ion collision under the Bertsch-Pratt convention is discussed and explicitly exhibited by a Monte Carlo model. The Gaussian source function popularly used in the HBT analysis of relativistic heavy ion collisions is invalid in this case. An inversion-asymmetric source function is suggested. A method for extracting the inversion-asymmetry degree of the source together with the source size from experimental data is proposed.

  8. Asymmetric dynamics of ion channel forming proteins - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) p7 bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Monoj Mon; Fischer, Wolfgang B

    2016-07-01

    Protein p7 of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a short 63 amino acid membrane protein which homo-oligomerises in the lipid membrane to form ion and proton conducting bundles. Two different genotypes (GTs) of p7, 1a and 5a, are used to simulate hexameric bundles of the protein embedded in a fully hydrated lipid bilayer during 400ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Whilst the bundle of GT 1a is based on a fully computational derived structure, the bundle of GT 5a is based on NMR spectroscopic data. Results of a full correlation analysis (FCA) reveal that albeit structural differences both bundles screen local minima during the simulation. The collective motion of the protein domains is asymmetric. No 'breathing-mode'-like dynamics is observed. The presence of divalent ions, such as Ca-ions affects the dynamics of especially solvent exposed parts of the protein, but leaves the asymmetric domain motion unaffected. PMID:27079148

  9. Selection and generation of waveforms for differential mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devices based on differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) are used in a number of ways, including applications as ion prefilters for API-MS systems, as detectors or selectors in hybrid instruments (GC-DMS, DMS-IMS), and in standalone systems for chemical detection and identification. DMS ion separation is based on the relative difference between high field and low field ion mobility known as the alpha dependence, and requires the application of an intense asymmetric electric field known as the DMS separation field, typically in the megahertz frequency range. DMS performance depends on the waveform and on the magnitude of this separation field. In this paper, we analyze the relationship between separation waveform and DMS resolution and consider feasible separation field generators. We examine ideal and practical DMS separation field waveforms and discuss separation field generator circuit types and their implementations. To facilitate optimization of the generator designs, we present a set of relations that connect ion alpha dependence to DMS separation fields. Using these relationships we evaluate the DMS separation power of common generator types as a function of their waveform parameters. Optimal waveforms for the major types of DMS separation generators are determined for ions with various alpha dependences. These calculations are validated by comparison with experimental data.

  10. Counter-ions between or at asymmetrically charged walls: 2D free-fermion point

    OpenAIRE

    Samaj, L.; Trizac, E.

    2014-01-01

    This work contributes to the problem of determining effective interaction between asymmetrically (likely or oppositely) charged objects whose total charge is neutralized by mobile pointlike counter-ions of the same charge, the whole system being in thermal equilibrium. The problem is formulated in two spatial dimensions with logarithmic Coulomb interactions. The charged objects correspond to two parallel lines at distance d, with fixed line charge densities. Two versions of the model are cons...

  11. Generation of circularly polarized attosecond pulses by intense ultrashort laser pulses from extended asymmetric molecular ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2011-08-01

    We present a method for generation of single circularly polarized attosecond pulses in extended asymmetric HHe2+ molecular ions. By employing an intense ultrashort circularly polarized laser pulse with intensity 4.0×1014 W/cm2, wavelength 400 nm, and duration 10 optical cycles, molecular high-order-harmonic generation (MHOHG) spectra with multiple plateaus exhibit characters of circular polarization. Using a classical laser-induced collision model, double collisions of continuum electrons first with neighboring ions and then second with parent ions are presented at a particular internuclear distance and confirmed from numerical solutions of a time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We analyze the MHOHG spectra with a Gabor time window and find that, due to the asymmetry of HHe2+, a single collision trajectory of continuum electrons with ions can produce circularly polarized harmonics, leading to single circularly polarized attosecond pulses for specific internuclear distances.

  12. Generation of circularly polarized attosecond pulses by intense ultrashort laser pulses from extended asymmetric molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a method for generation of single circularly polarized attosecond pulses in extended asymmetric HHe2+ molecular ions. By employing an intense ultrashort circularly polarized laser pulse with intensity 4.0x1014 W/cm2, wavelength 400 nm, and duration 10 optical cycles, molecular high-order-harmonic generation (MHOHG) spectra with multiple plateaus exhibit characters of circular polarization. Using a classical laser-induced collision model, double collisions of continuum electrons first with neighboring ions and then second with parent ions are presented at a particular internuclear distance and confirmed from numerical solutions of a time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We analyze the MHOHG spectra with a Gabor time window and find that, due to the asymmetry of HHe2+, a single collision trajectory of continuum electrons with ions can produce circularly polarized harmonics, leading to single circularly polarized attosecond pulses for specific internuclear distances.

  13. Generation of circularly polarized attosecond pulses by intense ultrashort laser pulses from extended asymmetric molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, Andre D. [Laboratoire de Chimie Theorique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    We present a method for generation of single circularly polarized attosecond pulses in extended asymmetric HHe{sup 2+} molecular ions. By employing an intense ultrashort circularly polarized laser pulse with intensity 4.0x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, wavelength 400 nm, and duration 10 optical cycles, molecular high-order-harmonic generation (MHOHG) spectra with multiple plateaus exhibit characters of circular polarization. Using a classical laser-induced collision model, double collisions of continuum electrons first with neighboring ions and then second with parent ions are presented at a particular internuclear distance and confirmed from numerical solutions of a time-dependent Schroedinger equation. We analyze the MHOHG spectra with a Gabor time window and find that, due to the asymmetry of HHe{sup 2+}, a single collision trajectory of continuum electrons with ions can produce circularly polarized harmonics, leading to single circularly polarized attosecond pulses for specific internuclear distances.

  14. Tailored-waveform excitation of capacitively coupled plasmas and the electrical asymmetry effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, T.

    2016-02-01

    Unequal areas of the powered and grounded electrodes in single-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) are well-known to generate a DC self-bias voltage and an asymmetric plasma response. By instead applying non-sinusoidal waveforms composed of multiple harmonics—referred to in the literature as arbitrary waveforms, multi-harmonic waveforms or tailored waveforms—an asymmetric plasma response and a DC self-bias can also be produced; even for perfectly geometrically symmetric systems. This electrical asymmetry effect (EAE) has opened the doors to a wide range of novel ideas and interesting new physics that could allow limitations between the control of the ion flux and ion energy in traditional CCPs to be broken; thus helping to develop next-generation industrial plasma processing reactors. This review is dedicated to the current status of the EAE, and highlights important theoretical, numerical and experimental work in the field that has contributed to our understanding.

  15. Control of electron heating and ion energy distributions in capacitive plasmas by voltage waveform tailoring based on a novel power supply and impedance matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Birk; Franek, James; Brandt, Steven; Liese, Martin; Barthel, Matthias; Schuengel, Edmund; Koepke, Mark; Schulze, Julian

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel RF power supply and impedance matching to drive technological plasmas with customized voltage waveforms. By adjusting the individual phases and amplitudes of multiple consecutive harmonics any voltage waveform can be realized as a customized finite Fourier series. This RF supply system is easily adaptable to any technological plasma for industrial applications and allows the commercial utilization of process optimization based on voltage waveform tailoring for the first time. Here, this system is tested on a capacitive discharge based on three consecutive harmonics of 13.56 MHz in argon. The effect of changing the shape of the driving voltage waveform on the electron heating and sheath dynamics is investigated by Phase Resolved Optical Emission Spectroscopy (PROES) for different electrode gaps, pressures, and applied voltages. At low pressure the results are correlated with ion energy distribution functions measured at both electrodes. Tuning the phases between the applied harmonics results in an electrical control of the DC self-bias and the mean ion energy. A comparison with the reference case of a dual-frequency discharge reveals that using more than two consecutive harmonics significantly enlarges the control range of the mean ion energy.

  16. Estimation of electric conductivity of the quark gluon plasma via asymmetric heavy-ion collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Hirono, Yuji(Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan); Hongo, Masaru; Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2012-01-01

    We show that in asymmetric heavy-ion collisions, especially off-central Cu+Au collisions, a sizable strength of electric field directed from Au nucleus to Cu nucleus is generated in the overlapping region, because of the difference in the number of electric charges between the two nuclei. This electric field would induce an electric current in the matter created after the collision, which result in a dipole deformation of the charge distribution. The directed flow parameters $v_1^{\\pm}$ of ch...

  17. Analysis of triazines and associated metabolites with electrospray ionization field-asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mie, Axel; Sandulescu, Madaline; Mathiasson, Lennart; Emnéus, Jenny; Reimann, Curt

    2008-01-01

    analysis of triazines. More specifically, we studied the background reduction and sensitivity enhancement that result from the use of a new interface technique, field-asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), in conjunction with electrospray ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry. This technique allows...

  18. Nonlinear Waveforms for Ion-Acoustic Waves in Weakly Relativistic Plasma of Warm Ion-Fluid and Isothermal Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. El-Wakil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The reductive perturbation method has been employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV equation for small- but finite-amplitude electrostatic ion-acoustic waves in weakly relativistic plasma consisting of warm ions and isothermal electrons. An algebraic method with computerized symbolic computation is applied in obtaining a series of exact solutions of the KdV equation. Numerical studies have been made using plasma parameters which reveal different solutions, that is, bell-shaped solitary pulses, rational pulses, and solutions with singularity at finite points, which called “blowup” solutions in addition to the propagation of an explosive pulses. The weakly relativistic effect is found to significantly change the basic properties (namely, the amplitude and the width of the ion-acoustic waves. The result of the present investigation may be applicable to some plasma environments, such as ionosphere region.

  19. Asymmetric catalytic formation of quaternary carbons by iminium ion trapping of radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John J.; Bastida, David; Paria, Suva; Fagnoni, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    An important goal of modern organic chemistry is to develop new catalytic strategies for enantioselective carbon–carbon bond formation that can be used to generate quaternary stereogenic centres. Whereas considerable advances have been achieved by exploiting polar reactivity, radical transformations have been far less successful. This is despite the fact that open-shell intermediates are intrinsically primed for connecting structurally congested carbons, as their reactivity is only marginally affected by steric factors. Here we show how the combination of photoredox and asymmetric organic catalysis enables enantioselective radical conjugate additions to β,β-disubstituted cyclic enones to obtain quaternary carbon stereocentres with high fidelity. Critical to our success was the design of a chiral organic catalyst, containing a redox-active carbazole moiety, that drives the formation of iminium ions and the stereoselective trapping of photochemically generated carbon-centred radicals by means of an electron-relay mechanism. We demonstrate the generality of this organocatalytic radical-trapping strategy with two sets of open-shell intermediates, formed through unrelated light-triggered pathways from readily available substrates and photoredox catalysts—this method represents the application of iminium ion activation (a successful catalytic strategy for enantioselective polar chemistry) within the realm of radical reactivity.

  20. Asymmetric catalytic formation of quaternary carbons by iminium ion trapping of radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John J; Bastida, David; Paria, Suva; Fagnoni, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-04-14

    An important goal of modern organic chemistry is to develop new catalytic strategies for enantioselective carbon-carbon bond formation that can be used to generate quaternary stereogenic centres. Whereas considerable advances have been achieved by exploiting polar reactivity, radical transformations have been far less successful. This is despite the fact that open-shell intermediates are intrinsically primed for connecting structurally congested carbons, as their reactivity is only marginally affected by steric factors. Here we show how the combination of photoredox and asymmetric organic catalysis enables enantioselective radical conjugate additions to β,β-disubstituted cyclic enones to obtain quaternary carbon stereocentres with high fidelity. Critical to our success was the design of a chiral organic catalyst, containing a redox-active carbazole moiety, that drives the formation of iminium ions and the stereoselective trapping of photochemically generated carbon-centred radicals by means of an electron-relay mechanism. We demonstrate the generality of this organocatalytic radical-trapping strategy with two sets of open-shell intermediates, formed through unrelated light-triggered pathways from readily available substrates and photoredox catalysts--this method represents the application of iminium ion activation (a successful catalytic strategy for enantioselective polar chemistry) within the realm of radical reactivity. PMID:27075098

  1. Scaling of triple differential cross-sections for asymmetric (, 2) process on helium isoelectronic ions by fast electrons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Srivastava

    2005-01-01

    A simple scaling law is obtained for asymmetric (, 2) process on helium isoelectronic ions by fast electrons. It is based on treating the targets as having one active electron moving in the effective Coulomb field of the atomic core with an effective charge ' = − 5/8. This effective charge is also used in the description of the scattered and ejected electrons. The model has been tested against other available (, 2) results on helium in asymmetric geometry. The scaling law is found to work reasonably well for fast incident electrons and becomes increasingly accurate as target increases.

  2. Detection of Potato Storage Disease via Gas Analysis: A Pilot Study Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Massimo Rutolo; Covington, James A.; John Clarkson; Daciana Iliescu

    2014-01-01

    Soft rot is a commonly occurring potato tuber disease that each year causes substantial losses to the food industry. Here, we explore the possibility of early detection of the disease via gas/vapor analysis, in a laboratory environment, using a recent technology known as FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry). In this work, tubers were inoculated with a bacterium causing the infection, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and stored within set environmental conditions in order to manage di...

  3. Scaling of cross-sections for asymmetric (, 3) process on helium-like ions by fast electrons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M K Srivastava

    2004-11-01

    An approximate simple scaling law is obtained for asymmetric (, 3) process on helium-like ions for double ionization by fast electrons. It is based on the equation $(Z'^{3} /)$ exp$[−Z' (r_{1} + r_{2})]$, $Z' = Z − (5/16)$ for ground state wave function of helium- like ions and $Z'^{2}$ scaling of energies. The scaling law is found to work very well if the lower energy electron is ejected along the momentum transfer direction and the other one is ejected in the opposite direction. It also works quite well if this electron is ejected within about 90° of the momentum transfer direction with the other electron going in the opposite direction. The scaling law becomes increasingly accurate as the target nuclear charge and the energy increase.

  4. Reverse osmosis separation of some metal ions from mining effluents using heterogeneous asymmetric membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterogeneous asymmetric membranes made from a blend of cellulose acetate and powdered coal were studied. The membranes were characterized in terms of pure water permeability constant A, solute transport parameter DAM/Kδ and mass transfer coefficient k of sodium chloride solution as the reference system. These membranes were used for treatment of mining and industrial effluents. Good separation and very high productivity were obtained at low operating pressure. (author). 3 refs, 3 tabs

  5. Pre-equilibrium dipole strength in charge asymmetric peripheral heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the results obtained from the study of the 32S+64Ni and 32S+58Ni peripheral reactions at incident energies Elab=288 MeV and Elab=320 MeV, respectively. High-energy γ-rays were detected in an array of 8 seven-pack BaF2 clusters. Coincidence with complex fragments detected in 12 three-stage telescopes ensured the selection of peripheral reaction events. All of the relevant reaction parameters were kept constant with the exception of the different initial dipole moment caused by the different entrance channel charge asymmetry. While for quasi-elastic events no N/Z effect was observed in the differential γ-ray multiplicities of the two reactions, for deep-inelastic events a larger dipole γ-ray emission occurs during the more N/Z asymmetric reaction. A theoretical interpretation based on a collective Bremsstrahlung analysis of the reaction dynamics is presented. (orig.)

  6. Influence of symmetry energy on the multifragmentation of asymmetric heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the role of different density dependencies of symmetry energy on fragmentation pattern, we simulated thousands of events for the asymmetric collisions of 40Ar + 64Cu,108Ag, 197Au using soft equation of state supplemented by energy-dependent nucleon-nucleon cross-section reduced by 20%, i.e, σnn = 0.8 σfreenn free for three different values of γ= 0.5, 1 and 2. The choice of colliding geometry and incident energies is guided from the experimental measurements. As these reactions cover wide range of asymmetry (η = 0.2-0.6) and experimental measurements are also available, so we simulate these reactions to study the effect of different density dependencies of symmetry energy

  7. Asymmetrical response of dayside ion precipitation to a large rotation of the IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchem, J.; Richard, R. L.; Escoubet, C. P.; Wing, S.; Pitout, F.

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations together with large-scale kinetic simulations to investigate the response of the dayside magnetospheric ion precipitation to a large rotation (135°) of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The study uses simplified global MHD model (no dipole tilt and constant ionospheric conductance) and idealized solar wind conditions where the IMF rotates smoothly from a southward toward a northward direction (BX = 0) to clearly identify the effects of the impact of the discontinuity on the magnetopause. Results of the global simulations reveal that a strong north-south asymmetry develops in the pattern of precipitating ions during the interaction of the IMF rotation with the magnetopause. For a counterclockwise IMF rotation from its original southward direction (BY original southward direction (BY > 0). Trends observed in the ion dispersions predicted from the simulations are in good agreement with Cluster observations of the midaltitude northern cusp, which motivated the study.

  8. RF reactor with asymmetrical electrodes for reactive ion etching of semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudin S. V.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Results of experimental and theoretical study of RF CCP reactor for reactive ion etching of semiconductors are presented. Breakdown curve and domain of the discharge existence are measured in various gases (argon, fluorocarbon, oxygen. The dependences of the DC selfbias potential on the RF voltage applied to the electrode have been found. The radial profiles of the ion current density to the processed surface and their behavior with the discharge parameters change are presented for various gases. The experimental data are compared to the numerical simulation results obtained using the OOPIC code.

  9. A 2D ion chamber array audit of wedged and asymmetric fields in an inhomogeneous lung phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) has implemented a new method of a nonreference condition Level II type dosimetric audit of radiotherapy services to increase measurement accuracy and patient safety within Australia. The aim of this work is to describe the methodology, tolerances, and outcomes from the new audit. Methods: The ACDS Level II audit measures the dose delivered in 2D planes using an ionization chamber based array positioned at multiple depths. Measurements are made in rectilinear homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms composed of slabs of solid water and lung. Computer generated computed tomography data sets of the rectilinear phantoms are supplied to the facility prior to audit for planning of a range of cases including reference fields, asymmetric fields, and wedged fields. The audit assesses 3D planning with 6 MV photons with a static (zero degree) gantry. Scoring is performed using local dose differences between the planned and measured dose within 80% of the field width. The overall audit result is determined by the maximum dose difference over all scoring points, cases, and planes. Pass (Optimal Level) is defined as maximum dose difference ≤3.3%, Pass (Action Level) is ≤5.0%, and Fail (Out of Tolerance) is >5.0%. Results: At close of 2013, the ACDS had performed 24 Level II audits. 63% of the audits passed, 33% failed, and the remaining audit was not assessable. Of the 15 audits that passed, 3 were at Pass (Action Level). The high fail rate is largely due to a systemic issue with modeling asymmetric 60° wedges which caused a delivered overdose of 5%–8%. Conclusions: The ACDS has implemented a nonreference condition Level II type audit, based on ion chamber 2D array measurements in an inhomogeneous slab phantom. The powerful diagnostic ability of this audit has allowed the ACDS to rigorously test the treatment planning systems implemented in Australian radiotherapy facilities. Recommendations from audits have led to

  10. Measurements of ion temperature and flow velocity using symmetric and asymmetric double probes in the boundary plasma of the JFT-2M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radial profiles of the ion temperature as well as the flow velocity have been measured by using rotatable symmetric and asymmetric double probes in the boundary plasma of the JFT-2M tokamak. It has been found that the ion temperature is higher than the electron temperature by a factor of about 10, and the flow velocity is 0.2-0.3 of the ion sound velocity in the SOL for both ohmic and NB injection heating. These data can help to determine the cross-field thermal diffusivity in tokamak boundary plasma. (author)

  11. Collective flow and balance energy in asymmetric heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energy provide a useful tool to determine the nuclear matter equation of state as well as in-medium nucleon-nucleon (nn) cross-section. We therefore, aim to study the transverse in-plane flow as well as its disappearance for different colliding nuclei with varying asymmetry. We plan to address this question using quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) model

  12. Multifragmentation in asymmetric heavy-ion collisions. An experimental trace search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents a review about experimental studies of multifragmentation in heavy ion collisions. After a description of the experimental methods for the study of such processes he describes the emission characteristics of medium heavy fragments like energy and angular distribution, production cross sections, and multiplicity. Then he considers statistical aspects of highly excited nuclei. Then the production of unstable fragments is discussed. Finally the author discusses the study of pp correlations looking for interference effects. (HSI)

  13. Primary amine/CSA ion pair: A powerful catalytic system for the asymmetric enamine catalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chen

    2011-05-20

    A novel ion pair catalyst containing a chiral counteranion can be readily derived by simply mixing cinchona alkaloid-derived diamine with chiral camphorsulfonic acid (CSA). A mixture of 9-amino(9-deoxy)epi-quinine 8 and (-)-CSA was found to be the best catalyst with matching chirality, enabling the direct amination of α-branched aldehydes to proceed in quantitative yields and with nearly perfect enantioselectivities. A 0.5 mol % catalyst loading was sufficient to catalyze the reaction, and a gram scale enantioselective synthesis of biologically important α-methyl phenylglycine has been successfully demonstrated. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  14. Detection of potato storage disease via gas analysis: a pilot study using field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutolo, Massimo; Covington, James A; Clarkson, John; Iliescu, Daciana

    2014-01-01

    Soft rot is a commonly occurring potato tuber disease that each year causes substantial losses to the food industry. Here, we explore the possibility of early detection of the disease via gas/vapor analysis, in a laboratory environment, using a recent technology known as FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry). In this work, tubers were inoculated with a bacterium causing the infection, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and stored within set environmental conditions in order to manage disease progression. They were compared with controls stored in the same conditions. Three different inoculation time courses were employed in order to obtain diseased potatoes showing clear signs of advanced infection (for standard detection) and diseased potatoes with no apparent evidence of infection (for early detection). A total of 156 samples were processed by PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and k-means clustering. Results show a clear discrimination between controls and diseased potatoes for all experiments with no difference among observations from standard and early detection. Further analysis was carried out by means of a statistical model based on LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis) that showed a high classification accuracy of 92.1% on the test set, obtained via a LOOCV (leave-one out cross-validation). PMID:25171118

  15. Detection of Potato Storage Disease via Gas Analysis: A Pilot Study Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Rutolo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Soft rot is a commonly occurring potato tuber disease that each year causes substantial losses to the food industry. Here, we explore the possibility of early detection of the disease via gas/vapor analysis, in a laboratory environment, using a recent technology known as FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry. In this work, tubers were inoculated with a bacterium causing the infection, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and stored within set environmental conditions in order to manage disease progression. They were compared with controls stored in the same conditions. Three different inoculation time courses were employed in order to obtain diseased potatoes showing clear signs of advanced infection (for standard detection and diseased potatoes with no apparent evidence of infection (for early detection. A total of 156 samples were processed by PCA (Principal Component Analysis and k-means clustering. Results show a clear discrimination between controls and diseased potatoes for all experiments with no difference among observations from standard and early detection. Further analysis was carried out by means of a statistical model based on LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis that showed a high classification accuracy of 92.1% on the test set, obtained via a LOOCV (leave-one out cross-validation.

  16. Membrane curvature generated by asymmetric depletion layers of ions, small molecules, and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Różycki, Bartosz; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2016-08-21

    Biomimetic and biological membranes consist of molecular bilayers with two leaflets that are typically exposed to different aqueous solutions. We consider solutions of "particles" that experience effectively repulsive interactions with these membranes and form depletion layers in front of the membrane leaflets. The particles considered here are water-soluble, have a size between a few angstrom and a few nanometers as well as a rigid, more or less globular shape, and do neither adsorb onto the membranes nor permeate these membranes. Examples are provided by ions, small sugar molecules, globular proteins, or inorganic nanoparticles with a hydrophilic surface. We first study depletion layers in a hard-core system based on ideal particle solutions as well as hard-wall interactions between these particles and the membrane. For this system, we obtain exact expressions for the coverages and tensions of the two leaflets as well as for the spontaneous curvature of the bilayer membrane. All of these quantities depend linearly on the particle concentrations. The exact results for the hard-core system also show that the spontaneous curvature can be directly deduced from the planar membrane geometry. Our results for the hard-core system apply both to ions and solutes that are small compared to the membrane thickness and to nanoparticles with a size that is comparable to the membrane thickness, provided the particle solutions are sufficiently dilute. We then corroborate the different relationships found for the hard-core system by extensive simulations of a soft-core particle system using dissipative particle dynamics. The simulations confirm the linear relationships obtained for the hard-core system. Both our analytical and our simulation results show that the spontaneous curvature induced by a single particle species can be quite large. When one leaflet of the membrane is exposed, e.g., to a 100 mM solution of glucose, a lipid bilayer can acquire a spontaneous curvature of ±1

  17. Ion Mobility Separation of Peptide Isotopomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszycki, Julia L.; Bowman, Andrew P.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2016-05-01

    Differential or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) operating at high electric fields fully resolves isotopic isomers for a peptide with labeled residues. The naturally present isotopes, alone and together with targeted labels, also cause spectral shifts that approximately add for multiple heavy atoms. Separation qualitatively depends on the gas composition. These findings may enable novel strategies in proteomic and metabolomic analyses using stable isotope labeling.

  18. Surrogate waveform models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Jonathan; Field, Scott; Galley, Chad; Scheel, Mark; Szilagyi, Bela; Tiglio, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    With the advanced detector era just around the corner, there is a strong need for fast and accurate models of gravitational waveforms from compact binary coalescence. Fast surrogate models can be built out of an accurate but slow waveform model with minimal to no loss in accuracy, but may require a large number of evaluations of the underlying model. This may be prohibitively expensive if the underlying is extremely slow, for example if we wish to build a surrogate for numerical relativity. We examine alternate choices to building surrogate models which allow for a more sparse set of input waveforms. Research supported in part by NSERC.

  19. Altimeter waveform software design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, G. S.; Miller, L. S.; Brown, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are described for preprocessing raw return waveform data from the GEOS-3 radar altimeter. Topics discussed include: (1) general altimeter data preprocessing to be done at the GEOS-3 Data Processing Center to correct altimeter waveform data for temperature calibrations, to convert between engineering and final data units and to convert telemetered parameter quantities to more appropriate final data distribution values: (2) time "tagging" of altimeter return waveform data quantities to compensate for various delays, misalignments and calculational intervals; (3) data processing procedures for use in estimating spacecraft attitude from altimeter waveform sampling gates; and (4) feasibility of use of a ground-based reflector or transponder to obtain in-flight calibration information on GEOS-3 altimeter performance.

  20. DSP Based Waveform Generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The DSP Based Waveform Generator is used for CSR Control system to control special controlled objects, such as the pulsed power supply for magnets, RF system, injection and extraction synchronization, global CSR synchronization etc. This intelligent controller based on 4800 MIPS DSP and 256M SDRAM technology will supply highly stable and highly accurate reference waveform used by the power supply of magnets. The specifications are as follows:

  1. Nonlinear waveform generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, L J; Rypins, E B

    1990-01-01

    We developed three analog logic SPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis, developed at the University of California, Berkeley, CA) subcircuits, a voltage comparator and a nonlinear waveform generator to compliment the previously derived functions (Goldstein and Rypins, Comput. Methods Programs Biomed. 29 (1989) 161-172) that simplify modeling of physiologic systems. The logic elements are the 'AND', 'OR' and 'NOT' Boolean functions. In addition, we derived a voltage comparator for use in our composite waveform generator. All the circuits are analog so they can be incorporated into existing analog circuits while performing digital functions. PMID:2364683

  2. Near-surface density profiling of Fe ion irradiated Si (100) using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction by variation of the wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we report on correlations between surface density variations and ion parameters during ion beam-induced surface patterning process. The near-surface density variations of irradiated Si(100) surfaces were investigated after off-normal irradiation with 5 keV Fe ions at different fluences. In order to reduce the x-ray probing depth to a thickness below 5 nm, the extremely asymmetrical x-ray diffraction by variation of wavelength was applied, exploiting x-ray refraction at the air-sample interface. Depth profiling was achieved by measuring x-ray rocking curves as function of varying wavelengths providing incidence angles down to 0°. The density variation was extracted from the deviations from kinematical Bragg angle at grazing incidence angles due to refraction of the x-ray beam at the air-sample interface. The simulations based on the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction revealed that while a net near-surface density decreases with increasing ion fluence which is accompanied by surface patterning, there is a certain threshold of ion fluence to surface density modulation. Our finding suggests that the surface density variation can be relevant with the mechanism of pattern formation.

  3. Strain evolution in Si substrate due to implantation of MeV ion observed by extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the strain introduced in a Si(111) substrate due to MeV ion implantation using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction and measured the rocking curves of asymmetrical 113 diffraction for the Si substrates implanted with a 1.5 MeV Au2+ ion at fluence values of 1x1013, 5x1013, and 1x1014/cm2. The measured curves consisted of a bulk peak and accompanying subpeak with an interference fringe. The positional relationship of the bulk peak to the subpeak and the intensity variation of those peaks with respect to the wavelengths of the x rays indicated that crystal lattices near the surface were strained; the lattice spacing of surface normal (111) planes near the surface was larger than that of the bulk. Detailed strain profiles along the depth direction were successfully estimated using a curve-fitting method based on Darwin's dynamical diffraction theory. Comparing the shapes of resultant strain profiles, we found that a strain evolution rapidly occurred within a depth of ∼300 nm at fluence values between 1x1013 and 5x1013/cm2. This indicates that formation of the complex defects progressed near the surface when the fluence value went beyond a critical value between 1x1013 and 5x1013/cm2 and the defects brought a large strain to the substrate.

  4. A Systematic Investigation of Quaternary Ammonium Ions as Asymmetric Phase Transfer Catalysts. Application of Quantitative Structure Activity/Selectivity Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Denmark, Scott E.; Gould, Nathan D.; Wolf, Larry M

    2011-01-01

    While the synthetic utility of asymmetric phase transfer catalysis continues to expand, the number of proven catalyst types and design criteria remains limited. At the origin of this scarcity is a lack in understanding of how catalyst structural features affect the rate and enantioselectivity of phase transfer catalyzed reactions. Described in this paper is the development of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) and -selectivity relationships (QSSR) for the alkylation of a pro...

  5. Adiabatic and sudden interaction potentials in the fusion-fission of heavy ion collisions: Asymmetric target-projectile combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is now well known that many reactions giving measurable fusion cross-sections also show a fission of the compound system formed, similar to the low energy fission of the known fissioning nuclei. Recently, both the fusion excitation functions and the mass equilibration in the fragmentation of the composite system were measured for a large number of systems with 94208Pb on different targets of 26Mg, 48Ca, 50Ti, 52Cr, 58Fe and 64Ni. From a theoretical point of view, it is relevant to ask the question: how do the colliding nuclei fuse and then why does the compound system formed fission instead of going to the ground state to give a stable system. In this Letter, we attempt to show that the fusion of asymmetric colliding nuclei is due to the overcoming of the interaction barriers in adiabatic potentials and the fission of the compound system should perhaps occur as a sudden process, like the one in the spontaneous fission phenomenon. We have made our calculations for the compound systems with 102<=Z<=110 and for the asymmetric target-projectile combinations of the experiments of Ref. 1, using the fragmentation theory whose basis is the asymmetric two-centre shell model

  6. Multiscale full waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Trampert, Jeannot; Cupillard, Paul; Saygin, Erdinc; Taymaz, Tuncay; Capdeville, Yann; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    We develop and apply a full waveform inversion method that incorporates seismic data on a wide range of spatio-temporal scales, thereby constraining the details of both crustal and upper-mantle structure. This is intended to further our understanding of crust-mantle interactions that shape the nature of plate tectonics, and to be a step towards improved tomographic models of strongly scale-dependent earth properties, such as attenuation and anisotropy. The inversion for detailed regional earth structure consistently embedded within a large-scale model requires locally refined numerical meshes that allow us to (1) model regional wave propagation at high frequencies, and (2) capture the inferred fine-scale heterogeneities. The smallest local grid spacing sets the upper bound of the largest possible time step used to iteratively advance the seismic wave field. This limitation leads to extreme computational costs in the presence of fine-scale structure, and it inhibits the construction of full waveform tomographic models that describe earth structure on multiple scales. To reduce computational requirements to a feasible level, we design a multigrid approach based on the decomposition of a multiscale earth model with widely varying grid spacings into a family of single-scale models where the grid spacing is approximately uniform. Each of the single-scale models contains a tractable number of grid points, which ensures computational efficiency. The multi-to-single-scale decomposition is the foundation of iterative, gradient-based optimization schemes that simultaneously and consistently invert data on all scales for one multi-scale model. We demonstrate the applicability of our method in a full waveform inversion for Eurasia, with a special focus on Anatolia where coverage is particularly dense. Continental-scale structure is constrained by complete seismic waveforms in the 30-200 s period range. In addition to the well-known structural elements of the Eurasian mantle

  7. Analysis of triazines and associated metabolites with electrospray ionization field-asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mie, Axel; Sandulescu, Madaline; Mathiasson, Lennart;

    2008-01-01

    Triazines comprise an important pollutant class owing to continued use in certain countries, and owing to strong environmental persistence that leads to problems even in countries like Sweden where the use of triazines has been prohibited for some years. We investigated mass-selective detection...... for ion sorting and discrimination against the considerable "chemical noise", nonspecific cluster and fragment ions, which are typically generated in electrospray ionization. This paper presents results of a pilot study of triazines and some metabolites in ideal solvents. Our long-range goal is automated...

  8. Electronics via waveform analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Edwin C

    1993-01-01

    The author believes that a good basic understanding of electronics can be achieved by detailed visual analyses of the actual voltage waveforms present in selected circuits. The voltage waveforms included in this text were photographed using a 35-rrun camera in an attempt to make the book more attractive. This book is intended for the use of students with a variety of backgrounds. For this reason considerable material has been placed in the Appendix for those students who find it useful. The Appendix includes many basic electricity and electronic concepts as well as mathematical derivations that are not vital to the understanding of the circuit being discussed in the text at that time. Also some derivations might be so long that, if included in the text, it could affect the concentration of the student on the circuit being studied. The author has tried to make the book comprehensive enough so that a student could use it as a self-study course, providing one has access to adequate laboratory equipment.

  9. Molecular model of a cell plasma membrane with an asymmetric multicomponent composition: Water permeation and ion effects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vácha, Robert; Berkowitz, M. L.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 96, č. 11 (2009), s. 4493-4501. ISSN 0006-3495 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD203/05/H001; GA ČR GA203/08/0114 Grant ostatní: NSF(US) MCB-0615469 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : membrane * ions * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.390, year: 2009

  10. Waveform analysis of sound

    CERN Document Server

    Tohyama, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    What is this sound? What does that sound indicate? These are two questions frequently heard in daily conversation. Sound results from the vibrations of elastic media and in daily life provides informative signals of events happening in the surrounding environment. In interpreting auditory sensations, the human ear seems particularly good at extracting the signal signatures from sound waves. Although exploring auditory processing schemes may be beyond our capabilities, source signature analysis is a very attractive area in which signal-processing schemes can be developed using mathematical expressions. This book is inspired by such processing schemes and is oriented to signature analysis of waveforms. Most of the examples in the book are taken from data of sound and vibrations; however, the methods and theories are mostly formulated using mathematical expressions rather than by acoustical interpretation. This book might therefore be attractive and informative for scientists, engineers, researchers, and graduat...

  11. Waveform diversity for wireless sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Tariq; Zoltowski, Michael

    2008-04-01

    In active sensing systems such as radar and sensor networks, one is interested in transmitting waveforms that possess an ideal thumbtack shaped ambiguity function. However, the synthesis of waveforms with the desired ambiguity function is a difficult problem in applied mathematics and more often than not, one needs to rely on developing waveforms with an ambiguity function that is close to the desired ambiguity function in some sense. Designing waveforms with ambiguity functions that possess certain desirable properties has been a well researched problem in the field of signal analysis. In this paper, we present a methodology for designing multiantenna adaptive waveforms with autocorrelation functions that allow perfect separation at the receiver. We focus on the 4×4 case and derive the conditions that the four waveforms must satisfy in order to achieve perfect separation. Using these conditions, we show that waveforms constructed using Golay complementary sequences, barker codes and quarter-band signals through kronecker products satisfy these conditions and are therefore seperable at the receiver. We also give examples of more general wavefom families that are matched to the environment and also of waveforms that do not necessarily satisfy the conditions for perfect separation but still have good delay-Doppler ambiguity functions making them suitable for sensing environments.

  12. Recent Developments in Radar Waveforms (in English)

    OpenAIRE

    Cao Si-yang; Zheng Yuan-fang

    2014-01-01

    With the development of high speed digital processor and solid state power electronics, more flexible waveforms become feasible to achieve by modern radar systems. In fact, the choice of waveforms has a significant impact on the performance of radar systems. In this paper, we review the conventional radar waveform design as well as explore the new generation of waveforms via different theoretical methods, including the most recent wavelet based waveforms. It is shown that the waveform design ...

  13. Waveform Catalog, Extreme Mass Ratio Binary (Capture)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Numerically-generated gravitational waveforms for circular inspiral into Kerr black holes. These waveforms were developed using Scott Hughes' black hole...

  14. Simulated lidar waveforms for understanding factors affecting waveform shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Angela M.; Olsen, Richard C.

    2011-06-01

    Full-waveform LIDAR is a technology which enables the analysis of the 3-D structure and arrangement of objects. An in-depth understanding of the factors that affect the shape of the full-waveform signal is required in order to extract as much information as possible from the signal. A simple model of LIDAR propagation has been created which simulates the interaction of LIDAR energy with objects in a scene. A 2-dimensional model tree allows controlled manipulation of the geometric arrangement of branches and leaves with varying spectral properties. Results suggest complex interactions of the LIDAR energy with the tree canopy, including the occurrence of multiple bounces for energy reaching the ground under the canopy. Idealized sensor instrument response functions incorporated in the simulation illustrate a large impact on waveform shape. A waveform recording laser rangefinder has been built which will allow validation or model results; preliminary collection results are presented here.

  15. Multiples waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, D. L.

    2013-01-01

    To increase the illumination of the subsurface and to eliminate the dependency of FWI on the source wavelet, we propose multiples waveform inversion (MWI) that transforms each hydrophone into a virtual point source with a time history equal to that of the recorded data. These virtual sources are used to numerically generate downgoing wavefields that are correlated with the backprojected surface-related multiples to give the migration image. Since the recorded data are treated as the virtual sources, knowledge of the source wavelet is not required, and the subsurface illumination is greatly enhanced because the entire free surface acts as an extended source compared to the radiation pattern of a traditional point source. Numerical tests on the Marmousi2 model show that the convergence rate and the spatial resolution of MWI is, respectively, faster and more accurate then FWI. The potential pitfall with this method is that the multiples undergo more than one roundtrip to the surface, which increases attenuation and reduces spatial resolution. This can lead to less resolved tomograms compared to conventional FWI. The possible solution is to combine both FWI and MWI in inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution.

  16. Waveform retracking for improving inland water heights from altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebbing, Bernd; Forootan, Ehsan; Kusche, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    For more than two decades, satellite radar altimeters have been providing valuable information on level changes of seas and oceans. In recent years, the usage of satellite altimetry to monitor the water level changes of lakes and rivers, as well as in hydrology applications, has become a topic of rising interest. The altimeter emits a radar pulse, which is reflected at the nadir-surface and measures the two-way travel time, as well as the returned energy as a function of time, resulting in a return waveform. Over the open ocean the waveform shape corresponds to a theoretical model which can be used to infer information on range corrections, significant wave height or wind speed. However, the waveforms over lakes and rivers show patterns which are significantly influenced by signals reflected from land present in the altimeter footprint. This results in a variety of different waveforms shapes ranging from waveforms similar to the theoretical ocean case to completely different ones such as those including only small leading edges and large peaks on the trailing edge. These peaks considerably influence the estimation of the parameters of interest, such as the time origin, connected to the range information, particularly if they are located very close to the leading edge. To mitigate this problem, we present a retracking approach, which combines the advantages of sub-waveform retracking with a flexible waveform model, that allows to model symmetric and asymmetric Gaussian peaks. Based on a preliminary waveform analysis step, a defined window is applied to the total waveform and the parameters are estimated by a flexible fitting procedure. We retracked Topex/Poseidon, Jason-1 and Jason-2 data over several lakes, including the African lakes Volta and Victoria. The inferred lake level heights are evaluated by comparisons to water heights from in situ gauge observations, the Global Reservoir and Lake Monitoring database, as well as those derived from applying conventional

  17. Generation of an intense single isolated attosecond pulse by use of two-colour waveform control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bin; Yu, Yongli; Chu, Wei; Yao, Jinping; Fu, Yuxi; Xiong, Hui; Xu, Han; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2009-07-01

    We theoretically demonstrate the generation of an intense single attosecond pulse by superposing a weak sub-harmonic pulse upon a sine-waveform few-cycle driving pulse. By use of a sine-waveform few-cycle pulse instead of its traditionally used cosine waveform counterpart, we show that efficient tunnel ionization for generating electrons which can revisit their parent ion with high kinetic energy can occur only once in the few-cycle laser field, leading to an increase of efficiency by nearly two orders of magnitude in single attosecond pulse generation as compared with the use of a cosine-waveform field.

  18. Generation of an intense single isolated attosecond pulse by use of two-colour waveform control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We theoretically demonstrate the generation of an intense single attosecond pulse by superposing a weak sub-harmonic pulse upon a sine-waveform few-cycle driving pulse. By use of a sine-waveform few-cycle pulse instead of its traditionally used cosine waveform counterpart, we show that efficient tunnel ionization for generating electrons which can revisit their parent ion with high kinetic energy can occur only once in the few-cycle laser field, leading to an increase of efficiency by nearly two orders of magnitude in single attosecond pulse generation as compared with the use of a cosine-waveform field.

  19. A marked point process for modeling lidar waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Clément; Lafarge, Florent; Roux, Michel; Soergel, Uwe; Bretar, Frédéric; Heipke, Christian

    2010-12-01

    Lidar waveforms are 1-D signals representing a train of echoes caused by reflections at different targets. Modeling these echoes with the appropriate parametric function is useful to retrieve information about the physical characteristics of the targets. This paper presents a new probabilistic model based upon a marked point process which reconstructs the echoes from recorded discrete waveforms as a sequence of parametric curves. Such an approach allows to fit each mode of a waveform with the most suitable function and to deal with both, symmetric and asymmetric, echoes. The model takes into account a data term, which measures the coherence between the models and the waveforms, and a regularization term, which introduces prior knowledge on the reconstructed signal. The exploration of the associated configuration space is performed by a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) sampler coupled with simulated annealing. Experiments with different kinds of lidar signals, especially from urban scenes, show the high potential of the proposed approach. To further demonstrate the advantages of the suggested method, actual laser scans are classified and the results are reported. PMID:20550992

  20. Device for two-dimensional gas-phase separation and characterization of ion mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-12-12

    The present invention relates to a device for separation and characterization of gas-phase ions. The device incorporates an ion source, a field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) analyzer, an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) drift tube, and an ion detector. In one aspect of the invention, FAIMS operating voltages are electrically floated on top of the IMS drift voltage. In the other aspect, the FAIMS/IMS interface is implemented employing an electrodynamic ion funnel, including in particular an hourglass ion funnel. The present invention improves the efficiency (peak capacity) and sensitivity of gas-phase separations; the online FAIMS/IMS coupling creates a fundamentally novel two-dimensional gas-phase separation technology with high peak capacity, specificity, and exceptional throughput.

  1. Asymmetric collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of CP violation in beauty decay is one of the key challenges facing high energy physics. Much work has not yielded a definitive answer how this study might best be performed. However, one clear conclusion is that new accelerator facilities are needed. Proposals include experiments at asymmetric electron-positron colliders and in fixed-target and collider modes at LHC and SSC. Fixed-target and collider experiments at existing accelerators, while they might succeed in a first observation of the effect, will not be adequate to study it thoroughly. Giomataris has emphasized the potential of a new approach to the study of beauty CP violation: the asymmetric proton collider. Such a collider might be realized by the construction of a small storage ring intersecting an existing or soon-to-exist large synchrotron, or by arranging collisions between a large synchrotron and its injector. An experiment at such a collider can combine the advantages of fixed-target-like spectrometer geometry, facilitating triggering, particle identification and the instrumentation of a large acceptance, while the increased √s can provide a factor > 100 increase in beauty-production cross section compared to Tevatron or HERA fixed-target. Beams crossing at a non-zero angle can provide a small interaction region, permitting a first-level decay-vertex trigger to be implemented. To achieve large √s with a large Lorentz boost and high luminosity, the most favorable venue is the high-energy booster (HEB) at the SSC Laboratory, though the CERN SPS and Fermilab Tevatron are also worth considering

  2. Asymmetric interference in molecular photoprocesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, the Coulomb continuum effects in asymmetric molecular interference have been studied analytically in photoionization, photorecombination, bremsstrahlung and Compton ionization. Simple, closed-form factors describe the interference not only in monochromatic photoprocesses, but also in the continuous photoelectron spectra generated by attosecond x-ray pulses with a frequency-dependent phase and broad bandwidth. Using HeH2+ molecular ion as an example, we show how the plane wave interference pattern is strongly modified by the two-centre Coulomb continuum. Asymmetric Coulomb continuum introduces qualitative changes in a photoionization process

  3. Waveform-dependent absorbing metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki; Rushton, Jeremiah J; Sievenpiper, Daniel F

    2014-01-01

    We present the first use of a waveform-dependent absorbing metasurface for high-power pulsed surface currents. The new type of nonlinear metasurface, composed of circuit elements including diodes, is capable of storing high power pulse energy to dissipate it between pulses, while allowing propagation of small signals. Interestingly, the absorbing performance varies for high power pulses but not for high power continuous waves (CWs), since the capacitors used are fully charged up. Thus, the waveform dependence enables us to distinguish various signal types (i.e. CW or pulse) even at the same frequency, which potentially creates new kinds of microwave technologies and applications.

  4. Selection and generation of waveforms for differential mobility spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Krylov, Evgeny V.; Coy, Stephen L.; Vandermey, John; Schneider, Bradley B.; Covey, Thomas R.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.

    2010-01-01

    Devices based on differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) are used in a number of ways, including applications as ion prefilters for API-MS systems, as detectors or selectors in hybrid instruments (GC-DMS, DMS-IMS), and in standalone systems for chemical detection and identification. DMS ion separation is based on the relative difference between high field and low field ion mobility known as the alpha dependence, and requires the application of an intense asymmetric electric field known as th...

  5. Phase Detector For Rectangular Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dischert, Robert A.; Walter, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Phase detector for use with phase-locked-loops, servocontrol, and other electronic circuits designed to avoid disadvantages of other phase detectors. Used with both intermittent and continuous input signals. Circuit offers several advantages; reference signals continuous, burst of few pulses, or single pulse. Circuit "coasts" in absence of reference signal. Generates no steady-state output waveform at lock which makes filtering easier.

  6. Geometrical effect on the issue of asymmetric C 1s photoelectron angular distributions detected in coincidence with the fragment ion pairs of CO+–O+ for CO2 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured C 1s photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) in coincidence with the CO+–O+ fragment ion pairs of CO2 molecules at the photoelectron energies of 85, 120 and 150 eV. The observed left–right asymmetric PADs have been well reproduced by our theoretical model taking into account the two degenerate zero-point bending vibrations. This leads to a conclusive result on the interpretation of such PADs; although it has been believed so far that they are the molecular frame, in fact they are the recoil frame. (fast track communications)

  7. Georgia Tech Catalog of Gravitational Waveforms

    OpenAIRE

    Jani, Karan; Healy, James; Clark, James A.; London, Lionel; Laguna, Pablo; Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a catalog of gravitational waveforms from the bank of simulations by the numerical relativity effort at Georgia Tech. Currently, the catalog consists of 452 distinct waveforms from more than 600 binary black hole simulations: 128 of the waveforms are from binaries with black hole spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, and 324 are from precessing binary black hole systems. The waveforms from binaries with non-spinning black holes have mass-ratios $q = m_1/m_2 \\l...

