WorldWideScience

Sample records for astrophysical reaction rates

  1. Indirect techniques for astrophysical reaction rates determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammache, F.; Oulebsir, N.; Benamara, S.; De Séréville, N.; Coc, A.; Laird, A.; Stefan, I.; Roussel, P.

    2016-05-01

    Direct measurements of nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest can be challenging. Alternative experimental techniques such as transfer reactions and inelastic scattering reactions offer the possibility to study these reactions by using stable beams. In this context, I will present recent results that were obtained in Orsay using indirect techniques. The examples will concern various astrophysical sites, from the Big-Bang nucleo synthesis to the production of radioisotopes in massive stars.

  2. Impact of THM reaction rates for astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.

    2015-10-01

    Burning reaction S(E)-factor determinations are among the key ingredients for stellar models when one has to deal with energy generation evaluation and the genesis of the elements at stellar conditions. To by pass the still present uncertainties in extrapolating low-energies values, S(E)-factor measurements for charged-particle induced reactions involving light elements have been made available by devote Trojan Horse Method (THM) experiments. The recent results are here discussed together with their impact in astrophysics.

  3. Astrophysical Reaction Rates as a Challenge for Nuclear Reaction Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Rauscher, T.

    2010-01-01

    The relevant energy ranges for stellar nuclear reactions are introduced. Low-energy compound and direct reactions are discussed. Stellar modifications of the cross sections are presented. Implications for experiments are outlined.

  4. Improved predictions of nuclear reaction rates with the TALYS reaction code for astrophysical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Goriely, S.; Hilaire, S; Koning, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear reaction rates of astrophysical applications are traditionally determined on the basis of Hauser-Feshbach reaction codes. These codes adopt a number of approximations that have never been tested, such as a simplified width fluctuation correction, the neglect of delayed or multiple-particle emission during the electromagnetic decay cascade, or the absence of the pre-equilibrium contribution at increasing incident energies. The reaction code TALYS has been recently updated to estimate t...

  5. Tables of nuclear cross sections and reaction rates: An addendum to the paper 'Astrophysical reaction rates from satistical model calculations'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previous publication (ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES75, 1 (2000)), we gave seven-parameter analytical fits to theoretical reaction rates derived from nuclear cross sections calculated in the statistical model (Hauser-Feshbach formalism) for targets with 10≤Z≤83 (Ne to Bi) and for a mass range reaching the neutron and proton driplines. Reactions considered were (n,γ), (n,p), (n,α), (p,γ), (p,α), (α,γ), and their inverse reactions. Here, we present the theoretical nuclear cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates from which those rate fits were derived, and we provide these data as on-line electronic files. Corresponding to the fitted rates, two complete data sets are provided, one of which includes a phenomenological treatment of shell quenching for neutron-rich nuclei

  6. BRUSLIB and NETGEN: the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library and nuclear network generator for astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Aikawa, M.; Arnould, M.; Goriely, S.; Jorissen, A.; Takahashi, K.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear reaction rates are quantities of fundamental importance in astrophysics. Substantial efforts have been devoted in the last decades to measure or calculate them. The present paper presents for the first time a detailed description of the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library BRUSLIB and of the nuclear network generator NETGEN so as to make these nuclear data packages easily accessible to astrophysicists for a large variety of applications. BRUSLIB is made of two parts. The first one c...

  7. BRUSLIB and NETGEN: the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library and nuclear network generator for astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Aikawa, M; Goriely, S; Jorissen, A; Takahashi, K

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear reaction rates are quantities of fundamental importance in astrophysics. Substantial efforts have been devoted in the last decades to measure or calculate them. The present paper presents for the first time a detailed description of the Brussels nuclear reaction rate library BRUSLIB and of the nuclear network generator NETGEN so as to make these nuclear data packages easily accessible to astrophysicists for a large variety of applications. BRUSLIB is made of two parts. The first one contains the 1999 NACRE compilation based on experimental data for 86 reactions with (mainly) stable targets up to Si. The second part of BRUSLIB concerns nuclear reaction rate predictions calculated within a statistical Hauser-Feshbach approximation, which limits the reliability of the rates to reactions producing compound nuclei with a high enough level density. These calculations make use of global and coherent microscopic nuclear models for the quantities entering the rate calculations. The use of such models is utterl...

  8. Complete inclusion of parity-dependent level densities in the statistical description of astrophysical reaction rates

    CERN Document Server

    Loens, Hans Peter; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel; Rauscher, Thomas; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2008-01-01

    Microscopic calculations show a strong parity dependence of the nuclear level density at low excitation energy of a nucleus. Previously, this dependence has either been neglected or only implemented in the initial and final channels of Hauser-Feshbach calculations. We present an indirect way to account for a full parity dependence in all steps of a reaction, including the one of the compound nucleus formed in a reaction. To illustrate the impact on astrophysical reaction rates, we present rates for neutron captures in isotopic chains of Ni and Sn. Comparing with the standard assumption of equipartition of both parities, we find noticeable differences in the energy regime of astrophysical interest caused by the parity dependence of the nuclear level density found in the compound nucleus even at sizeable excitation energies.

  9. Determining astrophysical three-body radiative capture reaction rates from inclusive Coulomb break-up measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, J.; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M.; Arias, J. M.; Gómez-Camacho, J.

    2016-04-01

    A relationship between the Coulomb inclusive break-up probability and the radiative capture reaction rate for weakly bound three-body systems is established. This direct link provides a robust procedure to estimate the reaction rate for nuclei of astrophysical interest by measuring inclusive break-up processes at different energies and angles. This might be an advantageous alternative to the determination of reaction rates from the measurement of B (E 1 ) distributions through exclusive Coulomb break-up experiments. In addition, it provides a reference to assess the validity of different theoretical approaches that have been used to calculate reaction rates. The procedure is applied to 11Li (9Li+n +n ) and 6He (4He+n +n ) three-body systems for which some data exist.

  10. Determining astrophysical three-body radiative capture reaction rates from inclusive Coulomb break-up measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Casal, J; Arias, J M; Gómez-Camacho, J

    2016-01-01

    A relationship between the Coulomb inclusive break-up probability and the radiative capture reaction rate for weakly-bound three-body systems is established. This direct link provides a robust procedure to estimate the reaction rate for nuclei of astrophysical interest by measuring inclusive break-up processes at different energies and angles. This might be an advantageous alternative to the determination of reaction rates from the measurement of $B(E1)$ distributions through exclusive Coulomb break-up experiments. In addition, it provides a reference to assess the validity of different theoretical approaches that have been used to calculate reaction rates. The procedure is applied to $^{11}$Li ($^{9}$Li+n+n) and $^6$He ($^{4}$He+n+n) three-body systems for which some data exist.

  11. Nuclear astrophysics from direct reactions

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Accurate nuclear reaction rates are needed for primordial nucleosynthesis and hydrostatic burning in stars. The relevant reactions are extremely difficult to measure directly in the laboratory at the small astrophysical energies. In recent years direct reactions have been developed and applied to extract low-energy astrophysical S-factors. These methods require a combination of new experimental techniques and theoretical efforts, which are the subject of this presentation.

  12. STARLIB: A Next-generation Reaction-rate Library for Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallaska, A. L.; Iliadis, C.; Champange, A. E.; Goriely, S.; Starrfield, S.; Timmes, F. X.

    2013-07-01

    STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, where uncertainties are rigorously defined. In STARLIB, experimental rates are supplemented with: (1) theoretical TALYS rates for reactions for which no experimental input is available, and (2) laboratory and theoretical weak rates. STARLIB includes all types of reactions of astrophysical interest to Z = 83, such as (p, γ), (p, α), (α, n), and corresponding reverse rates. Strong rates account for thermal target excitations. Here, we summarize our Monte Carlo formalism, introduce the library, compare methods of correcting rates for stellar environments, and discuss how to implement our library in Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. We also present a method for accessing STARLIB on the Internet and outline updated Monte Carlo-based rates.

  13. STARLIB: A NEXT-GENERATION REACTION-RATE LIBRARY FOR NUCLEAR ASTROPHYSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallaska, A. L. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8462 (United States); Iliadis, C.; Champange, A. E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States); Goriely, S. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, C.P. 226, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Starrfield, S.; Timmes, F. X., E-mail: anne.sallaska@nist.gov [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, where uncertainties are rigorously defined. In STARLIB, experimental rates are supplemented with: (1) theoretical TALYS rates for reactions for which no experimental input is available, and (2) laboratory and theoretical weak rates. STARLIB includes all types of reactions of astrophysical interest to Z = 83, such as (p, {gamma}), (p, {alpha}), ({alpha}, n), and corresponding reverse rates. Strong rates account for thermal target excitations. Here, we summarize our Monte Carlo formalism, introduce the library, compare methods of correcting rates for stellar environments, and discuss how to implement our library in Monte Carlo nucleosynthesis studies. We also present a method for accessing STARLIB on the Internet and outline updated Monte Carlo-based rates.

  14. Measurement of (alpha,n) reaction cross sections of erbium isotopes for testing astrophysical rate predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Kiss, G G; Rauscher, T; Török, Zs; Csedreki, L; Fülöp, Zs; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z

    2015-01-01

    The $\\gamma$-process in core-collapse and/or type Ia supernova explosions is thought to explain the origin of the majority of the so-called $p$ nuclei (the 35 proton-rich isotopes between Se and Hg). Reaction rates for $\\gamma$-process reaction network studies have to be predicted using Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations. Recent investigations have shown problems in the prediction of $\\alpha$-widths at astrophysical energies which are an essential input for the statistical model. It has an impact on the reliability of abundance predictions in the upper mass range of the $p$ nuclei. With the measurement of the $^{164,166}$Er($\\alpha$,n)$^{167,169}$Yb reaction cross sections at energies close to the astrophysically relevant energy range we tested the recently suggested low energy modification of the $\\alpha$+nucleus optical potential in a mass region where $\\gamma$-process calculations exhibit an underproduction of the $p$ nuclei. Using the same optical potential for the $\\alpha$-width which was der...

  15. New $^{32}$Cl(p,$\\gamma$)$^{33}$Ar reaction rate for astrophysical rp-process calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Schatz, H; Brown, B A; Clément, R; Sakharuk, A A; Sherrill, B M

    2005-01-01

    The $^{32}$Cl(p,$\\gamma$)$^{33}$Ar reaction rate is of potential importance in the rp-process powering type I X-ray bursts. Recently Clement et al. \\cite{CBB04} presented new data on excitation energies for low lying proton unbound states in $^{33}$Ar obtained with a new method developed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. We use their data, together with a direct capture model and a USD shell model calculation to derive a new reaction rate for use in astrophysical model calculations. In particular, we take into account capture on the first excited state in $^{32}$Cl, and also present a realistic estimate of the remaining uncertainties. We find that the $^{32}$Cl(p,$\\gamma$)$^{33}$Ar reaction rate is dominated entirely by capture on the first excited state in $^{32}$Cl over the whole temperature range relevant in X-ray bursts. In the temperature range from 0.2 to 1 GK the rate is up to a factor of 70 larger than the previously recommended rate based on shell model calculations only. The unce...

  16. Calculation of astrophysical reaction rate of 82Ge(n,γ)83Ge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mian; CHEN Yong-Shou; LI Zhi-Hong; LIU Wei-Ping; SHU Neng-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    The neutron capture reaction on a neutron-rich near closed-shell nucleus 82Ge may play an important role in the r-process following the fallout from nuclear statistical equilibrium in core-collapse supernovae.By carrying out a DWBA analysis for the experimental angular distribution of 82Ge(d, p)83Ge reaction we obtain the single particle spectroscopic factors, S2,5/2 and S0,1/2 for the ground and first excited states of 83Ge=82Ge(⊕)n, respectively. And then these spectroscopic factors are used to calculate the direct capture cross sections for the 82Ge(n, γ)83Ge reaction at energies of astrophysical interest. The optical potential for neutron scattering on unstable nucleus 82Ge is not known experimentally. We employed a real folding potential which was calculated by using the proper 82Ge density distribution and an effective nucleon-nucleon force DDM3Y.The neutron capture reactions on neutron-rich closed-shell nuclei are expected to be dominated by the direct capture to bound states. We will show that the direct capture rates on these nuclei are sensitive to the structure of the low-lying states.

  17. Nuclear reactions in astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is revised the nuclear reactions which present an interest in astrophysics regarding the explanation of some problems such as the relative quantity of the elements, the structure and evolution of the stars. The principal object of the study is the determination of the experimental possibilities in the field of astrophysics, of an accelerator Van de Graaff's 700 KeV type. Two hundred nuclear reactions approximately, were found, and nothing or very little has been done in the intervals of energy which are of interest. Since the bombardment energies and the involved sections are low in some cases, there are real possibilities, for the largest number of stars to obtain important statistical data with the above mentioned accelerator, taking some necessary precautions. (author)

  18. Photoneutron reactions in astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varlamov, V. V., E-mail: Varlamov@depni.sinp.msu.ru; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Peskov, N. N.; Stopani, K. A. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    Among key problems in nuclear astrophysics, that of obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of synthesis of chemical elements is of paramount importance. The majority of heavy elements existing in nature are produced in stars via radiative neutron capture in so-called s- and r processes, which are, respectively, slow and fast, in relation to competing β{sup −}-decay processes. At the same time, we know 35 neutron-deficient so-called bypassed p-nuclei that lie between {sup 74}Se and {sup 196}Hg and which cannot originate from the aforementioned s- and r-processes. Their production is possible in (γ, n), (γ, p), or (γ, α) photonuclear reactions. In view of this, data on photoneutron reactions play an important role in predicting and describing processes leading to the production of p-nuclei. Interest in determining cross sections for photoneutron reactions in the threshold energy region, which is of particular importance for astrophysics, has grown substantially in recent years. The use of modern sources of quasimonoenergetic photons obtained in processes of inverse Compton laser-radiation scattering on relativistic electronsmakes it possible to reveal rather interesting special features of respective cross sections, manifestations of pygmy E1 and M1 resonances, or the production of nuclei in isomeric states, on one hand, and to revisit the problem of systematic discrepancies between data on reaction cross sections from experiments of different types, on the other hand. Data obtained on the basis of our new experimental-theoretical approach to evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions are invoked in considering these problems.

  19. Transfer reactions in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2016-08-01

    To a high degree many aspects of the large-scale behavior of objects in the Universe are governed by the underlying nuclear physics. In fact the shell structure of nuclear physics is directly imprinted into the chemical abundances of the elements. The tranquility of the night sky is a direct result of the relatively slow rate of nuclear reactions that control and determines a star’s fate. Understanding the nuclear structure and reaction rates between nuclei is vital to understanding our Universe. Nuclear-transfer reactions make accessible a wealth of knowledge from which we can extract much of the required nuclear physics information. A review of transfer reactions for nuclear astrophysics is presented with an emphasis on the experimental challenges and opportunities for future development.

  20. STARLIB: A Next-Generation Reaction-Rate Library for Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Sallaska, A L; Champagne, A E; Goriely, S; Starrfield, S; Timmes, F X

    2013-01-01

    STARLIB is a next-generation, all-purpose nuclear reaction-rate library. For the first time, this library provides the rate probability density at all temperature grid points for convenient implementation in models of stellar phenomena. The recommended rate and its associated uncertainties are also included. Currently, uncertainties are absent from all other rate libraries, and, although estimates have been attempted in previous evaluations and compilations, these are generally not based on rigorous statistical definitions. A common standard for deriving uncertainties is clearly warranted. STARLIB represents a first step in addressing this deficiency by providing a tabular, up-to-date database that supplies not only the rate and its uncertainty but also its distribution. Because a majority of rates are lognormally distributed, this allows the construction of rate probability densities from the columns of STARLIB. This structure is based on a recently suggested Monte Carlo method to calculate reaction rates, w...

  1. An Updated 6Li(p, α)3He Reaction Rate at Astrophysical Energies with the Trojan Horse Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; Tognelli, E.; Tumino, A.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; La Cognata, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Sergi, M. L.

    2013-05-01

    The lithium problem influencing primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis is one of the most interesting unsolved issues in astrophysics. 6Li is the most fragile of lithium's stable isotopes and is largely destroyed in most stars during the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase. For these stars, the convective envelope easily reaches, at least at its bottom, the relatively low 6Li ignition temperature. Thus, gaining an understanding of 6Li depletion also gives hints about the extent of convective regions. For this reason, charged-particle-induced reactions in lithium have been the subject of several studies. Low-energy extrapolations of these studies provide information about both the zero-energy astrophysical S(E) factor and the electron screening potential, Ue . Thanks to recent direct measurements, new estimates of the 6Li(p, α)3He bare-nucleus S(E) factor and the corresponding Ue value have been obtained by applying the Trojan Horse method to the 2H(6Li, α 3He)n reaction in quasi-free kinematics. The calculated reaction rate covers the temperature window 0.01 to 2T 9 and its impact on the surface lithium depletion in PMS models with different masses and metallicities has been evaluated in detail by adopting an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code.

  2. Low-energy enhancement of nuclear γ strength and its impact on astrophysical reaction rates

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen A.C.; Blasi N.; Bracco A.; Bürger A.; Camera F.; Eriksen T.K.; Giacoppo F.; Goriely S.; Guttormsen M.; Görgen A.; Hagen T. W.; Harissopulos S.; Koehler P.E.; Leoni S.; Million B.

    2014-01-01

    An unexpected enhancement in the low-energy part of the γ-strength function for light and medium-mass nuclei has been discovered at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory. This enhancement could lead to an increase in the neutron-capture rates up to two orders of magnitude for very exotic, neutron-rich nuclei. However, it is still an open question whether this structure persists when approaching the neutron drip line.

  3. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from Major Evaluated Data Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-...

  4. Astrophysical Impact of the Updated 9Be(p,α)6Li and 10B(p,α)7Be Reaction Rates As Deduced By THM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Prada Moroni, P. G.

    2015-10-01

    The complete understanding of the stellar abundances of lithium, beryllium, and boron represents one of the most interesting open problems in astrophysics. These elements are largely used to probe stellar structure and mixing phenomena in different astrophysical scenarios, such as pre-main-sequence or main-sequence stars. Their different fragility against (p,α) burning reactions allows one to investigate different depths of the stellar interior. Such fusion mechanisms are triggered at temperatures between T ≈ (2-5) × {10}6 K, thus defining a corresponding Gamow energy between ≈ 3-10 keV, where S(E)-factor measurements need to be performed to get reliable reaction rate evaluations. The Trojan Horse Method is a well defined procedure to measure cross sections at Gamow energies overcoming the uncertainties due to low-energy S(E)-factor extrapolation as well as electron screening effects. Taking advantage of the {\\mathtt{THM}} measure of the 9Be(p,α)6Li and 10B(p,α)7Be cross sections, the corresponding reaction rates have been calculated and compared with the evaluations by the NACRE collaboration, widely used in the literature. The impact on surface abundances of the updated 9Be and 10B (p,α) burning rates is discussed for pre-MS stars.

  5. AN UPDATED {sup 6}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 3}He REACTION RATE AT ASTROPHYSICAL ENERGIES WITH THE TROJAN HORSE METHOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Sergi, M. L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Pizzone, R. G.; Tumino, A.; La Cognata, M. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Tognelli, E.; Degl' Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Pappalardo, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Universita di Ferrara, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    The lithium problem influencing primordial and stellar nucleosynthesis is one of the most interesting unsolved issues in astrophysics. {sup 6}Li is the most fragile of lithium's stable isotopes and is largely destroyed in most stars during the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase. For these stars, the convective envelope easily reaches, at least at its bottom, the relatively low {sup 6}Li ignition temperature. Thus, gaining an understanding of {sup 6}Li depletion also gives hints about the extent of convective regions. For this reason, charged-particle-induced reactions in lithium have been the subject of several studies. Low-energy extrapolations of these studies provide information about both the zero-energy astrophysical S(E) factor and the electron screening potential, U{sub e} . Thanks to recent direct measurements, new estimates of the {sup 6}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 3}He bare-nucleus S(E) factor and the corresponding U{sub e} value have been obtained by applying the Trojan Horse method to the {sup 2}H({sup 6}Li, {alpha} {sup 3}He)n reaction in quasi-free kinematics. The calculated reaction rate covers the temperature window 0.01 to 2T{sub 9} and its impact on the surface lithium depletion in PMS models with different masses and metallicities has been evaluated in detail by adopting an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code.

  6. The H2 + CO ↔ H2CO Reaction: Rate Constants and Relevance to Hot and Dense Astrophysical Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichietti, R. M.; Spada, R. F. K.; da Silva, A. B. F.; Machado, F. B. C.; Haiduke, R. L. A.

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical thermochemical and kinetic investigation of the thermal H2 + CO ↔ H2CO reaction was performed for a temperature range from 200 to 4000 K. Geometries and vibrational frequencies of reactants, product, and transition state (TS) were obtained at CCSD/cc-pVxZ (x = T and Q) levels and scaling factors were employed to consider anharmonicity effects on vibrational frequencies, zero-point energies, and thermal corrections provided by these methodologies. Enthalpies Gibbs energies, and rate constants for this reaction were determined by including a complete basis set extrapolation correction for the electronic properties calculated at CCSD(T)/cc-pVyZ (y = Q and 5) levels. Our study indicates that enthalpy changes for this reaction are highly dependent on temperature. Moreover, forward and reverse (high-pressure limit) rate constants were obtained from variational TS theory with quantum tunneling corrections. Thus, modified Arrhenius’ equations were fitted by means of the best forward and reverse rate constant values, which provide very reliable estimates for these quantities within the temperature range between 700 and 4000 K. To our knowledge, this is the first kinetic study done for the forward H2 + CO \\to H2CO process in a wide temperature range. Finally, these results can be used to explain the formaldehyde abundance in hot and dense interstellar media, possibly providing data about the physical conditions associated with H2CO masers close to massive star-forming regions.

  7. Stellar reaction rates of alpha capture on light (N not equal to Z) nuclei and their astrophysical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical analysis of direct and resonant capture of alpha-particles in specific states for Be-7(alpha, gamma)C-11, Li-7(alpha, gamma)B-11, C-14(alpha, gamma)O-18, O-15(alpha, gamma)Ne-19, and O-18(alpha, gamma)Ne-22 is presented, with application to the study of nucleosynthesis in the early universe and light element production in supermassive objects. It is demonstrated that the rates of some of these reactions could increase significantly depending upon certain spectroscopic factors. The direct capture process is shown to be of importance for alpha-fusion processes in steller environments when reactions involving compound nuclei with low-level densities occur at relatively low stellar temperatures. 31 references

  8. Calculations of Maxwellian-averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Using the ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-VI.8 Evaluated Nuclear Reaction Data Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughaghab, S. F.; Sonzogni, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    We calculated the Maxwellian-averaged cross sections (MACS) and astrophysical reaction rates of the stellar nucleosynthesis reactions (n,$\\gamma$), (n,fission), (n,p), (n,$\\alpha$) and (n,2n) using the ENDF/B-VII.0-, JEFF-3.1-, JENDL-3.3-, and ENDF/B-VI.8-evaluated nuclear-data libraries. Four major nuclear reaction libraries were processed under the same conditions for Maxwellian temperatures ({\\it kT}) ranging from 1 keV to 1 MeV. We compare our current calculations of the {\\it s}-process n...

  9. Surrogate nuclear reaction methods for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief outline of the Surrogate reaction method, an indirect approach for determining compound-nuclear reaction cross sections, is given. The assumptions introduced in the analysis of a typical Surrogate experiment are discussed and prospects for using the Surrogate method to obtain cross sections relevant to the astrophysical s-process are considered

  10. New determination of the {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction rates at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumino, A.; Spartà, R.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; La Cognata, M.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Cyclotron Institute Texas A and M University-College Station, Texas (United States); Typel, S. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH-Theorie Darmstadt (Germany); Tognelli, E.; Degl' Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, and INFN-Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; Hons, Z.; Mrazek, J.; Piskor, S. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR-Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Lamia, L., E-mail: tumino@lns.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-04-20

    The cross sections of the {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reactions have been measured via the Trojan Horse method applied to the quasi-free {sup 2}H({sup 3}He,p {sup 3}H){sup 1}H and {sup 2}H({sup 3}He,n {sup 3}He){sup 1}H processes at 18 MeV off the proton in {sup 3}He. For the first time, the bare nucleus S(E) factors have been determined from 1.5 MeV, across the relevant region for standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis, down to the thermal energies of deuterium burning in the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase of stellar evolution, as well as of future fusion reactors. Both the energy dependence and the absolute value of the S(E) factors deviate by more than 15% from the available direct data and existing fitting curves, with substantial variations in the electron screening by more than 50%. As a consequence, the reaction rates for astrophysics experience relevant changes, with a maximum increase of up to 20% at the temperatures of the PMS phase. From a recent primordial abundance sensitivity study, it turns out that the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction is quite influential on {sup 7}Li, and the present change in the reaction rate leads to a decrease in its abundance by up to 10%. The present reaction rates have also been included in an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code to analyze their influence on the central deuterium abundance in PMS stars with different masses. The largest variation of about 10%-15% pertains to young stars (≤1 Myr) with masses ≥1 M {sub ☉}.

  11. Coulomb dissociation studies for astrophysical thermonuclear reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motobayashi, T. [Dept. of Physics, Rikkyo Univ., Toshima, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    The Coulomb dissociation method was applied to several radiative capture processes of astrophysical interest. The method has an advantage of high experimental efficiency, which allow measurements with radioactive nuclear beams. The reactions {sup 13}N(p,{gamma}){sup 14}O and {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B are mainly discussed. They are the key reaction in the hot CNO cycle in massive stars and the one closely related to the solar neutrino problem, respectively. (orig.)

  12. Observation of low-lying resonances in the quasicontinuum of 195,196Pt and enhanced astrophysical reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An excess of strength on the low-energy tail of the giant dipole resonance recently has been observed in the γ-decay from the quasicontinuum of 195,196Pt. The nature of this phenomenon is not yet fully investigated. If this feature is present also in the γ-ray strength of the neutron-rich isotopes, it can affect the neutron-capture reactions involved in the formation of heavy-elements in stellar nucleosynthesis. The experimental level density and γ-ray strength function of 195,196Pt are presented together with preliminary calculations of the corresponding neutron-capture cross sections

  13. A chemical reaction network solver for the astrophysics code NIRVANA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, U.

    2016-02-01

    Context. Chemistry often plays an important role in astrophysical gases. It regulates thermal properties by changing species abundances and via ionization processes. This way, time-dependent cooling mechanisms and other chemistry-related energy sources can have a profound influence on the dynamical evolution of an astrophysical system. Modeling those effects with the underlying chemical kinetics in realistic magneto-gasdynamical simulations provide the basis for a better link to observations. Aims: The present work describes the implementation of a chemical reaction network solver into the magneto-gasdynamical code NIRVANA. For this purpose a multispecies structure is installed, and a new module for evolving the rate equations of chemical kinetics is developed and coupled to the dynamical part of the code. A small chemical network for a hydrogen-helium plasma was constructed including associated thermal processes which is used in test problems. Methods: Evolving a chemical network within time-dependent simulations requires the additional solution of a set of coupled advection-reaction equations for species and gas temperature. Second-order Strang-splitting is used to separate the advection part from the reaction part. The ordinary differential equation (ODE) system representing the reaction part is solved with a fourth-order generalized Runge-Kutta method applicable for stiff systems inherent to astrochemistry. Results: A series of tests was performed in order to check the correctness of numerical and technical implementation. Tests include well-known stiff ODE problems from the mathematical literature in order to confirm accuracy properties of the solver used as well as problems combining gasdynamics and chemistry. Overall, very satisfactory results are achieved. Conclusions: The NIRVANA code is now ready to handle astrochemical processes in time-dependent simulations. An easy-to-use interface allows implementation of complex networks including thermal processes

  14. Nuclear data needs in nuclear astrophysics: Charged-particle reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress in understanding a diverse range of astrophysical phenomena - such as the Big Bang, the Sun, the evolution of stars, and stellar explosions - can be significantly aided by improved compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of charged-particle nuclear reaction data. A summary of the charged-particle reaction data needs in these and other astrophysical scenarios is presented, along with recommended future nuclear data projects. (author)

  15. The FLUORINE-17(PROTON, PHOTON)NEON-18 and Oxygen -14(ALPHA Particle, PROTON)FLUORINE-17 Reaction Rates and the Structure of NEON-18 (NEON-18, FLUORINE-17, Oxygen -14, Astrophysical Hydrogen Burning)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Kevin Insik

    1993-01-01

    The 14O(alpha,p) 17F and ^ {17}F(p,gamma)18Ne reactions play crucial roles in the advanced stages of astrophysical hydrogen burning. The ^{14 }O(alpha,p)^ {17}F(p,gamma) ^ {18}Ne(beta^+nu) 18F(p,alpha)^ {15}O reaction sequence can provide a path around the relatively slow positron decay of 14O in the HCNO cycle, while the similar reaction sequence, ^{14 }O(alpha ,p) 17F(p,gamma)^ {18}Ne(beta ^+nu) 18F(p,gamma)^ {19}Ne, can provide an alternate path from the HCNO cycle to the rp-process. The 17F(p,gamma)18Ne reaction rate could provide the principal source of 18O. Under some astrophysical conditions, the ^{14 }O(alpha,p)^ {17}F reaction is expected to compete with the 15O(alpha, gamma)19Ne reaction in providing a path through which nuclei involved in the HCNO cycle can be transformed into heavier nuclei with Z >= 10.. In order to better determine the rates of these two reactions, we measured the properties of the resonances in 18Ne; the excitation energies, the spins, and the partial and total widths of the relevant resonances. By comparing the previously observed states in 18Ne to the well-studied isospin mirror nucleus, ^{18 }O, it is clear that there are a number of missing levels in 18Ne in the region rm Ex > 4 MeV. These missing states in ^ {18}Ne could be important in determining the 17F(p, gamma)18rm Ne and 14O(alpha ,p)17F reaction rates. We have studied the ^{12 }C(12C,^6He)^{18 }Ne, 20rm Ne(p{,}t)18Ne, and 16O(^3He{, }n)18Ne reactions to measure new nuclear structure information of ^{18 }Ne. From our experiments, we have the following major results: (a) an evidence of the 3^+ Funck et al. and Wiescher et al. have based on theoretical predictions and incomplete experimental information about the level structure of 18 Ne in the energy region of rm E_ {x} > 5.0 MeV. On the basis of the nuclear structure information for 18 Ne measured in our experiments, we have improved the calculation of the ^{14 }O(alpha,p)17F reaction rate.

  16. Nuclear Reactions for Astrophysics and Other Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Scielzo, N D; Ressler, J J

    2011-03-01

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions are required for many applications. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  17. On thermonuclear reaction rates

    OpenAIRE

    Hans J. Haubold; Mathai, Arak Mathai

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution of galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the cases of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are als...

  18. Expressions for the 18F(p, α) 15O and 18F (p, γ) 19Ne Astrophysical Reaction Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.Shu; M.S.Smith; D.W.Bardayan; J.C.Blackmon; D.W.Bardayan; R.L.Kozub; P.D.Parker; Y.S.Chen

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen is burned explosively in stellar explosions such as novae, X-ray bursts, X-ray pulsars, and supemovae, as well as possibly in other exotic astrophysical environments such as accretion disks around black holes, Thorne-Zytkow objects, and supermassive stars. Temperatures in these environments range from 107 to 109 K and above, and densities from 102 to 106g/cm3. In such sites,

  19. Astrophysical Neutrino Event Rates and Sensitivity for Neutrino Telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Albuquerque, Ivone F. M.; Lamoureux, Jodi; Smoot, George F.

    2001-01-01

    Spectacular processes in astrophysical sites produce high-energy cosmic rays which are further accelerated by Fermi-shocks into a power-law spectrum. These, in passing through radiation fields and matter, produce neutrinos. Neutrino telescopes are designed with large detection volumes to observe such astrophysical sources. A large volume is necessary because the fluxes and cross-sections are small. We estimate various telescopes' sensitivities and expected event rates from astrophysical sourc...

  20. Resonant elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and astrophysical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactions can occur at low kinetic energy. Low-energy reactions are characterized by a strong dependence on the structure of the compound nucleus. It turns out that it is possible to study the nuclear structure by measuring these reactions. In this course, three types of reactions are treated: Resonant Elastic Scattering (such as N14(p,p)N14), Inelastic Scattering (such as N14(p,p')N14*) and Astrophysical reactions (such as N14(p,γ)O15). (author)

  1. Calculation of astrophysical spallation reactions using the RENO model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, C. L.; Schmitt, W. F.; Merker, M.; Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    The RENO model for the Monte-Carlo treatment of astrophysical spallation reactions has been used to generate preliminary cross-sections for the purpose of illustrating the discrete-nucleon approach to spallation modeling and to exhibit differences between two versions of RENO. Comparisons with experimental, theoretical, and semiempirical data demonstrate the practicability of the discrete-nucleon approach.-

  2. Modern Theories of Low-Energy Astrophysical Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocco Schiavilla

    2004-02-01

    We summarize recent ab initio studies of low-energy electroweak reactions of astrophysical interest, relevant for both big bang nucleosynthesis and solar neutrino production. The calculational methods include direct integration for np radiative and pp weak capture, correlated hyperspherical harmonics for reactions of A=3,4 nuclei, and variational Monte Carlo for A=6,7 nuclei. Realistic nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon interactions and consistent current operators are used as input.

  3. Direct reactions for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct reactions are powerful probes for studying the atomic nucleus. Modern direct reaction studies are illuminating both the fundamental nature of the nucleus and its role in nucleosynthetic processes occurring in the cosmos. This report covers experiments using knockout reactions on neutron-deficient fragmentation beams, transfer reactions on fission fragment beams, and theoretical sensitivity studies relating to the astrophysical r-process. Results from experiments on 108,106Sn at the NSCL, and on 131Sn at HRIBF are presented as well as the results from the nucleosynthesis study.

  4. Direct reactions for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Katherine Louise [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Direct reactions are powerful probes for studying the atomic nucleus. Modern direct reaction studies are illuminating both the fundamental nature of the nucleus and its role in nucleosynthetic processes occurring in the cosmos. This report covers experiments using knockout reactions on neutron-deficient fragmentation beams, transfer reactions on fission fragment beams, and theoretical sensitivity studies relating to the astrophysical r-process. Results from experiments on 108,106Sn at the NSCL, and on 131Sn at HRIBF are presented as well as the results from the nucleosynthesis study.

  5. EMPIRE: A Reaction Model Code for Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The correct modeling of abundances requires knowledge of nuclear cross sections for a variety of neutron, charged particle and γ induced reactions. These involve targets far from stability and are therefore difficult (or currently impossible) to measure. Nuclear reaction theory provides the only way to estimate values of such cross sections. In this paper we present application of the EMPIRE reaction code to nuclear astrophysics. Recent measurements are compared to the calculated cross sections showing consistent agreement for n-, p- and α-induced reactions of strophysical relevance

  6. Uncertainties in Astrophysical β-decay Rates from the FRDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    β−-decay rates are of crucial importance in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis, as they are a key component in stellar processes. Tabulated values of the decay rates as functions of both temperature T and density ρ are necessary input to stellar evolution codes such as MESA, or largescale nucleosynthesis simulations such as those performed by the NuGrid collaboration. Therefore, it is interesting to know the uncertainties in these rates and the effects of these uncertainties on stellar structure and isotopic yields. We have calculated β-strength functions and reaction rates for nuclei ranging from 16O to 339136, extending from the proton drip line to the neutron drip line based on a quasi-particle random-phase approximation (QRPA) in a deformed folded-Yukawa single-particle model. Q values are determined from the finite-range droplet mass model (FRDM). We have investigated the effect of model uncertainty on astrophysical β−-decay rates calculated by the FRDM. The sources of uncertainty considered are Q values and deformation. The rates and their uncertainties are generated for a variety of temperature and density ranges, corresponding to key stellar processes. We demonstrate the effects of these rate uncertainties on isotopic abundances using the NuGrid network calculations

  7. New Determination of the H-2(d,p)H-3 and H-2(d,n)He-3 Reaction Rates at Astrophysical Energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tumino, A.; Sparta, R.; Spitaleri, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Typel, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Burjan, Václav; Kroha, Václav; Hons, Zdeněk; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Piskoř, Štěpán; Moroni, P. G. P.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 785, č. 2 (2014), s. 96. ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07050; GA ČR GAP203/10/0310 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : nuclear reactions * nucleosynthesis * abundances * primordial nucleosynthesis * stars: pre-main sequence Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 5.993, year: 2014

  8. Neutron Thermal Cross Sections, Westcott Factors, Resonance Integrals, Maxwellian Averaged Cross Sections and Astrophysical Reaction Rates Calculated from the ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0, ROSFOND-2010, CENDL-3.1 and EAF-2010 Evaluated Data Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritychenko, B.; Mughabghab, S. F.

    2012-12-01

    We present calculations of neutron thermal cross sections, Westcott factors, resonance integrals, Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates for 843 ENDF materials using data from the major evaluated nuclear libraries and European activation file. Extensive analysis of newly-evaluated neutron reaction cross sections, neutron covariances, and improvements in data processing techniques motivated us to calculate nuclear industry and neutron physics quantities, produce s-process Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and astrophysical reaction rates, systematically calculate uncertainties, and provide additional insights on currently available neutron-induced reaction data. Nuclear reaction calculations are discussed and new results are presented. Due to space limitations, the present paper contains only calculated Maxwellian-averaged cross sections and their uncertainties. The complete data sets for all results are published in the Brookhaven National Laboratory report.

  9. Trojan Horse technique to measure nuclear astrophysics rearrangement reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitaleri, Claudio

    2013-03-01

    The knowledge of nucleosynthesis and of energy production in stars requires an increasingly precise measurement of nuclear fusion reactions at the Gamow energy. Because of the Coulomb barrier reaction cross sections in astrophysics cannot be accessed directly at ultra -low energies, unless very favorable conditions are met. Moreover, the energies characterizing nuclear processes in several astrophysical contexts are so low that the presence of atomic electrons must be taken into account. Theoretical extrapolations of available data are then needed to derive astrophysical S(E)-factors. To overcome these experimental difficulties the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been introduced. The method provides a valid alternative path to measure unscreened low-energy cross sections of reactions between charged particles, and to retrieve information on the electron screening potential when ultra-low energy direct measurements are available. While the theory has been discussed in detail in some theoretical works, present in the scientific literature, also in relation to different types of excitation functions (e.g. non-resonant and resonant), work on detailed methodology used to extract the events to be considered for the bare nucleus cross section measurements is still on going. In this work we will present some critical points in the application of THM that deserve to be discussed in more detail.

  10. Dielectronic Recombination Rates In Astrophysical Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bachari, F; Maero, G; Quarati, P; Bachari, Fatima; Ferro, Fabrizio; Maero, Giancarlo; Quarati, Piero

    2006-01-01

    In this work we introduce a new expression of the plasma Dielecronic Recombination (DR) rate as a function of the temperature, derived assuming a small deformation of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution and containing corrective factors, in addition to the usual exponential behaviour, caused by non-linear effects in slightly non ideal plasmas. We then compare the calculated DR rates with the experimental DR fits in the low temperature region.

  11. Influences of the astrophysical environment on nuclear decay rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In many astronomical environments, physical conditions are so extreme that nuclear decay rates can be significantly altered from their laboratory values. Such effects are relevant to a number of current problems in nuclear astrophysics. Experiments related to these problems are now being pursued, and will be described in this talk. 19 refs., 5 figs

  12. Approximate penetration factors for nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humblet, J.; Fowler, W. A.; Zimmerman, B. A.

    1987-01-01

    The ranges of validity of approximations of P(l), the penetration factor which appears in the parameterization of nuclear-reaction cross sections at low energies and is employed in the extrapolation of laboratory data to even lower energies of astrophysical interest, are investigated analytically. Consideration is given to the WKB approximation, P(l) at the energy of the total barrier, approximations derived from the asymptotic expansion of G(l) for large eta, approximations for small values of the parameter x, applications of P(l) to nuclear reactions, and the dependence of P(l) on channel radius. Numerical results are presented in tables and graphs, and parameter ranges where the danger of serious errors is high are identified.