  8. An MSK Waveform for Radar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a minimum shift keying (MSK) waveform developed for use in radar applications. This waveform is characterized in terms of its spectrum, autocorrelation, and ambiguity function, and is compared with the conventionally used bi-phase coded (BPC) radar signal. It is shown that the MSK waveform has several advantages when compared with the BPC waveform, and is a better candidate for deep-space radar imaging systems such as NASA's Goldstone Solar System Radar.

  9. Generating nonlinear FM chirp waveforms for radar.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-09-01

    Nonlinear FM waveforms offer a radar matched filter output with inherently low range sidelobes. This yields a 1-2 dB advantage in Signal-to-Noise Ratio over the output of a Linear FM waveform with equivalent sidelobe filtering. This report presents design and implementation techniques for Nonlinear FM waveforms.

  10. Waveform digitization utilizing switched-capacitor arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared with traditional waveform digitization with flash-ADCs, waveform digitization with switched-capacitor arrays (SCAs) is able to achieve the sampling speed above 1 GS/s without degrading the analog to digital conversion precision significantly. In this paper, we present the implementation of a fast waveform digitization system with the use of SCAs, and evaluate its performance of waveform digitization and the waveform timing. At about 5 GS/s, the dynamic input range of the digitizer is about 66 dB, and its timing precision is about 20 ps (RMS). (authors)

  11. Simulating full-waveform LIDAR

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Angela M.

    2009-01-01

    LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) is used to remotely measure the threedimensional shapes and arrangements of objects with high efficiency and accuracy by making precise measurements of time-of-flight of pulses of light. Discrete return LIDAR systems provide a discrete series of elevation points corresponding to reflections from objects in the scene. Full-waveform LIDAR systems measure the intensity of light returned to the sensor continuously over a period of time. Relatively little r...

  12. Why Waveform Correlation Sometimes Fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, J.

    2015-12-01

    Waveform correlation detectors used in explosion monitoring scan noisy geophysical data to test two competing hypotheses: either (1) an amplitude-scaled version of a template waveform is present, or, (2) no signal is present at all. In reality, geophysical wavefields that are monitored for explosion signatures include waveforms produced by non-target sources that are partially correlated with the waveform template. Such signals can falsely trigger correlation detectors, particularly at low thresholds required to monitor for smaller target explosions. This challenge is particularly formidable when monitoring known test sites for seismic disturbances, since uncatalogued natural seismicity is (generally) more prevalent at lower magnitudes, and could be mistaken for small explosions. To address these challenges, we identify real examples in which correlation detectors targeting explosions falsely trigger on both site-proximal earthquakes (Figure 1, below) and microseismic "noise". Motivated by these examples, we quantify performance loss when applying these detectors, and re-evaluate the correlation-detector's hypothesis test. We thereby derive new detectors from more general hypotheses that admit unknown background seismicity, and apply these to real data. From our treatment, we derive "rules of thumb'' for proper template and threshold selection in heavily cluttered signal environments. Last, we answer the question "what is the probability of falsely detecting an earthquake collocated at a test site?", using correlation detectors that include explosion-triggered templates. Figure Top: An eight-channel data stream (black) recorded from an earthquake near a mine. Red markers indicate a detection. Middle: The correlation statistic computed by scanning the template against the data stream at top. The red line indicates the threshold for event declaration, determined by a false-alarm on noise probability constraint, as computed from the signal-absent distribution using

  13. Phenomenological gravitational waveforms from spinning coalescing binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Sturani, R; Cadonati, L; Guidi, G M; Healy, J; Shoemaker, D; Vicere', A

    2010-01-01

    An accurate knowledge of the coalescing binary gravitational waveform is crucial for match filtering techniques, which are currently used in the observational searches performed by the LIGO-Virgo collaboration. Following an earlier paper by the same authors we expose the construction of analytical phenomenological waveforms describing the signal sourced by generically spinning binary systems. The gap between the initial inspiral part of the waveform, described by spin-Taylor approximants, and its final ring-down part, described by damped exponentials, is bridged by a phenomenological phase calibrated by comparison with the dominant spherical harmonic mode of a set of waveforms including both numerical and phenomenological waveforms of a different type. All waveforms considered describe equal mass systems with dimension-less spin magnitudes equal to 0.6. The noise-weighted overlap integral between numerical and phenomenological waveforms ranges between 0.93 and 0.98 for a wide span of mass values.

  14. Automated Analysis, Classification, and Display of Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Chiman; Xu, Roger; Mayhew, David; Zhang, Frank; Zide, Alan; Bonggren, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    A computer program partly automates the analysis, classification, and display of waveforms represented by digital samples. In the original application for which the program was developed, the raw waveform data to be analyzed by the program are acquired from space-shuttle auxiliary power units (APUs) at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. The program could also be modified for application to other waveforms -- for example, electrocardiograms. The program begins by performing principal-component analysis (PCA) of 50 normal-mode APU waveforms. Each waveform is segmented. A covariance matrix is formed by use of the segmented waveforms. Three eigenvectors corresponding to three principal components are calculated. To generate features, each waveform is then projected onto the eigenvectors. These features are displayed on a three-dimensional diagram, facilitating the visualization of the trend of APU operations.

  15. Asymmetric Ashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    that oscillate in certain directions. Reflection or scattering of light favours certain orientations of the electric and magnetic fields over others. This is why polarising sunglasses can filter out the glint of sunlight reflected off a pond. When light scatters through the expanding debris of a supernova, it retains information about the orientation of the scattering layers. If the supernova is spherically symmetric, all orientations will be present equally and will average out, so there will be no net polarisation. If, however, the gas shell is not round, a slight net polarisation will be imprinted on the light. This is what broad-band polarimetry can accomplish. If additional spectral information is available ('spectro-polarimetry'), one can determine whether the asymmetry is in the continuum light or in some spectral lines. In the case of the Type Ia supernovae, the astronomers found that the continuum polarisation is very small so that the overall shape of the explosion is crudely spherical. But the much larger polarization in strongly blue-shifted spectral lines evidences the presence, in the outer regions, of fast moving clumps with peculiar chemical composition. "Our study reveals that explosions of Type Ia supernovae are really three-dimensional phenomena," says Dietrich Baade. "The outer regions of the blast cloud is asymmetric, with different materials found in 'clumps', while the inner regions are smooth." "This study was possible because polarimetry could unfold its full strength thanks to the light-collecting power of the Very Large Telescope and the very precise calibration of the FORS instrument," he adds. The research team first spotted this asymmetry in 2003, as part of the same observational campaign (ESO PR 23/03 and ESO PR Photo 26/05). The new, more extensive results show that the degree of polarisation and, hence, the asphericity, correlates with the intrinsic brightness of the explosion. The brighter the supernova, the smoother, or less clumpy

  16. Lightning current waveform measuring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtasinski, R. J.; Fuchs, J. C.; Grove, C. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus is described for monitoring current waveforms produced by lightning strikes which generate currents in an elongated cable. These currents are converted to voltages and to light waves for being transmitted over an optical cable to a remote location. At the remote location, the waves are reconstructed back into electrical waves for being stored into a memory. The information is stored within the memory with a timing signal so that only different signals need be stored in order to reconstruct the wave form.

  17. An infrasound waveform digitization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Infrasound Waveform Digitization System (IWDS) was introduced in detail in this paper. There are some functions in this system, such as scanning, rotating, image clipping, cleaning horizontal and vertical lines, wave tracking, etc. based on some algorithms of image processing. The key techniques include wavelet analysis, image thinning, pixel tracing in this system. With this system, it is possible to analyze historical infrasound drawing recorded in paper by using computer. Application of IWDS will be of help to the progress in nuclear explosion monitoring in the atmosphere, locating sources, estimating explosion energies, earthquake prediction, and geophysical researches. (authors)

  18. Fractal characteristics for binary noise radar waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing C.

    2016-05-01

    Noise radars have many advantages over conventional radars and receive great attentions recently. The performance of a noise radar is determined by its waveforms. Investigating characteristics of noise radar waveforms has significant value for evaluating noise radar performance. In this paper, we use binomial distribution theory to analyze general characteristics of binary phase coded (BPC) noise waveforms. Focusing on aperiodic autocorrelation function, we demonstrate that the probability distributions of sidelobes for a BPC noise waveform depend on the distances of these sidelobes to the mainlobe. The closer a sidelobe to the mainlobe, the higher the probability for this sidelobe to be a maximum sidelobe. We also develop Monte Carlo framework to explore the characteristics that are difficult to investigate analytically. Through Monte Carlo experiments, we reveal the Fractal relationship between the code length and the maximum sidelobe value for BPC waveforms, and propose using fractal dimension to measure noise waveform performance.

  19. Wideband Waveform Design for Robust Target Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Panahi, Ashkan; Ström, Marie; Viberg, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Future radar systems are expected to use waveforms of a high bandwidth, where the main advantage is an improved range resolution. In this paper, a technique to design robust wideband waveforms for a Multiple-Input-Single-Output system is developed. The context is optimal detection of a single object with partially unknown parameters. The waveforms are robust in the sense that, for a single transmission, detection capability is maintained over an interval of time-delay and time-scaling (Dopple...

  20. Seismic waveform modeling over cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cong; Friederich, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    With the fast growing computational technologies, numerical simulation of seismic wave propagation achieved huge successes. Obtaining the synthetic waveforms through numerical simulation receives an increasing amount of attention from seismologists. However, computational seismology is a data-intensive research field, and the numerical packages usually come with a steep learning curve. Users are expected to master considerable amount of computer knowledge and data processing skills. Training users to use the numerical packages, correctly access and utilize the computational resources is a troubled task. In addition to that, accessing to HPC is also a common difficulty for many users. To solve these problems, a cloud based solution dedicated on shallow seismic waveform modeling has been developed with the state-of-the-art web technologies. It is a web platform integrating both software and hardware with multilayer architecture: a well designed SQL database serves as the data layer, HPC and dedicated pipeline for it is the business layer. Through this platform, users will no longer need to compile and manipulate various packages on the local machine within local network to perform a simulation. By providing users professional access to the computational code through its interfaces and delivering our computational resources to the users over cloud, users can customize the simulation at expert-level, submit and run the job through it.

  1. Issues related to waveform computations for radar altimeter applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newkirk, Michael H.; Brown, Gary S.

    1992-12-01

    An algorithm has been developed to model the average return power waveforms available from general radar altimeter systems, such as the Multimode Airborne Radar Altimeter (MARA) system operated at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center - Wallops Flight Facility. The algorithm is based on a convolutional model comprised of three functions: the average flat surface impulse response (FSIR), the radar system point target response (PTR), and the height pdf of the specular points on the sea surface. The FSIR is modified to account for the asymmetric antenna beam used by the MARA system, and then certain properties of this modified SIR are exploited to obtain closed-form expressions that can be rapidly evaluated. An FFT convolution routine is used to further speed up the computations. The result is an algorithm that can be used to study the effects of pointing errors in surface measurements.

  2. Novel chiral N4S2- and N6S3-donor macrocyclic ligands: synthesis, protonation constants, metal-ion binding and asymmetric catalysis in the Henry reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Martell, A E

    2003-08-01

    New hydrophobic chiral macrocyclic ligands L1-L3 with chiral diamino and thiophene moieties have been synthesized by the Schiff base condensation approach. Protonation constants of L1 and L2 were determined by potentiometry titration. Metal-ion binding experiments exhibited that L1 and L3 are pronounced in selective recognition, Ag+, Cu2+ and Ca2+ ions among the surveyed metal ions (Cu2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, Ag+, Li+, Na+, K+, and Ca2+). L1 was found to spectroscopically detect the presence of Cu2+ and Ca2+ to function as a multiple readout sensor. The detection limit for Ca2+ ions was found to be 9.8 x 10(-5) M in CH2Cl2-MeOH solution. The trimeric chiral ligand L3 has been shown to be an efficient auxiliary in a Zn(II)-mediated enantioselective Henry reaction. PMID:12948208

  3. Digital Waveform Generator Basedon FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoucheng Ding

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA of the Cyclone II series was as the core processor of frequency meter and the Quartus II was as the development plat form. This article had designed the fully digital signal generator. It use dall-digital frequency synthesizer technology and FPGA programming implemented the three waveforms: sin wave and square wave and triangle wave. The frequency was adjustable through10- bit phase accumulator and the analog multiplier achieved amplitude modulation. Using 51soft nuclear FPGA wrote a C program and realized the in put control word. The 4 × 4 matrix keyboard inputted frequency or amplitude value and the LCD1602displayedthem. The test results show that the system has high precision, distortion and low.

  4. Asymmetric Wettability Directs Leidenfrost Droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, Rebecca L [ORNL; Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Briggs, Dayrl P [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL; Lavrik, Nickolay V [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Leidenfrost phenomena on nano- and microstructured surfaces are of great importance for increasing control over heat transfer in high power density systems utilizing boiling phenomena. They also provide an elegant means to direct droplet motion in a variety of recently emerging fluidic systems. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of tilted nanopillar arrays (TNPAs) that exhibit directional Leidenfrost water droplets under dynamic conditions, namely on impact with Weber numbers 40 at T 325 C. The batch fabrication of the TNPAs was achieved by glancing-angle anisotropic reactive ion etching of a thermally dewet platinum mask, with mean pillar diameters of 100 nm and heights of 200-500 nm. In contrast to previously implemented macro- and microscopic Leidenfrost ratchets, our TNPAs induce no preferential directional movement of Leidenfrost droplets under conditions approaching steady-state film boiling, suggesting that the observed droplet directionality is not a result of asymmetric vapor flow. Using high-speed imaging, phase diagrams were constructed for the boiling behavior upon impact for droplets falling onto TNPAs, straight nanopillar arrays, and smooth silicon surfaces. The asymmetric impact and directional trajectory of droplets was exclusive to the TNPAs for impacts corresponding to the transition boiling regime, revealing that asymmetric wettability upon impact is the mechanism for the droplet directionality.

  5. Computational Analysis of Quadrupole Mass Filters Employing Nontraditional Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabeck, Gregory F.; Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2016-06-01

    Quadrupole mass filters using non-sinusoidal driving potentials present exciting opportunities for new functionality. Predicting figures of merit like resolving power and transmission efficiency helps characterize these emerging devices. To this end, matrix methods of solving the Hill equation of ion motion are employed to calculate stability diagrams and pseudopotential well depth maps in the a,q plane for arbitrary waveforms. The theoretical resolving power and well depth of digital, trapezoidal and sinusoidal mass filters are compared. Simplified expressions for digital mass filter operation are presented.

  6. Current waveforms for pulse microdischarge inside dielectric cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer simulation for microplasma discharge inside coplanar dielectric cell was carried out via particles in cells (PiC) method. Discharge current waveforms have a shape of short pulses with length decreasing and maximum earlier appearance for larger voltages applied. Mostly ion current on the negative coplanar electrode has a smooth shape contrary to the mostly electron current on the positive one which has a sharp maximum at the end of electron avalanche. Address electrode current is significantly less than coplanar electrodes currents and has pulsations corresponding to the striation structures appearance.

  7. Attosecond control of optical waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new, monolithic scheme for stabilizing the phase between the carrier wave and the envelope (CE phase) in a train of few-cycle laser pulses is demonstrated. Self-phase modulation and second-harmonic generation or difference-frequency generation in a single periodically poled lithium niobate crystal, that transmits the main laser beam, allows for the CE-phase locking directly in the usable output. The monolithic scheme obviates the need for splitting off a fraction of the laser output for CE-phase control, coupling into microstructured fibre, as well as separation and recombination of spectral components. As a result, the CE-phase error integrated over the spectral range of 0.2 mHz-35 MHz is as small as 0.016 x 2π rad. This implies that the phase of the field oscillations (λ ∼ 830 nm) with respect to the pulse peak is locked to within 44 attoseconds, resulting in optical waveform control with subhundred attosecond fidelity for the first time

  8. Parallel Algorithm in Surface Wave Waveform Inversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In Surface wave waveform inversion, we want to reconstruct 3Dshear wav e velocity structure, which calculation beyond the capability of the powerful pr esent day personal computer or even workstation. So we designed a high parallele d algorithm and carried out the inversion on Parallel computer based on the part itioned waveform inversion (PWI). It partitions the large scale optimization pro blem into a number of independent small scale problems and reduces the computati onal effort by several orders of magnitude. We adopted surface waveform inversio n with a equal block(2°×2°) discretization.

  9. 气相色谱-高场非对称波形离子迁移谱(GC-FAIMS)法应用于白酒的风味研究%Study on liquor flavor by gas chromatography-field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娟; 郭亚洁; 赵伟军; 李灵峰; 李鹏; 汪小知

    2014-01-01

    目的:将 FAIMS 与 GC 分离技术联用,建立白酒中风味物质的甄别分析方法。方法首先利用 GC的高分离能力对白酒成分进行预分离,避免了干扰组分带来的离子竞争等问题;然后用 GC-FAIMS 进行检测;最后通过质谱对 GC-FAIMS 谱图中风味物质的出峰信号进行确认,并以各种风味物质含量为依据,通过主成分分析(PCA)法对白酒的不同香型进行划分。结果枝江大曲负模式下各组分峰的保留时间RSD均小于2.15%,峰高RSD均小于3.06%(n=5),系统的稳定性良好。对11种不同香型的白酒进行GC-FAIMS测试,在负模式下响应的组分主要是有机酸类物质。11种不同香型白酒具有较大的象限差异,能够通过PCA分析方法加以区分。结论 GC-FAIMS 联用技术成功实现了多种白酒的香型分析,该联用技术对复杂体系的分析具有一定的应用前景。%ABSTRACT:Objective To establish a method for identification analysis of flavor in liquors. Methods Liq-uor were separated by gas chromatography (GC) technology to avoid the ion of competition issues caused by the interference components, and determined by GC-high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrome-try (FAIMS). Finally, the peak signal of flavor compounds was confirmed by the mass spectra. Flavor of liquors were analyzed via PSA method. Results The RSDs of retention time were less than 2.15%, and high peak RSDs were below 3.06%(n=5) of each component in negative mode of Zhijiang Daqu, so the stability of the system was good. Response components of 11 kinds of different flavor liquors detected were the organic acids in negative mode. Different quadrant wine showed a great difference, which could be distinguished by PCA analysis methods. Conclusion GC-FAIMS is successfully implemented in liquor flavor analysis. It has an promising application prospect in dealing with complex sample system.

  10. Selection of Carrier Waveforms for PWM Inverter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国呈; 屈克庆; 许春雨; 孙承波

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the influence of different carrier waveforms upon the output characteristics of PWM inverter is described in detail. When a triangular carrier waveform is used in hard-switching PWM inverters, harmonics exist in the neighborhood of the output frequency of the inverter output voltage and current due to the dead time. The triangular carrier waveform used in soft-switching PWM inverter will cause difficulties in controlling resonance-trigger time, higher loss in the resonant circuit, and less utilization of the DC bus voltage. If a sawtooth carrier is used in hard-switching PWM inverter, there will be severe distortion in the current waveform. When sawtooth carriers with alternate positive and negative slopes are used in soft-switching PWM inverters, the resonancetrigger time is easy to control, and distortion in the output voltage and current caused by the dead time will not appear.

  11. GRC GSFC TDRSS Waveform Metrics Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Dale J.

    2013-01-01

    The report presents software metrics and porting metrics for the GGT Waveform. The porting was from a ground-based COTS SDR, the SDR-3000, to the CoNNeCT JPL SDR. The report does not address any of the Operating Environment (OE) software development, nor the original TDRSS waveform development at GSFC for the COTS SDR. With regard to STRS, the report presents compliance data and lessons learned.

  12. Measuring venous oxygenation using the photoplethysmograph waveform

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, Z. D.; Kyriacou, P. A.; Silverman, D. G.; Shelley, K. H.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigate the hypothesis that the photoplethysmograph (PPG) waveform can be analyzed to infer regional venous oxygen saturation. METHODS: Fundamental to the successful isolation of the venous saturation is the identification of PPG characteristics that are unique to the peripheral venous system. Two such characteristics have been identified. First, the peripheral venous waveform tends to reflect atrial contraction. Second, ventilation tends to move venous blood preferenti...

  13. Georgia Tech Catalog of Gravitational Waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Jani, Karan; Clark, James A; London, Lionel; Laguna, Pablo; Shoemaker, Deirdre

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces a catalog of gravitational waveforms from the bank of simulations by the numerical relativity effort at Georgia Tech. Currently, the catalog consists of 452 distinct waveforms from more than 600 binary black hole simulations: 128 of the waveforms are from binaries with black hole spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, and 324 are from precessing binary black hole systems. The waveforms from binaries with non-spinning black holes have mass-ratios $q = m_1/m_2 \\le 15$, and those with precessing, spinning black holes have $q \\le 8$. The waveforms expand a moderate number of orbits in the late inspiral, the burst during coalescence, and the ring-down of the final black hole. Examples of waveforms in the catalog matched against the widely used approximate models are presented. In addition, predictions of the mass and spin of the final black hole by phenomenological fits are tested against the results from the simulation bank. The role of the catalog in interpreting the GW150914 even...

  14. Towards Higher Resolution Global Mantle Waveform Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulgin, A. A.; Romanowicz, B.

    2005-12-01

    Over the last 10 years, we have developed several generations of three-dimensional elastic and anelastic models of the earth's mantle, based on the inversion of surface and body waveforms using an asymptotic normal mode coupling approach (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1996). Until now, the shortest period of analysis of the body waveforms was 32 sec, and we have assumed standard scaling relations between compressional and shear velocities to obtain isotropic and radially anisotropic models of the whole mantle. We have found, surprisingly, that our waveforms have some - albeit weak - ability to resolve the topography of major mantle discontinuities. In order to improve the resolution of our models, extract P velocity information, as well as obtain better constraints on discontinuity topography, it is necessary to extend the analysis to shorter periods. This presents some computational challenges, as the number of coupling terms that need to be included increases rapidly with frequency. It also leads us to rethink our data selection strategy, in particular to allow larger time shifts between observed waveforms and synthetic ones. The latter are computed for a reference earth model and used in an automatic pre-selection step. We present progress in the development of a 3D elastic mantle model based on three component body waveforms down to 16 sec and surface waveforms down to 60 sec.

  15. An adaptive transfer function for deriving the aortic pressure waveform from a peripheral artery pressure waveform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Gokul; Xu, Da; Olivier, N Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2009-11-01

    We developed a new technique to mathematically transform a peripheral artery pressure (PAP) waveform distorted by wave reflections into the physiologically more relevant aortic pressure (AP) waveform. First, a transfer function relating PAP to AP is defined in terms of the unknown parameters of a parallel tube model of pressure and flow in the arterial tree. The parameters are then estimated from the measured PAP waveform along with a one-time measurement of the wave propagation delay time between the aorta and peripheral artery measurement site (which may be accomplished noninvasively) by exploiting preknowledge of aortic flow. Finally, the transfer function with its estimated parameters is applied to the measured waveform so as to derive the AP waveform. Thus, in contrast to the conventional generalized transfer function, the transfer function is able to adapt to the intersubject and temporal variability of the arterial tree. To demonstrate the feasibility of this adaptive transfer function technique, we performed experiments in 6 healthy dogs in which PAP and reference AP waveforms were simultaneously recorded during 12 different hemodynamic interventions. The AP waveforms derived by the technique showed agreement with the measured AP waveforms (overall total waveform, systolic pressure, and pulse pressure root mean square errors of 3.7, 4.3, and 3.4 mmHg, respectively) statistically superior to the unprocessed PAP waveforms (corresponding errors of 8.6, 17.1, and 20.3 mmHg) and the AP waveforms derived by two previously proposed transfer functions developed with a subset of the same canine data (corresponding errors of, on average, 5.0, 6.3, and 6.7 mmHg). PMID:19783780

  16. The Asymmetric Leximin Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Driesen, Bram W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we define and characterize a class of asymmetric leximin solutions, that contains both the symmetric leximin solution of Imai[5] and the two-person asymmetric Kalai-Smorodinsky solution of Dubra [3] as special cases. Solutions in this class combine three attractive features: they are defined on the entire domain of convex n-person bargaining problems, they generally yield Pareto efficient solution outcomes, and asymmetries among bargainers are captured by a single parameter ve...

  17. Asymmetric WIMP dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Graesser, Michael L.; Shoemaker, Ian M.; Vecchi, Luca

    2011-01-01

    In existing dark matter models with global symmetries the relic abundance of dark matter is either equal to that of anti-dark matter (thermal WIMP), or vastly larger, with essentially no remaining anti-dark matter (asymmetric dark matter). By exploring the consequences of a primordial asymmetry on the coupled dark matter and anti-dark matter Boltzmann equations we find large regions of parameter space that interpolate between these two extremes. Interestingly, this new asymmetric WIMP framewo...

  18. Asymmetric Wettability Directs Leidenfrost Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapov, Rebecca; Boreyko, Jonathan; Briggs, Dayrl; Srijanto, Bernadeta; Retterer, Scott; Collier, C. Patrick; Lavrik, Nickolay

    2014-03-01

    Exploration of Leidenfrost droplets on nano- and microstructured surfaces are of great importance for increasing control over heat transfer in high power density systems using boiling phenomena. They also provide an elegant way to direct droplet motion in a variety of emerging fluidic systems. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of tilted nanopillar arrays (TNPAs) that exhibit directional Leidenfrost water droplets under dynamic conditions. The batch fabrication of the TNPAs was achieved by glancing-angle anisotropic reactive ion etching of a thermally dewet platinum mask. In contrast to previously implemented macro- and microscopic Leidenfrost ratchets, our TNPAs induce no preferential directional movement of Leidenfrost droplets under conditions approaching steady-state film boiling. This suggests that the observed droplet directionality is not a result of asymmetric vapor flow. Phase diagrams were constructed for the boiling behavior upon droplet impact onto TNPAs, straight nanopillar arrays, and smooth silicon surfaces. Asymmetric wettability and directional trajectory of droplets was exclusive to the TNPAs for impacts corresponding to the transition boiling regime, revealing this to be the mechanism for the droplet directionality. This work was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, which is sponsored at Oak Ridge National Lab by the Division of Scientific User Facilities, US Dept. of Energy.

  19. Krylov subspace acceleration of waveform relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsdaine, A.; Wu, Deyun [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Standard solution methods for numerically solving time-dependent problems typically begin by discretizing the problem on a uniform time grid and then sequentially solving for successive time points. The initial time discretization imposes a serialization to the solution process and limits parallel speedup to the speedup available from parallelizing the problem at any given time point. This bottleneck can be circumvented by the use of waveform methods in which multiple time-points of the different components of the solution are computed independently. With the waveform approach, a problem is first spatially decomposed and distributed among the processors of a parallel machine. Each processor then solves its own time-dependent subsystem over the entire interval of interest using previous iterates from other processors as inputs. Synchronization and communication between processors take place infrequently, and communication consists of large packets of information - discretized functions of time (i.e., waveforms).

  20. Wavelet analysis of the impedance cardiogram waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podtaev, S.; Stepanov, R.; Dumler, A.; Chugainov, S.; Tziberkin, K.

    2012-12-01

    Impedance cardiography has been used for diagnosing atrial and ventricular dysfunctions, valve disorders, aortic stenosis, and vascular diseases. Almost all the applications of impedance cardiography require determination of some of the characteristic points of the ICG waveform. The ICG waveform has a set of characteristic points known as A, B, E ((dZ/dt)max) X, Y, O and Z. These points are related to distinct physiological events in the cardiac cycle. Objective of this work is an approbation of a new method of processing and interpretation of the impedance cardiogram waveforms using wavelet analysis. A method of computer thoracic tetrapolar polyrheocardiography is used for hemodynamic registrations. Use of original wavelet differentiation algorithm allows combining filtration and calculation of the derivatives of rheocardiogram. The proposed approach can be used in clinical practice for early diagnostics of cardiovascular system remodelling in the course of different pathologies.

  1. Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection in Weakly Ionized Chromospheric Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Nicholas A

    2015-01-01

    Realistic models of magnetic reconnection in the solar chromosphere must take into account that the plasma is partially ionized and that plasma conditions within any two magnetic flux bundles undergoing reconnection may not be the same. Asymmetric reconnection in the chromosphere may occur when newly emerged flux interacts with pre-existing, overlying flux. We present 2.5D simulations of asymmetric reconnection in weakly ionized, reacting plasmas where the magnetic field strengths, ion and neutral densities, and temperatures are different in each upstream region. The plasma and neutral components are evolved separately to allow non-equilibrium ionization. As in previous simulations of chromospheric reconnection, the current sheet thins to the scale of the neutral-ion mean free path and the ion and neutral outflows are strongly coupled. However, the ion and neutral inflows are asymmetrically decoupled. In cases with magnetic asymmetry, a net flow of neutrals through the current sheet from the weak field (high ...

  2. Signal processing in noise waveform radar

    CERN Document Server

    Kulpa, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    This book is devoted to the emerging technology of noise waveform radar and its signal processing aspects. It is a new kind of radar, which use noise-like waveform to illuminate the target. The book includes an introduction to basic radar theory, starting from classical pulse radar, signal compression, and wave radar. The book then discusses the properties, difficulties and potential of noise radar systems, primarily for low-power and short-range civil applications. The contribution of modern signal processing techniques to making noise radar practical are emphasized, and application examples

  3. Fractal Dimension of Voice-Signal Waveforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The fractal dimension is one important parameter that characterizes waveforms. In this paper, we derive a new method to calculate fractal dimension of digital voice-signal waveforms. We show that fractal dimension is an efficient tool for speaker recognition or speech recognition. It can be used to identify different speakers or distinguish speech. We apply our results to Chinese speaker recognition and numerical experiment shows that fractal dimension is an efficient parameter to characterize individual Chinese speakers. We have developed a semiautomatic voiceprint analysis system based on the theory of this paper and former researches.

  4. Principles of waveform diversity and design

    CERN Document Server

    Wicks, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This is the first book to discuss current and future applications of waveform diversity and design in subjects such as radar and sonar, communications systems, passive sensing, and many other technologies. Waveform diversity allows researchers and system designers to optimize electromagnetic and acoustic systems for sensing, communications, electronic warfare or combinations thereof. This book enables solutions to problems, explaining how each system performs its own particular function, as well as how it is affected by other systems and how those other systems may likewise be affected. It is

  5. The Waveform Suite: A robust platform for accessing and manipulating seismic waveforms in MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, C. G.; West, M. E.; McNutt, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    The Waveform Suite, developed at the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute, is an open-source collection of MATLAB classes that provide a means to import, manipulate, display, and share waveform data while ensuring integrity of the data and stability for programs that incorporate them. Data may be imported from a variety of sources, such as Antelope, Winston databases, SAC files, SEISAN, .mat files, or other user-defined file formats. The waveforms being manipulated in MATLAB are isolated from their stored representations, relieving the overlying programs from the responsibility of understanding the specific format in which data is stored or retrieved. The waveform class provides an object oriented framework that simplifies manipulations to waveform data. Playing with data becomes easier because the tedious aspects of data manipulation have been automated. The user is able to change multiple waveforms simultaneously using standard mathematical operators and other syntactically familiar functions. Unlike MATLAB structs or workspace variables, the data stored within waveform class objects are protected from modification, and instead are accessed through standardized functions, such as get and set; these are already familiar to users of MATLAB’s graphical features. This prevents accidental or nonsensical modifications to the data, which in turn simplifies troubleshooting of complex programs. Upgrades to the internal structure of the waveform class are invisible to applications which use it, making maintenance easier. We demonstrate the Waveform Suite’s capabilities on seismic data from Okmok and Redoubt volcanoes. Years of data from Okmok were retrieved from Antelope and Winston databases. Using the Waveform Suite, we built a tremor-location program. Because the program was built on the Waveform Suite, modifying it to operate on real-time data from Redoubt involved only minimal code changes. The utility of the Waveform Suite as a foundation for large

  6. Using differential mobility spectrometry to measure ion solvation: an examination of the roles of solvents and ionic structures in separating quinoline-based drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Le Blanc, J C Yves; Shields, Jefry; Janiszewski, John S; Ieritano, Christian; Ye, Gene F; Hawes, Gillian F; Hopkins, W Scott; Campbell, J Larry

    2015-10-21

    Understanding the mechanisms and energetics of ion solvation is critical in many scientific areas. Here, we present a methodlogy for studying ion solvation using differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) coupled to mass spectrometry. While in the DMS cell, ions experience electric fields established by a high frequency asymmetric waveform in the presence of a desired pressure of water vapor. By observing how a specific ion's behavior changes between the high- and low-field parts of the waveform, we gain knowledge about the aqueous microsolvation of that ion. In this study, we applied DMS to investigate the aqueous microsolvation of protonated quinoline-based drug candidates. Owing to their low binding energies with water, the clustering propensity of 8-substituted quinolinium ions was less than that of the 6- or 7-substituted analogues. We attribute these differences to the steric hinderance presented by subtituents in the 8-position. In addition, these experimental DMS results were complemented by extensive computational studies that determined cluster structures and relative thermodynamic stabilities. PMID:26165786

  7. Analog circuit design designing waveform processing circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Feucht, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The fourth volume in the set Designing Waveform-Processing Circuits builds on the previous 3 volumes and presents a variety of analog non-amplifier circuits, including voltage references, current sources, filters, hysteresis switches and oscilloscope trigger and sweep circuitry, function generation, absolute-value circuits, and peak detectors.

  8. Cauchy-characteristic evolution and waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates a new method for computing waveforms generated by independent sources. A global spacetime evolution algorithms based on the Cauchy initial-value approach is used for the bounded interior area and the same algorithm based on the characteristic hypersurfaces is used for the exterior region. Both methods are equated at the common interface

  9. Cauchy-characteristic evolution and waveforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, N.T. [Univ. of South Africa, Pretoria (South Africa); Holvorcem, P.R.; Matzner, R.A. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)]|[Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    This paper investigates a new method for computing waveforms generated by independent sources. A global spacetime evolution algorithms based on the Cauchy initial-value approach is used for the bounded interior area and the same algorithm based on the characteristic hypersurfaces is used for the exterior region. Both methods are equated at the common interface.

  10. A transformer of closely spaced pulsed waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedra, J.

    1970-01-01

    Passive circuit, using diodes, transistors, and magnetic cores, transforms the voltage of repetitive positive or negative pulses. It combines a pulse transformer with switching devices to effect a resonant flux reset and can transform various pulsed waveforms that have a nonzero average value and are relatively cosely spaced in time.

  11. Parameters Determination of Oscillatory Impulse Current Waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shuji; Nishimura, Seisuke; Seki, Shingo

    This paper proposes numerical techniques to distil waveform parameters out of digitally measured data of oscillatory impulse current. The first method, to be used for liner circuit, based on a curve-fitting technique in which a smooth analytical curve is defined to fit the noise-superposed measured data. The waveform parameters are derived from the curve. The algorithm is examined its performance using a measured waveform data which is obtained from a circuit composed of linear elements only. It is not rare when impulse current is measured in a circuit with non-linear element, namely an arrester. After carefully observed behaviours of the circuit current when the non-linear element turns on and off, authors developed two algorithms capable to determine the parameters from the recorded data obtained from a circuit having a ZnO arrester. The developed algorithm processed the waveform data generated by TDG which is to be issued in 2009 as a part of IEC 61083-2. The details of the algorithm are to be demonstrated in the paper.

  12. Thomson scattering measurements from asymmetric interpenetrating plasma flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging Thomson scattering measurements of collective ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion temperature and density from laser produced counter-streaming asymmetric flows. Two foils are heated with 8 laser beams each, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 60 J 2ω probe laser with a 200 ps pulse length. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the multi-ion species, asymmetric flows theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperatures, ion densities, and flow velocities for each plasma flow are determined

  13. Thomson scattering measurements from asymmetric interpenetrating plasma flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, J. S., E-mail: ross36@llnl.gov; Moody, J. D.; Fiuza, F.; Ryutov, D.; Divol, L.; Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Imaging Thomson scattering measurements of collective ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion temperature and density from laser produced counter-streaming asymmetric flows. Two foils are heated with 8 laser beams each, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 60 J 2ω probe laser with a 200 ps pulse length. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the multi-ion species, asymmetric flows theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperatures, ion densities, and flow velocities for each plasma flow are determined.

  14. Asymmetric reactions in continuous flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Yin Mak

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available An overview of asymmetric synthesis in continuous flow and microreactors is presented in this review. Applications of homogeneous and heterogeneous asymmetric catalysis as well as biocatalysis in flow are discussed.

  15. SAR processing with non-linear FM chirp waveforms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-12-01

    Nonlinear FM (NLFM) waveforms offer a radar matched filter output with inherently low range sidelobes. This yields a 1-2 dB advantage in Signal-to-Noise Ratio over the output of a Linear FM (LFM) waveform with equivalent sidelobe filtering. This report presents details of processing NLFM waveforms in both range and Doppler dimensions, with special emphasis on compensating intra-pulse Doppler, often cited as a weakness of NLFM waveforms.

  16. Ion Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, W

    2014-01-01

    High-energy ion colliders are large research tools in nuclear physics to study the Quark-Gluon-Plasma (QGP). The range of collision energy and high luminosity are important design and operational considerations. The experiments also expect flexibility with frequent changes in the collision energy, detector fields, and ion species. Ion species range from protons, including polarized protons in RHIC, to heavy nuclei like gold, lead and uranium. Asymmetric collision combinations (e.g. protons against heavy ions) are also essential. For the creation, acceleration, and storage of bright intense ion beams, limits are set by space charge, charge change, and intrabeam scattering effects, as well as beam losses due to a variety of other phenomena. Currently, there are two operating ion colliders, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL, and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  17. LISA parameter estimation using numerical merger waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Thorpe, J I; Kelly, B J; Fahey, R P; Arnaud, K; Baker, J G

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in numerical relativity provide a detailed description of the waveforms of coalescing massive black hole binaries (MBHBs), expected to be the strongest detectable LISA sources. We present a preliminary study of LISA's sensitivity to MBHB parameters using a hybrid numerical/analytic waveform for equal-mass, non-spinning holes. The Synthetic LISA software package is used to simulate the instrument response and the Fisher information matrix method is used to estimate errors in the parameters. Initial results indicate that inclusion of the merger signal can significantly improve the precision of some parameter estimates. For example, the median parameter errors for an ensemble of systems with total redshifted mass of one million Solar masses at a redshift of one were found to decrease by a factor of slightly more than two for signals with merger as compared to signals truncated at the Schwarzchild ISCO.

  18. LISA parameter estimation using numerical merger waveforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorpe, J I; McWilliams, S T; Kelly, B J; Fahey, R P; Arnaud, K; Baker, J G, E-mail: James.I.Thorpe@nasa.go [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2009-05-07

    Recent advances in numerical relativity provide a detailed description of the waveforms of coalescing massive black hole binaries (MBHBs), expected to be the strongest detectable LISA sources. We present a preliminary study of LISA's sensitivity to MBHB parameters using a hybrid numerical/analytic waveform for equal-mass, non-spinning holes. The Synthetic LISA software package is used to simulate the instrument response, and the Fisher information matrix method is used to estimate errors in the parameters. Initial results indicate that inclusion of the merger signal can significantly improve the precision of some parameter estimates. For example, the median parameter errors for an ensemble of systems with total redshifted mass of 10{sup 6} M{sub o-dot} at a redshift of z approx 1 were found to decrease by a factor of slightly more than two for signals with merger as compared to signals truncated at the Schwarzchild ISCO.

  19. Comparing numerical and analytic approximate gravitational waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Nousha; Lovelace, Geoffrey; SXS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    A direct observation of gravitational waves will test Einstein's theory of general relativity under the most extreme conditions. The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, or LIGO, began searching for gravitational waves in September 2015 with three times the sensitivity of initial LIGO. To help Advanced LIGO detect as many gravitational waves as possible, a major research effort is underway to accurately predict the expected waves. In this poster, I will explore how the gravitational waveform produced by a long binary-black-hole inspiral, merger, and ringdown is affected by how fast the larger black hole spins. In particular, I will present results from simulations of merging black holes, completed using the Spectral Einstein Code (black-holes.org/SpEC.html), including some new, long simulations designed to mimic black hole-neutron star mergers. I will present comparisons of the numerical waveforms with analytic approximations.

  20. Programmable Clock Waveform Generation for CCD Readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, J. de; Castilla, J.; Martinez, G.; Marin, J.

    2006-07-01

    Charge transfer efficiency in CCDs is closely related to the clock waveform. In this paper, an experimental framework to explore different FPGA based clock waveform generator designs is described. Two alternative design approaches for controlling the rise/fall edge times and pulse width of the CCD clock signal have been implemented: level-control and time-control. Both approaches provide similar characteristics regarding the edge linearity and noise. Nevertheless, dissimilarities have been found with respect to the area and frequency range of application. Thus, while the time-control approach consumes less area, the level control approach provides a wider range of clock frequencies since it does not suffer capacitor discharge effect. (Author) 8 refs.

  1. LISA parameter estimation using numerical merger waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in numerical relativity provide a detailed description of the waveforms of coalescing massive black hole binaries (MBHBs), expected to be the strongest detectable LISA sources. We present a preliminary study of LISA's sensitivity to MBHB parameters using a hybrid numerical/analytic waveform for equal-mass, non-spinning holes. The Synthetic LISA software package is used to simulate the instrument response, and the Fisher information matrix method is used to estimate errors in the parameters. Initial results indicate that inclusion of the merger signal can significantly improve the precision of some parameter estimates. For example, the median parameter errors for an ensemble of systems with total redshifted mass of 106 Mo-dot at a redshift of z ∼ 1 were found to decrease by a factor of slightly more than two for signals with merger as compared to signals truncated at the Schwarzchild ISCO.

  2. On the Origin of the Charge-Asymmetric Matter. II. Localized Dirac Waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Makhlin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This paper continues the author's work \\cite{PartI}, where a new framework of the matter-induced physical geometry was built and an intrinsic nonlinearity of the Dirac equation discovered. Here, the nonlinear Dirac equation is solved and the localized configurations are found analytically. Of the two possible types of the potentially stationary localized configurations of the Dirac field, only one is stable with respect to the action of an external field and it corresponds to a positive charge. A connection with the global charge asymmetry of matter in the Universe and with the recently observed excess of the cosmic positrons is discussed.

  3. Clustering of Waveforms Based on FPCA Direction

    OpenAIRE

    Adelfio, Giada; Chiodi, Marcello; D'Alessandro, Antonino; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione CNT, Roma, Italia; Luzio, Dario

    2010-01-01

    Abstract. Looking for curves similarity could be a complex issue characterized by subjective choices related to continuous transformations of observed discrete data (Chiodi, 1989). Waveforms correlation techniques have been introduced to charac- terize the degree of seismic event similarity (Menke, 1999) and in facilitating more accurate relative locations within similar event clusters by providing more precise timing of seismic wave (P and S) arrivals (Phillips, 1997). In t...

  4. Full-waveform inversion: Filling the gaps

    KAUST Repository

    Beydoun, Wafik B.

    2015-09-01

    After receiving an outstanding response to its inaugural workshop in 2013, SEG once again achieved great success with its 2015 SEG Middle East Workshop, “Full-waveform inversion: Filling the gaps,” which took place 30 March–1 April 2015 in Abu Dhabi, UAE. The workshop was organized by SEG, and its partner sponsors were Saudi Aramco (gold sponsor), ExxonMobil, and CGG. Read More: http://library.seg.org/doi/10.1190/tle34091106.1

  5. Best waveform score for diagnosing keratoconus

    OpenAIRE

    Allan Luz; Bruno Machado Fontes; Bernardo Lopes; Isaac Ramos; Fernando Faria Correia; Paulo Schor; Renato Ambrósio Jr.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To test whether corneal hysteresis (CH) and corneal resistance factor (CRF) can discriminate between keratoconus and normal eyes and to evaluate whether the averages of two consecutive measurements perform differently from the one with the best waveform score (WS) for diagnosing keratoconus. METHODS: ORA measurements for one eye per individual were selected randomly from 53 normal patients and from 27 patients with keratoconus. Two groups were considered the average (CH-Avg, CRF-Avg)...

  6. Waveform sample method of excitable sensory neuron

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sheng-Jun; Xu, Xin-Jian; Wang, Ying-Hai

    2006-01-01

    We present a new interpretation for encoding information of the period of input signals into spike-trains in individual sensory neuronal systems. The spike-train could be described as the waveform sample of the input signal which locks sample points to wave crests with randomness. Based on simulations of the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuron responding to periodic inputs, we demonstrate that the random sampling is a proper encoding method in medium frequency region since power spectra of the reconst...

  7. Plasma propagation of a 13.56 MHz asymmetric surface barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dedrick, J; Boswell, R W; Charles, C [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia); Audier, P; Rabat, H; Hong, D, E-mail: james.dedrick@anu.edu.au [GREMI - UMR6606 CNRS/Universite d' Orleans, Polytech' Orleans, 14, rue d' Issoudun - BP6744, 45067 ORLEANS Cedex 2 (France)

    2011-05-25

    The propagation of an rf asymmetric surface barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure air has been investigated. Measurements of the pulse-modulated 13.56 MHz voltage and current together with ICCD images of the plasma were recorded to study the visible plasma structure with respect to the rf pulses, time within the pulses and the rf waveforms. When exposing images over full rf pulses, which comprise over 150 oscillations of the applied voltage, clearly defined filamentary structures are observed indicating a strong memory effect. The discharge intensity decreases exponentially with distance from the electrode edge, and the average propagation length increases linearly with the applied voltage. Similar to some lower frequency asymmetric surface dielectric barrier discharges, two distinct breakdown events occur during one period of the voltage waveform. The number of filaments is found to be the same for both breakdown events, and collective effects are observed in both discharges.

  8. Coordinating Complementary Waveforms for Sidelobe Suppression

    CERN Document Server

    Dang, Wenbing; Howard, Stephen; Moran, William; Calderbank, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We present a general method for constructing radar transmit pulse trains and receive filters for which the radar point-spread function in delay and Doppler, given by the cross-ambiguity function of the transmit pulse train and the pulse train used in the receive filter, is essentially free of range sidelobes inside a Doppler interval around the zero-Doppler axis. The transmit pulse train is constructed by coordinating the transmission of a pair of Golay complementary waveforms across time according to zeros and ones in a binary sequence P. The pulse train used to filter the received signal is constructed in a similar way, in terms of sequencing the Golay waveforms, but each waveform in the pulse train is weighted by an element from another sequence Q. We show that a spectrum jointly determined by P and Q sequences controls the size of the range sidelobes of the cross-ambiguity function and by properly choosing P and Q we can clear out the range sidelobes inside a Doppler interval around the zero- Doppler axis...

  9. Satellite and Instrument Influences on ICESat Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, C. E.; Urban, T. J.; Neuenschwander, A. L.; Gutierrez, R.; Schutz, B. E.