  13. Astrophysical S-factors for fusion reactions involving C, O, Ne and Mg isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Beard, M; Chamon, L C; Gasques, L R; Wiescher, M; Yakovlev, D G

    2010-01-01

    Using the Sao Paulo potential and the barrier penetration formalism we have calculated the astrophysical factor S(E) for 946 fusion reactions involving stable and neutron-rich isotopes of C, O, Ne, and Mg for center-of-mass energies E varying from 2 MeV to 18-30 MeV (covering the range below and above the Coulomb barrier). We have parameterized the energy dependence S(E) by an accurate universal 9-parameter analytic expression and present tables of fit parameters for all the reactions. We also discuss the reduced 3-parameter version of our fit which is highly accurate at energies below the Coulomb barrier, and outline the procedure for calculating the reaction rates. The results can be easily converted to thermonuclear or pycnonuclear reaction rates to simulate various nuclear burning phenomena, in particular, stellar burning at high temperatures and nucleosynthesis in high density environments.

  14. Determining cross sections of the {sup 187}Re(α,n) reaction at astrophysically relevant energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholz, Philipp; Endres, Janis; Mayer, Jan; Netterdon, Lars; Zilges, Andreas [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Sauerwein, Anne [Institute for Applied Physics, Goethe University Frankfurt (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Network calculations of the γ process rely almost completely on theoretically predicted reaction rates in the scope of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model. But especially the prediction of cross sections for (γ,α)-reactions at energies within or close to the astrophysically relevant energy window remains a problem due to the uncertainties in the basic α+nucleus optical-model potentials. Although experimental values far above the Coulomb-barrier are well reproduced, commonly used α-optical potentials often fail to describe the trend at center-of-mass energies comparable to those in astrophysical sites of the γ process. Improvements of the adopted optical-model potentials are hampered by the lack of experimental values at low energies. For the improvement of the experimental situation an α-induced reaction on the very heavy nucleus {sup 187}Re was investigated via the activation technique using the Cologne Clover Counting Setup. Cross sections at five energies close to the astrophysically relevant energy region could be measured amongst others applying the γγ-coincidence method. The experimental setup as well as recent results are presented.

  15. Alpha induced reaction cross section measurements on 162Er for the astrophysical gamma process

    CERN Document Server

    Kiss, G G; Rauscher, T; Török, Zs; Fülöp, Zs; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z; Somorjai, E

    2014-01-01

    The cross sections of the 162Er(a,g,)166Yb and 162Er(a,n)165Yb reactions have been measured for the first time. The radiative alpha capture reaction cross section was measured from Ec.m. = 16.09 down to Ec.m. = 11.21 MeV, close to the astrophysically relevant region (which lies between 7.8 and 11.48 MeV at 3 GK stellar temperature). The 162Er(a,n)165Yb reaction was studied above the reaction threshold between Ec.m. = 12.19 and 16.09 MeV. The fact that the 162Er(a,g)166Yb cross sections were measured below the (a,n) threshold at first time in this mass region opens the opportunity to study directly the a-widths required for the determination of astrophysical reaction rates. The data clearly show that compound nucleus formation in this reaction proceeds differently than previously predicted.

  16. Alpha induced reaction cross section measurements on 162Er for the astrophysical γ process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross sections of the 162Er(α,γ)166Yb and 162Er(α,n)165Yb reactions have been measured for the first time. The radiative alpha capture reaction cross section was measured from Ec.m.=16.09 MeV down to Ec.m.=11.21 MeV, close to the astrophysically relevant region (which lies between 7.8 and 11.48 MeV at 3 GK stellar temperature). The 162Er(α,n)165Yb reaction was studied above the reaction threshold between Ec.m.=12.19 and 16.09 MeV. The fact that the 162Er(α,γ)166Yb cross sections were measured below the (α,n) threshold at first time in this mass region opens the opportunity to study directly the α-widths required for the determination of astrophysical reaction rates. The data clearly show that compound nucleus formation in this reaction proceeds differently than previously predicted

  17. Astrophysical Neutrino Event Rates and Sensitivity for Neutrino Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Albuquerque, I F M; Smoot, G F; Albuquerque, Ivone F.M.; Lamoureux, Jodi; Smoot, George F.

    2001-01-01

    Spectacular processes in astrophysical sites produce high-energy cosmic rays which are further accelerated by Fermi-shocks into a power-law spectrum. These, in passing through radiation fields and matter, produce neutrinos. Neutrino telescopes are designed with large detection volumes to observe such astrophysical sources. A large volume is necessary because the fluxes and cross-sections are small. We estimate various telescopes' sensitivity and expected event rates from astrophysical sources of high-energy neutrinos. We find that an ideal detector of km^2 incident area can be sensitive to a flux of neutrinos integrated over energy from 10^5 and 10^{7} GeV as low as 1.3 * 10^(-8) * E^(-2) (GeV/cm^2 s sr) which is three times smaller than the Waxman-Bachall conservative upper limit on potential neutrino flux. Detection from point sources is possible from known bursts and unlikely if there is no prior knowledge of the location and time of the burst. A real detector will have degraded performance.

  18. Bayesian Estimation of Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Iliadis, Christian; Coc, Alain; Timmes, Frank; Starrfield, Sumner

    2016-01-01

    The problem of estimating non-resonant astrophysical S-factors and thermonuclear reaction rates, based on measured nuclear cross sections, is of major interest for nuclear energy generation, neutrino physics, and element synthesis. Many different methods have been applied in the past to this problem, all of them based on traditional statistics. Bayesian methods, on the other hand, are now in widespread use in the physical sciences. In astronomy, for example, Bayesian statistics is applied to the observation of extra-solar planets, gravitational waves, and type Ia supernovae. However, nuclear physics, in particular, has been slow to adopt Bayesian methods. We present the first astrophysical S-factors and reaction rates based on Bayesian statistics. We develop a framework that incorporates robust parameter estimation, systematic effects, and non-Gaussian uncertainties in a consistent manner. The method is applied to the d(p,$\\gamma$)$^3$He, $^3$He($^3$He,2p)$^4$He, and $^3$He($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$)$^7$Be reactions,...

  19. Nuclear Astrophysics and Neutron Induced Reactions: Quasi-Free Reactions and RIBs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cherubini, S.; Coc, A.; Kubono, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Binh, D.N.; Burjan, Václav; Crucilla, V.; De Sereville, N.; Elekes, Z.; Gulino, M.; Hammache, F.; Hayakawa, S.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Kroha, Václav; Komatsubara, H.; La Cognata, M.; Lamiaa, L.; Li, C. B.; Nishimura, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Somorjai, E.; Tumino, A.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.

    MELVILLE, NY: AMER INST PHYSICS, 2 HUNTINGTON QUADRANGLE, STE 1NO1, 2010 - (Tanihara, I.; Shima, T.; Ong, H.; Tamii, A.; Kishimoto, T.; Toki, H.; Kajino, T.; Kubono, S.), s. 98-103 ISBN 978-0-7354-0819-7. ISSN 0094-243X. [10th International Symposium on Origin of Matter and Evolution of Galaxies (OMEG10). Osaka (JP), 08.03.2010-10.03.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Quasi-free reaction * nuclear astrophysics * neutron induced reaction Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  20. Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 5 of the proceedings contains 62 papers of which 61 have been incorporated in INIS. They are divided by subject into several groups: early-type stars, late-type stars, binaries and multiple systems, theoretical considerations, ultraviolet stellar spectra, high energy astrophysics and binary stars. Many papers dealt with variable stars, star development and star models. (M.D.). 200 figs., 38 tabs., 1189 refs

  1. The Trojan Horse Method as a tool for investigating astrophysically relevant fusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Prada Moroni, P. G.

    2016-05-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been largely adopted for investigating astrophysically relevant charged-particle induced reactions at Gamow energies. Indeed, THM allows one to by pass extrapolation procedures, thus overcoming this source of uncertainty. Here, the recent THM results and their impact in astrophysics are going to be discussed.

  2. The Trojan Horse Method as a tool for investigating astrophysically relevant fusion reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Lamia L.; Spitaleri C.; Tognelli E.; Degl’Innocenti S.; Pizzone R.G.; Prada Moroni P.G.

    2016-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been largely adopted for investigating astrophysically relevant charged-particle induced reactions at Gamow energies. Indeed, THM allows one to by pass extrapolation procedures, thus overcoming this source of uncertainty. Here, the recent THM results and their impact in astrophysics are going to be discussed.

  3. The Trojan Horse Method as a tool for investigating astrophysically relevant fusion reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamia L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Trojan Horse Method (THM has been largely adopted for investigating astrophysically relevant charged-particle induced reactions at Gamow energies. Indeed, THM allows one to by pass extrapolation procedures, thus overcoming this source of uncertainty. Here, the recent THM results and their impact in astrophysics are going to be discussed.

  4. Nuclear astrophysical plasmas: ion distribution functions and fusion rates

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This article illustrates how very small deviations from the Maxwellian exponential tail, while leaving unchanged bulk quantities, can yield dramatic effects on fusion reaction rates and discuss several mechanisms that can cause such deviations.

  5. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Tumino, A.

    2014-05-01

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

  6. Charged-particle induced reaction studies for the astrophysical γ process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netterdon, Lars; Baldenhofer, Martin; Mayer, Jan; Scholz, Philipp; Zilges, Andreas [Institute for Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Sauerwein, Anne [Institute for Applied Physics, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    About 35 neutron-deficient nuclei, referred to as p nuclei, are bypassed by the s and r process. The majority of these nuclei is believed to be produced by photodisintegration reactions and subsequent β decays during the γ process. Reaction rates for the γ-process reaction network are mainly predicted by statistical model calculations as experimental data are scarce. In order to reduce the uncertainties in these calculations from the nuclear physics side, the input parameters entering the calculations, such as optical-model potentials and the γ-strength function, must be constrained experimentally. In this talk, an overview of experiments aiming at these input parameters performed at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Cologne is given. This includes α-induced reactions on {sup 168}Yb and the {sup 130}Ba(p,γ) reaction using the activation technique. Moreover, a dedicated setup for in-beam nuclear astrophysics experiments utilizing the high-efficiency HPGe-detector array HORUS is presented in detail. Total and partial cross-section results of the {sup 89}Y(p,γ) reaction and first results of experiments on the {sup 85}Rb(p,γ) and {sup 112}Sn(α,γ) reactions are shown.

  7. Direct Reactions with Exotic Nuclei, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, G

    2006-01-01

    Intermediate energy Coulomb excitation and dissociation is a useful tool for nuclear structure and astrophysics studies. Low-lying strength in nuclei far from stability was discovered by this method. The effective range theory for low-lying strength in one-neutron halo nuclei is summarized and extended to two-neutron halo nuclei. This is of special interest in view of recent rather accurate experimental results on the low-lying electric dipole strength in $^{11}$Li. Another indirect approach to nuclear astrophysics is the Trojan horse method. It is pointed out that it is a suitable tool to investigate subthreshold resonances.

  8. Determination by transfer reaction of alpha widths in fluorine for astrophysical interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nucleosynthesis of fluorine is not known. Several astrophysical models predict the alpha radiative capture onto N15 as the main fluorine production reaction. In the expression of the reaction rate, one parameter is missing: the alpha width of the resonance on the E = 4.377 MeV level in fluorine. A direct measurement is excluded due to the very low cross-section expected. We have determined this alpha width using a transfer reaction followed by analyses with FR-DWBA (Finite Range Distorted Wave Born Approximation) in a simple cluster alpha model. This experiment was carried out with a Li7 beam with E = 28 MeV onto a N15 gas target. The 16 first levels were studied. Spectroscopic factors were extracted for most of them. Alpha widths for unbound levels were determined. Many alpha width were compared with known values from direct reaction and the differences lie within the uncertainty range (factor 2). The alpha width for the E = 4.377 MeV level was determined (Γα = 1.5*10-15 MeV), its value is about 60 times weaker than the used value. The influence of our new rate was studied in AGB (Asymptotic Giant Branch) stars during thermal pulses. In this model the alteration is sensitive. (author)

  9. Trojan Horse as an indirect technique in nuclear astrophysics. Resonance reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Blokhintsev, L.D.; Irgaziev, B. F.; Kadyrov, A. S.; M. La Cognata; Spitaleri, C.(Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia, Univ. di Catania, via S. Sofia, Catania, Italy); Tribble, R. E.

    2007-01-01

    The Trojan Horse method is a powerful indirect technique that provides information to determine astrophysical factors for binary rearrangement processes $x + A \\to b + B$ at astrophysically relevant energies by measuring the cross section for the Trojan Horse reaction $a + A \\to y+ b + B$ in quasi-free kinematics. We present the theory of the Trojan Horse method for resonant binary subreactions based on the half-off-energy-shell R matrix approach which takes into account the off-energy-shell ...

  10. Reexamination of Astrophysical Resonance-Reaction Equations for AN Isolated, Narrow Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J. J.; Hu, J.; Zhang, L. Y.; Li, L.; Xu, S. W.; Yu, X. Q.; Liu, M. L.

    The well-known astrophysical resonant-reaction-rate (RRR) equations for an isolated narrow resonance induced by the charged particles have been reexamined. The validity of those assumptions used in deriving the classical analytic equations has been checked, and found that these analytic equations only hold for certain circumstances. It shows the customary definition of "narrow" is inappropriate or ambiguous in some sense, and it awakes us not to use those analytic equations without caution. As a suggestion, it is better to use the broad-resonance equation to calculate the RRR numerically even for a narrow resonance of a few keV width. The present conclusion may influence some work in which the classical narrow-resonant equations were used for calculating the RRRs, especially at low stellar temperatures for those previously defined "narrow" resonances.

  11. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results for direct reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.

    2014-05-01

    The Trojan Horse method is a powerful indirect technique to determine the astrophysical factor for binary rearrangement processes A+x→b+B at astrophysical energies by measuring the cross section for the Trojan Horse (TH) reaction A+a→B+b+s in quasi free kinematics. The Trojan Horse Method has been successfully applied to many reactions of astrophysical interest, both direct and resonant. In this paper, we will focus on direct sub-processes. The theory of the THM for direct binary reactions will be shortly presented based on a few-body approach that takes into account the off-energy-shell effects and initial and final state interactions. Examples of recent results will be presented to demonstrate how THM works experimentally.

  12. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results for direct reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumino, A.; Gulino, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania, Italy and Università degli Studi di Enna Kore, Enna (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy); Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09

    The Trojan Horse method is a powerful indirect technique to determine the astrophysical factor for binary rearrangement processes A+x→b+B at astrophysical energies by measuring the cross section for the Trojan Horse (TH) reaction A+a→B+b+s in quasi free kinematics. The Trojan Horse Method has been successfully applied to many reactions of astrophysical interest, both direct and resonant. In this paper, we will focus on direct sub-processes. The theory of the THM for direct binary reactions will be shortly presented based on a few-body approach that takes into account the off-energy-shell effects and initial and final state interactions. Examples of recent results will be presented to demonstrate how THM works experimentally.

  13. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results for direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Trojan Horse method is a powerful indirect technique to determine the astrophysical factor for binary rearrangement processes A+x→b+B at astrophysical energies by measuring the cross section for the Trojan Horse (TH) reaction A+a→B+b+s in quasi free kinematics. The Trojan Horse Method has been successfully applied to many reactions of astrophysical interest, both direct and resonant. In this paper, we will focus on direct sub-processes. The theory of the THM for direct binary reactions will be shortly presented based on a few-body approach that takes into account the off-energy-shell effects and initial and final state interactions. Examples of recent results will be presented to demonstrate how THM works experimentally

  14. The Trojan Horse method for nuclear astrophysics: Recent results on resonance reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cognata, M. La; Pizzone, R. G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; Romano, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Gulino, M.; Tumino, A. [Kore University, Enna, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09

    Nuclear astrophysics aims to measure nuclear-reaction cross sections of astrophysical interest to be included into models to study stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Low energies, < 1 MeV or even < 10 keV, are requested for this is the window where these processes are more effective. Two effects have prevented to achieve a satisfactory knowledge of the relevant nuclear processes, namely, the Coulomb barrier exponentially suppressing the cross section and the presence of atomic electrons. These difficulties have triggered theoretical and experimental investigations to extend our knowledge down to astrophysical energies. For instance, indirect techniques such as the Trojan Horse Method have been devised yielding new cutting-edge results. In particular, I will focus on the application of this indirect method to resonance reactions. Resonances might dramatically enhance the astrophysical S(E)-factor so, when they occur right at astrophysical energies, their measurement is crucial to pin down the astrophysical scenario. Unknown or unpredicted resonances might introduce large systematic errors in nucleosynthesis models. These considerations apply to low-energy resonances and to sub-threshold resonances as well, as they may produce sizable modifications of the S-factor due to, for instance, destructive interference with another resonance.

  15. Updating the Nuclear Reaction Rate Library (REACLIB) I. Experimental Reaction Rates of the Proton-Proton Chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REACLIB is one of the most comprehensive and popular astrophysical reaction rate libraries. However, its experimentally obtained rates for light isotopes still rely mainly on the Caughlan and Fowler (1988) compilation and have never been updated despite the progress in many relevant nuclear astrophysics experiments. Moreover, due to fitting errors REACLIB is not reliable at temperatures lower than 107K. In this work we establish the formalism for updating the obsolete Caughlan-Fowler experimental rates of REACLIB. Then we use the NACRE compilation and results from the LUNA experiments to update some important charged-particle induced rates of REACLIB focusing on the proton-proton chain. The updated rates (available also in digital form) can now be used in the low temperature regime (below 107K) which was forbidden to the old version of REACLIB. (authors)

  16. Tests of carbon targets for 12C+12C reactions at astrophysical energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a preliminary step towards measurements of the 12C +12 C reactions at astrophysical energies, we investigate the behaviour of targets under beam bombardment, specifically the quantitative relation between hydrogen and deuterium content of different carbon targets and target temperature. Experiments have taken place at the CIRCE accelerator in Caserta, Italy and preliminary results are presented here

  17. Evaluation of neutron reaction cross sections for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a code system to evaluate nuclear reaction cross sections for the nucleosynthesis. The system includes an interface to Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL), as well as some systematics to extrapolate the parameters into unstable regions. We are focusing on neutron capture processes important for s- and r-processes. The structure of the system is reviewed, and calculated capture cross sections in the fission product mass region are compared with experimental data available. (author)

  18. Non-resonant Triple-α Reaction Rate at Low Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The triple α reaction rate in stars is quite important in many astrophysical scenarios including the stellar evolution and carbon synthesis in stars. Recently the non-resonant triple α reaction rate has been reevaluated using a calculation with the continuum-discretized coupled-channels (CDCC) method, which dramatically increased the rate at low temperature compared to the widely-used NACRE compilation. Since the enhancement influences strongly on astrophysical model simulations, we have planned an experiment for drawing conclusion on the non-resonant triple α reaction rate at low temperature by measuring the three-α continuum state in 12C. We report the present situation of the experiment. (author)

  19. The power-law reaction rate coefficient for barrierless reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Cangtao; Du, Jiulin

    2014-01-01

    The power-law reaction rate coefficient for the barrierless reactions is studied if the reactions take place in systems with power-law distributions, and a generalized rate formula for the barrierless reactions in Gorin model is derived. We show that due to barrierless, different from those for bimolecular and unimolcular reactions, the power-law rate coefficient for the barrierless reactions does not have the factor of power-law distribution function and thus it is not very strongly dependen...

  20. Trojan Horse as an indirect technique in nuclear astrophysics. Resonance reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Irgaziev, B F; Kadyrov, A S; La Cognata, M; Spitaleri, C; Tribble, R E

    2007-01-01

    The Trojan Horse method is a powerful indirect technique that provides information to determine astrophysical factors for binary rearrangement processes $x + A \\to b + B$ at astrophysically relevant energies by measuring the cross section for the Trojan Horse reaction $a + A \\to y+ b + B$ in quasi-free kinematics. We present the theory of the Trojan Horse method for resonant binary subreactions based on the half-off-energy-shell R matrix approach which takes into account the off-energy-shell effects and initial and final state interactions.

  1. Measurement of reaction rates of interest in stellar structure and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrasi, F.; D`Onofrio, A. [Dipt. di Scienze Ambientali, Seconda Univ. di Napoli, Caserta (Italy)]|[INFN, Napoli (Italy); Campajola, L.; Imbriani, G. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Gialanella, L. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy)]|[Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Greife, U.; Rolfs, C.; Strieder, F.; Trautvetter, H.P. [Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik III, Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Roca, V.; Romano, M. [INFN, Napoli (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Straniero, O. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Collurania, Teramo (Italy)

    1998-06-01

    Accurate determinations of reaction rates at astrophysical energies are very important in stellar structure and evolution studies. The cases of two key reactions, namely {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B and {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O are discussed, both from the point of view of their astrophysical interest and of the experimental difficulties in the measurement of their cross section. (orig.)

  2. Coulomb dissociation reactions on molybdenum isotopes for astrophysics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershova, Olga

    2012-03-09

    Within the present work, photodissociation reactions on {sup 100}Mo, {sup 93}Mo and {sup 92}Mo isotopes were studied by means of the Coulomb dissociation method at the LAND setup at GSI. As a result of the analysis of the present experiment, integrated Coulomb excitation cross sections of the {sup 100}Mo({gamma},n), {sup 100}Mo({gamma},2n), {sup 93}Mo({gamma},n) and {sup 92}Mo({gamma},n) reactions were determined. A second important topic of the present thesis is the investigation of the efficiency of the CsI gamma detector. The data taken with the gamma calibration sources shortly after the experiment were used for the investigation. In addition, a test experiment in refined conditions was conducted within the framework of this thesis. Numerous GEANT3 simulations of the detector were performed in order to understand various aspects of its performance. As a result, the efficiency of the detector was determined to be approximately a factor of 2 lower than the efficiency expected from the simulation. (orig.)

  3. Nuclear reaction rates and the primordial nucleosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Abhishek; Basu, D. N.

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical predictions of the primordial abundances of elements in the big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) are dominated by uncertainties in the input nuclear reaction rates. We investigate the effect of modifying these reaction rates on light element abundance yields in BBN by replacing the thirty-five reaction rates out of the existing eighty-eight. We have studied these yields as functions of evolution time or temperature. We find that using these new reaction rates results in only a littl...

  4. Light elements burning reaction rates at stellar temperatures as deduced by the Trojan Horse measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Palmerini, S.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Sergi, M. L.

    2015-02-01

    Experimental nuclear astrophysics aims at determining the reaction rates for astrophysically relevant reactions at their Gamow energies. For charged-particle induced reactions, the access to these energies is usually hindered, in direct measurements, by the presence of the Coulomb barrier between the interacting particles or by electron screening effects, which make hard the determination of the bare-nucleus S(E)-factor of interest for astrophysical codes. The use of the Trojan Horse Method (THM) appears as one of the most suitable tools for investigating nuclear processes of interest for astrophysics. Here, in view of the recent TH measurements, the main destruction channels for deuterium (2H ), for the two lithium 6,7Li isotopes, for the 9Be and the one for the two boron 10,11B isotopes will be discussed.

  5. Light elements burning reaction rates at stellar temperatures as deduced by the Trojan Horse measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); La Cognata, M.; Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Puglia, S. M. R. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2015-02-24

    Experimental nuclear astrophysics aims at determining the reaction rates for astrophysically relevant reactions at their Gamow energies. For charged-particle induced reactions, the access to these energies is usually hindered, in direct measurements, by the presence of the Coulomb barrier between the interacting particles or by electron screening effects, which make hard the determination of the bare-nucleus S(E)-factor of interest for astrophysical codes. The use of the Trojan Horse Method (THM) appears as one of the most suitable tools for investigating nuclear processes of interest for astrophysics. Here, in view of the recent TH measurements, the main destruction channels for deuterium ({sup 2}H), for the two lithium {sup 6,7}Li isotopes, for the {sup 9}Be and the one for the two boron {sup 10,11}B isotopes will be discussed.

  6. The Rate Laws for Reversible Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Edward L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the rate laws for reversible reactions. Indicates that although prediction of the form of the rate law for a reverse reaction given the rate law for the forward reaction is not certain, the number of possibilities is limited because of relationships described. (JN)

  7. Nuclear astrophysics: An application of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear astrophysics, a fruitful combination of nuclear physics and astrophysics can be viewed as a special application of nuclear physics where the study of nuclei and their reactions are motivated by astrophysical problems. Nuclear astrophysics is also a good example for the state of the art interdisciplinary research. The origin of elements studied by geologists is explored by astrophysicists using nuclear reaction rates provided by the nuclear physics community. Due to the high interest in the field two recent Nuclear Physics Divisional Conferences of the European Physical Society were devoted to nuclear astrophysics and a new conference series entitled 'Nuclear Physics in Astrophysics' has been established. Selected problems of nuclear astrophysics will be presented emphasizing the interplay between nuclear physics and astrophysics. As an example the role of 14N(p,r)15O reaction rate in the determination of the age of globular clusters will be discussed in details

  8. Experimental studies of keV energy neutron-induced reactions relevant to astrophysics and nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shima, T.; Kii, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Okazaki, F.; Kobayashi, T.; Baba, T.; Nagai, Y. [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Faculty of Science; Igashira, M.

    1997-03-01

    Nuclear reactions induced by keV energy neutrons provide a plenty of informations for studies of both astrophysics and nuclear physics. In this paper we will show our experimental studies of neutron- induced reactions of light nuclei in the keV energy region by means of a pulsed keV neutron beam and high-sensitivity detectors. Also we will discuss astrophysical and nuclear-physical consequences by using the obtained results. (author)

  9. Investigating resonances above and below the threshold in nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Cognata, M.; Kiss, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.

    2015-10-01

    Resonances in nuclear cross sections dramatically change their trends. Therefore, the presence of unexpected resonances might lead to unpredicted consequences on astrophysics and nuclear physics. In nuclear physics, resonances allow one to study states in the intermediate compound systems, to evaluate their cluster structure, for instance, especially in the energy regions approaching particle decay thresholds. In astrophysics, resonances might lead to changes in the nucleosynthesis flow, determining different isotopic compositions of the nuclear burning ashes. For these reasons, the Trojan Horse method has been modified to investigate resonant reactions. Thanks to this novel approach, for the first time normalization to direct data might be avoided. Moreover, in the case of sub threshold resonances, the Trojan Horse method modified to investigate resonances allows one to deduce the asymptotic normalization coefficient, showing the close connection between the two indirect approaches.

  10. Investigating resonances above and below the threshold in nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Cognata, M., E-mail: lacognata@lns.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Kiss, G. G. [ATOMKI, Debrecen (Hungary); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Spitaleri, C. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud - INFN, Catania (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Trippella, O. [Sezione di Perugia - INFN, Perugia (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Resonances in nuclear cross sections dramatically change their trends. Therefore, the presence of unexpected resonances might lead to unpredicted consequences on astrophysics and nuclear physics. In nuclear physics, resonances allow one to study states in the intermediate compound systems, to evaluate their cluster structure, for instance, especially in the energy regions approaching particle decay thresholds. In astrophysics, resonances might lead to changes in the nucleosynthesis flow, determining different isotopic compositions of the nuclear burning ashes. For these reasons, the Trojan Horse method has been modified to investigate resonant reactions. Thanks to this novel approach, for the first time normalization to direct data might be avoided. Moreover, in the case of sub threshold resonances, the Trojan Horse method modified to investigate resonances allows one to deduce the asymptotic normalization coefficient, showing the close connection between the two indirect approaches.

  11. Investigating resonances above and below the threshold in nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonances in nuclear cross sections dramatically change their trends. Therefore, the presence of unexpected resonances might lead to unpredicted consequences on astrophysics and nuclear physics. In nuclear physics, resonances allow one to study states in the intermediate compound systems, to evaluate their cluster structure, for instance, especially in the energy regions approaching particle decay thresholds. In astrophysics, resonances might lead to changes in the nucleosynthesis flow, determining different isotopic compositions of the nuclear burning ashes. For these reasons, the Trojan Horse method has been modified to investigate resonant reactions. Thanks to this novel approach, for the first time normalization to direct data might be avoided. Moreover, in the case of sub threshold resonances, the Trojan Horse method modified to investigate resonances allows one to deduce the asymptotic normalization coefficient, showing the close connection between the two indirect approaches

  12. Analytic representations of thermonuclear reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic physical principles common for all nonresonant and resonant thermonuclear reaction rates are taken as a basis to derive the standard forms of both types of reaction rates. Results are given for the closed-form representations of the standard non-resonant and resonant thermonuclear reaction rates in terms of a certain type of Meijer's G-function. Then, for physical reasons the non-resonant reaction rate with modified Maxwell-Boltzmannian distribution is considered. The mathematical method for the derivation of closed-form representations for the modified non-resonant reaction rate integral which is also suitable for numerical computations is given in detail. Some new techniques developed by the authors are used for deriving the results. The reaction rate systematics thus obtained in terms of Meijer's G-function is a contribution to Fowler's methods for the numerical computation of thermonuclear reaction rates. (author)

  13. Investigating the astrophysical 22Ne(p, γ23Na and 22Mg(p, γ23Al reactions with a multi-channel scattering formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser P. R.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The reaction 22Ne(p, γ23Na is key to the NeNa cycle of stellar nucleogenesis, and better understanding of the 22Mg(p, γ23Al reaction is needed to understand the 22Na puzzle in ONe white dwarf novae. We aim to study these reactions using a multi-channel algebraic scattering (MCAS formalism for low-energy nucleon-nucleus scattering, recently expanded to investigate radiative capture. As a first step towards this goal, we here calculate the energy levels of the mass-23 (Ne, Mg, Na, Al nuclei. This is not only because the resonant structure of these nuclei are related to the astrophysical -rates of interest, but also because the interaction parameters determined for describing the energy levels are an integral part of the future calculation of the astrophysical reactions when using the MCAS scheme.

  14. Investigating the astrophysical 22Ne(p,γ)23Na and 22Mg(p,γ)23Al reactions with a multi-channel scattering formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction 22Ne(p,γ)23Na is key to the NeNa cycle of stellar nucleogenesis, and a better understanding of the 22Mg(p,γ)23Al reaction is needed to understand the 22Na puzzle in ONe white dwarf novae. We aim at studying these reactions using a multi-channel algebraic scattering (MCAS) formalism for low-energy nucleon-nucleus scattering, recently expanded to investigate radiative capture. As a first step towards this goal, we here calculate the energy levels of the mass-23 (Ne, Mg, Na, Al) nuclei. This is not only because the resonant structure of these nuclei are related to the astrophysical γ-rates of interest, but also because the interaction parameters determined for describing the energy levels are an integral part of the future calculation of the astrophysical reactions when using the MCAS scheme. (authors)

  15. The power-law reaction rate coefficient for barrierless reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the power-law reaction rate coefficient for barrierless reactions, when the reactions take place in systems with power-law distributions, and derive a generalized rate formula for the barrierless reactions in the Gorin model. We show that, unlike those for bimolecular and unimolcular reactions, due to the lack of barriers, the power-law rate coefficient for barrierless reactions does not have a power-law function, and thus is not very strongly dependent on the ν-parameter. Four barrierless reactions are taken as application examples to calculate the new rate coefficients, which with larger fitting ν-parameters can be exactly in agreement with measurements in the experimental studies. (paper)

  16. Three-body Effects for the p(pe^-, ν_e)d Reaction in Nuclear Astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong E.; Zubarev, Alexander L.

    1996-05-01

    We have investigated three-body effect for p(pe^-, ν_e)d reaction in nuclear astrophysics. Solutions of three-body equation for the initial pep state show that two-proton dynamics does not depend on the electron degrees of freedom and hence the conventional adiabatic approximation is valid for energy sector (E_ep/E_pp) > 10-3 where E_ep and E_pp are the relative kinetic energies between e and p, and between p and p, respectively. For the energy sector (E_ep/E_pp) ≈ 10-3, an exact solution of the three-body equation is required. For the energy sector (E_ep/E_pp) GFC) can occur between two protons. Our estimate of the GFC effect indicates that the previous conventional estimate of the pep solar neutrino flux may be an underestimate at least by a factor of two. Implications of our results for the solar neutrino problem are described. At lower temperatures, the GFC effect becomes more significant, and p(pe^-, ν_e)d may dominate over p(p,e^+ ν_e)d. The enhancement of the reaction rate for p(pe^-, νe )d at lower temperatures due to the GFC effect may offer possible explanations for some of long-standing anomalies in astrophysical and geophysical problems.

  17. Trojan Horse method and radioactive ion beams: study of 18F(p,α)15O reaction at astrophysical energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulino, M.; Cherubini, S.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Kubono, S.; Lamia, L.; La Cognata, M.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, H.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; De Séréville, N.; Hammache, F.; Spitaleri, C.

    2013-03-01

    The Trojan Horse Method was applied for the first time to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction to study the reaction 18F(p,α)15O via the three body reaction 18F(d,α 15O)n at the low energies relevant for astrophysics. The abundance of 18F in Nova explosions is an important issue for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. For this reason it is necessary to study the nuclear reactions that produce or destroy 18F in Novae. 18F(p,α)15O is one of the main 18F destruction channels. Preliminary results are presented in this paper.

  18. Trojan Horse method and radioactive ion beams: study of $^{18}$F(p,$\\alpha$)$^{15}$O reaction at astrophysical energies

    CERN Document Server

    Gulino, M; Rapisarda, G G; Kubono, S; Lamia, L; La Cognata, M; Yamaguchi, H; Hayakawa, S; Wakabayashi, Y; Iwasa, N; Kato, S; Komatsubara, H; Teranishi, T; Coc, A; De Séréville, N; Hammache, F; Spitaleri, C

    2012-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method was applied for the first time to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction to study the reaction $^{18}$F(p,$\\alpha$)$^{15}$O via the three body reaction $^{18}$F(d,$\\alpha$ $^{15}$O)n at the low energies relevant for astrophysics. The abundance of $^{18}$F in Nova explosions is an important issue for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. For this reason it is necessary to study the nuclear reactions that produce or destroy $^{18}$F in Novae. $^{18}$F(p,$\\alpha$)$^{15}$O is one of the main $^{18}$F destruction channels. Preliminary results are presented in this paper.

  19. Cross sections and reaction rates of d+8Li reactions involved in Big Bang nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have measured angular distributions of the 2H(8Li, 7Li)3H and 2H(8Li, 9Be)n reactions at Ec.m.=1.5 to 2.8 MeV using an 8Li-radioactive-beam technique. Astrophysical S-factors and reaction rates were calculated from the measured cross sections. Although the 2H(8Li, 9Be)n cross section is small, it can contribute to 9Be synthesis. The 2H(8Li, 7Li)3H reaction has a sufficiently large cross section to destroy 8Li, which may decrease the synthesis of heavier elements. No products from the 2H(8Li, 9Li)p reaction were detected. We also present the results of calculations using the inhomogeneous model of primordial nucleosynthesis in several regions of parameter space. ((orig.))

  20. Resonance reaction rate of 21Na(p,γ)22Mg

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hong-Lin; Liu Men-Quan; Liu Jing-Jing; Luo Zhi-Quan

    2007-01-01

    By using the new Coulomb screening model and most recent experimental results, this paper calculates the resonance reaction rates of 21Na(p,γ)22Mg. The derived result shows that the effect of electron screening on resonant reaction is prominent in astrophysical interesting temperature range. In conjunction with the experimental results, the recommended rates of21Na(p,γ)22Mg would increase at least 10%, which undoubtedly affect the nucleosynthesis of some heavier nuclei in a variety of astrophysical sites.

  1. Millimeter and Submillimeter Studies of O(^1D) Insertion Reactions to Form Molecules of Astrophysical Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Brian; Wehres, Nadine; Deprince, Bridget Alligood; Roy, Althea A. M.; Laas, Jacob; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2015-06-01

    While both the number of detected interstellar molecules and their chemical complexity continue to increase, understanding of the processes leading to their formation is lacking. Our research group combines laboratory spectroscopy, observational astronomy, and astrochemical modeling for an interdisciplinary examination of the chemistry of star and planet formation. This talk will focus on our laboratory studies of O(^1D) insertion reactions with organic molecules to produce molecules of astrophysical interest. By employing these reactions in a supersonic expansion, we are able to produce interstellar organic reaction intermediates that are unstable under terrestrial conditions; we then probe the products using millimeter and submillimeter spectroscopy. We benchmarked this setup using the well-studied O(^1D) + methane reaction to form methanol. After optimizing methanol production, we moved on to study the O(^1D) + ethylene reaction to form vinyl alcohol (CH_2CHOH), and the O(^1D) + methyl amine reaction to form aminomethanol (NH_2CH_2OH). Vinyl alcohol measurements have now been extended up to 450 GHz, and the associated spectral analysis is complete. A possible detection of aminomethanol has also been made, and continued spectral studies and analysis are underway. We will present the results from these experiments and discuss future applications of these molecular and spectroscopic techniques.

  2. Reaction Order Ambiguity in Integrated Rate Plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Integrated rate plots are frequently used in reaction kinetics to determine orders of reactions. It is often emphasised, when using this methodology in practice, that it is necessary to monitor the reaction to a substantial fraction of completion for these plots to yield unambiguous orders. The present article gives a theoretical and statistical…

  3. Jitter Suppression Via Reaction Wheel Passive Isolation for the NASA Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, Karl J.; Schauwecker, Chris J.

    1998-01-01

    Text: Third in the series of NASA great observatories, the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is scheduled for launch from the Space Shuttle in September 1998. Following in the path of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, this telescope will image light at x-ray wavelengths, facilitating the detailed study of such phenomena as supernovae and quasars. The AXAF program is sponsored by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. Due to exacting requirements on the performance of the AXAF optical system, it is necessary to reduce the transmission of reaction wheel jitter disturbances to the observatory. This reduction is accomplished via use of a passive mechanical isolation system which acts as an interface between the reaction wheels and the spacecraft central structure.

  4. Indirect Study of the (2)H(d,p)(3)H and (2)H(d,n)(3)He Reactions at Astrophysical Energies via the Trojan Horse Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Typel, S.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, Václav; Del Santo, M. G.; Kiss, G.G.; Kroha, Václav; Hons, Zdeněk; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Pizzone, R. G.; Piskoř, Štěpán; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Sparta, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 50, 1-4 (2011), s. 323-325. ISSN 0177-7963. [21st European Conference on Few-Body Problems in Physics Location. Salamanca, 30.08.2010-03092010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP203/10/0310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : CROSS-SECTIONS * REACTION-RATES * COMPILATION * D+D Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.438, year: 2011

  5. Measurement of inertial confinement fusion reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion reaction rate is an important parameter for measuring compression during the implosion in inertial confinement fusion experiment. We have developed a system for fusion reaction history measurement with high temporal resolution. The system is composed of plastic scintillator and nose cone, optical system and streak camera. We have applied this system on the SG-III prototype for fusion reaction rate measuring. For the first time, fusion reaction rate history have been measured for deuterium-tritium filled targets with neutrons yields about 1010. We have analyzed possible influence factor during fusion reaction rate measuring. It indicates that the instrument measures fusion reaction bang time at temporal resolutions as low as 30 ps.(authors)

  6. First application of the Trojan horse method with a radioactive ion beam: Study of the 18F (p,α ) 15O reaction at astrophysical energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Rapisarda, G. G.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, T.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; de Séréville, N.; Hammache, F.; Kiss, G.; Bishop, S.; Binh, D. N.

    2015-07-01

    Measurement of nuclear cross sections at astrophysical energies involving unstable species is one of the most challenging tasks in experimental nuclear physics. The use of indirect methods is often unavoidable in this scenario. In this paper the Trojan horse method is applied for the first time to a radioactive ion beam-induced reaction studying the 18F (p ,α )15O process at low energies relevant to astrophysics via the three-body reaction 2H (18F ,α15O ) n . The knowledge of the 18F (p,α ) 15O reaction rate is crucial to understand the nova explosion phenomena. The cross section of this reaction is characterized by the presence of several resonances in 19Ne and possibly interference effects among them. The results reported in literature are not satisfactory and new investigations of the 18F (p,α ) 15O reaction cross section will be useful. In the present work the spin-parity assignments of relevant levels have been discussed and the astrophysical S factor has been extracted considering also interference effects.