    2007-12-01

    The White Sands Space Harbor (WSSH) has served as the principal ground calibration site throughout the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) mission. The Center for Space Research (CSR) at the University of Texas at Austin continues to conduct various experiments designed to validate the timing, geolocation and geometric characteristics of individual laser footprints on the surface. In addition, two airborne lidar surveys of the calibration site and surrounding area were conducted during the mission, first in 2003 and again in 2007. Chosen for its limited surface roughness and topographic flatness, this area has been targeted 3-4 times in each of the 12 ICESat mapping campaigns to date, yielding a significant altimetry data set. The derived surface elevations are compared with those from the airborne lidar surveys, as well as those obtained by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Furthermore, the Geoscience Laser Altimetry System (GLAS) onboard ICESat records a digitized waveform for each laser pulse returned from the surface. The two methods currently used to fit such signals in ICESat data processing are examined and compared for the WSSH waveforms. The first fits up to two distinct Gaussians and provides a surface elevation at the location of the maximum peak. The second fits up to six overlapping Gaussians and provides a surface elevation at the centroid of the pulse. Observed differences in the reported elevations are discussed in terms of the satellite's off-nadir targeting geometry, the laser energy, and the skewness of the returned waveforms.

  10. Asymmetric information and economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieden, B. Roy; Hawkins, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    We present an expression of the economic concept of asymmetric information with which it is possible to derive the dynamical laws of an economy. To illustrate the utility of this approach we show how the assumption of optimal information flow leads to a general class of investment strategies including the well-known Q theory of Tobin. Novel consequences of this formalism include a natural definition of market efficiency and an uncertainty principle relating capital stock and investment flow.

  11. Asymmetric Organocatalytic Cycloadditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    were pioneered by Otto Paul Hermann Diels and Kurt Alder who discovered what later became known as the Diels Alder reaction. The Diels Alder reaction is a [4+2] cycloaddition in which a π4 component reacts with a π2 component via a cyclic transition state to generate a 6 membered ring. This reaction...... reactions constitute the first organocatalytic asymmetric higher order cycloadditions and a rational for the periselectivity and stereoselectivity is provided based on experimental and computational investigations....

  12. Asymmetric extractions in orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Aquino Melgaço

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Extraction decisions are extremely important in during treatment planning. In addition to the extraction decision orthodontists have to choose what tooth should be extracted for the best solution of the problem and the esthetic/functional benefit of the patient. OBJECTIVE: This article aims at reviewing the literature relating the advantages, disadvantages and clinical implications of asymmetric extractions to orthodontics. METHODS: Keywords were selected in English and Portuguese and the EndNote 9 program was used for data base search in PubMed, Web of Science (WSc and LILACS. The selected articles were case reports, original articles and prospective or retrospective case-control studies concerning asymmetrical extractions of permanent teeth for the treatment of malocclusions. CONCLUSION: According to the literature reviewed asymmetric extractions can make some specific treatment mechanics easier. Cases finished with first permanent molars in Class II or III relationship in one or both sides seem not to cause esthetic or functional problems. However, diagnosis knowledge and mechanics control are essential for treatment success.

  13. Asymmetric Evolutionary Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAvoy, Alex; Hauert, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Evolutionary game theory is a powerful framework for studying evolution in populations of interacting individuals. A common assumption in evolutionary game theory is that interactions are symmetric, which means that the players are distinguished by only their strategies. In nature, however, the microscopic interactions between players are nearly always asymmetric due to environmental effects, differing baseline characteristics, and other possible sources of heterogeneity. To model these phenomena, we introduce into evolutionary game theory two broad classes of asymmetric interactions: ecological and genotypic. Ecological asymmetry results from variation in the environments of the players, while genotypic asymmetry is a consequence of the players having differing baseline genotypes. We develop a theory of these forms of asymmetry for games in structured populations and use the classical social dilemmas, the Prisoner's Dilemma and the Snowdrift Game, for illustrations. Interestingly, asymmetric games reveal essential differences between models of genetic evolution based on reproduction and models of cultural evolution based on imitation that are not apparent in symmetric games. PMID:26308326

  14. Sparse Frequency Waveform Design for Radar-Embedded Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoyun Mai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the Tag application with function of covert communication, a method for sparse frequency waveform design based on radar-embedded communication is proposed. Firstly, sparse frequency waveforms are designed based on power spectral density fitting and quasi-Newton method. Secondly, the eigenvalue decomposition of the sparse frequency waveform sequence is used to get the dominant space. Finally the communication waveforms are designed through the projection of orthogonal pseudorandom vectors in the vertical subspace. Compared with the linear frequency modulation waveform, the sparse frequency waveform can further improve the bandwidth occupation of communication signals, thus achieving higher communication rate. A certain correlation exists between the reciprocally orthogonal communication signals samples and the sparse frequency waveform, which guarantees the low SER (signal error rate and LPI (low probability of intercept. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of this method.

  15. The Waveform Server: A Web-based Interactive Seismic Waveform Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, R. L.; Clemesha, A.; Lindquist, K. G.; Reyes, J.; Steidl, J. H.; Vernon, F. L.

    2009-12-01

    Seismic waveform data has traditionally been displayed on machines that are either local area networked to, or directly host, a seismic networks waveform database(s). Typical seismic data warehouses allow online users to query and download data collected from regional networks passively, without the scientist directly visually assessing data coverage and/or quality. Using a suite of web-based protocols, we have developed an online seismic waveform interface that directly queries and displays data from a relational database through a web-browser. Using the Python interface to Datascope and the Python-based Twisted network package on the server side, and the jQuery Javascript framework on the client side to send and receive asynchronous waveform queries, we display broadband seismic data using the HTML Canvas element that is globally accessible by anyone using a modern web-browser. The system is used to display data from the USArray experiment, a US continent-wide migratory transportable seismic array. We are currently creating additional interface tools to create a rich-client interface for accessing and displaying seismic data that can be deployed to any system running Boulder Real Time Technology's (BRTT) Antelope Real Time System (ARTS). The software is freely available from the Antelope contributed code Git repository. Screenshot of the web-based waveform server interface

  16. Origin of Asymmetric Charge Partitioning in the Dissociation of Gas-Phase Protein Homodimers

    OpenAIRE

    Jurchen, John C.; Williams, Evan R.

    2003-01-01

    The origin of asymmetric charge and mass partitioning observed for gas-phase dissociation of multiply charged macromolecular complexes has been hotly debated. These experiments hold the potential to provide detailed information about the interactions between the macromolecules within the complex. Here, this unusual phenomenon of asymmetric charge partitioning is investigated for several protein homodimers. Asymmetric charge partitioning in these ions depends on a number of factors, including ...

  17. Probing the effect of different cross-sections in asymmetric collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Deepinder; Kaur, Varinderjit; Kumar, Suneel

    2011-01-01

    We present a complete systematic theoretical study of multifragmentation for asymmetric colliding nuclei for heavy-ion reactions in the energy range between 50 MeV/nucleon and 1000 MeV/nucleon by using isospin dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model. We have observed an interesting outcome for asymmetric colliding nuclei. The comparison between the symmetric and asymmetric colliding nuclei for the isospin independent cross section and isospin dependent cross section has been studied...

  18. Deriving pseudo-vertical waveforms from small-footprint full-waveform LiDAR data

    OpenAIRE

    Hermosilla, T.; Coops, Nicholas; Ruiz Fernández, Luis Ángel; Moskal, Monika

    2014-01-01

    This is an author's accepted manuscript of an article published in “Remote Sensing Letters", Volume 5, Issue 4, 2014; copyright Taylor & Francis; available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/2150704X.2014.903350 When processing scanning LiDAR data, it is commonly assumed that the extracted full-waveform LiDAR pulse registers truly vertical information of forest canopies. This assumption may lead to uncertain results for the spatiotemporal analysis of the waveforms due to...

  19. H- beam emittance measurements for the penning and the asymmetric, grooved magnetron surface-plasma sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam-intensity and emittance measurements show that the H- beam from our Penning surface-plasma source (SPS) has twice the intensity and ten times the brightness of the H- beam from an asymmetric, grooved magnetron SPS. We deduce H- ion temperatures of 5 eV for the Penning SPS and 22 eV for the asymmetric, grooved magnetron

  20. Characteristics of Ion Activation and Collision Induced Dissociation Using Digital Ion Trap Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fuxing; Dang, Qiankun; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2016-05-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) is one of the most established techniques for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The CID of mass selected ion could be realized by ion resonance excitation with a digital rectangular waveform. The method is simple, and highly efficient CID result could be obtained by optimizing the experimental parameters, such as digital waveform voltage, frequency, and q value. In this work, the relationship between ion trapping waveform voltage and frequency at preselected q value, the relationship between waveform frequency and the q value at certain ion trapping voltage for optimum CID efficiency were investigated. Experiment results showed that the max CID efficiency of precursor reserpine ions can be obtained at different trapping waveform voltage and frequency when q and β are different. Based on systematic experimental analysis, the optimum experimental conditions for high CID efficiency can be calculated at any selected β or q. By using digital ion trap technology, the CID process and efficient fragmentation of parent ions can be realized by simply changing the trapping waveform amplitude, frequency, and the β values in the digital ion trap mass spectrometry. The technology and method are simple. It has potential use in ion trap mass spectrometry.

  1. Facilitated Asymmetric Exclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Gabel, Alan; Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a class of facilitated asymmetric exclusion processes in which particles are pushed by neighbors from behind. For the simplest version in which a particle can hop to its vacant right neighbor only if its left neighbor is occupied, we determine the steady state current and the distribution of cluster sizes on a ring. We show that an initial density downstep develops into a rarefaction wave that can have a jump discontinuity at the leading edge, while an upstep results in a shock w...

  2. Asymmetric synthesis v.4

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, James

    1984-01-01

    Asymmetric Synthesis, Volume 4: The Chiral Carbon Pool and Chiral Sulfur, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, and Silicon Centers describes the practical methods of obtaining chiral fragments. Divided into five chapters, this book specifically examines initial chiral transmission and extension. The opening chapter describes the so-called chiral carbon pool, the readily available chiral carbon fragments used as building blocks in synthesis. This chapter also provides a list of 375 chiral building blocks, along with their commercial sources, approximate prices, and methods of synthesis. Schemes involving

  3. Best waveform score for diagnosing keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Luz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To test whether corneal hysteresis (CH and corneal resistance factor (CRF can discriminate between keratoconus and normal eyes and to evaluate whether the averages of two consecutive measurements perform differently from the one with the best waveform score (WS for diagnosing keratoconus. METHODS: ORA measurements for one eye per individual were selected randomly from 53 normal patients and from 27 patients with keratoconus. Two groups were considered the average (CH-Avg, CRF-Avg and best waveform score (CH-WS, CRF-WS groups. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to evaluate whether the variables had similar distributions in the Normal and Keratoconus groups. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC curves were calculated for each parameter to assess the efficacy for diagnosing keratoconus and the same obtained for each variable were compared pairwise using the Hanley-McNeil test. RESULTS: The CH-Avg, CRF-Avg, CH-WS and CRF-WS differed significantly between the normal and keratoconus groups (p<0.001. The areas under the ROC curve (AUROC for CH-Avg, CRF-Avg, CH-WS, and CRF-WS were 0.824, 0.873, 0.891, and 0.931, respectively. CH-WS and CRF-WS had significantly better AUROCs than CH-Avg and CRF-Avg, respectively (p=0.001 and 0.002. CONCLUSION: The analysis of the biomechanical properties of the cornea through the ORA method has proved to be an important aid in the diagnosis of keratoconus, regardless of the method used. The best waveform score (WS measurements were superior to the average of consecutive ORA measurements for diagnosing keratoconus.

  4. Insights Into GLAS Waveforms Using Google Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, D.; Khalsa, S. S.; Swick, R.; Haran, T.; Scambos, T.; Korn, D.

    2008-12-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) instrument aboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation (ICESat) satellite was launched on 12 January 2003. The primary objective of the ICESat mission is to provide global measurements of polar ice sheet elevation to discern changes in ice volume and ice sheet mass balance over time. Secondary objectives of the mission are to measure sea ice thickness, cloud and atmospheric properties, land topography, vegetation canopy heights, ocean surface topography, and surface reflectivity. The GLAS instrument has three lasers, each of which has a 1064 nm laser channel for surface altimetry and dense cloud heights, and a 532 nm lidar channel for the vertical distribution of clouds and aerosols. The laser emits a pulse every 0.02 seconds, and receives a return signal. Laser footprints are roughly 70 meters in diameter and spaced 170 meters apart and are assigned terrestrial positions at the 10s of meters level of accuracy. As an aid to data selection we demonstrate how GLAS footprints, waveforms and quality information can be displayed in Google Earth. We represent the approximate spatial coverage of each laser shot on the Earth's surface, allowing users to assess the shot in the context of the surface characteristics gleaned from the underlying image and topography in Google Earth. Each footprint can be expanded to show the associated waveform, summarizing the detected return signal, along with numerical values for latitude and longitude, elevation, and date/time. Surface characteristics such as tree canopy, low- level dust or clouds, snow or ice cover, extreme surface roughness, have significant, easily-visible effects on the waveform. This application will provide extremely useful information, and will facilitate a detailed data preview before ordering or processing.

  5. Optimal Transport for Seismic Full Waveform Inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Engquist, Bjorn; Yang, Yunan

    2016-01-01

    Full waveform inversion is a successful procedure for determining properties of the earth from surface measurements in seismology. This inverse problem is solved by a PDE constrained optimization where unknown coefficients in a computed wavefield are adjusted to minimize the mismatch with the measured data. We propose using the Wasserstein metric, which is related to optimal transport, for measuring this mismatch. Several advantageous properties are proved with regards to convexity of the objective function and robustness with respect to noise. The Wasserstein metric is computed by solving a Monge-Ampere equation. We describe an algorithm for computing its Frechet gradient for use in the optimization. Numerical examples are given.

  6. RHIC operation with asymmetric collisions in 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Aschenauer, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Atoian, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, K. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bruno, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Connolly, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ottavio, T. D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Drees, K. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gardner, C. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gu, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hayes, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Laster, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Makdisi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marr, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mernick, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Michnoff, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Montag, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Morris, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Narayan, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nayak, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nemesure, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pile, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Poblaguev, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Robert-Demolaize, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schmidke, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Schoefer, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Severino, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shrey, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Steski, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); White, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yip, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaltsman, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zeno, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhang, S. Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-08-07

    To study low-x shadowing/saturation physics as well as other nuclear effects [1], [2], proton-gold (p-Au, for 5 weeks) and proton-Aluminum (p-Al, for 2 weeks) collisions were provided for experiments in 2015 at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), with polarized proton beam in the Blue ring and Au/Al beam in the Yellow ring. The special features of the asymmetric run in 2015 will be introduced. The operation experience will be reviewed as well in the report.

  7. Asymmetric quantum cloning machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A family of asymmetric cloning machines for quantum bits and N-dimensional quantum states is introduced. These machines produce two approximate copies of a single quantum state that emerge from two distinct channels. In particular, an asymmetric Pauli cloning machine is defined that makes two imperfect copies of a quantum bit, while the overall input-to-output operation for each copy is a Pauli channel. A no-cloning inequality is derived, characterizing the impossibility of copying imposed by quantum mechanics. If p and p' are the probabilities of the depolarizing channels associated with the two outputs, the domain in (√p,√p')-space located inside a particular ellipse representing close-to-perfect cloning is forbidden. This ellipse tends to a circle when copying an N-dimensional state with N→∞, which has a simple semi-classical interpretation. The symmetric Pauli cloning machines are then used to provide an upper bound on the quantum capacity of the Pauli channel of probabilities px, py and pz. The capacity is proven to be vanishing if (√px, √py, √pz) lies outside an ellipsoid whose pole coincides with the depolarizing channel that underlies the universal cloning machine. Finally, the tradeoff between the quality of the two copies is shown to result from a complementarity akin to Heisenberg uncertainty principle. (author)

  8. Asymmetric inclusion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuveni, Shlomi; Eliazar, Iddo; Yechiali, Uri

    2011-10-01

    We introduce and explore the asymmetric inclusion process (ASIP), an exactly solvable bosonic counterpart of the fermionic asymmetric exclusion process (ASEP). In both processes, random events cause particles to propagate unidirectionally along a one-dimensional lattice of n sites. In the ASEP, particles are subject to exclusion interactions, whereas in the ASIP, particles are subject to inclusion interactions that coalesce them into inseparable clusters. We study the dynamics of the ASIP, derive evolution equations for the mean and probability generating function (PGF) of the sites’ occupancy vector, obtain explicit results for the above mean at steady state, and describe an iterative scheme for the computation of the PGF at steady state. We further obtain explicit results for the load distribution in steady state, with the load being the total number of particles present in all lattice sites. Finally, we address the problem of load optimization, and solve it under various criteria. The ASIP model establishes bridges between statistical physics and queueing theory as it represents a tandem array of queueing systems with (unlimited) batch service, and a tandem array of growth-collapse processes.

  9. Complete phenomenological gravitational waveforms from spinning coalescing binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Sturani, R; Cadonati, L; Guidi, G M; Healy, J; Shoemaker, D; Viceré, A

    2010-01-01

    The quest for gravitational waves from coalescing binaries is customarily performed by the LIGO-Virgo collaboration via matched filtering, which requires a detailed knowledge of the signal. Complete analytical coalescence waveforms are currently available only for the non-precessing binary systems. In this paper we introduce complete phenomenological waveforms for the dominant quadrupolar mode of generically spinning systems. These waveforms are constructed by bridging the gap between the analytically known inspiral phase, described by spin Taylor (T4) approximants in the restricted waveform approximation, and the ring-down phase through a phenomenological intermediate phase, calibrated by comparison with specific, numerically generated waveforms, describing equal mass systems with dimension-less spin magnitudes equal to 0.6. The overlap integral between numerical and phenomenological waveforms ranges between 0.95 and 0.99.

  10. Complete phenomenological gravitational waveforms from spinning coalescing binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturani, R; Guidi, G M; Vicere, A [Dipartimento di Matematica, Fisica e Informatica, Universita degli Studi di Urbino ' Carlo Bo' , I-61029 Urbino (Italy); Fischetti, S; Cadonati, L [Physics Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Healy, J; Shoemaker, D, E-mail: riccardo.sturani@uniurb.i [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, Georgia Tech, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    The quest for gravitational waves from coalescing binaries is customarily performed by the LIGO-Virgo collaboration via matched filtering, which requires a detailed knowledge of the signal. Complete analytical coalescence waveforms are currently available only for the non-precessing binary systems. In this paper we introduce complete phenomenological waveforms for the dominant quadrupolar mode of generically spinning systems. These waveforms are constructed by bridging the gap between the analytically known inspiral phase, described by spin Taylor (T4) approximants in the restricted waveform approximation, and the ring-down phase through a phenomenological intermediate phase, calibrated by comparison with specific, numerically generated waveforms, describing equal mass systems with dimension-less spin magnitudes equal to 0.6. The overlap integral between numerical and phenomenological waveforms ranges between 0.95 and 0.99.

  11. Fetal electrocardiogram: ST waveform analysis in intrapartum surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Amer-Wahlin, I; Arulkumaran, S; Hagberg, H.; Maršál, K; Visser, GHA

    2007-01-01

    ST waveform analysis of fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) for intrapartum surveillance (STAN) is a newly introduced method for fetal surveillance. The purpose of this commentary is to assist in the proper use of fetal ECG in combination with cardiotocography (CTG) during labour. Guidelines and recommendations concerning CTG and ST waveform interpretation and classification are stated that were agreed on by the European experts on ST waveform analysis for intrapartum surveillance during a meeting ...

  12. Direct Current Contamination of Kilohertz Frequency Alternating Current Waveforms

    OpenAIRE

    Franke, Manfred; Bhadra, Niloy; Bhadra, Narendra; Kilgore, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Kilohertz Frequency Alternating Current (KHFAC) waveforms are being evaluated in a variety of physiological settings because of their potential to modulate neural activity uniquely when compared to frequencies in the sub-kilohertz range. However, the use of waveforms in this frequency range presents some unique challenges regarding the generator output. In this study we explored the possibility of undesirable contamination of the KHFAC waveforms by direct current (DC). We evaluated current- a...

  13. Target discrimination technique utilizing noise waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodington, Gordon; DeLuca, Mark; Moro, Richard; Lemus, Daniel; Vela, Russell; Narayanan, Ram

    2011-06-01

    Noise waveforms generated using low cost diodes are a simple way for radars to transmit a wideband (> 4 GHz) multi-bit pseudorandom code for use in a cross correlation receiver. This type of waveform also has the advantage of being difficult to intercept and is less prone to interfere with adjacent systems. Radar designed to operate over this wide frequency range can take advantage of unique target Radar Cross Section (RCS) ripple versus frequency for objects of different materials and sizes. Specifically the periodicity and amplitude of the ripple is dependent on the shape and size of a target. Since background clutter does not display this variation, RCS variation determines whether a known target is present in a return. This paper will present the radar hardware and signal processing techniques used to maximize a target's unique spectral response against a cluttered background. The system operates CW over a 4-8 GHz bandwidth requiring the need to address issues regarding range resolution and far out undesired returns. Lessons learned from field observations and mitigation techniques incorporated in the system are included. This paper also deals with the signal processing technique used for detection, then discrimination. Detection thresholds are set and triggered by a simple correlation peak level. Discrimination involves inspection of the spectral return. A comparison performed in real time to a stored library value determines the presence of known objects. Measured data provided demonstrates the ability of the radar to discriminate multiple targets against multiple backgrounds.

  14. Adaptive Robust Waveform Selection for Unknown Target Detection in Clutter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu-Lu Wang; Hong-Qiang Wang; Yu-Liang Qin; Yong-Qiang Cheng

    2014-01-01

    @@@A basic assumption of most recently proposed waveform design algorithms is that the target impulse response is a known deterministic function or a stochastic process with a known power spectral density (PSD). However, it is well-known that a target impulse response is neither easily nor accurately obtained; besides it changes sharply with attitude angles. Both of the aforementioned cases complicate the waveform design process. In this paper, an adaptive robust waveform selection method for unknown target detection in clutter is proposed. The target impulse response is considered to be unknown but belongs to a known uncertainty set. An adaptive waveform library is devised by using a signal-to-clutter-plus-noise ratio (SCNR)- based optimal waveform design method. By applying the minimax robust waveform selection method, the optimal robust waveform is selected to ensure the lowest performance bound of the unknown target detection in clutter. Results show that the adaptive waveform library outperforms the predefined linear frequency modulation (LFM) waveform library on the SCNR bound.

  15. Alternative Asymmetric Stochastic Volatility Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Asai (Manabu); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe stochastic volatility model usually incorporates asymmetric effects by introducing the negative correlation between the innovations in returns and volatility. In this paper, we propose a new asymmetric stochastic volatility model, based on the leverage and size effects. The model is

  16. Electron power absorption dynamics in capacitive radio frequency discharges driven by tailored voltage waveforms in CF4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, S.; Berger, B.; Schüngel, E.; Korolov, I.; Derzsi, A.; Bruneau, B.; Johnson, E.; Lafleur, T.; O’Connell, D.; Koepke, M.; Gans, T.; Booth, J.-P.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-08-01

    The power absorption dynamics of electrons and the electrical asymmetry effect in capacitive radio-frequency plasmas operated in CF4 and driven by tailored voltage waveforms are investigated experimentally in combination with kinetic simulations. The driving voltage waveforms are generated as a superposition of multiple consecutive harmonics of the fundamental frequency of 13.56 MHz. Peaks/valleys and sawtooth waveforms are used to study the effects of amplitude and slope asymmetries of the driving voltage waveform on the electron dynamics and the generation of a DC self-bias in an electronegative plasma at different pressures. Compared to electropositive discharges, we observe strongly different effects and unique power absorption dynamics. At high pressures and high electronegativities, the discharge is found to operate in the drift-ambipolar (DA) heating mode. A dominant excitation/ionization maximum is observed during sheath collapse at the edge of the sheath which collapses fastest. High negative-ion densities are observed inside this sheath region, while electrons are confined for part of the RF period in a potential well formed by the ambipolar electric field at this sheath edge and the collapsed (floating potential) sheath at the electrode. For specific driving voltage waveforms, the plasma becomes divided spatially into two different halves of strongly different electronegativity. This asymmetry can be reversed electrically by inverting the driving waveform. For sawtooth waveforms, the discharge asymmetry and the sign of the DC self-bias are found to reverse as the pressure is increased, due to a transition of the electron heating mode from the α-mode to the DA-mode. These effects are interpreted with the aid of the simulation results.

  17. Engineered Asymmetric Synthetic Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Chiarot, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic vesicles are small, fluid-filled spheres that are enclosed by a bilayer of lipid molecules. They can be used as models for investigating membrane biology and as delivery vehicles for pharmaceuticals. In practice, it is difficult to simultaneously control membrane asymmetry, unilamellarity, vesicle size, vesicle-to-vesicle uniformity, and luminal content. Membrane asymmetry, where each leaflet of the bilayer is composed of different lipids, is of particular importance as it is a feature of most natural membranes. In this study, we leverage microfluidic technology to build asymmetric vesicles at high-throughput. We use the precise flow control offered by microfluidic devices to make highly uniform emulsions, with controlled internal content, that serve as templates to build the synthetic vesicles. Flow focusing, dielectrophoretic steering, and interfacial lipid self-assembly are critical procedures performed on-chip to produce the vesicles. Fluorescent and confocal microscopy are used to evaluate the vesicle characteristics.

  18. Asymmetric black dyonic holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cabrera-Munguia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A 6-parametric asymptotically flat exact solution, describing a two-body system of asymmetric black dyons, is studied. The system consists of two unequal counterrotating Kerr–Newman black holes, endowed with electric and magnetic charges which are equal but opposite in sign, separated by a massless strut. The Smarr formula is generalized in order to take into account their contribution to the mass. The expressions for the horizon half-length parameters σ1 and σ2, as functions of the Komar parameters and of the coordinate distance, are displayed, and the thermodynamic properties of the two-body system are studied. Furthermore, the seven physical parameters satisfy a simple algebraic relation which can be understood as a dynamical scenario, in which the physical properties of one body are affected by the ones of the other body.

  19. Asymmetric twin Dark Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study a natural implementation of Asymmetric Dark Matter in Twin Higgs models. The mirroring of the Standard Model strong sector suggests that a twin baryon with mass around 5 GeV is a natural Dark Matter candidate once a twin baryon number asymmetry comparable to the SM asymmetry is generated. We explore twin baryon Dark Matter in two different scenarios, one with minimal content in the twin sector and one with a complete copy of the SM, including a light twin photon. The essential requirements for successful thermal history are presented, and in doing so we address some of the cosmological issues common to many Twin Higgs models. The required interactions we introduce predict signatures at direct detection experiments and at the LHC

  20. Organizing for Asymmetric Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørn Flohr; Sørensen, Henrik B.

    meet each other. On the contrary, we assume that asymmetry is both important and normal; moreover, asymmetry should be considered to be more complex than economists indicate with their concept of asymmetric information. Thus, the aim of the paper is to explore how asymmetries related to partners......  The vision of new organizational forms consists of less-organized networks and alliances between organizations, in which collaborative capabilities are assumed to be crucial (Miles et al., 2005). The path to such new forms may go through fragile cooperative efforts. Despite the good will of many......' different motives and different situational factors appear in an interorganizational setting. We classify interfaces according to the symmetry/asymmetry in the respective parent organizations' resources, commitment, and control of representatives and indicate how  classification schemes can be used to...

  1. Annihilating Asymmetric Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Nicole F; Shoemaker, Ian M

    2014-01-01

    The relic abundance of particle and antiparticle dark matter (DM) need not be vastly different in thermal asymmetric dark matter (ADM) models. By considering the effect of a primordial asymmetry on the thermal Boltzmann evolution of coupled DM and anti-DM, we derive the requisite annihilation cross section. This is used in conjunction with CMB and Fermi-LAT gamma-ray data to impose a limit on the number density of anti-DM particles surviving thermal freeze-out. When the extended gamma-ray emission from the Galactic Center is reanalyzed in a thermal ADM framework, we find that annihilation into $\\tau$ leptons prefer anti-DM number densities 1-4$\\%$ that of DM while the $b$-quark channel prefers 50-100$\\%$.

  2. Integrating Biosystem Models Using Waveform Relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seymour RobertM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Modelling in systems biology often involves the integration of component models into larger composite models. How to do this systematically and efficiently is a significant challenge: coupling of components can be unidirectional or bidirectional, and of variable strengths. We adapt the waveform relaxation (WR method for parallel computation of ODEs as a general methodology for computing systems of linked submodels. Four test cases are presented: (i a cascade of unidirectionally and bidirectionally coupled harmonic oscillators, (ii deterministic and stochastic simulations of calcium oscillations, (iii single cell calcium oscillations showing complex behaviour such as periodic and chaotic bursting, and (iv a multicellular calcium model for a cell plate of hepatocytes. We conclude that WR provides a flexible means to deal with multitime-scale computation and model heterogeneity. Global solutions over time can be captured independently of the solution techniques for the individual components, which may be distributed in different computing environments.

  3. Waveform Selectivity at the Same Frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki; Rushton, Jeremiah J; Gao, Fei; Kim, Sanghoon; Sievenpiper, Daniel F

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic properties depend on the composition of materials, i.e. either angstrom scales of molecules or, for metamaterials, subwavelength periodic structures. Each material behaves differently in accordance with the frequency of an incoming electromagnetic wave due to the frequency dispersion or the resonance of the periodic structures. This indicates that if the frequency is fixed, the material always responds in the same manner unless it has nonlinearity. However, such nonlinearity is controlled by the magnitude of the incoming wave or other bias. Therefore, it is difficult to distinguish different incoming waves at the same frequency. Here we present a new concept of circuit-based metasurfaces to selectively absorb or transmit specific types of waveforms even at the same frequency. The metasurfaces, integrated with schottky diodes as well as either capacitors or inductors, selectively absorb short or long pulses, respectively. The two types of the circuit elements are then combined to absorb or tran...

  4. Flagellar waveform analysis of swimming algal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtuldu, Huseyin; Johnson, Karl; Gollub, Jerry

    2011-11-01

    The twin flagella of the green alga Chlamydomas reinhardtii are driven by dynein molecular motors to oscillate at about 50-60 Hz in a breaststroke motion. For decades, Chlamydomas has been used as a model organism for studies of flagellar motility, and of genetic disorders of ciliary motion. However, little is known experimentally about the flagellar waveforms, and the resulting time-dependent force distribution along the 250 nm diameter flagella. Here, we study flagellar dynamics experimentally by confining cells in quasi-2D liquid films. From simultaneous measurements of the cell body velocity and the time-dependent velocities along the center lines of the two flagella, we determine the drag coefficients, and estimate the power expended by the body and the flagella, comparing our findings with measurements based on the induced fluid flow field. We contrast the results for the quite different beating patterns of synchronous and asynchronous flagella, respectively. Supported by NSF Grant DMR-0803153.

  5. Integrating Biosystem Models Using Waveform Relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Baigent

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Modelling in systems biology often involves the integration of component models into larger composite models. How to do this systematically and efficiently is a significant challenge: coupling of components can be unidirectional or bidirectional, and of variable strengths. We adapt the waveform relaxation (WR method for parallel computation of ODEs as a general methodology for computing systems of linked submodels. Four test cases are presented: (i a cascade of unidirectionally and bidirectionally coupled harmonic oscillators, (ii deterministic and stochastic simulations of calcium oscillations, (iii single cell calcium oscillations showing complex behaviour such as periodic and chaotic bursting, and (iv a multicellular calcium model for a cell plate of hepatocytes. We conclude that WR provides a flexible means to deal with multitime-scale computation and model heterogeneity. Global solutions over time can be captured independently of the solution techniques for the individual components, which may be distributed in different computing environments.

  6. Negative Corona Discharge Ion Source Under Ambient Conditions with Mini Line-cylinder Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Liu; Fei Tang; Xiao-hao Wang; Liang Zhang; Xue-ye Wei

    2009-01-01

    A novel ambient negative corona discharge ion source with mini line-cylinder electrodes is designed. The diameters of inner and outer electrode are 0.16 and 4 mm respectively. With a special assembly method, a perfect coaxiality of the two electrodes is obtained. An injection system utilizing a temperature control technique, achieves a constant and stable concentra-tion of the sample, which is critical to the experiment. The formulas of the corona onset voltage of line-cylinder electrodes are also introduced. The experiment results show that negative substances such as formic acid and acetic acid can be ionized under ambient con-ditions. When combined with micro electrical mechanical system fabrication process, the volume of the ion source can be reduced dramatically, but there is an undesirable surface discharge. To solve the surface discharge problem, an improved structure was designed and tested. The simplicity of the interface of the ion source makes it suitable for mass spec-trometer, micro mass spectrometer, ion mobility spectrometer, and high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometer applications.

  7. Automated multimode inversion of surface and S waveforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebedev, Sergei; Nolet, Guust; Meier, Thomas; Hilst, R.D. van der

    2005-01-01

    Inversion of the surface, S, and multiple-S waveforms is an effective means of constraining the structure of the upper mantle, including the transition zone. Exploiting the resolving power of the enormous volume of presently available data requires efficiency of data processing and waveform modellin

  8. Flagellar waveform dynamics of freely swimming algal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurtuldu, H.; Tam, D.; Hosoi, A.E.; Johnson, K.A.; Gollub, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    We present quantitative measurements of time-dependent flagellar waveforms for freely swimming biflagellated algal cells, for both synchronous and asynchronous beating. We use the waveforms in conjunction with resistive force theory as well as a singularity method to predict a cell's time-dependent

  9. Attosecond Steering of Electrons with Optimised Strong Field Waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Haessler, S; Fan, G; Witting, T; Squibb, R; Chipperfield, L; Zaïr, A; Andriukaitis, G; Pugžlys, A; Tisch, J W G; Marangos, J P; Baltuška, A

    2013-01-01

    Quasi-free field driven electron trajectories are a key element of strong-field dynamics. Upon recollision with the parent ion, the energy transferred from the field to the electron may be released as attosecond duration XUV emission1,2 in the process of high harmonic generation (HHG). The conventional sinusoidal driver fields set limitations on the maximum value of this energy transfer, and it has been predicted that this limit can be significantly exceeded by an appropriately ramped-up cycle-shape3.Here, we present an experimental realization of such cycle-shaped waveforms and demonstrate control of the HHG process on the single-atom quantum level via attosecond steering of the electron trajectories. With our optimized optical cycles, we boost the field-ionization launching the electron trajectories, increase the subsequent field-to-electron energy transfer, and reduce the trajectory duration, to obtain greatly enhanced HHG efficiency as well as spectral extension compared to sinusoidal drivers. This applic...

  10. Metal rolling - Asymmetrical rolling process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexa, V.; Raţiu, S.; Kiss, I.

    2016-02-01

    The development of theory and practice related to the asymmetric longitudinal rolling process is based on the general theory of metalworking by pressure and symmetric rolling theory, to which a large number of scientists brought their contribution. The rolling of metal materials was a serious problem throughout history, either economically or technically, because the plating technologies enabled the consumption of raw materials (scarce and expensive) to be reduced, while improving the mechanical properties. Knowing the force parameters related to asymmetric rolling leads to the optimization of energy and raw material consumption. This paper presents data on symmetric rolling process, in order to comparatively highlight the particularities of the asymmetric process.

  11. Trans-sonic cusped shaped, periodic waves and solitary waves of the electrostatic ion-cyclotron type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available By adopting an essentially fluid dynamic viewpoint we derive the wave structure equation for stationary, fully nonlinear, electrostatic, ion-cyclotron waves. The existence of two fundamental constants of the motion, namely, conservation of momentum flux parallel to the ambient magnetic field, and energy flux parallel to the direction of wave propagation, enables the wave structure equation to be reduced to a first order differential equation, which has solutions that are physically transparent. The analysis shows that sufficiently oblique waves, propagating at sub-ion acoustic speeds, form soliton pulse-like solutions whose amplitudes are greatest for perpendicular propagation. Waves that propagate supersonically have periodic cnoidal waveforms, which are asymmetric about the compressive and rarefactive phases of the wave. It is also shown that there exist critical driver fields for which the end point of the compressive phase goes sonic (in the wave frame, with the consequence that the wave form develops a cusp. It is possible that this trans-sonic, choked flow feature provides a mechanism for the 'spiky' waveforms observed in auroral electric field measurements.

  12. Asymmetric Gepner Models (Revisited)

    CERN Document Server

    Gato-Rivera, B

    2010-01-01

    We reconsider a class of heterotic string theories studied in 1989, based on tensor products of N=2 minimal models with asymmetric simple current invariants. We extend this analysis from (2,2) and (1,2) spectra to (0,2) spectra with SO(10) broken to the Standard Model. In the latter case the spectrum must contain fractionally charged particles. We find that in nearly all cases at least some of them are massless. However, we identify a large subclass where the fractional charges are at worst half-integer, and often vector-like. The number of families is very often reduced in comparison to the 1989 results, but there are no new tensor combinations yielding three families. All tensor combinations turn out to fall into two classes: those where the number of families is always divisible by three, and those where it is never divisible by three. We find an empirical rule to determine the class, which appears to extend beyond minimal N=2 tensor products. We observe that distributions of physical quantities such as th...

  13. Magnetically Modified Asymmetric Supercapacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is for the development of an asymmetric supercapacitor that will have improved energy density and cycle...

  14. Active Matter on Asymmetric Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Reichhardt, C. J. Olson; Drocco, J.; Mai, T.; Wan, M. B.; Reichhardt, C.

    2011-01-01

    For collections of particles in a thermal bath interacting with an asymmetric substrate, it is possible for a ratchet effect to occur where the particles undergo a net dc motion in response to an ac forcing. Ratchet effects have been demonstrated in a variety of systems including colloids as well as magnetic vortices in type-II superconductors. Here we examine the case of active matter or self-driven particles interacting with asymmetric substrates. Active matter systems include self-motile c...

  15. Mobile Termination with Asymmetric Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Dewenter, Ralf; Haucap, Justus

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines mobile termination fees and their regulation when networks are asymmetric in size. It is demonstrated that with consumer ignorance about the exact termination rates (a) a mobile network?s termination rate is the higher the smaller the network?s size (as measured through its subscriber base) and (b) asymmetric regulation of only the larger operators in a market will, ce-teris paribus, induce the smaller operators to increase their termination rates. The results are supporte...

  16. Multicatalyst system in asymmetric catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Jian

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces multi-catalyst systems by describing their mechanism and advantages in asymmetric catalysis.  Helps organic chemists perform more efficient catalysis with step-by-step methods  Overviews new concepts and progress for greener and economic catalytic reactions  Covers topics of interest in asymmetric catalysis including bifunctional catalysis, cooperative catalysis, multimetallic catalysis, and novel tandem reactions   Has applications for pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, materials, and flavour and fragrance

  17. Asymmetric Dark Matter from Leptogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Falkowski, Adam; Ruderman, Joshua T.; Volansky, Tomer

    2011-01-01

    We present a new realization of asymmetric dark matter in which the dark matter and lepton asymmetries are generated simultaneously through two-sector leptogenesis. The right-handed neutrinos couple both to the Standard Model and to a hidden sector where the dark matter resides. This framework explains the lepton asymmetry, dark matter abundance and neutrino masses all at once. In contrast to previous realizations of asymmetric dark matter, the model allows for a wide range of dark matter mas...

  18. Waveform analysis of tremor may help to differentiate Parkinson's disease from drug-induced parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we analyzed the waveform characteristics of resting tremor by accelerometer recordings in patients with drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) and Parkinson's disease (PD). We prospectively recruited 12 patients with tremulous PD and 12 patients with DIP presenting with resting tremor. Tremor was recorded from the more affected side and was recorded twice for a 60 s period in each patient. Peak frequency, amplitude and all harmonic peaks were obtained, and the asymmetry of the decay of the autocorrelation function, third momentum and time-reversal invariance were also computed using a mathematical algorithm. Among the parameters used in the waveform analysis, the harmonic ratio, time-reversal invariance and asymmetric decay of the autocorrelation function were different between PD and DIP at a statistically significant level (all p < 0.01). The total harmonic peak power and third momentum in the time series were not significantly different. The clinical characteristics of DIP patients may be similar to those of PD patients in some cases, which makes the clinical differentiation between DIP and PD challenging. Our study shows that the identification of parameters reflecting waveform asymmetry might be helpful in differentiating between DIP and PD. (note)

  19. Generation of correlated finite alphabet waveforms using gaussian random variables

    KAUST Repository

    Jardak, Seifallah

    2014-09-01

    Correlated waveforms have a number of applications in different fields, such as radar and communication. It is very easy to generate correlated waveforms using infinite alphabets, but for some of the applications, it is very challenging to use them in practice. Moreover, to generate infinite alphabet constant envelope correlated waveforms, the available research uses iterative algorithms, which are computationally very expensive. In this work, we propose simple novel methods to generate correlated waveforms using finite alphabet constant and non-constant-envelope symbols. To generate finite alphabet waveforms, the proposed method map the Gaussian random variables onto the phase-shift-keying, pulse-amplitude, and quadrature-amplitude modulation schemes. For such mapping, the probability-density-function of Gaussian random variables is divided into M regions, where M is the number of alphabets in the corresponding modulation scheme. By exploiting the mapping function, the relationship between the cross-correlation of Gaussian and finite alphabet symbols is derived. To generate equiprobable symbols, the area of each region is kept same. If the requirement is to have each symbol with its own unique probability, the proposed scheme allows us that as well. Although, the proposed scheme is general, the main focus of this paper is to generate finite alphabet waveforms for multiple-input multiple-output radar, where correlated waveforms are used to achieve desired beampatterns. © 2014 IEEE.

  20. Simulation of Full-Waveform Laser Altimeter Echowaveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Y.; Tong, X. H.; Liu, S. J.; Xie, H.; Luan, K. F.; Liu, J.

    2016-06-01

    Change of globe surface height is an important factor to study human living environment. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on ICESat is the first laser-ranging instrument for continuous global observations of the Earth. In order to have a comprehensive understanding of full-waveform laser altimeter, this study simulated the operating mode of ICESat and modeled different terrains' (platform terrain, slope terrain, and artificial terrain) echo waveforms based on the radar equation. By changing the characteristics of the system and the targets, numerical echo waveforms can be achieved. Hereafter, we mainly discussed the factors affecting the amplitude and size (width) of the echoes. The experimental results implied that the slope of the terrain, backscattering coefficient and reflectivity, target height, target position in the footprint and area reacted with the pulse all can affect the energy distribution of the echo waveform and the receiving time. Finally, Gaussian decomposition is utilized to decompose the echo waveform. From the experiment, it can be noted that the factors which can affect the echo waveform and by this way we can know more about large footprint full-waveform satellite laser altimeter.

  1. Source-independent elastic waveform inversion using a logarithmic wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2012-01-01

    The logarithmic waveform inversion has been widely developed and applied to some synthetic and real data. In most logarithmic waveform inversion algorithms, the subsurface velocities are updated along with the source estimation. To avoid estimating the source wavelet in the logarithmic waveform inversion, we developed a source-independent logarithmic waveform inversion algorithm. In this inversion algorithm, we first normalize the wavefields with the reference wavefield to remove the source wavelet, and then take the logarithm of the normalized wavefields. Based on the properties of the logarithm, we define three types of misfit functions using the following methods: combination of amplitude and phase, amplitude-only, and phase-only. In the inversion, the gradient is computed using the back-propagation formula without directly calculating the Jacobian matrix. We apply our algorithm to noise-free and noise-added synthetic data generated for the modified version of elastic Marmousi2 model, and compare the results with those of the source-estimation logarithmic waveform inversion. For the noise-free data, the source-independent algorithms yield velocity models close to true velocity models. For random-noise data, the source-estimation logarithmic waveform inversion yields better results than the source-independent method, whereas for coherent-noise data, the results are reversed. Numerical results show that the source-independent and source-estimation logarithmic waveform inversion methods have their own merits for random- and coherent-noise data. © 2011.

  2. Asymmetric Gepner models (revisited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gato-Rivera, B. [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Schellekens, A.N., E-mail: t58@nikhef.n [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain)] [IMAPP, Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-12-11

    We reconsider a class of heterotic string theories studied in 1989, based on tensor products of N=2 minimal models with asymmetric simple current invariants. We extend this analysis from (2,2) and (1,2) spectra to (0,2) spectra with SO(10) broken to the Standard Model. In the latter case the spectrum must contain fractionally charged particles. We find that in nearly all cases at least some of them are massless. However, we identify a large subclass where the fractional charges are at worst half-integer, and often vector-like. The number of families is very often reduced in comparison to the 1989 results, but there are no new tensor combinations yielding three families. All tensor combinations turn out to fall into two classes: those where the number of families is always divisible by three, and those where it is never divisible by three. We find an empirical rule to determine the class, which appears to extend beyond minimal N=2 tensor products. We observe that distributions of physical quantities such as the number of families, singlets and mirrors have an interesting tendency towards smaller values as the gauge groups approaches the Standard Model. We compare our results with an analogous class of free fermionic models. This displays similar features, but with less resolution. Finally we present a complete scan of the three family models based on the triply-exceptional combination (1,16{sup *},16{sup *},16{sup *}) identified originally by Gepner. We find 1220 distinct three family spectra in this case, forming 610 mirror pairs. About half of them have the gauge group SU(3)xSU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R}xU(1){sup 5}, the theoretical minimum, and many others are trinification models.

  3. Full Waveform Inversion of Solar Interior Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Hanasoge, Shravan M

    2014-01-01

    The inference of flows of material in the interior of the Sun is a subject of major interest in helioseismology. Here we apply techniques of Full Waveform Inversion (FWI) to synthetic data to test flow inversions. In this idealized setup, we do not model seismic realization noise, training the focus entirely on the problem of whether a chosen supergranulation flow model can be seismically recovered. We define the misfit functional as a sum of L_2 norm deviations in travel times between prediction and observation, as measured using short-distance f and p_1 filtered and large-distance unfiltered $p$ modes. FWI allows for the introduction of measurements of choice and iteratively improving the background model, while monitoring the evolution of the misfit in all desired categories. Although the misfit is seen to uniformly reduce in all categories, convergence to the true model is very slow, possibly because it is trapped in a local minimum. The primary source of error is inaccurate depth localization, which, owi...

  4. Seismic full waveform inversion from compressive measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Ana; Arce, Gonzalo R.

    2015-05-01

    Traditional methods in seismic acquisition require sources and geophones that are uniformly located along a spatial line, using the Nyquist sampling rate. Depending on the area to be explored, it can be necessary to use seismic surveys with large offsets, or decrease the separation between adjacent geophones to improve the resolution, which generates very high volumes of data. It makes the exploration process more difficult and particularly expensive. This work presents the reconstruction of a compressive set of seismic traces acquired using the compressive sensing paradigm where the pair of sources and geophones are randomly located along the spatial line. The recovery of the wavefield from compressive measurements is feasible due to the capabilities of Curvelets on representing wave propagators with only a small set of coefficients. The method first uses the compressive samples to find a sparse vector representation of each pixel in a 2-D Curvelet dictionary. The sparse vector representation is estimated by solving a sparsity constrained optimization problem using the Gradient Projection for Sparse Reconstruction (GPSR) method. The estimated vector is then used to compute the seismic velocity profiles via acoustic Full Waveform Inversion (FWI). Simulations of the reconstructed image gathers and the resulting seismic velocity profiles illustrate the performance of the method. An improvement in the resulting images is obtained in comparison with traditional F-K filtering used in seismic data processing when traces are missing.

  5. The deconfinement phase transition in asymmetric matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the phase transition of asymmetric hadronic matter to a quark-gluon plasma within the framework of a simple two-phase model. The analysis is performed in a system with two conserved charges (baryon number and isospin) using the stability conditions on the free energy, the conservation laws and Gibbs' criteria for phase equilibrium. The EOS is obtained in a separate description for the hadronic phase and for the quark-gluon plasma. For the hadrons, a relativistic mean-field model calibrated to the properties of nuclear matter is used, and a bag-model type EOS is used for the quarks and gluons. The model is applied to the deconfinement phase transition that may occur in matter created in ultra-relativistic collisions of heavy ions. Based on the two-dimensional coexistence surface (binodal), various phase separation scenarios and the Maxwell construction through the mixed phase are discussed. In the framework of the two-phase model the phase transition in asymmetric matter is continuous (second-order by Ehrenfest's definition) in contrast to the discontinuous (first-order) transition of symmetric systems. (orig.)

  6. Generation of correlated finite alphabet waveforms using gaussian random variables

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Sajid

    2016-01-13

    Various examples of methods and systems are provided for generation of correlated finite alphabet waveforms using Gaussian random variables in, e.g., radar and communication applications. In one example, a method includes mapping an input signal comprising Gaussian random variables (RVs) onto finite-alphabet non-constant-envelope (FANCE) symbols using a predetermined mapping function, and transmitting FANCE waveforms through a uniform linear array of antenna elements to obtain a corresponding beampattern. The FANCE waveforms can be based upon the mapping of the Gaussian RVs onto the FANCE symbols. In another example, a system includes a memory unit that can store a plurality of digital bit streams corresponding to FANCE symbols and a front end unit that can transmit FANCE waveforms through a uniform linear array of antenna elements to obtain a corresponding beampattern. The system can include a processing unit that can encode the input signal and/or determine the mapping function.

  7. Hybridizing Gravitationl Waveforms of Inspiralling Binary Neutron Star Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Torrey; LIGO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waves are ripples in space and time and were predicted to be produced by astrophysical systems such as binary neutron stars by Albert Einstein. These are key targets for Laser Interferometer and Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), which uses template waveforms to find weak signals. The simplified template models are known to break down at high frequency, so I wrote code that constructs hybrid waveforms from numerical simulations to accurately cover a large range of frequencies. These hybrid waveforms use Post Newtonian template models at low frequencies and numerical data from simulations at high frequencies. They are constructed by reading in existing Post Newtonian models with the same masses as simulated stars, reading in the numerical data from simulations, and finding the ideal frequency and alignment to ``stitch'' these waveforms together.

  8. Tailored voltage waveform capacitively coupled plasmas in electronegative gases: frequency dependence of asymmetry effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüngel, E.; Korolov, I.; Bruneau, B.; Derzsi, A.; Johnson, E.; O’Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Booth, J.-P.; Donkó, Z.; Schulze, J.

    2016-07-01

    Capacitively coupled radio frequency plasmas operated in an electronegative gas (CF4) and driven by voltage waveforms composed of four consecutive harmonics are investigated for different fundamental driving frequencies using PIC/MCC simulations and an analytical model. As has been observed previously for electropositive gases, the application of peak-shaped waveforms (that are characterized by a strong amplitude asymmetry) results in the development of a DC self-bias due to the electrical asymmetry effect (EAE), which increases the energy of ions arriving at the powered electrode. In contrast to the electropositive case (Korolov et al 2012 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45 465202) the absolute value of the DC self-bias is found to increase as the fundamental frequency is reduced in this electronegative discharge, providing an increased range over which the DC self-bias can be controlled. The analytical model reveals that this increased DC self-bias is caused by changes in the spatial profile and the mean value of the net charge density in the grounded electrode sheath. The spatio-temporally resolved simulation data show that as the frequency is reduced the grounded electrode sheath region becomes electronegative. The presence of negative ions in this sheath leads to very different dynamics of the power absorption of electrons, which in turn enhances the local electronegativity and plasma density via ionization and attachment processes. The ion flux to the grounded electrode (where the ion energy is lowest) can be up to twice that to the powered electrode. At the same time, while the mean ion energies at both electrodes are quite different, their ratio remains approximately constant for all base frequencies studied here.

  9. Full waveform inversion of solar interior flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inference of flows of material in the interior of the Sun is a subject of major interest in helioseismology. Here, we apply techniques of full waveform inversion (FWI) to synthetic data to test flow inversions. In this idealized setup, we do not model seismic realization noise, training the focus entirely on the problem of whether a chosen supergranulation flow model can be seismically recovered. We define the misfit functional as a sum of L 2 norm deviations in travel times between prediction and observation, as measured using short-distance filtered f and p 1 and large-distance unfiltered p modes. FWI allows for the introduction of measurements of choice and iteratively improving the background model, while monitoring the evolution of the misfit in all desired categories. Although the misfit is seen to uniformly reduce in all categories, convergence to the true model is very slow, possibly because it is trapped in a local minimum. The primary source of error is inaccurate depth localization, which, due to density stratification, leads to wrong ratios of horizontal and vertical flow velocities (cross talk). In the present formulation, the lack of sufficient temporal frequency and spatial resolution makes it difficult to accurately localize flow profiles at depth. We therefore suggest that the most efficient way to discover the global minimum is to perform a probabilistic forward search, involving calculating the misfit associated with a broad range of models (generated, for instance, by a Monte Carlo algorithm) and locating the deepest minimum. Such techniques possess the added advantage of being able to quantify model uncertainty as well as realization noise (data uncertainty).

  10. Binary Black Hole Waveform Extraction at Null Infinity

    CERN Document Server

    Babiuc, M C; Zlochower, Y

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we present a work in progress towards an efficient and economical computational module which interfaces between Cauchy and characteristic evolution codes. Our goal is to provide a standardized waveform extraction tool for the numerical relativity community which will allow CCE to be readily applied to a generic Cauchy code. The tool provides a means of unambiguous comparison between the waveforms generated by evolution codes based upon different formulations of the Einstein equations and different numerical approximation.

  11. Use and abuse of the model waveform accuracy standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accuracy standards have been developed to ensure that the waveforms used for gravitational-wave data analysis are good enough to serve their intended purposes. These standards place constraints on certain norms of the frequency-domain representations of the waveform errors. Examples are given here of possible misinterpretations and misapplications of these standards, whose effect could be to vitiate the quality control they were intended to enforce. Suggestions are given for ways to avoid these problems.

  12. Joint MIMO radar waveform and receiving filter optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chun-Yang; Vaidyanathan, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of MIMO (multiple-input multipleoutput) radar allows each transmitting antenna element to transmit an arbitrary waveform. This provides extra degrees of freedom compared to the traditional transmit beamforming approach. It has been shown in the recent literature that MIMO radar systems have many advantages. In this paper, we consider the joint optimization of waveforms and receiving filters in the MIMO radar when the prior information of target and clutter ...

  13. SIMULATION OF FULL-WAVEFORM LASER ALTIMETER ECHOWAVEFORM

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Lv; Tong, X. H.; Liu, S. J.; Xie, H; Luan, K. F.; Liu, J

    2016-01-01

    Change of globe surface height is an important factor to study human living environment. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on ICESat is the first laser-ranging instrument for continuous global observations of the Earth. In order to have a comprehensive understanding of full-waveform laser altimeter, this study simulated the operating mode of ICESat and modeled different terrains’ (platform terrain, slope terrain, and artificial terrain) echo waveforms based on the radar eq...

  14. An Initialization Technique for the Waveform-Relaxation Circuit Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the development of the Cairo University Waveform Relaxation (CUWORX) simulator. In order to accelerate the convergence of the waveform relaxation (WR) in the presence of logic feedback, CUWORK is initialized via a logic simulator. This logic initialization scheme is shown to be highly effective for digital synchronous circuits. Additionally, this logic initialization scheme preserves fully the multi-rate properties of the WR algorithm.

  15. Optimal control of photoelectron emission by realistic waveforms

    OpenAIRE

    Solanpää, Janne; Ciappina, Marcelo F.; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental techniques in multicolor waveform synthesis allow the temporal shaping of strong femtosecond laser pulses with applications in the control of quantum mechanical processes in atoms, molecules, and nanostructures. Prediction of the shapes of the optimal waveforms can be done computationally using quantum optimal control theory (QOCT). In this work we bring QOCT to experimental feasibility by providing an optimal control scheme with realistic pulse representation. We apply th...

  16. Fast prediction and evaluation of gravitational waveforms using surrogate models

    CERN Document Server

    Field, Scott E; Hesthaven, Jan S; Kaye, Jason; Tiglio, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    [Abridged] We propose a solution to the problem of quickly and accurately predicting gravitational waveforms within any given physical model. The method is relevant for both real-time applications and in more traditional scenarios where the generation of waveforms using standard methods can be prohibitively expensive. Our approach is based on three offline steps resulting in an accurate reduced-order model that can be used as a surrogate for the true/fiducial waveform family. First, a set of m parameter values is determined using a greedy algorithm from which a reduced basis representation is constructed. Second, these m parameters induce the selection of m time values for interpolating a waveform time series using an empirical interpolant. Third, a fit in the parameter dimension is performed for the waveform's value at each of these m times. The cost of predicting L waveform time samples for a generic parameter choice is of order m L + m c_f online operations where c_f denotes the fitting function operation ...

  17. Full Elastic Waveform Search Engine for Near Surface Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2014-12-01

    For processing land seismic data, the near-surface problem is often very complex and may severely affect our capability to image the subsurface. The current state-of-the-art technology for near surface imaging is the early arrival waveform inversion that solves an acoustic wave-equation problem. However, fitting land seismic data with acoustic wavefield is sometimes invalid. On the other hand, performing elastic waveform inversion is very time-consuming. Similar to a web search engine, we develop a full elastic waveform search engine that includes a large database with synthetic elastic waveforms accounting for a wide range of interval velocity models in the CMP domain. With each CMP gather of real data as an entry, the search engine applies Multiple-Randomized K-Dimensional (MRKD) tree method to find approximate best matches to the entry in about a second. Interpolation of the velocity models at CMP positions creates 2D or 3D Vp, Vs, and density models for the near surface area. The method does not just return one solution; it gives a series of best matches in a solution space. Therefore, the results can help us to examine the resolution and nonuniqueness of the final solution. Further, this full waveform search method can avoid the issues of initial model and cycle skipping that the method of full waveform inversion is difficult to deal with.

  18. Frequency-domain waveform inversion using the unwrapped phase

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2011-01-01

    Phase wrapping in the frequency-domain (or cycle skipping in the time-domain) is the major cause of the local minima problem in the waveform inversion. The unwrapped phase has the potential to provide us with a robust and reliable waveform inversion, with reduced local minima. We propose a waveform inversion algorithm using the unwrapped phase objective function in the frequency-domain. The unwrapped phase, or what we call the instantaneous traveltime, is given by the imaginary part of dividing the derivative of the wavefield with respect to the angular frequency by the wavefield itself. As a result, the objective function is given a traveltime-like function, which allows us to smooth it and reduce its nonlinearity. The gradient of the objective function is computed using the back-propagation algorithm based on the adjoint-state technique. We apply both our waveform inversion algorithm using the unwrapped phase and the conventional waveform inversion and show that our inversion algorithm gives better convergence to the true model than the conventional waveform inversion. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  19. Ion colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions (77Asb1, 81Bou1). The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  20. A digital waveform discrimination system for an NE213 scintillator using a VXIbus general purpose waveform digitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the performance of the waveform analyzer Tektronix TVS645 operated with a UNIX based VXIbus system controller, and then report the result of getting the best FOM for neutron measurement with NE213 by using these hardwares

  1. Hydroxamic acids in asymmetric synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2013-02-19

    Metal-catalyzed stereoselective reactions are a central theme in organic chemistry research. In these reactions, the stereoselection is achieved predominantly by introducing chiral ligands at the metal catalyst's center. For decades, researchers have sought better chiral ligands for asymmetric catalysis and have made great progress. Nevertheless, to achieve optimal stereoselectivity and to catalyze new reactions, new chiral ligands are needed. Because of their high metal affinity, hydroxamic acids play major roles across a broad spectrum of fields from biochemistry to metal extraction. Dr. K. Barry Sharpless first revealed their potential as chiral ligands for asymmetric synthesis in 1977: He published the chiral vanadium-hydroxamic-acid-catalyzed, enantioselective epoxidation of allylic alcohols before his discovery of Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation, which uses the titanium-tartrate complex as the chiral reagent. However, researchers have reported few highly enantioselective reactions using metal-hydroxamic acid as catalysts since then. This Account summarizes our research on metal-catalyzed asymmetric epoxidation using hydroxamic acids as chiral ligands. We designed and synthesized a series of new hydroxamic acids, most notably the C2-symmetric bis-hydroxamic acid (BHA) family. V-BHA-catalyzed epoxidation of allylic and homoallylic alcohols achieved higher activity and stereoselectivity than Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation in many cases. Changing the metal species led to a series of unprecedented asymmetric epoxidation reactions, such as (i) single olefins and sulfides with Mo-BHA, (ii) homoallylic and bishomoallylic alcohols with Zr- and Hf-BHA, and (iii) N-alkenyl sulfonamides and N-sulfonyl imines with Hf-BHA. These reactions produce uniquely functionalized chiral epoxides with good yields and enantioselectivities. PMID:23157425

  2. The research of land covers classification based on waveform features correction of full-waveform LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mei; Liu, Menghua; Zhang, Zheng; Ma, Lian; Zhang, Huijing

    2015-10-01

    In order to solve the problem of insufficient classification types and low classification accuracy using traditional discrete LiDAR, in this paper, the waveform features of Full-waveform LiDAR were analyzed and corrected to be used for land covers classification. Firstly, the waveforms were processed, including waveform preprocessing, waveform decomposition and features extraction. The extracted features were distance, amplitude, waveform width and the backscattering cross-section. In order to decrease the differences of features of the same land cover type and further improve the effectiveness of the features for land covers classification, this paper has made comprehensive correction on the extracted features. The features of waveforms obtained in Zhangye were extracted and corrected. It showed that the variance of corrected features can be reduced by about 20% compared to original features. Then classification ability of corrected features was clearly analyzed using the measured waveform data with different characteristics. To further verify whether the corrected features can improve the classification accuracy, this paper has respectively classified typical land covers based on original features and corrected features. Since the features have independently Gaussian distribution, the Gaussian mixture density model (GMDM) was put forward to be the classification model to classify the targets as road, trees, buildings and farmland in this paper. The classification results of these four land cover types were obtained according to the ground truth information gotten from CCD image data of the targets region. It showed that the classification accuracy can be improved by about 8% when the corrected features were used.

  3. Asymmetric counterpropagating fronts without flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Silva, I; Clerc, M G; Odent, V

    2015-06-01

    Out-of-equilibrium systems exhibit domain walls between different states. These walls, depending on the type of connected states, can display rich spatiotemporal dynamics. In this Rapid Communication, we investigate the asymmetrical counterpropagation of fronts in an in-plane-switching cell filled with a nematic liquid crystal. Experimentally, we characterize the different front shapes and propagation speeds. These fronts present dissimilar elastic deformations that are responsible for their asymmetric speeds. Theoretically, using a phenomenological model, we describe the observed dynamics with fair agreement. PMID:26172647

  4. Incompressibility of asymmetric nuclear matter

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lie-Wen; Cai, Bao-Jun; Shen, Chun; Ko, Che Ming; Xu, Jun; Li, Bao-An(Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University-Commerce, Commerce, TX, 75429-3011, USA)

    2009-01-01

    The incompressibility $K_sat(\\delta)$ of isospin asymmetric nuclear matter at its saturation density. Our results show that in the expansion of $K_sat(\\delta)$ in powers of isospin asymmetry $\\delta$, i.e., $K_sat(\\delta )$=K_{0}+K_{sat,2}\\delta^{2}+K_{sat,4}\\delta^{4}+O(\\delta^{6})$, the magnitude of the 4th-order K_{sat,4} parameter is generally small. The 2nd-order K_{sat,2} parameter thus essentially characterizes the isospin dependence of the incompressibility of asymmetric nuclear matte...

  5. Asymmetric Baxter-King filter

    OpenAIRE

    Buss, Ginters

    2011-01-01

    The paper proposes an extension of the symmetric Baxter-King band pass filter to an asymmetric Baxter-King filter. The optimal correction scheme of the ideal filter weights is the same as in the symmetric version, i.e, cut the ideal filter at the appropriate length and add a constant to all filter weights to ensure zero weight on zero frequency. Since the symmetric Baxter-King filter is unable to extract the desired signal at the very ends of the series, the extension to an asymmetric filter...

  6. Forces between asymmetric polymer brushes

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, D.F.K.; Cates, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    We study the equilibrium compression of asymmetric polymer brushes grafted on flat plates, under athermal and theta solvent conditions, using a lattice self-consistent field (SCF) approach. We find that the separation d between two plates coated asymmetrically with brushes of type 1 and 2, as a function of the force F, obeys the "bisection rule", d(F) = (d1(F) + d 2(F)) /2 where d1(F)and d 2(F) are the corresponding separations for the symmetric brushes of type 1 and 2 respectively.The bisect...

  7. Research on asymmetric "Jerusalem" unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Lu; Jianbo Wang

    2009-01-01

    An asymmetric Jerusalem unit and the frequency selective surface(FSS)structure composed of such units are designed.The transmittance of the designed FSS structure is calculated by mode-matching method and compared with the test results.The comparison results show that the FSS center frequency of the asymmetric structure unit drifts little with the variation of the incident angles of the electromagnetic waves and keeps relatively stable.The research offers a new choice for the application of FSS under the large scanning angle of electromagnetic waves.

  8. Performance Analysis of an Asymmetrical Phase-Converter-Fed Induction Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Sujit Kumar; Chakraborty, Chandan; Basak, Biswarup; Gupta, Debi Prasad Sen

    1998-01-01

    Of the various types of single-phase-to-three-phase static converters used to interface a three-phase motor to single- phase supply, one simple type uses an open delta connection of a sinusoidal supply and a pulsewidth modulated (PWM) waveform to feed the motor. This paper presents an analysis of the performance of the three-phase motor when fed from such an asymmetrical supply. The analysis is based on the steady-state approximate-equivalent circuit of the motor, using the method of symmetri...

  9. Novel FinFET Device Using Asymmetric Doping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moradi, Farshad

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new technique is proposed to improve the device characteristics by introducing asymmetric doping at the source and the drain of the conventional FinFET. Specifically, the proposed device exhibits 9X increase of the Ion/Ioff ratio and 3X improved DIBL compared to conventional symm...... symmetric FinFET devices. We note a reduction in sub-threshold swing (SS) of 16% with 7% Ion degradation. The proposed FinFETs can be utilized in SRAM cells and logic circuits to improve their functionality at ultra-scaled technologies....

  10. Pyroelectricity and Asymmetric Thermal Vibrations of Atoms in Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Kuniaki; Okudera, Hiroki

    A structural approach was attempted to estimate rigid ion contributions to pyroelectric coefficients, employing atomic position vectors determined in the least-squares refinement of a polar mineral, cancrinite. The two sets of positions, obtained from the centers of gravity (centroids) and modes of asymmetric probability density functions (pdf) of atoms, were applied to calculate electric polarizations, whose temperature derivatives may correspond to the rigid ion contributions to the pyroelectric coefficient, γ(σ), normally measured under the condition of constant stresses and to the secondary pyroelectric coefficients, γ(2), respectively. The primary pyroelectric coefficient γ(ε) was given as the difference γ(σ)-γ(2).

  11. JET and COMPASS asymmetrical disruptions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gerasimov, S.N.; Abreu, P.; Baruzzo, M.; Drozdov, V.; Dvornova, A.; Havlíček, Josef; Hender, T.C.; Hronová-Bilyková, Olena; Kruezi, U.; Li, X.; Markovič, Tomáš; Pánek, Radomír; Rubinacci, G.; Tsalas, M.; Ventre, S.; Villone, F.; Zakharov, L.E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 11 (2015), s. 113006-113006. ISSN 0029-5515 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * asymmetrical disruption * JET * COMPASS Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.062, year: 2014

  12. Synthesis of Asymmetric Propanetriol Analogues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    From natural tartaric acid, (R)-2-benzyloxy-3-(2-tetrahydropyranyloxy) propanol 3 was designed and synthesized, and (R)-2-benzyloxy-3-(4-methoxybenzyloxy) propanol 7 was prepared in a new method. They can be used as chiral synthons of lysophosphatidic acid and other compounds with asymmetric propanetriol backbone.

  13. Asymmetrical Switch Costs in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellefson, Michelle R.; Shapiron, Laura R.; Chater, Nick

    2006-01-01

    Switching between tasks produces decreases in performance as compared to repeating the same task. Asymmetrical switch costs occur when switching between two tasks of unequal difficulty. This asymmetry occurs because the cost is greater when switching to the less difficult task than when switching to the more difficult task. Various theories about…

  14. Asymmetric Synthesis via Chiral Aziridines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, David Ackland; Harden, Adrian; Wyatt, Paul; Andersson, Pher G.; Johansson, Fredrik

    1996-01-01

    A series of chiral bis(aziridines) has been synthesised and evaluated as chelating ligands for a variety of asymmetric transformations mediated by metals [Os (dihydroxylation), Pd (allylic alkylation) Cu (cyclopropanation and aziridination, Li (1,2-addition of organolithiums to imines)]. In the...

  15. Selfhealing of asymmetric Bessel-like modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Israelsen, Stine Møller; Rishøj, Lars Søgaard; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    We numerically investigate asymmetric Bessel-like modes in an aircladding fiber. The selfhealing ability of asymmetric Bessel-like modes is demonstrated and quantified including the angular dependency of this ability.......We numerically investigate asymmetric Bessel-like modes in an aircladding fiber. The selfhealing ability of asymmetric Bessel-like modes is demonstrated and quantified including the angular dependency of this ability....

  16. Ocular pressure waveform reflects ventricular bigeminy and aortic insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean B Kassem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular pulse amplitude (OPA is defined as the difference between maximum and minimum intraocular pressure (IOP during a cardiac cycle. Average values of OPA range from 1 to 4 mmHg. The purpose of this investigation is to determine the source of an irregular IOP waveform with elevated OPA in a 48-year-old male. Ocular pressure waveforms had an unusual shape consistent with early ventricular contraction. With a normal IOP, OPA was 9 mmHg, which is extraordinarily high. The subject was examined by a cardiologist and was determined to be in ventricular bigeminy. In addition, he had bounding carotid pulses and echocardiogram confirmed aortic insufficiency. After replacement of the aortic valve, the bigeminy resolved and the ocular pulse waveform became regular in appearance with an OPA of 1.6-2.0 mmHg. The ocular pressure waveform is a direct reflection of hemodynamics. Evaluating this waveform may provide an additional opportunity for screening subjects for cardiovascular anomalies and arrhythmias.

  17. Evaluation of novel stimulus waveforms for deep brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foutz, Thomas J.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of a wide range of neurological disorders. Historically, DBS and other neurostimulation technologies have relied on rectangular stimulation waveforms to impose their effects on the nervous system. Recent work has suggested that non-rectangular waveforms may have advantages over the traditional rectangular pulse. Therefore, we used detailed computer models to compare a range of charge-balanced biphasic waveforms with rectangular, exponential, triangular, Gaussian and sinusoidal stimulus pulse shapes. We explored the neural activation energy of these waveforms for both intracellular and extracellular current-controlled stimulation conditions. In the context of extracellular stimulation, we compared their effects on both axonal fibers of passage and projection neurons. Finally, we evaluated the impact of delivering the waveforms through a clinical DBS electrode, as opposed to a theoretical point source. Our results suggest that DBS with a 1 ms centered-triangular pulse can decrease energy consumption by 64% when compared with the standard 100 µs rectangular pulse (energy cost of 48 and 133 nJ, respectively, to stimulate 50% of a distributed population of axons) and can decrease energy consumption by 10% when compared with the most energy efficient rectangular pulse (1.25 ms duration). In turn, there may be measureable energy savings when using appropriately designed non-rectangular pulses in clinical DBS applications, thereby warranting further experimental investigation.

  18. Reflection seismic waveform tomography of physical modelling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Y.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, Z. D.; Ning, Y. C.; Chen, X. H.; Li, J. Y.

    2016-04-01

    Waveform tomography is commonly tested using numerically generated synthetic seismic data, before the method is applied to field seismic data. However, there are often noticeable differences between idealized synthetic data and real field data, and many factors in the field data, such as noise, irregular source/receiver geometry, affect the inversion solutions. For exploring the potential of reflection seismic waveform tomography, we presented a more realistic test than the synthetic data test, by applying it to physical modelling data, to reconstruct a laboratorial model with complex velocity variation. First, we provided a formulation of the perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary condition, associated with the second-order acoustic wave equation, in order to suppress artificial reflections from subsurface model boundaries in seismic waveform simulation and tomography. Then, we demonstrated the successful implementation of a layer-striping inversion scheme applicable to reflection seismic waveform tomography. Finally, we confirmed the effectiveness of frequency grouping, rather than a single frequency at each iteration, a strategy specifically for the frequency-domain waveform tomography.

  19. Study on simulation and experiment of array micro Faraday cup ion detector for FAIMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    An array micro Faraday cup ion detector for FAIMS (High-field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry) was introduced, with which the size of the FAIMS system was reduced. With simple structure, good stability, low noise, large measurements range, this detector can work under the condition of atmospheric pressure. The array micro Faraday cup was composed of gate electrode, sensitive electrode and shielding electrode. The sensitive electrode was made of tens of crossing silicon columns with diameter of 200 μm. It was fabricated through typical MEMS technology, which was compatible completely with plane FAIMS. It was shown from FLUENT simulation result that the resistance to gas motion was low and the flow field distribution was helpful for full absorption of the ion in this array design. Through electricity simulation, the method to reduce interference on the detection signal of the micro Faraday cup was given out. Connecting with KEITHLEY 237 ampere meter, the noise level of the array micro Faraday cup was lower than 0.5 pA. The output signal of the acetone sample measured by experiment was about 210 pA. Through contrast experiment, the design parameter of the micro Faraday cup was obtained primarily. This array micro Faraday cup can meet the requirements of the FAIMS system.

  20. Modified Quasi-Steady State Model of DC System for Transient Stability Simulation under Asymmetric Faults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As using the classical quasi-steady state (QSS model could not be able to accurately simulate the dynamic characteristics of DC transmission and its controlling systems in electromechanical transient stability simulation, when asymmetric fault occurs in AC system, a modified quasi-steady state model (MQSS is proposed. The model firstly analyzes the calculation error induced by classical QSS model under asymmetric commutation voltage, which is mainly caused by the commutation voltage zero offset thus making inaccurate calculation of the average DC voltage and the inverter extinction advance angle. The new MQSS model calculates the average DC voltage according to the actual half-cycle voltage waveform on the DC terminal after fault occurrence, and the extinction advance angle is also derived accordingly, so as to avoid the negative effect of the asymmetric commutation voltage. Simulation experiments show that the new MQSS model proposed in this paper has higher simulation precision than the classical QSS model when asymmetric fault occurs in the AC system, by comparing both of them with the results of detailed electromagnetic transient (EMT model of the DC transmission and its controlling system.

  1. Generating Correlated QPSK Waveforms By Exploiting Real Gaussian Random Variables

    KAUST Repository

    Jardak, Seifallah

    2012-11-01

    The design of waveforms with specified auto- and cross-correlation properties has a number of applications in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar, one of them is the desired transmit beampattern design. In this work, an algorithm is proposed to generate quadrature phase shift- keying (QPSK) waveforms with required cross-correlation properties using real Gaussian random-variables (RV’s). This work can be considered as the extension of what was presented in [1] to generate BPSK waveforms. This work will be extended for the generation of correlated higher-order phase shift-keying (PSK) and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) schemes that can better approximate the desired beampattern.

  2. Fast evaluation of asymptotic waveforms from gravitational perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Benedict, Alex G; Lau, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    In the context of blackhole perturbation theory, we describe both exact evaluation of an asymptotic waveform from a time series recorded at a finite radial location and its numerical approximation. From the user's standpoint our technique is easy to implement, affords high accuracy, and works for both axial (Regge-Wheeler) and polar (Zerilli) sectors. Our focus is on the ease of implementation with publicly available numerical tables, either as part of an existing evolution code or a post-processing step. Nevertheless, we also present a thorough theoretical discussion of asymptotic waveform evaluation and radiation boundary conditions, which need not be understood by a user of our methods. In particular, we identify (both in the time and frequency domains) analytical asymptotic waveform evaluation kernels, and describe their approximation by techniques developed by Alpert, Greengard, and Hagstrom. This paper also presents new results on the evaluation of far-field signals for the ordinary (acoustic) wave equa...

  3. Classification of Pulse Waveforms Using Edit Distance with Real Penalty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Dongyu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advances in sensor and signal processing techniques have provided effective tools for quantitative research in traditional Chinese pulse diagnosis (TCPD. Because of the inevitable intraclass variation of pulse patterns, the automatic classification of pulse waveforms has remained a difficult problem. In this paper, by referring to the edit distance with real penalty (ERP and the recent progress in -nearest neighbors (KNN classifiers, we propose two novel ERP-based KNN classifiers. Taking advantage of the metric property of ERP, we first develop an ERP-induced inner product and a Gaussian ERP kernel, then embed them into difference-weighted KNN classifiers, and finally develop two novel classifiers for pulse waveform classification. The experimental results show that the proposed classifiers are effective for accurate classification of pulse waveform.

  4. Stimulator with arbitrary waveform for auditory evoked potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, H R; Romao, M; Placido, D; Provenzano, F; Tierra-Criollo, C J [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Departamento de Engenharia Eletrica (DEE), Nucleo de Estudos e Pesquisa em Engenharia Biomedica NEPEB, Av. Ant. Carlos, 6627, sala 2206, Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, MG, 31.270-901 (Brazil)

    2007-11-15

    The technological improvement helps many medical areas. The audiometric exams involving the auditory evoked potentials can make better diagnoses of auditory disorders. This paper proposes the development of a stimulator based on Digital Signal Processor. This stimulator is the first step of an auditory evoked potential system based on the ADSP-BF533 EZ KIT LITE (Analog Devices Company - USA). The stimulator can generate arbitrary waveform like Sine Waves, Modulated Amplitude, Pulses, Bursts and Pips. The waveforms are generated through a graphical interface programmed in C++ in which the user can define the parameters of the waveform. Furthermore, the user can set the exam parameters as number of stimuli, time with stimulation (Time ON) and time without stimulus (Time OFF). In future works will be implemented another parts of the system that includes the acquirement of electroencephalogram and signal processing to estimate and analyze the evoked potential.

  5. Consistency of post-Newtonian waveforms with numerical relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, J G; Kelly, B J; McWilliams, S T; Van Meter, J R; Baker, John G.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.; Meter, James R. van; Williams, Sean T. Mc

    2006-01-01

    General relativity predicts the gravitational radiation signatures of mergers of compact binaries, such as coalescing binary black hole systems. Derivations of waveform predictions for such systems are required for optimal scientific analysis of observational gravitational wave data, and have so far been achieved primarily with the aid of the post-Newtonian (PN) approximation. The quality of this treatment is unclear, however, for the important late inspiral portion. We derive late-inspiral waveforms via a complementary approach, direct numerical simulation of Einstein's equations, which has recently matured sufficiently for such applications. We compare waveform phasing from simulations covering the last $\\sim 14$ cycles of gravitational radiation from an equal-mass binary system of non-spinning black holes with the corresponding 3PN and 3.5PN orbital phasing. We find agreement consistent with internal error estimates based on either approach at the level of one radian over $\\sim 10$ cycles. The result sugge...

  6. Model Waveform Accuracy Requirements for the $\\chi^2$ Discriminator

    CERN Document Server

    Lindblom, Lee

    2016-01-01

    This paper derives accuracy standards for model gravitational waveforms required to ensure proper use of the $\\chi^2$ discriminator test in gravitational wave (GW) data analysis. These standards are different from previously established requirements for detection and waveform parameter measurement based on signal-to-noise optimization. We present convenient formulae both for evaluating and interpreting the contribution of model errors to measured $\\chi^2$ values. Motivated by these formula, we also present an enhanced, complexified variant of the standard $\\chi^2$ statistic used in GW searches. While our results are not directly relevant to current searches (which use the $\\chi^2$ test only to veto signal candidates with extremely high $\\chi^2$ values), they could be useful in future GW searches and as figures of merit for model gravitational waveforms.

  7. Cyclodextrins in Asymmetric and Stereospecific Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fliur Macaev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, cyclodextrins have widely been used as green and easily available alternatives to promoters or catalysts of different chemical reactions in water. This review covers the research and application of cyclodextrins and their derivatives in asymmetric and stereospecific syntheses, with their division into three main groups: (1 cyclodextrins promoting asymmetric and stereospecific catalysis in water; (2 cyclodextrins’ complexes with transition metals as asymmetric and stereospecific catalysts; and (3 cyclodextrins’ non-metallic derivatives as asymmetric and stereospecific catalysts. The scope of this review is to systematize existing information on the contribution of cyclodextrins to asymmetric and stereospecific synthesis and, thus, to facilitate further development in this direction.

  8. Krylov-subspace acceleration of time periodic waveform relaxation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsdaine, A. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the author uses Krylov-subspace techniques to accelerate the convergence of waveform relaxation applied to solving systems of first order time periodic ordinary differential equations. He considers the problem in the frequency domain and presents frequency dependent waveform GMRES (FDWGMRES), a member of a new class of frequency dependent Krylov-subspace techniques. FDWGMRES exhibits many desirable properties, including finite termination independent of the number of timesteps and, for certain problems, a convergence rate which is bounded from above by the convergence rate of GMRES applied to the static matrix problem corresponding to the linear time-invariant ODE.

  9. Full waveform modelling and misfit calculation using the VERCE platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garth, Thomas; Spinuso, Alessandro; Casarotti, Emanuele; Magnoni, Federica; Krischner, Lion; Igel, Heiner; Schwichtenberg, Horst; Frank, Anton; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    In recent years the increasing resolution of seismic imagining by full waveform inversion has opened new research perspectives and practices. These methods rely on harnessing the computational power of large supercomputers and new storage capabilities, to run large parallel codes to simulate the seismic wave field in three-dimensional geological settings. The VERCE platform is designed to make these full waveform techniques accessible to a far wider spectrum of the seismological community. VERCE empowers a broad base of seismology researchers to harvest the new opportunities provided by well-established high-performance wave simulation codes such as SPECFEM3D. It meets a range of seismic research needs by eliminating the technical difficulties associated with using these codes, allowing users to focus on their research questions. VERCE delivers this power to seismologists through its science gateway, supporting wave simulation codes on each of the provided computing resources. Users can design their waveform simulation scenarios making use of a library of pre-loaded meshes and velocity models, and services for selecting earthquake focal mechanisms, seismic stations and recorded waveforms from existing catalogues, such as the GCMT catalogue, and FDSN data sources. They can also supply their own mesh, velocity model, earthquake catalogue and seismic observations. They can submit the simulations onto different computing resources, where VERCE provides codes that are tuned and supported for those resources. The simulations can currently be run on a range of European supercomputers in the PRACE network, including superMUC at LRZ, GALILEO at CINECA and on selected resources like Drachenfels at SCAI and within the EGI network. The gateway automates and looks after all these stages, but supplies seismologists with a provenance system that allows them to manage a large series of runs, review progress, and explore the results. The platform automates misfit analysis between

  10. Dynamic characteristics of boost inverter with waveform control

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, W.; Zhu, GR; Xiao, CY; Wang, HR; Tan, SC

    2014-01-01

    The input current of single-phase inverter typically has an AC ripple component at twice the output frequency. The low-frequency current ripple can cause a reduction in both the operating lifetime of its DC source and the energy conversion efficiency of the system. In this paper1, a proposed waveform control method which can eliminate such a ripple current in boost inverter system, is discussed. The characteristics of the waveform control method in boost inverter under input voltage or wide r...

  11. Flagellar waveform dynamics of freely swimming algal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtuldu, H.; Tam, D.; Hosoi, A. E.; Johnson, K. A.; Gollub, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    We present quantitative measurements of time-dependent flagellar waveforms for freely swimming biflagellated algal cells, for both synchronous and asynchronous beating. We use the waveforms in conjunction with resistive force theory as well as a singularity method to predict a cell's time-dependent velocity for comparison with experiments. While net propulsion is thought to arise from asymmetry between the power and recovery strokes, we show that hydrodynamic interactions between the flagella and cell body on the return stroke make an important contribution to enhance net forward motion.

  12. A Novel Memory Compress Algorithm for Arbitrary Waveform Generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕铁良; 仇玉林

    2000-01-01

    A memory compress algorithm for 12-bit Arbitrary Waveform Generator (AWG) is presented and optimized. It can compress waveform memory for a sinusoid to 16× 13hits with a Spurious-Free Dynamic Range (SFDR) 90.7dBc (1/1890 of uncompressed memory at the same SFDR) and to 8× 12bits with a SFDR 79dBc. Its hardware cost is six adders and two multipliers. Exploiting this memory compress technique makes it possible to build a high performance AWG on a chip.

  13. Efficient 2d full waveform inversion using Fortran coarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Donghyun; Kim, ahreum; Ha, Wansoo

    2016-04-01

    We developed a time-domain seismic inversion program using the coarray feature of the Fortran 2008 standard to parallelize the algorithm. We converted a 2d acoustic parallel full waveform inversion program with Message Passing Interface (MPI) to a coarray program and examined performance of the two inversion programs. The results show that the speed of the waveform inversion program using the coarray is slightly faster than that of the MPI version. The standard coarray lacks features for collective communication; however, it can be improved in following standards since it is introduced recently. The parallel algorithm can be applied for 3D seismic data processing.

  14. On the potential of OFDM enhancements as 5G waveforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berardinelli, Gilberto; Pajukoski, Kari; Lähetkangas, Eeva;

    2014-01-01

    The ideal radio waveform for an upcoming 5th Generation (5G) radio access technology should cope with a set of requirements such as limited complexity, good time/frequency localization and simple extension to multi-antenna technologies. This paper discusses the suitability of Orthogonal Frequency...... Division Multiplexing (OFDM) and its recently proposed enhancements as 5G waveforms, mainly focusing on their capability to cope with our requirements. Significant focus is given to the novel zero-tail paradigm, which allows boosting the OFDM flexibility while circumventing demerits such as poor spectral...

  15. Partitioned Waveform Inversion Applied to Eurasia and Northern Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    bedle, H; Matzel, E; Flanagan, M

    2006-07-27

    This report summarizes the data analysis achieved during Heather Bedle's eleven-week Technical Scholar internship at Lawrence Livermore National Labs during the early summer 2006. The work completed during this internship resulted in constraints on the crustal and upper mantle S-velocity structure in Northern Africa, the Mediterranean, the Middle East, and Europe, through the fitting of regional waveform data. This data extends current raypath coverage and will be included in a joint inversion along with data from surface wave group velocity measurements, S and P teleseismic arrival time data, and receiver function data to create an improved velocity model of the upper mantle in this region. The tectonic structure of the North African/Mediterranean/Europe/Middle Eastern study region is extremely heterogeneous. This region consists of, among others, stable cratons and platforms such as the West Africa Craton, and Baltica in Northern Europe; oceanic subduction zones throughout the Mediterranean Sea where the African and Eurasian plate collide; regions of continental collision as the Arabian Plate moves northward into the Turkish Plate; and rifting in the Red Sea, separating the Arabian and Nubian shields. With such diverse tectonic structures, many of the waveforms were difficult to fit. This is not unexpected as the waveforms are fit using an averaged structure. In many cases the raypaths encounter several tectonic features, complicating the waveform, and making it hard for the software to converge on a 1D average structure. Overall, the quality of the waveform data was average, with roughly 30% of the waveforms being discarded due to excessive noise that interfered with the frequency ranges of interest. An inversion for the 3D S-velocity structure of this region was also performed following the methodology of Partitioned Waveform Inversion (Nolet, 1990; Van der Lee and Nolet, 1997). The addition of the newly fit waveforms drastically extends the range of the

  16. Waveform and packet structure of lion roars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Baumjohann

    Full Text Available The Equator-S magnetometer is very sensitive and has a sampling rate of normally 128 Hz. The high sampling rate allows for the first time fluxgate magnetometer measurements of ELF waves between the ion cyclotron and the lower hybrid frequencies in the equatorial dayside magnetosheath. The so-called lion roars, typically seen by the Equator-S magnetometer at the bottom of the magnetic troughs of magnetosheath mirror waves, are near-monochromatic packets of electron whistler waves lasting for a few wave cycles only, typically 0.25 s. They are right-hand circularly polarized waves with typical amplitudes of 0.5–1 nT at around one tenth of the electron gyrofrequency. The cone angle between wave vector and ambient field is usually smaller than 1.5°.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (MHD waves and turbulence; plasma waves and turbulence

  17. Stable walking with asymmetric legs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asymmetric leg function is often an undesired side-effect in artificial legged systems and may reflect functional deficits or variations in the mechanical construction. It can also be found in legged locomotion in humans and animals such as after an accident or in specific gait patterns. So far, it is not clear to what extent differences in the leg function of contralateral limbs can be tolerated during walking or running. Here, we address this issue using a bipedal spring-mass model for simulating walking with compliant legs. With the help of the model, we show that considerable differences between contralateral legs can be tolerated and may even provide advantages to the robustness of the system dynamics. A better understanding of the mechanisms and potential benefits of asymmetric leg operation may help to guide the development of artificial limbs or the design novel therapeutic concepts and rehabilitation strategies.

  18. Asymmetrically coupled directed percolation systems

    OpenAIRE

    Noh, Jae Dong; Park, Hyunggyu

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a dynamical model of coupled directed percolation systems with two particle species. The two species $A$ and $B$ are coupled asymmetrically in that $A$ particles branch $B$ particles whereas $B$ particles prey on $A$ particles. This model may describe epidemic spreading controlled by reactive immunization agents. We study nonequilibrium phase transitions with focused attention to the multicritical point where both species undergo the absorbing phase transition simultaneously. In ...

  19. Asymmetric information and macroeconomic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Aoki, Masanao; Roy Frieden, B.

    2010-09-01

    We show how macroeconomic dynamics can be derived from asymmetric information. As an illustration of the utility of this approach we derive the equilibrium density, non-equilibrium densities and the equation of motion for the response to a demand shock for productivity in a simple economy. Novel consequences of this approach include a natural incorporation of time dependence into macroeconomics and a common information-theoretic basis for economics and other fields seeking to link micro-dynamics and macro-observables.

  20. Entrepreneurship, Asymmetric Information and Unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Robin Boadway; Nicolas Marceau; Maurice Marchand; Marianne Vigneault

    1998-01-01

    We examine how three sources of asymmetric information affect the supply of entrepreneurs and unemployment. In the first case, banks cannot observe entrepreneurs' risk of failure so ration credit. This increases the number of entrepreneurs and the level of unemployment. In the second case, firms cannot observe workers' effort so offer a wage above the market clearing one. This results in unemployment and too few entrepreneurs. The final case arises when firms cannot observe workers' abilities...

  1. Asymmetric Microscopic Driving Behavior Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, Hwasoo

    2008-01-01

    Numerous theories on traffic have been developed as traffic congestion gains more and more interest in our daily life. To model traffic phenomena, many traffic theorists have adopted theories from other fields such as fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. However, their efforts to model the traffic at a microscopic level have not been successful yet. Therefore, to overcome the limitations of the existing theories we propose a microscopic asymmetric traffic theory based on analysis of individual...

  2. Effciency Concern under Asymmetric Information

    OpenAIRE

    Winschel, Evguenia; Zahn, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Experimental evidence from simple distribution games supports the view that some individuals have a concern for the effciency of allocations. This motive could be important for the implementation of economic policy proposals. In a typical lab experiment, however, individuals have much more information available than outside the lab. We conduct a lab experiment to test whether asymmetric information influences prosocial behavior in a simple non-strategic interaction. In our setting, a dictator...

  3. High performance of junctionless MOSFET with asymmetric gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Sun, Ling-ling; Cao, Fei

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we propose a junctionless MOSFET with asymmetric gates (AG-JL MOSFET). This device is a double gate structure with a lateral offset between the gate, and this leads to different characteristic than a conventional double gate structure. Specifically, the asymmetric gate modulates the effective channel length depending on whether the device is in the ON or OFF state, which this leads to more ideal device characteristics. A comprehensive device performance comparison including the ION/IOFF ratio, subthreshold slope (SS), and drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) between the proposed device and a conventional device is presented. The proposed device exhibits superior performance when compared a conventional device, and results show that it is also less sensitive to process variations.

  4. Automated microseismic event location using Master-Event Waveform Stacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Krieger, Lars; Kriegerowski, Marius; Gammaldi, Sergio; Horalek, Josef; Priolo, Enrico; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and automated locations of microseismic events are desirable for many seismological and industrial applications. The analysis of microseismicity is particularly challenging because of weak seismic signals with low signal-to-noise ratio. Traditional location approaches rely on automated picking, based on individual seismograms, and make no use of the coherency information between signals at different stations. This strong limitation has been overcome by full-waveform location methods, which exploit the coherency of waveforms at different stations and improve the location robustness even in presence of noise. However, the performance of these methods strongly depend on the accuracy of the adopted velocity model, which is often quite rough; inaccurate models result in large location errors. We present an improved waveform stacking location method based on source-specific station corrections. Our method inherits the advantages of full-waveform location methods while strongly mitigating the dependency on the accuracy of the velocity model. With this approach the influence of an inaccurate velocity model on the results is restricted to the estimation of travel times solely within the seismogenic volume, but not for the entire source-receiver path. We finally successfully applied our new method to a realistic synthetic dataset as well as real data. PMID:27185465

  5. Visualization using 3D voxelization of full lidar waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joong Yong; Ramnath, Vinod; Feygels, Victor

    2014-11-01

    Airborne bathymetric lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) systems measure photoelectrons on the optical path (range and angle) at the photocathode of a returned laser pulse at high rates, such as every nanosecond. The collected measurement of a single pulse in a time series is called a waveform. Based on the calibration of the lidar system, the return signal is converted into units of received power. This converted value from the lidar waveform data is used to compute an estimate of the reflectance from the returned backscatter, which contains environmental information from along the optical path. This concept led us to develop a novel tool to visualize lidar data in terms of the returned backscatter, and to use this as a data analysis and editing tool. The full lidar waveforms along the optical path, from laser points collected in the region of interest (ROI), are voxelized into a 3D image cube. This allows lidar measurements to be analyzed in three orthogonal directions simultaneously. The laser pulse return (reflection) from the seafloor is visible in the waveform as a pronounced "bump" above the volume backscatter. Floating or submerged objects in the water may also be visible. Similarly, forest canopies and tree branches can be identified in the 3D voxelization. This paper discusses the possibility of using this unique three-orthogonal volume visualizing tool to extract environmental information for carrying out rapid environmental assessments over forests and water.

  6. Automated microseismic event location using Master-Event Waveform Stacking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Krieger, Lars; Kriegerowski, Marius; Gammaldi, Sergio; Horalek, Josef; Priolo, Enrico; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and automated locations of microseismic events are desirable for many seismological and industrial applications. The analysis of microseismicity is particularly challenging because of weak seismic signals with low signal-to-noise ratio. Traditional location approaches rely on automated picking, based on individual seismograms, and make no use of the coherency information between signals at different stations. This strong limitation has been overcome by full-waveform location methods, which exploit the coherency of waveforms at different stations and improve the location robustness even in presence of noise. However, the performance of these methods strongly depend on the accuracy of the adopted velocity model, which is often quite rough; inaccurate models result in large location errors. We present an improved waveform stacking location method based on source-specific station corrections. Our method inherits the advantages of full-waveform location methods while strongly mitigating the dependency on the accuracy of the velocity model. With this approach the influence of an inaccurate velocity model on the results is restricted to the estimation of travel times solely within the seismogenic volume, but not for the entire source-receiver path. We finally successfully applied our new method to a realistic synthetic dataset as well as real data. PMID:27185465

  7. Consistency of Post-Newtonian Waveforms with Numerical Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.; vanMeter, James R.; McWilliams, Sean T.; Centrella, Joan; Kelly, Bernard J.