  7. Nuclear fusion in dense matter: Reaction rate and carbon burning

    CERN Document Server

    Gasques, L R; Aguilera, E F; Beard, M; Chamon, L C; Ring, P; Wiescher, M; Yakovlev, D G

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the nuclear fusion rate between equal nuclei for all five different nuclear burning regimes in dense matter (two thermonuclear regimes, two pycnonuclear ones, and the intermediate regime). The rate is determined by Coulomb barrier penetration in dense environments and by the astrophysical S-factor at low energies. We evaluate previous studies of the Coulomb barrier problem and propose a simple phenomenological formula for the reaction rate which covers all cases. The parameters of this formula can be varied, taking into account current theoretical uncertainties in the reaction rate. The results are illustrated for the example of the ^{12}C+^{12}C fusion reaction. This reaction is very important for the understanding of nuclear burning in evolved stars, in exploding white dwarfs producing type Ia supernovae, and in accreting neutron stars. The S-factor at stellar energies depends on a reliable fit and extrapolation of the experimental data. We calculate the energy dependence of the S-f...

  8. Future coordinated researches by Argonne (USA), Tashkent (Uzbekistan) and Almaty (Kazakhstan) nuclear centres on the nuclear reactions and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An actual problem of modern nuclear physics and astrophysics is realistic evaluation of astrophysical S-factors and rates of the nuclear reactions, which are responsible for the energy generation and nucleosynthesis in Universe. The essential progress in understanding of these processes has been made in the last decade. Those are the discovery of neutrino oscillations, obtaining new precise data on the reactions cross sections at rather low energies, development of methods of extrapolation to the stellar energy region. Nevertheless, the available experimental data close to stellar energies are very poor especially for unstable particles interactions, and uncertainties remain rather remarkable. It leads to large errors when measured data are extrapolated to astrophysical important super low energy region. The experimental possibilities for improvement the accuracy of the data using 'indirect' measurements are discussed. One of them is based on the peripheral character of charged particles interaction at low energy in which the asymptotical normalization coefficients (ANC) of overlapping functions are used for extrapolation. In this case the differential cross-section of the particle transfer reaction is expressed via the product of ANCs squares of participating particles. Their values may be obtained from the peripheral reactions at larger energies where the accuracy of measurement is higher. From this point of view the particle transfer A(x,y)B reactions are the most preferable, where (x,y) are (13N,12C) or (17F,16O) (proton transfer) and (13C,12C) or (17O,16O) (neutron transfer). We should know firstly the ANCs for 13C→ 12C+n (17O→ 16O+n) and 13N→ 12C+p (17F→ 16O+p) systems, and all other ANCs B→ A+p(n) are expressed through these values. The nucleon separation energies εN are relatively small for these nuclei (ε13N →12C+p=1.943 MeV; ε17F→ 16O+p=0.6003 MeV; ε13C→ 12C+n=4.946 MeV and ε17O→ 16O+n=4.143 MeV). So the reactions should be

  9. Future coordinated researches by ANL (USA), INP AS RUz and INP NNC RKaz on the nuclear reactions and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: An actual problem of modern nuclear physics and astrophysics is realistic evaluation of astrophysical S-factors and rates of the nuclear reactions, which are responsible for the energy generation and nucleosynthesis in Universe. The essential progress in understanding of these processes has been made in the last decade. Those are the discovery of neutrino oscillations, obtaining new precise data on the reactions cross sections at rather low energies, development of methods of extrapolation to the stellar energy region. Nevertheless, the available experimental data close to stellar energies are very poor especially for unstable particles interactions, and uncertainties remain rather remarkable. It leads to large errors when measured data are extrapolated to astrophysical important super low energy region. The experimental possibilities for improvement the accuracy of the data using 'indirect' measurements are discussed. One of them is based on the peripheral character of charged particles interaction at low energy in which the asymptotical normalization coefficients (ANC) of overlapping functions are used for extrapolation [1, 2]. In this case the differential cross-section of the particle transfer reaction is expressed via the product of ANCs squares of participating particles. Their values may be obtained from the peripheral reactions at larger energies where the accuracy of measurement is higher. From this point of view the particle transfer A(x,y)B reactions are the most preferable, where (x,y) are (13N,12C) or (17F,16O) (proton transfer) and (13C,12C) or (17O,16O) (neutron transfer). We should know firstly the ANCs for 13C→ 12C+n (17O→ 16O+n) and 13N→ 12C+p (17F→ 16O+p) systems, and all other ANCs B→ A+p(n) are expressed through these values. The nucleon separation energies εN are relatively small for these nuclei (ε13N →12C+p=1.943 MeV; ε17F→ 16O+p=0.6003 MeV; ε13C→ 12C+n=4.946 MeV and ε17O→ 16O+n=4.143 MeV). So the reactions

  10. Results and prospects of joint researches on low energy nuclear reactions and nuclear astrophysics at the INP AS, IAP NUU (Uzbekistan) and INP NNC (Kazakhstan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Review of the last theoretical and experimental results obtained by scientists of the mentioned 3 institutions in the field of nuclear reactions with nucleon transferring at low energies (∼10 MeV/nucleon) and nuclear astrophysical reactions at stellar energies is discussed. The experimental studies of heavy ion sub-coulomb interaction as well as lightest ions scattering and nucleon transferring reactions are carried out using the cyclotrons DC-60 (Astana, RK), U-150M (Almaty, RK), U-150-II (Tashkent, RUz). The linear accelerators UKP-II-1 (Almaty, RK) and EG-2 (Tashkent, RUz) are used for studies of low energy proton scattering and astrophysical relevant proton capture reactions. The developed installation at the accelerator EG-2 for the prompt and activation methods of measurement of the astrophysical radiative capture reactions is presented. The reactions 6Li(3He,d)7Be, 10,11B(3He,d)11,12C, 14N(3He,d)15O, 16O(3He,d)17F, 7Li(d,t)6Li, 11B(d,t)10B are analyzed in the framework of modified DWBA for obtaining the spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANC) of nucleon separation. A search of necessary data on the optical parameters and phase shifts is carried out with the optical Model (OM) and Coupled Reaction Channel Method (CRC) analysis of the measured scattering cross sections. The obtained values of ANC are used in calculation of the astrophysical S-factors of proton radiative capture at low energies up to zero value. The specified values of S-factors and the reaction rates for the nuclear astrophysical processes D(p,γ)3He, 6Li(p,γ)7Be 14N(p,γ)15O, 16O(p,γ)17F have been obtained. Prospects of future investigations including expansion of the collaboration by arranging the joint experiments with the scientists of the University of Catania (Italy) and Warsaw University (Poland) are discussed. (authors)

  11. The C-14(alpha, gamma)O-18 reaction at astrophysical energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C-14(alpha, gamma)O-18 reaction rate is estimated for temperatures important for He flashes in white dwarfs and for nonhomogeneous big-bang nucleosynthesis. If available, the resonant contributions to the rate are derived using recent experimental data. The direct capture rate is evaluated on the basis of a microscopic multichannel calculation of the C-14(alpha, gamma)O-18 reaction. Possible interference contributions are discussed. The present rate is compared to previous estimates of Hashimoto et al. (1986) and of Buchmann et al. (1988). 23 refs

  12. The C-14(alpha, gamma)O-18 reaction at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funck, C.; Langanke, K. (Muenster Universitaet (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-09-01

    The C-14(alpha, gamma)O-18 reaction rate is estimated for temperatures important for He flashes in white dwarfs and for nonhomogeneous big-bang nucleosynthesis. If available, the resonant contributions to the rate are derived using recent experimental data. The direct capture rate is evaluated on the basis of a microscopic multichannel calculation of the C-14(alpha, gamma)O-18 reaction. Possible interference contributions are discussed. The present rate is compared to previous estimates of Hashimoto et al. (1986) and of Buchmann et al. (1988). 23 refs.

  13. Nuclear astrophysics data at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a new program of evaluation and dissemination of nuclear data of critical importance for nuclear astrophysics within the Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Recent activities include determining the rates of the important 14O(α,p)17 F and 17F(p,γ) 18Ne reactions, disseminating the Caughlan and Fowler reaction rate compilation on the World Wide Web, and evaluating the 17O(p,α)14N reaction rate. These projects, which are closely coupled to current ORNL nuclear astrophysics research, are briefly discussed along with future plans

  14. 12C+12C reactions at astrophysical energies: Tests of targets behaviour under beam bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    12C(12C,α)20Ne and 12C(12C,p)23Na are the most important reactions during the carbon burning phase in stars. Direct measurements at the relevant astrophysical energy (E=1.5±0.3MeV) are very challenging because of the extremely small cross sections involved and of the high beam-induced background originating from impurities in the targets. In addition, persistent resonant structures at low energies are not well understood and make the extrapolation of the cross section from high energy data very uncertain. As a preliminary step towards the measurements of the 12C(12C,α)20Ne and 12C(12C,p)23Na reactions we intend to investigate the behaviour of targets under beam bombardment, specifically the quantitative measurement of hydrogen and deuterium content of highly pure stable carbon targets in relation to target temperature. Experiments are taking place at the CIRCE accelerator in Caserta, Italy and preliminary results are presented here

  15. Reaction rate of the proton radiative capture on 3H

    CERN Document Server

    Dubovichenko, S B; Afanasyeva, N V

    2016-01-01

    Calculations of the reaction rate of the proton radiative capture on 3H at temperatures from 0.01 T9 up to 5 T9, which are based on the theoretical results for the astrophysical S factor and take into account the latest experimental data, were carried out. Theoretical results for the S factor at energies from 1 keV up to 5 MeV were obtained in the framework of the modified potential cluster model with the classification of orbital states according to Young tableaux. On the basis of used nuclear model of the interaction of p and 3H particles there was shown possibility of description the latest experimental data for the S factor at the energy range from 50 keV up to 5 MeV.

  16. Rates of the main thermonuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data on the cross sections of main thermonuclear reactions have been estimated with an account of the latest experimental results in a form of S-factor spline presentation. Based on this estimation, the reates of these reactions in 0.0001-1 MeV temperature range in the supposition of Maxwell distribution of relative velocities have been computed. The Maxwell-Boltzmann averaged -factors were calculated according to the table values of the reaction rates. Then the -factors were approximated with the 3 order spline-function. The necessity of the account of electron shielding and intramolecular movement at low temperatures is discussed (orig.)

  17. First application of the Trojan Horse Method with a Radioactive Ion Beam: study of the $^{18}$F($p,{\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O}} reaction at astrophysical energies

    CERN Document Server

    Cherubini, S; Spitaleri, C; Rapisarda, G G; La Cognata, M; Lamia, L; Pizzone, R G; Romano, S; Kubono, S; Yamaguchi, H; Hayakawa, S; Wakabayashi, Y; Iwasa, N; Kato, S; Komatsubara, T; Teranishi, T; Coc, A; de Séréville, N; Hammache, F; Kiss, G; Bishop, S; Binh, D N

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of nuclear cross sections at astrophysical energies involving unstable species is one of the most challenging tasks in experimental nuclear physics. The use of indirect methods is often unavoidable in this scenario. In this paper the Trojan Horse Method is applied for the first time to a radioactive ion beam induced reaction studying the $^{18}$F($p,{\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O process at low energies relevant to astrophysics via the three body reaction $^{2}$H($^{18}$F,${\\alpha}^{15}$O)n. The knowledge of the $^{18}$F($p, {\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O reaction rate is crucial to understand the nova explosion phenomena. The cross section of this reaction is characterized by the presence of several resonances in $^{19}$Ne and possibly interference effects among them. The results reported in Literature are not satisfactory and new investigations of the $^{18}$F($p,{\\alpha}$)$^{15}$O reaction cross section will be useful. In the present work the spin-parity assignments of relevant levels have been discussed and the astro...

  18. Measurement of cross section and astrophysical factor of the d(d,p)t reaction using the Trojan Horse Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinollo, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Romano, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Bonomo, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Cherubini, S. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Del Zoppo, A.; Figuera, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); La Cognata, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Lamia, L.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M.G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Pizzone, R.G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Rolfs, C.; Schuermann, D.; Strieder, F. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Tudisco, S.; Tumino, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)]|[Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy)

    2005-07-25

    Knowledge about reactions involving deuterium is required for a correct understanding of stellar and primordial nucleosynthesis processes, and also in planning fusion reactors for energy production. We have studied the d(d,p)t reaction in the energy range from 1.5 MeV down to astrophysical energies by means of the Trojan Horse Method applied to the three-body {sup 6}Li(d,pt){alpha} reaction, at a beam energy of 14 MeV. Protons and tritons have been detected in coincidence and identified. Quasi-free events have been kinematically selected, in order to extract the cross section and the astrophysical factor, and compare them with the values measured for the direct d(d,p)t process.

  19. Reaction rates for a generalized reaction-diffusion master equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellander, Stefan; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that there is an inherent limit to the accuracy of the reaction-diffusion master equation. Specifically, there exists a fundamental lower bound on the mesh size, below which the accuracy deteriorates as the mesh is refined further. In this paper we extend the standard reaction-diffusion master equation to allow molecules occupying neighboring voxels to react, in contrast to the traditional approach, in which molecules react only when occupying the same voxel. We derive reaction rates, in two dimensions as well as three dimensions, to obtain an optimal match to the more fine-grained Smoluchowski model and show in two numerical examples that the extended algorithm is accurate for a wide range of mesh sizes, allowing us to simulate systems that are intractable with the standard reaction-diffusion master equation. In addition, we show that for mesh sizes above the fundamental lower limit of the standard algorithm, the generalized algorithm reduces to the standard algorithm. We derive a lower limit for the generalized algorithm which, in both two dimensions and three dimensions, is of the order of the reaction radius of a reacting pair of molecules.

  20. Predicting the capture rate in the Sun from a direct detection signal independently of the astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Garcia, Juan

    2016-05-01

    The goal of the works on which this talk is based is to relate a direct detection signal with neutrino limits from the Sun independently of the astrophysics. In order to achieve this we derive a halo-independent lower bound on the dark matter capture rate in the Sun from a direct detection signal, with which one can set upper limits on the branching ratios into different channels from the absence of a high-energy neutrino flux in neutrino observatories. We also extend this bound to the case of inelastic scattering, both endothermic and exothermic. From two inelastic signals we show how the dark matter mass, the mass difference of the states and the couplings to neutrons and protons can be obtained. Furthermore, one can also pin down the exothermic/endothermic nature of the scattering, and therefore a precise lower bound on the solar capture rate is predicted. We also discuss isospin violation and uncertainties due to form factors.

  1. Recent results in nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Coc, Alain; Kiener, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we emphasize the interplay between astrophysical observations, modeling, and nuclear physics laboratory experiments. Several important nuclear cross sections for astrophysics have long been identified e.g. 12C(alpha,gamma)16O for stellar evolution, or 13C(alpha,n)16O and 22Ne(alpha,n)25Mg as neutron sources for the s-process. More recently, observations of lithium abundances in the oldest stars, or of nuclear gamma-ray lines from space, have required new laboratory experiments. New evaluation of thermonuclear reaction rates now includes the associated rate uncertainties that are used in astrophysical models to i) estimate final uncertainties on nucleosynthesis yields and ii) identify those reactions that require further experimental investigation. Sometimes direct cross section measurements are possible, but more generally the use of indirect methods is compulsory in view of the very low cross sections. Non-thermal processes are often overlooked but are also important for nuclear astrophysics,...

  2. Cross sections for nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General properties of low-energy cross sections and of reaction rates are presented. We describe different models used in nuclear astrophysics: microscopic models, the potential model, and the R-matrix method. Two important reactions, 7Be(p,γ)8B and 12C(α,γ)16O, are then briefly discussed. (author)

  3. Study of the {sup 7}Li (p,{alpha}){sup 4}He Reaction at Astrophysical Energies Through the Trojan Horse Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegriti, M.G.; Aliotta, M.; Cherubini, S.; Lattuada, M.; Miljanic, D.; Pizzone, R.G.; Romano, S.; Soic, N.; Spitaleri, C.; Zadro, M.; Zappala, R.A.

    2000-12-31

    The Trojan Horse Method has been applied to obtain information about {sup 7}Li(p,{alpha}),{sup 4}He reaction at astrophysical energies. The {sup 7}Li(d,{alpha} n){sup 4}He reaction has been used and the two body reaction cross section for the {sup 7}Li(p,{alpha}){sup 4}He has been extracted together with its astrophysical factor S(E).

  4. The Proton- 3He - And α-Particle-Induced Nuclear Reactions At Low And Extremely Low Energies For Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The present report is devoted to brief discussion of the following subjects. The modern methods of definition of nuclear vertex constants (NVC) (or respective asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANC)): a) the modified DWBA; b) the modified two-body potential approach for direct radiative b(c, γ )c capture reactions. About accuracy of the available 'indirectly' measured values of the NVC's and ANC's for the specific nuclei such as 3He,6,7Li, 7Be, 8B, 13,14N and 17F obtained by different methods. Use of ANCs for determination of the astrophysical S factors of the radiative capture A(p,γ )B and A(α, γ)B reactions relevant for astrophysics. About prospects of using of the available experimental facilities of INP (Almaty, Kazakhstan), RIAP (Tashkent, Uzbekistan) and CNRTC (Istanbul, Turkey) for the precise measurements of the radiative capture 6Li(p,γ )7Be, d(α,γ )6Li and 10B(p, γ)11C and 12C(p, γ)13N and A(α, γ)B reactions relevant for astrophysics. (authors)

  5. Enhancement of Resonant Thermonuclear Reaction Rates in Extremely Dense Stellar Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, Naoki; Tomizawa, Nami; Wanajo, Shinya; Nozawa, Satoshi

    2002-01-01

    The enhancement factor of the resonant thermonuclear reaction rates is calculated for the extremely dense stellar plasmas in the liquid phase. In order to calculate the enhancement factor we use the screening potential which is deduced from the numerical experiment of the classical one-component plasma. It is found that the enhancement is tremendous for white dwarf densities if the ^{12}C + ^{12}C fusion cross sections show resonant behavior in the astrophysical energy range. We summarize our...

  6. Trojan Horse Method and RIBs: The {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Iwasa, N.; Kato, S.; Komatsubara, H.; Teranishi, T.; Coc, A.; De Sereville, N.; Hammache, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita di Catania and INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy) and UniKORE, Enna (Italy)

    2012-11-12

    The abundance of {sup 18}F in Nova explosions is an important issue for the understanding of this astrophysical phenomenon. For this reason it is necessary to study the nuclear reactions that produce or destroy this isotope in novae. Among these latter processes, the {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}){sup 15}O is one of the main {sup 18}F destruction channels. We report here on the preliminary results of the first experiment that applies the Trojan Horse Method to a Radioactive Ion Beam induced reaction. The experiment was performed using the CRIB apparatus of the Center for Nuclear Study of The Tokyo University.

  7. A Modified activation method for reaction total cross section and yield measurements at low astrophysically relevant energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemov, S. V.; Igamov, S. B.; Karakhodjaev, A. A.; Radyuk, G. A.; Tojiboyev, O. R.; Salikhbaev, U. S.; Ergashev, F. Kh.; Nam, I. V.; Aliev, M. K.; Kholbaev, I.; Rumi, R. F.; Khalikov, R. I.; Eshkobilov, Sh. Kh.; Muminov, T. M.

    2016-07-01

    The activation method is proposed for collection of the sufficient statistics during the investigation of the nuclear astrophysical reactions at low energies with the short-living residual nuclei formation. The main feature is a multiple cyclical irradiation of a target by an ion beam and measurement of the radioactivity decay curve. The method was tested by the yield measurement of the 12C(p,γ)13N reaction with detecting the annihilation γγ- coincidences from 13N(β+ν)13C decay at the two-arm scintillation spectrometer.

  8. The fluorine destruction in stars: First experimental study of the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Cognata, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Indelicato, I.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, V.; Cherubini, S.; Coc, A.; Gulino, M.; Hons, Z.; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, V.; Lamia, L.; Mrazek, J.; Palmerini, S.; Piskor, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S. [INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); University of Catania and INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); and others

    2012-11-12

    The {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}){sup 16}O reaction is an important fluorine destruction channel in the proton-rich outer layers of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and it might also play a role in hydrogendeficient post-AGB star nucleosynthesis. So far, available direct measurements do not reach the energy region of astrophysical interest (E{sub cm}{approx} 300 keV), because of the hindrance effect of the Coulomb barrier. The Trojan Horse (TH) method was thus used to access this energy region, by extracting the quasi-free contribution to the {sup 2}H({sup 19}F,{alpha}{sup 16}O)n reaction. The TH measurement of the {alpha}{sub 0} channel, which is the dominant one at such energies, shows the presence of resonant structures not observed before that cause an increase of the reaction rate at astrophysical temperatures up to a factor of 1.7, with potential important consequences for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  9. An approximate classical unimolecular reaction rate theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meishan; Rice, Stuart A.

    1992-05-01

    We describe a classical theory of unimolecular reaction rate which is derived from the analysis of Davis and Gray by use of simplifying approximations. These approximations concern the calculation of the locations of, and the fluxes of phase points across, the bottlenecks to fragmentation and to intramolecular energy transfer. The bottleneck to fragment separation is represented as a vibration-rotation state dependent separatrix, which approximation is similar to but extends and improves the approximations for the separatrix introduced by Gray, Rice, and Davis and by Zhao and Rice. The novel feature in our analysis is the representation of the bottlenecks to intramolecular energy transfer as dividing surfaces in phase space; the locations of these dividing surfaces are determined by the same conditions as locate the remnants of robust tori with frequency ratios related to the golden mean (in a two degree of freedom system these are the cantori). The flux of phase points across each dividing surface is calculated with an analytic representation instead of a stroboscopic mapping. The rate of unimolecular reaction is identified with the net rate at which phase points escape from the region of quasiperiodic bounded motion to the region of free fragment motion by consecutively crossing the dividing surfaces for intramolecular energy exchange and the separatrix. This new theory generates predictions of the rates of predissociation of the van der Waals molecules HeI2, NeI2 and ArI2 which are in very good agreement with available experimental data.

  10. Theoretical analysis of the astrophysical S-factor for the capture reaction α + d → {sup 6}Li + γ in the two-body model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tursunov, E. M., E-mail: tursune@inp.uz; Turakulov, S. A., E-mail: turakulov@inp.uz [Uzbek Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Uzbekistan); Descouvemont, P., E-mail: pdesc@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique (Belgium)

    2015-03-15

    Theoretical estimates for the astrophysical S-factor and the rate of the reaction d(α, γ){sup 6}Li were obtained on the basis of the two-body model involving an α−d potential that has a simple Gaussian form and which describes correctly S-, P-, and D-wave phase shifts, the binding energy, and the asymptotic normalization coefficient for the S-wave bound state. The wave functions for the bound and continuum channels were calculated with the aid of the highly precise Numerov algorithm. The results for the contributions of the E1 and E2 transition components reveal a good convergence as the upper limit in the effective integrals increases up to 40 fm. The results obtained for the astrophysical S-factor and the rate of the reaction d(α, γ){sup 6}Li in the temperature range of 10{sup 6}K ≤ T ≤ 10{sup 10} K agree well with the results of the calculations performed by A.M. Mukhamedzhanov and his coauthors [Phys. Rev. C 83, 055805 (2011)] by using the known asymptotic form of the wave function at low energies and a complicated two-body potential at higher energies.

  11. Theoretical analysis of the astrophysical S-factor for the capture reaction α + d → 6Li + γ in the two-body model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical estimates for the astrophysical S-factor and the rate of the reaction d(α, γ)6Li were obtained on the basis of the two-body model involving an α−d potential that has a simple Gaussian form and which describes correctly S-, P-, and D-wave phase shifts, the binding energy, and the asymptotic normalization coefficient for the S-wave bound state. The wave functions for the bound and continuum channels were calculated with the aid of the highly precise Numerov algorithm. The results for the contributions of the E1 and E2 transition components reveal a good convergence as the upper limit in the effective integrals increases up to 40 fm. The results obtained for the astrophysical S-factor and the rate of the reaction d(α, γ)6Li in the temperature range of 106K ≤ T ≤ 1010 K agree well with the results of the calculations performed by A.M. Mukhamedzhanov and his coauthors [Phys. Rev. C 83, 055805 (2011)] by using the known asymptotic form of the wave function at low energies and a complicated two-body potential at higher energies

  12. Few-Body Problems in Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, H.O.U.

    2013-01-01

    The 3α-reaction is one of the key reactions in nuclear astrophysics. Since it is a three-body reaction direct measurement is impossible, and therefore the reaction rate must be estimated theoretically. In this contribution I will discuss uncertainties in this reaction rate both at very low...

  13. Nuclear reaction rates and the nova outburst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we examined the consequences of improving the nuclear reaction library on our simulations of TNRs on 1.25M, WD and 1.35M, WDS. We have found that the changes in the rates have affected the nucleosynthesis predictions of our calculations but not, to any great extent, the gross features. In addition, we have used a lower mass accretion rate than in our previous studies in order to accrete (and eject) more material. This has, as expected, caused the peak values of some important parameters to increase over our previous studies at the same WD mass. However, because some important reaction rates have declined in the new compilation this has not increased the abundances for nuclei above aluminum and, in fact, they have declined while the abundances of both 26Al and 27Al have increased at both WD masses. In contrast, the abundance of 22Na has declined at both WD masses over the values predicted in our earlier work. This has important implications with respect to predictions of the observability of novae with INTEGRAL

  14. The Astrophysical S-factor for the 2H(, )6Li Nuclear Reaction at Low-Energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H. Sadeghi; A. Moghadasi; M. Ghamary

    2014-12-01

    The alpha radiative capture reactions are the key to understand about primordial nucleosynthesis and the observed abundance of light nucleus in stars. The astrophysical S-factor for the process 2H(, )6Li has been calculated at the low-energies relevant to big-bang nucleosynthesis and in comparison with laboratory data. On the basis of the model, the alpha radiative capture process is studied by using the two-and three-body electromagnetic currents. The bound and resonance states of 6Li are calculated via an inverse process, deuteron- photodisintegration of a 6Li nucleus. In comparison with other theoretical approaches and available laboratory data, excellent agreement is achieved for the astrophysical S-factor of this process.

  15. Fusion Reaction Rate in an Inhomogeneous Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Son; N.J. Fisch

    2004-09-03

    The local fusion rate, obtained from the assumption that the distribution is a local Maxwellian, is inaccurate if mean-free-paths of fusing particles are not sufficiently small compared with the inhomogeneity length of the plasma. We calculate the first order correction of P0 in terms of the small spatial gradient and obtain a non-local modification of P(sub)0 in a shock region when the gradient is not small. Use is made of the fact that the fusion reaction cross section has a relatively sharp peak as a function of energy.

  16. New measurement of the d(d,p)t reaction at astrophysical energies via the Trojan-horse method

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chengbo; Wen, Qungang; Fu, Yuanyong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Shuhua; Meng, Qiuying; Spitaleri, C.(Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia, Univ. di Catania, via S. Sofia, Catania, Italy); A. Tumino; Pizzone, R. G.; Lamia, L

    2015-01-01

    The study of d(d,p)t reaction is very important for the nucleosynthesis in both standard Big Bang and stellar evolution, as well as for the future fusion reactors planning of energy production. The d(d,p)t bare nucleus astrophysical S(E) factor has been measured indirectly at energies from about 400 keV down to several keV by means of the Trojan horse method applied to the quasi-free process $\\rm {}^2H({}^6Li,pt){}^4He$ induced at a lithium beam energy of 9.5 MeV, which is closer to the zero ...

  17. Computational infrastructure for nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Computational Infrastructure for Nuclear Astrophysics is a platform-independent suite of computer codes available online at nucastrodata.org that enables users to quickly quantify the potential astrophysical impact of a new laboratory nuclear physics result. Users can evaluate cross sections, process them into thermonuclear reaction rates, and parameterize (with a few percent accuracy) these rates that vary by up to 30 orders of magnitude over temperatures from 0.01 - 10 GK. Users can then properly format these rates for input into astrophysical computer simulations, create and manipulate libraries of rates, and enter and browse through comments on rates and libraries. Users can also run sample post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations, and visualize the calculation results with one- or two-dimensional plots. (author)

  18. Neutron Capture Reactions on Fe and Ni Isotopes for the Astrophysical s-process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron capture cross sections in the keV neutron energy region are the key nuclear physics input to study the astrophysical slow neutron capture process. In the past years, a series of neutron capture cross section measurements has been performed at the neutron time-of-flight facility nTOF at CERN focussing on the Fe/Ni mass region. Recent results and future developments in the neutron time-of-flight technique are discussed

  19. LUNA: Nuclear astrophysics underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underground nuclear astrophysics with LUNA at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso spans a history of 20 years. By using the rock overburden of the Gran Sasso mountain chain as a natural cosmic-ray shield very low signal rates compared to an experiment on the surface can be tolerated. The cross sectons of important astrophysical reactions directly in the stellar energy range have been successfully measured. In this proceeding we give an overview over the key accomplishments of the experiment and an outlook on its future with the expected addition of an additional accelerator to the underground facilities, enabling the coverage of a wider energy range and the measurement of previously inaccessible reactions

  20. Indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Shubhchintak; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Kruppa, A.; Pang, D. Y.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss recent developments in indirect methods used in nuclear astrophysics to determine the capture cross sections and subsequent rates of various stellar burning processes, when it is difficult to perform the corresponding direct measurements. We discuss in brief, the basic concepts of Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients, the Trojan Horse Method, the Coulomb Dissociation Method, (d,p), and charge-exchange reactions.

  1. Indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Bertulani, C A; Mukhamedzhanov, A; Kadyrov, A S; Kruppa, A; Pang, D Y

    2015-01-01

    We discuss recent developments in indirect methods used in nuclear astrophysics to determine the capture cross sections and subsequent rates of various stellar burning processes, when it is difficult to perform the corresponding direct measurements. We discuss in brief, the basic concepts of Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients, the Trojan Horse Method, the Coulomb Dissociation Method, (d,p), and charge-exchange reactions.

  2. Experimental Study of the {sup 6}Li(d,{alpha}){sup 4}He Reaction and its Astrophysical Implications via the Trojan Horse Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzone, R.G.; Aliotta, M.; Blagus, S.; Cherubini, S.; Figuera, P.; Lattuada, M; Milin, M.; Miljanic, D.; Pellegriti, M.G.; Rendic, D.; Romano, S.; Soic, N.; Spitaleri, C.; Zadro, M.; Zappala, R.A.

    2000-12-31

    The {sup 6}Li(d, {alpha}){sup 4}He reaction, whose astrophysical importance is connected to the primordial nucleosynthesis in the framework of the Inhomogeneous Big Bang, has been studied by using the Trojan Horse Method (THM). We derive and discuss the cross section and the astrophysical S(E)-factor for E{sub cm}=0.025-0.7 MeV. Results are compared with data from a direct measurement.

  3. High-energy direct reactions with exotic nuclei and low-energy nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Baur, G

    2006-01-01

    Indirect methods in nuclear astrophysics are discussed. Recent work on Coulomb dissociation and an effective-range theory of low-lying electromagnetic strength of halo nuclei is presented. Coulomb dissociation of a halo nucleus bound by a zero-range potential is proposed as a homework problem (for further references see G. Baur and S. Typel, nucl-th/0504068). It is pointed out that the Trojan-Horse method (G. Baur, F. R\\"{o}sel, D. Trautmann and R. Shyam, Phys. Rep. 111 (1984) 333) is a suitable tool to investigate subthreshold resonances.

  4. Modeling of DNA zipper reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Preston; Sanchez, Casey; Mo, Alexander; Lal, Ratnesh

    2012-02-01

    DNA zippers are a thermodynamically driven system consisting of three DNA oligonucleotides. Two of the strands are designed to create a small helix the third is designed to invade and separated the helix. A zipper system consisting of a normal strand (N), a weak strand (W), and an opening strand (O). N is made up of normal DNA bases, while W is engineered with inosine bases substituted for guanine. Inosine forms one less hydrogen bond with cytosine than guanine. By varying the number and order of inosine, W is engineered to provide less than natural bonding affinities to N in forming the [N:W] helix. When O is introduced (a natural complement of N), it competitively displaces W from [N:W] and forms [N:O]. DNA zippers have been used to create new DNA devices such as springs and tweezers and to create functionalized DNA origami structures. Currently, The basic principles and interactions of DNA zippers are not well understood. Here we will report the results on an investigation of several different DNA zipper constructs designed to aid in the creation of a mathematical prediction of the reaction rate for DNA zippers.

  5. Thermonuclear reaction rates from statistical model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality of statistical model predictions for thermonuclear reaction rates is based on the accuracy of theoretical determinations of particle and photon transmission coefficients as well as of level densities of excited states in nuclei. The square well potentials for neutrons, protons and alpha particles, used in previous approaches, have been replaced in this work by realistic optical potentials which reproduce nicely experimental data, e.g. the neutron strength functions. E1 γ-transitions are calculated in the framework of the Giant Dipole Resonance model. The width ΓGDR(A.Z) is based on a macroscopic-microscopic model which results in a good agreement with the observed shell structure. The nuclear level densities are still computed with the aid of the back-shifted Fermi-gas model. The relation between the level density parameters a and δ and the shell correction term of nuclear mass formulae is obtained by using the most recent experimental level densities at the neutron separation energy. Cross sections predictions obtained within this framework are expected to lie safety within a factor of 2 of experimental values

  6. Visible light photon counters (VLPCs) for high rate tracking medical imaging and particle astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is on the operation principles of the Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs), application to high luminosity-high multiplicity tracking for High Energy Charged Particle Physics, and application to Medical Imaging and Particle Astrophysics. The VLPCs as Solid State Photomultipliers (SSPMS) with high quantum efficiency can detect down to single photons very efficiently with excellent time resolution and high avalanche gains

  7. Visible light photon counters (VLPCs) for high rate tracking medical imaging and particle astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atac, M.

    1998-02-01

    This paper is on the operation principles of the Visible Light Photon Counters (VLPCs), application to high luminosity-high multiplicity tracking for High Energy Charged Particle Physics, and application to Medical Imaging and Particle Astrophysics. The VLPCs as Solid State Photomultipliers (SSPMS) with high quantum efficiency can detect down to single photons very efficiently with excellent time resolution and high avalanche gains.

  8. Investigations of astrophysically interesting nuclear reactions by the use of gas target techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of the common properties of windowless and recirculating gas targets is presented. As example the Stuttgart gas target facility Rhinoceros in the extended and in the supersonic jet mode with its properties and techniques is explained, also with respect to gas purification techniques. Furthermore several typical experiments from the field of nuclear astrophysics with characteristic results are described (D(α,γ)6Li, 15N(α,γ)19F, 16O(p,γ)17F, 16O(α,γ)20Ne, 20Ne(α,γ)24Mg, 21Ne(α,n)24Mg, 18O(α,n)21Ne, 17O(α,n)20Ne). In several cases the experimental sensitivity could be raised by up to a factor of 106. (orig.)

  9. Investigations of astrophysically interesting nuclear reactions by the use of gas target techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, J.W. [Inst. fuer Strahlenphysik, Univ. Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    A brief review of the common properties of windowless and recirculating gas targets is presented. As example the Stuttgart gas target facility Rhinoceros in the extended and in the supersonic jet mode with its properties and techniques is explained, also with respect to gas purification techniques. Furthermore several typical experiments from the field of nuclear astrophysics with characteristic results are described (D({alpha},{gamma}){sup 6}Li, {sup 15}N({alpha},{gamma}){sup 19}F, {sup 16}O(p,{gamma}){sup 17}F, {sup 16}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 20}Ne, {sup 20}Ne({alpha},{gamma}){sup 24}Mg, {sup 21}Ne({alpha},n){sup 24}Mg, {sup 18}O({alpha},n){sup 21}Ne, {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne). In several cases the experimental sensitivity could be raised by up to a factor of 10{sup 6}. (orig.)

  10. Multi-detector setup for nuclear astrophysical reaction studies on the low energy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multi-detector setup assembled on the basis of the ion beam from 'SOKOL' electrostatic accelerator is described. The setup allows one to measure three various spectra in a single experiment: prompt gamma-quanta from nuclear reactions, positrons from the decays of radioactive nuclei formed in the reactions and coincidence spectrum of annihilation gamma-quanta. (authors)

  11. Recent results in nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coc, Alain; Kiener, Juergen [CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite Paris Sud 11, UMR 8609, Centre de Sciences Nucleaires et de Sciences de la Matiere (CSNSM), Orsay Campus (France); Hammache, Fairouz [CNRS/IN2P3 et Universite Paris Sud 11, UMR 8608, Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay (IPNO), Orsay Campus (France)

    2015-03-01

    In this review, we emphasize the interplay between astrophysical observations, modeling, and nuclear physics laboratory experiments. Several important nuclear cross sections for astrophysics have long been identified, e.g., {sup 12}C(α, γ){sup 16}O for stellar evolution, or {sup 13}C(α, n){sup 16}O and {sup 22}Ne(α, n){sup 25}Mg as neutron sources for the s-process. More recently, observations of lithium abundances in the oldest stars, or of nuclear gamma-ray lines from space, have required new laboratory experiments. New evaluation of thermonuclear reaction rates now includes the associated rate uncertainties that are used in astrophysical models to i) estimate final uncertainties on nucleosynthesis yields and ii) identify those reactions that require further experimental investigation. Sometimes direct cross section measurements are possible, but more generally the use of indirect methods is compulsory in view of the very low cross sections. Non-thermal processes are often overlooked but are also important for nuclear astrophysics, e.g., in gamma-ray emission from solar flares or in the interaction of cosmic rays with matter, and also motivate laboratory experiments. Finally, we show that beyond the historical motivations of nuclear astrophysics, understanding i) the energy sources that drive stellar evolution and ii) the origin of the elements can also be used to give new insights into physics beyond the standard model. (orig.)

  12. Determination by transfer reaction of alpha widths in fluorine for astrophysical interest; Determination par reaction de transfert de largeurs alpha dans le fluor 19. Applications a l'astrophysique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Santos, F. de

    1995-04-15

    The nucleosynthesis of fluorine is not known. Several astrophysical models predict the alpha radiative capture onto N{sup 15} as the main fluorine production reaction. In the expression of the reaction rate, one parameter is missing: the alpha width of the resonance on the E = 4.377 MeV level in fluorine. A direct measurement is excluded due to the very low cross-section expected. We have determined this alpha width using a transfer reaction followed by analyses with FR-DWBA (Finite Range Distorted Wave Born Approximation) in a simple cluster alpha model. This experiment was carried out with a Li{sup 7} beam with E = 28 MeV onto a N{sup 15} gas target. The 16 first levels were studied. Spectroscopic factors were extracted for most of them. Alpha widths for unbound levels were determined. Many alpha width were compared with known values from direct reaction and the differences lie within the uncertainty range (factor 2). The alpha width for the E = 4.377 MeV level was determined ({gamma}{sub {alpha}} = 1.5*10{sup -15} MeV), its value is about 60 times weaker than the used value. The influence of our new rate was studied in AGB (Asymptotic Giant Branch) stars during thermal pulses. In this model the alteration is sensitive. (author)

  13. Astrophysical S-factor for destructive reactions of lithium-7 in big bang nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most prominent success with the Big Bang models is the precise reproduction of mass abundance ratio for 4He. In spite of the success, abundances of lithium isotopes are still inconsistent between observations and their calculated results, which is known as lithium abundance problem. Since the calculations were based on the experimental reaction data together with theoretical estimations, more precise experimental measurements may improve the knowledge of the Big Bang nucleosynthesis. As one of the destruction process of lithium-7, we have performed measurements for the reaction cross sections of the 7L(3He,p)9Be reaction

  14. Typewriting rate as a function of reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, V; Wilson, G D; Schafer, R L

    1977-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the relationship between reaction time and typewriting rate. Subjects were 24 typists ranging in age from 19 to 39 yr. Reaction times (.001 sec) to a light were recorded for each finger and to each alphabetic character and three punctuation marks. Analysis of variance yielded significant differences in reaction time among subjects and fingers. Correlation between typewriting rate and average reaction time to the alphabetic characters and three punctuation marks was --.75. Correlation between typewriting rate and the difference between the reaction time of the hands was --.42. Factors influencing typewriting rate may include reaction time of the fingers, difference between the reaction time of the hands, and reaction time to individual keys on the typewriter. Implications exist for instructional methodology and further research. PMID:604897

  15. Measurements of neutron-induced reactions in inverse kinematics and applications to nuclear astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Reifarth René; Litvinov Yuri A.; Endres Anne; Göbel Kathrin; Heftrich Tanja; Glorius Jan; Koloczek Alexander; Sonnabend Kerstin; Travaglio Claudia; Weigand Mario

    2015-01-01

    Neutron capture cross sections of unstable isotopes are important for neutron-induced nucleosynthesis as well as for technological applications. A combination of a radioactive beam facility, an ion storage ring and a high flux reactor would allow a direct measurement of neutron induced reactions over a wide energy range on isotopes with half lives down to minutes. The idea is to measure neutron-induced reactions on radioactive ions in inverse kinematics. This means, the radioactive ions will ...

  16. Electron capture rates in stars studied with heavy ion charge exchange reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bertulani, C A

    2015-01-01

    Indirect methods using nucleus-nucleus reactions at high energies (here, high energies mean $\\sim$ 50 MeV/nucleon and higher) are now routinely used to extract information of interest for nuclear astrophysics. This is of extreme relevance as many of the nuclei involved in stellar evolution are short-lived. Therefore, indirect methods became the focus of recent studies carried out in major nuclear physics facilities. Among such methods, heavy ion charge exchange is thought to be a useful tool to infer Gamow-Teller matrix elements needed to describe electron capture rates in stars and also double beta-decay experiments. In this short review, I provide a theoretical guidance based on a simple reaction model for charge exchange reactions.

  17. Global transmission coefficients in Hauser-Feshbach calculations for astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauscher, T. [Inst. fuer Physik, Univ. Basel, Basel (Switzerland)

    1998-06-01

    The current status of optical potentials employed in the prediction of thermonuclear reaction rates for astrophysics in the Hauser-Feshbach formalism is discussed. Special emphasis is put on {alpha}+nucleus potentials. Further experimental efforts are motivated. (orig.)

  18. Study of the reaction of astrophysical interest 60Fe(n,γ)61Fe via (d,pγ) transfer reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    60Fe is of special interest in nuclear astrophysics. Indeed the recent observations of 60Fe characteristic gamma-ray lines by the RHESSI and INTEGRAL spacecrafts allowed to measure the total flux of 60Fe over the Galaxy. Moreover the observation in presolar grains of an excess of the daughter-nuclei of 60Fe, 60Ni, gives constraints on the conditions of formation of the early solar system. However, the cross-sections of some reactions involved in 60Fe nucleosynthesis and included to stellar models are still uncertain. The destruction reaction of 60Fe, 60Fe(n, γ)61Fe, is one of them. The total cross-section can be separate into two contributions: the direct one, involving states below the neutron separation threshold of 61Fe, and the resonant one.We improved 61Fe spectroscopy in order to evaluate the direct capture part of the 60Fe(n, γ)61Fe reaction cross-section. 60Fe(n, γ)61Fe was thus studied via d(60Fe, pγ)61Fe transfer reaction with the CATS/MUST2/EXOGAM setup at LISE-GANIL. DWBA analysis of experimental proton differential cross-sections allowed to extract orbital angular momentum and spectroscopic factors of different populated states identified below the neutron threshold. A comparison of experimental results for 61Fe with experimental results for similar nuclei and with shell-model calculations was also performed. (author)

  19. OH{sup +} in astrophysical media: state-to-state formation rates, Einstein coefficients and inelastic collision rates with He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gómez-Carrasco, Susana [Facultad de Química, Unidad Asociada CSIC-USAL, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Godard, Benjamin [LERMA, CNRS UMR 8112, Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon (France); Lique, François [LOMC-UMR 6294, CNRS-Université du Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 540, F-76058 Le Havre (France); Bulut, Niyazi [Department of Physics, Firat University, 23169 Elazig (Turkey); Kłos, Jacek [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2021 (United States); Roncero, Octavio [Instituto de Física Fundamental (IFF-CSIC), C.S.I.C., Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Aguado, Alfredo [Facultad de Ciencias, Unidad Asociada de Química-Física Aplicada CSIC-UAM, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Aoiz, F. Javier; Castillo, Jesús F. [Departamento de Química Física I, Unidad Asociada de Química-Física CSIC-UCM, Facultad de Química, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Goicoechea, Javier R.; Etxaluze, Mireya; Cernicharo, José, E-mail: octavio.roncero@csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales (ICMM-CSIC), C.S.I.C., Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, 3, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-10-10

    The rate constants required to model the OH{sup +} observations in different regions of the interstellar medium have been determined using state of the art quantum methods. First, state-to-state rate constants for the H{sub 2}(v = 0, J = 0, 1) + O{sup +}({sup 4} S) → H + OH{sup +}(X {sup 3}Σ{sup –}, v', N) reaction have been obtained using a quantum wave packet method. The calculations have been compared with time-independent results to assess the accuracy of reaction probabilities at collision energies of about 1 meV. The good agreement between the simulations and the existing experimental cross sections in the 0.01-1 eV energy range shows the quality of the results. The calculated state-to-state rate constants have been fitted to an analytical form. Second, the Einstein coefficients of OH{sup +} have been obtained for all astronomically significant rovibrational bands involving the X {sup 3}Σ{sup –} and/or A {sup 3}Π electronic states. For this purpose, the potential energy curves and electric dipole transition moments for seven electronic states of OH{sup +} are calculated with ab initio methods at the highest level, including spin-orbit terms, and the rovibrational levels have been calculated including the empirical spin-rotation and spin-spin terms. Third, the state-to-state rate constants for inelastic collisions between He and OH{sup +}(X {sup 3}Σ{sup –}) have been calculated using a time-independent close coupling method on a new potential energy surface. All these rates have been implemented in detailed chemical and radiative transfer models. Applications of these models to various astronomical sources show that inelastic collisions dominate the excitation of the rotational levels of OH{sup +}. In the models considered, the excitation resulting from the chemical formation of OH{sup +} increases the line fluxes by about 10% or less depending on the density of the gas.

  20. The power-law reaction rate coefficient for an elementary bimolecular reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Cangtao; Du, Jiulin

    2013-01-01

    The power-law TST reaction rate coefficient for an elementary bimolecular reaction is studied when the reaction takes place in a nonequilibrium system with power-law distributions. We derive a generalized TST rate coefficient, which not only depends on a power-law parameter but also on the reaction coordinate frequency of transition state. The numerical analyses show a very strong dependence of TST rate coefficient on the power-law parameter, and clearly indicate that a tiny deviation from un...

  1. Enzymatic spectrophotometric reaction rate determination of aspartame

    OpenAIRE

    Trifković Kata T.; Łękawska-Andrinopoulou Lucyna; Bugarski Branko M.; Georgiou Constantinos A.

    2015-01-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetener of low caloric value (approximately 200 times sweeter than sucrose). Aspartame is currently permitted for use in food and beverage production in more than 90 countries. The application of aspartame in food products requires development of rapid, inexpensive and accurate method for its determination. The new assay for determination of aspartame was based on set of reactions that are catalyzed by three different enzymes: α...

  2. The Trojan-Horse Method applied to the {sup 6}Li(p,{alpha}){sup 3}He reaction down to astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Pappalardo, L.; Cherubini, S.; Del Zoppo, A.; La Cognata, M.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M.G.; Pizzone, R.G.; Rinollo, A.; Romano, S.; Typel, S

    2004-04-05

    The Trojan-Horse Method has been applied to the three-body d({sup 6}Li,{alpha}{sup 3}He)n break-up reaction in order to extract the bare nucleus S(E) factor for the {sup 6}Li(p,{alpha}){sup 3}He down to astrophysical energies.

  3. On the Rate of Change of Period for Accelerated Motion and Their Implications in Astrophysics Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamohan R.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available We have derived in this paper, the relationship that needs to be satisfied when length measurements are expressed in two different units. Interesting relationships emerge when the smaller of the two units chosen is a function of time. We relate these results to the expected periodicities in the observed data when a system of objects are revolving around a common center of mass. We find that these results are highly intriguing and can equally well account for some of the major results in the field of astrophysics.

  4. Stellar Astrophysics and a Fundamental Description of Thermonuclear Reactions ? 04-ERD-058 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormand, W E; Navratil, P; Libby, S B

    2007-02-22

    Report on the progress achieved in 04-ERD-058. The primary goal of the project was to investigate new methods to provide a comprehensive understanding of how reactions between light nuclei proceed in hot, dense environments, such as stellar interiors. The project sought to develop an entirely new theoretical framework to describe the dynamics of nuclear collisions based on the fundamental nuclear interactions. Based on the new theoretical framework, new computational tools were developed to address specific questions in nuclear structure and reactions. A full study of the true nature of the three-nucleon interaction was undertaken within the formalism of effective field theory. We undertook a preliminary theoretical study of the quantum corrections to electron screening in thermal plasmas to resolve a discrepancy exhibited in previous theoretical approaches.

  5. Measurements of neutron-induced reactions in inverse kinematics and applications to nuclear astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reifarth René

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron capture cross sections of unstable isotopes are important for neutron-induced nucleosynthesis as well as for technological applications. A combination of a radioactive beam facility, an ion storage ring and a high flux reactor would allow a direct measurement of neutron induced reactions over a wide energy range on isotopes with half lives down to minutes. The idea is to measure neutron-induced reactions on radioactive ions in inverse kinematics. This means, the radioactive ions will pass through a neutron target. In order to efficiently use the rare nuclides as well as to enhance the luminosity, the exotic nuclides can be stored in an ion storage ring. The neutron target can be the core of a research reactor, where one of the central fuel elements is replaced by the evacuated beam pipe of the storage ring. Using particle detectors and Schottky spectroscopy, most of the important neutron-induced reactions, such as (n,γ, (n,p, (n,α, (n,2n, or (n,f, could be investigated.

  6. Measurements of neutron-induced reactions in inverse kinematics and applications to nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Reifarth, René; Endres, Anne; Göbel, Kathrin; Heftrich, Tanja; Glorius, Jan; Koloczek, Alexander; Sonnabend, Kerstin; Travaglio, Claudia; Weigand, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Neutron capture cross sections of unstable isotopes are important for neutron-induced nucleosynthesis as well as for technological applications. A combination of a radioactive beam facility, an ion storage ring and a high flux reactor would allow a direct measurement of neutron induced reactions over a wide energy range on isotopes with half lives down to minutes. The idea is to measure neutron-induced reactions on radioactive ions in inverse kinematics. This means, the radioactive ions will pass through a neutron target. In order to efficiently use the rare nuclides as well as to enhance the luminosity, the exotic nuclides can be stored in an ion storage ring. The neutron target can be the core of a research reactor, where one of the central fuel elements is replaced by the evacuated beam pipe of the storage ring. Using particle detectors and Schottky spectroscopy, most of the important neutron-induced reactions, such as (n,$\\gamma$), (n,p), (n,$\\alpha$), (n,2n), or (n,f), could be investigated.

  7. Dependence of X-Ray Burst Models on Nuclear Reaction Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Cyburt, R H; Heger, A; Johnson, E; Keek, L; Meisel, Z; Schatz, H; Smith, K

    2016-01-01

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear flashes on the surface of accreting neutron stars and reliable burst models are needed to interpret observations in terms of properties of the neutron star and the binary system. We investigate the dependence of X-ray burst models on uncertainties in (p,$\\gamma$), ($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$), and ($\\alpha$,p) nuclear reaction rates using fully self-consistent burst models that account for the feedbacks between changes in nuclear energy generation and changes in astrophysical conditions. A two-step approach first identified sensitive nuclear reaction rates in a single-zone model with ignition conditions chosen to match calculations with a state-of-the-art 1D multi-zone model based on the {\\Kepler} stellar evolution code. All relevant reaction rates on neutron deficient isotopes up to mass 106 were individually varied by a factor of 100 up and down. Calculations of the 84 highest impact reaction rate changes were then repeated in the 1D multi-zone model. We find a number of uncertain reac...

  8. Enzymatic spectrophotometric reaction rate determination of aspartame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifković Kata T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspartame is an artificial sweetener of low caloric value (approximately 200 times sweeter than sucrose. Aspartame is currently permitted for use in food and beverage production in more than 90 countries. The application of aspartame in food products requires development of rapid, inexpensive and accurate method for its determination. The new assay for determination of aspartame was based on set of reactions that are catalyzed by three different enzymes: α-chymotrypsin, alcohol oxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Optimization of the proposed method was carried out for: (i α-chymotrypsin activity; (ii time allowed for α-chymotrypsin action, (iii temperature. Evaluation of the developed method was done by determining aspartame content in “diet” drinks, as well as in artificial sweetener pills. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III46010

  9. Reduced transition probabilities for 4He radiative capture reactions at astrophysical energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reduced transition probabilities from an electric quadrupole B(E2) and reduced transition probabilities from a magnetic dipole B(M1) between the ground state and the first excited state have been calculated for the 3He(α,γ)7Be, 8Be(α,γ)12C and 12C(α,γ)16O radiative capture reactions with the M3Y potential. These reactions are important in stellar evolution. The calculated B(M1) and B(E2) for 7Be nuclei are found to be 1.082 × 10−3 e2 fm2 and 1.921 e2 fm4 from transitions 3/2− to 1/2−, respectively. The obtained values for reduced transition probabilities B(E2) for the 12C and 16O nuclei from transitions 0+ to 2+ are 12.54 e2 fm4 and 14.18 e2 fm4, respectively. The results are in satisfactory agreement with available experimental data

  10. Charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates: II. Tables and graphs of reaction rates and probability density functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical values of charged-particle thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei in the A=14 to 40 region are tabulated. The results are obtained using a method, based on Monte Carlo techniques, that has been described in the preceding paper of this issue (Paper I). We present a low rate, median rate and high rate which correspond to the 0.16, 0.50 and 0.84 quantiles, respectively, of the cumulative reaction rate distribution. The meaning of these quantities is in general different from the commonly reported, but statistically meaningless expressions, 'lower limit', 'nominal value' and 'upper limit' of the total reaction rate. In addition, we approximate the Monte Carlo probability density function of the total reaction rate by a lognormal distribution and tabulate the lognormal parameters μ and σ at each temperature. We also provide a quantitative measure (Anderson-Darling test statistic) for the reliability of the lognormal approximation. The user can implement the approximate lognormal reaction rate probability density functions directly in a stellar model code for studies of stellar energy generation and nucleosynthesis. For each reaction, the Monte Carlo reaction rate probability density functions, together with their lognormal approximations, are displayed graphically for selected temperatures in order to provide a visual impression. Our new reaction rates are appropriate for bare nuclei in the laboratory. The nuclear physics input used to derive our reaction rates is presented in the subsequent paper of this issue (Paper III). In the fourth paper of this issue (Paper IV) we compare our new reaction rates to previous results.

  11. Neutron induced reactions on aluminum-26, chloride-36 and calcium-41 and their astrophysical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Smet, Liesbeth Paula

    In this work (n,p) and (n,a) reactions on 26 A1, 36 Cl and 41 Ca are studied as a function of the neutron energy. The measurements were performed at the high resolution GELINA time-of-flight facility of the IRMM in Geel, Belgium. Besides the nuclear physics information obtained from the resonance analysis of the reaction cross sections, these reactions are of importance in the understanding of the observed 36 S and 26 Al solar abundances. In the case of 26 Al, the 26 A1(n,a) 23 Na cross section up to 45 keV has been determined. Six resonances are observed. For three of them, the total level width and the spin could be calculated. For most of the resonances the obtained resonance parameters are in agreement with previous data. The calculated Maxwellian Averaged Cross Section values (MACS) used in stellar model calculations confirm that 26 Al is indeed severely depleted by neutron captures in AGB stars. In the (n,p) and (n,a) measurements on 36 Cl, eighteen resonances are observed in the energy region up to 250 keV, whereas eight were identified before. Only the lowest energy resonance shows a significant (n,(x)-contribution of (76±7)%, which is in perfect agreement with the value reported before. Furthermore, for four resonances, the resonance strength, spin, total and partial width G p could be determined. They are in good agreement with previous data, but the achieved accuracy is better. The calculated MACS values are used in stellar model calculations to trace the origin of 36 S and reveal that the weak component of the s-process occurring in massive stars accounts for almost the entire production of solar 36 S. The 41 Ca(n,a) 3 8Ar measurement is the first ever reported in the resonance region and affects the 36 S abundance through 41 Ca(n,a) 38 Ar(n,g) 39 Ar(n,a) 36 S. Twelve resonances are observed in the energy region up to 45 keV. For most of them the area, the total width, the spin and a value for G n /G p could be determined. After extension of the energy

  12. The 25Mg(p,g)Al reaction at low astrophysical energies

    CERN Document Server

    Strieder, F; Formicola, A; Imbriani, G; Junker, M; Bemmerer, D; Best, A; Broggini, C; Caciolli, A; Corvisiero, P; Costantini, H; DiLeva, A; Elekes, Z; Fülöp, Zs; Gervino, G; Guglielmetti, A; Gustavino, C; Gyürky, Gy; Lemut, A; Marta, M; Mazzocchi, C; Menegazzo, R; Prati, P; Roca, V; Rolfs, C; Alvarez, C Rossi; Somorjai, E; Straniero, O; Terrasi, F; Trautvetter, H P

    2011-01-01

    In the present work we report on a new measurement of resonance strengths in the reaction 25Mg(p,gamma)26Al at E_cm= 92 and 189 keV. This study was performed at the LUNA facility in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory using a 4pi BGO summing crystal. For the first time the 92 keV resonance was directly observed and a resonance strength omega-gamma=(2.9+/-0.6)x10E-10 eV was determined. Additionally, the gamma-ray branchings and strength of the 189 keV resonance were studied with a high resolution HPGe detector yielding an omega-gamma value in agreement with the BGO measurement, but 20% larger compared to previous works.

  13. 78Kr(α,γ) reaction of astrophysical interest in inverse kinematics and the electronic screening effect on the beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis is constituted of two different topics related to astrophysics. The titles of these topics are: 'Alpha capture reaction in inverse kinematics, measurement of 78Kr(α,γ)82Sr reaction' and 'Measurement of the radioactive decay of 19O and 19Ne implanted in niobium'. The goal of the first part of the thesis was to establish an experimental technique for measuring radiative alpha capture reaction at low energies in inverse kinematics. The measurement of these reactions is very important in astrophysics since it will help to improve the reliability of alpha particle optical model potentials which are used for prediction of cross sections of nuclear reaction used in different astrophysical models of supernovae explosions. In this part we insisted on a technical feasibility of this type of experiment. In the second part of the thesis, we examined the influence of the environment on the beta decay probability, in particular the influence of the electronic screening of Coulomb barrier of nuclei induced by Cooper pairs in superconductors. The indication of an extremely weak effect was noticed. (author)

  14. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H; Suleimanov, Yu. V.

    2013-01-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett–Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any ...

  15. The Unity of Chemistry and Physics: Absolute Reaction Rate Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Hinne Hettema

    2012-01-01

    Henry Eyring's absolute rate theory explains the size of chemical reaction rate constants in terms of thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and quantum chemistry. In addition it uses a number of unique concepts such as the 'transition state'. A key feature of the theory is that the explanation it provides relies on the comparison of reaction rate constant expressions derived from these individual theories. In this paper, the example is used to develop a naturalized notion of reduction and th...

  16. Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates: III. Nuclear Physics Input

    OpenAIRE

    Iliadis, Christian; Longland, Richard; Champagne, Art; Coc, Alain

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear physics input used to compute the Monte Carlo reaction rates and probability density functions that are tabulated in the second paper of this series (Paper II) is presented. Specifically, we publish the input files to the Monte Carlo reaction rate code RatesMC, which is based on the formalism presented in the first paper of this series (Paper I). This data base contains overwhelmingly experimental nuclear physics information. The survey of literature for this review was concluded ...

  17. Estimating the Backup Reaction Wheel Orientation Using Reaction Wheel Spin Rates Flight Telemetry from a Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    2013-01-01

    A report describes a model that estimates the orientation of the backup reaction wheel using the reaction wheel spin rates telemetry from a spacecraft. Attitude control via the reaction wheel assembly (RWA) onboard a spacecraft uses three reaction wheels (one wheel per axis) and a backup to accommodate any wheel degradation throughout the course of the mission. The spacecraft dynamics prediction depends upon the correct knowledge of the reaction wheel orientations. Thus, it is vital to determine the actual orientation of the reaction wheels such that the correct spacecraft dynamics can be predicted. The conservation of angular momentum is used to estimate the orientation of the backup reaction wheel from the prime and backup reaction wheel spin rates data. The method is applied in estimating the orientation of the backup wheel onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The flight telemetry from the March 2011 prime and backup RWA swap activity on Cassini is used to obtain the best estimate for the backup reaction wheel orientation.

  18. Measurement of the 2H(d ,p ) 3H reaction at astrophysical energies via the Trojan-horse method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengbo; Wen, Qungang; Fu, Yuanyong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Shuhua; Meng, Qiuying; Spitaleri, C.; Tumino, A.; Pizzone, R. G.; Lamia, L.

    2015-08-01

    The study of the 2H(d ,p ) 3H reaction is very important for the nucleosynthesis in both the standard Big Bang and stellar evolution, as well as for the future fusion reactor's planning of energy production. The 2H(d ,p ) 3H bare nucleus astrophysical S (E ) factor has been measured indirectly at energies from about 400 keV down to several keV by means of the Trojan-horse method applied to the quasifree process 2H(6Li ,p t ) 4He induced at a lithium beam energy of 9.5 MeV, which is closer to the zero-quasifree-energy point. An accurate analysis leads to the determination of the Sbare(0 ) =56.7 ±2.0 keV b and of the corresponding electron screening potential Ue=13.2 ±4.3 eV. In addition, this work gives an updated test for the Trojan-horse nucleus invariance by comparing with previous indirect investigations using the 3He=(d +p ) breakup.

  19. Energy diffusion controlled reaction rate in dissipative Hamiltonian systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Mao-Lin; Zhu Wei-Qiu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the energy diffusion controlled reaction rate in dissipative Hamiltonian systems is investigated by using the stochastic averaging method for quasi Hamiltonian systems. The boundary value problem of mean first-passage time (MFPT) of averaged system is formulated and the energy diffusion controlled reaction rate is obtained as the inverse of MFPT. The energy diffusion controlled reaction rate in the classical Kramers bistable potential and in a two-dimensional bistable potential with a heat bath are obtained by using the proposed approach respectively. The obtained results are then compared with those from Monte Carlo simulation of original systems and from the classical Kramers theory. It is shown that the reaction rate obtained by using the proposed approach agrees well with that from Monte Carlo simulation and is more accurate than the classical Kramers rate.

  20. Theory of Crowding Effects on Bimolecular Reaction Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Szabo, Attila

    2016-07-01

    An analytical expression for the rate constant of a diffusion-influenced bimolecular reaction in a crowded environment is derived in the framework of a microscopic model that accounts for: (1) the slowdown of diffusion due to crowding and the dependence of the diffusivity on the distance between the reactants, (2) a crowding-induced attractive short-range potential of mean force, and (3) nonspecific reversible binding to the crowders. This expression spans the range from reaction to diffusion control. Crowding can increase the reaction-controlled rate by inducing an effective attraction between reactants but decrease the diffusion-controlled rate by reducing their relative diffusivity. PMID:27096470

  1. Effective reaction rates of a thin catalyst layer

    OpenAIRE

    Lenzinger, Michael; Schweizer, Ben

    2008-01-01

    The catalyst layer in a fuel cell can be described with the help of a system of reaction diffusion equations for the protonic overpotential and the oxygen concentration. The Tafel equation gives an exponential law for the reaction rate, the Tafel slope is a coefficient in this law. We present a rigorous thin layer analysis for two reaction regimes. In the case of thin catalyst layers, the original Tafel slope enters an effective boundary condition. In the case of large protonic overpotentials...

  2. Present status and perspectives in nuclear astrophysics studies of the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present status of the 12C(α,γ)16O cross section knowledge at stellar helium-core burning temperature is presented. Its consequences on the reaction rate uncertainties are discussed considering available models to extrapolate experimental results down to stellar helium-core burning temperature. Some experimental perspectives to reach the desired precision at stellar temperatures are described. (author)

  3. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: the O-17(p, alpha)N-14 reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Kroha, Václav

    Vol. 1681. Melville: American Institute of Physics, 2015, s. 050005. (AIP Conference Proceedings). ISBN 978-0-7354-1328-3. ISSN 0094-243X. [3rd International Conference on Nuclear Structure and Dynamics. Portoroz (SI), 14.06.2015-19.06.2015] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : thermonuclear reaction rates * cross-section * nucleosynthesis Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  4. Quantum, multibody effects and nuclear reaction rates in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed calculations of the contribution from off-shell effects to the quasiclassical tunneling of fusing particles are provided. It is shown that these effects accelerate the Gamow rates of nuclear reactions in dense plasma by several orders of magnitude

  5. Evaluation of the implementation of the R-matrix formalism with reference to the astrophysically important 18F(p,α)15O reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountford, D. J.; deBoer, R. J.; Descouvemont, P.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M.

    2014-12-01

    Background. The R-Matrix formalism is a crucial tool in the study of nuclear astrophysics reactions, and many codes have been written to implement the relevant mathematics. One such code makes use of Visual Basic macros. A further open-source code, AZURE, written in the FORTRAN programming language is available from the JINA collaboration and a C++ version, AZURE2, has recently become available. Purpose The detailed mathematics and extensive programming required to implement broadly applicable R-Matrix codes make comparisons between different codes highly desirable in order to check for errors. This paper presents a comparison of the three codes based around data and recent results of the astrophysically important 18F(p,α)15O reaction. Methods Using the same analysis techniques as in the work of Mountford et al. parameters are extracted from the two JINA codes, and the resulting cross-sections are compared. This includes both refitting data with each code and making low-energy extrapolations. Results All extracted parameters are shown to be broadly consistent between the three codes and the resulting calculations are in good agreement barring a known low-energy problem in the original AZURE code. Conclusion The three codes are shown to be broadly consistent with each other and equally valid in the study of astrophysical reactions, although one must be careful when considering low lying, narrow resonances which can be problematic when integrating.

  6. Nuclear astrophysics and the Trojan Horse Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Pizzone, R. G.

    2016-04-01

    In this review, we discuss the new recent results of the Trojan Horse Method that is used to determine reaction rates for nuclear processes in several astrophysical scenarios. The theory behind this technique is shortly presented. This is followed by an overview of some new experiments that have been carried out using this indirect approach.

  7. Analysis of reaction schemes using maximum rates of constituent steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motagamwala, Ali Hussain; Dumesic, James A

    2016-05-24

    We show that the steady-state kinetics of a chemical reaction can be analyzed analytically in terms of proposed reaction schemes composed of series of steps with stoichiometric numbers equal to unity by calculating the maximum rates of the constituent steps, rmax,i, assuming that all of the remaining steps are quasi-equilibrated. Analytical expressions can be derived in terms of rmax,i to calculate degrees of rate control for each step to determine the extent to which each step controls the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction. The values of rmax,i can be used to predict the rate of the overall stoichiometric reaction, making it possible to estimate the observed reaction kinetics. This approach can be used for catalytic reactions to identify transition states and adsorbed species that are important in controlling catalyst performance, such that detailed calculations using electronic structure calculations (e.g., density functional theory) can be carried out for these species, whereas more approximate methods (e.g., scaling relations) are used for the remaining species. This approach to assess the feasibility of proposed reaction schemes is exact for reaction schemes where the stoichiometric coefficients of the constituent steps are equal to unity and the most abundant adsorbed species are in quasi-equilibrium with the gas phase and can be used in an approximate manner to probe the performance of more general reaction schemes, followed by more detailed analyses using full microkinetic models to determine the surface coverages by adsorbed species and the degrees of rate control of the elementary steps. PMID:27162366

  8. New High-Precision Measurement of the Reaction Rate of the 18O(p,alpha)15N Reaction via THM

    CERN Document Server

    La Cognata, M; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Irgaziev, B; Tribble, R E; Banu, A; Cherubini, S; Coc, A; Crucilla, V; Goldberg, V Z; Gulino, M; Kiss, G G; Lamia, L; Chengbo, L; Mrazek, J; Pizzone, R G; Puglia, S M R; Rapisarda, G G; Romano, S; Sergi, M L; Tabacaru, G; Trache, L; Trzaska, W; Tumino, A

    2009-01-01

    The 18O(p,alpha)15N reaction rate has been extracted by means of the Trojan-Horse method. For the first time the contribution of the 20-keV peak has been directly evaluated, giving a value about 35% larger than previously estimated. The present approach has allowed to improve the accuracy of a factor 8.5, as it is based on the measured strength instead of educated guesses or spectroscopic measurements. The contribution of the 90-keV resonance has been determined as well, which turned out to be of negligible importance to astrophysics.

  9. Neutron Reactions in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Reifarth, R; Käppeler, F

    2014-01-01

    The quest for the origin of matter in the Universe had been the subject of philosophical and theological debates over the history of mankind, but quantitative answers could be found only by the scientific achievements of the last century. A first important step on this way was the development of spectral analysis by Kirchhoff and Bunsen in the middle of the 19$^{\\rm th}$ century, which provided first insight in the chemical composition of the sun and the stars. The energy source of the stars and the related processes of nucleosynthesis, however, could be revealed only with the discoveries of nuclear physics. A final breakthrough came eventually with the compilation of elemental and isotopic abundances in the solar system, which are reflecting the various nucleosynthetic processes in detail. This review is focusing on the mass region above iron, where the formation of the elements is dominated by neutron capture, mainly in the slow ($s$) and rapid ($r$) processes. Following a brief historic account and a sketc...

  10. Stellar $\\beta^{\\pm}$ decay rates of iron isotopes and its implications in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2014-01-01

    $\\beta$-decay and positron decay are believed to play a consequential role during the late phases of stellar evolution of a massive star culminating in a supernova explosion. Recently the microscopic calculation of weak-interaction mediated rates on key isotopes of iron was introduced using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory with improved model parameters. Here I discuss in detail the improved calculation of $\\beta^{\\pm}$ decay rates for iron isotopes ($^{54,55,56}$Fe) in stellar environment. The pn-QRPA theory allows a microscopic "state-by-state" calculation of stellar rates as explained later in text. Excited state Gamow-Teller distributions are much different from ground state and a microscopic calculation of decay rates from these excited states greatly increases the reliability of the total decay rate calculation specially during the late stages of stellar evolution. The reported decay rates are also compared with earlier calculations. The positron decay rates a...

  11. Stellar $\\beta^{\\pm}$ decay rates of iron isotopes and its implications in astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2014-01-01

    $\\beta$-decay and positron decay are believed to play a consequential role during the late phases of stellar evolution of a massive star culminating in a supernova explosion. Recently the microscopic calculation of weak-interaction mediated rates on key isotopes of iron was introduced using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory with improved model parameters. Here I discuss in detail the improved calculation of $\\beta^{\\pm}$ decay rates for iron isotopes...

  12. The Unity of Chemistry and Physics: Absolute Reaction Rate Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinne Hettema

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Henry Eyring's absolute rate theory explains the size of chemical reaction rate constants in terms of thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and quantum chemistry. In addition it uses a number of unique concepts such as the 'transition state'. A key feature of the theory is that the explanation it provides relies on the comparison of reaction rate constant expressions derived from these individual theories. In this paper, the example is used to develop a naturalized notion of reduction and the unity of science. This characterization provides the necessary clues to the sort of inter-theoretic linkages that are present in the theory of reaction rates. The overall theory is then further characterized as a theory network, establishing connections between non-reductive notions of inter-theory connections. This characterization also sheds new light on the unity of science.

  13. Measurement of astrophysical S-factors and cross sections of the p(d,γ)3He reaction in the ultralow energy region using deuterated zirconium target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article is devoted to the study of the d(p, γ)3He reaction mechanism with using of the zirconium deuterated target at proton energies of 11-19 keV. The experiment was carried out using the plasma high-current pulsed Hall ion accelerator (TPU, Tomsk). The dependence of the astrophysical S-factor and the effective cross section for pd-reaction on the energy of collision of protons with deuterons were measured. The results are compared with the literature. There is agreement between the results of the present work and the experiment performed by the LUNA collaboration with the target of deuterium gas

  14. State Space Path Integrals for Electronically Nonadiabatic Reaction Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Duke, Jessica Ryan

    2016-01-01

    We present a state-space-based path integral method to calculate the rate of electron transfer (ET) in multi-state, multi-electron condensed-phase processes. We employ an exact path integral in discrete electronic states and continuous Cartesian nuclear variables to obtain a transition state theory (TST) estimate to the rate. A dynamic recrossing correction to the TST rate is then obtained from real-time dynamics simulations using mean field ring polymer molecular dynamics. We employ two different reaction coordinates in our simulations and show that, despite the use of mean field dynamics, the use of an accurate dividing surface to compute TST rates allows us to achieve remarkable agreement with Fermi's golden rule rates for nonadiabatic ET in the normal regime of Marcus theory. Further, we show that using a reaction coordinate based on electronic state populations allows us to capture the turnover in rates for ET in the Marcus inverted regime.

  15. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  16. Reaction rate in an evanescent random walkers system

    CERN Document Server

    Ré, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion mediated reaction models are particularly ubiquitous in the description of physical, chemical or biological processes. The random walk schema is a useful tool for formulating these models. Recently, evanescent random walk models have received attention in order to include finite lifetime processes. For instance, activated chemical reactions, such as laser photolysis, exhibit a different asymptotic limit when compared with immortal walker models. A diffusion limited reaction model based on a one dimensional continuous time random walk on a lattice with evanescent walkers is presented here. The absorption probability density and the reaction rate are analytically calculated in the Laplace domain. A finite absorption rate is considered, a model usually referred to as imperfect trapping. Short and long time behaviors are analyzed.

  17. Effects of Surfactants on the Rate of Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Samiey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are self-assembled compounds that depend on their structure and electric charge can interact as monomer or micelle with other compounds (substrates. These interactions which may catalyze or inhibit the reaction rates are studied with pseudophase, cooperativity, and stoichiometric (classical models. In this review, we discuss applying these models to study surfactant-substrate interactions and their effects on Diels-Alder, redox, photochemical, decomposition, enzymatic, isomerization, ligand exchange, radical, and nucleophilic reactions.

  18. Benchmark calculations of thermal reaction rates. I - Quantal scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, David C.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal rate coefficient for the prototype reaction H + H2 yields H2 + H with zero total angular momentum is calculated by summing, averaging, and numerically integrating state-to-state reaction probabilities calculated by time-independent quantum-mechanical scattering theory. The results are very carefully converged with respect to all numerical parameters in order to provide high-precision benchmark results for confirming the accuracy of new methods and testing their efficiency.

  19. Reaction Rate Sensitivity of the gamma-Process Path

    OpenAIRE

    Rauscher, T.

    2004-01-01

    The location of the (gamma,p)/(gamma,n) and (gamma,alpha)/(gamma,n) line at gamma-process temperatures is discussed, using recently published reaction rates based on global Hauser-Feshbach calculations. The results can directly be compared to previously published, classic gamma-process discussions. The nuclei exhibiting the largest sensitivity to uncertainties in nuclear structure and reaction parameters are specified.

  20. RPMDrate: Bimolecular chemical reaction rates from ring polymer molecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Suleimanov, Yu.V.

    2013-03-01

    We present RPMDrate, a computer program for the calculation of gas phase bimolecular reaction rate coefficients using the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) method. The RPMD rate coefficient is calculated using the Bennett-Chandler method as a product of a static (centroid density quantum transition state theory (QTST) rate) and a dynamic (ring polymer transmission coefficient) factor. The computational procedure is general and can be used to treat bimolecular polyatomic reactions of any complexity in their full dimensionality. The program has been tested for the H+H2, H+CH 4, OH+CH4 and H+C2H6 reactions. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Angle-integrated measurements of the {sup 26}Al(d, n){sup 27}Si reaction cross section: a probe of spectroscopic factors and astrophysical resonance strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kankainen, A.; Woods, P.J.; Doherty, D.T.; Estrade, A.; Lotay, G. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Nunes, F.; Schatz, H.; Brown, B.A.; Browne, J.; Meisel, Z.; Zegers, R. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, East Lansing, MI (United States); Langer, C.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.; Stevens, J. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, East Lansing, MI (United States); Bader, V.; Gade, A.; Stroberg, R.; Scott, M. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Michigan State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Lansing, MI (United States); Baugher, T.; Bazin, D.; Kontos, A.; Noji, S.; Recchia, F.; Weisshaar, D. [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Perdikakis, G. [Michigan State University, JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, East Lansing, MI (United States); Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Redpath, T.; Wimmer, K. [Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI (United States); Seweryniak, D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Measurements of angle-integrated cross sections to discrete states in {sup 27}Si have been performed studying the {sup 26}Al(d, n) reaction in inverse kinematics by tagging states by their characteristic γ-decays using the GRETINA array. Transfer reaction theory has been applied to derive spectroscopic factors for strong single-particle states below the proton threshold, and astrophysical resonances in the {sup 26}Al(p, γ){sup 27}Si reaction. Comparisons are made between predictions of the shell model and known characteristics of the resonances. Overall very good agreement is obtained, indicating this method can be used to make estimates of resonance strengths for key reactions currently largely unconstrained by experiment. (orig.)

  2. Angle-integrated measurements of the 26Al(d, n)27Si reaction cross section: a probe of spectroscopic factors and astrophysical resonance strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of angle-integrated cross sections to discrete states in 27Si have been performed studying the 26Al(d, n) reaction in inverse kinematics by tagging states by their characteristic γ-decays using the GRETINA array. Transfer reaction theory has been applied to derive spectroscopic factors for strong single-particle states below the proton threshold, and astrophysical resonances in the 26Al(p, γ)27Si reaction. Comparisons are made between predictions of the shell model and known characteristics of the resonances. Overall very good agreement is obtained, indicating this method can be used to make estimates of resonance strengths for key reactions currently largely unconstrained by experiment. (orig.)

  3. LUNA: Nuclear Astrophysics Deep Underground

    OpenAIRE

    Broggini, Carlo; Bemmerer, Daniel; Guglielmetti, Alessandra; Menegazzo, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics strives for a comprehensive picture of the nuclear reactions responsible for synthesizing the chemical elements and for powering the stellar evolution engine. Deep underground in the Gran Sasso laboratory the cross sections of the key reactions of the proton-proton chain and of the Carbon-Nitrogen-Oxygen (CNO) cycle have been measured right down to the energies of astrophysical interest. The salient features of underground nuclear astrophysics are summarized here. The mai...

  4. The search for a main cause of uncertainty of the calculated astrophysical S factor for the direct radiative capture d(α, γ)6Li reaction at stellar energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: It is well known that the d( α,γ )6Li reaction is one of the sources of the 6Li production in the Big Bang nucleosynthesis. At the present time rather large uncertainties exist in the prediction of the rate of this reaction, which are mainly due to the absence both of the reliable experimental cross section (or the astrophysical S factor, S(E)) and of the theoretical calculations at extremely low energies E (E ≤ 600 keV) (see [1] and references therein). The aim of our work is to find out the principal cause of the existing large spread of the calculated values of S(E) at extremely low energies obtained by different authors, including the results of the present work. The basic idea of our consideration is that the d( α, γ)6Li reaction at such energies is predominantly peripheral [2]-[4]. Therefore the values of S(E) at extremely low energies are mainly determined by the nuclear vertex constant (NVC) (or by the asymptotic normalization constant (ANC)) for the virtual decay 6Li→α+ d. Taking this circumstance into account, we calculated the NVC for the virtual decay 6Li→α + d in the framework of three- body ( np) Faddeev equations in the momentum space. The Malfliet-Tjon and Graz potentials for NN interaction and the Sack-Biedenharn-Breit and Yamaguchi type potentials for αN interaction were used. The results of our calculations show that the obtained values of the NVC (or the ANC) are sensitive to the form of NN and αN potentials. This result is also corroborated by the values of the NVC calculated within the microscopic model using the Minnesota and Volkov potentials for NN- interaction [5]. The values of the NVC obtained in the present work were used to determine the values of the astrophysical S factor for the direct radiative capture d( α,γ )6Li reaction at extremely low energies. It is shown that the values of the NVC corresponding to the different forms of NN and αN potentials lead to the different values of the astrophysical factor

  5. A transition in the spatially integrated reaction rate of bimolecular reaction-diffusion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi, Masoud; Rajaram, Harihar

    2015-09-01

    Numerical simulations of diffusion with bimolecular reaction demonstrate a transition in the spatially integrated reaction rate—increasing with time initially, and transitioning to a decrease with time. In previous work, this reaction-diffusion problem has been analyzed as a Stefan problem involving a distinct moving boundary (reaction front), leading to predictions that front motion scales as √t, and correspondingly the spatially integrated reaction rate decreases as the square root of time 1/√t. We present a general nondimensionalization of the problem and a perturbation analysis to show that there is an early time regime where the spatially integrated reaction rate scales as √t rather than 1/√t. The duration of this early time regime (where the spatially integrated reaction rate is kinetically rather than diffusion controlled) is shown to depend on the kinetic rate parameters, diffusion coefficients, and initial concentrations of the two species. Numerical simulation results confirm the theoretical estimates of the transition time. We present illustrative calculations in the context of in situ chemical oxidation for remediation of fractured rock systems where contaminants are largely dissolved in the rock matrix. We consider different contaminants of concern (COCs), including TCE, PCE, MTBE, and RDX. While the early time regime is very short lived for TCE, it can persist over months to years for MTBE and RDX, due to slow oxidation kinetics.