    2007-01-01

    General relativity predicts the gravitational radiation signatures of mergers of compact binaries,such as coalescing binary black hole systems. Derivations of waveform predictions for such systems are required for optimal scientific analysis of observational gravitational wave data, and have so far been achieved primarily with the aid of the post-Newtonian (PN) approximation. The quaIity of this treatment is unclear, however, for the important late inspiral portion. We derive late-inspiral wave forms via a complementary approach, direct numerical simulation of Einstein's equations, which has recently matured sufficiently for such applications. We compare waveform phasing from simulations covering the last approximately 14 cycles of gravitational radiation from an equal-mass binary system of nonspinning black holes with corresponding 3PN and 3.5PN waveforms. We find phasing agreement consistent with internal error estimates based in either approach, at the level of one radian over approximately 10 cycles. The result suggests that PN waveforms for this system are effective roughly until the system reaches its last stable orbit just prior to the final merger.

  8. Synchronous Generator Model Parameter Estimation Based on Noisy Dynamic Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhausen, Sebastian; Paszek, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have occurred system failures in many power systems all over the world. They have resulted in a lack of power supply to a large number of recipients. To minimize the risk of occurrence of power failures, it is necessary to perform multivariate investigations, including simulations, of power system operating conditions. To conduct reliable simulations, the current base of parameters of the models of generating units, containing the models of synchronous generators, is necessary. In the paper, there is presented a method for parameter estimation of a synchronous generator nonlinear model based on the analysis of selected transient waveforms caused by introducing a disturbance (in the form of a pseudorandom signal) in the generator voltage regulation channel. The parameter estimation was performed by minimizing the objective function defined as a mean square error for deviations between the measurement waveforms and the waveforms calculated based on the generator mathematical model. A hybrid algorithm was used for the minimization of the objective function. In the paper, there is described a filter system used for filtering the noisy measurement waveforms. The calculation results of the model of a 44 kW synchronous generator installed on a laboratory stand of the Institute of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science of the Silesian University of Technology are also given. The presented estimation method can be successfully applied to parameter estimation of different models of high-power synchronous generators operating in a power system.

  9. Perturbative extraction of gravitational waveforms generated with Numerical Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Nakano, H; Lousto, C O; Zlochower, Y

    2015-01-01

    We derive an analytical expression for extracting the gravitational waveforms at null infinity using the Weyl scalar $\\psi_4$ measured at a finite radius. Our expression is based on a series solution in orders of 1/r to the equations for gravitational perturbations about a spinning black hole. We compute this expression to order $1/r^2$ and include the spin parameter $a$ of the Kerr background. We test the accuracy of this extraction procedure by measuring the waveform for a merging black-hole binary at ten different extraction radii (in the range r/M=75-190) and for three different resolutions in the convergence regime. We find that the extraction formula provides a set of values for the radiated energy and momenta that at finite extraction radii converges towards the expected values with increasing resolution, which is not the case for the `raw' waveform at finite radius. We also examine the phase and amplitude errors in the waveform as a function of observer location and again observe the benefits of using...

  10. Towards high resolution quantitative subsurface models by full waveform inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haffinger, P.; Gisolf, A.; Van den Berg, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) has the potential to recover detailed quantitative property models of the subsurface, but the process is computationally expensive. Currently available computer systems do not allow to use the full bandwidth of the acquired seismic data, which effectively reduces the re

  11. Multisource waveform inversion of marine streamer data using normalized wavefield

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2013-09-01

    Multisource full-waveform inversion based on the L1- and L2-norm objective functions cannot be applied to marine streamer data because it does not take into account the unmatched acquisition geometries between the observed and modeled data. To apply multisource full-waveform inversion to marine streamer data, we construct the L1- and L2-norm objective functions using the normalized wavefield. The new residual seismograms obtained from the L1- and L2-norms using the normalized wavefield mitigate the problem of unmatched acquisition geometries, which enables multisource full-waveform inversion to work with marine streamer data. In the new approaches using the normalized wavefield, we used the back-propagation algorithm based on the adjoint-state technique to efficiently calculate the gradients of the objective functions. Numerical examples showed that multisource full-waveform inversion using the normalized wavefield yields much better convergence for marine streamer data than conventional approaches. © 2013 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  12. Optimal control theory with arbitrary superpositions of waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard optimal control methods perform optimization in the time domain. However, many experimental settings demand the expression of the control signal as a superposition of given waveforms, a case that cannot easily be accommodated using time-local constraints. Previous approaches [1, 2] have circumvented this difficulty by performing optimization in a parameter space, using the chain rule to make a connection to the time domain. In this paper, we present an extension to optimal control theory which allows gradient-based optimization for superpositions of arbitrary waveforms directly in a time-domain subspace. Its key is the use of the Moore–Penrose pseudoinverse as an efficient means of transforming between a time-local and waveform-based descriptions. To illustrate this optimization technique, we study the parametrically driven harmonic oscillator as model system and reduce its energy, considering both Hamiltonian dynamics and stochastic dynamics under the influence of a thermal reservoir. We demonstrate the viability and efficiency of the method for these test cases and find significant advantages in the case of waveforms which do not form an orthogonal basis. (paper)

  13. Designing waveforms for temporal encoding using a frequency sampling method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    for the linear frequency modulated signal) were tested for both waveforms in simulation with respect to the Doppler frequency shift occurring when probing moving objects. It was concluded that the Doppler effect of moving targets does not significantly degrade the filtered output. Finally, in vivo measurements...

  14. Ultralow-velocity zone geometries resolved by multidimensional waveform modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacore, E. A.; Rost, S.; Thorne, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Ultralow-velocity zones (ULVZs) are thin patches of material with strongly reduced seismic wave speeds situated on top of the core-mantle boundary (CMB). A common phase used to detect ULVZs is SPdKS (SKPdS), an SKS wave with a short diffracted P leg along the CMB. Most previous efforts have examined ULVZ properties using 1-D waveform modelling approaches. We present waveform modelling results using the 2.5-D finite-difference algorithm PSVaxi allowing us better insight into ULVZ structure and location. We characterize ULVZ waveforms based on ULVZ elastic properties, shape and position along the SPdKS ray path. In particular, we vary the ULVZ location (e.g. source or receiver side), ULVZ topographical profiles (e.g. boxcar, trapezoidal or Gaussian) and ULVZ lateral scale along great circle path (2.5°, 5°, 10°). We observe several waveform effects absent in 1-D ULVZ models and show evidence for waveform effects allowing the differentiation between source and receiver side ULVZs. Early inception of the SPdKS/SKPdS phase is difficult to detect for receiver-side ULVZs with maximum shifts in SKPdS initiation of ˜3° in epicentral distance, whereas source-side ULVZs produce maximum shifts of SPdKS initiation of ˜5°, allowing clear separation of source- versus receiver-side structure. We present a case study using data from up to 300 broad-band stations in Turkey recorded between 2005 and 2010. We observe a previously undetected ULVZ in the southern Atlantic Ocean region centred near 45°S, 12.5°W, with a lateral scale of ˜3°, VP reduction of 10 per cent, VS reduction of 30 per cent and density increase of 10 per cent relative to PREM.

  15. GLAS/ICESat L1B Global Waveform-based Range Corrections Data V033

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The level 1B waveform parameterization data will contain waveform-based range corrections and surface characteristics at the full 40 per second resolution. Data...

  16. Analysis of LFM-waveform Libraries for Cognitive Tracking Maneuvering Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the idea of the waveform agility in cognitive radars,the waveform libraries for maneuvering target tracking are discussed. LFM-waveform libraries are designed according to different combinations of chirp parameters and FrFT rotation angles. By applying the interact multiple model (IMM algorithm in tracking maneuvering targets, transmitted waveform is called real time from the LFM-waveform libraries. The waveforms are selected from the library according to the criterion of maximum mutual information between the current state of knowledge of the model and the measurement. Simulation results show that waveform library containing certain amount LFM-waveforms can improve the performance of cognitive tracking radar.

  17. Incompressibility of asymmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an isospin- and momentum-dependent modified Gogny (MDI) interaction, the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock (SHF) approach, and a phenomenological modified Skyrme-like (MSL) model, we have studied the incompressibility Ksat(δ) of isospin asymmetric nuclear matter at its saturation density. Our results show that in the expansion of Ksat(δ) in powers of isospin asymmetry δ, i.e., Ksat(δ) = K0 + Ksat,2δ2 + Ksat,4δ4 + O(δ6), the magnitude of the 4th-order Ksat,4 parameter is generally small. The 2nd-order Ksat,2 parameter thus essentially characterizes the isospin dependence of the incompressibility of asymmetric nuclear matter at saturation density. Furthermore, the Ksat,2 can be expressed as Ksat,2 = Ksym – 6L – J0/K0 L in terms of the slope parameter L and the curvature parameter Ksym of the symmetry energy and the third-order derivative parameter J0 of the energy of symmetric nuclear matter at saturation density, and we find the higher order J0 contribution to Ksat,2 generally cannot be neglected. Also, we have found a linear correlation between Ksym and L as well as between J0/K0 and K0. Using these correlations together with the empirical constraints on K0 and L, the nuclear symmetry energy Esym(ρ0) at normal nuclear density, and the nucleon effective mass, we have obtained an estimated value of Ksat,2 = -370 ± 120 MeV for the 2nd-order parameter in the isospin asymmetry expansion of the incompressibility of asymmetric nuclear matter at its saturation density. (author)

  18. Assessment of waveform control method for mitigation of low-frequency current ripple

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, GR; Wang, HR; Xiao, CY; Kang, Y.; Tan, SC

    2013-01-01

    Waveform control method can mitigate such a low-frequency ripple current being drawn from the DC distribution while the DC distribution system delivers AC power to the load through a differential inverter. Assessment on the waveform control method and comparative study between with and without waveform control method are proposed in this paper1. Experimental results are provided to explain the operation and showcase the performance between with and without the waveform control method. Results...

  19. Asymmetric Information and Consumer Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Ismagilova G. N.; Danilina E. I.; Gafurov I. R.; Ismagilov R. I.; Safiullin L. N.

    2014-01-01

    In the paper study the peculiarities of the formation the consumer demand for durable goods, the so-called «experience goods» in markets with asymmetric information. In the known literature sources studying of the demand is based on the assumption that at the moment of the purchase of goods and services people know exactly what price they are willing to pay for them and what utility they are going to obtain using those goods and services. Consider the signal model in which the initial price a...

  20. Transient Stability During Asymmetrical Faults

    OpenAIRE

    Couturier, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    This research project has been conducted at RTE in order to study the transient stability after asymmetrical faults. When three-phase short-circuits occur in a network, almost all the electrical power is lost on the relevant line(s). Among all short-circuit types, it is the most drastic event and the issue has to be solved very quickly. But oddly, it is also the easiest problem to solve mathematically speaking. This comes from the fact that the system stays balanced, and equations can be simp...

  1. Phase equilibria in asymmetric mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simplified version of the Perturbed Hard-Chain Theory (SPHCT) is used to compute the phase equilibria and Henry's constants for mixtures in which the molecules are highly asymmetric both in shape and in the intermolecular potential. These mixtures include binary systems such as CO2/hydrocarbons and hydrocarbons/hydrocarbons, which are of particular interest for the oil industry. For this type of mixtures a single parameter (which is calculated from available experimental data of liquid-vapor equilibrium) is introduced. The approach yields results which compare well with the experimental behavior reported in the literature (Author)

  2. Tripartite fully asymmetric universal quantum cloning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We investigate the universal asymmetric cloning of states in a Hilbert space of arbitrary dimension d. We derive the class of optimal and fully asymmetric universal 1 → 3 cloners, which produce three copies, each having a different fidelity. A simple parametric expression for the maximum achievable cloning fidelity triplets will be provided. As a side-product, we also prove the optimality of the 1 → 2 asymmetric cloning machines that have been proposed in the literature. (author)

  3. Enhanced Asymmetric Bilinear Model for Face Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Wenjuan Gong; Weishan Zhang; Jordi Gonzàlez; Yan Ren; Zhen Li

    2015-01-01

    Bilinear models have been successfully applied to separate two factors, for example, pose variances and different identities in face recognition problems. Asymmetric model is a type of bilinear model which models a system in the most concise way. But seldom there are works exploring the applications of asymmetric bilinear model on face recognition problem with illumination changes. In this work, we propose enhanced asymmetric model for illumination-robust face recognition. Instead of initiali...

  4. The Modularized Software Package ASKI - Full Waveform Inversion Based on Waveform Sensitivity Kernels Utilizing External Seismic Wave Propagation Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, F.; Friederich, W.

    2015-12-01

    We present the modularized software package ASKI which is a flexible and extendable toolbox for seismic full waveform inversion (FWI) as well as sensitivity or resolution analysis operating on the sensitivity matrix. It utilizes established wave propagation codes for solving the forward problem and offers an alternative to the monolithic, unflexible and hard-to-modify codes that have typically been written for solving inverse problems. It is available under the GPL at www.rub.de/aski. The Gauss-Newton FWI method for 3D-heterogeneous elastic earth models is based on waveform sensitivity kernels and can be applied to inverse problems at various spatial scales in both Cartesian and spherical geometries. The kernels are derived in the frequency domain from Born scattering theory as the Fréchet derivatives of linearized full waveform data functionals, quantifying the influence of elastic earth model parameters on the particular waveform data values. As an important innovation, we keep two independent spatial descriptions of the earth model - one for solving the forward problem and one representing the inverted model updates. Thereby we account for the independent needs of spatial model resolution of forward and inverse problem, respectively. Due to pre-integration of the kernels over the (in general much coarser) inversion grid, storage requirements for the sensitivity kernels are dramatically reduced.ASKI can be flexibly extended to other forward codes by providing it with specific interface routines that contain knowledge about forward code-specific file formats and auxiliary information provided by the new forward code. In order to sustain flexibility, the ASKI tools must communicate via file output/input, thus large storage capacities need to be accessible in a convenient way. Storing the complete sensitivity matrix to file, however, permits the scientist full manual control over each step in a customized procedure of sensitivity/resolution analysis and full

  5. Phase transitions in warm, asymmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A relativistic mean-field model of nuclear matter with arbitrary proton fraction is studied at finite temperature. An analysis is performed of the liquid-gas phase transition in a system with two conserved charges (baryon number and isospin) using the stability conditions on the free energy, the conservation laws, and Gibbs' criteria for phase equilibrium. For a binary system with two phases, the coexistence surface (binodal) is two dimensional. The Maxwell construction through the phase-separation region is discussed, and it is shown that the stable configuration can be determined uniquely at every density. Moreover, because of the greater dimensionality of the binodal surface, the liquid-gas phase transition is continuous (second order by Ehrenfest's definition), rather than discontinuous (first order), as in familiar one-component systems. Using a mean-field equation of state calibrated to the properties of nuclear matter and finite nuclei, various phase-separation scenarios are considered. The model is then applied to the liquid-gas phase transition that may occur in the warm, dilute matter produced in energetic heavy-ion collisions. In asymmetric matter, instabilities that produce a liquid-gas phase separation arise from fluctuations in the proton concentration (chemical instability), rather than from fluctuations in the baryon density (mechanical instability)

  6. Managing Full waveform LiDAR data: a challenging task for the forthcoming years

    OpenAIRE

    Bretar, Frederic; Chauve, Adrien; Mallet, Clément; Jutzi, B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes to summarize researches and new advances in full waveform lidar data. After a description of full waveform lidar systems, we will review different methodologies developed to process the waveforms (modelling, correlation, stacking). Applications on urban and vegetated areas are then presented. The paper ends up with recommendations on future research themes.

  7. Growth mechanisms study of microcrystalline silicon deposited by SiH4/H2 plasma using tailored voltage waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of Tailored Voltage Waveforms is a technique wherein one uses non-sinusoidal waveforms with a period equivalent to RF frequencies to excite a plasma. It has been shown to be an effective technique to decouple maximum Ion Bombardment Energy (IBE) from the ion flux at the surface of the electrodes. In this paper, we use it for the first time as a way to scan through the IBE in order to study the growth mechanism of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon using a SiH4/H2 chemistry. We find that at critical energies, a stepwise increase in the amorphous to microcrystalline transition thickness is observed, as detected by Real Time Spectroscopic Ellipsometry. The same energy thresholds (30 eV and 70 eV) are found to be very influential on the final surface morphology of the samples, as observed by Atomic Force Microscopy. These thresholds correspond to SiHx+ bulk displacement (30 eV) and Hx+ (70 eV) surface displacement energies. A model is therefore proposed to account for the impact of these ions on the morphology of μc-Si:H growth

  8. Hydrogen migration in methanol studied under asymmetric fs laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsina, N.; Kaziannis, S.; Kosmidis, C.

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogen migration processes in deuterated methanol (CH3OD) under the irradiation of ultrashort (30 fs) two color (400/800 nm) laser field have been investigated by means of time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The utilization of an asymmetric ω/2ω laser field contributes to a better understanding of hydrogen migration processes. Based on the comparative study of the asymmetry dependence and the angular distributions of the H2D+, HOD+ and H2OD+ fragment ions, whose formation requires hydrogen migration, it was feasible to distinguish the most probable site of the molecular skeleton where the hydrogen migrates from.

  9. Interaction modes between asymmetrically and oppositely charged rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antila, Hanne S.; Van Tassel, Paul R.; Sammalkorpi, Maria

    2016-02-01

    The interaction of oppositely and asymmetrically charged rods in salt—a simple model of (bio)macromolecular assembly—is observed via simulation to exhibit two free energy minima, separated by a repulsive barrier. In contrast to similar minima in the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, the governing mechanism includes electrostatic attraction at large separation, osmotic repulsion at close range, and depletion attraction near contact. A model accounting for ion condensation and excluded volume is shown to be superior to a mean-field treatment in predicting the effect of charge asymmetry on the free-energy profile.

  10. Aneutronic fusion on the base of asymmetrical centrifugal trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volosov, V. I.

    2006-08-01

    A physical design of a device that can be a base for a direct-conversion nuclear electric power station is considered. The project considers the aneutronic reaction P-11B in the asymmetric centrifugal trap. Kinetic energy of nuclear particles (alpha particles) is converted into electrical energy inside this device; no thermal cycle is used. Heating and recuperation of energy of protons and boron ions take place in the plasma space. The presented scheme differs significantly from the conventional thermonuclear fusion. 'Fast' protons, which are the main energy component of plasma, have an almost monoenergetic spectrum. This makes it possible to realize the 'resonance' fusion.

  11. The shaping of a national ignition campaign pulsed waveform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► NIF pulse is generated using an electro-optic modulator to vary the intensity of light. ► Electrical impulse generators, each with a 300 ps pulse Gaussian signal are utilized. ► Adjusting the impulse amplitude for 140 impulses, produces a pulsed waveform. ► System auto shapes 48 waveforms with to 275:1 contrast ratio with 3% absolute error. - Abstract: The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192 beam, 1.8 MJ, 500 TW ultraviolet laser system used for inertial confinement fusion research. For each experimental shot, NIF must deliver a precise amount of laser power on the target for successful and efficient target ignition, and these characteristics vary depending on the physics of the particular campaign. The precise temporal shape, energy and timing characteristics of a pulsed waveform target interaction are key components in meeting the experimental goals. Each NIF pulse is generated in the Master Oscillator Room (MOR) using an electro-optic modulator to vary the intensity of light in response to an electrical input. The electrical drive signal to the modulator is produced using a unique, high-performance arbitrary waveform generator (AWG). This AWG sums the output of 140 electrical impulse generators, each producing a 300 ps pulse width Gaussian signal separated in time by 250 ps. By adjusting the amplitudes and summing the 140 impulses, a pulsed waveform can be sculpted from a seed 45 ns square pulse. Using software algorithms written for NIF's Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), the system is capable of autonomously shaping 48 unique experimental pulsed waveforms for each shot that have demonstrated up to 275:1 contrast ratio with ±3% absolute error averaged over any 2 ns interval, meeting the stringent pulse requirements needed to achieve ignition. In this paper, we provide an overview of the pulse shaping system, software algorithms and associated

  12. Aberrations in asymmetrical electron lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting from well established knowledge in light-optics we explore the question if electron-optical aberration can be improved in asymmetrical electron lenses. We show that spherical as well as chromatic aberration coefficients are reduced in asymmetric electrostatic einzel lenses when the center electrode is moved away from the center position towards the entrance electrode. Relative improvements up to 40% for both the chromatic and the spherical aberration coefficients can be obtained. We use analytical and numerical calculations to confirm this result for exemplary cases of a lens with fixed length and working distance. The agreement of the two calculation methods is very good. We then derive an estimate for the electron-optical aberration coefficients from light-optics. The derived expressions for chromatic and spherical aberrations are somewhat simpler than the ones derived from electron-optics as they involve integrals only over the electrostatic potential, not over the electron paths. The estimated formulas still agree well with the electron optical calculations. Overall, we are tempted to suggest that the enormous knowledge base of light optics can provide considerable guidance for electron-optical applications. -- Highlights: ► Develops the analogy between light and electron optics in aberration calculations. ► Optimized spherical and chromatic aberrations for an electrostatic einzel lens. ► Comparison between analytic and numerical aberration calculations.

  13. Aberrations in asymmetrical electron lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J P S; Word, R C; Könenkamp, R

    2012-08-01

    Starting from well established knowledge in light-optics we explore the question if electron-optical aberration can be improved in asymmetrical electron lenses. We show that spherical as well as chromatic aberration coefficients are reduced in asymmetric electrostatic einzel lenses when the center electrode is moved away from the center position towards the entrance electrode. Relative improvements up to 40% for both the chromatic and the spherical aberration coefficients can be obtained. We use analytical and numerical calculations to confirm this result for exemplary cases of a lens with fixed length and working distance. The agreement of the two calculation methods is very good. We then derive an estimate for the electron-optical aberration coefficients from light-optics. The derived expressions for chromatic and spherical aberrations are somewhat simpler than the ones derived from electron-optics as they involve integrals only over the electrostatic potential, not over the electron paths. The estimated formulas still agree well with the electron optical calculations. Overall, we are tempted to suggest that the enormous knowledge base of light optics can provide considerable guidance for electron-optical applications. PMID:22206603

  14. Excitons in asymmetric quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryev, P. S.; Kurdyubov, A. S.; Kuznetsova, M. S.; Ignatiev, I. V.; Efimov, Yu. P.; Eliseev, S. A.; Petrov, V. V.; Lovtcius, V. A.; Shapochkin, P. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    Resonance dielectric response of excitons is studied for the high-quality InGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with wide asymmetric quantum wells (QWs). To highlight effects of the QW asymmetry, we have grown and studied several heterostructures with nominally square QWs as well as with triangle-like QWs. Several quantum confined exciton states are experimentally observed as narrow exciton resonances. A standard approach for the phenomenological analysis of the profiles is generalized by introducing different phase shifts for the light waves reflected from the QWs at different exciton resonances. Good agreement of the phenomenological fit to the experimentally observed exciton spectra for high-quality structures allowed us to reliably obtain parameters of the exciton resonances: the exciton transition energies, the radiative broadenings, and the phase shifts. A direct numerical solution of the Schrödinger equation for the heavy-hole excitons in asymmetric QWs is used for microscopic modeling of the exciton resonances. Remarkable agreement with the experiment is achieved when the effect of indium segregation is taken into account. The segregation results in a modification of the potential profile, in particular, in an asymmetry of the nominally square QWs.

  15. ASYMMETRIC SOLAR POLAR FIELD REVERSALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solar polar fields reverse because magnetic flux from decaying sunspots moves toward the poles, with a preponderance of flux from the trailing spots. If there is a strong asymmetry, in the sense that most activity is in the northern hemisphere, then that excess flux will move toward the north pole and reverse that pole first. If there is more activity in the south later on, then that flux will help to reverse the south pole. In this way, two humps in the solar activity and a corresponding difference in the time of reversals develop (in the ideal case). Such a difference was originally noted in the very first observation of polar field reversal just after the maximum of the strongly asymmetric solar cycle 19, when the southern hemisphere was most active before sunspot maximum and the south pole duly reversed first, followed by the northern hemisphere more than a year later, when that hemisphere became most active. Solar cycles since then have had the opposite asymmetry, with the northern hemisphere being most active before solar maximum. We show that polar field reversals for these cycles have all happened in the north first, as expected. This is especially noteworthy for the present solar cycle 24. We suggest that the association of two or more peaks of solar activity when separated by hemispheres with correspondingly different times of polar field reversals is a general feature of the cycle, and that asymmetric polar field reversals are simply a consequence of the asymmetry of solar activity.

  16. Asymmetric Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, A. A.; Kotlyar, V. V.; Porfirev, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    We introduce a family of asymmetric Laguerre-Gaussian (aLG) laser beams. The beams have been derived via a complex-valued shift of conventional LG beams in the Cartesian plane. While propagating in a uniform medium, the first bright ring of the aLG beam becomes less asymmetric and the energy is redistributed toward peripheral diffraction rings. The projection of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) onto the optical axis is calculated. The OAM is shown to grow quadratically with increasing asymmetry parameter of the aLG beam, which equals the ratio of the shift to the waist radius. Conditions for the OAM becoming equal to the topological charge have been derived. For aLG beams with zero radial index, we have deduced an expression to define the intensity maximum coordinates and shown the crescent-shaped intensity pattern to rotate during propagation. Results of the experimental generation and rotation of aLG beams agree well with theoretical predictions.

  17. Active matter on asymmetric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson Reichhardt, C. J.; Drocco, J.; Mai, T.; Wan, M. B.; Reichhardt, C.

    2011-10-01

    For collections of particles in a thermal bath interacting with an asymmetric substrate, it is possible for a ratchet effect to occur where the particles undergo a net dc motion in response to an ac forcing. Ratchet effects have been demonstrated in a variety of systems including colloids as well as magnetic vortices in type-II superconductors. Here we examine the case of active matter or self-driven particles interacting with asymmetric substrates. Active matter systems include self-motile colloidal particles undergoing catalysis, swimming bacteria, artificial swimmers, crawling cells, and motor proteins. We show that a ratchet effect can arise in this type of system even in the absence of ac forcing. The directed motion occurs for certain particle-substrate interaction rules and its magnitude depends on the amount of time the particles spend swimming in one direction before turning and swimming in a new direction. For strictly Brownian particles there is no ratchet effect. If the particles reflect off the barriers or scatter from the barriers according to Snell's law there is no ratchet effect; however, if the particles can align with the barriers or move along the barriers, directed motion arises. We also find that under certain motion rules, particles accumulate along the walls of the container in agreement with experiment. We also examine pattern formation for synchronized particle motion. We discuss possible applications of this system for self-assembly, extracting work, and sorting as well as future directions such as considering collective interactions and flocking models.

  18. Some Remarks on Asymmetric Syntheses from Recent Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Baba, Naomichi

    1990-01-01

    Some asymmetric syntheses were presented here and discussed briefly including NADH model reactions, phase transfer-catalyzed asymmetric epoxidation, enantiotopic group-selective hydrolysis of a malonic anhydride with alkoxide anion, intramolecular acid-catalyzed lactonizations, catalytic asymmetric Diels-Alder synthesis, asymmetric aldol condensation, chiral homoallyl alcohol synthesis, asymmetric addition of diethylzinc to aldehyde, kinetic resolution of racemic hydroperoxides and binaphthol...

  19. Image-domain full waveform inversion: Field data example

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Sanzong

    2014-08-05

    The main difficulty with the data-domain full waveform inversion (FWI) is that it tends to get stuck in the local minima associated with the waveform misfit function. This is the result of cycle skipping which degrades the low-wavenumber update in the absence of low-frequencies and long-offset data. An image-domain objective function is defined as the normed difference between the predicted and observed common image gathers (CIGs) in the subsurface offset domain. This new objective function is not constrained by cycle skipping at the far subsurface offsets. To test the effectiveness of this method, we apply it to marine data recorded in the Gulf of Mexico. Results show that image-domain FWI is less sensitive to the initial model and the absence of low-frequency data compared with conventional FWI. The liability, however, is that it is almost an order of magnitude more expensive than standard FWI.

  20. An electro-optic waveform interconnect based on quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Li-Guo; Gong, Shang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The ability to modulate an optical field via an electric field is regarded as a key function of electro-optic interconnects, which are used in optical communications and information processing systems. One of the main required devices for such interconnects is the electro-optic modulator (EOM). Current EOM based on the electro-optic effect and the electro-absorption effect often is bulky and power inefficient due to the weak electro-optic properties of its constituent materials. Here we propose a new mechanism to produce an arbitrary-waveform EOM based on the quantum interference, in which both the real and imaginary parts of the susceptibility are engineered coherently with the superhigh efficiency. Based on this EOM, a waveform interconnect from the voltage to the modulated optical absorption is realised. We expect that such a new type of electro-optic interconnect will have a broad range of applications including the optical communications and network.

  1. Analytic gravitational waveforms for generic precessing compact binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Chatziioannou, Katerina; Cornish, Neil; Yunes, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Binary systems of two compact objects circularize and spiral toward each other via the emission of gravitational waves. The coupling of the spins of each object with the orbital angular momentum causes the orbital plane to precess, which leads to modulation of the gravitational wave signal. Until now, generating frequency-domain waveforms for fully precessing systems for use in gravitational wave data analysis meant numerically integrating the equations of motion, then Fourier transforming the result, which is very computationally intensive for systems that complete hundreds or thousands of cycles in the sensitive band of a detector. Previously, analytic solutions were only available for certain special cases or for simplified models. Here we describe the construction of closed-form, frequency-domain waveforms for fully-precessing, quasi-circular binary inspirals.

  2. Waveform inversion of acoustic waves for explosion yield estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.; Rodgers, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new waveform inversion technique to estimate the energy of near-surface explosions using atmospheric acoustic waves. Conventional methods often employ air blast models based on a homogeneous atmosphere, where the acoustic wave propagation effects (e.g., refraction and diffraction) are not taken into account, and therefore, their accuracy decreases with increasing source-receiver distance. In this study, three-dimensional acoustic simulations are performed with a finite difference method in realistic atmospheres and topography, and the modeled acoustic Green's functions are incorporated into the waveform inversion for the acoustic source time functions. The strength of the acoustic source is related to explosion yield based on a standard air blast model. The technique was applied to local explosions (structure. The presented method can be extended to explosions recorded at far distance provided proper meteorological specifications.

  3. Two New Gradient Precondition Schemes for Full Waveform Inversion

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Guanghui; Ren, Haoran

    2014-01-01

    We propose two preconditioned gradient direction for full waveform inversion (FWI). The first one is using time integral wavefields. The Least square problem is formulated as the time integral residual wavefields, which can partially resolve the effect of high-passed filter in the traditional gradient formula; the convergence rate is greatly accelerated. The other one is localized offset Hessian inspired by the generalized imaging condition, which provides another redundancy in the Hessian. We compare the traditional conjugate gradient scaled by the shot illumination and localized offset Hessian (actually, only diagonal part is considered here), and contrast their performance for waveform inversion. The results demonstrate the localized offset Hessian (diagonal part) can provide much more information in the subsurface, and is preferred to the layer-strip inversion.

  4. Transient waveform acquisition system for the ELMO Bumpy Torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transient waveform system described in this report is designed to acquire analog waveforms from the ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) diagnostic experiments. Pressure, density, synchrotron radiation, etc., are acquired and digitized with a Kinetic Systems TR812 transient recorder and associated modules located in a CAMAC crate. The system can simultaneously acquire, display, and transmit sets of data consisting of identification parameters and up to 1024 data points for 1 to 64 input signals (frequency range = 0.01 pulse/s to 100 kHz) of data every one or more minutes; thus, it can run continuously without operator intervention. The data are taken on a VAX 11/780 and transmitted to a data base on a DECSystem-10. To aid the programmer in making future modifications to the system, detailed documentation using the Yourdon structural methods has been given

  5. Software Communication Architecture Implementation and Its Waveform Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Pei-gang; ZHAO Hai; WANG Ting-chang; FAN Jian-hua

    2006-01-01

    This paper attempts to do a research on the development of software defined radio(SDR) based on software communication architecture(SCA). Firstly, SCA is studied and a whole reference model of SCA3.0 core framework (CF)is realized; Secondly, an application-specific FM3TR waveform is implemented on the platform of common software based on the reference model; Thirdly, from the point of view of real-time performance and software reuse, tests and validations are made on the above realized CF reference model and FM3TR waveform. As a result, the SCA-compliant SDR has favorable interoperability and software portability and can satisfy the real-time performance requirements which are not too rigorous.

  6. Optimal control of photoelectron emission by realistic waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Solanpää, Janne; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental techniques in multicolor waveform synthesis allow the temporal shaping of strong femtosecond laser pulses with applications in the control of quantum mechanical processes in atoms, molecules, and nanostructures. Prediction of the shapes of the optimal waveforms can be done computationally using quantum optimal control theory (QOCT). In this work we bring QOCT to experimental feasibility by providing an optimal control scheme with realistic pulse representation. We apply the technique to optimal control of above-threshold photoelectron emission from a one-dimensional hydrogen atom. By mixing different spectral channels and thus lowering the intensity requirements for individual channels, the resulting optimal pulses can extend the cutoff energies by at least up to 50% and bring up the electron yield by several orders of magnitude. Insights into the electron dynamics for optimized photoelectron emission are obtained with a semiclassical two-step model.

  7. TOF Spectroscopy measurement with waveform Digitizer at TMSR Photoneutron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Longxiang; Ma, Yugang; Cao, Xiguang; Cai, Xiangzhou; Chen, Jingen; Zhang, Guilin; Han, Jianlong; Zhang, Guogiang; Hu, Jifeng; Wang, Xiaohe

    2015-01-01

    The Photo-Neutron Source(PNS,phase 1), is an electron linear accelerator (linac) based pulsed neutron facility, combined with TOF technique, was constructed for nuclear data measurement of Thorium Molten Salt Reactor(TMSR) in Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics(SINAP) at JiaDing campus. The TOF detector signal, with the arrive time, pulse shape and pulse hight information, was recorded by a waveform digitizer. Through the pulse-shape discrimination(PSD) between neutrons and gamma-rays and time of Gamma Flash and Neutron signal analyse, the neutron TOF spectrum was deduced with this simple electronics design, and a new DAQ system based on waveform digitizer was used in this test experiment.

  8. Leveraging waveform complexity for confident detection of gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kanner, Jonah B; Cornish, Neil; Millhouse, Meg; Xhakaj, Enia; Salemi, Francesco; Drago, Marco; Vedovato, Gabriele; Klimenko, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    The recent completion of Advanced LIGO suggests that gravitational waves (GWs) may soon be directly observed. Past searches for gravitational-wave transients have been impacted by transient noise artifacts, known as glitches, introduced into LIGO data due to instrumental and environmental effects. In this work, we explore how waveform complexity, instead of signal-to-noise ratio, can be used to rank event candidates and distinguish short duration astrophysical signals from glitches. We test this framework using a new hierarchical pipeline that directly compares the Bayesian evidence of explicit signal and glitch models. The hierarchical pipeline is shown to have strong performance, and in particular, allows high-confidence detections of a range of waveforms at realistic signal-to-noise ratio with a two detector network.

  9. Quantum path analysis for arbitrary optical-waveform measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungseung; Nam, Chang Hee; Kim, Kyung Taec

    2016-03-01

    An arbitrary optical waveform can be measured using a perturbative approach known as the petahertz optical oscilloscope, in which an electron trajectory in the process of high-order-harmonic generation is used as a temporal gate. Here, we report that the petahertz optical oscilloscope exhibits a significant frequency dependence for the short wavelength signal field due to the finite time span of the electron trajectory. We show that the intrinsic response of the atom to the signal field can be used to correct the frequency dependence of the measurement. It is shown that the optical waveform having the spectral components from the second harmonic to the fourth harmonic of the fundamental field can accurately be reconstructed after the correction of the frequency dependence.

  10. Effects of output waveforms on penetration for Nd: YAG laser welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    By using a Nd: YAG laser welding system devised for transmitting continuous, rectangular and pulsed waveforms, comprehensive and deep investigation is focused on the effects of several parameters of rectangular waveform and pulsed output wave superimposed on a rectangular waveform on the penetration depth of weld. Research results indicate that the average power, duty cycle, frequency and peak power of rectangular wave affect the weld penetration depth to different extent. Results of experiments and analysis also indicate that the pulse delay time, pulse width and the power ratio of pulse to rectangular waveform seriously influence the penetration when the pulsed wave is superimposed on a rectangular waveform.

  11. PMT waveform modeling at the Daya Bay experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sören, Jetter; Dan, Dwyer; Jiang, Wen-Qi; Liu, Da-Wei; Wang, Yi-Fang; Wang, Zhi-Min; Wen, Liang-Jian

    2012-08-01

    Detailed measurements of Hamamatsu R5912 photomultiplier signals are presented, including the single photoelectron charge response, waveform shape, nonlinearity, saturation, overshoot, oscillation, prepulsing, and afterpulsing. The results were used to build a detailed model of the PMT signal characteristics over a wide range of light intensities. Including the PMT model in simulated Daya Bay particle interactions shows no significant systematic effects that are detrimental to the experimental sensitivity.

  12. PMT waveform modeling at the Daya Bay experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed measurements of Hamamatsu R5912 photomultiplier signals are presented, including the single photoelectron charge response, waveform shape, nonlinearity, saturation, overshoot, oscillation, prepulsing, and afterpulsing. The results were used to build a detailed model of the PMT signal characteristics over a wide range of light intensities. Including the PMT model in simulated Daya Bay particle interactions shows no significant systematic effects that are detrimental to the experimental sensitivity. (authors)

  13. Waveform design and diversity for advanced radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gini, Fulvio

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, various algorithms for radar signal design, that rely heavily upon complicated processing and/or antenna architectures, have been suggested. These techniques owe their genesis to several factors, including revolutionary technological advances (new flexible waveform generators, high speed signal processing hardware, digital array radar technology, etc.) and the stressing performance requirements, often imposed by defence applications in areas such as airborne early warning and homeland security.Increasingly complex operating scenarios calls for sophisticated algorithms with the

  14. LAS-CDMA using Various Time Domain Chip-Waveforms

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, H.; Hanzo, L.

    2005-01-01

    LAS CDMA exhibits a significantly better performance than that of classic random code based DS-CDMA, when operating in a quasi-synchronous scenario. Classic frequency-domain raised cosine Nyquist filtering is known to show the best possible performance, but its complexity may be excessive in highchip-rate systems. Hence in these systems often low-complexity time-domain waveform shaping is considered. Motivated by this fact, the achievable performance of LAS-CDMA is investigated in conjunction...

  15. Read channel for signal waveform modulation multi-level disc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel read channel for signal waveform modulation multi-level disc is presented in this paper. This read channel employs timing recovery system and partial response maximum likelihood detector. Compared to the previous read channel composed of level detection and run-length detection, the present read channel shows superiority in capacity increase and robust performance. Especially, relying on the partial response maximum likelihood detection, lower bit error rate can be obtained. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  16. Multidimensional Waveform Encoding for Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar

    OpenAIRE

    Krieger, Gerhard; Gebert, Nicolas; Moreira, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces the innovative concept of multidimensional waveform encoding for spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The combination of this technique with digital beamforming on receive enables a new generation of SAR systems with improved performance and flexible imaging capabilities. Examples are high-resolution wide-swath radar imaging with compact antennas, enhanced sensitivity for applications like along-track interferometry and moving object indication, or the implementati...

  17. Multidimensional Waveform Encoding for Synthetic Aperture Radar Remote Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Krieger, Gerhard; Gebert, Nicolas; Moreira, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces and analyses the innovative concept of multidimensional waveform encoding for spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). The combination of this technique with digital beamforming on receive enables a new class of highly performant SAR systems employing novel and highly flexible radar imaging modes. Examples are adaptive high-resolution wide-swath SAR imaging with compact antennas, enhanced parameter estimation sensitivity for applications like along...

  18. A Time Domain Waveform for Testing General Relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Huwyler, Cédric; Porter, Edward K.; Jetzer, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational-wave parameter estimation is only as good as the theory the waveform generation models are based upon. It is therefore crucial to test General Relativity (GR) once data becomes available. Many previous works, such as studies connected with the ppE framework by Yunes and Pretorius, rely on the stationary phase approximation (SPA) to model deviations from GR in the frequency domain. As Fast Fourier Transform algorithms have become considerably faster and in order to circumvent pos...

  19. DISECA - A Matlab code for dispersive waveform calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gaždová, Renata; Vilhelm, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 4 (2011), s. 526-531. ISSN 0266-352X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300460705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : velocity dispersion * synthetic waveform * seismic method Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.987, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0266352X11000425

  20. The SAMPIC Waveform and Time to Digital Converter

    OpenAIRE

    Delagnes, E.; Breton, D.; H. Grabas; Maalmi, J.; Rusquart, P.; Saimpert, M.

    2014-01-01

    Sce Electronique International audience SAMPIC is a Waveform and Time to DigitalConverter (WTDC) multichannel chip. Each of its 16 channelsassociates a DLL-based TDC providing a raw time with an ultrafastanalog memory allowing fine timing extraction as well asother parameters of the pulse. Each channel also integrates adiscriminator that can trigger itself independently or participateto a more complex trigger. After triggering, analog data isdigitized by an on-chip ADC and only that cor...

  1. Interpretation of Doppler blood flow velocity waveforms using neural networks.

    OpenAIRE

    Baykal, N; Reggia, J. A.; Yalabik, N.; Erkmen, A.; Beksac, M. S.

    1994-01-01

    Doppler umbilical artery blood flow velocity waveform measurement is used in perinatal surveillance for the evaluation of pregnancy status. There is an ongoing debate on the predictive value of Doppler measurements concerning the critical effect of the selection of parameters for the evaluation of Doppler output. In this paper, we describe how neural network methods can be used both to discover relevant classification features and subsequently to classify patients. Classification accuracy var...

  2. HEMODYNAMICS FOR ASYMMETRIC INLET AXIAL VELOCITY PROFILE IN CAROTID BIFURCATION MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Zu-rong; LIU Bin; YANG Shuo; XIA Yan

    2008-01-01

    The asymmetric inlet velocity profile has been observed in phantom model using LDA and in health subjects using Magnet Resonance (MR). The effects of asymmetric inlet axial velocity profile on the flow field and the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) ofcarotid bifurcation were numerically studied herein with the TF-AHCB model. The results show that the Wall Shear Stress Gradient (WSSG) in the front part of the sinus for inward-tilting inlet axial velocity profile is nearly 2 times of that for the symmetric one in the beginning of systole, the end of systole, and diastole, respectively. The area of WSS below 5x 10.3 Pa at the outer wall of the sinus for outward-tilting inlet axial velocity profile is 1.5 times of that for the inward-tilting one during diastole of the cardiac cycle. The asymmetric inlet velocity profiles can reduce the flow velocity near the inner wall of the sinus, which has been normally considered a high velocity region. It is concluded that besides bifurcation geometry and flow waveform, the asymmetry of inlet velocity profile is probably a factor influencing atherosclerosis.

  3. Simultaneous inversion for velocity and attenuation by waveform tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fengxia; Wang, Yanghua

    2016-08-01

    Seismic waveform tomography can invert for the velocity and attenuation (Q- 1) variations simultaneously. For this simultaneous inversion, we propose two strategies for waveform tomography. First, we analyze the contributions of the real part and the imaginary part of the gradients, associated with the velocity and attenuation parameters respectively, and determine that the combination of the real part of the gradient subvector for the velocity parameter and the imaginary part of the gradient subvector for the attenuation parameter would produce an optimal inversion result. Second, we attempt to balance the sensitivities of the objective function to the velocity and the attenuation parameters. Considering the magnitude differences between these two-type parameters in the simultaneous inversion, we apply preliminarily a normalization to both the velocity model and the attenuation model. However, for balancing their sensitivities, we further adjust the corresponding model updates using a tuning factor. We determine this tuning parameter adaptively, based on the sensitivities of these two parameters, at each iteration. Numerical tests demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of these two strategies in full waveform inversion.

  4. Frequency-domain waveform inversion using the phase derivative

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2013-09-26

    Phase wrapping in the frequency domain or cycle skipping in the time domain is the major cause of the local minima problem in the waveform inversion when the starting model is far from the true model. Since the phase derivative does not suffer from the wrapping effect, its inversion has the potential of providing a robust and reliable inversion result. We propose a new waveform inversion algorithm using the phase derivative in the frequency domain along with the exponential damping term to attenuate reflections. We estimate the phase derivative, or what we refer to as the instantaneous traveltime, by taking the derivative of the Fourier-transformed wavefield with respect to the angular frequency, dividing it by the wavefield itself and taking the imaginary part. The objective function is constructed using the phase derivative and the gradient of the objective function is computed using the back-propagation algorithm. Numerical examples show that our inversion algorithm with a strong damping generates a tomographic result even for a high ‘single’ frequency, which can be a good initial model for full waveform inversion and migration.

  5. Photoplethysmographic signal waveform index for detection of increased arterial stiffness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this research was to assess the validity of the photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveform index PPGAI for the estimation of increased arterial stiffness. For this purpose, PPG signals were recorded from 24 healthy subjects and from 20 type II diabetes patients. The recorded PPG signals were processed with the analysis algorithm developed and the waveform index PPGAI similar to the augmentation index (AIx) was calculated. As a reference, the aortic AIx was assessed and normalized for a heart rate of 75 bpm (AIx@75) by a SphygmoCor device. A strong correlation (r = 0.85) between the PPGAI and the aortic AIx@75 and a positive correlation of both indices with age were found. Age corrections for the indices PPGAI and AIx@75 as regression models from the signals of healthy subjects were constructed. Both indices revealed a significant difference between the groups of diabetes patients and healthy controls. However, the PPGAI provided the best statistical discrimination for the group of subjects with increased arterial stiffness. The waveform index PPGAI based on the inexpensive PPG technology can be considered as a perspective measure of increased arterial stiffness estimation in clinical screenings. (paper)

  6. The effect of inlet waveforms on computational hemodynamics of patient-specific intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, J; Siddiqui, A H; Meng, H

    2014-12-18

    Due to the lack of patient-specific inlet flow waveform measurements, most computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of intracranial aneurysms usually employ waveforms that are not patient-specific as inlet boundary conditions for the computational model. The current study examined how this assumption affects the predicted hemodynamics in patient-specific aneurysm geometries. We examined wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI), the two most widely studied hemodynamic quantities that have been shown to predict aneurysm rupture, as well as maximal WSS (MWSS), energy loss (EL) and pressure loss coefficient (PLc). Sixteen pulsatile CFD simulations were carried out on four typical saccular aneurysms using 4 different waveforms and an identical inflow rate as inlet boundary conditions. Our results demonstrated that under the same mean inflow rate, different waveforms produced almost identical WSS distributions and WSS magnitudes, similar OSI distributions but drastically different OSI magnitudes. The OSI magnitude is correlated with the pulsatility index of the waveform. Furthermore, there is a linear relationship between aneurysm-averaged OSI values calculated from one waveform and those calculated from another waveform. In addition, different waveforms produced similar MWSS, EL and PLc in each aneurysm. In conclusion, inlet waveform has minimal effects on WSS, OSI distribution, MWSS, EL and PLc and a strong effect on OSI magnitude, but aneurysm-averaged OSI from different waveforms has a strong linear correlation with each other across different aneurysms, indicating that for the same aneurysm cohort, different waveforms can consistently stratify (rank) OSI of aneurysms. PMID:25446264

  7. Estimating effect of terlipressin on portal pressure in cirrhosis by observing hepatic vein doppler waveform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the changes in doppler waveform of hepatic vein after the administration of terlipressin, and to assess indirectly the efficacy of the drug to reduce the Hepatic Vein Pressure Gradient and portal pressure. Methods: The quasi-experimental study was conducted at the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from April 1 to November 25, 2011, and comprised 50 patients with cirrhosis with abnormal doppler waveform of the hepatic vein. Patients with diseases causing abnormal hepatic vein doppler waveform were excluded. Doppler waveforms were studied for 20 minutes before and for 20 minutes after the administration of terlipressin. Tracings with best waveform before and after injection were saved for analysis. Changes in waveform after vasoactive drug were defined as mild, significant, marked and gross changes. SPSS 10 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 50 patients, 36 (72%) were males and 14 (28%) females. Commonest waveform was monophasic 38(76%). Gross changes i.e. turning triphasic from monophasic waveform was observed in 8 (16%) patients. Significant gross changes were seen in 24 (48%) patients. Total number of patients showing improvement in waveform was 36 (72%). In no case, waveform deteriorated after the administration of terlipressin (p= 0.001). Conclusion: Non-invasive method of observing the improvement of hepatic vein waveform by duplex ultrasound, after more studies, may be an important tool for assessing and monitoring the effects of portal pressure lowering drugs. (author)

  8. Condensation on Slippery Asymmetric Bumps

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Kyoo-Chul; He, Neil; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Bumps are omnipresent from human skin to the geological structures on planets, which offer distinct advantages in numerous phenomena including structural color, drag reduction, and extreme wettability. Although the topographical parameters of bumps such as radius of curvature of convex regions significantly influence various phenomena including anti-reflective structures and contact time of impacting droplets, the effect of the detailed bump topography on growth and transport of condensates have not been clearly understood. Inspired by the millimetric bumps of the Namib Desert beetle, here we report the identified role of radius of curvature and width of bumps with homogeneous surface wettability in growth rate, coalescence and transport of water droplets. Further rational design of asymmetric convex topography and synergetic combination with slippery coating simultaneously enable self-transport, leading to unseen five-fold higher growth rate and an order of magnitude faster shedding time of droplets compared...