  6. Reaction rates in squeezed polaron bands controlled by quantum statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiev, Mladen; Gochev, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Reaction rates are often defined using classical statistics for introducing the thermal occupation probabilities. Its predictions for the temperature dependence of a rate are found in reasonable agreement with experiments. In view of the applications to polaronic systems at lower temperatures under strongly quantized conditions, we now extend the definition so as to incorporate quantum statistics as well, Fermi-Dirac for polarons and Bose-Einstein for bipolarons. We find both extensions feasi...

  7. Indirect techniques in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is very difficult or often impossible to measure in the lab conditions nuclear cross sections at astrophysically relevant energies. That is why different indirect techniques are used to extract astrophysical information. In this talk different experimental possibilities to get astrophysical information using radioactive and stable beams will be addressed. 1. The asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) method. 2. Radiative neutron captures are determined by the spectroscopic factors (SP). A new experimental technique to determine the neutron SPs will be addressed. 3. 'Trojan Horse' is another unique indirect method, which allows one to extract the astrophysical factors for direct and resonant nuclear reactions at astrophysically relevant energies. (author)

  8. X particle effect for 6Li reaction rates calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inferred primordial 6Li-7Li abundances are different from standard big bang nucleosynthesis results, 6Li is 1000 times larger and 7Li is 3 times smaller than the big bang prediction. In big bang nucleosynthesis, negatively charged massive X particles a possible solution to explain this primordial Li abundances problem [1]. In this study, we consider only X particle effect for nuclear reactions to obtain S-factor and reaction rates for Li. All S-factors calculated within the Optical Model framework for d(α,γ)6Li system. We showed that the enhancement effect of massive negatively charged X particle for 6Li system reaction rate.(author)

  9. The Feasibility of direct measurement of the {sup 44}Ti(α, p){sup 47}V and {sup 40}Ca(α, p){sup 43}Sc reactions in forward kinematics at astrophysically relevant temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Abdullah, T. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, Dresden (Germany); The Hashemite University, Physics Department, P.O. Box 150459, Zarqa (Jordan); Akhmadaliev, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Sobiella, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, Dresden (Germany); Ayranov, M. [Directorate-General for Energy, European Commission, Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Dressler, R.; Schumann, D.; Stowasser, T. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Laboratory of Radiochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Elekes, Z. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (MTA ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Kivel, N. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Nuclear Energy and Safety, Hot Laboratory Division, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Schmidt, K.; Takacs, M.P. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiation Physics, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Dresden (Germany); Zuber, K. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Understanding the synthesis of radioactive {sup 44}Ti in the α-rich freeze-out following core-collapse supernovae may help to better interpret such explosive events. The γ-ray lines from the decay of {sup 44}Ti have been observed by space-based γ-ray telescopes from two supernova remnants. It is believed that the {sup 44}Ti(α, p){sup 47}V reaction dominates the destruction of {sup 44}Ti, while the {sup 40}Ca(α, p){sup 43}Sc reaction removes fuel from the main {sup 44}Ti production reaction {sup 40}Ca(α, γ){sup 44}Ti. Here we report on a possible technique to determine both reaction rates at astrophysically relevant energies in forward kinematics. The first reaction will be performed using a 1-10 MBq {sup 44}Ti target. Two important concerns are considered to make this study possible: The amount of stable Ti in the radioactive target, which will be prepared via spallation reactions at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), and the degree of radioactive contaminations in the experimental setup due to sputtered {sup 44}Ti atoms after intensive irradiations. Several online and offline measurements in parallel with Monte Carlo simulations were performed to investigate these issues. (orig.)

  10. The Feasibility of direct measurement of the 44Ti(α, p)47V and 40Ca(α, p)43Sc reactions in forward kinematics at astrophysically relevant temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the synthesis of radioactive 44Ti in the α-rich freeze-out following core-collapse supernovae may help to better interpret such explosive events. The γ-ray lines from the decay of 44Ti have been observed by space-based γ-ray telescopes from two supernova remnants. It is believed that the 44Ti(α, p)47V reaction dominates the destruction of 44Ti, while the 40Ca(α, p)43Sc reaction removes fuel from the main 44Ti production reaction 40Ca(α, γ)44Ti. Here we report on a possible technique to determine both reaction rates at astrophysically relevant energies in forward kinematics. The first reaction will be performed using a 1-10 MBq 44Ti target. Two important concerns are considered to make this study possible: The amount of stable Ti in the radioactive target, which will be prepared via spallation reactions at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), and the degree of radioactive contaminations in the experimental setup due to sputtered 44Ti atoms after intensive irradiations. Several online and offline measurements in parallel with Monte Carlo simulations were performed to investigate these issues. (orig.)

  11. Finite temperature amplitudes and reaction rates in Thermofield dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rakhimov, A M

    2001-01-01

    We propose a method for calculating the reaction rates and transition amplitudes of generic process taking place in a many body system in equilibrium. The relationship of the scattering and decay amplitudes as calculated in Thermo Field Dynamics the conventional techniques is established. It is shown that in many cases the calculations are relatively easy in TFD.

  12. Solar reaction rates, non-extensivity and quantum uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Lavagno, A; Quarati, P

    2001-01-01

    We show that in weakly non-ideal plasmas, like the solar interior, both non-extensivity and quantum uncertainty (a' la Galitskii and Yakimets) should be taken into account to derive equilibrium ion distribution functions and to estimate nuclear reaction rates and solar neutrino fluxes.

  13. Study of astrophysically important resonant states in 30 S using the 32S(p,t30 S reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrede C.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A small fraction (< 1% of presolar SiC grains is suggested to have been formed in the ejecta of classical novae. The 29P(p,γ30S reaction plays an important role in understanding the Si isotopic abundances in such grains, which in turn provide us with information on the nature of the probable white dwarf progenitor’s core, as well as the peak temperatures achieved during nova outbursts, and thus the nova nucleosynthetic path. The 29P(p,γ30S reaction rate at nova temperatures is determined by two low-lying 3+ and 2+ resonances above the proton threshold at 4399 keV in 30S. Despite several experimental studies in the past, however, only one of these two states has only been observed very recently. We have studied the 30S nuclear structure via the 32S(p,t 30S reaction at 5 laboratory angles between 9° to 62°. We have observed 14 states, eleven of which are above the proton threshold, including two levels at 4692.7 ± 4.5 keV and 4813.8 ± 3.4 keV that are candidates for the 3+ and the previously “issing” 2+ state, respectively.

  14. Measurement of the 13C(α, n)16O reaction at astrophysical energies using the Trojan Horse Method. Focus on the -3 keV sub-threshold resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Cognata, M.; Spitaleri, C.; Trippella, O.; Kiss, G. G.; Rogachev, G. V.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Avila, M.; Guardo, G. L.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A.; Lamia, L.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Santiago, D.; Spartà, R.

    2014-03-01

    Most of the nuclei in the mass range 90 ≲ A ≲ 208 are produced through the so-called s-process, namely through a series of neutron capture reactions on seed nuclei followed by β-decays. The 13C(α, n)16O reaction is the neutron source for the main component of the s-process. It is active inside the helium-burning shell of asymptotic giant branch stars, at temperatures ≲ 108 K, corresponding to an energy interval of 140 - 230 keV. In this region, the astrophysical S(E)-factor is dominated by the -3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in 17O. Direct measurements could not soundly establish its contribution owing to the cross section suppression at astrophysical energies determined by the Coulomb barrier between interacting nuclei. Indirect measurements and extrapolations yielded inconsistent results, calling for further investigations. The Trojan Horse Method turns out to be very suited for the study of the 13C(α, n)16O reaction as it allows us to access the low as well as the negative energy re- gion, in particular in the case of resonance reactions. We have applied the Trojan HorseMethod to the 13C(6Li, n16O)d quasi-free reaction. By using the modified R-matrix approach, the asymptotic normalization coefficient {( {tilde C{α 13{{C}}}17{{O(1/}{{{2}}{ + }}{{)}}}} )^2} of the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced as well as the n-partial width, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy for the 13C(α, n)16O astrophysical factor. A preliminary analysis of a partial data set has lead to {( {tilde C{α 13{{C}}}17{{O(1/}{{{2}}{ + }}{{)}}}} )^2} = 6.7 - 0.6 + 0.9 {{f}}{{{m}} - 1}, slightly larger than the values in the literature, determining a 13C(α, n)16O reaction rate in agreement with the most results in the literature at ˜ 108 K, with enhanced accuracy thanks to this innovative approach.

  15. Measurement of the 13C(α, n16O reaction at astrophysical energies using the Trojan Horse Method. Focus on the -3 keV sub-threshold resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Cognata M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Most of the nuclei in the mass range 90 ≲ A ≲ 208 are produced through the so-called s-process, namely through a series of neutron capture reactions on seed nuclei followed by β-decays. The 13C(α, n16O reaction is the neutron source for the main component of the s-process. It is active inside the helium-burning shell of asymptotic giant branch stars, at temperatures ≲ 108 K, corresponding to an energy interval of 140 − 230 keV. In this region, the astrophysical S(E-factor is dominated by the −3 keV sub-threshold resonance due to the 6.356 MeV level in 17O. Direct measurements could not soundly establish its contribution owing to the cross section suppression at astrophysical energies determined by the Coulomb barrier between interacting nuclei. Indirect measurements and extrapolations yielded inconsistent results, calling for further investigations. The Trojan Horse Method turns out to be very suited for the study of the 13C(α, n16O reaction as it allows us to access the low as well as the negative energy re- gion, in particular in the case of resonance reactions. We have applied the Trojan HorseMethod to the 13C(6Li, n16Od quasi-free reaction. By using the modified R-matrix approach, the asymptotic normalization coefficient (C˜α13 C17O(1/2+2${\\left( {\\tilde C_{{\\alpha ^{13}}{\\rm{C}}}^{17{\\rm{O(1/}}{{\\rm{2}}^{\\rm{ + }}}{\\rm{}}}} \\right^2}$ of the 6.356 MeV level has been deduced as well as the n-partial width, allowing to attain an unprecedented accuracy for the 13C(α, n16O astrophysical factor. A preliminary analysis of a partial data set has lead to (C˜α13C17O(1/2+2 = 6.7−0.6+0.9 fm−1,${\\left( {\\tilde C_{{\\alpha ^{13}}{\\rm{C}}}^{17{\\rm{O(1/}}{{\\rm{2}}^{\\rm{ + }}}{\\rm{}}}} \\right^2}\\, = \\,6.7_{ - 0.6}^{ + 0.9}\\,{\\rm{f}}{{\\rm{m}}^{ - 1}},$ slightly larger than the values in the literature, determining a 13C(α, n16O reaction rate in agreement with the most results in the literature at ∼ 108 K

  16. Unscreened cross-sections for nuclear astrophysics via the Trojan Horse Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Sergi, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The bare nucleus astrophysical S(E) factor is the Nuclear Physics parameter to determine the reaction rates in stellar plasmas. Whilst not being accessed in direct measurements, it can be easily determined using the Trojan Horse Method, successful indirect technique for nuclear astrophysics. The basic features of the method will be discussed and some recent results will be presented.

  17. Unscreened cross-sections for nuclear astrophysics via the Trojan Horse Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bare nucleus astrophysical S(E) factor is the Nuclear Physics parameter to determine the reaction rates in stellar plasmas. Whilst not being accessed in direct measurements, it can be easily determined using the Trojan Horse Method, successful indirect technique for nuclear astrophysics. The basic features of the method will be discussed and some recent results will be presented

  18. The microscopic folding potential describing elastic scattering and astrophysical S factor of 12C + 12C fusion reaction at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 12C + 12C reaction is important to understand the nuclear burning in stellar evolution. In this work, we calculate the 12C + 12C microscopic potential based on the effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction and the wave functions of interaction nuclei. The Optical Model analysis for elastic scattering angular distributions of 12C + 12C system at energies near to the Coulomb barrier agrees well with the experimental data, which makes sure the applicability of our obtained potential. The Barrier Penetration Model (BPM) and WKB approximation are applied to estimate the astrophysical S factor, which is reasonable to measurement results. (author)

  19. Recent developments in semiclassical mechanics: eigenvalues and reaction rate constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.H.

    1976-04-01

    A semiclassical treatment of eigenvalues for a multidimensional non-separable potential function and of the rate constant for a chemical reaction with an activation barrier is presented. Both phenomena are seen to be described by essentially the same semiclassical formalism, which is based on a construction of the total Hamiltonian in terms of the complete set of ''good'' action variables (or adiabatic invariants) associated with the minimum in the potential energy surface for the eigenvalue case, or the saddle point in the potential energy surface for the case of chemical reaction.

  20. Rate Constant Calculation for Thermal Reactions Methods and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    DaCosta, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Providing an overview of the latest computational approaches to estimate rate constants for thermal reactions, this book addresses the theories behind various first-principle and approximation methods that have emerged in the last twenty years with validation examples. It presents in-depth applications of those theories to a wide range of basic and applied research areas. When doing modeling and simulation of chemical reactions (as in many other cases), one often has to compromise between higher-accuracy/higher-precision approaches (which are usually time-consuming) and approximate/lower-preci

  1. Nuclear physics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated a variety of research topics on the interface of nuclear physics and astrophysics during the past year. We have continued our study of dihyperon states in dense matter and have started to make a connection between their properties in the core of neutron stars with the ongoing experimental searches at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We started to build a scenario for the origin of gamma-ray bursts using the conversion of neutron stars to strange stars close to an active galactic nucleous. We have been reconsidering the constraints due to neutron star cooling rates on the equation of state for high density matter in the light, of recent findings which show that the faster direct Urca cooling process is possible for a range of nuclear compositions. We have developed a model for the formation of primordial magnetic fields due to the dynamics of the quark-hadron phase transition. Encouraged by the most recent observational developments, we have investigated the possible origin of the boron and beryllium abundances. We have greatly improved the calculations of the primordial abundances of these elements I>y augmenting the reaction networks and by updating the most recent experimental nuclear reaction rates. Our calculations have shown that the primordial abundances are much higher than previously thought but that the observed abundances cannot be explained by primordial sources alone. We have also studied the origin of the boron and beryllium abundances due to cosmic ray spallation. Finally, we have continued to address the solar neutrino problem by investigating the impact of astrophysical uncertainties on the MSW solution for a full three-family treatment of MSW mixing

  2. Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Arnould, M.; K. Takahashi

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding some of the many facets of the Universe through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic n...

  3. Pore size and the lab-field reaction rate riddle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel, S.; Ague, J. J.; Walderhaug, O.

    2009-12-01

    Pore size is usually thought to influence the rate of crystal growth during diagenesis and metamorphism by controlling the ratio of surface area to fluid volume. However, theory suggests that in micron-scale to nanometer-scale pores, interfacial energy effects can also become important. We used mercury porosimetry to investigate the pore-size distributions in naturally cemented sandstone adjacent to stylolites and found that quartz precipitation was inhibited in pores smaller than 10 microns in diameter. We demonstrate that standard kinetic models cannot reproduce the observed pore-size patterns in mineralized samples; by contrast, excellent fits with the data are obtained when interfacial energy effects are taken into account. Moreover, as such micron-scale pores comprise the overwhelming majority of surface area in the sandstone, average reaction rates for the rock are significantly reduced. Reaction rates in geological media determined in field studies can be orders of magnitude lower than those measured in laboratory experiments, and we propose that reduced reaction rates in rocks with micron-scale porosity could account for the apparent paradox.

  4. The astrophysical r-process and its dependence on properties of nuclei far from stability: Beta strength functions and neutron capture rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of the astrophysical site of the rapid neutron capture (r-) process which is believed to be responsible for the production of the heavy elements in the universe has been a problem in astrophysics for more than two decades. The solution of this problem is not only dependent on the development of realistic astrophysical supernova models, i.e. correct treatment of the hydrodynamics of gravitational collapse and supernova explosion and the equation of state of hot and dense matter, but is shown in this paper to be very sensitive also to 'standard' nuclear physics properties of nuclei far from stability such as beta decay properties and neutron capture rates. For both of the latter, strongly oversimplifying assumptions, not applying the development in nuclear physics during the last decade, have been made in almost all r-process calculations performed up to now. A critical discussion of the state of the art of such calculations seems therefore to be indicated. In this paper procedures are described which allow one to obtain: 1) β-decay properties (decay rates, β-delayed neutron emissions and fission rates); 2) neutron capture rates for neutron-rich nuclei considerably improved over what has been used up to now. The beta strength functions are calculated for approx. equal to6000 nuclei between beta stability line and neutron drip line. By hydrodynamical supernova explosion calculations using realistic stellar models it is shown that as a consequence of the improved β-rates explosive He burning is a convincing alternative site to the 'classical' r-process whose existence still is questionable. The new β-rates will be important also for the investigation of further astrophysical sites producing heavy elements such as the r(n)-processes in explosive C or Ne burning. (orig.)

  5. Suppression of Excited-State Contributions to Stellar Reaction Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, T

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown in previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 191101 (2008); Phys. Rev. C 80, 035801 (2009)] that a suppression of the stellar enhancement factor (SEF) occurs in some endothermic reactions at and far from stability. This effect is re-evaluated using the ground-state contributions to the stellar reaction rates, which were shown to be better suited to judge the importance of excited state contributions than the previously applied SEFs. An update of the tables shown in Phys. Rev. C 80, 035801 (2009) is given. The new evalution finds 2350 cases (out of a full set of 57513 reactions) for which the ground-state contribution is larger in the reaction direction with negative reaction Q-value than in the exothermic direction, thus providing exceptions to the commonly applied Q-value rule. The results confirm the Coulomb suppression effect but lead to a larger number of exceptions than previously found. This is due to the fact that often a large variation in the g.s. contribution does not lead to a sizeable...

  6. Interfacial reaction rates and free energy of cubic clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Lepinoux, Joel

    2004-01-01

    Abstract A new formulation of interfacial reaction rates for clusters in binary alloys is presented. It accounts for the matrix structure and the topological properties of cluster at the atomic scale. It is shown that the probabilities per unit time that a solute atom be captured or released by a cluster are functions of the partition function but also of a transition function. The principles of calculation of these functions are general but only the case of cubic clusters is treat...

  7. Application of semiclassical methods to reaction rate theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, R.

    1993-11-01

    This work is concerned with the development of approximate methods to describe relatively large chemical systems. This effort has been divided into two primary directions: First, we have extended and applied a semiclassical transition state theory (SCTST) originally proposed by Miller to obtain microcanonical and canonical (thermal) rates for chemical reactions described by a nonseparable Hamiltonian, i.e. most reactions. Second, we have developed a method to describe the fluctuations of decay rates of individual energy states from the average RRKM rate in systems where the direct calculation of individual rates would be impossible. Combined with the semiclassical theory this latter effort has provided a direct comparison to the experimental results of Moore and coworkers. In SCTST, the Hamiltonian is expanded about the barrier and the ``good`` action-angle variables are obtained perturbatively; a WKB analysis of the effectively one-dimensional reactive direction then provides the transmission probabilities. The advantages of this local approximate treatment are that it includes tunneling effects and anharmonicity, and it systematically provides a multi-dimensional dividing surface in phase space. The SCTST thermal rate expression has been reformulated providing increased numerical efficiency (as compared to a naive Boltzmann average), an appealing link to conventional transition state theory (involving a ``prereactive`` partition function depending on the action of the reactive mode), and the ability to go beyond the perturbative approximation.

  8. Application of semiclassical methods to reaction rate theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is concerned with the development of approximate methods to describe relatively large chemical systems. This effort has been divided into two primary directions: First, we have extended and applied a semiclassical transition state theory (SCTST) originally proposed by Miller to obtain microcanonical and canonical (thermal) rates for chemical reactions described by a nonseparable Hamiltonian, i.e. most reactions. Second, we have developed a method to describe the fluctuations of decay rates of individual energy states from the average RRKM rate in systems where the direct calculation of individual rates would be impossible. Combined with the semiclassical theory this latter effort has provided a direct comparison to the experimental results of Moore and coworkers. In SCTST, the Hamiltonian is expanded about the barrier and the ''good'' action-angle variables are obtained perturbatively; a WKB analysis of the effectively one-dimensional reactive direction then provides the transmission probabilities. The advantages of this local approximate treatment are that it includes tunneling effects and anharmonicity, and it systematically provides a multi-dimensional dividing surface in phase space. The SCTST thermal rate expression has been reformulated providing increased numerical efficiency (as compared to a naive Boltzmann average), an appealing link to conventional transition state theory (involving a ''prereactive'' partition function depending on the action of the reactive mode), and the ability to go beyond the perturbative approximation

  9. Radiative rates for forbidden M1 and E2 transitions of astrophysical interest in doubly ionized iron-peak elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fivet, V.; Quinet, P.; Bautista, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Accurate and reliable atomic data for lowly ionized Fe-peak species (Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni) are of paramount importance for analyzing the high-resolution astrophysical spectra currently available. The third spectra of several iron group elements have been observed in different galactic sources, such as Herbig-Haro objects in the Orion Nebula and stars like Eta Carinae. However, forbidden M1 and E2 transitions between low-lying metastable levels of doubly charged iron-peak ions have been investigated very little so far, and radiative rates for those lines remain sparse or nonexistent. We attempt to fill that gap and provide transition probabilities for the most important forbidden lines of all doubly ionized iron-peak elements. Methods: We carried out a systematic study of the electronic structure of doubly ionized Fe-peak species. The magnetic dipole (M1) and electric quadrupole (E2) transition probabilities were computed using the pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock (HFR) code of Cowan and the central Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-Amaldi potential approximation implemented in AUTOSTRUCTURE. This multiplatform approach allowed for consistency checks and intercomparison and has proven very useful in many previous works for estimating the uncertainties affecting the radiative data. Results: We present transition probabilities for the M1 and E2 forbidden lines depopulating the metastable even levels belonging to the 3dk and 3dk-14s configurations in Sc III (k = 1), Ti III (k = 2), V III (k = 3), Cr III (k = 4), Mn III (k = 5), Fe III (k = 6), Co III (k = 7), and Ni III (k = 8).

  10. Introduction to Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first lecture of this volume, we will present the basic fundamental ideas regarding nuclear processes occurring in stars. We start from stellar observations, will then elaborate on some important quantum-mechanical phenomena governing nuclear reactions, continue with how nuclear reactions proceed in a hot stellar plasma and, finally, we will provide an overview of stellar burning stages. At the end, the current knowledge regarding the origin of the elements is briefly summarized. This lecture is directed towards the student of nuclear astrophysics. Our intention is to present seemingly unrelated phenomena of nuclear physics and astrophysics in a coherent framework.

  11. Essential astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Kenneth R

    2013-01-01

    Essential Astrophysics is a book to learn or teach from, as well as a fundamental reference volume for anyone interested in astronomy and astrophysics. It presents astrophysics from basic principles without requiring any previous study of astronomy or astrophysics. It serves as a comprehensive introductory text, which takes the student through the field of astrophysics in lecture-sized chapters of basic physical principles applied to the cosmos. This one-semester overview will be enjoyed by undergraduate students with an interest in the physical sciences, such as astronomy, chemistry, engineering or physics, as well as by any curious student interested in learning about our celestial science. The mathematics required for understanding the text is on the level of simple algebra, for that is all that is needed to describe the fundamental principles. The text is of sufficient breadth and depth to prepare the interested student for more advanced specialized courses in the future. Astronomical examples are provide...

  12. Angular distribution for 7Be(d,n)8B reaction at Ec.m. = 8.3 MeV and the astrophysical S17(0) factor for 7Be(p, γ)8B reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The differential cross section for 7Be(d, n)8B reaction at Ec.m. 8.3 MeV has been measured by using a 7Be radioactive beam. The reaction cross section was determined to be 28 +- 3 mb. The astrophysical S17(0) factor for the 7Be(p, γ)8B reaction was derived to be 24 +- 5 eVb through the asymptotic normalization constant of 8B extracted from the experimental data. This results is found to be consistent with a previous value obtained from the same reaction at Ec.m. = 5.8 MeV, implying the energy independence of this indirect method within the uncertainty

  13. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA)

    CERN Document Server

    Paxton, Bill; Dotter, Aaron; Herwig, Falk; Lesaffre, Pierre; Timmes, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Stellar physics and evolution calculations enable a broad range of research in astrophysics. Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) is a suite of open source libraries for a wide range of applications in computational stellar astrophysics. A newly designed 1-D stellar evolution module, MESA star, combines many of the numerical and physics modules for simulations of a wide range of stellar evolution scenarios ranging from very-low mass to massive stars, including advanced evolutionary phases. MESA star solves the fully coupled structure and composition equations simultaneously. It uses adaptive mesh refinement and sophisticated timestep controls, and supports shared memory parallelism based on OpenMP. Independently usable modules provide equation of state, opacity, nuclear reaction rates, and atmosphere boundary conditions. Each module is constructed as a separate Fortran 95 library with its own public interface. Examples include comparisons to other codes and show evolutionary tracks of very l...

  14. Applications of the Trojan Horse method in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitaleri, Claudio

    2015-02-01

    The study of the energy production in stars and related nucleosyntesis processes requires increasingly precise knowledge of the nuclear reaction cross section and reaction rates at interaction energy. In order to overcome the experimental difficulties, arising from small cross-sections involved in charge particle induced reactions at astrophysical energies, and from the presence of electron screening, it was necessary to introduce indirect methods. Trough these methods it is possible to measure cross sections at very small energies and retrieve information on electron screening effect when ultra-low energy direct measurements are available. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) represents the indirect technique to determine the bare nucleus astrophysical S-factor for reactions between charged particles at astrophysical energies. The basic theory of the THM is discussed in the case of non-resonant.

  15. Applications of the Trojan Horse method in nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitaleri, Claudio, E-mail: spitaleri@lns.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-INFN, Catania (Italy)

    2015-02-24

    The study of the energy production in stars and related nucleosyntesis processes requires increasingly precise knowledge of the nuclear reaction cross section and reaction rates at interaction energy. In order to overcome the experimental difficulties, arising from small cross-sections involved in charge particle induced reactions at astrophysical energies, and from the presence of electron screening, it was necessary to introduce indirect methods. Trough these methods it is possible to measure cross sections at very small energies and retrieve information on electron screening effect when ultra-low energy direct measurements are available. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) represents the indirect technique to determine the bare nucleus astrophysical S-factor for reactions between charged particles at astrophysical energies. The basic theory of the THM is discussed in the case of non-resonant.

  16. Absolute rate constants of alkoxyl radical reactions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pulse radiolysis technique was used to generate the alkoxyl radical derived from tert-butyl hydroperoxide (/sup t/BuOOH) in aqueous solution. The reactions of this radical with 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethyl-6-benzothiazolinesulfonate) (ABTS) and promethazine were monitored by kinetic spectroscopy. The unimolecular decay rate constant of the tert-butoxyl radical (/sup t/BuO) was determined to be 1.4 x 106 s-1. On the basis of this value, the rate constants for /sup t/BuO attack on quercetin, crocin, crocetin, ascorbate, isoascorbate, trolox c, glutathione, thymidine, adenosine, guanosine, and unsaturated fatty acids were determined. In addition, the reaction of /sup t/BuO with the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was observed by directly monitoring the formation of the fatty acid pentadienyl radicals. Interestingly, the attack of /sup t/BuO on PUFA was found to be faster by about one order of magnitude as compared to the same reaction in a nonpolar solvent

  17. Charge state distribution of 16O from the 4He(12C,16O)γ reaction of astrophysical interest studied both experimentally and theoretically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In astrophysics, 4He(12C,16O)γ reaction places an important role. At Kyushu University Tandem accelerator Laboratory (KUTL), the measurement of 4He(12C,16O)γ cross section is in progress in the energy range of astrophysical nuclear reaction. Since the charge state of product 16O ions after passing through the gas target is spread and only one charge state can be measured at terminal detector, it is necessary to know the charge state distribution of 16O ions passing through the He gas target precisely. Here, we report the charge state distribution of the 16O recoils both experimentally and theoretically. Experimentally, we measured the equilibrium charge state distribution of 16O ions in the windowless helium gas target with the beam energy of primary 16O ions at 7.2, 4.5, and 3.45 MeV at KUTL. The measured results showed a Gaussian distribution for the charge state fraction. Theoretically, we proposed a framework for the charge state distribution study. Charge state distribution was computed by solving a set of differential equations including a series of charge exchange cross sections. For the ionization cross section, plane-wave Born approximation was applied and modified by taking target atomic screening as a function of momentum transfer into account. For the capture cross section, continuum distorted wave approximation was applied and the influence of the gas target density was taken into account in the process of electron capture. Using above charge exchange cross sections, the charge state evolution was simulated. According to the equilibrium distribution, we compared the theoretical calculation to the experimental data. After taking into account the density effects in the charge exchange process, the theoretical charge state distributions shows a good agreement with the experimental data. Both experimental and theoretical results are useful to understand the charge fraction of recoil oxygen created via 4He(12C,16O)γ reaction, especially in the energy

  18. Nuclear inputs for astrophysics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As many astrophysical applications involve a large number of unstable nuclei or energy ranges far below the Coulomb barrier, only the most reliable nuclear models can be used. The major theories used in nuclear reaction calculations for astrophysical applications are briefly reviewed

  19. Primordial lithium: New reaction rates, new abundances, new constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newly measured nuclear reaction rates for 3H(α,γ)7Li (higher than previous values) and 7Li(p,α)4He (lower than previous values) are shown to increase the 7Li yield from big bang nucleosynthesis for lower baryon to photon ratio (eta ≤ 4 x 10-10); the yield for higher eta is not affected. New, independent determinations of Li abundances in extreme Pop II stars are in excellent agreement with the earlier work of the Spites and give continued confidence in the use of 7Li in big bang baryon density determinations. The new 7Li constraints imply a lower limit on eta of 2 x 10-10 and an upper limit of 5 x 10-10. This lower limit to eta is concordant with that obtained from considerations of D + 3He. The upper limit is consistent with, but even more restrictive than, the D bound. With the new rates, any observed primordial Li/H ratio below 10-10 would be inexplicable by the standard big bang nucleosynthesis. A review is made of the strengths and possible weaknesses of utilizing conclusions drawn from big bang lithium considerations. An appendix discusses the null effect of a factor of 32 increase in the experimental rate for the D(d,γ)4He reaction. 28 refs., 1 fig

  20. Reaction Rate Constant for Radiative Association of CF$^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Öström, Jonatan; Nyman, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations ($\\text{C}^+$) and fluorine atoms ($\\text{F}$) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition $1^1\\Pi \\rightarrow X^1\\Sigma^+$ and rovibrational transitions on the $X^1\\Sigma^+$ and $a^3\\Pi$ potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit--Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius--Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of $<3\\:\\%$. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of $10$ to $250\\:\\text{K}$, the rate constant is about $10^{-21}\\:\\text{cm}^3\\text{s}^{-1}$, rising toward $10^{-16}\\:\\text{cm}^3\\text{s}^{-1}$ fo...

  1. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öström, Jonatan, E-mail: jonatan.ostrom@gmail.com; Gustafsson, Magnus, E-mail: magnus.gustafsson@ltu.se [Applied Physics, Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Science and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå (Sweden); Bezrukov, Dmitry S. [Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Nyman, Gunnar [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-01-28

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C{sup +}) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 1{sup 1}Π → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and rovibrational transitions on the X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and a{sup 3}Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit–Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius–Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10–250 K, the rate constant is about 10{sup −21} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1}, rising toward 10{sup −16} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  2. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C+) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 11Π → X1Σ+ and rovibrational transitions on the X1Σ+ and a3Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit–Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius–Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10–250 K, the rate constant is about 10−21 cm3 s−1, rising toward 10−16 cm3 s−1 for a temperature of 30 000 K

  3. Kinetics of Imidazole Catalyzed Ester Hydrolysis: Use of Buffer Dilutions to Determine Spontaneous Rate, Catalyzed Rate, and Reaction Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Anthony

    1982-01-01

    Described is an advanced undergraduate kinetics experiment using buffer dilutions to determine spontaneous rate, catalyzed rate, and reaction order. The reaction utilized is hydrolysis of p-nitro-phenyl acetate in presence of imidazole, which has been shown to enhance rate of the reaction. (Author/JN)

  4. Constraining kinetic rates of mineral reactions using reactive transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, E. W.; Wang, Z.; Ague, J.; Bercovici, D.; Cai, Z.; Karato, S.; Oristaglio, M. L.; Qiu, L.

    2012-12-01

    We use a reactive transport model to better understand results of experiments to obtain kinetic rates of mineral reactions in closed systems. Closed system experiments pose special challenges in that secondary minerals may form that modify the fluid composition evolution and may grow on the dissolving minerals thus armoring the surface. Even so, such closed system experiments provide critical data for what minerals would actually form in field applications and how coupled dissolution and precipitation mineral reactions are strongly linked. Comparing to experimental observations can test the reactive transport model, and the experimental observations can be better understood by comparing the results to the modeling. We apply a 0D end member of the model to understand the dissolution of single crystals of forsterite in a variety of settings (low pH, high pH, or NaHCO3 initial fluids, at 100 C and 1 bar, or 200 C and 150 bar). Depending on the initial conditions, we observe the precipitation of talc, brucite, amorphous silica, chrysotile, or magnesite, in various combinations. We compare simulation results to fluid compositions and the presence of secondary minerals experimentally sampled at various times. Insight from the simulations helped create an inverse model to extract the rates of forsterite dissolution and to create a simple forward model useful for exploring the influence of system size, secondary mineral surface areas, etc. Our reactive transport model allows secondary minerals to armor the forsterite surface, which can strongly decrease the dissolution rate as the system evolves. Tuning our model with experimentally derived rates and assuring relevant processes are included so as to reproduce experimental observations is necessary before upscaling to heterogeneous field conditions. The reactive transport model will be used for field-scale sequestration simulations and coupled with a geomechanical model that includes the influence of deformation.

  5. Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Brune, Carl R.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear physics has a long and productive history of application to astrophysics which continues today. Advances in the accuracy and breadth of astrophysical data and theory drive the need for better experimental and theoretical understanding of the underlying nuclear physics. This paper will review some of the scenarios where nuclear physics plays an important role, including Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, neutrino production by our sun, nucleosynthesis in novae, the creation of elements heavier ...

  6. Relativistic astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Demianski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic Astrophysics brings together important astronomical discoveries and the significant achievements, as well as the difficulties in the field of relativistic astrophysics. This book is divided into 10 chapters that tackle some aspects of the field, including the gravitational field, stellar equilibrium, black holes, and cosmology. The opening chapters introduce the theories to delineate gravitational field and the elements of relativistic thermodynamics and hydrodynamics. The succeeding chapters deal with the gravitational fields in matter; stellar equilibrium and general relativity

  7. Nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized

  8. Reaction rate theory of radiation exposure: Effects of the dose rate on mutation frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Manabe, Yuichiro; Nakamura, Issei

    2014-01-01

    We develop a kinetic reaction model for the cells having the irradiated DNA molecules due to the ionizing radiation exposure. Our theory simultaneously accounts for the time-dependent reactions of the DNA damage, the DNA mutation, the DNA repair, and the proliferation and apoptosis of cells in a tissue with a minimal set of model parameters. In contrast to the existing theories for the radiation exposition, we do not assume the relationships between the total dose and the induced mutation frequency. We show good agreement between theory and experiment. Importantly, our result shows a new perspective that the key ingredient in the study of the irradiated cells is the rate constants depending on the dose rate. Moreover, we discuss the universal scaling function for mutation frequencies due to the irradiation at low dose rates.

  9. Are American astrophysics papers accepted more quickly than others? Part II: Correlations with citation rates, subdisciplines, and author numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Trimble, V; Ceja, JA

    2013-01-01

    We continue the investigation for more than 2,150 astrophysics papers published from July 2007 to June 2008 of various possible correlations among time from submission to acceptance; nationalities of lead authors; numbers of citations to the papers in three years after publication; subdisciplines; and numbers of authors. Paper I found that submissions from American authors were accepted faster than others but by only about 3. 8 days out of a median of 105 days. Here we report the following ad...

  10. Development of a Monte Carlo code for the data analysis of the 18F(p,α)15O reaction at astrophysical energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novae are astrophysical events (violent explosion) occurring in close binary systems consisting of a white dwarf and a main-sequence star or a star in a more advanced stage of evolution. They are called 'narrow systems' because the two components interact with each other: there is a process of mass exchange with resulting in the transfer of matter from the companion star to the white dwarf, leading to the formation of this last of the so-called accretion disk, rich mainly of hydrogen. Over time, more and more material accumulates until the pressure and the temperature reached are sufficient to trigger nuclear fusion reactions, rapidly converting a large part of the hydrogen into heavier elements. The products of 'hot hydrogen burning' are then placed in the interstellar medium as a result of violent explosions. Studies on the element abundances observed in these events can provide important information about the stages of evolution stellar. During the outbursts of novae some radioactive isotopes are synthesized: in particular, the decay of short-lived nuclei such as 13N and 18F with subsequent emission of gamma radiation energy below 511 keV. The gamma rays from products electron-positron annihilation of positrons emitted in the decay of 18F are the most abundant and the first observable as soon as the atmosphere of the nova starts to become transparent to gamma radiation. Hence the importance of the study of nuclear reactions that lead both to the formation and to the destruction of 18F. Among these, the 18F(p,α)15O reaction is one of the main channels of destruction. This reaction was then studied at energies of astrophysical interest. The experiment done at Riken, Japan, has as its objective the study of the 18F(p,α)15O reaction, using a beam of 18F produced at CRIB, to derive important information about the phenomenon of novae. In this paper we present the experimental technique and the Monte Carlo code developed to be used in the data

  11. Development of a Monte Carlo code for the data analysis of the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction at astrophysical energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, A.; Cherubini, S.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, ML. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Crucillà, V. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Gulino, M. [Universitá di Enna KORE, Enna, Italy and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Kubono, S. [Riken, Wako, Tokyo, Japan and Center for Nuclear Study, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Yamaguchi, H.; Hayakawa, S.; Wakabayashi, Y. [Center for Nuclear Study, The University of Tokyo (Japan); Iwasa, N. [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Kato, S. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Komatsubara, T. [Rare Isotope Science Project, Institute for Basic Science, Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Coc, A. [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de Masse, Orsay (France); Hammache, F. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire, IN2P3, Orsay (France); and others

    2015-02-24

    Novae are astrophysical events (violent explosion) occurring in close binary systems consisting of a white dwarf and a main-sequence star or a star in a more advanced stage of evolution. They are called 'narrow systems' because the two components interact with each other: there is a process of mass exchange with resulting in the transfer of matter from the companion star to the white dwarf, leading to the formation of this last of the so-called accretion disk, rich mainly of hydrogen. Over time, more and more material accumulates until the pressure and the temperature reached are sufficient to trigger nuclear fusion reactions, rapidly converting a large part of the hydrogen into heavier elements. The products of 'hot hydrogen burning' are then placed in the interstellar medium as a result of violent explosions. Studies on the element abundances observed in these events can provide important information about the stages of evolution stellar. During the outbursts of novae some radioactive isotopes are synthesized: in particular, the decay of short-lived nuclei such as {sup 13}N and {sup 18}F with subsequent emission of gamma radiation energy below 511 keV. The gamma rays from products electron-positron annihilation of positrons emitted in the decay of {sup 18}F are the most abundant and the first observable as soon as the atmosphere of the nova starts to become transparent to gamma radiation. Hence the importance of the study of nuclear reactions that lead both to the formation and to the destruction of {sup 18}F. Among these, the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction is one of the main channels of destruction. This reaction was then studied at energies of astrophysical interest. The experiment done at Riken, Japan, has as its objective the study of the {sup 18}F(p,α){sup 15}O reaction, using a beam of {sup 18}F produced at CRIB, to derive important information about the phenomenon of novae. In this paper we present the experimental technique and the

  12. Effect of Substrate Character on Heterogeneous Ozone Reaction Rate with Individual PAHs and Their Reaction Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmen, B. A.; Stevens, T.

    2009-12-01

    Vehicle exhaust contains many unregulated chemical compounds that are harmful to human health and the natural environment, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), a class of organic compounds derived from fuel combustion that can be carcinogenic and mutagenic. PAHs have been quantified in vehicle-derived ultrafine particles (Dpfilter and (ii) NIST diesel PM. The difference in the PAH/O3 heterogeneous reaction rate resulting from the two substrates will be discussed. The experiments were completed by spiking a known PAH mixture to the solid, reacting the samples with gas-phase ozone, and determining both PAH loss over time and products formed, using thermal-desorption gas chromatography / mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS). The individual PAHs anthracene, phenanthrene, and fluorene, adsorbed to a QFF were also separately reacted with 0.4 ppm ozone. A volatilization control and the collection of volatilized PAHs using a Tenax-packed thermal desorption vial completed the mass balance and aided determination parent-product relationships. Heterogeneous reaction products analyzed directly without derivatization indicate the formation of 9,10-anthracenedione, 9H-fluoren-9-one, and (1,1’-biphenyl)-2,2’-dicarboxaldehyde from the reaction of ozone with the PAH mix on a QFF, but only 9,10-anthracenedione was detected for the diesel PM reaction. The implications of these results for aging of diesel particulate in urban environments will be discussed.

  13. Competition between the compound and the pre-compound emission processes in α-induced reactions at near astrophysical energy to well above it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Sharma, Vijay Raj; Yadav, Abhiskek; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.

    2016-04-01

    The study of pre-compound emission in α-induced reactions, particularly at the low incident energies, is of considerable interest as the pre-compound emission is more likely to occur at higher energies. With a view to study the competition between the compound and the pre-compound emission processes in α-induced reactions at different energies and with different targets, a systematics for neutron emission channels in targets 51V, 55Mn, 93Nb, 121, 123Sb and 141Pr at energy ranging from astrophysical interest to well above it, has been developed. The off-line γ-ray-spectrometry based activation technique has been adopted to measure the excitation functions. The experimental excitation functions have been analysed within the framework of the compound nucleus mechanism based on the Weisskopf-Ewing model and the pre-compound emission calculations based on the geometry dependent hybrid model. The analysis of the data shows that experimental excitation functions could be reproduced only when the pre-compound emission, simulated theoretically, is taken into account. The strength of pre-compound emission process for each system has been obtained by deducing the pre-compound fraction. Analysis of data indicates that in α-induced reactions, the pre-compound emission process plays an important role, particularly at the low incident energies, where the pure compound nucleus process is likely to dominate.

  14. In Search of Reaction Rate Scaling Law for Supersonic Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeinde, Foluso; Lou, Zhipeng; Li, Wenhai

    2015-11-01

    As a way of employing the flamelet approach, which was developed essentially for incompressible flows, to model supersonic combustion, the role ascribed to pressure has not been very convincing. That is, the reaction rate is often scaled on the square of the pressure in the finite Mach number flow field relative to the usually atmospheric static pressure field used in the generation of the flamelet library. This scaling assumption is quite simple and will therefore be very attractive if it has a sound theoretical basis and it works for a large selection of high-speed combustion flows. We try to find some justifications for different scaling laws, with the hope of coming up with a more universally-acceptable flamelet procedure for supersonic combustion.

  15. Resonance Strength Measurement at Astrophysical Energies: The 17O(p,α14N Reaction Studied via THM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature.

  16. Resonance Strength Measurement at Astrophysical Energies: The 17O(p,α)14N Reaction Studied via THM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wischer, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature.

  17. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The 17O(p,α)14N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Irgaziev, B.; Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  18. Resonance Strength Measurement at Astrophysical Energies: The 17O(p,α)14N Reaction Studied via THM

    OpenAIRE

    Sergi M.L.; Spitaleri C.; La Cognata M.; Lamia L.; Pizzone R.G.; Rapisarda G.G.; Mukhamedzhanov A.; Irgaziev B.; Tang X.D.; Wischer M.; Mrazek J.; Kroha V.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the Trojan Horse Method by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. The mean value of the strengths obtained in ...

  19. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The 17O(p,α)14N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on 17O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the 17O(p,α)14N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments

  20. Nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  1. Neutrino astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general overview of neutrino physics and astrophysics is given, starting with a historical account of the development of our understanding of neutrinos and how they helped to unravel the structure of the Standard Model. We discuss why it is so important to establish if neutrinos are massive and introduce the main scenarios to provide them a mass. The present bounds and the positive indications in favor of non-zero neutrino masses are discussed, including the recent results on atmospheric and solar neutrinos. The major role that neutrinos play in astrophysics and cosmology is illustrated. (author)

  2. Plasma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, S A; ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    Plasma Astrophysics is a translation from the Russian language; the topics discussed are based on lectures given by V.N. Tsytovich at several universities. The book describes the physics of the various phenomena and their mathematical formulation connected with plasma astrophysics. This book also explains the theory of the interaction of fast particles plasma, their radiation activities, as well as the plasma behavior when exposed to a very strong magnetic field. The text describes the nature of collective plasma processes and of plasma turbulence. One author explains the method of elementary

  3. Relativistic Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.; Markovic, Dragoljub

    1997-06-01

    Preface; Prologue: Conference overview Bernard Carr; Part I. The Universe At Large and Very Large Redshifts: 2. The size and age of the Universe Gustav A. Tammann; 3. Active galaxies at large redshifts Malcolm S. Longair; 4. Observational cosmology with the cosmic microwave background George F. Smoot; 5. Future prospects in measuring the CMB power spectrum Philip M. Lubin; 6. Inflationary cosmology Michael S. Turner; 7. The signature of the Universe Bernard J. T. Jones; 8. Theory of large-scale structure Sergei F. Shandarin; 9. The origin of matter in the universe Lev A. Kofman; 10. New guises for cold-dark matter suspects Edward W. Kolb; Part II. Physics and Astrophysics Of Relativistic Compact Objects: 11. On the unification of gravitational and inertial forces Donald Lynden-Bell; 12. Internal structure of astrophysical black holes Werner Israel; 13. Black hole entropy: external facade and internal reality Valery Frolov; 14. Accretion disks around black holes Marek A. Abramowicz; 15. Black hole X-ray transients J. Craig Wheeler; 16. X-rays and gamma rays from active galactic nuclei Roland Svensson; 17. Gamma-ray bursts: a challenge to relativistic astrophysics Martin Rees; 18. Probing black holes and other exotic objects with gravitational waves Kip Thorne; Epilogue: the past and future of relativistic astrophysics Igor D. Novikov; I. D. Novikov's scientific papers and books.

  4. Nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this review is to briefly point out some questions of nuclear physics in which progress has still to be made before more quantitative and secure conclusions can be drawn concerning the astrophysical sites and physical conditions in which certain nuclides have been (or are still) produced. (orig./AH)

  5. An efficient nonclassical quadrature for the calculation of nonresonant nuclear fusion reaction rate coefficients from cross section data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2016-08-01

    Nonclassical quadratures based on a new set of half-range polynomials, Tn(x) , orthogonal with respect to w(x) =e - x - b /√{ x } for x ∈ [ 0 , ∞) are employed in the efficient calculation of the nuclear fusion reaction rate coefficients from cross section data. The parameter b = B /√{kB T } in the weight function is temperature dependent and B is the Gamow factor. The polynomials Tn(x) satisfy a three term recurrence relation defined by two sets of recurrence coefficients, αn and βn. These recurrence coefficients define in turn the tridiagonal Jacobi matrix whose eigenvalues are the quadrature points and the weights are calculated from the first components of the eigenfunctions. For nonresonant nuclear reactions for which the astrophysical function can be expressed as a lower order polynomial in the relative energy, the convergence of the thermal average of the reactive cross section with this nonclassical quadrature is extremely rapid requiring in many cases 2-4 quadrature points. The results are compared with other libraries of nuclear reaction rate coefficient data reported in the literature.

  6. Proton-proton reaction rates at extreme energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results on proton-antiproton reaction rates (total cross-section) at collision energies of 1.8 TeV from experiments at Fermilab have suggested a lower rate of increase with energy compared to the extrapolation based on results previously obtained at CERN's proton-antiproton collider (CERN Courier, October 1991). Now an independent estimate of the values for the proton-proton total cross-section for collision energies from 5 to 30 TeV has been provided by the analysis of cosmic ray shower data collected over ten years at the Akeno Observatory operated by the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research of University of Tokyo. These results are based on the inelastic cross-section for collisions of cosmic ray protons with air nuclei at energies in the range1016-18eV. A new extensive air shower experiment was started at Akeno, 150 km west of Tokyo, in 1979 with a large array of detectors, both on the ground and under a 1-metre concrete absorber. This measured the total numbers of electrons and muons of energies above 1GeV for individual showers with much better accuracy than before. Data collection was almost continuous for ten years without any change in the triggering criteria for showers above1016eV. The mean free path for proton-air nuclei collisions has been determined from the zenith angle of the observed frequency of air showers which have the same effective path length for development in the atmosphere and the same primary energy

  7. Nuclear Astrophysics with LUNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggini, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    One of the main ingredients of nuclear astrophysics is the knowledge of the thermonuclear reactions which power the stars and synthesize the chemical elements. Deep underground in the Gran Sasso Laboratory the cross section of the key reactions of the proton-proton chain and of the Carbon-Nitrogen-Oxygen (CNO) cycle have been measured right down to the energies of astrophysical interest. The main results obtained during the 'solar' phase of LUNA are reviewed and their influence on our understanding of the properties of the neutrino and of the Sun is discussed. We then describe the current LUNA program mainly devoted to the study of the nucleosynthesis of the light elements in AGB stars and Classical Novae. Finally, the future of LUNA towards the study of helium and carbon burning with a new 3.5 MV accelerator is outlined.

  8. Revision of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction rate and oxygen abundance in H-burning zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caciolli, A.; Mazzocchi, C.; Capogrosso, V.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Corvisiero, P.; Costantini, H.; Elekes, Z.; Formicola, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Lemut, A.; Marta, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Palmerini, S.; Prati, P.; Roca, V.; Rolfs, C.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Somorjai, E.; Straniero, O.; Strieder, F.; Terrasi, F.; Trautvetter, H. P.; Vomiero, A.

    2011-09-01

    Context. The NO cycle takes place in the deepest layer of a H-burning core or shell, when the temperature exceeds T ≃ 30 × 106 K. The O depletion observed in some globular cluster giant stars, always associated with a Na enhancement, may be due to either a deep mixing during the red giant branch (RGB) phase of the star or to the pollution of the primordial gas by an early population of massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, whose chemical composition was modified by the hot bottom burning. In both cases, the NO cycle is responsible for the O depletion. Aims: The activation of this cycle depends on the rate of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction. A precise evaluation of this reaction rate at temperatures as low as experienced in H-burning zones in stellar interiors is mandatory to understand the observed O abundances. Methods: We present a new measurement of the 15N(p, γ)16O reaction performed at LUNA covering for the first time the center of mass energy range 70-370 keV, which corresponds to stellar temperatures between 65 × 106 K and 780 × 106 K. This range includes the 15N(p, γ)16O Gamow-peak energy of explosive H-burning taking place in the external layer of a nova and the one of the hot bottom burning (HBB) nucleosynthesis occurring in massive AGB stars. Results: With the present data, we are also able to confirm the result of the previous R-matrix extrapolation. In particular, in the temperature range of astrophysical interest, the new rate is about a factor of 2 smaller than reported in the widely adopted compilation of reaction rates (NACRE or CF88) and the uncertainty is now reduced down to the 10% level.

  9. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  10. Improved determination of the astrophysical S(0) factor of the 15N(p,α)12C reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present new improved R matrix fits of direct data and indirect Trojan Horse data for the 15N(p,α)12C reaction and provide a more accurate recommended value of S(0)=73.0±5.0 MeV b from direct Redder data [A. Redder et al., Z. Phys. A 305, 325 (1982)] and S(0)=70.0±13.5 MeV b from the Trojan Horse data [M. La Cognata et al., Phys. Rev. C 76, 065804 (2007)]. We also analyze a recent fit by Barker [F. C. Barker, Phys. Rev. C 78, 044611 (2008)] and demonstrate that when all the uncertainties are taken into account, our results overlap with his. We also provide a fit of the Trojan Horse data that properly takes into account finite residual energy resolution of the data.

  11. astrophysical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dartois E.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Clathrate hydrates, ice inclusion compounds, are of major importance for the Earth’s permafrost regions and may control the stability of gases in many astrophysical bodies such as the planets, comets and possibly interstellar grains. Their physical behavior may provide a trapping mechanism to modify the absolute and relative composition of icy bodies that could be the source of late-time injection of gaseous species in planetary atmospheres or hot cores. In this study, we provide and discuss laboratory-recorded infrared signatures of clathrate hydrates in the near to mid-infrared and the implications for space-based astrophysical tele-detection in order to constrain their possible presence.

  12. On the ambiguity of the reaction rate constants in multivariate curve resolution for reversible first-order reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Henning; Sawall, Mathias; Kubis, Christoph; Selent, Detlef; Hess, Dieter; Franke, Robert; Börner, Armin; Neymeyr, Klaus

    2016-07-13

    If for a chemical reaction with a known reaction mechanism the concentration profiles are accessible only for certain species, e.g. only for the main product, then often the reaction rate constants cannot uniquely be determined from the concentration data. This is a well-known fact which includes the so-called slow-fast ambiguity. This work combines the question of unique or non-unique reaction rate constants with factor analytic methods of chemometrics. The idea is to reduce the rotational ambiguity of pure component factorizations by considering only those concentration factors which are possible solutions of the kinetic equations for a properly adapted set of reaction rate constants. The resulting set of reaction rate constants corresponds to those solutions of the rate equations which appear as feasible factors in a pure component factorization. The new analysis of the ambiguity of reaction rate constants extends recent research activities on the Area of Feasible Solutions (AFS). The consistency with a given chemical reaction scheme is shown to be a valuable tool in order to reduce the AFS. The new methods are applied to model and experimental data. PMID:27237834

  13. Neutrino Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Haxton, W. C.

    2000-01-01

    A general overview of neutrino physics and astrophysics is given, starting with a historical account of the development of our understanding of neutrinos and how they helped to unravel the structure of the Standard Model. We discuss why it is so important to establish if neutrinos are massive and introduce the main scenarios to provide them a mass. The present bounds and the positive indications in favor of non-zero neutrino masses are discussed, including the recent results on atmospheric an...

  14. New measurement of $\\rm S_{bare}(E)$ factor of the d(d,p)t reaction at astrophysical energies via the Trojan-horse method

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Chengbo; Fu, Yuanyong; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Shuhua; Meng, Qiuying; Spitaleri, C; Tumino, A; Pizzone, R G; Lamia, L

    2015-01-01

    The study of d(d,p)t reaction is very important for the nucleosynthesis in both standard Big Bang and stellar evolution, as well as for the future fusion reactor planning of energy production. The d(d,p)t bare nucleus astrophysical S(E) factor has been measured indirectly at energies from about 400 keV down to several keV by means of the Trojan horse method applied to the quasi-free process $\\rm {}^2H({}^6Li,pt){}^4He$ induced at the lithium beam energy of 9.5 MeV, which is closer to the zero quasi-free energy point, in CIAE HI-13 tandem accelerator laboratory. An accurate analysis leads to the determination of the d(d,p)t $\\rm S(E)$ factor $\\rm S_{bare}(0)=56.7 \\pm 2.0 keV*b$ and of the corresponding electron screening potential $\\rm U_e = 13.2 \\pm 4.3 eV$. In addition, this work also gives an updated test for the Trojan horse nucleus invariance comparing with previous indirect investigations using $\\rm {}^3He=(d+p)$ breakup.

  15. An introduction to nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of nuclear reactions in astrophysics is described. Stellar energy generation and heavy element nucleosynthesis is explained in terms of specific sequences of charged-particle and neutron induced reactions. The evolution and final states of stars are examined. 20 refs. 11 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Few-body models for nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descouvemont, P., E-mail: pdesc@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique, C.P. 229, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Baye, D., E-mail: dbaye@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique, C.P. 229, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Physique Quantique, C.P. 165/82, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Suzuki, Y., E-mail: suzuki@nt.sc.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Aoyama, S., E-mail: aoyama@cc.niigata-u.ac.jp [Center for Academic Information Service, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Arai, K., E-mail: arai@nagaoka-ct.ac.jp [Division of General Education, Nagaoka National College of Technology, 888 Nishikatakai, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-8532 (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    We present applications of microscopic models to nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, and we essentially focus on few-body systems. The calculation of radiative-capture and transfer cross sections is outlined, and we discuss the corresponding reaction rates. Microscopic theories are briefly presented, and we emphasize on the matrix elements of four-body systems. The microscopic extension of the R-matrix theory to nuclear reactions is described. Applications to the {sup 2}H(d, γ){sup 4}He, {sup 2}H(d, p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d, n){sup 3}He reactions are presented. We show the importance of the tensor force to reproduce the low-energy behaviour of the cross sections.

  17. Few-body models for nuclear astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Descouvemont

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We present applications of microscopic models to nuclear reactions of astrophysical interest, and we essentially focus on few-body systems. The calculation of radiative-capture and transfer cross sections is outlined, and we discuss the corresponding reaction rates. Microscopic theories are briefly presented, and we emphasize on the matrix elements of four-body systems. The microscopic extension of the R-matrix theory to nuclear reactions is described. Applications to the 2H(d, γ4He, 2H(d, p3H and 2H(d, n3He reactions are presented. We show the importance of the tensor force to reproduce the low-energy behaviour of the cross sections.

  18. $\\alpha$-cluster ANCs for nuclear astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Avila, M L; Koshchiy, E; Baby, L T; Belarge, J; Kemper, K W; Kuchera, A N; Santiago-Gonzalez, D

    2014-01-01

    Background. Many important $\\alpha$-particle induced reactions for nuclear astrophysics may only be measured using indirect techniques due to small cross sections at the energy of interest. One of such indirect technique, is to determine the Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients (ANC) for near threshold resonances extracted from sub-Coulomb $\\alpha$-transfer reactions. This approach provides a very valuable tool for studies of astrophysically important reaction rates since the results are practically model independent. However, the validity of the method has not been directly verified. Purpose. The aim of this letter is to verify the technique using the $^{16}$O($^6$Li,$d$)$^{20}$Ne reaction as a benchmark. The $^{20}$Ne nucleus has a well known $1^-$ state at excitation energy of 5.79 MeV with a width of 28 eV. Reproducing the known value with this technique is an ideal opportunity to verify the method. Method. The 1$^-$ state at 5.79 MeV is studied using the $\\alpha$-transfer reaction $^{16}$O($^6$Li,$d$)$^...

  19. Astrophysical cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardeen, J. M.

    The last several years have seen a tremendous ferment of activity in astrophysical cosmology. Much of the theoretical impetus has come from particle physics theories of the early universe and candidates for dark matter, but what promise to be even more significant are improved direct observations of high z galaxies and intergalactic matter, deeper and more comprehensive redshift surveys, and the increasing power of computer simulations of the dynamical evolution of large scale structure. Upper limits on the anisotropy of the microwave background radiation are gradually getting tighter and constraining more severely theoretical scenarios for the evolution of the universe.

  20. Women's Self-Disclosure of HIV Infection: Rates, Reasons, Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Jane M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 65 ethnically diverse women revealed relatively low rates of disclosure of HIV-positive serostatus to extended family members, somewhat higher rates for immediate family members, and highest rates for lovers or friends. Spanish-speaking Latinas were less likely to disclose their serostatus than English-speaking Latinas, African…

  1. Nuclear Data for Astrophysical Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Pritychenko, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear physics has been playing an important role in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Since the early 1950's it has been successfully applied for the interpretation and prediction of astrophysical phenomena. Nuclear physics models helped to explain the observed elemental and isotopic abundances and star evolution and provided valuable insights on the Big Bang theory. Today, the variety of elements observed in stellar surfaces, solar system and cosmic rays, and isotope abundances are calculated and compared with the observed values. Consequently, the overall success of the modeling critically depends on the quality of underlying nuclear data that helps to bring physics of macro and micro scales together. To broaden the scope of traditional nuclear astrophysics activities and produce additional complementary information, I will investigate applicability of the U.S. Nuclear Data Program (USNDP) databases for astrophysical applications. EXFOR (Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data) and ENDF (Evaluated Nuclear Dat...

  2. The Rate of the Proton-Proton Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Bahcall, John N.

    1993-01-01

    We re-evaluate the matrix element for the proton-proton reaction which is important for stellar-evolution calculations and for the solar-neutrino problem. We self-consistently determine the effect of vacuum polarization on the matrix element by first correcting the low-energy scattering data to account for vacuum polarization. We then calculate the proton-proton wave function by integrating the Schrodinger equation with vacuum polarization included. We use improved data for proton-proton scat...

  3. Indirect techniques in nuclear astrophysics. Asymptotic Normalization Coefficient and Trojan Horse

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Brown, B A; Burjan, V; Cherubini, S; Gagliardi, C A; Irgaziev, B F; Kroha, V; Nunes, F M; Pirlepesov, F; Pizzone, R G; Romano, S; Spitaleri, C; Tang, X D; Trache, L; Tribble, R E; Tumino, A

    2005-01-01

    Owing to the presence of the Coulomb barrier at astrophysically relevant kinetic energies it is very difficult, or sometimes impossible, to measure astrophysical reaction rates in the laboratory. That is why different indirect techniques are being used along with direct measurements. Here we address two important indirect techniques, the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) and the Trojan Horse (TH) methods. We discuss the application of the ANC technique for calculation of the astrophysical processes in the presence of subthreshold bound states, in particular, two different mechanisms are discussed: direct capture to the subthreshold state and capture to the low-lying bound states through the subthreshold state, which plays the role of the subthreshold resonance. The ANC technique can also be used to determine the interference sign of the resonant and nonresonant (direct) terms of the reaction amplitude. The TH method is unique indirect technique allowing one to measure astrophysical rearrangement reac...

  4. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Error rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu, Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition. PMID:25197572

  5. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter McInerney

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Error rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu, Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition.

  6. Comparative study of Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the odd-odd nucleus 50V and its impact on electron capture rates in astrophysical environments

    CERN Document Server

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; 10.1103/PhysRevC.76.055803

    2011-01-01

    Gamow-Teller (GT) strength transitions are an ideal probe for testing nuclear structure models. In addition to nuclear structure, GT transitions in nuclei directly affect the early phases of Type Ia and Type-II supernovae core collapse since the electron capture rates are partly determined by these GT transitions. In astrophysics, GT transitions provide an important input for model calculations and element formation during the explosive phase of a massive star at the end of its life-time. Recent nucleosynthesis calculations show that odd-odd and odd-A nuclei cause the largest contribution in the rate of change of lepton-to-baryon ratio. In the present manuscript, we have calculated the GT strength distributions and electron capture rates for odd-odd nucleus 50V by using the pn-QRPA theory. At present 50V is the first experimentally available odd-odd nucleus in fp-shell nuclei. We also compare our GT strength distribution with the recently measured results of a 50V(d,2He)50Ti experiment, with the earlier work ...

  7. Interlaboratory reaction rate program. 12th progress report, November 1976-October 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Interlaboratory Reaction Rate UILRR) program is establishing the capability to accurately measure neutron-induced reactions and reaction rates for reactor fuels and materials development programs. The goal for the principal fission reactions, 235U, 238U and 239Pu, is an accuracy to within +- 5% at the 95% confidence level. Accurate measurement of other fission and nonfission reactions is also required, but to a lesser accuracy, between +- 5% and 10% at the 95% confidence level. A secondary program objective is improvement in knowledge of the nuclear parameters involved in the standarization of fuels and materials dosimetry measurements of neutron flux, spectra, fluence and burnup

  8. Interlaboratory reaction rate program. 12th progress report, November 1976-October 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippincott, E.P.; McElroy, W.N.; Preston, C.C. (comps.)

    1980-09-01

    The Interlaboratory Reaction Rate UILRR) program is establishing the capability to accurately measure neutron-induced reactions and reaction rates for reactor fuels and materials development programs. The goal for the principal fission reactions, /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U and /sup 239/Pu, is an accuracy to within +- 5% at the 95% confidence level. Accurate measurement of other fission and nonfission reactions is also required, but to a lesser accuracy, between +- 5% and 10% at the 95% confidence level. A secondary program objective is improvement in knowledge of the nuclear parameters involved in the standarization of fuels and materials dosimetry measurements of neutron flux, spectra, fluence and burnup.

  9. Breakup of loosely bound nuclei as indirect method in nuclear astrophysics. 8B, 9C, 23Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the use of one-nucleon breakup reactions of loosely bound nuclei at intermediate energies as an indirect method in nuclear astrophysics. These are peripheral processes, therefore from breakup reaction data we can extract asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANC) from which reaction rates of astrophysical interest can be precisely evaluated. In particular, the breakup of 8B and 9C is described in detail in terms of an extended Glauber model. The results of this new analysis lead to the astrophysical factor S17(0) = 18.7 ± 1.9 eVb for the key reaction for solar neutrino production 7Be(p,γ)8B. We discuss a proposed use of the breakup of proton drip line nucleus 23Al to obtain the stellar reaction rate for 22Mg(p,γ)23Al. (author)

  10. Trojan Horse Method: recent results in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Gimenez Del Santo, M.; Burjan, V.; Carlin, N.; Li, Chengbo; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Irgaziev, B.; La Cognata, M.; Mrazek, J.; Mukhamedzhanov, M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Palmerini, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Puglia, M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, L.; Zhou, Shu-Hua; Somorjai, E.; Souza, F. A.; Tabacaru, G.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Tumino, A.; Wen, Qungang; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2015-07-01

    The accurate knowledge of thermonuclear reaction rates is important in understanding the energy generation, the neutrinos luminosity and the synthesis of elements in stars. The physical conditions under which the majority of astrophysical reactions proceed in stellar environments make it difficult or impossible to measure them under the same conditions in the laboratory. That is why different indirect techniques are being used along with direct measurements. The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is introduced as an independent technique to obtain the bare nucleus astrophysical S(E)-factor. As examples the results of recent the application of THM to the 2H(11B, σ08Be)n and 2H(10B, σ07Be)n reactions are presented.

  11. Electrochemical reaction rates in a dye sentisised solar cell - the iodide/tri-iodide redox system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Lasse; West, Keld; Winter-Jensen, Bjørn; Jacobsen, Torben

    2006-01-01

    The electrochemical reaction rate of the redox couple iodide / tri-iodide in acetonitrile is characterised by impedance spectroscopy. Different electrode materials relevant for the function of dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC) are investigated. Preferably, the reaction with the iodide / tri-iodide...... layer on top of the FTO glass to lower the tri-iodide reduction rate....

  12. Radiative Magnetic Reconnection in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2015-01-01

    I review a new rapidly growing area of high-energy plasma astrophysics --- radiative magnetic reconnection, i.e., a reconnection regime where radiation reaction influences reconnection dynamics, energetics, and nonthermal particle acceleration. This influence be may be manifested via a number of astrophysically important radiative effects, such as radiation-reaction limits on particle acceleration, radiative cooling, radiative resistivity, braking of reconnection outflows by radiation drag, radiation pressure, viscosity, and even pair creation at highest energy densities. Self-consistent inclusion of these effects in magnetic reconnection theory and modeling calls for serious modifications to our overall theoretical approach to the problem. In addition, prompt reconnection-powered radiation often represents our only observational diagnostic tool for studying remote astrophysical systems; this underscores the importance of developing predictive modeling capabilities to connect the underlying physical condition...

  13. The nuclear fusion reaction rate based on relativistic equilibrium velocity distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jian-Miin

    2002-01-01

    The Coulomb barrier is in general much higher than thermal energy. Nuclear fusion reactions occur only among few protons and nuclei with higher relative energies than Coulomb barrier. It is the equilibrium velocity distribution of these high-energy protons and nuclei that participates in determining the rate of nuclear fusion reactions. In the circumstance it is inappropriate to use the Maxwellian velocity distribution for calculating the nuclear fusion reaction rate. We use the relativistic ...

  14. Controlling the emotional heart: heart rate biofeedback improves cardiac control during emotional reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peira, Nathalie; Fredrikson, Mats; Pourtois, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    When regulating negative emotional reactions, one goal is to reduce physiological reactions. However, not all regulation strategies succeed in doing that. We tested whether heart rate biofeedback helped participants reduce physiological reactions in response to negative and neutral pictures. When viewing neutral pictures, participants could regulate their heart rate whether the heart rate feedback was real or not. In contrast, when viewing negative pictures, participants could regulate heart rate only when feedback was real. Ratings of task success paralleled heart rate. Participants' general level of anxiety, emotion awareness, or cognitive emotion regulation strategies did not influence the results. Our findings show that accurate online heart rate biofeedback provides an efficient way to down-regulate autonomic physiological reactions when encountering negative stimuli. PMID:24373886

  15. Integrating Out Astrophysical Uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Patrick J; Weiner, Neal

    2010-01-01

    Underground searches for dark matter involve a complicated interplay of particle physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics and astrophysics. We attempt to remove the uncertainties associated with astrophysics by developing the means to map the observed signal in one experiment directly into a predicted rate at another. We argue that it is possible to make experimental comparisons that are completely free of astrophysical uncertainties by focusing on {\\em integral} quantities, such as $g(v_{min})=\\int_{v_{min}} dv\\, f(v)/v $ and $\\int_{v_{thresh}} dv\\, v g(v)$. Direct comparisons are possible when the $v_{min}$ space probed by different experiments overlap. As examples, we consider the possible dark matter signals at CoGeNT, DAMA and CRESST-Oxygen. We find that expected rate from CoGeNT in the XENON10 experiment is higher than observed, unless scintillation light output is low. Moreover, we determine that S2-only analyses are constraining, unless the charge yield $Q_y< 2.4 {\\, \\rm electrons/keV}$. For DAMA t...

  16. Nuclear Astrophysics with the Trojan Horse Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumino, A.; Spitaleri, C.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Cherubini, S.; Gulino, M.; La Cognata, M.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Spartá, R.

    2016-01-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) represents the indirect path to determine the bare nucleus astrophysical S(E) factor for reactions between charged particles at astrophysical energies. This is done by measuring the quasi free cross section of a suitable three body process. The basic features of the THM will be presented together with some applications to demonstrate its practical use.

  17. Triple-differential cross section of the 208Pb(6Li, αd)208 Pb Coulomb breakup and astrophysical S-factor of the d(α,γ)6 Li reaction at extremely low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of calculation of the triple-differential cross section of the 208Pb(6Li, αd)208Pb Coulomb breakup at astrophysically relevant energies E of the relative motion of the breakup fragments, taking into account the three-body (α - d - 208Pb) Coulomb effects and the contributions from the E1- and E2- multipoles, including their interference, has been proposed. The new results for the astrophysical S-factor of the direct radiative capture d(α, γ)6 Li reaction at E ≤ 250 keV have been obtained. It is shown that the experimental triple-differential cross section of the 208Pb(6Li, αd)208Pb Coulomb breakup can also be used to give information about the value of the modulus squared of the nuclear vertex constant for the virtual 6Li → α + d. (author)

  18. Study of the astrophysically important $\\boldsymbol{^{23}\\mathrm{Na}(\\alpha,p)^{26}\\mathrm{Mg}}$ and $\\boldsymbol{^{23}\\mathrm{Na}(\\alpha,n)^{26}\\mathrm{Al}}$ reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Avila, M L; Almaraz-Calderon, S; Ayangeakaa, A D; Dickerson, C; Hoffman, C R; Jiang, C L; Kay, B P; Lai, J; Nusair, O; Pardo, R C; Santiago-Gonzalez, D; Talwar, R; Ugalde, C

    2016-01-01

    The $^{23}$Na$(\\alpha,p)^{26}$Mg and $^{23}$Na$(\\alpha,n)^{26}$Al reactions are important for our understanding of the $^{26}$Al abundance in massive stars. The aim of this work is to report on a direct and simultaneous measurement of these astrophysically important reactions using an active target system. The reactions were investigated in inverse kinematics using $^{4}$He as the active target gas in the detector. We measured the excitation functions in the energy range of about 2 to 6 MeV in the center of mass. We have found that the cross sections of the $^{23}$Na$(\\alpha,p)^{26}$Mg and the $^{23}$Na$(\\alpha,n)^{26}$Al reactions are in good agreement with previous experiments, and with statistical model calculations.

  19. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Peter McInerney; Paul Adams; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differe...

  20. Astrophysical Naturalness

    CERN Document Server

    Soker, Noam

    2015-01-01

    I suggest that stars introduce mass and density scales that lead to `naturalness' in the Universe. Namely, two ratios of order unity. (1) The combination of the stellar mass scale, M*, with the Planck mass, MPl, and the Chandrasekhar mass leads to a ratio of order unity that reads NPl*=MPl/[(M*)(mp)^2]^{1/3}=0.15-3, where mp is the proton mass. (2) The ratio of the density scale, rhoD = 1/[(G)(tau)^2], introduced by the nuclear life time of stars, tau, to the density of the dark energy, rhoL, is NL*=rhoL/rhoD=10^{-7}-10^{5}. Although the range is large, it is critically much smaller than the 123 orders of magnitude usually referred to when rhoL is compered to the Planck density. In the pure fundamental particles domain there is no naturalness; either naturalness does not exist or there is a need for a new physics or new particles. The `Astrophysical Naturalness' offers a third possibility: stars introduce the combinations of, or relations among, known fundamental quantities that lead to naturalness.

  1. The H-2(d,p)H-3 Reaction At Astrophysical Energies Studied Via The Trojan Horse Method And Pole Approximation Validity Test

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sparta, R.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Aliotta, M.; Burjan, Václav; Cherubini, S.; Crucilla, V.; Gulino, M.; Hons, Zdeněk; Kiss, G.; Kroha, Václav; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; McCleskey, M.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Puglia, S.M.R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Trache, L.; Tumino, A.

    MELVILLE, NY: AMER INST PHYSICS, 2 HUNTINGTON QUADRANGLE, STE 1NO1, MELVILLE, NY 11747-4501 USA, 2010 - (Spitaleri, C.; Rolfs, C.; Pizzone, R.), s. 242-245 ISBN 978-0-7354-0756-5. ISSN 0094-243X. [5th European Summer School on Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics. Sicily (IT), 20.09.2009-27.09.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Nuclear Astrophysics * Trojan Horse * H-2(d,p)H-3 Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  2. Nuclear astrophysics with real photons—the data acquisition system of the NEPTUN tagger setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvers, M.; Hasper, J.; Müller, S.; Savran, D.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Sonnabend, K.; Zilges, A.

    2008-01-01

    Photodissociation reactions play an important role in p-process nucleosynthesis. A precise knowledge of the energy dependence of a cross section is mandatory to determine the reaction rates for astrophysical network calculations. The NEPTUN tagger setup constructed at the S-DALINAC will provide high resolution measurements of (γ,n), (γ,p) and (γ, α) reactions. Besides a general overview on this setup its data acquisition system will be explained in more detail.

  3. Experimental status of 7Be production and destruction at astrophysical relevant energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leva, A.; Gialanella, L.; Strieder, F.

    2016-01-01

    The production and destruction of 7Be plays a significant role in the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis as well as in the framework of the solar neutrino. The 3He(α, γ)7Be reaction cross sections has been measured several times in the last decades, but the precision achieved on reaction rate determinations at the relevant astrophysical energies is not yet satisfactory. The experimental status of this reaction will be critically reviewed, and the theoretical descriptions available will be discussed.

  4. Recent Progress in Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Langanke, K

    1999-01-01

    The manuscript reviews progress achieved in recent years in various aspects of nuclear astrophysics, including stellar nucleosynthesis, nuclear aspects of supernova collapse and explosion, neutrino-induced reactions and their possible role in the supernova mechanism and nucleosynthesis, explosive hydrogen burning in binary systems, and finally the observation of $\\gamma$-rays from supernova remnants.

  5. Simulation of biochemical reactions with time-dependent rates by the rejection-based algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We address the problem of simulating biochemical reaction networks with time-dependent rates and propose a new algorithm based on our rejection-based stochastic simulation algorithm (RSSA) [Thanh et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141(13), 134116 (2014)]. The computation for selecting next reaction firings by our time-dependent RSSA (tRSSA) is computationally efficient. Furthermore, the generated trajectory is exact by exploiting the rejection-based mechanism. We benchmark tRSSA on different biological systems with varying forms of reaction rates to demonstrate its applicability and efficiency. We reveal that for nontrivial cases, the selection of reaction firings in existing algorithms introduces approximations because the integration of reaction rates is very computationally demanding and simplifying assumptions are introduced. The selection of the next reaction firing by our approach is easier while preserving the exactness

  6. Tests of the market's reaction to federal funds rate target changes

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel L. Thornton

    1998-01-01

    In this article, Daniel L. Thornton tests several hypotheses about the market's reactions to changes in the Federal Reserve's federal funds rate target. Thornton finds that short-term rates and long-term rates responded differently to funds rate target changes when target changes were accompanied by a change in the discount rate. He presents evidence that the smaller response of long-term rates (in these instances) is due to the market revising its inflation outlook when the target is changed...

  7. Nonradial and nonpolytropic astrophysical outflows IX. Modeling T Tauri jets with a low mass-accretion rate

    CERN Document Server

    Sauty, C; Lima, J J G; Tsinganos, K; Cayatte, V; Globus, N

    2011-01-01

    Context: A large sample of T Tauri stars exhibits optical jets, approximately half of which rotate slowly, only at ten per cent of their breakup velocity. The disk-locking mechanism has been shown to be inefficient to explain this observational fact. Aims: We show that low mass accreting T Tauri stars may have a strong stellar jet component that can effectively brake the star to the observed rotation speed. Methods: By means of a nonlinear separation of the variables in the full set of the MHD equations we construct semi- analytical solutions describing the dynamics and topology of the stellar component of the jet that emerges from the corona of the star. Results: We analyze two typical solutions with the same mass loss rate but different magnetic lever arms and jet radii. The first solution with a long lever arm and a wide jet radius effectively brakes the star and can be applied to the visible jets of T Tauri stars, such as RY Tau. The second solution with a shorter lever arm and a very narrow jet radius ma...

  8. A simple expression for the apparent reaction rate of large wood char gasification with steam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeki, Kentaro; Roh, Seon-Ah; Min, Tai-Jin; Namioka, Tomoaki; Yoshikawa, Kunio

    2010-06-01

    A simple expression for the apparent reaction rate of large wood char gasification with steam is proposed. Large char samples were gasified under steam atmosphere using a thermo-balance reactor. The apparent reaction rate was expressed as the product of the intrinsic rate and the effective factor. The effective factor was modified to include the effect of change in char diameter and intrinsic reaction rate during the reaction. Assuming uniform conversion ratio throughout a particle, the simplified reaction scheme was divided into three stages. In the initial stage, the local conversion ratio increases without particle shrinkage. In the middle stage, the particle shrinks following the shrinking core model without change in the local conversion ratio. In the final stage, the local conversion ratio increases without particle shrinkage. The validity of the modified effective value was confirmed by comparison with experimental results. PMID:20144863

  9. Thermonuclear reaction rate of 17O(p,γ)18F-a high-current, low-energy study at sea level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classical novae are thought to be the dominant source of 17O in our Galaxy. These energetic events produce 18F that, as it decays to 18O, drives the ejection of nuclear 'ash' into the interstellar medium. The importance of the non-resonant component of the 17O(p,γ)18F reaction is well established, and numerous studies have been performed to analyze this reaction. However, the temperature regime relevant to explosive hydrogen burning during classical novae corresponds to very low proton bombarding energies. At these low energies, the Coulomb barrier suppresses the reaction yield in the laboratory, and environmental backgrounds dominate the detected signal making it difficult to differentiate the direct capture γ-cascade from background. At the Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA), our electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source produces intense, low-energy proton beam (∼ 2.0 mA at the target), and these high currents boost the reaction yield. The LENA facility also has a coincidence detector setup that reduces environmental background contributions and boosts signal-to-noise. The sensitivity afforded by γγ -coincidence and high beam current allowed us to probe the 17O(p,γ)18F reaction within the classical nova Gamow window. Improved 17O(p,γ)18F direct capture reaction rates are currently being determined, and our progress will be reported. (author)

  10. Spectrophotometric reaction rate method for determination of barbituric acid by inhibition of the hydrochloric acid-bromate reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Movahedinia, H.