  9. Asymmetric diffusion of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Medvedev, Mikhail V

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic ray propagation is diffusive because of pitch angle scattering by waves. We demonstrate that if the high-amplitude magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with $\\tilde B/\\langle B\\rangle \\sim 1$ is present on top of the mean field gradient, the diffusion becomes asymmetric. As an example, we consider the vertical transport of cosmic rays in our Galaxy propagating away from a point-like source. We solve this diffusion problem analytically using a one-dimensional Markov chain analysis. We obtained that the cosmic ray density markedly differs from the standard diffusion prediction and has a sizable effect on their distribution throughout the galaxy. The equation for the continuous limit is also derived, which shows limitations of the convection-diffusion equation.

  10. New asymmetric quantum codes over Fq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuena; Feng, Xiaoyi; Xu, Gen

    2016-07-01

    Two families of new asymmetric quantum codes are constructed in this paper. The first family is the asymmetric quantum codes with length n=qm-1 over Fq, where qge 5 is a prime power. The second one is the asymmetric quantum codes with length n=3m-1. These asymmetric quantum codes are derived from the CSS construction and pairs of nested BCH codes. Moreover, let the defining set T1=T2^{-q}, then the real Z-distance of our asymmetric quantum codes are much larger than δ _max+1, where δ _max is the maximal designed distance of dual-containing narrow-sense BCH code, and the parameters presented here have better than the ones available in the literature.

  11. Colocated MIMO Radar: Beamforming, Waveform design, and Target Parameter Estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Jardak, Seifallah

    2014-04-01

    Thanks to its improved capabilities, the Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) radar is attracting the attention of researchers and practitioners alike. Because it transmits orthogonal or partially correlated waveforms, this emerging technology outperformed the phased array radar by providing better parametric identifiability, achieving higher spatial resolution, and designing complex beampatterns. To avoid jamming and enhance the signal to noise ratio, it is often interesting to maximize the transmitted power in a given region of interest and minimize it elsewhere. This problem is known as the transmit beampattern design and is usually tackled as a two-step process: a transmit covariance matrix is firstly designed by minimizing a convex optimization problem, which is then used to generate practical waveforms. In this work, we propose simple novel methods to generate correlated waveforms using finite alphabet constant and non-constant-envelope symbols. To generate finite alphabet waveforms, the proposed method maps easily generated Gaussian random variables onto the phase-shift-keying, pulse-amplitude, and quadrature-amplitude modulation schemes. For such mapping, the probability density function of Gaussian random variables is divided into M regions, where M is the number of alphabets in the corresponding modulation scheme. By exploiting the mapping function, the relationship between the cross-correlation of Gaussian and finite alphabet symbols is derived. The second part of this thesis covers the topic of target parameter estimation. To determine the reflection coefficient, spatial location, and Doppler shift of a target, maximum likelihood estimation yields the best performance. However, it requires a two dimensional search problem. Therefore, its computational complexity is prohibitively high. So, we proposed a reduced complexity and optimum performance algorithm which allows the two dimensional fast Fourier transform to jointly estimate the spatial location

  12. Lithium Titanate Confined in Carbon Nanopores for Asymmetric Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Enbo; Qin, Chuanli; Jung, Hong-Ryun; Berdichevsky, Gene; Nese, Alper; Marder, Seth; Yushin, Gleb

    2016-04-26

    Porous carbons suffer from low specific capacitance, while intercalation-type active materials suffer from limited rate when used in asymmetric supercapacitors. We demonstrate that nanoconfinement of intercalation-type lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12) nanoparticles in carbon nanopores yielded nanocomposite materials that offer both high ion storage density and rapid ion transport through open and interconnected pore channels. The use of titanate increased both the gravimetric and volumetric capacity of porous carbons by more than an order of magnitude. High electrical conductivity of carbon and the small size of titanate crystals allowed the composite electrodes to achieve characteristic charge and discharge times comparable to that of the electric double-layer capacitors. The proposed composite synthesis methodology is simple, scalable, and applicable for a broad range of active intercalation materials, while the produced composite powders are compatible with commercial electrode fabrication processes. PMID:26950509

  13. Ion mobility sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  14. Implementation of a quasi-realtime display of DIII-D neutral beam heating waveforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DIII-D neutral beam system employs eight 80 keV ion sources mounted on four beamlines to provide plasma heating to the DIII-D tokamak. The neutral beam system is capable of injecting over 20 MW of deuterium power with flexibility in terms of timing and modulation of the individual neutral beams. To maintain DIII-D's efficient tokamak shot cycle and make informed control decisions, it is important to be able to determine which beams fired, and exactly when, by the time the tokamak shot is over. Previously this information was available in centralized form only after a several minute wait. A cost-effective alternative to the traditional eight-channel storage oscilloscope has been implemented using off the shelf PC hardware and software. The system provides a real time display of injected neutral beam accelerator voltages and tokamak plasma current, as well an a summation waveform indicative of the total injected power as a function of time. The hardware consists of a Macintosh Centris 650 PC with a Motorola 68040 microprocessor. Data acquisition is accomplished using a National Instrument's 16-channel analog to digital conversion board for the Macintosh. The color displays and functionality were developed using National Instruments' LabView environment. Because the price of PCs has been decreasing rapidly and their capabilities increasing, this system is far less expensive than an eight-channel storage oscilloscope. As a flexible combination of PC and software, the system also provides much more capability than a dedicated oscilloscope, acting as the neutral beam coordinator's logbook, recording comments and availability statistics. Data such as shot number and neutral beam parameters are obtained over the local network from other computers and added to the display. Waveforms are easily archived to disk for future recall. Details of the implementation will be discussed along with samples of the displays and a description of the system's function and capabilities

  15. Implementation of a quasi-realtime display of DIII-D neutral beam heating waveforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J.C.

    1993-10-01

    The DIII-D neutral beam system employs eight 80 keV ion sources mounted on four beamlines to provide plasma heating to the DIII-D tokamak. The neutral beam system is capable of injecting over 20 MW of deuterium power with flexibility in terms of timing and modulation of the individual neutral beams. To maintain DIII-D`s efficient tokamak shot cycle and make informed control decisions, it is important to be able to determine which beams fired, and exactly when, by the time the tokamak shot is over. Previously this information was available in centralized form only after a several minute wait. A cost-effective alternative to the traditional eight-channel storage oscilloscope has been implemented using off the shelf PC hardware and software. The system provides a real time display of injected neutral beam accelerator voltages and tokamak plasma current, as well an a summation waveform indicative of the total injected power as a function of time. The hardware consists of a Macintosh Centris 650 PC with a Motorola 68040 microprocessor. Data acquisition is accomplished using a National Instrument`s 16-channel analog to digital conversion board for the Macintosh. The color displays and functionality were developed using National Instruments` LabView environment. Because the price of PCs has been decreasing rapidly and their capabilities increasing, this system is far less expensive than an eight-channel storage oscilloscope. As a flexible combination of PC and software, the system also provides much more capability than a dedicated oscilloscope, acting as the neutral beam coordinator`s logbook, recording comments and availability statistics. Data such as shot number and neutral beam parameters are obtained over the local network from other computers and added to the display. Waveforms are easily archived to disk for future recall. Details of the implementation will be discussed along with samples of the displays and a description of the system`s function and capabilities.

  16. Comparing gravitational waveform extrapolation to Cauchy-characteristic extraction in binary black hole simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nicholas W.; Boyle, Michael; Reisswig, Christian; Scheel, Mark A.; Chu, Tony; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Szilágyi, Béla

    2013-12-01

    We extract gravitational waveforms from numerical simulations of black hole binaries computed using the Spectral Einstein Code. We compare two extraction methods: direct construction of the Newman-Penrose (NP) scalar Ψ4 at a finite distance from the source and Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE). The direct NP approach is simpler than CCE, but NP waveforms can be contaminated by near-zone effects—unless the waves are extracted at several distances from the source and extrapolated to infinity. Even then, the resulting waveforms can in principle be contaminated by gauge effects. In contrast, CCE directly provides, by construction, gauge-invariant waveforms at future null infinity. We verify the gauge invariance of CCE by running the same physical simulation using two different gauge conditions. We find that these two gauge conditions produce the same CCE waveforms but show differences in extrapolated-Ψ4 waveforms. We examine data from several different binary configurations and measure the dominant sources of error in the extrapolated-Ψ4 and CCE waveforms. In some cases, we find that NP waveforms extrapolated to infinity agree with the corresponding CCE waveforms to within the estimated error bars. However, we find that in other cases extrapolated and CCE waveforms disagree, most notably for m=0 “memory” modes.

  17. Haemodynamic analysis of femoral artery bifurcation models under different physiological flow waveforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadzadegan, Ashkan; Lotfi, Azadeh; Simmons, Anne; Barber, Tracie

    2016-08-01

    Thrombus in a femoral artery may form under stagnant flow conditions which vary depending on the local arterial waveform. Four different physiological flow waveforms - poor (blunt) monophasic, sharp monophasic, biphasic and triphasic - can exist in the femoral artery as a result of different levels of peripheral arterial disease progression. This study aims to examine the effect of different physiological waveforms on femoral artery haemodynamics. In this regard, a fluid-structure interaction analysis was carried out in idealised models of bifurcated common femoral artery. The results showed that recirculation zones occur in almost all flow waveforms; however, the sites at where these vortices are initiated, the size and structure of vortices are highly dependent on the type of flow waveform being used. It was shown that the reverse diastolic flow in biphasic and triphasic waveforms leads to the occurrence of a retrograde flow which aids in 'washout' of the disturbed flow regions. This may limit the likelihood of thrombus formation, indicating the antithrombotic role of retrograde flow in femoral arteries. Furthermore, our data revealed that the flow particles experience considerably higher residence time under blunt and sharp monophasic waveforms than under biphasic and triphasic waveforms. This confirms that the risk of atherothrombotic plaque initiation and development in femoral arteries is higher under blunt and sharp monophasic waveforms than under biphasic and triphasic flow waveforms. PMID:26582544

  18. Heavy residues from very mass asymmetric heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic production cross sections and momenta of all residues with nuclear charge (Z) greater than 39 from the reaction of 26, 40, and 50 MeV/nucleon 129Xe + Be, C, and Al were measured. The isotopic cross sections, the momentum distribution for each isotope, and the cross section as a function of nuclear charge and momentum are presented here. The new cross sections are consistent with previous measurements of the cross sections from similar reaction systems. The shape of the cross section distribution, when considered as a function of Z and velocity, was found to be qualitatively consistent with that expected from an incomplete fusion reaction mechanism. An incomplete fusion model coupled to a statistical decay model is able to reproduce many features of these reactions: the shapes of the elemental cross section distributions, the emission velocity distributions for the intermediate mass fragments, and the Z versus velocity distributions. This model gives a less satisfactory prediction of the momentum distribution for each isotope. A very different model based on the Boltzman-Nordheim-Vlasov equation and which was also coupled to a statistical decay model reproduces many features of these reactions: the shapes of the elemental cross section distributions, the intermediate mass fragment emission velocity distributions, and the Z versus momentum distributions. Both model calculations over-estimate the average mass for each element by two mass units and underestimate the isotopic and isobaric widths of the experimental distributions. It is shown that the predicted average mass for each element can be brought into agreement with the data by small, but systematic, variation of the particle emission barriers used in the statistical model. The predicted isotopic and isobaric widths of the cross section distributions can not be brought into agreement with the experimental data using reasonable parameters for the statistical model

  19. Regenerating a symmetry in asymmetric dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Matthew R; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric dark matter theories generically allow for mass terms that lead to particle-antiparticle mixing. Over the age of the Universe, dark matter can thus oscillate from a purely asymmetric configuration into a symmetric mix of particles and antiparticles, allowing for pair-annihilation processes. Additionally, requiring efficient depletion of the primordial thermal (symmetric) component generically entails large annihilation rates. We show that unless some symmetry completely forbids dark matter particle-antiparticle mixing, asymmetric dark matter is effectively ruled out for a large range of masses, for almost any oscillation time scale shorter than the age of the Universe. PMID:22304253

  20. Modelling asymmetric growth in crowded plant communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian

    2010-01-01

    A class of models that may be used to quantify the effect of size-asymmetric competition in crowded plant communities by estimating a community specific degree of size-asymmetric growth for each species in the community is suggested. The model consists of two parts: an individual size......-asymmetric growth part, where growth is assumed to be proportional to a power function of the size of the individual, and a term that reduces the relative growth rate as a decreasing function of the individual plant size and the competitive interactions from other plants in the neighbourhood....

  1. Asymmetric warfare and the will to win

    OpenAIRE

    Quinn, Matthew D.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis explores the will to win in asymmetric war. Asymmetric war, in which one side has an overwhelming advantage over its opponent, will likely be the war of the future for the United States in the post-Cold War uni-polar world. To win an asymmetric war, the individual and then the masses must be motivated to fight and, ultimately, the will to win must be cultivated and sustained for victory. Religion is a highly effective motivat or for both the individual and the masses. This motiva...

  2. Improved gravitational waveforms from spinning black hole binaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard post-Newtonian approximation to gravitational waveforms, called T-approximants, from nonspinning black hole binaries are known not to be sufficiently accurate close to the last stable orbit of the system. A new approximation, called P-approximants, is believed to improve the accuracy of the waveforms rendering them applicable up to the last stable orbit. In this study we apply P-approximants to the case of a test particle in equatorial orbit around a Kerr black hole parameterized by a spin-parameter q that takes values between -1 and 1. In order to assess the performance of the two approximants we measure their effectualness (i.e., larger overlaps with the exact signal), and faithfulness (i.e., smaller biases while measuring the parameters of the signal) with the exact (numerical) waveforms. We find that in the case of prograde orbits, that is orbits whose angular momentum is in the same sense as the spin angular momentum of the black hole, T-approximant templates obtain an effectualness of ∼0.99 for spins q 0.99 for all spins up to q=0.95. The bias in the estimation of parameters is much lower in the case of P-approximants than T-approximants. We find that P-approximants are both effectual and faithful and should be more effective than T-approximants as a detection template family when q>0. For q<0 both T- and P-approximants perform equally well so that either of them could be used as a detection template family

  3. Waveform feature extraction algorithms for IceCube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory at South Pole consists of digital optical modules (DOMs) deep down in the ice equipped with photomultipliers to capture Cherenkov light induced by muons and other particles. These DOMs digitize the analogue pulse shapes of the photomultiplier signals. The large amount of information has to be condensed for later particle track and energy reconstructions. This talk presents a new framework (the NewFeatureExtractor) to extract the arrival times and the number of photons. Three algorithms have been implemented in this framework to analyze different types of waveforms. Their performance is tested by comparison between experimental and simulated data and by comparison with earlier algorithms.

  4. Waveform control of fuel-cell inverter systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, GR; Wang, KW; Tse, CK; Tan, SC

    2012-01-01

    Fuel-cell power systems comprising single-phase DC/AC inverters draw low-frequency AC ripple currents at twice the output frequency from the fuel cell. Such a 100/120 Hz ripple current may create instability in the fuel cell system, lowers its efficiency, and shortens the lifetime of fuel cell stack. This paper1 presents a waveform control method that can mitigate such a low-frequency ripple current from being drawn from the fuel cell while the fuel-cell system delivers AC power to the load t...

  5. Waveform digitization for high resolution timing detectors with silicon photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of time resolution studies with silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) read out with high bandwidth constant fraction discrimination electronics were presented earlier . Here we describe the application of fast waveform digitization readout based on the DRS4 chip , a switched capacitor array (SCA) produced by the Paul Scherrer Institute, to further our goal of developing high time resolution detectors based on SiPMs. The influence of the SiPM signal shape on the time resolution was investigated. Different algorithms to obtain the best time resolution are described, and test beam results are presented.

  6. Ultrafast chirped optical waveform recorder using a time microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Corey Vincent

    2015-04-21

    A new technique for capturing both the amplitude and phase of an optical waveform is presented. This technique can capture signals with many THz of bandwidths in a single shot (e.g., temporal resolution of about 44 fs), or be operated repetitively at a high rate. That is, each temporal window (or frame) is captured single shot, in real time, but the process may be run repeatedly or single-shot. By also including a variety of possible demultiplexing techniques, this process is scalable to recoding continuous signals.

  7. Signal quality measures for pulse oximetry through waveform morphology analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulse oximetry has been extensively used to estimate oxygen saturation in blood, a vital physiological parameter commonly used when monitoring a subject's health status. However, accurate estimation of this parameter is difficult to achieve when the fundamental signal from which it is derived, the photoplethysmograph (PPG), is contaminated with noise artifact induced by movement of the subject or the measurement apparatus. This study presents a novel method for automatic rejection of artifact contaminated pulse oximetry waveforms, based on waveform morphology analysis. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared to a manually annotated gold standard. The creation of the gold standard involved two experts identifying sections of the PPG signal containing good quality PPG pulses and/or noise, in 104 fingertip PPG signals, using a simultaneous electrocardiograph (ECG) signal as a reference signal. The fingertip PPG signals were each 1 min in duration and were acquired from 13 healthy subjects (10 males and 3 females). Each signal contained approximately 20 s of purposely induced artifact noise from a variety of activities involving subject movement. Some unique waveform morphology features were extracted from the PPG signals, which were believed to be correlated with signal quality. A simple decision-tree classifier was employed to arrive at a classification decision, at a pulse-by-pulse resolution, of whether a pulse was of acceptable quality for use or not. The performance of the algorithm was assessed using Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ), sensitivity, specificity and accuracy measures. A mean κ of 0.64 ± 0.22 was obtained, while the mean sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 89 ± 10%, 77 ± 19% and 83 ± 11%, respectively. Furthermore, a heart rate estimate, extracted from uncontaminated sections of PPG, as identified by the algorithm, was compared with the heart rate derived from an uncontaminated simultaneous ECG signal. The mean error

  8. Asymmetric Information and Consumer Demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismagilova G. N.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the paper study the peculiarities of the formation the consumer demand for durable goods, the so-called «experience goods» in markets with asymmetric information. In the known literature sources studying of the demand is based on the assumption that at the moment of the purchase of goods and services people know exactly what price they are willing to pay for them and what utility they are going to obtain using those goods and services. Consider the signal model in which the initial price and advertising expenditures are the signals of the quality influencing the formation of the demand for new goods offered by the company of unknown quality through consumer behavior. The basis of this model is the study of producers by consumers, acquisition of knowledge, information about price and quality, as well as their use in order to determine the market share of high-quality goods and low-quality goods in the asymmetry of information.

  9. Chaos suppression through asymmetric coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragard, J.; Vidal, G.; Mancini, H.; Mendoza, C.; Boccaletti, S.

    2007-12-01

    We study pairs of identical coupled chaotic oscillators. In particular, we have used Roessler (in the funnel and no funnel regimes), Lorenz, and four-dimensional chaotic Lotka-Volterra models. In all four of these cases, a pair of identical oscillators is asymmetrically coupled. The main result of the numerical simulations is that in all cases, specific values of coupling strength and asymmetry exist that render the two oscillators periodic and synchronized. The values of the coupling strength for which this phenomenon occurs is well below the previously known value for complete synchronization. We have found that this behavior exists for all the chaotic oscillators that we have used in the analysis. We postulate that this behavior is presumably generic to all chaotic oscillators. In order to complete the study, we have tested the robustness of this phenomenon of chaos suppression versus the addition of some Gaussian noise. We found that chaos suppression is robust for the addition of finite noise level. Finally, we propose some extension to this research.

  10. Why Do Nucleosomes Unwrap Asymmetrically?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Lennart; Tompitak, Marco; Eslami-Mossallam, Behrouz; Schiessel, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Nucleosomes, DNA spools with a protein core, engage about three-quarters of eukaryotic DNA and play a critical role in chromosomal processes, ranging from gene regulation, recombination, and replication to chromosome condensation. For more than a decade, micromanipulation experiments where nucleosomes are put under tension, as well as the theoretical interpretations of these experiments, have deepened our understanding of the stability and dynamics of nucleosomes. Here we give a theoretical explanation for a surprising new experimental finding: nucleosomes wrapped onto the 601 positioning sequence (the sequence used in most laboratories) respond highly asymmetrically to external forces by always unwrapping from the same end. Using a computational nucleosome model, we show that this asymmetry can be explained by differences in the DNA mechanics of two very short stretches on the wrapped DNA portion. Our finding suggests that the physical properties of nucleosomes, here the response to forces, can be tuned locally by the choice of the underlying base-pair sequence. This leads to a new view of nucleosomes: a physically highly varied set of DNA-protein complexes whose properties can be tuned on evolutionary time scales to their specific function in the genomic context. PMID:26991771

  11. Twin Higgs Asymmetric Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García García, Isabel; Lasenby, Robert; March-Russell, John

    2015-09-18

    We study asymmetric dark matter (ADM) in the context of the minimal (fraternal) twin Higgs solution to the little hierarchy problem, with a twin sector with gauged SU(3)^{'}×SU(2)^{'}, a twin Higgs doublet, and only third-generation twin fermions. Naturalness requires the QCD^{'} scale Λ_{QCD}^{'}≃0.5-20  GeV, and that t^{'} is heavy. We focus on the light b^{'} quark regime, m_{b^{'}}≲Λ_{QCD}^{'}, where QCD^{'} is characterized by a single scale Λ_{QCD}^{'} with no light pions. A twin baryon number asymmetry leads to a successful dark matter (DM) candidate: the spin-3/2 twin baryon, Δ^{'}∼b^{'}b^{'}b^{'}, with a dynamically determined mass (∼5Λ_{QCD}^{'}) in the preferred range for the DM-to-baryon ratio Ω_{DM}/Ω_{baryon}≃5. Gauging the U(1)^{'} group leads to twin atoms (Δ^{'}-τ^{'}[over ¯] bound states) that are successful ADM candidates in significant regions of parameter space, sometimes with observable changes to DM halo properties. Direct detection signatures satisfy current bounds, at times modified by dark form factors. PMID:26430985

  12. Twin Higgs Asymmetric Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    García, Isabel García; March-Russell, John

    2015-01-01

    We study Asymmetric Dark Matter (ADM) in the context of the minimal (Fraternal) Twin Higgs solution to the little hierarchy problem, with a twin sector with gauged $SU(3)' \\times SU(2)'$, a twin Higgs, and only third generation twin fermions. Naturalness requires the QCD$^\\prime$ scale $\\Lambda'_{\\rm QCD} \\simeq 0.5 - 20 \\ {\\rm GeV}$, and $t'$ to be heavy. We focus on the light $b'$ quark regime, $m_{b'} \\lesssim \\Lambda'_{\\rm QCD}$, where QCD$^\\prime$ is characterised by a single scale $\\Lambda'_{\\rm QCD}$ with no light pions. A twin baryon number asymmetry leads to a successful DM candidate: the spin-3/2 twin baryon, $\\Delta' \\sim b'b'b'$, with a dynamically determined mass ($\\sim 5 \\Lambda'_{\\rm QCD}$) in the preferred range for the DM-to-baryon ratio $\\Omega_{\\rm DM}/\\Omega_{\\rm baryon} \\simeq 5$. Gauging the $U(1)'$ group leads to twin atoms ($\\Delta'$ - $\\bar {\\tau'}$ bound states) that are successful ADM candidates in significant regions of parameter space, sometimes with observable changes to DM halo ...

  13. Asymmetric plasmonic induced ionic noise in metallic nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Chen, Chang; Willems, Kherim; Lagae, Liesbet; Groeseneken, Guido; Stakenborg, Tim; van Dorpe, Pol

    2016-06-01

    We present distinct asymmetric plasmon-induced noise properties of ionic transport observed through gold coated nanopores. We thoroughly investigated the effects of bias voltage and laser illumination. We show that the potential drop across top-coated silicon nanocavity pores can give rise to a large noise asymmetry (~2-3 orders of magnitude). Varying the bias voltage has an appreciable effect on the noise density spectra, typically in the Lorentzian components. The laser power is found to strongly affect the ionic noise level as well as the voltage threshold for light-induced noise generation. The asymmetric noise phenomenon is attributed to plasmon-induced interfacial reactions which promote light-induced charge fluctuation in the ion flow and allow voltage modulation of photo-induced carriers surmounting over such Schottky junctions. We further compare the ionic noise performances of gold nanocavities containing different material stacks, among which thermal oxide passivation of the silicon successfully mitigates the light-induced noise and is also fully CMOS-compatible. The understanding of the described noise characteristics will help to foster multiple applications using related structures including plasmonic-based sensing or plasmon-induced catalysis such as water splitting or solar energy conversion devices.We present distinct asymmetric plasmon-induced noise properties of ionic transport observed through gold coated nanopores. We thoroughly investigated the effects of bias voltage and laser illumination. We show that the potential drop across top-coated silicon nanocavity pores can give rise to a large noise asymmetry (~2-3 orders of magnitude). Varying the bias voltage has an appreciable effect on the noise density spectra, typically in the Lorentzian components. The laser power is found to strongly affect the ionic noise level as well as the voltage threshold for light-induced noise generation. The asymmetric noise phenomenon is attributed to plasmon

  14. Asymmetric surface dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure: electrical properties and induced airflow characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pons, Jerome; Moreau, Eric; Touchard, Gerard [LEA, University of Poitiers/CNRS/ENSMA, Bd. Curie, Teleport 2, BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France)

    2005-10-07

    The electrical properties of an asymmetric surface dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric air have been investigated experimentally. The discharge is used for airflow production close to the dielectric surface, and the time-averaged flow velocity spatial profiles have been measured. Velocities of up to 3.5 m s{sup -1} at heights of 1-2 mm are reached when filamentary discharges with current peaks up to 20 mA are produced along the surface. In terms of powers, mechanical powers (output) of a few milliwatts are obtained for electrical powers (input) up to 10 W. Variation laws or behaviour with several discharge parameters (applied voltage waveform, distance between electrodes, dielectric thickness and permittivity) have been experimentally determined.

  15. Dynamic curvature regulation accounts for the symmetric and asymmetric beats of Chlamydomonas flagella

    CERN Document Server

    Sartori, Pablo; Scholich, Andre; Jülicher, Frank; Howard, Jonathon

    2015-01-01

    Axonemal dyneins are the molecular motors responsible for the beating of cilia and flagella. These motors generate sliding forces between adjacent microtubule doublets within the axoneme, the motile cytoskeletal structure inside the flagellum. To create regular, oscillatory beating patterns, the activities of the axonemal dyneins must be coordinated both spatially and temporally. It is thought that coordination is mediated by stresses or strains that build up within the moving axoneme, but it is not known which components of stress or strain are involved, nor how they feed back on the dyneins. To answer this question, we used isolated, reactivate axonemes of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas as a model system. We derived a theory for beat regulation in a two-dimensional model of the axoneme. We then tested the theory by measuring the beat waveforms of wild type axonemes, which have asymmetric beats, and mutant axonemes, in which the beat is nearly symmetric, using high-precision spatial and temporal imaging....

  16. Physical mechanism of Eψ-driven current in asymmetric toroidal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical mechanism of the Eψ-driven neoclassical current which exists only in asymmetric toroidal systems is clarified. It found that symmetry-breaking, violating the total angular momentum conservation, changes the direction of flow and heat flux to be damped by the parallel viscosities. The change in the direction depends on the collisionality through the gemetric factor which reflects symmetry-breaking. As a result, in contrast to symmetric toroidal systems, the flow and heat flux due to the radial electric field Eψ can damped according to the collisionality in asymmetric toroidal systems. If dominant species such as electrons and primary ions have different collisionalities, there remains a difference between the flows due to Eψ, hence a parallel current proportional directly to the radial electric field, i,e., the Eψ-driven current, is generated in asymmetric toroidal systems in spit of the charge neutrality condition. (author)

  17. Physical mechanism of Eψ-driven current in asymmetric toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical mechanism of the Eψ-driven neoclassical current which exists only in asymmetric toroidal systems is clarified. It is found that symmetry-breaking, violating the total angular momentum conservation, changes the direction of flow and heat flux to be damped by the parallel viscosities. The change in the direction depends on the collisionality through the geometric factor which reflects symmetry-breaking. As a result, in contrast to symmetric toroidal systems, the flow and heat flux due to the radial electric field Eψ can be damped according to the collisionality in asymmetric toroidal systems. If dominant species such as electrons and primary ions have different collisionalities, there remains a difference between the flow due to Eψ, hence a parallel current proportional directly to the radial electric field, i.e., the Eψ-driven current, is generated in asymmetric toroidal systems in spite of the charge neutrality condition. (author)

  18. Comparing Gravitational Waveform Extrapolation to Cauchy-Characteristic Extraction in Binary Black Hole Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Nicholas W; Reisswig, Christian; Scheel, Mark A; Chu, Tony; Kidder, Lawrence E; Szilagyi, Bela

    2013-01-01

    We extract gravitational waveforms from numerical simulations of black hole binaries computed using the Spectral Einstein Code. We compare two extraction methods: direct construction of the Newman-Penrose (NP) scalar $\\Psi_4$ at a finite distance from the source and Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE). The direct NP approach is simpler than CCE, but NP waveforms can be contaminated by near-zone effects---unless the waves are extracted at several distances from the source and extrapolated to infinity. Even then, the resulting waveforms can in principle be contaminated by gauge effects. In contrast, CCE directly provides, by construction, gauge-invariant waveforms at future null infinity. We verify the gauge invariance of CCE by running the same physical simulation using two different gauge conditions. We find that these two gauge conditions produce the same CCE waveforms but show differences in extrapolated-$\\Psi_4$ waveforms. We examine data from several different binary configurations and measure the domi...

  19. Waveform efficiency analysis of auditory nerve fiber stimulation for cochlear implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the electrical stimulation efficiency of various stimulating waveforms is an important issue for efficient neural stimulator design. Concerning the implantable micro devices design, it is also necessary to consider the feasibility of hardware implementation of the desired waveforms. In this paper, the charge, power and energy efficiency of four waveforms (i.e. square, rising ramp, triangular and rising ramp-decaying exponential) in various durations have been simulated and evaluated based on the computational model of the auditory nerve fibers. Moreover, for a fair comparison of their feasibility, a fully integrated current generator circuit has been developed so that the desired stimulating waveforms can be generated. The simulation results show that stimulation with the square waveforms is a proper choice in short and intermediate durations while the rising ramp-decaying exponential or triangular waveforms can be employed for long durations.

  20. Radar Constant-Modulus Waveform Design with Prior Information of the Extended Target and Clutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Wenzhen; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yimin; Xie, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    Radar waveform design is of great importance for radar system performances and has drawn considerable attention recently. Constant modulus is an important waveform design consideration, both from the point of view of hardware realization and to allow for full utilization of the transmitter's power. In this paper, we consider the problem of constant-modulus waveform design for extended target detection with prior information about the extended target and clutter. At first, we propose an arbitrary-phase unimodular waveform design method via joint transmitter-receiver optimization. We exploit a semi-definite relaxation technique to transform an intractable non-convex problem into a convex problem, which can then be efficiently solved. Furthermore, quadrature phase shift keying waveform is designed, which is easier to implement than arbitrary-phase waveforms. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods. PMID:27322275

  1. A Denoising Method for LiDAR Full-Waveform Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition of LiDAR full-waveform data can not only enhance the density and positioning accuracy of a point cloud, but also provide other useful parameters, such as pulse width, peak amplitude, and peak position which are important information for subsequent processing. Full-waveform data usually contain some random noises. Traditional filtering algorithms always cause distortion in the waveform. λ/μ filtering algorithm is based on Mean Shift method. It can smooth the signal iteratively and will not cause any distortion in the waveform. In this paper, an improved λ/μ filtering algorithm is proposed, and several experiments on both simulated waveform data and real waveform data are implemented to prove the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  2. Application of Waveform Factors in Extracting Fault Trend of Rotary Machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Yu-gang; ZUO Yun-bo; HUANG Xiao-bin

    2009-01-01

    Vibration intensity and non-dimensional amplitude parameters are often used to extract the fault trend of rotary machines. But, they are the parameters related to energy, and can not describe the fault trend because of varying load and conditions or too slight change of vibration signal. For this reason, three non-dimensional parameters are presented, namely waveform repeatability factor, waveform jumping factor and waveform similarity factor, called as waveform factors jointly, which are based on statistics analysis for the waveform and sensitive to the change of signal waveform. When they are used to extract the fault trend of rotary machines as a kind of technology of instrument and meter, they can reflect the fault trend better than the vibration intensity, peak amplitude and margin index.

  3. Sinusoidal oscillators and waveform generators using modern electronic circuit building blocks

    CERN Document Server

    Senani, Raj; Singh, V K; Sharma, R K

    2016-01-01

    This book serves as a single-source reference to sinusoidal oscillators and waveform generators, using classical as well as a variety of modern electronic circuit building blocks. It provides a state-of-the-art review of a large variety of sinusoidal oscillators and waveform generators and includes a catalogue of over 600 configurations of oscillators and waveform generators, describing their relevant design details and salient performance features/limitations. The authors discuss a number of interesting, open research problems and include a comprehensive collection of over 1500 references on oscillators and non-sinusoidal waveform generators/relaxation oscillators. Offers readers a single-source reference to everything connected to sinusoidal oscillators and waveform generators, using classical as well as modern electronic circuit building blocks; Provides a state-of-the-art review of a large variety of sinusoidal oscillators and waveform generators; Includes a catalog of over 600 configurations of oscillato...

  4. Asymmetric dense matter in holographic QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Ik Jae

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We study asymmetric dense matter in holographic QCD.We construct asymmetric dense matter by considering two quark flavor branes with dierent quark masses in a D4/D6/D6 model. To calculate the symmetry energy in nuclear matter, we consider two quarks with equal masses and observe that the symmetry energy increases with the total charge showing the stiff dependence. This behavior is universal in the sense that the result is independent of parameters in the model. We also study strange (or hyperon matter with one light and one intermediate mass quarks. In addition to the vacuum properties of asymmetric matter, we calculate meson masses in asymmetric dense matter and discuss our results in the light of in-medium kaon masses.

  5. Massless sunset diagrams in finite asymmetric volumes

    CERN Document Server

    Niedermayer, Ferenc

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present methods to compute massless sunset diagrams in finite asymmetric volumes in the framework of dimensional regularization and lattice regularization. We also consider 1-loop sums in both regularizations.

  6. Source-independent time-domain waveform inversion using convolved wavefields: Application to the encoded multisource waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Yun Seok

    2011-09-01

    Full waveform inversion requires a good estimation of the source wavelet to improve our chances of a successful inversion. This is especially true for an encoded multisource time-domain implementation, which, conventionally, requires separate-source modeling, as well as the Fourier transform of wavefields. As an alternative, we have developed the source-independent time-domain waveform inversion using convolved wavefields. Specifically, the misfit function consists of the convolution of the observed wavefields with a reference trace from the modeled wavefield, plus the convolution of the modeled wavefields with a reference trace from the observed wavefield. In this case, the source wavelet of the observed and the modeled wavefields are equally convolved with both terms in the misfit function, and thus, the effects of the source wavelets are eliminated. Furthermore, because the modeled wavefields play a role of low-pass filtering, the observed wavefields in the misfit function, the frequency-selection strategy from low to high can be easily adopted just by setting the maximum frequency of the source wavelet of the modeled wavefields; and thus, no filtering is required. The gradient of the misfit function is computed by back-propagating the new residual seismograms and applying the imaging condition, similar to reverse-time migration. In the synthetic data evaluations, our waveform inversion yields inverted models that are close to the true model, but demonstrates, as predicted, some limitations when random noise is added to the synthetic data. We also realized that an average of traces is a better choice for the reference trace than using a single trace. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  7. Worst Asymmetrical Short-Circuit Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arana Aristi, Iván; Holmstrøm, O; Grastrup, L;

    2010-01-01

    In a typical power plant, the production scenario and the short-circuit time were found for the worst asymmetrical short-circuit current. Then, a sensitivity analysis on the missing generator values was realized in order to minimize the uncertainty of the results. Afterward the worst asymmetrical...... short-circuit current was analyzed in order to compare the results with the allowable DC current component based in the IEC. Finally the normal operating condition for the power plant was modeled....

  8. Renewable resource management under asymmetric information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank; Andersen, Peder; Nielsen, Max

    Asymmetric information between fishermen and the regulator is important within fisheries. The regulator may have less information about stock sizes, prices, costs, effort, productivity and catches than fishermen. With asymmetric information, a strong analytical tool is principal-agent analysis. In......-productivity agents receive an information rent. The information rent is equivalent to the total incentive cost. The incentive costs arise as we want to reveal the agent's type....

  9. An asymmetric pericyclic cascade approach to oxindoles

    OpenAIRE

    Richmond, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The research in this thesis describes an asymmetric pericyclic cascade approach to the synthesis of a range of enantioenriched oxindoles using enantiopure oxazolidine derived nitrones and disubstituted ketenes. Chapter 1 aims to place this work in the context of the literature, describing other commonly employed or state-of-the-art asymmetric approaches to oxindoles and related compounds. Examples of where these approaches have been used successfully in the total synthesis of related indol...

  10. Asymmetric Federalism in Russia: Cure or Poison?

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Martinez-Vazquez

    2003-01-01

    In the early years of its existence, the Russian Federation adopted a system of differential treatment of its regions in order to cope with the great degree of diversity present in them. This paper examines the Russian Federation’s asymmetric federalism by evaluating the system’s role, significance and effects on the Federation’s development. The study incorporates a detailed description of the asymmetric federalism over time along with the benefits and costs incurred by its implementation. I...

  11. Asymmetric Membrane Osmotic Capsules for Terbutaline Sulphate

    OpenAIRE

    Gobade, N. G.; Marina Koland; K H Harish

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist...

  12. Asymmetric septal hypertrophy and hypothyroidism in children.

    OpenAIRE

    Altman, D I; Murray, J.; Milner, S.; Dansky, R; Levin, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    Any echocardiographic study of two children with hypothyroidism demonstrated the presence of asymmetric septal hypertrophy. One child died aged 11 months, and pronounced thickening of the interventricular septum was confirmed at necropsy. There was also hypertrophy of the left ventricular free wall. Histological examination showed only slight muscle fibre disarray, but there was striking vacuolation and hypertrophy of muscle fibres. In the second case, a child aged five years, the asymmetric ...

  13. Effects of Forest Disturbances on Forest Structural Parameters Retrieval from Lidar Waveform Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranson, K, Lon; Sun, G.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of forest disturbance on the lidar waveform and the forest biomass estimation was demonstrated by model simulation. The results show that the correlation between stand biomass and the lidar waveform indices changes when the stand spatial structure changes due to disturbances rather than the natural succession. This has to be considered in developing algorithms for regional or global mapping of biomass from lidar waveform data.

  14. Mergers of black-hole binaries with aligned spins: Waveform characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Bernard J.; Baker, John G.; Boggs, William D.; McWilliams, Sean T.; Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    We conduct a descriptive analysis of the multipolar structure of gravitational-radiation waveforms from equal-mass aligned-spin mergers, following an approach first presented in the complementary context of nonspinning black holes of varying mass ratio [J.G. Baker et al. Phys. Rev. D 78 044046 (2008)]. We find that, as with the nonspinning mergers, the dominant waveform mode phases evolve together in lock-step through inspiral and merger, supporting the previous waveform description in terms ...

  15. FULL WAVEFORM LIDAR EXPLOITATION TECHNIQUE AND ITS EVALUATION IN THE MIXED FOREST HILLY REGION

    OpenAIRE

    Chhatkuli, S.; Mano, K.; Kogure, T.; Tachibana, K; H. Shimamura

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a full waveform exploitation technique and its evaluation in the mixed forest hilly region is presented. The increment in ground penetration by using the full waveform exploitation technique compared to the discrete LiDAR pulses during autumn and winter season is evaluated. The results showed that the technique used for the full waveform exploitation has effectively increased the ground penetration by 50 % and 20 %, respectively, during autumn and winter in the mixed fo...

  16. MIMO RADAR DETECTION IN COMPOUND GAUSSIAN CLUTTER USING ORTHOGONAL DISCRETE FREQUENCY CODING SPACE TIME WAVEFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Roja Reddy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes orthogonal Discrete Frequency Coding Space Time Waveforms (DFCSTW for Multiple Input and Multiple Output (MIMO radar detection in compound Gaussian clutter. The proposed orthogonal waveforms are designed considering the position and angle of the transmitting antenna when viewed from origin. These orthogonally optimized show good resolution in spikier clutter with Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test (GLRT detector. The simulation results show that this waveform provides better detection performance in spikier Clutter.

  17. Mimo Radar Detection in Compound Gaussian Clutter Using Orthogonal Discrete Frequency Coding Space Time Waveform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Roja Reddy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes orthogonal Discrete Frequency Coding Space Time Waveforms (DFCSTW for Multiple Input and Multiple Output (MIMO radar detection in compound Gaussian clutter. The proposed orthogonal waveforms are designed considering the position and angle of the transmitting antenna when viewed from origin. These orthogonally optimized show good resolution in spikier clutter with Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test (GLRT detector. The simulation results show that this waveform provides better detection performance in spikier Clutter

  18. ORTHOGONAL DISCRETE FREQUENCY CODING SPACE TIME WAVEFORM FOR MIMO RADAR DETECTION IN COMPOUND GAUSSIAN CLUTTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Roja Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes orthogonal Discrete Frequency Coding Space Time Waveforms (DFCSTW for Multiple Input and Multiple Output (MIMO radar detection in compound Gaussian clutter. The proposed orthogonal waveforms are designed considering the position and angle of the transmitting antenna when viewed from origin. These orthogonally optimized show good resolution in spikier clutter with Generalized Likelihood Ratio Test (GLRT detector. The simulation results show that this waveform provides better detection performance in spikier Clutter.

  19. Hepatic vein Doppler waveform in patients with diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguzkurt, Levent [Department of Radiology, Adana Teaching and Medical Research Center, Baskent University, Adana 01250 (Turkey)]. E-mail: loguzkurt@yahoo.com; Yildirim, Tulin [Department of Radiology, Adana Teaching and Medical Research Center, Baskent University, Adana 01250 (Turkey); Torun, Dilek [Department of Nephrology, Adana Teaching and Medical Research Center, Baskent University, Adana (Turkey); Tercan, Fahri [Department of Radiology, Adana Teaching and Medical Research Center, Baskent University, Adana 01250 (Turkey); Kizilkilic, Osman [Department of Radiology, Adana Teaching and Medical Research Center, Baskent University, Adana 01250 (Turkey); Niron, E. Alp [Department of Radiology, Baskent University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2005-05-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of abnormal hepatic vein Doppler waveform in patients with diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver (FIL). Materials and methods: In this prospective study, 40 patients with diffuse FIL and 50 normal healthy adults who served as control group underwent hepatic vein (HV) Doppler ultrasonography. The patients with the diagnosis of FIL were 23 men (57.5%) and 17 women aged 30-62 years (mean age {+-} S.D., 42 {+-} 12 years). Subjects in the control group were 27 men (54%) and 23 women aged 34-65 years (mean age {+-} S.D., 45 {+-} 14 years). The diagnosis of FIL was confirmed with computed tomography density measurements. The waveforms of HV were classified into three groups: regular triphasic waveform, biphasic waveform without a reverse flow, and monophasic or flat waveform. Etiological factors for FIL were diabetes mellitus (DM), hyperlipidemia and obesity (body mass index > 25). Serum lipid profile was obtained from all the patients with FIL. Results: Seventeen of the 40 patients (43%) with FIL had an abnormal HV Doppler waveform, whereas only one of the 50 (2%) healthy subjects had an abnormal waveform. The difference in the distribution of normal Doppler waveform pattern between the patients and the control group was significant (P < 0.001). No differences were found in the behaviour of the hepatic vein Doppler waveform in relation to the different etiologic factors for FIL (P > 0.05). There was not any correlation between the degree of fat infiltration and the hepatic vein waveform pattern (P = 0.60). Conclusion: Patients with fatty liver has a high rate of an abnormal hepatic vein Doppler waveform pattern which can be biphasic or monophasic. We could not find a relation between the etiological factors for FIL and the occurrence of an abnormal HV Doppler waveform.

  20. Waveform Optimization for Wireless Power Transfer with Nonlinear Energy Harvester Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Clerckx, Bruno; Bayguzina, Ekaterina; Yates, David; Mitcheson, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Far-field Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) and Simultaneous Wireless Information and Power Transfer (SWIPT) have attracted significant attention in the RF and communication communities. Despite the rapid progress, the problem of waveform design to enhance the output DC power of wireless energy harvester has received limited attention so far. In this paper, we bridge communication and RF design and derive novel multisine waveforms for multi-antenna wireless power transfer. The waveforms are adapt...

  1. Waveform control pulse magnetization for HTS bulk magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Tetsuya; Shigeuchi, Koji; Okuda, Sayo; Watasaki, Masahiro; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2016-03-01

    For the past 10 years, we have studied high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk magnets for use in electromagnetic rotating machines. If the magnetic field effectively magnetizes the HTS bulk, then the size of the motor and generator can be reduced without a reduction in output. We showed that the melt-textured Gd-Ba-Cu-O HTS bulk effectively traps a high magnetic field using waveform control pulse magnetization (WCPM). WCPM makes it possible to generate any pulsed magnetic field waveform by appropriately changing the duty ratio of the pulse width modulation. By chopping so that the pulsed magnetic field has a period of about 1ms, the WCPM technology enables active control of the rise time and suppresses magnetic flux motion that decreases magnetization efficiency. This method is also useful for any HTS bulk magnet, and the high magnetic flux density is trapped in the HTS bulk by a single pulse magnetic field. We developed a magnetizer that has a feedback system from the penetrated magnetic flux density to realize WCPM. In this research, using only a single pulse magnetic field of WCPM method at 77K, an HTS bulk with a 45mm diameter and 19mm thickness trapped a maximum magnetic field of 1.63T, which is more than 90% of the trapped magnetic flux density by FC magnetization. This result suggests that the pulse magnetizing method can replace the conventional field-cooled method and promote the practical use of HTS magnets for electromagnetic power applications.

  2. Frequency spectrum analysis of finger photoplethysmographic waveform variability during haemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigates the peripheral circulatory and autonomic response to volume withdrawal in haemodialysis based on spectral analysis of photoplethysmographic waveform variability (PPGV). Frequency spectrum analysis was performed on the baseline and pulse amplitude variabilities of the finger infrared photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveform and on heart rate variability extracted from the ECG signal collected from 18 kidney failure patients undergoing haemodialysis. Spectral powers were calculated from the low frequency (LF, 0.04–0.145 Hz) and high frequency (HF, 0.145–0.45 Hz) bands. In eight stable fluid overloaded patients (fluid removal of >2 L) not on alpha blockers, progressive reduction in relative blood volume during haemodialysis resulted in significant increase in LF and HF powers of PPG baseline and amplitude variability (P < 0.01), when expressed in mean-scaled units. The augmentation of LF powers in PPGV during haemodialysis may indicate the recovery and possibly further enhancement of peripheral sympathetic vascular modulation subsequent to volume unloading, whilst the increase in respiratory HF power in PPGV is most likely a sign of preload reduction. Spectral analysis of finger PPGV may provide valuable information on the autonomic vascular response to blood volume reduction in haemodialysis, and can be potentially utilized as a non-invasive tool for assessing peripheral circulatory control during routine dialysis procedure

  3. Waveform design for cognitive radar: target detection in heavy clutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Benjamin H.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Martone, Anthony F.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.

    2016-05-01

    In many applications of radar systems, detection of targets in environments with heavy clutter and interference can be difficult. It is desired that a radar system should detect targets at a further range as well as be able to detect these targets with very few false positive or negative readings. In a cognitive radar system, there are ways that these negative effects can be mitigated and target detection can be significantly improved. An important metric to focus on for increasing target detectability is the signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). Cognitive radar offers solutions to issues such as this with the use of a priori knowledge of targets and environments as well as real time adaptations. A feature of cognitive radar that is of interest is the ability to adapt and optimize transmitted waveforms to a given situation. A database is used to hold a priori and dynamic knowledge of the operational environment and targets to be detected, such as clutter characteristics and target radar cross-section (RCS) estimations. Assuming this knowledge is available or can be estimated in real-time, the transmitted waveform can be tailored using methods such as transmission of a spectrum corresponding to the target-to-clutter ratio (TCR). These methods provide significant improvement in distinguishing targets from clutter or interference.

  4. Platform for Post-Processing Waveform-Based NDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Don J.

    2010-01-01

    Signal- and image-processing methods are commonly needed to extract information from the waves, improve resolution of, and highlight defects in an image. Since some similarity exists for all waveform-based nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods, it would seem that a common software platform containing multiple signal- and image-processing techniques to process the waveforms and images makes sense where multiple techniques, scientists, engineers, and organizations are involved. NDE Wave & Image Processor Version 2.0 software provides a single, integrated signal- and image-processing and analysis environment for total NDE data processing and analysis. It brings some of the most useful algorithms developed for NDE over the past 20 years into a commercial-grade product. The software can import signal/spectroscopic data, image data, and image series data. This software offers the user hundreds of basic and advanced signal- and image-processing capabilities including esoteric 1D and 2D wavelet-based de-noising, de-trending, and filtering. Batch processing is included for signal- and image-processing capability so that an optimized sequence of processing operations can be applied to entire folders of signals, spectra, and images. Additionally, an extensive interactive model-based curve-fitting facility has been included to allow fitting of spectroscopy data such as from Raman spectroscopy. An extensive joint-time frequency module is included for analysis of non-stationary or transient data such as that from acoustic emission, vibration, or earthquake data.

  5. Waveform Cross-Correlation for Improved North Texas Earthquake Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M.; DeShon, H. R.; Oldham, H. R.; Hayward, C.

    2014-12-01

    In November 2013, a sequence of earthquakes began in Reno and Azle, TX, two communities located northwest of Fort Worth in an area of active oil and gas extraction. Only one felt earthquake had been reported within the area before the occurrence of probable injection-induced earthquakes at the Dallas-Fort Worth airport in 2008. The USGS National Earthquakes Information Center (NEIC) has reported 27 felt earthquakes in the Reno-Azle area through January 28, 2014. A temporary seismic network was installed beginning in December 2013 to acquire data to improve location and magnitude estimates and characterize the earthquake sequence. Here, we present high-resolution relative earthquake locations derived using differential time data from waveform cross-correlation. Cross-correlation is computed using the GISMO software suite and event relocation is done using double difference relocation techniques. Waveform cross-correlation of the local data indicates high (>70%) similarity between 4 major swarms of events lasting between 18 and 24 hours. These swarms are temporal zones of high event frequency; 1.4% of the time series data accounts for 42.1% of the identified local earthquakes. Local earthquakes are occurring along the Newark East Fault System, a NE-SW striking normal fault system previously thought inactive at depths between 2 and 8 km in the Ellenburger limestone formation and underlying Precambrian basement. Data analysis is ongoing and continued characterization of the associated fault will provide improved location estimates.

  6. Fission fragments spectrometer based on ionization chamber and waveform digitizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method for fission process investigation which allows to get full information on fission fragments properties is suggested. The method is based on using the fission fragment spectrometer with the twin ionization chamber having the Frisch grid and the waveform digitizer. The new design of the twin ionization chamber is described in details. The main and very important difference is the distances between the cathode and the grid and the anode. These values are 40 and 2 mm correspondingly, so the ratio is equal to 20 instead of 3 - 5 as usual. The diameter of the electrodes is 120 mm. The working gas is the mixture of argon plus 10% of methane under the pressure of 0.65 atm. High voltage of 3.5 kV is applied to the cathode. The scheme of the spectrometer electronic circuit is given. The method of simultaneous measurements of the signal amplitudes from the ionization chamber electrodes is applied, but the shape of the signals is processed by means of the waveform digitizer which gives an opportunity to obtain much more information on the fission fragments properties. It is shown that the described spectrometer can be successfully used for fission fragment energy, mass and charge distribution measurements

  7. Plasma and Energetic Particle Behaviors During Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection at the Magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. H.; Zhang, H.; Zong, Q.-G.; Otto, A.; Sibeck, D. G.; Wang, Y.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Daly, P.W.; Reme, H.

    2014-01-01

    The factors controlling asymmetric reconnection and the role of the cold plasma population in the reconnection process are two outstanding questions. We present a case study of multipoint Cluster observations demonstrating that the separatrix and flow boundary angles are greater on the magnetosheath than on the magnetospheric side of the magnetopause, probably due to the stronger density than magnetic field asymmetry at this boundary. The motion of cold plasmaspheric ions entering the reconnection region differs from that of warmer magnetosheath and magnetospheric ions. In contrast to the warmer ions, which are probably accelerated by reconnection in the diffusion region near the subsolar magnetopause, the colder ions are simply entrained by ??×?? drifts at high latitudes on the recently reconnected magnetic field lines. This indicates that plasmaspheric ions can sometimes play only a very limited role in asymmetric reconnection, in contrast to previous simulation studies. Three cold ion populations (probably H+, He+, and O+) appear in the energy spectrum, consistent with ion acceleration to a common velocity.

  8. Waveform-selective metasurfaces with normal waves at the same frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Wakatsuchi, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Waveform-selective metasurfaces, reported by Wakatsuchi et al. in 2014, have enabled us to distinguish different surface waves even at the same frequency in accordance with their waveforms or pulse widths. In this study we demonstrate that such new characteristics are applicable to controlling not only surface waves but also free-space waves normal to metasurfaces. Both simulation and measurement results show selective absorption or transmission for specific pulses at the same frequency. Thus the waveform selectivity is expected to create a wider range of new applications, for instance, waveform-selective antennas and wireless communications.

  9. Simulation of droplet transfer process and current waveform control of CO2 arc welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A simulation system used in the arc welding short-circuit transfer process and current waveform control process was developed in this paper. The simulation results are basically consistent with welding technical experiments. The simulation system can be used to simulate and test the current waveform control parameters with welding variables. By this simulation system, the influence regularities of the current waveform control parameters in the CO2 arc welding droplet short-circuit transfer process can be got. Moreover, the basic mode of real-time current waveform control can be also established by the simulation testing.

  10. Energy-efficient waveform shapes for neural stimulation revealed with a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsarnpigoon, Amorn; Grill, Warren M.

    2010-08-01

    The energy efficiency of stimulation is an important consideration for battery-powered implantable stimulators. We used a genetic algorithm (GA) to determine the energy-optimal waveform shape for neural stimulation. The GA was coupled to a computational model of extracellular stimulation of a mammalian myelinated axon. As the GA progressed, waveforms became increasingly energy efficient and converged upon an energy-optimal shape. The results of the GA were consistent across several trials, and resulting waveforms resembled truncated Gaussian curves. When constrained to monophasic cathodic waveforms, the GA produced waveforms that were symmetric about the peak, which occurred approximately during the middle of the pulse. However, when the cathodic waveforms were coupled to rectangular charge-balancing anodic pulses, the location and sharpness of the peak varied with the duration and timing (i.e., before or after the cathodic phase) of the anodic phase. In a model of a population of mammalian axons and in vivo experiments on a cat sciatic nerve, the GA-optimized waveforms were more energy efficient and charge efficient than several conventional waveform shapes used in neural stimulation. If used in implantable neural stimulators, GA-optimized waveforms could prolong battery life, thereby reducing the frequency of recharge intervals, the volume of implanted pulse generators, and the costs and risks of battery-replacement surgeries.

  11. Voxel Based Representation of Full-Waveform Airborne Laser Scanner Data for Forestry Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelling, N.; Richter, K.

    2016-06-01

    The advantages of using airborne full-waveform laser scanner data in forest applications, e.g. for the description of the vertical vegetation structure or accurate biomass estimation, have been emphasized in many publications. To exploit the full potential offered by airborne full-waveform laser scanning data, the development of voxel based methods for data analysis is essential. In contrast to existing approaches based on the extraction of discrete 3D points by a Gaussian decomposition, it is very promising to derive the voxel attributes from the digitised waveform directly. For this purpose, the waveform data have to be transferred into a 3D voxel representation. This requires a series of radiometric and geometric transformations of the raw full-waveform laser scanner data. Thus, the paper deals with the geometric aspects and describes a processing chain from the raw waveform data to an attenuationcorrected volumetric forest stand reconstruction. The integration of attenuation-corrected waveform data into the voxel space is realised with an efficient parametric voxel traversal method operating on an octree data structure. The voxel attributes are derived from the amplitudes of the attenuation-corrected waveforms. Additionally, a new 3D filtering approach is presented to eliminate non-object voxel. Applying these methods to real full-waveform laser scanning data, a voxel based representation of a spruce was generated combining three flight strips from different viewing directions.

  12. The use of synthetic master events for waveform cross correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkov, Mikhail; Bobrov, Dmitry; Kitov, Ivan

    2013-04-01

    It has been clearly demonstrated that waveform cross correlation substantially improves signal detection, phase association and event building. These processes are inherently related to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring. The workhorse of cross correlation is the set of seismic master events (earthquakes or explosions) with high quality waveform templates recorded at array stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS). For the monitoring to be globally uniform, these master events have to be evenly distributed and their template waveforms should be representative and pure. However, global seismicity is characterized by a non-uniform distribution. Therefore, the master events selected from the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) produced by the International Data Centre (IDC) can be found in the areas constrained by the global seismicity. There are two principal possibilities to populate the globe with master events: to replicate real REB events or to build synthetic events. Here we compare the performance of these two approaches as applied to the aftershock sequence of the April 11, 2012 Sumatera earthquake. To compute synthetic waveforms, we use AK135 teleseismic velocity model and local CRUST-2 models for source and receiver, and four different source functions representing three different source mechanisms for earthquakes and one for explosion. The synthetic modeling is performed for teleseismic events and based on the stationary phase approximation to a wave equation solution developed by J. Hudson. The grid covering the aftershock area consists of 16 points. For each grid point, we find detections associated with real, replicated, and four versions of synthetic master events at seven IMS array stations, and then build event hypothesis using the Local Association (LA) procedure based on the clustering of origin times as estimated by back projection of the relevant arrival times with known master/station travel times. Then all

  13. Fatigue in asymmetric-field-driven ferroelectric thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polarization fatigue problems in asymmetric-field-driven ferroelectric thin films is investigated in present Letter. The refreshment of fatigue induced by the application of asymmetric voltage to the top and bottom electrodes is modeled by asymmetric Schottky voltage barrier of a quantum well structure. The fatigue behavior under various asymmetric driving voltages and asymmetric driving pulses have been studied. Theoretical calculations are shown to be in agreement with experimental results

  14. Hepatic vein Doppler waveform in patients with diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the incidence of abnormal hepatic vein Doppler waveform in patients with diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver (FIL). Materials and methods: In this prospective study, 40 patients with diffuse FIL and 50 normal healthy adults who served as control group underwent hepatic vein (HV) Doppler ultrasonography. The patients with the diagnosis of FIL were 23 men (57.5%) and 17 women aged 30-62 years (mean age ± S.D., 42 ± 12 years). Subjects in the control group were 27 men (54%) and 23 women aged 34-65 years (mean age ± S.D., 45 ± 14 years). The diagnosis of FIL was confirmed with computed tomography density measurements. The waveforms of HV were classified into three groups: regular triphasic waveform, biphasic waveform without a reverse flow, and monophasic or flat waveform. Etiological factors for FIL were diabetes mellitus (DM), hyperlipidemia and obesity (body mass index > 25). Serum lipid profile was obtained from all the patients with FIL. Results: Seventeen of the 40 patients (43%) with FIL had an abnormal HV Doppler waveform, whereas only one of the 50 (2%) healthy subjects had an abnormal waveform. The difference in the distribution of normal Doppler waveform pattern between the patients and the control group was significant (P 0.05). There was not any correlation between the degree of fat infiltration and the hepatic vein waveform pattern (P = 0.60). Conclusion: Patients with fatty liver has a high rate of an abnormal hepatic vein Doppler waveform pattern which can be biphasic or monophasic. We could not find a relation between the etiological factors for FIL and the occurrence of an abnormal HV Doppler waveform

  15. Full Seismic Waveform Inversion for the Japanese Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žukauskaitė, Saulė; Steptoe, Hamish; Fichtner, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    We present a seismic tomography model for the Japanese archipelago obtained using full waveform inversion and adjoint methods. A credible seismic velocity model is essential for the Japan region as a means to further our understanding of earthquake source mechanics by allowing for more accurate seismic source inversion, to benefit seismic hazard assessment as well as early warning systems, and to comprehend the complexity of the tectonic setting. The study area covers the Japanese islands, Taiwan, Korean peninsula, easternmost parts of China and Russia, Sakhalin and the majority of the Kuril Islands chain. The domain extends down into the mantle transition zone. We choose 58 earthquakes of magnitudes Mw5.0 - 6.9 distributed across the model domain as uniformly as possible. The data are obtained from several seismic networks in the area, namely F-net in Japan, BATS in Taiwan, South Korean National Earthquake Network and several stations from each China National Seismic Network, New China Digital Seismograph Network, Global Seismograph Network and Korean Seismic Network made available by IRIS Data Management Center. To facilitate full waveform inversion the forward problem is solved numerically using the spectral element method (SEM), which comes with the geometric flexibility of the finite-elements method and the accuracy of the spectral methods. Owing to the SEM and the advance in High Performance Computing we are able to perform numerical simulations of seismic waves in realistic 3D heterogeneous visco-elastic structures. Differences between the calculated and the real waveforms are quantified using the time-frequency misfits (Fichtner et al., 2008), which allow us to explore the temporal evolution of the frequency content of the data with no need to identify specific seismic phases. We use adjoint methods as an effective means to obtain sensitivity kernels and ultimately gradients, required for iterative gradient-based minimisation techniques. The obtained model

  16. Global seismic waveform tomography based on the spectral element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdeville, Y.; Romanowicz, B.; Gung, Y.

    2003-04-01

    Because seismogram waveforms contain much more information on the earth structure than body wave time arrivals or surface wave phase velocities, inversion of complete time-domain seismograms should allow much better resolution in global tomography. In order to achieve this, accurate methods for the calculation of forward propagation of waves in a 3D earth need to be utilized, which presents theoretical as well as computational challenges. In the past 8 years, we have developed several global 3D S velocity models based on long period waveform data, and a normal mode asymptotic perturbation formalism (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1996). While this approach is relatively accessible from the computational point of view, it relies on the assumption of smooth heterogeneity in a single scattering framework. Recently, the introduction of the spectral element method (SEM) has been a major step forward in the computation of seismic waveforms in a global 3D earth with no restrictions on the size of heterogeneities (Chaljub, 2000). While this method is computationally heavy when the goal is to compute large numbers of seismograms down to typical body wave periods (1-10 sec), it is much more accessible when restricted to low frequencies (T>150sec). When coupled with normal modes (e.g. Capdeville et al., 2000), the numerical computation can be restricted to a spherical shell within which heterogeneity is considered, further reducing the computational time. Here, we present a tomographic method based on the non linear least square inversion of time domain seismograms using the coupled method of spectral elements and modal solution. SEM/modes are used for both the forward modeling and to compute partial derivatives. The parametrisation of the model is also based on the spectral element mesh, the "cubed sphere" (Sadourny, 1972), which leads to a 3D local polynomial parametrization. This parametrization, combined with the excellent earth coverage resulting from the full 3D theory used

  17. Large-scale seismic waveform quality metric calculation using Hadoop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magana-Zook, S.; Gaylord, J. M.; Knapp, D. R.; Dodge, D. A.; Ruppert, S. D.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we investigated the suitability of Hadoop MapReduce and Apache Spark for large-scale computation of seismic waveform quality metrics by comparing their performance with that of a traditional distributed implementation. The Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC) provided 43 terabytes of broadband waveform data of which 5.1 TB of data were processed with the traditional architecture, and the full 43 TB were processed using MapReduce and Spark. Maximum performance of ~0.56 terabytes per hour was achieved using all 5 nodes of the traditional implementation. We noted that I/O dominated processing, and that I/O performance was deteriorating with the addition of the 5th node. Data collected from this experiment provided the baseline against which the Hadoop results were compared. Next, we processed the full 43 TB dataset using both MapReduce and Apache Spark on our 18-node Hadoop cluster. These experiments were conducted multiple times with various subsets of the data so that we could build models to predict performance as a function of dataset size. We found that both MapReduce and Spark significantly outperformed the traditional reference implementation. At a dataset size of 5.1 terabytes, both Spark and MapReduce were about 15 times faster than the reference implementation. Furthermore, our performance models predict that for a dataset of 350 terabytes, Spark running on a 100-node cluster would be about 265 times faster than the reference implementation. We do not expect that the reference implementation deployed on a 100-node cluster would perform significantly better than on the 5-node cluster because the I/O performance cannot be made to scale. Finally, we note that although Big Data technologies clearly provide a way to process seismic waveform datasets in a high-performance and scalable manner, the technology is still rapidly changing, requires a high degree of investment in personnel, and will likely

  18. Asymmetric plasmonic induced ionic noise in metallic nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Chen, Chang; Willems, Kherim; Lagae, Liesbet; Groeseneken, Guido; Stakenborg, Tim; Van Dorpe, Pol

    2016-06-16

    We present distinct asymmetric plasmon-induced noise properties of ionic transport observed through gold coated nanopores. We thoroughly investigated the effects of bias voltage and laser illumination. We show that the potential drop across top-coated silicon nanocavity pores can give rise to a large noise asymmetry (∼2-3 orders of magnitude). Varying the bias voltage has an appreciable effect on the noise density spectra, typically in the Lorentzian components. The laser power is found to strongly affect the ionic noise level as well as the voltage threshold for light-induced noise generation. The asymmetric noise phenomenon is attributed to plasmon-induced interfacial reactions which promote light-induced charge fluctuation in the ion flow and allow voltage modulation of photo-induced carriers surmounting over such Schottky junctions. We further compare the ionic noise performances of gold nanocavities containing different material stacks, among which thermal oxide passivation of the silicon successfully mitigates the light-induced noise and is also fully CMOS-compatible. The understanding of the described noise characteristics will help to foster multiple applications using related structures including plasmonic-based sensing or plasmon-induced catalysis such as water splitting or solar energy conversion devices. PMID:27273622

  19. Orientation of x-lines in asymmetric magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, Masha

    2015-11-01

    At Earth's magnetopause, reconnection proceeds asymmetrically between magnetosheath plasmas, namely solar wind plasmas compressed by Earth's bow shock, and magnetospheric plasmas. In an asymmetric configuration, it is unclear if there is a simple principle to determine the orientation of the x-line. Using fully kinetic simulations, we study this issue and a spatially localized perturbation is employed to induce a single x-line, that has sufficient freedom to choose its orientation in three-dimensional systems. The effect of ion to electron mass ratio is investigated, and the x-line appears to bisect the magnetic shear angle across the current sheet in the large mass ratio limit. The deviation from the bisection angle in the lower mass ratio limit can be explained by the physics of tearing instability. The local physics control of the x-line orientation studied in this slab geometry could potentially interplay with global geometrical effects to determine the location of collisionless magnetic reconnection at Earth's magnetopause.

  20. Asymmetric switching in a homodimeric ABC transporter: a simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Aittoniemi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ABC transporters are a large family of membrane proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes, including multidrug and tumor resistance and ion channel regulation. Advances in the structural and functional understanding of ABC transporters have revealed that hydrolysis at the two canonical nucleotide-binding sites (NBSs is co-operative and non-simultaneous. A conserved core architecture of bacterial and eukaryotic ABC exporters has been established, as exemplified by the crystal structure of the homodimeric multidrug exporter Sav1866. Currently, it is unclear how sequential ATP hydrolysis arises in a symmetric homodimeric transporter, since it implies at least transient asymmetry at the NBSs. We show by molecular dynamics simulation that the initially symmetric structure of Sav1866 readily undergoes asymmetric transitions at its NBSs in a pre-hydrolytic nucleotide configuration. MgATP-binding residues and a network of charged residues at the dimer interface are shown to form a sequence of putative molecular switches that allow ATP hydrolysis only at one NBS. We extend our findings to eukaryotic ABC exporters which often consist of two non-identical half-transporters, frequently with degeneracy substitutions at one of their two NBSs. Interestingly, many residues involved in asymmetric conformational switching in Sav1866 are substituted in degenerate eukaryotic NBS. This finding strengthens recent suggestions that the interplay of a consensus and a degenerate NBS in eukaroytic ABC proteins pre-determines the sequence of hydrolysis at the two NBSs.

  1. Multigrid waveform relaxation on spatial finite element meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, J. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium); Vandewalle, S. [Caltech, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The authors shall discuss the numerical solution of a parabolic partial differential equation {partial_derivative}u/{partial_derivative}t(x,t) = Lu(x,t) + f(x,t), x{element_of}{Omega}, t>0, (1) supplied with a boundary condition and given initial values. The spatial finite element discretization of (1) on a discrete grid {Omega}{sub h} leads to an initial value problem of the form B{dot u} + Au = f, u(0) = u{sub o}, t > 0, (2) with B a non-singular matrix. The waveform relaxation method is a method for solving ordinary differential equations. It differs from most standard iterative techniques in that it is a continuous-time method, iterating with functions in time, and thereby well-suited for parallel computation.

  2. Full-waveform inversion: From near surface to deep

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2013-11-01

    The ancient Persian Gulf port city of Muscat provided a spectacular setting for the SEG\\'s 2013 Workshop on Full-waveform Inversion (FWI). This active R&D topic attracted about 36 oral presentations and 20 or so posters, which added up to three intense days of ideas, images, and discussion. FWI has progressed from academic research topic to commercial workflow component in roughly 10 years, with many case studies documenting improved imaging and business value and others documenting a definite need for improved understanding of algorithms and applicability. Along with fundamental research issues of worldwide importance, the meeting provided an opportunity to showcase implications of the Middle East\\'s particular exploration challenges for the further development of FWI.

  3. Constrained optimization of gradient waveforms for generalized diffusion encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölund, Jens; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; Nilsson, Markus; Topgaard, Daniel; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Knutsson, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion MRI is a useful probe of tissue microstructure. The conventional diffusion encoding sequence, the single pulsed field gradient, has recently been challenged as more general gradient waveforms have been introduced. Out of these, we focus on q-space trajectory imaging, which generalizes the scalar b-value to a tensor valued entity. To take full advantage of its capabilities, it is imperative to respect the constraints imposed by the hardware, while at the same time maximizing the diffusion encoding strength. We provide a tool that achieves this by solving a constrained optimization problem that accommodates constraints on maximum gradient amplitude, slew rate, coil heating and positioning of radio frequency pulses. The method's efficacy and flexibility is demonstrated both experimentally and by comparison with previous work on optimization of isotropic diffusion sequences. PMID:26583528

  4. 3-D waveform tomography sensitivity kernels for anisotropic media

    KAUST Repository

    Djebbi, R.

    2014-01-01

    The complications in anisotropic multi-parameter inversion lie in the trade-off between the different anisotropy parameters. We compute the tomographic waveform sensitivity kernels for a VTI acoustic medium perturbation as a tool to investigate this ambiguity between the different parameters. We use dynamic ray tracing to efficiently handle the expensive computational cost for 3-D anisotropic models. Ray tracing provides also the ray direction information necessary for conditioning the sensitivity kernels to handle anisotropy. The NMO velocity and η parameter kernels showed a maximum sensitivity for diving waves which results in a relevant choice of those parameters in wave equation tomography. The δ parameter kernel showed zero sensitivity; therefore it can serve as a secondary parameter to fit the amplitude in the acoustic anisotropic inversion. Considering the limited penetration depth of diving waves, migration velocity analysis based kernels are introduced to fix the depth ambiguity with reflections and compute sensitivity maps in the deeper parts of the model.

  5. Conditioning the full waveform inversion gradient to welcome anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-08-05

    Multi-parameter full waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from the complex nonlinearity in the objective function, compounded by the eventual tradeoff between the model parameters. A hierarchical approach based on frequency and arrival time data decimation to maneuver the complex nonlinearity associated with this problem usually falls short in anisotropic media. In place of data decimation, I use a model gradient filter approach to access the parts of the gradient more suitable to combat the potential nonlinearity and parameter trade off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain in which the small scattering angles of the gradient update is initially muted out. A model update hierarchical filtering strategy includes applying varying degree of filtering to the different parameter updates. A feature not easily accessible to simple data decimation. Using both FWI and reection based FWI (RFWI), two strategies to combat the tradeoff between anisotropic parameters are outlined.

  6. Early arrival waveform inversion of shallow seismic land data

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2013-09-22

    We estimate the near-surface velocity distribution over Wadi Qudaid in Saudi Arabia by applying early arrival waveform inversion (EWI) to shallow seismic land data collected with source-receiver offsets no longer than 232 m. The main purpose is to characterize the shallow subsurface for its water storage and reuse potential. To enhance the accuracy of EWI, we extracted a natural source wavelet from the data, and also corrected for the attenuation effects with an estimated factor Q. Results suggest that, compared to traveltime tomography, EWI can generate a highly resolved velocity tomogram from shallow seismic data. The more accurate EWI tomogram can make an economically important difference in assessing the storage potential of this wadi; in this case we find an increase of 18% of storage potential in the EWI tomogram relative to the traveltime tomogram. This approach suggests that FWI might be a more accurate means for economically characterizing the water storage potential for wadis’ throughout the world.

  7. Notes on the integration of numerical relativity waveforms

    CERN Document Server

    Reisswig, Christian

    2010-01-01

    A primary goal of numerical relativity is to provide estimates of the wave strain, $h$, from strong gravitational wave sources, to be used in detector templates. The simulations, however, typically measure waves in terms of gauge resilient quantities, such as the Weyl curvature component, $\\psi_4$. Transforming to the strain requires integration of the measured variable twice in time. There are a number of fundamental difficulties which can arise from integrating finite length, discretely sampled and noisy data streams. These issues are related to the post-processing of the data, and thus independent of the characteristics of the original simulation, such as gauge or numerical method used. In particular, secular drifts in integrated waveforms have been observed empirically, but can also be studied with simple analytic models. We demonstrate that regardless of the nature of the original simulation, a degree of uncertainty will always be present in a strain which is calculated by integration. We suggest, howeve...

  8. Time reversed photonic beamforming of arbitrary waveform ladar arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Joseph L.; Zmuda, Henry; Bussjaeger, Rebecca J.; Erdmann, Reinhard K.; Fanto, Michael L.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Malowicki, John E.

    2007-04-01

    Herein is described a novel approach of performing adaptive photonic beam forming of an array of optical fibers with the expressed purpose of performing laser ranging. The beam forming technique leverages the concepts of time reversal, previously implemented in the sonar community, and wherein photonic implementation has recently been described for use by beamforming of ultra-wideband radar arrays. Photonic beam forming is also capable of combining the optical output of several fiber lasers into a coherent source, exactly phase matched on a pre-determined target. By implementing electro-optically modulated pulses from frequency chirped femtosecond-scale laser pulses, ladar waveforms can be generated with arbitrary spectral and temporal characteristics within the limitations of the wide-band system. Also described is a means of generating angle/angle/range measurements of illuminated targets.

  9. Optimal overlapping of waveform relaxation method for linear differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waveform relaxation (WR) method is extremely suitable for solving large systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) on parallel computers, but the convergence of the method is generally slow. In order to accelerate the convergence, the methods which decouple the system into many subsystems with overlaps some of the components between the adjacent subsystems have been proposed. The methods, in general, converge much faster than the ones without overlapping, but the computational cost per iteration becomes larger due to the increase of the dimension of each subsystem. In this research, the convergence of the WR method for solving constant coefficients linear ODEs is investigated and the strategy to determine the number of overlapped components which minimizes the cost of the parallel computations is proposed. Numerical experiments on an SR2201 parallel computer show that the estimated number of the overlapped components by the proposed strategy is reasonable. (author)

  10. Efficient And Portable SDR Waveform Development: The Nucleus Concept

    CERN Document Server

    Ramakrishnan, Venkatesh; Kempf, Torsten; Kammler, David; Ascheid, Gerd; Meyr, Heinrich; Adrat, Marc; Antweiler, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Future wireless communication systems should be flexible to support different waveforms (WFs) and be cognitive to sense the environment and tune themselves. This has lead to tremendous interest in software defined radios (SDRs). Constraints like throughput, latency and low energy demand high implementation efficiency. The tradeoff of going for a highly efficient implementation is the increase of porting effort to a new hardware (HW) platform. In this paper, we propose a novel concept for WF development, the Nucleus concept, that exploits the common structure in various wireless signal processing algorithms and provides a way for efficient and portable implementation. Tool assisted WF mapping and exploration is done efficiently by propagating the implementation and interface properties of Nuclei. The Nucleus concept aims at providing software flexibility with high level programmability, but at the same time limiting HW flexibility to maximize area and energy efficiency.

  11. Full-waveform inversion on heterogeneous HPC systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhberg, Alexey; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    We present a spectral-element implementation of full seismic waveform inversion for large heterogeneous HPC systems. In this we address the optimal parallelisation configurations of individual simulations, the large I/O requirements of adjoint simulations, and the scheduling of large numbers of forward and adjoint solves, typical for realistic inversions. Using GPU accelerators allows us to achieve a 3.5-4 times performance improvement over the best known homogeneous implementation. We achieve GPU memory throughput varying from 60 to 80% of the peak bandwidth, thus providing good utilisation of hardware resources. We demonstrate the practical applicability of our developments in a real-data application in the western Mediterranean. With the help of GPU accelerators, we are able to model and invert seismic wave propagation in a frequency band that is broader than permitted by the use of CPUs alone, which helps bridging the traditional gap between crustal and mantle tomography.

  12. Constrained optimization of gradient waveforms for generalized diffusion encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölund, Jens; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; Nilsson, Markus; Topgaard, Daniel; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Knutsson, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion MRI is a useful probe of tissue microstructure. The conventional diffusion encoding sequence, the single pulsed field gradient, has recently been challenged as more general gradient waveforms have been introduced. Out of these, we focus on q-space trajectory imaging, which generalizes the scalar b-value to a tensor valued entity. To take full advantage of its capabilities, it is imperative to respect the constraints imposed by the hardware, while at the same time maximizing the diffusion encoding strength. We provide a tool that achieves this by solving a constrained optimization problem that accommodates constraints on maximum gradient amplitude, slew rate, coil heating and positioning of radio frequency pulses. The method's efficacy and flexibility is demonstrated both experimentally and by comparison with previous work on optimization of isotropic diffusion sequences.

  13. Control of apoptosis by asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzold, Julia; Conradt, Barbara

    2008-04-01

    Asymmetric cell division and apoptosis (programmed cell death) are two fundamental processes that are important for the development and function of multicellular organisms. We have found that the processes of asymmetric cell division and apoptosis can be functionally linked. Specifically, we show that asymmetric cell division in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is mediated by a pathway involving three genes, dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail, that directly control the enzymatic machinery responsible for apoptosis. Interestingly, the MIDA1-like protein GlsA of the alga Volvox carteri, as well as the Snail-related proteins Snail, Escargot, and Worniu of Drosophila melanogaster, have previously been implicated in asymmetric cell division. Therefore, C. elegans dnj-11 MIDA1, ces-2 HLF, and ces-1 Snail may be components of a pathway involved in asymmetric cell division that is conserved throughout the plant and animal kingdoms. Furthermore, based on our results, we propose that this pathway directly controls the apoptotic fate in C. elegans, and possibly other animals as well. PMID:18399720

  14. Asymmetric bilayer graphene nanoribbon MOSFETs for analog and digital electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinarvand, A.; Ahmadi, V.; Darvish, Gh.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a new structure was proposed for bilayer graphene nanoribbon field-effect transistor (BGNFET) mainly to enhance the electrical characteristics in analog and digital applications. The proposed device uses two metallic gates on the top and bottom of a bilayer graphene nanoribbon, which is surrounded by SiO2 and connected to heavily doped source/drain contacts. Electrical properties of the proposed device were explored using fully self-consistent solution of Poisson and Schrödinger equations based on the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. Significant improvements in the electrical behavior was seen in the simulation results for gates asymmetrically biased. The comparison with graphene nanoribbon FET showed that the proposed structure benefited from higher intrinsic voltage gain and cut-off frequency and improved switching characteristics such as delay and Ion/Ioff ratio.

  15. Performance-Enhancing Asymmetric Separator for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conder, Joanna; Forner-Cuenca, Antoni; Gubler, Elisabeth Müller; Gubler, Lorenz; Novák, Petr; Trabesinger, Sigita

    2016-07-27

    Asymmetric separators with polysulfide barrier properties consisting of porous polypropylene grafted with styrenesulfonate (PP-g-PLiSS) were characterized in lithium-sulfur cells to assess their practical applicability. Galvanostatic cycling at different C-rates with and without an electrolyte additive and cyclic voltammetry were used to probe the electrochemical performance of the cells with the PP-g-PLiSS separators and to compare it with the performance of the cells utilizing state-of-the-art separator, Celgard 2400. Overall, it was found that regardless of the applied cycling rate, the use of the grafted separators greatly enhances the Coulombic efficiency of the cell. An appropriate Li-exchange-site (-SO3(-)) concentration at and near the surface of the separator was found to be essential to effectively suppress the polysulfide shuttle without sacrificing the Li-ion mobility through the separator and to improve the practical specific charge of the cell. PMID:27367443

  16. Global inversion for anisotropy during full-waveform inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debens, H. A.; Warner, M.; Umpleby, A.

    2015-12-01

    Full-waveform inversion (FWI) is a powerful tool for quantitative estimation of high-resolution high-fidelity models of subsurface seismic parameters, typically P-wave velocity. The solution to FWI's posed nonlinear inverse problem is obtained via an iterative series of linearized local updates to a start model, assuming this model lies within the basin of attraction to the global minimum. Thanks to many successful published applications to three-dimensional (3D) field datasets, its advance has been rapid and driven in large-part by the oil and gas industry. The consideration of seismic anisotropy during FWI is of vital importance, as it holds influence over both the kinematics and dynamics of seismic waveforms. If not appropriately taken into account then inadequacies in the anisotropy model are likely to manifest as significant error in the recovered velocity model. Conventionally, anisotropic FWI employs either an a priori anisotropy model, held fixed during FWI, or it uses a multi-parameter local inversion scheme to recover the anisotropy as part of the FWI; both of these methods can be problematic. Constructing an anisotropy model prior to FWI often involves intensive (and hence expensive) iterative procedures, such as travel-time tomography or moveout velocity analysis. On the other hand, introducing multiple parameters to FWI itself increases the complexity of what is already an underdetermined inverse problem. We propose that global rather than local FWI can be used to recover the long-wavelength acoustic anisotropy model, and that this can then be followed by more-conventional local FWI to recover the detailed model. We validate this approach using a full 3D field dataset, demonstrating that it avoids problems associated to crosstalk that can bedevil local inversion schemes, and reconciles well with in situ borehole measurements. Although our approach includes a global inversion for anisotropy, it is nonetheless affordable and practical for 3D field data.

  17. Implementation of Waveform Digitization In A Small Footprint, Airborne Lidar Topographic Mapping System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, R.; Crawford, M. M.; Liadsky, J.

    2004-12-01

    Accurate mapping is critical for applications ranging from geodesy, geomorphology, and forestry to urban planning and natural hazards monitoring. While airborne lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) has had a revolutionary impact on three-dimensional imaging of the earth's surface, there is great potential for developing new capability by replacing the laser range and backscatter intensity information recorded by conventional lidar systems with full waveform digitization. The University of Texas at Austin (UT) owns and operates an Optech ALTM 1225, a small footprint lidar system. In response to an initiative from UT, Optech has developed a module which samples the analog waveform of a laser pulse and converts these samples into digital measurements. The waveform digitizer specifications include a 1-nanosecond sampling interval, 440 samples per return laser waveform (approximately 65 meters of vertical extent), and waveform digitization at the 25kHz laser pulse repetition rate. The digitizer also records the initial T0 pulse that starts the timing cycle. The digitizer unit is an independent module supported by a Pentium-4 computer, two hard drives, and a high-speed data recording system. The digitizer is integrated into the ALTM system so that both full waveform and the conventional first and last returns are recorded for each transmitted laser pulse. This unique capability allows for conventional lidar data to be directly compared to the full waveform. We present examples of full waveform lidar mapping over different environments and discuss future applications.

  18. Ideal Waveform to Generate the Maximum Possible Electron Recollision Energy for Any Given Oscillation Period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the perfect waveform which, during a strong field interaction, generates the maximum possible electron recollision energy for any given oscillation period, over 3 times as high as that for a pure sinusoidal wave. This ideal waveform has the form of a linear ramp with a dc offset. A genetic algorithm was employed to find an optimized practically achievable waveform composed of a longer wavelength field, to provide the offset, in addition to higher frequency components. This second waveform is found to be capable of generating electron recollision energies as high as those for the perfect waveform while retaining the high recollision amplitudes of a pure sinusoidal wave. Calculations of high harmonic generation demonstrate this enhancement, by increasing the cutoff energy by a factor of 2.5 while maintaining the harmonic yield, providing an enhanced tool for attosecond science

  19. Carotid arterial blood pressure waveform monitoring using a portable ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joohyun Seo; Pietrangelo, Sabino J; Hae-Seung Lee; Sodini, Charles G

    2015-08-01

    This work presents a non-invasive arterial blood pressure (ABP) waveform monitoring technique using ultrasound. A portable ultrasound system to excite ultrasound transducers and acquire data is designed with off-the-shelf components. The insonation angles are identified using a vector Doppler technique based on the cosine dependency of the Doppler signals. The pulse pressure of an estimated waveform at the left common carotid artery is compared to the standard sphygmomanometer measurement in a clinical test. The estimated carotid ABP waveform shows excellent agreement to the finger ABP waveform with expected discrepancy of the systolic peak shape due to different measurement sites. The proposed method also tracks slow blood pressure fluctuations. This validation on human subjects shows potential for a noninvasive blood pressure waveform monitoring device at central arterial sites. PMID:26737584

  20. Fast and accurate prediction of numerical relativity waveforms from binary black hole mergers using surrogate models

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, Jonathan; Galley, Chad R; Szilagyi, Bela; Scheel, Mark A; Tiglio, Manuel; Hemberger, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Simulating a binary black hole coalescence by solving Einstein's equations is computationally expensive, requiring days to months of supercomputing time. In this paper, we construct an accurate and fast-to-evaluate surrogate model for numerical relativity (NR) waveforms from non-spinning binary black hole coalescences with mass ratios from $1$ to $10$ and durations corresponding to about $15$ orbits before merger. Our surrogate, which is built using reduced order modeling techniques, is distinct from traditional modeling efforts. We find that the full multi-mode surrogate model agrees with waveforms generated by NR to within the numerical error of the NR code. In particular, we show that our modeling strategy produces surrogates which can correctly predict NR waveforms that were {\\em not} used for the surrogate's training. For all practical purposes, then, the surrogate waveform model is equivalent to the high-accuracy, large-scale simulation waveform but can be evaluated in a millisecond to a second dependin...

  1. Photonic generation of arbitrary waveforms based on incoherent wavelength-to-time mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Jian-Ji; Luo Bo-Wen; Yu Yuan; Zhang Xin-Liang

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally a radio frequency arbitrary waveform generator using the incoherent wavelengthto-time mapping technique.The system is implemented by amplitude modulation of a broadband optical resource whose spectrum is reshaped by a programmable optical pulse shaper and transmitted over a single mode fiber link.The shape of the generated waveform is controlled by the optical pulse shaper,and the fiber link introduces a certain group velocity delay to implement wavelength-to-time mapping.Assisted by the flexible optical pulse shaper,we obtain different shapes of optical waveforms,such as rectangle,triangle,and sawtooth waveforms.Furthermore,we also demonstrate ultra-wideband generation,such as Gaussian monocycle,doublet,and triplet waveforms,using the incoherent technique.

  2. Mergers of black-hole binaries with aligned spins: Waveform characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, Bernard J; Boggs, William D; McWilliams, Sean T; Centrella, Joan

    2011-01-01

    We conduct a descriptive analysis of the multipolar structure of gravitational-radiation waveforms from equal-mass aligned-spin mergers, following an approach first presented in the complementary context of nonspinning black holes of varying mass ratio [Baker et al., Phys. Rev. D 78:044046 (2008)]. We find that, as with the nonspinning mergers, the dominant waveform mode phases evolve together in lock-step through inspiral and merger, supporting the previous waveform description in terms of an adiabatically rigid rotator driving gravitational-wave emission -- an implicit rotating source (IRS). We further apply the late-time merger-ringdown model for the rotational frequency introduced in Baker et al. (2008), along with an improved amplitude model appropriate for the dominant (2,+/- 2) modes. This provides a quantitative description of the merger-ringdown waveforms, and suggests that the major features of these waveforms can be described with reference only to the intrinsic parameters associated with the state...

  3. Anomalous waveforms observed in laboratory-formed gas hydrate-bearing and ice-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.W.; Waite, W.F.

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic transmission measurements of compressional, P, and shear, S, wave velocities rely on correctly identifying the P- and S-body wave arrivals in the measured waveform. In cylindrical samples for which the sample is much longer than the acoustic wavelength, these body waves can be obscured by high-amplitude waveform features arriving just after the relatively small-amplitude P-body wave. In this study, a normal mode approach is used to analyze this type of waveform, observed in sediment containing gas hydrate or ice. This analysis extends an existing normal-mode waveform propagation theory by including the effects of the confining medium surrounding the sample, and provides guidelines for estimating S-wave velocities from waveforms containing multiple large-amplitude arrivals. ?? 2011 Acoustical Society of America.

  4. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF BARKER CODES BY USING NONSINUSOIDAL WAVEFORMS IN RADAR SIGNAL PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.BALAJI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Radar signal processing, waveform design plays major role. The target range and Doppler resolution depends on the selection of the waveform. In the waveform design, pulse compression techniques are being implemented for better resolution and accuracy measurements of range and velocity of targets. Hence radar detector requires sophisticated signal processor. Presently, there are so many radar codes are being developed. Barker codes (Bi-phase codes are being implemented by using sinusoidal waveforms. In this paper, we developed Barker codes by using non-sinusoidal waveforms like Gaussian function. The performances of nonsinusoidal signals are evaluated by using Barker codes(in terms of PSLR,ISLR. By using some performance factor, these two techniques are compared and results are presented.

  5. Asymmetric Magnon Excitation by Spontaneous Toroidal Ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. The implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  6. Dc SQUIDs with asymmetric shunt resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated asymmetrically shunted Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb dc SQUIDs. Simulations based on the coupled Langevin equations predict that the optimum energy resolution ε, and thus also the noise performance of such an asymmetric SQUID, can be 3-4 times better than that of its symmetric counterpart. While keeping the total resistance R identical to a comparable symmetric SQUID with R-1 = R1-1 + R2-1, we shunted only one of the two Josephson junctions with R = R1,2/2. Both types of SQUIDs were characterized with respect to their transport and noise properties at temperature T = 4.2 K, and we compared the experimental results with numerical simulations. Experiments yielded ε ∼ 32 ℎ for an asymmetric SQUID with an inductance L = 22 pH, whereas a comparable symmetric device achieved ε = 110 ℎ.

  7. DNA SECURITY USING SYMMETRIC AND ASYMMETRIC CRYPTOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Terec

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents alternative security methods based on DNA. From the available alternative security methods, symmetric DNA algorithms were developed and implemented. The first symmetric DNA algorithm was implemented in the Java language, while the second DNA algorithm was implemented in BioJava and MatLab. Comparisons have been made between the performances of different standard symmetrical algorithms and the DNA proposed algorithms. As a new step to enhance the security, an asymmetric key generation inside a DNA security algorithm is presented. The asymmetric key generation algorithm starts from a password phrase. The asymmetric DNA algorithm proposes a mechanism which makes use of more encryption technologies. Therefore, it is more reliable and more powerful than the OTP DNA symmetric algorithms.

  8. Asymmetric Composite Nanoparticles with Anisotropic Surface Functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donglu Shi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric inorganic/organic composite nanoparticles with anisotropic surface functionalities represent a new approach for creating smart materials, requiring the selective introduction of chemical groups to dual components of composite, respectively. Here, we report the synthesis of snowman-like asymmetric silica/polystyrene heterostructure with anisotropic functionalities via a chemical method, creating nanostructure possibly offering two-sided biologic accessibility through the chemical groups. Carboxyl group was introduced to polystyrene component of the snowman-like composites by miniemulsion polymerization of monomer on local surface of silica particles. Moreover, amino group was then grafted to remained silica surface through facile surface modification of the composite nanoparticles. The asymmetric shape of these composites was confirmed by TEM characterization. Moreover, characteristics of anisotropic surface functionalities were indicated by Zeta potential measurement and confocal laser microscopy after being labeled with fluorescent dyes. This structure could find potential use as carriers for biological applications.