    2003-11-01

    A new kinetic-spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of barbituric acid. The method is based on its inhibition effect on the reaction between hydrochloric acid and bromate. The decolorization of methyl orange by the reaction products was used to monitor the reaction spectrophotometrically at 510 nm. The variable affecting the rate of the reaction was investigated. The method is simple, rapid, relatively sensitive and precise. The limit of detection is 7.9×10 -7 M and calibration rang is 1×10 -6-6.0×10 -4 M barbituric acid. The linearity range of the calibration graph is depends on bromate concentration. The relative standard deviation of seven replication determination of 5.6×10 -6 M barbituric acid was 1.8%. The influence of potential interfering substance was studied.

  11. Trends in Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Schatz, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Astrophysics is a vibrant field at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics that encompasses research in nuclear physics, astrophysics, astronomy, and computational science. This paper is not a review. It is intended to provide an incomplete personal perspective on current trends in nuclear astrophysics and the specific role of nuclear physics in this field.

  12. Trends in nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Hendrik

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is a vibrant field at the intersection of nuclear physics and astrophysics that encompasses research in nuclear physics, astrophysics, astronomy, and computational science. This paper is not a review. It is intended to provide an incomplete personal perspective on current trends in nuclear astrophysics and the specific role of nuclear physics in this field.

  13. Measurement of sub threshold resonance contributions to fusion reactions: the case of the 13C(α, n16O astrophysical neutron source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Cognata M.

    2015-01-01

    of the 6.356 MeV level was deduced. For the first time, the Trojan Horse Method and the asymptotic normalization coefficient were used in synergy. Our indirect approach lead to (C̃17O(1/2+α13C2 = 7.7−1.5+1.6 fm−1, slightly larger than the values in the literature, determining a 13C(α, n16O reaction rate slightly larger than the one in the literature at temperatures lower than 108 K, with enhanced accuracy.

  14. Ion-neutral gas reactions in a collision/reaction cell in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Correlation of ion signal decrease to kinetic rate constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction gas flow rate dependent Ar2+ and Ar+ signals are correlated to fundamental kinetic rate coefficients. A simple calculation, assuming that gas exits the reaction cell due only to effusion, is described to estimate the gas pressure in the reaction cell. The value of the product of the kinetic rate constant and the ion residence time in the reaction cell can be determined from experimental measurement of the decrease in an ion signal as a function of reaction gas flow rate. New kinetic rate constants are determined for the reaction of CH3F with Ar+ and Ar2+. - Highlights: • How to determine pressure and the product of the kinetic rate constant times the ion residence time in reaction cell • Relate measured ICP-DRC-MS signals versus gas flow rate to kinetic rate constants measured previously using SIFT-MS • Describe how to determine previously unmeasured kinetic rate constants using ICP-DRC-MS

  15. Viscosity Dependence of Some Protein and Enzyme Reaction Rates: Seventy-Five Years after Kramers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sashi, Pulikallu; Bhuyan, Abani K

    2015-07-28

    Kramers rate theory is a milestone in chemical reaction research, but concerns regarding the basic understanding of condensed phase reaction rates of large molecules in viscous milieu persist. Experimental studies of Kramers theory rely on scaling reaction rates with inverse solvent viscosity, which is often equated with the bulk friction coefficient based on simple hydrodynamic relations. Apart from the difficulty of abstraction of the prefactor details from experimental data, it is not clear why the linearity of rate versus inverse viscosity, k ∝ η(-1), deviates widely for many reactions studied. In most cases, the deviation simulates a power law k ∝ η(-n), where the exponent n assumes fractional values. In rate-viscosity studies presented here, results for two reactions, unfolding of cytochrome c and cysteine protease activity of human ribosomal protein S4, show an exceedingly overdamped rate over a wide viscosity range, registering n values up to 2.4. Although the origin of this extraordinary reaction friction is not known at present, the results indicate that the viscosity exponent need not be bound by the 0-1 limit as generally suggested. For the third reaction studied here, thermal dissociation of CO from nativelike cytochrome c, the rate-viscosity behavior can be explained using Grote-Hynes theory of time-dependent friction in conjunction with correlated motions intrinsic to the protein. Analysis of the glycerol viscosity-dependent rate for the CO dissociation reaction in the presence of urea as the second variable shows that the protein stabilizing effect of subdenaturing amounts of urea is not affected by the bulk viscosity. It appears that a myriad of factors as diverse as parameter uncertainty due to the difficulty of knowing the exact reaction friction and both mode and consequences of protein-solvent interaction work in a complex manner to convey as though Kramers rate equation is not absolute. PMID:26135219

  16. Reaction rates in blanket assemblies of a fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To validate neutronics calculation for the blanket design of fusion-fission hybrid reactor, experiments for measuring reaction rates inside two simulating assemblies are performed. Two benchmark assemblies were developed for the neutronics experiments. A D-T fusion neutron source is placed at the center of the setup. One of them consists of three layers of depleted uranium shells and two layers of polyethylene shells, and these shells are arranged alternatively. The 238U capture reaction rates are measured using depleted uranium foils and an HPGe gamma spectrometer. The fission reaction rates are measured using a fission chamber coated with depleted uranium. The other assembly consists of depleted uranium and LiH shells. The tritium production rates are measured using the lithium glass scintillation detector which is placed in the LiH region of the assembly. The measured reaction rates are compared with the calculated ones predicted using MCNP code, and C/E values are obtained. (authors)

  17. Comparison of ENDF/B-V and VI cross sections for dosimetry foil reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to compare calculations of pressure vessel surveillance dosimetry foil reaction rates computed using the ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI cross-section libraries. Reaction rates for dosimetry foils irradiated in the cavity surrounding the pressure vessel of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) were determined using the MCNP4A code with ENDF/B-V and -VI cross sections. The computed reaction rates were compared to measured ones obtained during three fuel cycles of the Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1 (ANO-1)

  18. INTERF: the reaction rates and spectra editing code for analysis of fusion neutronics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction rates and spectra editing code INTERF has been developed for transport calculation codes as a part of the analysis system for fusion neutronics experiments. This code can provide the ratio of calculation to experiment value for reaction rate (C/E), spectra, reaction rate distributions, contour distributions, etc. from results of transport calculation. The transport calculation codes that INTERF can process are the ANISN, DOT3.5, BERMUDA-2DN, MCNP and MORSE-DD codes. In this report, the concept, functions, input data, and input/output files in INTERF are described and the examples of input data for usage of INTERF are shown. (author)

  19. Evidence of reaction rate influencing cubic and hexagonal phase formation process in CdS nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Kuldeep; Kalita, M. P. C.

    2016-05-01

    CdS nanocrystals are synthesized by co-precipitation method using 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) as capping agent. Cubic, hexagonal and their mixture are obtained by varying the ME concentration. Lower (higher) ME concentration results in cubic (hexagonal) phase. The crystallite sizes are in the range 3-7 nm. Increase in ME concentration lead to lower reaction rate between Cd2+ and S2- of the precursors, and slower reaction rate is found to favor hexagonal phase formation over the cubic one in CdS nanocrystals. Role of reaction rate in the phase formation process provides a way to synthesize CdS nanocrystals in desired crystal phase.

  20. The trojan horse method as indirect technique in nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumino, A; Spitaleri, C; Cherubini, S; Crucilla, V; Fu, C; Gulino, M; La Cognata, M; Lamia, L; Pizzone, R G; Puglia, S M R; Rapisarda, G G; Romano, S; Sergi, M L [Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria - Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Elekes, Z; Fueloep, Z; Gyuerky, G; Kiss, G; Mukhamedzhanov, A [ATOMKI - Debrecen (Hungary); Goldberg, V [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station (United States); Rolfs, C [Ruhr-Universitaet, Bochum (Germany)], E-mail: tumino@lns.infn.it (and others)

    2008-05-15

    The Trojan Horse Method is a successful indirect technique for nuclear astrophysics. It allows one to measure astrophysical rearrangement reactions down to the relevant energies, providing a successful alternative path to measure the astrophysical S(E) factor. The basic features will be discussed and some recent results will be presented.

  1. Direct Measurement of the Astrophysical ^{38}K(p,γ)^{39}Ca Reaction and Its Influence on the Production of Nuclides toward the End Point of Nova Nucleosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotay, G; Christian, G; Ruiz, C; Akers, C; Burke, D S; Catford, W N; Chen, A A; Connolly, D; Davids, B; Fallis, J; Hager, U; Hutcheon, D A; Mahl, A; Rojas, A; Sun, X

    2016-04-01

    We have performed the first direct measurement of the ^{38}K(p,γ)^{39}Ca reaction using a beam of radioactive ^{38}K. A proposed ℓ=0 resonance in the ^{38}K+p system has been identified at 679(2) keV with an associated strength of 120_{-30}^{+50}  meV. Upper limits of 1.16 (3.5) and 8.6 (26) meV at the 68% (95%) confidence level were also established for two further expected ℓ=0 resonances at 386 and 515 keV, respectively. The present results have reduced uncertainties in the ^{38}K(p,γ)^{39}Ca reaction rate at temperatures of 0.4 GK by more than 2 orders of magnitude and indicate that Ar and Ca may be ejected in observable quantities by oxygen-neon novae. However, based on the newly evaluated rate, the ^{38}K(p,γ)^{39}Ca path is unlikely to be responsible for the production of Ar and Ca in significantly enhanced quantities relative to solar abundances. PMID:27081974

  2. Direct Measurement of the Astrophysical 38K (p ,γ )39Ca Reaction and Its Influence on the Production of Nuclides toward the End Point of Nova Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotay, G.; Christian, G.; Ruiz, C.; Akers, C.; Burke, D. S.; Catford, W. N.; Chen, A. A.; Connolly, D.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Hager, U.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Mahl, A.; Rojas, A.; Sun, X.

    2016-04-01

    We have performed the first direct measurement of the 38K (p ,γ )39Ca reaction using a beam of radioactive 38K. A proposed ℓ=0 resonance in the 38K +p system has been identified at 679(2) keV with an associated strength of 120-30+50 meV . Upper limits of 1.16 (3.5) and 8.6 (26) meV at the 68% (95%) confidence level were also established for two further expected ℓ=0 resonances at 386 and 515 keV, respectively. The present results have reduced uncertainties in the 38K (p ,γ )39Ca reaction rate at temperatures of 0.4 GK by more than 2 orders of magnitude and indicate that Ar and Ca may be ejected in observable quantities by oxygen-neon novae. However, based on the newly evaluated rate, the 38K (p ,γ )39Ca path is unlikely to be responsible for the production of Ar and Ca in significantly enhanced quantities relative to solar abundances.

  3. Selected specific rates of reactions of transients from water in aqueous solution. II. Hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rates of reactions of hydrogen atoms (from radiolysis of water and other sources) with organic and inorganic molecules, ions, and transients in aqueous solution were tabulated. Directly measured rates obtained by kinetic spectroscopy or conductimetric methods, and relative rates determined by competition kinetics are included. (U.S.)

  4. The rate constants of the H + FO reaction and its isotope variant on two electronic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The calculated integral cross sections as a function of collision energy for the reaction of H + FO (v = 0, j = 0) on two electronic state PES have been presented. Also, the rate constants have been calculated. Display Omitted Research highlights: → We calculated the rate constants of the H + FO reaction using QCT method. → Results on its isotope variant on two electronic states were also obtained. → The preference of reaction with H to D atom is presented in most cases. - Abstract: The investigations for reaction dynamics of the H + FO reaction have been carried out for initial state j = 0 and v = 0 of reagent FO on two high quality potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the 3A' and 3A' energy states developed by Go'mez-Carrasco et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 383 (2004) 25] using quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations. The integral cross section and its dependence on collision energy for the title reaction are presented. The temperature-dependent rate constants are calculated over the temperature range 200-4000 K, fitted using the Arrhenius equation for the title reaction. Isotope effects, the different product channels OH(D) + F, H(D)F + O and their reaction mechanisms on different electronic states of 13A'', 13A' are investigated by calculating the ratios of corresponding rate constants and then discussing the varying trends and differences. Comparisons and analogies between our calculations and other theoretical results are made to get a deep understanding of the phenomena.

  5. Compilation of neutron flux density spectra and reaction rates in different neutron fields. V.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon the recommendation of the International Working Group of Reactor Radiation Measurements (IWGRRM) a compilation of documents containing neutron flux density spectra and the reaction rates obtained by activiation and fission foils in different neutron fields is presented

  6. Neutron Scattering in Hydrogenous Moderators, Studied by Time Dependent Reaction Rate Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The moderation and absorption of a neutron burst in water, poisoned with the non-1/v absorbers cadmium and gadolinium, has been followed on the time scale by multigroup calculations, using scattering kernels for the proton gas and the Nelkin model. The time dependent reaction rate curves for each absorber display clear differences for the two models, and the separation between the curves does not depend much on the absorber concentration. An experimental method for the measurement of infinite medium reaction rate curves in a limited geometry has been investigated. This method makes the measurement of the time dependent reaction rate generally useful for thermalization studies in a small geometry of a liquid hydrogenous moderator, provided that the experiment is coupled to programs for the calculation of scattering kernels and time dependent neutron spectra. Good agreement has been found between the reaction rate curve, measured with cadmium in water, and a calculated curve, where the Haywood kernel has been used

  7. Anticipatory Heart Rate Deceleration and Reaction Time in Children with and without Referral for Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroufe, L. Alan; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The finding of major significance in this study concerns the effect of stimulant drug medication on the relationship between heart rate deceleration and reaction time with the clinic children. (Authors)

  8. Measurement of 235U fission reaction-rates in combined device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission reaction-rates of 235U (wrapped with Cd of 0.8 mm) in the combined setup were measured, using the enriched uranium fission chamber and capturing detector. The method of detecting the low-energy scattering, neutron background was studied. The experimental error is ±6.0%-±10.2%. The results was compared with the ones of 238U the fission reaction-rates. (authors)

  9. New Approach to the Stability of Chemical Reaction Networks: Piecewise Linear in Rates Lyapunov Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Radhawi, M. Ali; Angeli, David

    2014-01-01

    Piecewise-Linear in Rates (PWLR) Lyapunov functions are introduced for a class of Chemical Reaction Networks (CRNs). In addition to their simple structure, these functions are robust with respect to arbitrary monotone reaction rates, of which mass-action is a special case. The existence of such functions ensures the convergence of trajectories towards equilibria, and guarantee their asymptotic stability with respect to the corresponding stoichiometric compatibility class. We give the definiti...

  10. Compilation and R-matrix analysis of Big Bang nuclear reaction rates

    OpenAIRE

    Descouvemont, Pierre; Adahchour, Abderrahim; Angulo, Carmen; Coc, Alain; Vangioni-Flam, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    We use the R-matrix theory to fit low-energy data on nuclear reactions involved in Big Bang nucleosynthesis. A special attention is paid to the rate uncertainties which are evaluated on statistical grounds. We provide S factors and reaction rates in tabular and graphical formats. Comment: 40 pages, accepted for publication at ADNDT, web site at http://pntpm3.ulb.ac.be/bigbang

  11. Temperature trends for reaction rates, hydrogen generation, and partitioning of iron during experimental serpentinization of olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Klein, Frieder; Robbins, Mark; Moskowitz, Bruce; Berquó, Thelma S.; Jöns, Niels; Bach, Wolfgang; Templeton, Alexis

    2016-05-01

    A series of laboratory experiments were conducted to examine how partitioning of Fe among solid reaction products and rates of H2 generation vary as a function of temperature during serpentinization of olivine. Individual experiments were conducted at temperatures ranging from 200 to 320 °C, with reaction times spanning a few days to over a year. The extent of reaction ranged from brucite, and magnetite, with minor amounts of magnesite, dolomite, and iowaite. The chrysotile contained only small amounts of Fe (XFe = 0.03-0.05, with ∼25% present as ferric Fe in octahedral sites), and displayed little variation in composition with reaction temperature. Conversely, the Fe contents of brucite (XFe = 0.01-0.09) increased steadily with decreasing reaction temperature. Analysis of the reaction products indicated that the stoichiometry of the serpentinization reactions varied with temperature, but remained constant with increasing reaction progress at a given temperature. The observed distribution of Fe among the reaction products does not appear to be entirely consistent with existing equilibrium models of Fe partitioning during serpentinization, suggesting improved models that include kinetic factors or multiple reaction steps need to be developed. Rates of H2 generation increased steeply from 200 to 300 °C, but dropped off at higher temperatures. This trend in H2 generation rates is attributable to a combination of the overall rate of serpentinization reactions and increased partitioning of Fe into brucite rather than magnetite at lower temperatures. The results suggest that millimolal concentration of H2 could be attained in moderately hot hydrothermal systems like Lost City during fluid circulation on timescales of a few years.

  12. Sensitivity study of explosive nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernovae: I. Modification of individual thermonuclear reaction rates

    CERN Document Server

    Bravo, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    We explore the sensitivity of the nucleosynthesis due to type Ia supernovae with respect to uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates. We have adopted a standard one-dimensional delayed detonation model of the explosion of a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf, and have post-processed the thermodynamic trajectories of every mass-shell with a nucleosynthetic code, with increases (decreases) by a factor of ten on the rates of 1196 nuclear reactions. We have computed as well hydrodynamic models for different rates of the fusion reactions of 12C and of 16O. For selected reactions, we have recomputed the nucleosynthesis with alternative prescriptions for their rates taken from the JINA REACLIB database, and have analyzed the temperature ranges where modifications of their rates have the strongest effect on nucleosynthesis. The nucleosynthesis resulting from the Type Ia supernova models is quite robust with respect to variations of nuclear reaction rates, with the exception of the reaction of fusion of 12C nuclei. The ene...

  13. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindquist, W Brent

    2009-03-03

    The overall goal of the project was to bridge the gap between our knowledge of small-scale geochemical reaction rates and reaction rates meaningful for modeling transport at core scales. The working hypothesis was that reaction rates, determined from laboratory measurements based upon reactions typically conducted in well mixed batch reactors using pulverized reactive media may be significantly changed in in situ porous media flow due to rock microstructure heterogeneity. Specifically we hypothesized that, generally, reactive mineral surfaces are not uniformly accessible to reactive fluids due to the random deposition of mineral grains and to the variation in flow rates within a pore network. Expected bulk reaction rates would therefore have to be correctly up-scaled to reflect such heterogeneity. The specific objective was to develop a computational tool that integrates existing measurement capabilities with pore-scale network models of fluid flow and reactive transport. The existing measurement capabilities to be integrated consisted of (a) pore space morphology, (b) rock mineralogy, and (c) geochemical reaction rates. The objective was accomplished by: (1) characterizing sedimentary sandstone rock morphology using X-ray computed microtomography, (2) mapping rock mineralogy using back-scattered electron microscopy (BSE), X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and CMT, (3) characterizing pore-accessible reactive mineral surface area, and (4) creating network models to model acidic CO{sub 2} saturated brine injection into the sandstone rock samples.

  14. Reaction rate and energy-loss rate for photopair production by relativistic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Michal J.; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Sikora, Marek

    1992-01-01

    The process of e(+/-) pair production by relativistic nuclei on ambient photons is considered. The process is important for cosmic-ray nuclei in interstellar and intergalactic space as well as in galactic and extragalactic compact objects. The rate of this process is given by an integral of the cross section over the photon angular and energy distribution. In the case of isotropic photons, the angular integration is performed to provide an expression for the rate at given photon energy in the nucleus rest frame. The total rate then becomes a single integral of that rate over the photon energy distribution. Formulas are also given for the fractional energy loss of a relativistic nucleus colliding with a photon of a given energy in the rest frame. The nucleus energy-loss rate is integrated over the photon angular distribution in the case of isotropic photons, and simple fits are provided.

  15. Indirect techniques in nuclear astrophysics. Asymptotic normalization coefficient and trojan horse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhamedzhanov, A.M.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Pirlepesov, F.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R.E. [Texas A and M University, Cyclotron Institute, College Station, TX (United States); Blokhintsev, L.D. [Moscow State University, Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Brown, B.A.; Nunes, F.M. [Michigan State University, N.S.C.L. and Department of Physics and Astronomy, East Lansing, MI (United States); Burjan, V.; Kroha, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague-Rez (Czech Republic); Cherubini, S.; Pizzone, R.G.; Romano, S.; Spitaleri, C.; Tumino, A. [DMFCI, Universita di Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Irgaziev, B.F. [National University, Physics Department, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Tang, X.D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Physics Division, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2006-03-15

    Owing to the presence of the Coulomb barrier at astrophysically relevant kinetic energies it is very difficult, or sometimes impossible, to measure astrophysical reaction rates in the laboratory. That is why different indirect techniques are being used along with direct measurements. Here we address two important indirect techniques, the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) and the Trojan Horse (TH) methods. We discuss the application of the ANC technique for calculation of the astrophysical processes in the presence of subthreshold bound states, in particular, two different mechanisms are discussed: direct capture to the subthreshold state and capture to the low-lying bound states through the subthreshold state, which plays the role of the subthreshold resonance. The ANC technique can also be used to determine the interference sign of the resonant and nonresonant (direct) terms of the reaction amplitude. The TH method is unique indirect technique allowing one to measure astrophysical rearrangement reactions down to astrophysically relevant energies. We explain why there is no Coulomb barrier in the sub-process amplitudes extracted from the TH reaction. The expressions for the TH amplitude for direct and resonant cases are presented. (orig.)

  16. Re-evaluation of the 23Mg(p,γ) 24Al reaction rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hong-Lin; Liu Men-Quan; Lai Xiang-Jun; Luo Zhi-Quan

    2007-01-01

    Based on a new screening Coulomb model, this paper discusses the effect of electron screening on proton capture reaction of 23Mg. The derived result shows that, in some considerable range of stellar temperatures, the effect of electron screening on resonant reaction is prominent; on the non-resonant reaction the effect is obvious only in the low stellar temperatures. The reaction rates of 23Mg(p,γ)24Al would increase 15%-25% due to the fact that the electron screening are considered in typical temperature range of massive mass white dwarfs, and the results undoubtedly affect the nucleosynthesis of some heavier nuclei in massive mass white dwarfs.

  17. Sodium Enrichment in Yellow Supergiants: a Perspective from the Uncertainties of Reaction Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Sodium overabundance in yellow supergiants has stumped people for more than 20 years. The purpose of this paper is to explore this problem from the perspective of nuclear physics. We investigate carefully the CNO and NeNa cycles that are responsible for sodium production. We investigate some key reactions in the appropriate network. We show whether and how the sodium output can be affected by the rate uncertainties in these reactions. In this way, we evaluate if a reaction is important enough to deserve a better determination of its rate in terrestrial laboratories.

  18. Rate coefficients from quantum and quasi-classical cumulative reaction probabilities for the S(1D) + H2 reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambrina, P. G.; Lara, Manuel; Menéndez, M.; Launay, J.-M.; Aoiz, F. J.

    2012-10-01

    Cumulative reaction probabilities (CRPs) at various total angular momenta have been calculated for the barrierless reaction S(1D) + H2 → SH + H at total energies up to 1.2 eV using three different theoretical approaches: time-independent quantum mechanics (QM), quasiclassical trajectories (QCT), and statistical quasiclassical trajectories (SQCT). The calculations have been carried out on the widely used potential energy surface (PES) by Ho et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 4124 (2002), 10.1063/1.1431280] as well as on the recent PES developed by Song et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 9213 (2009), 10.1021/jp903790h]. The results show that the differences between these two PES are relatively minor and mostly related to the different topologies of the well. In addition, the agreement between the three theoretical methodologies is good, even for the highest total angular momenta and energies. In particular, the good accordance between the CRPs obtained with dynamical methods (QM and QCT) and the statistical model (SQCT) indicates that the reaction can be considered statistical in the whole range of energies in contrast with the findings for other prototypical barrierless reactions. In addition, total CRPs and rate coefficients in the range of 20-1000 K have been calculated using the QCT and SQCT methods and have been found somewhat smaller than the experimental total removal rates of S(1D).

  19. α-cluster asymptotic normalization coefficients for nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, M. L.; Rogachev, G. V.; Koshchiy, E.; Baby, L. T.; Belarge, J.; Kemper, K. W.; Kuchera, A. N.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.

    2014-10-01

    Background: Many important α-particle induced reactions for nuclear astrophysics may only be measured using indirect techniques due to the small cross sections at the energy of interest. One such indirect technique is to determine the asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) for near-threshold resonances extracted from sub-Coulomb α-transfer reactions. This approach provides a very valuable tool for studies of astrophysically important reaction rates since the results are practically model independent. However, the validity of the method has not been directly verified. Purpose: The aim of this Rapid Communication is to verify the technique using the O16(Li6,d)Ne20 reaction as a benchmark. The Ne20 nucleus has a well-known 1- state at an excitation energy of 5.79 MeV with a width of 28 eV. Reproducing the known value with this technique is an ideal opportunity to verify the method. Method: The 1- state at 5.79 MeV is studied using the α-transfer reaction O16(Li6,d)Ne20 at sub-Coulomb energies. Results: The partial α width for the 1- state at excitation energy of 5.79 MeV is extracted and compared with the known value, allowing the accuracy of the method to be evaluated. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that extracting the ANCs using sub-Coulomb α-transfer reactions is a powerful tool that can be used to determine the partial α width of near-threshold states that may dominate astrophysically important nuclear reaction rates.

  20. Absolute reaction rate measurement with D-D neutron source in polyethylene spherical shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absolute reaction rate distribution measurements in a polyethylene spherical shell with 38.6 cm outside diameter and 10 cm thickness were performed with D-D neutron source. By combining fission method and activation method, rich-uranium fission chamber, depleted-uranium fission chamber, 237Np fission chamber and 115In activation foils were placed at several positions on the equatorial line of the inner face of the shell, and the absolute reaction rates were obtained. The uncertainty of fission rates is 2.5%-4.3%, while the uncertainty of activation rates is about 6.3%. The reaction rates were calculated by MCNP and ENDF/B-VII. 0. The calculated results are lower than the measured results and 238U is typical. (authors)

  1. Underground nuclear astrophysics: Why and how

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, A.; Caciolli, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gyürky, Gy.; Laubenstein, M.; Napolitani, E.; Rigato, V.; Roca, V.; Szücs, T.

    2016-04-01

    The goal of nuclear astrophysics is to measure cross-sections of nuclear physics reactions of interest in astrophysics. At stars temperatures, these cross-sections are very low due to the suppression of the Coulomb barrier. Cosmic-ray-induced background can seriously limit the determination of reaction cross-sections at energies relevant to astrophysical processes and experimental setups should be arranged in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Placing experiments in underground sites, however, reduces this background opening the way towards ultra low cross-section determination. LUNA (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) was pioneer in this sense. Two accelerators were mounted at the INFN National Laboratories of Gran Sasso (LNGS) allowing to study nuclear reactions close to stellar energies. A summary of the relevant technology used, including accelerators, target production and characterisation, and background treatment is given.

  2. Underground nuclear astrophysics: why and how

    CERN Document Server

    Best, A; Fülöp, Zs; Gyürky, Gy; Laubenstein, M; Napolitani, E; Rigato, V; Roca, V; Szücs, T

    2016-01-01

    The goal of nuclear astrophysics is to measure cross sections of nuclear physics reactions of interest in astrophysics. At stars temperatures, these cross sections are very low due to the suppression of the Coulomb barrier. Cosmic ray induced background can seriously limit the determination of reaction cross sections at energies relevant to astrophysical processes and experimental setups should be arranged in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Placing experiments in underground sites, however, reduces this background opening the way towards ultra low cross section determination. LUNA (Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics) was pioneer in this sense. Two accelerators were mounted at the INFN National Laboratories of Gran Sasso (LNGS) allowing to study nuclear reactions close to stellar energies. A summary of the relevant technology used, including accelerators, target production and characterisation, and background treatment is given.

  3. Impact of a Revised 25Mg(p, γ)26Al Reaction Rate on the Operation of the Mg-Al Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straniero, O.; Imbriani, G.; Strieder, F.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Corvisiero, P.; Costantini, H.; Cristallo, S.; DiLeva, A.; Formicola, A.; Elekes, Z.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Junker, M.; Lemut, A.; Limata, B.; Marta, M.; Mazzocchi, C.; Menegazzo, R.; Piersanti, L.; Prati, P.; Roca, V.; Rolfs, C.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Somorjai, E.; Terrasi, F.; Trautvetter, H.-P.

    2013-02-01

    Proton captures on Mg isotopes play an important role in the Mg-Al cycle active in stellar H-burning regions. In particular, low-energy nuclear resonances in the 25Mg(p, γ)26Al reaction affect the production of radioactive 26Algs as well as the resulting Mg/Al abundance ratio. Reliable estimations of these quantities require precise measurements of the strengths of low-energy resonances. Based on a new experimental study performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics, we provide revised rates of the 25Mg(p, γ)26Algs and the 25Mg(p, γ)26Al m reactions with corresponding uncertainties. In the temperature range 50-150 MK, the new recommended rate of 26Al m production is up to five times higher than previously assumed. In addition, at T = 100 MK, the revised total reaction rate is a factor of two higher. Note that this is the range of temperature at which the Mg-Al cycle operates in a H-burning zone. The effects of this revision are discussed. Due to the significantly larger 25Mg(p, γ)26Al m rate, the estimated production of 26Algs in H-burning regions is less efficient than previously obtained. As a result, the new rates should imply a smaller contribution from Wolf-Rayet stars to the galactic 26Al budget. Similarly, we show that the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) extra-mixing scenario does not appear able to explain the most extreme values of 26Al/27Al, i.e., >10-2, found in some O-rich presolar grains. Finally, the substantial increase of the total reaction rate makes the hypothesis of self-pollution by massive AGBs a more robust explanation for the Mg-Al anticorrelation observed in globular-cluster stars.

  4. Pore-Scale Process Coupling and Effective Surface Reaction Rates in Heterogeneous Subsurface Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-09-01

    This manuscript provides a review of pore-scale researches in literature including experimental and numerical approaches, and scale-dependent behavior of geochemical and biogeochemical reaction rates in heterogeneous porous media. A mathematical equation that can be used to predict the scale-dependent behavior of geochemical reaction rates in heterogeneous porous media has been derived. The derived effective rate expression explicitly links the effective reaction rate constant to the intrinsic rate constant, and to the pore-scale variations in reactant concentrations in porous media. Molecular simulations to calculate the intrinsic rate constants were provided. A few examples of pore-scale simulations were used to demonstrate the application of the equation to calculate effective rate constants in heterogeneous materials. The results indicate that the deviation of effective rate constant from the intrinsic rate in heterogeneous porous media is caused by the pore-scale distributions of reactants and their correlation, which are affected by the pore-scale coupling of reactions and transport.

  5. THM determination of the 65 keV resonance strength intervening in the O-17(p,alpha)N-14 reaction rate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Burjan, Václav; Cherubini, S.; Coc, A.; Gulino, M.; Hammache, F.; Hons, Zdeněk; Izgaziev, B.; Kroha, Václav

    Vol. 1645. Melville: American Institute of Physics, 2015, s. 392-396. ISBN 978-0-7354-1284-2. ISSN 0094-243X. [Carpathian Summer School of Physics. Sinaia (RO), 13.07.2014-26.07.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07050; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11001 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : nuclear astrophysics * direct reactions * nucleosynthesis in novae * supernovae * other explosive environments Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  6. Estimation of the reaction rate constant of HOCl by SMILES observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuribayashi, Kouta; Kasai, Yasuko; Sato, Tomohiro; Sagawa, Hideo

    2012-07-01

    Hypochlorous acid, HOCl plays an important role to link the odd ClOx and the odd HOx in the atmospheric chemistry with the reaction: {ClO} + {HO_{2}} \\longrightarrow {HOCl} + {O_{2}} Quantitative understanding of the rate constant of the reaction (1.1) is essential for understanding the ozone loss in the mid-latitude region because of a view point of its rate controlling role in the ozone depletion chemistry. Reassessment of the reaction rate constant was pointed out from MIPAS/Envisat observations (von Clarmann et al., 2011) and balloon-borne observations (Kovalenko et al., 2007). Several laboratory studies had been reported, although the reaction rate constants have large uncertainties, as k{_{HOCl}} = (1.75 ± 0.52) × 10^{-12} exp[(368 ± 78)/T] (Hickson et al., 2007), and large discrepancies (Hickson et al., 2007;Stimpfle et al., 1979). Moreover, theoretical ab initio studies pointed out the pressure dependence of the reaction (1.1) (Xu et al., 2003). A new high-sensitive remote sensing technology named Superconducting SubMillimeter-wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on the International Space Station (ISS) had observed diurnal variations of HOCl in the upper stratosphere/lower mesosphere (US/LM) region for the first time. ClO and HO_{2} were slso observed simultaneously with HOCl. SMILES performed the observations between 12^{{th}} October 2009 and 21^{{th}} April 2010. The latitude coverage of SMILES observation is normally 38°S-65°N. The altitude region of HOCl observation is about 28-70 km. We estimated the time period in which the reaction (1.1) becomes dominant in the ClO_{y} diurnal chemistry in US/LM. The reaction rate constant was directly estimated by decay of [ClO] and [HO_{2}] amounts in that period. The derived reaction rate constant represented well the increase of [HOCl] amount.

  7. Determination of the enzyme reaction rate in a differential fixed-bed reactor: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baruque Filho E.A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction rate of starch hydrolysis catalyzed by a glucoamylase covalently bound to chitin particles was measured in a Differential Fixed-Bed Reactor (DFBR. Under selected test conditions the initial reaction rate may represent biocatalyst activity. Some aspects which influence measurement of the initial reaction rate of an immobilized enzyme were studied: the amount of desorbed enzyme and its hydrolytic activity, the extent of pore blockage of the biocatalyst caused by substrate solution impurities and the internal and external diffusional mass transfer effects. The results showed that the enzyme glucoamylase was firmly bound to the support, as indicated by the very low amount of desorbed protein found in the recirculating liquid. Although this protein was very active, its contribution to the overall reaction rate was negligible. It was observed that the biocatalyst pores were susceptible to being blocked by the impurities of the starch solution. This latter effect was accumulative, increasing with the number of sequential experiments carried out. When the substrate solution was filtered before use, very reliable determinations of immobilized enzyme reaction rates could be performed in the DFBR. External and internal diffusional resistences usually play a significant role in fixed-bed reactors. However, for the experimental system studied, internal mass transfer effects were not significant, and it was possible to select an operational condition (recirculation flow rate value that minimized the external diffusional limitations.

  8. Dielectronic recombination data for astrophysical applications: Plasma rate-coefficients for Fe^q+ (q=7-10, 13-22) and Ni^25+ ions from storage-ring experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Schippers, S.; Lestinsky, M.; Müller, A.; Savin, D. W.; Schmidt, E.W.; Wolf, A.

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes the present status of an ongoing experimental effort to provide reliable rate coefficients for dielectronic recombination of highly charged iron ions for the modeling of astrophysical and other plasmas. The experimental work has been carried out over more than a decade at the heavy-ion storage-ring TSR of the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. The experimental and data reduction procedures are outlined. The role of previously disregarded pr...

  9. Nuclear Astrophysics: CIPANP 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Haxton, W. C.

    2006-01-01

    I review progress that has been made in nuclear astrophysics over the past few years and summarize some of the questions that remain. Topics selected include solar neutrinos, supernovae (the explosion and associated nucleosynthesis), laboratory astrophysics, and neutron star structure.

  10. Measurement and calculation of 238U fission reaction rates induced by neutrons reflected by carbon material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To check the data of carbon material reflecting neutrons, the distribution of 238U fission reaction rates induced by D-T fusion neutrons reflected by carbon material was measured by using the small depleted uranium fission chamber and the capturing detector. For comparison, 238U fission rates without carbon material was measured too. The combined standard uncertainty of 238U fission reaction rate is 5.1%-6.4%. The measured results are consistent with the calculated ones with MCNP/4A code and ENDF/B-IV library data in the range of the error

  11. Metabolic control analysis of biochemical pathways based on a thermokinetic description of reaction rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1997-01-01

    of the thermokinetic description of reaction rates to include the influence of effecters. Here the reaction rate is written as a linear function of the logarithm of the metabolite concentrations. With this type of rate function it is shown that the approach of Delgado and Liao [Biochem. J. (1992) 282......, 919-927] can be much more widely applied, although it was originally based on linearized kinetics. The methodology of determining elasticity coefficients directly from pool levels is illustrated with an analysis of the first two steps of the biosynthetic pathway of penicillin. The results compare well...

  12. The power-law TST reaction rate coefficient with tunneling correction

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Cangtao; Zhou, Yanjun; Du, Jiulin

    2014-01-01

    We study the TST reaction rate for the systems with power-law distributions. We derive the expressions of the reaction rate coefficient with tunneling correction, which strongly depends on the power-law parameter. The numerical results show that a small deviation from one in the parameter can result in a significant change in the rate coefficient, but only cause a small change in the tunneling correction. Thus the tunneling correction is not sensitive to the power-law distributions. As an app...

  13. Chemical Reaction Rates from Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics: Theory and Practical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Suleimanov, Yury V; Guo, Hua

    2016-01-01

    This Feature Article presents an overview of the current status of Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (RPMD) rate theory. We first analyze theory and its connection to quantum transition state theory. We then focus on its practical application to prototypical chemical reactions in the gas phase, which demonstrate how accurate and reliable RPMD is for calculating thermal chemical reaction rates in multifarious cases. This review serves as an important checkpoint in RPMD rate theory development, which shows that RPMD is shifting from being just one of recent novel ideas to a well-established and validated alternative to conventional techniques for calculating thermal chemical rates. We also hope it will motivate further applications of RPMD to various chemical reactions.

  14. Rate Constant Change of Photo Reaction of Bacteriorhodopsin Observed in Trimeric Molecular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujiuchi, Yutaka; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Goto, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    To elucidate the time evolution of photo reaction of bacteriorhodopsin in glycerol mixed purple membrane at around 196 K under irradiation by red light, a kinetic model was constructed. The change of absorption with irradiation at times of 560 nm and 412 nm was analyzed for the purpose of determining reaction rates of photo reaction of bacteriorhodopsin and its product M intermediate. In this study it is shown that reaction rates of conversion from bacteriorhodopsin to the M intermediate can be explained by a set of linear differential equations. This model analysis concludes that bacteriorhodopsin in which constitutes a trimer unit with other two bacteriorhodopsin molecules changes into M intermediates in the 1.73 of reaction rate, in the initial step, and according to the number of M intermediate in a trimer unit, from three to one, the reaction rate of bacteriorhodopsin into M intermediates smaller as 1.73, 0.80, 0.19 which caused by influence of inter-molecular interaction between bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:27451646

  15. A numerical evaluation of prediction accuracy of CO2 absorber model for various reaction rate coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the CO2 absorber column using mono-ethanolamine (MEA solution as chemical solvent are predicted by a One-Dimensional (1-D rate based model in the present study. 1-D Mass and heat balance equations of vapor and liquid phase are coupled with interfacial mass transfer model and vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The two-film theory is used to estimate the mass transfer between the vapor and liquid film. Chemical reactions in MEA-CO2-H2O system are considered to predict the equilibrium pressure of CO2 in the MEA solution. The mathematical and reaction kinetics models used in this work are calculated by using in-house code. The numerical results are validated in the comparison of simulation results with experimental and simulation data given in the literature. The performance of CO2 absorber column is evaluated by the 1-D rate based model using various reaction rate coefficients suggested by various researchers. When the rate of liquid to gas mass flow rate is about 8.3, 6.6, 4.5 and 3.1, the error of CO2 loading and the CO2 removal efficiency using the reaction rate coefficients of Aboudheir et al. is within about 4.9 % and 5.2 %, respectively. Therefore, the reaction rate coefficient suggested by Aboudheir et al. among the various reaction rate coefficients used in this study is appropriate to predict the performance of CO2 absorber column using MEA solution. [Acknowledgement. This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF, funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2011-0017220].