  9. Analysis of a series of chlorogenic acid isomers using differential ion mobility and tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Jamie L; Khamis, Mona M; Mohammed Saeid, Waleed; Purves, Randy W; Katselis, George; Low, Nicholas H; El-Aneed, Anas

    2016-08-24

    Chlorogenic acids are among the most abundant phenolics found in the human diet. Of these, the mono-caffeoylquinic acids are the predominant phenolics found in fruits, such as apples and pears, and products derived from them. In this research, a comprehensive study of the electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) dissociation behavior of the three most common mono-caffeoylquinic acids, namely 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3-CQA) and 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4-CQA), were determined using both positive and negative ionization. All proposed structures of the observed product ions were confirmed with second-generation MS(3) experiments. Similarities and differences between the dissociation pathways in the positive and negative ion modes are discussed, confirming the proposed structures and the established MS/MS fingerprints. MS/MS dissociation was primarily driven via the cleavage of the ester bond linking the quinic acid moiety to the caffeic acid moiety within tested molecules. Despite being structural isomers with the same m/z values and dissociation behaviors, the MS/MS data in the negative ion mode was able to differentiate the three isomers based on ion intensity for the major product ions, observed at m/z 191, 179 and 173. This differentiation was consistent among various MS instruments. In addition, ESI coupled with high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (ESI-FAIMS-MS) was employed for the separation of these compounds for the first time. By combining MS/MS data and differential ion mobility, a method for the separation and identification of mono-caffeoylquinic in apple/pear juice samples was developed with a run time of less than 1 min. It is envisaged that this methodology could be used to identify pure juices based on their chlorogenic acid profile (i.e., metabolomics), and could also be used to detect juice-to-juice adulteration (e.g., apple juice addition to pear juice

  10. Simulation of Duty Cycle-Based Trapping and Ejection of Massive Ions Using Linear Digital Quadrupoles: the Enabling Technology for High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry in the Ultra High Mass Range

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jeonghoon; Marino, Maxwell A.; Koizumi, Hideya; Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2011-01-01

    Duty cycle-based trapping and extraction processes have been investigated for linear digitally-driven multipoles by simulating ion trajectories. The duty cycles of the applied waveforms were adjusted so that an effective trapping or ejection electric field was created between the rods and the grounded end cap electrodes. By manipulating the duty cycles of the waveforms, the potentials of the multipole rods can be set equal for part of the waveform cycle. When all rods are negative for this pe...

  11. Putting in evidence the asymmetric fission in the desexcitation process of 47V nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fusion-fission, which reflects the instability of the nuclei against the deformation and leads to a binary break up into nearly equal mass nuclei, have been considered as a general feature of the heavy ions (A>80). For lighter systems the fission decay of the compound nucleus is predicted by the rotating liquid drop model to be minor process and the fully-damped products observed in reactions between light heavy ions (A35 Cl+12 C, 31 P+16 O and 23 Na+24 Mg reactions used in order to populate the 47 V system at two excitation energies E = 59 and 64 MeV. This study shows that these fragments are the result of the emission from a source and their elemental distributions are asymmetric independently to the entrance channel asymmetry. The absence of entrance channel effect is a signature of the asymmetric fission process of the 47 V nucleus. The comparison of the experimental observations to the statistical model shows that the fission barriers in this mass region are lower than those predicted by the rotating liquid drop model and the need of introducing their angular momentum and mass asymmetry dependence is clearly shown. In conclusion, it is well established that the evidence of the asymmetric fission break up into the desexcitation process of the 47 V nucleus should be taken into account in the statistical calculations describing the complete fusion of light heavy ions

  12. Asymmetric membrane osmotic capsules for terbutaline sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N G Gobade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist widely used in the treatment of asthma. The oral dosage regimen of terbutaline sulphate is 5 mg twice or thrice daily, the plasma half-life is approximate 3-4 h and it produces GI irritation with extensive first pass metabolism. Hence, terbutaline sulphate was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop controlled release system. Different formulations of ethyl cellulose were prepared by phase inversion technique using different concentrations of sorbitol as pore forming agent. It was found that the thickness of the prepared asymmetric membrane capsules was increased with increase in concentration of ethyl cellulose and pore forming agent, i.e. sorbitol. The dye release study in water and 10% sodium chloride solution indicates that, the asymmetric membrane capsules follow osmotic principle to release content. The pores formed due to sorbitol were confirmed by microscopic observation of transverse section of capsule membrane. Data of in vitro release study of terbutaline sulphate from asymmetric membrane capsules indicated that, the capsules prepared with 10% and 12.5% of ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol released as much as 97.44% and 76.27% in 12 h, respectively with zero order release rate. Hence asymmetric membrane capsule of 10% ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol is considered as optimum for controlled oral delivery of terbutaline sulphate.

  13. Asymmetric membrane osmotic capsules for terbutaline sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobade, N G; Koland, Marina; Harish, K H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist widely used in the treatment of asthma. The oral dosage regimen of terbutaline sulphate is 5 mg twice or thrice daily, the plasma half-life is approximate 3-4 h and it produces GI irritation with extensive first pass metabolism. Hence, terbutaline sulphate was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop controlled release system. Different formulations of ethyl cellulose were prepared by phase inversion technique using different concentrations of sorbitol as pore forming agent. It was found that the thickness of the prepared asymmetric membrane capsules was increased with increase in concentration of ethyl cellulose and pore forming agent, i.e. sorbitol. The dye release study in water and 10% sodium chloride solution indicates that, the asymmetric membrane capsules follow osmotic principle to release content. The pores formed due to sorbitol were confirmed by microscopic observation of transverse section of capsule membrane. Data of in vitro release study of terbutaline sulphate from asymmetric membrane capsules indicated that, the capsules prepared with 10% and 12.5% of ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol released as much as 97.44% and 76.27% in 12 h, respectively with zero order release rate. Hence asymmetric membrane capsule of 10% ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol is considered as optimum for controlled oral delivery of terbutaline sulphate. PMID:23204625

  14. Algebraic Davis Decomposition and Asymmetric Doob Inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guixiang; Junge, Marius; Parcet, Javier

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we investigate asymmetric forms of Doob maximal inequality. The asymmetry is imposed by noncommutativity. Let {({M}, τ)} be a noncommutative probability space equipped with a filtration of von Neumann subalgebras {({M}_n)_{n ≥ 1}} , whose union {bigcup_{n≥1}{M}_n} is weak-* dense in {{M}} . Let {{E}_n} denote the corresponding family of conditional expectations. As an illustration for an asymmetric result, we prove that for {1 algebraic atomic description for the involved Hardy spaces. The latter results are new even for commutative von Neumann algebras.

  15. Improved DFIG Capability during Asymmetrical Grid Faults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Dao; Blaabjerg, Frede

    In the wind power application, different asymmetrical types of the grid fault can be categorized after the Y/d transformer, and the positive and negative components of a single-phase fault, phase-to-phase fault, and two-phase fault can be summarized. Due to the newly introduced negative and even......, the capability of a 2 MW DFIG to ride through asymmetrical grid faults can be estimated at the existing design of the power electronics converter. Finally, a control scheme aimed to improve the DFIG capability is proposed and the simulation results validate its feasibility....

  16. Hot and flowing, asymmetric nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a consistent treatment for hot and flowing asymmetric nuclear matter. Using the mean-field theory, predictions of the σ- ω Walecka model at finite temperature are compared with the corresponding results of the Zimanyi-Moszlowski and the non-linear models. The statistical theory of grand-canonical potentials is incorporated to the formalism. We also describe the behavior, at finite temperature, of the asymmetric and flowing nuclear matter. As an application, we describe bulk properties of neutron and protoneutron stars by considering the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations. (author)

  17. Asymmetric acoustic transmission in multiple frequency bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report both experimentally and numerically that the multi-band device of the asymmetric acoustic transmission is realized by placing two periodic gratings with different periods on both sides of two brass plates immersed in water. The asymmetric acoustic transmission can exist in four frequency bands below 1500 kHz, which arises from the interaction between various diffractions from the two gratings and Lamb modes in the brass plates immersed in water. The results indicate that the device has the advantages of multiple band, broader bandwidth, and simpler structure. Our finding should have great potential applications in ultrasonic devices

  18. GLAS/ICESat L1B Global Waveform-based Range Corrections Data (HDF5) V033

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The level 1B waveform parameterization data will contain waveform-based range corrections and surface characteristics at the full 40 per second resolution. Data...

  19. Generation of acoustic rogue waves in dusty plasmas through three-dimensional particle focusing by distorted waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ya-Yi; Tsai, Jun-Yi; I, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Rogue waves--rare uncertainly emerging localized events with large amplitudes--have been experimentally observed in many nonlinear wave phenomena, such as water waves, optical waves, second sound in superfluid He II (ref. ) and ion acoustic waves in plasmas. Past studies have mainly focused on one-dimensional (1D) wave behaviour through modulation instabilities, and to a lesser extent on higher-dimensional behaviour. The question whether rogue waves also exist in nonlinear 3D acoustic-type plasma waves, the kinetic origin of their formation and their correlation with surrounding 3D waveforms are unexplored fundamental issues. Here we report the direct experimental observation of dust acoustic rogue waves in dusty plasmas and construct a picture of 3D particle focusing by the surrounding tilted and ruptured wave crests, associated with the higher probability of low-amplitude holes for rogue-wave generation.

  20. Acoustic bubble: Controlled and selective micropropulsion and chemical waveform generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Daniel

    have offered a higher level of sophistication in terms of liquid manipulation, however, due to low Reynolds number associated with these methods, precise temporal manipulation has remained a challenge. Furthermore, varying the sample concentration rapidly and controllably, an important task for a plethora of chemical and biological studies, has proven to be extremely difficult. Here I demonstrate (Chapter 3) a novel approach for generating chemical waveforms that permits continuous modulation of the signal characteristics including the shape, frequency, amplitude (sample concentration), and duty cycle, with frequencies reaching up to 30 Hz. Furthermore, using multiple bubbles of different sizes in a single microchannel, we show fast switching between multiple distinct stimuli, wherein the waveform of each stimulus is independently controlled. Using our device, we characterized the frequency-dependent activation and internalization of the -adrenergic receptor (beta2-AR), a prototypic G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) due to epinephrine. We determined that beta2-AR internalization due to epinephrine occurs on timescales between 100 ms and 5sec. The chemical waveform generation and switching method presented herein is expected to be useful for understanding the dynamics of fast biomolecular processes.

  1. DISCRIMINATION OF COMBUSTION FUEL SOURCES USING GAS CHROMATOGRAPY-PLANAR FIELD ASYMETRIC WAVEFORM ION MOBILITY SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoke plumes from cotton, paper, grass and cigarettes and emissions from a gasoline engine were sampled using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds(VOC) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Chemical compositions were sufficiently ...

  2. Study of the energy inventory during asymmetric magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Na, Ben; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Ji, Hantao; Fox, Will; Chien, Abe

    2015-11-01

    The energy inventory of a magnetic reconnection layer is studied in a laboratory plasma with a significant density asymmetry across the current sheet. The upstream density ratio of about 7 is generated by the in-plane inductive electric field during the plasma formation in MRX. Compared to the symmetric case where the ion energy gain is about twice more than that of electrons, the ion energy gain becomes smaller and the electron energy gain is larger. The reduction in the ion energy gain is mainly caused by the asymmetric profile of the in-plane electrostatic potential, which is generated to balance the Lorentz force in the electron momentum equation. Since the out-of-plane electron fluid velocity on the high-density side is small due to the high density, the potential drop on the high-density side becomes also small. The potential drop on the low-density side is also smaller than expected from the general scaling (~B2 / n), since it is suppressed by a large density gradient across the low-density side separatrices. As a result, the ion energy gain from the in-plane electrostatic field is smaller than the symmetric case, thereby decreasing the total ion energy gain. Discussion on the electron energization process during asymmetric reconnection is also presented. This research is supported by DoE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. Full Waveform Inversion Using Oriented Time Migration Method

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2016-04-12

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) for reflection events is limited by its linearized update requirements given by a process equivalent to migration. Unless the background velocity model is reasonably accurate the resulting gradient can have an inaccurate update direction leading the inversion to converge into what we refer to as local minima of the objective function. In this thesis, I first look into the subject of full model wavenumber to analysis the root of local minima and suggest the possible ways to avoid this problem. And then I analysis the possibility of recovering the corresponding wavenumber components through the existing inversion and migration algorithms. Migration can be taken as a generalized inversion method which mainly retrieves the high wavenumber part of the model. Conventional impedance inversion method gives a mapping relationship between the migration image (high wavenumber) and model parameters (full wavenumber) and thus provides a possible cascade inversion strategy to retrieve the full wavenumber components from seismic data. In the proposed approach, consider a mild lateral variation in the model, I find an analytical Frechet derivation corresponding to the new objective function. In the proposed approach, the gradient is given by the oriented time-domain imaging method. This is independent of the background velocity. Specifically, I apply the oriented time-domain imaging (which depends on the reflection slope instead of a background velocity) on the data residual to obtain the geometrical features of the velocity perturbation. Assuming that density is constant, the conventional 1D impedance inversion method is also applicable for 2D or 3D velocity inversion within the process of FWI. This method is not only capable of inverting for velocity, but it is also capable of retrieving anisotropic parameters relying on linearized representations of the reflection response. To eliminate the cross-talk artifacts between different parameters, I

  4. Global mantle waveform tomography using the Spectral Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, B. A.; French, S.; Masson, Y.; Jiménez-Pérez, H.

    2015-12-01

    In the past 20 years, we developed several generations of global mantle shear velocity models based entirely on time domain waveform inversion. This implies computations of synthetics in 3D earth models. Initially, the method of choice relied on normal mode perturbation theory, within which we built the framework of our inversion methodology. The latter includes, among others, windowing of waveforms to bring out contribution of weak amplitude phases, (e,g, Sdiff), and a fast converging quasi-Newton inversion with an approximate Hessian calculated using non-linear asymptotic coupling theory (NACT, Li and Romanowicz, 1995). Recently, the Spectral Element Method (SEM) was introduced in global seismology as a powerful numerical method to compute the seismic wavefield accurately in arbitrary 3D models (Komatitsch and Vilotte, 1998; Komatitsch and Tromp, 2002). Implementing the numerical SEM synthetics was straightforward, albeit with significantly increased cost of computation. In order to advance mantle imaging at the global scale, we introduced computational efficiencies, such as (1) substituting a fine layered crustal model by an equivalent, smooth, "homogeneized" crust designed to fit a global surface wave dispersion dataset, (2) continuing quasi-Newton inversion using NACT rather than adjoints, which involved the development of an efficient matrix assembly method (French et al., 2015), and (3) stepping progressively from long to short periods. The resulting models (Lekic and Romanowicz, 2011; French et al., 2013; French and Romanowicz, 2014), in particular, confirm the presence of deep mantle plumes beneath many major hotspots (French and Romanowicz, 2015). We discuss the choice of inverse approach, and illustrate the stability of our global models, in view of the use of NACT kernels, with respect to the choice of the starting model. Global inversion remains a challenge as higher resolution implies reaching higher frequencies to capture more of the scattered

  5. Growth mechanisms study of microcrystalline silicon deposited by SiH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} plasma using tailored voltage waveforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneau, B., E-mail: bastien.bruneau@polytechnique.edu; Johnson, E. V. [LPICM-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Wang, J. [LPICM-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); ICARE China-Europe Institute for Clean and Renewable Energy at Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, 430074 Wuhan (China); Dornstetter, J.-C. [LPICM-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); TOTAL New Energies, 24 cours Michelet, 92069 Paris La Défense Cedex (France)

    2014-02-28

    The use of Tailored Voltage Waveforms is a technique wherein one uses non-sinusoidal waveforms with a period equivalent to RF frequencies to excite a plasma. It has been shown to be an effective technique to decouple maximum Ion Bombardment Energy (IBE) from the ion flux at the surface of the electrodes. In this paper, we use it for the first time as a way to scan through the IBE in order to study the growth mechanism of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon using a SiH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} chemistry. We find that at critical energies, a stepwise increase in the amorphous to microcrystalline transition thickness is observed, as detected by Real Time Spectroscopic Ellipsometry. The same energy thresholds (30 eV and 70 eV) are found to be very influential on the final surface morphology of the samples, as observed by Atomic Force Microscopy. These thresholds correspond to SiH{sub x}{sup +} bulk displacement (30 eV) and H{sub x}{sup +} (70 eV) surface displacement energies. A model is therefore proposed to account for the impact of these ions on the morphology of μc-Si:H growth.

  6. Asymmetric cell division: a persistent issue?

    OpenAIRE

    Aakre, Christopher D.; Laub, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneity within a clonal population of cells can increase survival in the face of environmental stress. In a recent issue of Science, Aldridge et al. (2012) demonstrate that cell division in mycobacteria is asymmetric, producing daughter cells that differ in size, growth rate, and susceptibility to antibiotics.

  7. Asymmetric demand for energy: A cointegration approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Thomas Frank

    1997-12-01

    This paper uses time series data in a study of the demand for energy. One goal is to compare the results from the traditional autoregressive distributed lag (ADL) model to the error correction model (ECM) using cointegration. The second goal is to determine if the demand elasticity is asymmetric with respect to increasing and decreasing prices. This paper discusses three topics that are important to the use of time series data. The first topic is the presence and consequences unit roots which are common in time series data. The second topic is the identification of cointegrated variables and the third topic is a development of the ECM. This results in a model that can be used in either a single equation or multivariate system context and it will estimate both long run and short run elasticities. Asymmetry theory and its implications are studied along with an investigation into competing methods of creating the asymmetric variables. Simulations provided evidence that the use of dummy variables results in biased estimates and that the cumulative difference method of Wolffram/Houck gives valid estimates. The results of the empirical part of the paper show that the short run estimates of the ADL model are like those of the error correction model, but the cointegration method's long run estimates are better since they are known to be consistent and asymptotically unbiased. Tests for asymmetry do not support the theory of asymmetric long run price elasticities; however there is evidence to support the presence of asymmetric demand in the short run.

  8. Leverage bounds with default and asymmetric information

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boháček, Radim

    2014. [2014 North American Summer Meeting of the Econometric Society. Minneapolis (US), 19.06.2014-22.06.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA402/09/1340 Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : financial markets and the macroeconomy * asymmetric and private information * occupational choice Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://editorialexpress.com/conference/NASM2014/program/NASM2014.html

  9. Asymmetric Taxation under Incremental and Sequential Investment

    OpenAIRE

    Panteghini, Paolo

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses the effects of an asymmetric tax scheme on incremental and sequential investment strategies. The tax base is equal to the firm’s return, net of an imputation rate. When the firm’s return is less than this rate, however, no tax refunds are allowed. This scheme is neutral under both income and capital uncertainty.

  10. Beam-beam issues in asymmetric colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furman, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    We discuss generic beam-beam issues for proposed asymmetric e{sup +}- e{sup -} colliders. We illustrate the issues by choosing, as examples, the proposals by Cornell University (CESR-B), KEK, and SLAC/LBL/LLNL (PEP-II).

  11. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of mycocerosic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, B.; Feringa, B.L.; J. Minnaard, A.

    2007-01-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric total synthesis of mycocerosic acid was achieved via the application of iterative enantioselective 1,4-addition reactions and allows for the efficient construction of 1,3-polymethyl arrays with full stereocontrol; further exemplified by the synthesis of tetramethyl-dec

  12. Evidence of asymmetric top in 130Ba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduced is a new relation connecting moment of inertia, Lipas parameter and asymmetric rotor model energies and put forward much closer trend in odd even staggering of quasi γ-band. A different view point regarding generation of quasi γ-band in 130Ba have been presented

  13. Asymmetric conditional volatility in international stock markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Nuno B.; Menezes, Rui; Mendes, Diana A.

    2007-08-01

    Recent studies show that a negative shock in stock prices will generate more volatility than a positive shock of similar magnitude. The aim of this paper is to appraise the hypothesis under which the conditional mean and the conditional variance of stock returns are asymmetric functions of past information. We compare the results for the Portuguese Stock Market Index PSI 20 with six other Stock Market Indices, namely the SP 500, FTSE 100, DAX 30, CAC 40, ASE 20, and IBEX 35. In order to assess asymmetric volatility we use autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity specifications known as TARCH and EGARCH. We also test for asymmetry after controlling for the effect of macroeconomic factors on stock market returns using TAR and M-TAR specifications within a VAR framework. Our results show that the conditional variance is an asymmetric function of past innovations raising proportionately more during market declines, a phenomenon known as the leverage effect. However, when we control for the effect of changes in macroeconomic variables, we find no significant evidence of asymmetric behaviour of the stock market returns. There are some signs that the Portuguese Stock Market tends to show somewhat less market efficiency than other markets since the effect of the shocks appear to take a longer time to dissipate.

  14. Detection loophole in asymmetric Bell experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Brunner, Nicolas; Gisin, Nicolas; Scarani, Valerio; Simon, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    The problem of closing the detection loophole with asymmetric systems, such as entangled atom-photon pairs, is addressed. We show that, for the Bell inequality I_3322, a minimal detection efficiency of 43% can be tolerated for one of the particles, if the other one is always detected. We also study the influence of noise and discuss the prospects of experimental implementation.

  15. [Study of sharing platform of web-based enhanced extracorporeal counterpulsation hemodynamic waveform data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingbo; Hu, Ding; Yu, Donglan; Zheng, Zhensheng; Wang, Kuijian

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced extracorporeal counterpulsation (EECP) information consists of both text and hemodynamic waveform data. At present EECP text information has been successfully managed through Web browser, while the management and sharing of hemodynamic waveform data through Internet has not been solved yet. In order to manage EECP information completely, based on the in-depth analysis of EECP hemodynamic waveform file of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format and its disadvantages in Internet sharing, we proposed the use of the extensible markup language (XML), which is currently the Internet popular data exchange standard, as the storage specification for the sharing of EECP waveform data. Then we designed a web-based sharing system of EECP hemodynamic waveform data via ASP. NET 2.0 platform. Meanwhile, we specifically introduced the four main system function modules and their implement methods, including DICOM to XML conversion module, EECP waveform data management module, retrieval and display of EECP waveform module and the security mechanism of the system. PMID:22295686

  16. Standards vs. labels with imperfect competition and asymmetric information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltzer, Kenneth Thomas

    2012-01-01

    I demonstrate that providing information about product quality is not necessarily the best way to address asymmetric information problems when markets are imperfectly competitive. In a vertical differentiation model I show that a Minimum Quality Standard, which retains asymmetric information...

  17. Standards vs. labels with imperfect competition and asymmetric information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baltzer, Kenneth Thomas

    I demonstrate that providing information about product quality is not necessarily the best way to address asymmetric information problems when markets are imperfectly competitive. In a vertical dierentiation model I show that a Minimum Quality Standard, which retains asymmetric information...

  18. Asymmetric Bulkheads for Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Donald B.

    2007-01-01

    Asymmetric bulkheads are proposed for the ends of vertically oriented cylindrical pressure vessels. These bulkheads, which would feature both convex and concave contours, would offer advantages over purely convex, purely concave, and flat bulkheads (see figure). Intended originally to be applied to large tanks that hold propellant liquids for launching spacecraft, the asymmetric-bulkhead concept may also be attractive for terrestrial pressure vessels for which there are requirements to maximize volumetric and mass efficiencies. A description of the relative advantages and disadvantages of prior symmetric bulkhead configurations is prerequisite to understanding the advantages of the proposed asymmetric configuration: In order to obtain adequate strength, flat bulkheads must be made thicker, relative to concave and convex bulkheads; the difference in thickness is such that, other things being equal, pressure vessels with flat bulkheads must be made heavier than ones with concave or convex bulkheads. Convex bulkhead designs increase overall tank lengths, thereby necessitating additional supporting structure for keeping tanks vertical. Concave bulkhead configurations increase tank lengths and detract from volumetric efficiency, even though they do not necessitate additional supporting structure. The shape of a bulkhead affects the proportion of residual fluid in a tank that is, the portion of fluid that unavoidably remains in the tank during outflow and hence cannot be used. In this regard, a flat bulkhead is disadvantageous in two respects: (1) It lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet and (2) a vortex that forms at the outlet during outflow prevents a relatively large amount of fluid from leaving the tank. A concave bulkhead also lacks a single low point for optimum placement of an outlet. Like purely concave and purely convex bulkhead configurations, the proposed asymmetric bulkhead configurations would be more mass-efficient than is the flat

  19. Burn-off dominated uranium and asymmetric copper-gold operation in RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Kling, N.; Mernick, K.; Roser, T.

    2014-08-01

    In 2012 the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider collided uranium-uranium ions with a particle energy of 96.4 GeV/nucleon and copper-gold (Cu-Au) ions at 100 GeV/nucleon for the first time. 3-dimensional stochastic cooling became operational for the first time and greatly enhanced the luminosity. Together with a new lattice configuration, we achieved a burn-off dominated uranium beam lifetime at physics stores. In the asymmetric Cu-Au collision, we observed an increased Cu beam loss stemming from different intrabeam-scattering and cooling rates between the Au and Cu ion bunches. By intentionally slowing down the cooling rate for the Au beam at the beginning of store, we reduced the Cu beam loss and maximized the integrated luminosity.

  20. Efficient pulse compression for LPI waveforms based on a nonparametric iterative adaptive approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengzheng; Nepal, Ramesh; Zhang, Yan; Blake, WIlliam

    2015-05-01

    In order to achieve low probability-of-intercept (LPI), radar waveforms are usually long and randomly generated. Due to the randomized nature, Matched filter responses (autocorrelation) of those waveforms can have high sidelobes which would mask weaker targets near a strong target, limiting radar's ability to distinguish close-by targets. To improve resolution and reduced sidelobe contaminations, a waveform independent pulse compression filter is desired. Furthermore, the pulse compression filter needs to be able to adapt to received signal to achieve optimized performance. As many existing pulse techniques require intensive computation, real-time implementation is infeasible. This paper introduces a new adaptive pulse compression technique for LPI waveforms that is based on a nonparametric iterative adaptive approach (IAA). Due to the nonparametric nature, no parameter tuning is required for different waveforms. IAA can achieve super-resolution and sidelobe suppression in both range and Doppler domains. Also it can be extended to directly handle the matched filter (MF) output (called MF-IAA), which further reduces the computational load. The practical impact of LPI waveform operations on IAA and MF-IAA has not been carefully studied in previous work. Herein the typical LPI waveforms such as random phase coding and other non- PI waveforms are tested with both single-pulse and multi-pulse IAA processing. A realistic airborne radar simulator as well as actual measured radar data are used for the validations. It is validated that in spite of noticeable difference with different test waveforms, the IAA algorithms and its improvement can effectively achieve range-Doppler super-resolution in realistic data.

  1. The fingerprints of Changbaishan Volcano on Regional Seismic Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, M.; Chun, K.; Henderson, G. A.

    2008-12-01

    Located in the southeastern margin of Jilin Province, China, Changbaishan Volcano, a Cenozoic composite volcano, has been dormant for about 300 years. In this study we investigate the seismic structure beneath this volcano by comparing waveforms for rays that pass through it with rays that do not. Our seismic sources are composed mainly of chemical and nuclear explosions, including the 9 October 2006 North Korea underground nuclear test. All were recorded by 16 broadband stations installed by Tongji University along the southeastern boundary of Jilin Province. Here we focus our attention on seismograms from the 9 October 2006 North Korea event and a magnitude 2.3 local chemical explosion. Our preliminary results show that shear waves disappear abruptly when great-circle paths intersect the volcanic region. Our observations suggest that a magma body is present beneath the Changbaishan and that it is responsible for the severe attenuation of shear waves. We are currently expanding our dataset to pin down the location and geometry of the magma body. Our study highlights the dramatic effects a tectonic structure may exert upon the observed wavefield and hence the necessity to take them into account when carrying out source discrimination analysis.

  2. Spectral implementation of full waveform inversion based on reflections

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Zedong

    2014-01-01

    Using the reflection imaging process as a source to model reflections for full waveform inversion (FWI), referred to as reflection FWI (RFWI), allows us to update the background component of the model, and avoid using the relatively costly migration velocity analysis (MVA), which usually relies on extended images. However, RFWI requires a good image to represent the current reflectivity, as well as, some effort to obtain good smooth gradients. We develop a spectral implementation of RFWI where the wavefield extrapolations and gradient evaluation are performed in the wavenumber domain, obtaining clean dispersion free and fast extrapolations. The gradient, in this case, yields three terms, two of which provide us with each side of the rabbit ear kernel, and the third, often ignored, provides a normalization of the reflectivity within the kernel, which can be used to obtain a reflectivity free background update. Since the image is imperfect (it is an adjoint, not an inverse), an optimization process for the third term scaling is implemented to achieve the smoothest gradient update. A rare application of RFWI on the reflectivity infested Marmousi model shows some of the potential of the approach.

  3. Conditioning the full-waveform inversion gradient to welcome anisotropy

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-04-23

    Multiparameter full-waveform inversion (FWI) suffers from complex nonlinearity in the objective function, compounded by the eventual trade-off between the model parameters. A hierarchical approach based on frequency and arrival time data decimation to maneuver the complex nonlinearity associated with this problem usually falls short in anisotropic media. In place of data decimation, I use a model gradient filter approach to access the parts of the gradient more suitable to combat the potential nonlinearity and parameter trade-off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain, in which small scattering-angles of the gradient update are initially muted out. The model update hierarchical filtering strategy include applying varying degrees of filtering to the different anisotropic parameter updates, a feature not easily accessible to simple data decimation. Using FWI and reflection-based FWI, when the modeled data are obtained with the single-scattering theory, allows access to additional low model wavenumber components. Combining such access to wavenumbers with scattering-angle filters applied to the individual parameter gradients allows for multiple strategies to avoid complex FWI nonlinearity as well as the parameter trade-off.

  4. Optimisation of multisine waveform for bio-impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multisine excitation is widely used in impedance measurements to retain the advantages of the sine wave, while reducing the measurement time. Adding up sine waves increases the amplitude of the excitation signal, but, for the linearity assumption to be valid, the overall amplitude of the signal needs to be kept low. Thus, the crest factor (CF) of the excitation signal must be minimized. A novel empirical method for minimization of the CF is presented in this paper. As in case of other known methods, the computed CF may be guaranteed to be only a local minimum. However, a systematic variation of initial parameters, which is possible due to the sparing algorithm, ensures the CF value, very close or equal to the global minimum. A brief analysis of the calculation errors and comparison with the results from other sources is provided. In the DSP applications, initial phases of the waveforms must match the grid of sample points if separate signal sources are used to generate the components. An equation for calculation of the indexes of the sample points corresponding to the optimal initial phases is provided, and the time discreteness caused relative error of CF is illustrated.

  5. Accurate and efficient waveforms for compact binaries on eccentric orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Huerta, E A; McWilliams, Sean T; O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Yunes, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Compact binaries that emit gravitational waves in the sensitivity band of ground-based detectors can have non-negligible eccentricities just prior to merger, depending on the formation scenario. We develop a purely analytic, frequency-domain model for gravitational waves emitted by compact binaries on orbits with small eccentricity, which reduces to the quasi-circular post-Newtonian approximant TaylorF2 at zero eccentricity and to the post-circular approximation of Yunes et al. (2009) at small eccentricity. Our model uses a spectral approximation to the (post-Newtonian) Kepler problem to model the orbital phase as a function of frequency, accounting for eccentricity effects up to ${\\cal{O}}(e^8)$ at each post-Newtonian order. Our approach accurately reproduces an alternative time-domain eccentric waveform model for eccentricities $e\\in [0, 0.4]$ and binaries with total mass less than 12 solar masses. As an application, we evaluate the signal amplitude that eccentric binaries produce in different networks of e...

  6. Scattering-angle based filtering of the waveform inversion gradients

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-11-22

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) requires a hierarchical approach to maneuver the complex non-linearity associated with the problem of velocity update. In anisotropic media, the non-linearity becomes far more complex with the potential trade-off between the multiparameter description of the model. A gradient filter helps us in accessing the parts of the gradient that are suitable to combat the potential non-linearity and parameter trade-off. The filter is based on representing the gradient in the time-lag normalized domain, in which the low scattering angle of the gradient update is initially muted out in the FWI implementation, in what we may refer to as a scattering angle continuation process. The result is a low wavelength update dominated by the transmission part of the update gradient. In this case, even 10 Hz data can produce vertically near-zero wavenumber updates suitable for a background correction of the model. Relaxing the filtering at a later stage in the FWI implementation allows for smaller scattering angles to contribute higher-resolution information to the model. The benefits of the extended domain based filtering of the gradient is not only it\\'s ability in providing low wavenumber gradients guided by the scattering angle, but also in its potential to provide gradients free of unphysical energy that may correspond to unrealistic scattering angles.

  7. Fifty years of progress in speech waveform coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atal, Bishnu S.

    2004-10-01

    Over the past 50 years, sustained research in speech coding has made it possible to encode speech with high speech quality at rates as low as 4 kb/s. The technology is now used in many applications, such as digital cellular phones, personal computers, and packet telephony. The early research in speech coding was aimed at reproducing speech spectra using a small number of slowly varying parameters. The focus of research shifted later to accurate reproduction of speech waveforms at low bit rates. The introduction of linear predictive coding (LPC) led to the development of new algorithms, such as adaptive predictive coding, multipulse and code-excited LPC. Code-excited LPC has become the method of choice for low bit rate speech coding and is used in most voice transmission standards. Digital speech communication is rapidly moving away from traditional circuit-switched to packet-switched networks based on IP protocols (VoIP). The focus of speech coding research is now on providing to low cost, reliable, and secure transmission of high-quality speech on IP networks.

  8. Waveform cross correlation applied to earthquakes in the Atlantic Ocean

    CERN Document Server

    Bobrov, Dmitry; Rozhkov, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    We assess the level of cross correlation between P-waves generated by earthquakes in the Atlantic Ocean and measured by 22 array stations of the International Monitoring System (IMS). There are 931 events with 6,411 arrivals in 2011 and 2012. Station TORD was the most sensitive and detected 868 from 931 events. We constructed several 931 by 931 matrices of cross correlation coefficients (CCs) for individual stations and also for average and cumulative CCs. These matrices characterize the detection performance of the involved stations and the IMS. Sixty earthquakes located in the northern hemisphere were selected as master events for signal detection and building of events populating a cross correlation Standard Event List (XSEL) for the first halves of 2009 and 2012. High-quality signals (SNR>5.0) recorded by 10 most sensitive stations were used as waveform templates. In order to quantitatively estimate the gain in the completeness and resolution of the XSEL we compared it with the Reviewed Event Bulletin (RE...

  9. Full waveform inversion with extrapolated low frequency data

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yunyue Elita

    2016-01-01

    The availability of low frequency data is an important factor in the success of full waveform inversion (FWI) in the acoustic regime. The low frequencies help determine the kinematically relevant, low-wavenumber components of the velocity model, which are in turn needed to avoid convergence of FWI to spurious local minima. However, acquiring data below 2 or 3 Hz from the field is a challenging and expensive task. In this paper we explore the possibility of synthesizing the low frequencies computationally from high-frequency data, and use the resulting prediction of the missing data to seed the frequency sweep of FWI. As a signal processing problem, bandwidth extension is a very nonlinear and delicate operation. It requires a high-level interpretation of bandlimited seismic records into individual events, each of which is extrapolable to a lower (or higher) frequency band from the non-dispersive nature of the wave propagation model. We propose to use the phase tracking method for the event separation task. The...

  10. Efficient scattering angle filtering for Full waveform inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2015-08-19

    Controlling the scattering angles between the state and the adjoint variables for the energy admitted into an inversion gradient or an image can help improve these functions for objectives in full waveform inversion (FWI) or seismic imaging. However, the access of the scattering angle information usually requires an axis extension that could be costly, especially in 3D. For the purpose of a scattering angle filter, I develop techniques that utilize the mapping nature (no domain extension) of the filter for constant-velocity background models to interpolate between such filtered gradients using the actual velocity. The concept has well known roots in the application of phase-shift-plus-interpolation utilized commonly in the downward continuation process. If the difference between the minimum and maximum velocity of the background medium is large, we obtain filtered gradients corresponding to more constant velocity backgrounds and use linear interpolation between such velocities. The accuracy of this approximation for the Marmousi model gradient demonstrates the e ectiveness of the approach.

  11. Monofrequency waveform acquisition and inversion: A new paradigm

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-08-05

    In seismic inversion, we tend to use the geometrical behavior of the wavefield (the kinematics), extracted from the data, to constrain the long wavelength model components and use the recorded reections to invert for the short wavelength features in a process referred to as full waveform inversion (FWI). For such a recipe, single frequency (the right frequency) data are capable of providing the ingredients for both model components. A frequency that provides model wavelengths (through the transmission components) low enough to update the background and high enough (reections) to map the scattering may render the other frequencies almost obsolete, especially large offset data are available to provide the transition from background to scattering components. Thus, I outline a scenario in which we acquire dedicated mono frequency data, allowing for more time to inject more of that single frequency energy at a reduced cost. The cost savings can be utilized to acquire larger offsets, which is an important for constraining the background model. Combing this single frequency data with a hierarchical scattering angle filter strategy in FWI, and potentially reection FWI, provides an opportunity to invert for complex models starting even with poor initial velocity models. The objective of this new paradigm is a high resolution model of the Earth to replace our focus on the image, which requires a band of frequencies.

  12. The selectivity of zirconium phosphate for caesium in electrochemical ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of amorphous zirconium phosphate are investigated as an inorganic ion exchanger for use in liquid waste treatment by electrochemical ion exchange. Experiments to determine and increase the selectivity for caesium exchange over sodium are discussed, including various pulsed waveforms and studies with rotating membranes. Automation of a sampling system with pH and atomic absorption measurements is described. (author)

  13. Assessment of valve actuator motor rotor degradation by Fourier analysis of current waveform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a test report of a motor diagnostic system that uses Fourier Analysis of the motor current waveform to detect broken rotor bars in the motor or defects in the driven equipment. The test was conducted on a valve actuator motor driving a valve actuator that was in turn driving a dynamometer to measure the actuator torque output. The motor was gradually degraded by open circuiting rotor bars. The test confirmed the efficacy of the waveform analysis method for assessing motor rotor degradation and also provided data regarding the change in waveform characteristic as motor rotors are gradually degraded to failure

  14. Closed form of optimal current waveform for class-F PA up to fourth harmonic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anamarija Juhas; Ladislav A Novak

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, rigorous analytical derivation of the coefficients of optimal current waveform for class-F power amplifier (PA) up to fourth harmonic (dc, 1st, 2nd and 4th harmonic) is presented. The coefficients of the optimal current waveform along with related maximum attainable efficiency are provided in closed form. The results obtained are also of interest for the inverse class-F, in the case when optimal voltage waveform consists of dc, 1st, 2nd and 4th harmonic.

  15. Computer-controlled High Resolution Arbitrary Waveform Generator (HRAWG) for Focusing Beamforming Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assef, Amauri Amorin; Maia, Joaquim Miguel; Costa, Eduardo Tavares

    In advanced ultrasound imaging systems, expensive high-end integrated analog front-ends have been traditionally used to support generation of arbitrary transmit waveforms, in addition to transmit focusing and apodization control. In this paper, we present a cost-effective computer-controlled reconfigurable high-resolution arbitrary waveform generator (HRAWG) that has been designed for ultrasound research, development and teaching at the Federal University of Technology (UTFPR), Brazil. The 8-channel transmit beamformer is fully controlled by a host computer in which a Matlab GUI with the Field II simulation program, allows easy and accurate control over the transmission parameters such as waveform, amplitude apodization and timing.

  16. Is there an Optimal Shape of the Defibrillation Shock: Constant Current vs. Pulsed Biphasic Waveforms

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Dotsinsky; Tsvetan Mudrov; Vessela Krasteva; Jecho Kostov

    2013-01-01

    Three waveforms for transthoracic defibrillation are assessed and compared: the Pulsed Biphasic Waveform (PBW), the Rectilinear Biphasic Waveform (RBW), and the "lossless" constant current (LLCC) pulses. Two indices are introduced: 1) kf = W/W0 - the ratio between the delivered energy W and the energy W0 of a rectangular pulse with the same duration and electric charge; 2) ηC = W/WC0 - the level of utilizing the initially loaded capacitor energy WC0. The envisioned comparative study shows tha...

  17. Waveform Timing Performance of a 5 GS/s Fast Pulse Sampling Module with DRS4

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jinhong; An, Qi

    2015-01-01

    We first clarify timing issues of non-uniform sampling intervals regarding a 5 GS/s fast pulse sampling module with DRS4. Calibration strategy is proposed, and as a result, the waveform timing performance is improved to be below 10 ps RMS. We then further evaluate waveform timing performance of the module by comparing with a 10 GS/s oscilloscope in a setup with plastic scintillators and fast PMTs. Different waveform timing algorithms are employed for analysis, and the module shows comparable timing performance with that of the oscilloscope.

  18. Asymmetric dual-gate tunneling FET with improved performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Yan-fu; Xue, Wei; Cao, Fei

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we propose and simulate an asymmetric dual-gate tunneling FET (ADG-TFET) combining a tunneling field effect transistor (TFET) with a junctionless field effect transistor (JLFET). The current is controlled by an in the bottom channel potential barrier as well as the reverse-biased P+ pocket-Intrinsic region (p-i) tunnel junction bandgap, which combines the merits of both bandgap-controlled TFET and barrier-controlled JLFET. The simulation results of ADG-TFET with high-κ dielectric material (HfO2) of 40-nm gate length show excellent characteristics with high ION/IOFF ratio of 3.3 × 1010 and ION of 302 μA/μm, a steep subthreshold slope (SS) for point SS of 35 mV/decade and average SS of 54 mV/decade at room temperature, which indicates that ADG-TFET is a promising candidate for future low power circuit applications.

  19. Intrinsic momentum transport in up-down asymmetric tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Justin; Barnes, Michael; Dorland, William; Hammett, Gregory W; Rodrigues, Paulo; Loureiro, Nuno F

    2014-01-01

    Recent work demonstrated that breaking the up-down symmetry of tokamak flux surfaces removes a constraint that limits intrinsic momentum transport, and hence toroidal rotation, to be small. We show, through MHD analysis, that ellipticity is most effective at introducing up-down asymmetry throughout the plasma. We detail an extension to GS2, a local $\\delta f$ gyrokinetic code that self-consistently calculates momentum transport, to permit up-down asymmetric configurations. Tokamaks with tilted elliptical poloidal cross-sections were simulated to determine nonlinear momentum transport. The results, which are consistent with experiment in magnitude, suggest that a toroidal velocity gradient, $\\left( \\partial u_{\\zeta i} / \\partial \\rho \\right) / v_{th i}$, of 5% of the temperature gradient, $\\left(\\partial T_{i} / \\partial \\rho \\right) / T_{i}$, is sustainable. Here $v_{th i}$ is the ion thermal speed, $u_{\\zeta i}$ is the ion toroidal mean flow, $\\rho$ is the minor radial coordinate normalized to the tokamak m...

  20. Ultrafast cyclic voltammetry with asymmetrical potential scan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Yong Guo; Xiang Qin Lin

    2008-01-01

    Based on the perfect ohmic drop compensation by online electronic positive feedback, ultrafast cyclic voltammetry withasymmetrical potential scan is achieved for the first time, with the reduction of anthracene acting as the test system. Compared withthe traditional cyclic voltammetry utilizing symmetrical triangular waveform as the excitation one, the new method allows a simplerapproach to mechanistic analysis of ultrafast chemical reactions coupled with a charge transfer. And perhaps more important, it alsoprovides a way to eliminate the interference of the adsorbed product in dynamic monitoring.

  1. Waveform Inversion with Source Encoding for Breast Sound Speed Reconstruction in Ultrasound Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Kun; Anis, Fatima; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Anastasio, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) holds great promise for improving the detection and management of breast cancer. Because they are based on the acoustic wave equation, waveform inversion-based reconstruction methods can produce images that possess improved spatial resolution properties over those produced by ray-based methods. However, waveform inversion methods are computationally demanding and have not been applied widely in USCT breast imaging. In this work, source encoding concepts are employed to develop an accelerated USCT reconstruction method that circumvents the large computational burden of conventional waveform inversion methods. This method, referred to as the waveform inversion with source encoding (WISE) method, encodes the measurement data using a random encoding vector and determines an estimate of the sound speed distribution by solving a stochastic optimization problem by use of a stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Both computer-simulation and experimental phantom studies are conduc...

  2. Fast and Accurate Prediction of Numerical Relativity Waveforms from Binary Black Hole Coalescences Using Surrogate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Jonathan; Field, Scott E.; Galley, Chad R.; Szilágyi, Béla; Scheel, Mark A.; Tiglio, Manuel; Hemberger, Daniel A.

    2015-09-01

    Simulating a binary black hole coalescence by solving Einstein's equations is computationally expensive, requiring days to months of supercomputing time. Using reduced order modeling techniques, we construct an accurate surrogate model, which is evaluated in a millisecond to a second, for numerical relativity (NR) waveforms from nonspinning binary black hole coalescences with mass ratios in [1, 10] and durations corresponding to about 15 orbits before merger. We assess the model's uncertainty and show that our modeling strategy predicts NR waveforms not used for the surrogate's training with errors nearly as small as the numerical error of the NR code. Our model includes all spherical-harmonic -2Yℓm waveform modes resolved by the NR code up to ℓ=8 . We compare our surrogate model to effective one body waveforms from 50 M⊙ to 300 M⊙ for advanced LIGO detectors and find that the surrogate is always more faithful (by at least an order of magnitude in most cases).

  3. Evaluation of Waveform Mapping as a Signal Processing Tool for Quantitative Ultrasonic NDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Patrick H.; Kishoni, Doron

    1993-01-01

    The mapping of one pulsed waveform into another, more desirable waveform by the application of a time-domain filter has been employed in a number of NDE situations. The primary goal of these applications has been to improve the range resolution of an ultrasonic signal for detection of echoes arising from particular interfaces masked by the response of the transducer. The work presented here addresses the use of this technique for resolution enhancement in imaging situations and in mapping signals from different transducers to a common target waveform, allowing maintenance of quantitative calibration of ultrasonic systems. We also describe the use of this technique in terms of the frequency analysis of the resulting waveforms.

  4. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for January, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002558)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  5. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for December, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002557)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  6. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for April, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002364)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  7. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for February, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002559)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  8. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for March, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002363)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  9. Storage of Fractional Flow Reserve Hemodynamic Waveforms Using Semantic Extension of the DICOM Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakouros, Nikolaos

    2016-06-01

    Visual assessment of coronary stenoses by coronary angiography remains widely used but correlates poorly with ischemia, particularly for moderate lesions. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a cardiac catheterization procedure that aims to provide objective measures of coronary lesion hemodynamic significance and involves the acquisition of phasic pressure and electrocardiographic waveforms. The dataset from these procedures currently remains in proprietary systems with restricted data access, inability for data exchange, and often inadequate archiving. Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) includes a waveform information object definition. We describe the method of encapsulating FFR procedural information into a DICOM waveform file. We define private data elements to capture modality-specific data that is not represented by standard DICOM data elements. We propose the adoption of this semantic extension of the DICOM waveform information object for exchange and archiving of data from studies of pressure-derived indices of coronary stenoses. PMID:26527469

  10. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for May, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002562)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  11. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for May, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002365)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  12. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for July, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002564)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  13. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for August, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002565)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  14. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for June, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002563)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  15. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for June, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  16. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for July, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002552)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  17. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for September, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002566)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  18. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for August, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — his accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  19. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for March, 1986 (NODC Accession 0002560)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...

  20. Geosat Geodetic Mission Waveform Data Records (WDR) for September, 1985 (NODC Accession 0002554)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains one month of waveform data records (WDRs) from the GEOSAT Geodetic Mission (GM) and(or) Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) for the time period of...