  16. Research in nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction between nuclear theory and some outstanding problems in astrophysics is examined. We are actively researching both the astrophysics of gravitational collapse, neutron star birth, and the emission of neutrinos from supernovae, on the one hand, and the nuclear physics of the equation of state of hot, dense matter on the other hand. There is close coupling between nuclear theory and the supernova phenomenon; in fact, nuclear matter properties, especially at supernuclear densities, might be best delineated by astrophysical considerations. Our research has also focused on the neutrinos emitted from supernovae, since they are the only available observables of the internal supernova mechanism. The recent observations of neutrinos from SN 1987A proved to be in remarkable agreement with models we pioneered in the one and one half years prior to its explosion in February 1987. We have also developed a novel hydrodynamical code in which shocks are treated via Riemann resolution rather than with artificial viscosity. We propose to modify it to use implicit differencing and to include multi-group neutrino diffusion and General Relativity. In parallel, we are extending calculations of the birth of a neutron star to include convection and mass accretion, by incorporating a hydrodynamic envelope onto a hydrostatic core. In view of the possible recent discovery of a pulsar in SN1987A, we are including the effects of rotation. We are undertaking a detailed comparison of current equations of state, focusing on disagreements regarding the nuclear incompressibly, symmetry energy and specific heat. Especially important is the symmetry energy, which below nuclear density controls free proton fractions and weak interaction rates and above this density critically influences the neutron star maximum mass and binding energy. 60 refs

  17. Benchmark experiments for validation of reaction rates determination in reactor dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precision of Monte Carlo calculations of quantities of neutron dosimetry strongly depends on precision of reaction rates prediction. Research reactor represents a very useful tool for validation of the ability of a code to calculate such quantities as it can provide environments with various types of neutron energy spectra. Especially, a zero power research reactor with well-defined core geometry and neutronic properties enables precise comparison between experimental and calculated data. Thus, at the VR-1 zero power research reactor, a set of benchmark experiments were proposed and carried out to verify the MCNP Monte Carlo code ability to predict correctly the reaction rates. For that purpose two frequently used reactions were chosen: He-3(n,p)H-3 and Au-197(n,γ)Au-198. The benchmark consists of response measurement of small He-3 gas filled detector in various positions of reactor core and of activated gold wires placed inside the core or to its vicinity. The reaction rates were calculated in MCNP5 code utilizing a detailed model of VR-1 reactor which was validated for neutronic calculations at the reactor. The paper describes in detail the experimental set-up of the benchmark, the MCNP model of the VR-1 reactor and provides a comparison between experimental and calculated data. - Highlights: • Use of zero power reactor for validation of reaction rates calculations. • Reaction rates measurement in reactor core by He-3 detector and Au wires. • Validation of reaction rates calculation by MCNP5. • Comparison of measured and calculated RR for different positions in core

  18. The collision theory reaction rate coefficient for power-law distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Cangtao; Du, Jiulin

    2014-01-01

    The collision theory for power-law distributions and a generalized collision theory rate coefficient is studied when the reactions take place in nonequilibrium systems with power-law distributions. We obtain the power-law rate coefficient and by numerical analyses we show a very strong dependence of the rate coefficient on the power-law parameter. We find that the power-law collision theory can successfully overcome the two difficulties of Lindemann-Christiansen mechanism. We take three react...

  19. Unbound states of 32Cl and the 31S(p,gamma)32Cl reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 31S(p,γ)32Cl reaction is expected to provide the dominant break-out path from the SiP cycle in novae and is important for understanding enrichments of sulfur observed in some nova ejecta. We studied the 32S(3He,t)32Cl charge-exchange reaction to determine properties of proton-unbound levels in 32Cl that have previously contributed significant uncertainties to the 31S(p,γ)32Cl reaction rate. Measured triton magnetic rigidities were used to determine excitation energies in 32Cl. Proton-branching ratios were obtained by detecting decay protons from unbound 32Cl states in coincidence with tritons. An improved 31S(p,γ)32Cl reaction rate was calculated including robust statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  20. Unbound states of 32Cl and the 31S(p,\\gamma)32Cl reaction rate

    CERN Document Server

    Matoš, M; Linhardt, L E; Bardayan, D W; Nesaraja, C D; Clark, J A; Deibel, C M; O'Malley, P D; Parker, P D

    2011-01-01

    The 31S(p,\\gamma)32Cl reaction is expected to provide the dominant break-out path from the SiP cycle in novae and is important for understanding enrichments of sulfur observed in some nova ejecta. We studied the 32S(3He,t)32Cl charge-exchange reaction to determine properties of proton-unbound levels in 32Cl that have previously contributed significant uncertainties to the 31S(p,\\gamma)32Cl reaction rate. Measured triton magnetic rigidities were used to determine excitation energies in 32Cl. Proton-branching ratios were obtained by detecting decay protons from unbound 32Cl states in coincidence with tritons. An improved 31S(p,\\gamma)32Cl reaction rate was calculated including robust statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  1. Ab Initio Calculation of Rate Constants for Molecule-Surface Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, GiovanniMaria; Alessio, Maristella; Sauer, Joachim

    2016-04-18

    The ab initio prediction of reaction rate constants for systems with hundreds of atoms with an accuracy that is comparable to experiment is a challenge for computational quantum chemistry. We present a divide-and-conquer strategy that departs from the potential energy surfaces obtained by standard density functional theory with inclusion of dispersion. The energies of the reactant and transition structures are refined by wavefunction-type calculations for the reaction site. Thermal effects and entropies are calculated from vibrational partition functions, and the anharmonic frequencies are calculated separately for each vibrational mode. This method is applied to a key reaction of an industrially relevant catalytic process, the methylation of small alkenes over zeolites. The calculated reaction rate constants (free energies), pre-exponential factors (entropies), and enthalpy barriers show that our computational strategy yields results that agree with experiment within chemical accuracy limits (less than one order of magnitude). PMID:27008460

  2. A comprehensive experimental procedure for CO2 coal gasification: Is there really a maximum reaction rate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The maximum reaction rate during gasification is caused by switching the gas. • The time to observe a maximum only depends on gas flow rate and reactor volume. • Isothermal pyrolysis step prior to gasification reduces char mesopore area. • An improved gasification procedure using TGA has been proposed and evaluated. • Results with the new procedure exhibit no maximum with faster reaction rate. - Abstract: A novel procedure to perform carbon dioxide (CO2) gasification studies was tested with two different Alberta coals and compared to the most common procedures using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The designed experiments indicate that maximum reaction rates reported in the literature were probably a consequence of the increasing CO2 concentration in the gas mixture when the inert gas was switched to CO2. It has been proven that, independent of feedstocks, the time to observe this maximum reaction rate was constant, indicating the reported maximum reaction rate depends only on the gas dispersion when the gasifying agent is fed and not on the surface properties of the char. In addition, the comparison of different experimental procedures shows the time that the char was exposed to an inert gas atmosphere prior to gasification, decreased the reactivity of the char. The reason is a reduction of the char mesopore area, which was induced when pyrolysis and gasification were separated with an isothermal step using an inert gas. The random pore model is the most common model used to describe coal and biomass gasification in the literature, since it can predict a maximum reaction rate for a determined conversion. However, its usage may be inappropriate for gasification kinetics analysis, if the changing gas mixture effect and the char surface area reduction induced by the experimental procedure are not considered

  3. A review of the rates of reaction of unirradiated uranium in gaseous atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The review collates available quantitative rate data for the reaction of unirradiated uranium in dry and moist air, steam and carbon dioxide based atmospheres at temperatures ranging from room temperature to above the melting point of uranium. Reactions in nitrogen and carbon monoxide are also considered. The aim of the review is to provide a compilation of base data for the hazard analysis of fault conditions relating to Magnox fuel. (author)

  4. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. I. Quantum Mechanical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual form activated complex theory assumes a quasi-equilibrium between reactants and activated complex, a separable reaction coordinate, a Cartesian reaction coordinate, and an absence of interaction of rotation with internal motion in the complex. In the present paper a rate expression is derived without introducing the Cartesian assumption. The expression bears a formal resemblance to the usual one and reduces to it when the added assumptions of the latter are introduced.

  5. Mathematical Formalism of Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics for Nonlinear Chemical Reaction Systems with General Rate Law

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Hao; Qian, Hong

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a mathematical formalism of nonequilibrium thermodynamics for chemical reaction models with $N$ species, $M$ reactions, and general rate law. We establish a mathematical basis for J. W. Gibbs' macroscopic chemical thermodynamics under G. N. Lewis' kinetic law of entire equilibrium (detailed balance in nonlinear chemistry kinetics). In doing so, the equilibrium thermodynamics is then naturally generalized to nonequilibrium settings without detailed balance. The kinetic model...

  6. Percolation-dependent Reaction Rates in the Etching of Disordered Solids

    OpenAIRE

    Kolwankar, K. M.; Plapp, M.; Sapoval, B.

    2002-01-01

    A prototype statistical model for the etching of a random solid is investigated in order to assess the influence of disorder and temperature on the dissolution kinetics. At low temperature, the kinetics is dominated by percolation phenomena, and the percolation threshold determines the global reaction time. At high temperature, the fluctuations of the reaction rate are Gaussian, whereas at low temperature they exhibit a power law tail due to chemical avalanches. This is an example where micro...

  7. Nuclear Reaction Rate Uncertainties and their effects on Nova Nucleosynthesis Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Hix, W. Raphael; Smith, Michael S.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Starrfield, Sumner; Smith, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    The nucleosynthesis and other observable consequences of a nova outburst depend sensitively on the details of the thermonuclear runaway which initiates the outburst. One important source of uncertainty in our current models is the nuclear reaction data used as input for the evolutionary calculations. We present preliminary results of the first analyses of the impact on nova nucleosynthesis of all reaction rate uncertainties considered simultaneously.

  8. Rate constants for chemical reactions in high-temperature nonequilibrium air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the nonequilibrium atmospheric chemistry regime that will be encountered by the proposed Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle in the upper atmosphere, where air density is too low for thermal and chemical equilibrium to be maintained, the detailed high temperature air chemistry plays a critical role in defining radiative and convective heating loads. Although vibrational and electronic temperatures remain low (less than 15,000 K), rotational and translational temperatures may reach 50,000 K. Attention is presently given to the effects of multiple temperatures on the magnitudes of various chemical reaction rate constants, for the cases of both bimolecular exchange reactions and collisional excitation and dissociation reactions.

  9. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of hypochlorous acid with protein side chains and peptide bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, D I; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    , absolute second-order rate constants for the reactions of HOCl with protein side chains, model compounds, and backbone amide (peptide) bonds have been determined at physiological pH values. The reactivity of HOCl with potential reactive sites in proteins is summarized by the series: Met (3.8 x 10(7) M(-1....... Proteins are major targets for this oxidant, and such reaction results in side-chain modification, backbone fragmentation, and cross-linking. Despite a wealth of qualitative data for such reactions, little absolute kinetic data is available to rationalize the in vitro and in vivo data. In this study...

  10. Simplified method of ''push-pull'' test data analysis for determining in situ reaction rate coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The single-well, ''''push-pull'''' test method is useful for obtaining information on a wide variety of aquifer physical, chemical, and microbiological characteristics. A push-pull test consists of the pulse-type injection of a prepared test solution into a single monitoring well followed by the extraction of the test solution/ground water mixture from the same well. The test solution contains a conservative tracer and one or more reactants selected to investigate a particular process. During the extraction phase, the concentrations of tracer, reactants, and possible reaction products are measured to obtain breakthrough curves for all solutes. This paper presents a simplified method of data analysis that can be used to estimate a first-order reaction rate coefficient from these breakthrough curves. Rate coefficients are obtained by fitting a regression line to a plot of normalized concentrations versus elapsed time, requiring no knowledge of aquifer porosity, dispersivity, or hydraulic conductivity. A semi-analytical solution to the advective-dispersion equation is derived and used in a sensitivity analysis to evaluate the ability of the simplified method to estimate reaction rate coefficients in simulated push-pull tests in a homogeneous, confined aquifer with a fully-penetrating injection/extraction well and varying porosity, dispersivity, test duration, and reaction rate. A numerical flow and transport code (SUTRA) is used to evaluate the ability of the simplified method to estimate reaction rate coefficients in simulated push-pull tests in a heterogeneous, unconfined aquifer with a partially penetrating well. In all cases the simplified method provides accurate estimates of reaction rate coefficients; estimation errors ranged from 0.1 to 8.9% with most errors less than 5%

  11. Trojan Horse Method: recent applications in nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Pizzone, R.G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M.L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Chimiche e Fisiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania (Italy); Tumino, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Enna ' Kore' , Enna (Italy)

    2010-03-01

    The Trojan Horse Method (THM) is a powerful indirect technique to extract the bare nucleus cross section (or equivalently the bare nucleus astrophysical factor) for astrophysically relevant reactions. The theory has been discussed in many works in relation to the different types of reactions studied. Here we present the methodology to select the quasi free mechanism in order to extract this important parameter.

  12. Subsurface mineralisation. Rate of CO2 mineralisation and geomechanical effects on host and seal formations. A review of relevant reactions and reaction rate data. First interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is general agreement that CO2 emissions need to be reduced in order to limit climate change and global warming effects. One way of disposing of carbon dioxide is by subsurface mineralisation, which entails the injection of CO2 into the subsurface where it will be converted into carbonates, and hence rendered immobile. Research on subsurface mineralisation is the main focus of Work Package 4.1 of the Dutch international research programme CATO (CO2 capture, transport and storage). CATO aims to build up a strong and coherent knowledge network, combined with adequate dissemination of knowledge, in the area of CO2 capture, transport and storage. This network will gather and validate knowledge, develop novel technologies for CO2 capture and storage, built up capacity to implement these technologies, and explore to which extent specific Clean Fossil Fuel options are acceptable to society. The principle behind CO2 sequestration by subsurface mineralisation is based on a number of sequential chemical reactions: (1) CO2 dissolves in the reservoir water to form carbonic acid, and subsequently bicarbonate; (2) the bicarbonate reacts with cations present in the reservoir water in order to form stable carbonates. If sufficient cations are present, these reactions can lead to the long term, safe, storage of carbon dioxide as stable carbonates. When CO2 is injected into an impure sandstone reservoir, feldspars and clays present in the rock will act as the cation source, and protons present in the reservoir water, as a result of carbon dioxide dissolution, will leach out the necessary cations from the silicate structure. In order to model the progress, efficiency and geochemical/geomechanical effects of any such mineralisation process, data are needed on the response of appropriate reservoir rocks to CO2 injections.The title PhD project forms part of CATO Workpackage WP 4.1. It aims to (1) determine the reaction rates of any relevant reactions taking place; (2) characterise

  13. Effect of macromolecular crowding on the rate of diffusion-limited enzymatic reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manish Agrawal; S B Santra; Rajat Anand; Rajaram Swaminathan

    2008-08-01

    The cytoplasm of a living cell is crowded with several macromolecules of different shapes and sizes. Molecular diffusion in such a medium becomes anomalous due to the presence of macromolecules and diffusivity is expected to decrease with increase in macromolecular crowding. Moreover, many cellular processes are dependent on molecular diffusion in the cell cytosol. The enzymatic reaction rate has been shown to be affected by the presence of such macromolecules. A simple numerical model is proposed here based on percolation and diffusion in disordered systems to study the effect of macromolecular crowding on the enzymatic reaction rates. The model qualitatively explains some of the experimental observations.

  14. Calculation of the CB1 burnup credit benchmark reaction rates with MCNP4B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first calculational VVER-440 burnup credit benchmark CB1 in 1996. VTT Energy participated in the calculation of the CB1 benchmark with three different codes: CASMO-4, KENO-VI and MCNP4B. However, the reaction rates and the fission ν were calculated only with CASMO-4. Now, the neutron absorption and production reaction rates and the fission ν values have been calculated at VTT Energy with the MCNP4B Monte Carlo code using the ENDF60 neutron data library. (author)

  15. An implicit relation between temperature and reaction rate in the SLFM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Arrhenius law implies that reaction rate is a continuous function of temperature. However,the steady laminar flamelet model(SLFM) does not explicitly give this functional relationship. The present study addresses this relation in the SLFM.It is found that reaction rate is not continuous in the mixture-fraction space.As a result,the SLFM is unable to predict local extinction and reignition.Furthermore,we use the unstable branch of the"S-curve"to fill the gap between steady burning branch and extinctio...

  16. Cross-section evaluation utilizing integral reaction-rate measurements in fast neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of integral reaction-rate data for cross-section evaluation is reviewed. The subset of integral data considered comprises integral reaction rates measured for dosimeter, fission-product, and actinide-type materials irradiated in reactor dosimetry fast neutron benchmark fields and in the EBR-II. Utilization of these integral data for integral testing, multigroup cross-section adjustment and pointwise cross section adjustment is treated in some detail. Examples are given that illustrate the importance of considering a priori uncertainty and correlation information for these analyses. 3 figures, 3 tables

  17. Bubble Chambers for Experiments in Nuclear Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    DiGiovine, B.; Henderson, D.; Holt, R. J.; Rehm, K. E.; Raut, R.; Robinson, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Rusev, G.; A.P. Tonchev; Ugalde, C.

    2015-01-01

    A bubble chamber has been developed to be used as an active target system for low energy nuclear astrophysics experiments. Adopting ideas from dark matter detection with superheated liquids, a detector system compatible with gamma-ray beams has been developed. This detector alleviates some of the limitations encountered in standard measurements of the minute cross sections of interest to stellar environments. While the astrophysically relevant nuclear reaction processes at hydrostatic burning...

  18. Temperature dependence of electrocatalytic and photocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction rates using NiFe oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Nurlaela, Ela

    2016-01-25

    The present work compares oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in electrocatalysis and photocatalysis in aqueous solutions using nanostructured NiFeOx as catalysts. The impacts of pH and reaction temperature on the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic OER kinetics were investigated. For electrocatalysis, a NiFeOx catalyst was hydrothermally decorated on Ni foam. In 1 M KOH solution, the NiFeOx electrocatalyst achieved 10 mA cm-2 at an overpotential of 260 mV. The same catalyst was decorated on the surface of Ta3N5 photocatalyst powder. The reaction was conducted in the presence of 0.1 M Na2S2O8 as a strong electron scavenger, thus likely leading to the OER being kinetically relevant. When compared with the bare Ta3N5, NiFeOx/Ta3N5 demonstrated a 5-fold improvement in photocatalytic activity in the OER under visible light irradiation, achieving a quantum efficiency of 24 % at 480 nm. Under the conditions investigated, a strong correlation between the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic performances was identified: an improvement in electrocatalysis corresponded with an improvement in photocatalysis without altering the identity of the materials. The rate change at different pH was likely associated with electrocatalytic kinetics that accordingly influenced the photocatalytic rates. The sensitivity of the reaction rates with respective to the reaction temperature resulted in an apparent activation energy of 25 kJ mol-1 in electrocatalysis, whereas that in photocatalysis was 16 kJ mol-1. The origin of the difference in these activation energy values is likely attributed to the possible effects of temperature on the individual thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the reaction process. The work described herein demonstrates a method of “transferring the knowledge of electrocatalysis to photocatalysis” as a strong tool to rationally and quantitatively understand the complex reaction schemes involved in photocatalytic reactions.

  19. 3,6-Substituted-1,2,4,5-Tetrazines: Tuning Reaction Rates for Staged Labeling Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Danzhu; Chen, Weixuan; Zheng, Yueqin; Dai, Chaofeng; Wang, Ke; Ke, Bowen; Wang, Binghe

    2014-01-01

    Cycloaddition reactions involving tetrazine have proven to be powerful bioorthogonal tools for various applications. Conceivably, sequential and selective labeling using tetrazine-based reactions can be achieved by tuning the reaction rate. By varying the substituents on tetrazine, cycloaddition rate variations of over 200 fold have been achieved with the same dienophile. Coupled with the availability of different dienophiles, such as norbornene, the reaction rate difference can be over 14,00...

  20. Photochemistry of solutes in/on ice: reaction rate dependence on sample orientation and photon flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullar, T.; Anastasio, C.

    2015-12-01

    Particularly in polar regions, photochemical reactions in snowpacks can be an important mechanism for transforming organic and inorganic compounds. Chemicals within snow and ice are found in three different compartments: distributed in the bulk ice, concentrated in liquid-like regions (LLRs) within the ice matrix (such as at grain boundaries), or present in quasi-liquid layers (QLLs) at the air-ice interface. While some previous work suggested reaction rates may vary in these different compartments, our preliminary experiments found similar reaction rates in all three compartments, as well as in aqueous solution. Previous work also suggested reaction rate constants may be independent of photon flux under certain illumination conditions. Here, we extend our investigations to measure reaction rate constants in ice samples with different orientations to the illumination source, which our work thus far suggests may impact the measured rate constants. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common pollutants in snow and ice. We first prepared aqueous solutions of a single PAH. We then froze these samples using various methods previously shown to segregate the solute into known locations in the ice matrix. With simulated polar sunlight, we illuminated these samples and measured photon flux (using 2-nitrobenzaldehyde as a chemical actinometer) and photodecay of the PAH. Using this information, we normalized the rate of PAH loss to the photon flux and calculated the rate constants for PAH photodegradation under various freezing conditions, photon fluxes, and sample orientations. We will report on the impact of these variables on PAH photodegradation as well as the effect of varying the photon flux.

  1. Excitation of compound states in the subsystems as indirect tool in nuclear astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tribble R.E.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Astrophysical reactions proceeding through compound states represent one of the crucial part of nuclear astrophysics. However, due to the presence of the Coulomb barrier, it is often very difficult or even impossible to obtain the astrophysical S (E factor from measurements in the laboratory at astrophysically relevant energies. The Trojan Horse method (THM provides a unique tool to obtain the information about resonant astrophysical reactions at astrophysically relevant energies. Here the theory and application of the THM for the resonant reactions is addressed.

  2. Nuclear Astrophysics at DANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most interesting nuclear physics challenges is obtaining a detailed understanding of the nucleosynthesis processes of the elements. Knowledge about the stellar sites, and how they are governed by stellar evolution and cosmology are crucial in understanding the overall picture. Information on reaction rates for neutron- and charged-particle-induced reactions have a direct impact on existing stellar models. Except for the stable isotopes, very few neutron-induced reactions in the energy range of interest have been measured to date. DANCE measurements on stable and unstable isotopes will provide many of the missing key reactions that are needed to understand the nucleosynthesis of the heavy elements

  3. Comparison of measured and calculated reaction rate distributions in an scwr-like test lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements were performed on 61 rods of an SCWR-like fuel lattice, after irradiation in the central test zone of the PROTEUS zero-power research reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. The derived reaction rates are the capture rate in 238U (C8) and the total fission rate (Ftot), and also the reaction rate ratio C8/Ftot. Each of these has been mapped rod-wise on the lattice and compared to calculated results from whole-reactor Monte Carlo simulations with MCNPX. Ratios of calculated to experimental values (C/E's) have been assessed for the C8, Ftot and C8/Ftot distributions across the lattice. These C/E's show excellent agreement between the calculations and the measurements. For the 238U capture rate distribution, the 1σ level in the comparisons corresponds to an uncertainty of ±0.8%, while for the total fission rate the corresponding value is ±0.4%. The uncertainty for C8/Ftot, assessed as a reaction rate ratio characterizing each individual rod position in the test lattice, is significantly higher at ±2.2%. To determine the reproducibility of these results, the measurements were performed twice, once in 2006 and again in 2009. The agreement between these two measurement sets is within the respective statistical uncertainties.

  4. Recent Status of Astrophysical S17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motobayashi, T.

    2002-12-01

    The present status of the astrophysical S factor for the 7Be(p, γ)8B reaction is reviewed. Because of its importance for the solar neutrino problem, the reaction has been extensively studied. Three independent methods, the direct capture, the Coulomb dissociation and the ANC method, give almost consistent results within 10-20% accuracy.

  5. Neutron cross sections of importance to astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron reactions of importance to the various stellar burning cycles are discussed. The role of isomeric states in the branched s-process is considered for particular cases. Neutron cross section needs for the 187Re-187Os, 87Rb-87Sr clocks for nuclear cosmochronology are discussed. Other reactions of interest to astrophysical processes are presented. 35 references

  6. High dose rate interstitial radiotherapy for tongue cancer with special reference to mucosal reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To decide the most suitable dose schedule of high dose rate interstitial radiotherapy (HDRISR) for the tongue cancer, we paid attention to the acute mucosal reaction after radiation therapy. There is the European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer/Radiotherapy Oncology Group (EORTC/RTOG) scoring system for the intraoral mucosal reaction after radiation therapy, but this scoring system does not assess the degree of the mucosal reaction adequately at the disapprearing phase. So we modify the scoring system at the disappearing phase of mucosal reaction. When the mucositis turns to disappear phase, the score is 3.5 and when the coating area reduces less than 50% area at the peak mucosal reaction, the score is 2.5. When the coating becomes transparent, the score is further reduced by 1 degree. When there is only erythema, the score is 1, and when reaction disappears completely, the score is 0. We observed 10 cases of tongue cancer treated with interstitital brachytherapy; 5 cases were treated with HDRISR and 5 cases were low dose rate interstitital radiotherapy (LDRISR). During the appearing phase, we used the EORTC/RTOG scoring system and during the disappearing phase, the new scoring system. This system reflected the mucosal healing course very well. (author)

  7. Modeling of atmospheric OH reaction rates using newly developed variable distance weighted zero order connectivity index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markelj, Jernej; Pompe, Matevž

    2016-04-01

    A new variable distance weighted zero order connectivity index was used for development of structure-activity relationship for modeling reactivity of OH radical with alkanes and non-conjugated alkenes in the atmosphere. The proposed model is based on the assumptions that the total reaction rate can be obtained by summing all partial reaction rates and that all reaction sites are interrelated by influencing each other. The results suggest that these assumptions are justified. The model was compared with the EPA implemented model in the studied application domain and showed superior prediction capabilities. Further, optimized values of the weights that were used in our model permit some insight into mechanisms that govern the reaction OH + alkane/alkene. The most important conclusion is that the branching degree of the forming radical seems to play a major role in site specific reaction rates. Relative qualitative structural interpretation is possible, e.g. allylic site is suggested to be much more reactive than even tertiary sp3 carbon. Novel modeling software MACI, which was developed in our lab and is now available for research purposes, was used for calculations. Various variable topological indices that are again starting to be recognized because of their great potentials in simplicity, fast calculations, very good correlations and structural information, were implemented in the program.

  8. Pore and Continuum Scale Study of the Effect of Subgrid Transport Heterogeneity on Redox Reaction Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chongxuan; Zhang, Changyong; Yang, Xiaofan; Zachara, John M.

    2015-08-01

    A micromodel system with a pore structure for heterogeneous flow and transport was used to investigate the effect of subgrid transport heterogeneity on redox reaction rates. Hematite reductive dissolution by injecting a reduced form of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) at variable flow rates was used as an example to probe the variations of redox reaction rates in different subgrid transport domains. Experiments, pore-scale simulations, and macroscopic modeling were performed to measure and simulate in-situ hematite reduction and to evaluate the scaling behavior of the redox reaction rates from the pore to macroscopic scales. The results indicated that the measured pore-scale rates of hematite reduction were consistent with the predictions from a pore scale reactive transport model. A general trend is that hematite reduction followed reductant transport pathways, starting from the advection-dominated pores toward the interior of diffusion-dominated domains. Two types of diffusion domains were considered in the micromodel: a micropore diffusion domain, which locates inside solid grains or aggregates where reactant transport is limited by diffusion; and a macropore diffusion domain, which locates at wedged, dead-end pore spaces created by the grain-grain contacts. The rate of hematite reduction in the advection-dominated domain was faster than those in the diffusion-controlled domains, and the rate in the macropore diffusion domain was faster than that in the micropore domain. The reduction rates in the advection and macropore diffusion domains increased with increasing flow rate, but were affected by different mechanisms. The rate increase in the advection domain was controlled by the mass action effect as a faster flow supplied more reactants, and the rate increase in the macropore domain was more affected by the rate of mass exchange with the advection domain, which increased with increasing flow rate. The hematite reduction rate in the micropore domain was, however

  9. Solid-gas reaction with adsorption as the rate limiting step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Rafał; Arabczyk, Walerian

    2006-07-27

    The model of nucleation where adsorption of reactant is a rate-limiting step has been considered. Assuming the adsorption range model, a numerical simulation has been made. The dependency of bulk concentration and surface coverage versus time and thermogravimetric curves are presented. The crystallite size is suggested to be the key factor of the nucleation rate. Theoretical considerations have been compared with the experimental results of the iron nitriding reaction. PMID:16854036

  10. Learned Cardiac Control with Heart Rate Biofeedback Transfers to Emotional Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Nathalie Peira; Gilles Pourtois; Mats Fredrikson

    2013-01-01

    Emotions involve subjective feelings, action tendencies and physiological reactions. Earlier findings suggest that biofeedback might provide a way to regulate the physiological components of emotions. The present study investigates if learned heart rate regulation with biofeedback transfers to emotional situations without biofeedback. First, participants learned to decrease heart rate using biofeedback. Then, inter-individual differences in the acquired skill predicted how well they could dec...

  11. Numerical kinetic model including equilibrium and rate equations for chemical reactions of actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical simulation method was examined for chemical reactions of actinide elements U, Pu, Np, and Tc etc. in an aqueous nitric acid solution. It is known that the numerical calculation for the Purex process with chemical reactions and liquid flow becomes stiff, because time constant for the chemical reactions is two to three order of magnitude smaller due to the very fast reactions than that of mass transfer or of reaching distribution equilibrium. Recently in order to increase a time step Δt the partial equilibrium (P.E.) model, in which some very fast reactions are treated by the equilibrium law whereas other reactions are by the rate law, has been proposed. In the present study concentration change of the solutes in an aqueous solution with 30 chemical reactions, of which 4 are expressed by equilibrium equations, has been calculated. Description of the P.E. model and the comparison of the results and cpu time between the kinetic and the P.E. models are given. (author)

  12. The rate constant for the CO + H2O2 reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction CO + H2O2 -> HOCO + OH (R1) at 713 K is determined based on the batch reactor experiments of Baldwin et al. [ R. R. Baldwin, R. W. Walker, S. J. Webster, Combust. Flame 15 (1970) 167] on decomposition of H2O2 sensitized by CO. The value, k(1) (713 K) = 8.1 x 10......(2) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), is consistent with spin-unrestricted density functional theory. Extrapolation to a wider temperature range through ab initio calculations yields the rate constant k(1) = 3.6 x 10(4)T(2.5) exp(-14425[K]/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1). The reaction is probably of minor importance in...... combustion. The present analysis reconciles the batch reactor data of Baldwin et al. with recent high-level theoretical work on the CO + HO2 reaction....

  13. The rate of the reaction of NH2 with O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of the gas-phase reaction of NH2 radicals with O3 was studied in the temperature range 250-358 K, and over the pressure range 4-20 mbar. NH2+O3 → products. The kinetics of the reaction was followed in a discharge-flow reactor by measuring the decay of [NH2] by laser-induced fluorescence. The rate coefficient can be expressed as: k1(T) = (1.21 ± 0.07).1012exp(5.9 ± 0.4)kJ mol-1/RT)cm3 mol-1s-1. No significant dependence of k1 on pressure was observed. A numerical analysis of the [NH2] profiles suggests that the metathesis reaction to form NH2O and O2 is a plausible initial step, and that the NH2O radical can react further with O3 to regenerate NH2 radicals. (orig.)

  14. Reaction Rates and Kinetic Isotope Effects of H$_2$ + OH $\\rightarrow$ H$_2$O + H

    CERN Document Server

    Meisner, Jan

    2016-01-01

    We calculated reaction rate constants including atom tunneling of the reaction of dihydrogen with the hydroxy radical down to a temperature of 50 K. Instanton theory and canonical variational theory with microcanonical optimized multidimensional tunneling (CVT/$\\mu$OMT) were applied using a fitted potential energy surface [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 154301 (2013)]. All possible protium/deuterium isotopologues were considered. Atom tunneling increases at about 250 K (200 K for deuterium transfer). Even at 50 K the rate constants of all isotopologues remain in the interval $ 4 \\cdot 10^{-20}$ to $4 \\cdot 10^{-17}$ cm$^3$ s$^{-1}$ , demonstrating that even deuterated versions of the title reaction are possibly relevant to astrochemical processes in molecular clouds. The transferred hydrogen atom dominates the kinetic isotope effect at all temperatures.

  15. Reaction rates and kinetic isotope effects of H2 + OH → H2O + H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Jan; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    We calculated reaction rate constants including atom tunneling of the reaction of dihydrogen with the hydroxy radical down to a temperature of 50 K. Instanton theory and canonical variational theory with microcanonical optimized multidimensional tunneling were applied using a fitted potential energy surface [J. Chen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 138, 154301 (2013)]. All possible protium/deuterium isotopologues were considered. Atom tunneling increases at about 250 K (200 K for deuterium transfer). Even at 50 K the rate constants of all isotopologues remain in the interval 4 ⋅ 10(-20) to 4 ⋅ 10(-17) cm(3) s(-1), demonstrating that even deuterated versions of the title reaction are possibly relevant to astrochemical processes in molecular clouds. The transferred hydrogen atom dominates the kinetic isotope effect at all temperatures. PMID:27155636

  16. Numerical Analysis Of Hooke Jeeves-Runge Kutta To Determine Reaction Rate Equation In Pyrrole Polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The numerical analysis of Hooke Jeeves Methods combined with Runge Kutta Methods is used to determine the exact model of reaction rate equation of pyrrole polymerization. Chemical polymerization of pyrrole was conducted with FeCI3 / pyrrole solution at concentration ratio of 1.62 mole / mole and 2.18 mole / mole with varrying temperature of 28, 40, 50, and 60 oC. FeCl3 acts as an oxidation agent to form pyrrole cation that will polymerize. The numerical analysis was done to examine the exact model of reaction rate equation which is derived from reaction equation of initiation, propagation, and termination. From its numerical analysis, it is found that the pyrrole polymerization follows third order of pyrrole cation concentration

  17. Reaction Rate Acceleration and Tg Depression of Polycyanurate Under Nanopore Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Evelyn; Simon, Sindee L.

    2015-03-01

    Material properties such as Tg and the reaction kinetics are known to deviate from the bulk when subjected to nano-sized confinement. Previous work from our laboratory on the trimerization of cyanate esters found that the reaction kinetics were faster for a monofunctional reactant compared to a difunctional monomer, whereas the Tg depression was greater for the crosslinked product of the latter compared to the low molecular weight trimer of the former. The origin of the changes in nanoconfined reaction rates differs from those that govern changes in the Tg. The research objective is to further explore the effect that confinement has on reaction kinetics and Tg using a mixture consisting of mono- and di- cyanate ester monomers. The product is an uncrosslinked polycyanurate with Mn = 5240 g/mol and PDI = 1.78. The confinement mediums are controlled pore glasses with diameters ranging from 8.1 to 111.1 nm. The nanopore-confined material was synthesized in-situ and the reaction kinetics are followed by DSC; after the reaction, the Tg values of the nanoconfined polymer where also measured by DSC. An acceleration factor of 13 and a Tg depression of 38 °C are observed for the material confined in the smallest 8.1 nm-diameter pores. The Tg depression is between those of the trimer and network previously studied, while the acceleration of the reaction rate is lower. Our results are consistent with the reaction acceleration arising from packing effects at the pore wall and the Tg depression arising from intrinsic size effects.

  18. A modified Gaussian integration method for thermal reaction rate calculation in U- and Pu-isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced multi-group cell calculations a lot of data information is very often necessary, and hence the data administration will be elaborate, and the spectrum calculation will be time consuming. We think it is possible to reduce the necessary data information by using an effective reaction rate integration method well suited for U- and Pu-absorptions (author)

  19. A method of inferring k-infinity from reaction rate measurements in thermal reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme is described for inferring a value of k-infinity from reaction rate measurements. The method is devised with the METHUSELAH group structure in mind and was developed for the analysis of S.G.H.W. reactor experiments; the underlying principles, however, are general. (author)

  20. Generalization of the Activated Complex Theory of Reaction Rates. II. Classical Mechanical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, R. A.

    1964-01-01

    In its usual classical form activated complex theory assumes a particular expression for the kinetic energy of the reacting system -- one associated with a rectilinear motion along the reaction coordinate. The derivation of the rate expression given in the present paper is based on the general kinetic energy expression.

  1. Should thermostatted ring polymer molecular dynamics be used to calculate thermal reaction rates?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We apply Thermostatted Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (TRPMD), a recently proposed approximate quantum dynamics method, to the computation of thermal reaction rates. Its short-time transition-state theory limit is identical to rigorous quantum transition-state theory, and we find that its long-time limit is independent of the location of the dividing surface. TRPMD rate theory is then applied to one-dimensional model systems, the atom-diatom bimolecular reactions H + H2, D + MuH, and F + H2, and the prototypical polyatomic reaction H + CH4. Above the crossover temperature, the TRPMD rate is virtually invariant to the strength of the friction applied to the internal ring-polymer normal modes, and beneath the crossover temperature the TRPMD rate generally decreases with increasing friction, in agreement with the predictions of Kramers theory. We therefore find that TRPMD is approximately equal to, or less accurate than, ring polymer molecular dynamics for symmetric reactions, and for certain asymmetric systems and friction parameters closer to the quantum result, providing a basis for further assessment of the accuracy of this method

  2. Quantum, Multi-Body Effects and Nuclear Reaction Rates in Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Savchenko, V. I.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed calculations of the contribution from off-shell effects to the quasiclassical tunneling of fusing particles are provided. It is shown that these effects change the Gamow rates of certain nuclear reactions in dense plasma by several orders of magnitude.

  3. Calibration of reaction rates for the CREST reactive-burn model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Caroline

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, the hydrocode-based CREST reactive-burn model has had success in modelling a range of shock initiation and detonation propagation phenomena in polymer bonded explosives. CREST uses empirical reaction rates that depend on a function of the entropy of the non-reacted explosive, allowing the effects of initial temperature, porosity and double-shock desensitisation to be simulated without any modifications to the model. Until now, the sixteen reaction-rate coefficients have been manually calibrated by trial and error, using hydrocode simulations of a subset of sustained-shock initiation gas-gun experiments and the detonation size-effect curve for the explosive. This paper will describe the initial development of an automatic method for calibrating CREST reaction-rate coefficients, using the well-established Particle Swarm Optimisation (PSO) technique. The automatic method submits multiple hydrocode simulations for each ``particle'' and analyses the results to determine the ``misfit'' to gas-gun and size-effect data. Over ~40 ``generations,'' the PSO code finds a best set of reaction-rate coefficients that minimises the misfit. The method will be demonstrated by developing a new CREST model for EDC32, a conventional high explosive.

  4. Compilation of neutron flux density spectra and reaction rates in different neutron fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon the recommendation of International Working Group of Reactor Radiation Measurements (IWGRRM), the compilation of neutron flux density spectra and the reaction rates obtained by activation and fission foils in different neutron fields is presented. The neutron fields considered are as follows: 1/E; iron block; LWR core and pressure vessel; LMFBR core and blanket; CTR first wall and blanket; fission spectrum

  5. The new JENSA gas-jet target for astrophysical radioactive beam experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardayan, D. W.; Chipps, K. A.; Ahn, S.; Blackmon, J. C.; Browne, J.; Greife, U.; Jones, K. L.; Kontos, A.; Kozub, R. L.; Linhardt, L.; Manning, B.; Matoš, M.; O'Malley, P. D.; Montes, F.; Ota, S.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Pittman, S. T.; Sachs, A.; Schatz, H.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Thompson, P.

    2016-06-01

    To take full advantage of advanced exotic beam facilities, target technology must also be advanced. Particularly important to the study of astrophysical reaction rates is the creation of localized and dense targets of hydrogen and helium. The Jet Experiments in Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics (JENSA) gas-jet target has been constructed for this purpose. JENSA was constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) where it was tested and characterized, and has now moved to the ReA3 reaccelerated beam hall at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University for use with radioactive beams.

  6. Automated Prediction of Catalytic Mechanism and Rate Law Using Graph-Based Reaction Path Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habershon, Scott

    2016-04-12

    In a recent article [ J. Chem. Phys. 2015 , 143 , 094106 ], we introduced a novel graph-based sampling scheme which can be used to generate chemical reaction paths in many-atom systems in an efficient and highly automated manner. The main goal of this work is to demonstrate how this approach, when combined with direct kinetic modeling, can be used to determine the mechanism and phenomenological rate law of a complex catalytic cycle, namely cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation of ethene. Our graph-based sampling scheme generates 31 unique chemical products and 32 unique chemical reaction pathways; these sampled structures and reaction paths enable automated construction of a kinetic network model of the catalytic system when combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations of free energies and resultant transition-state theory rate constants. Direct simulations of this kinetic network across a range of initial reactant concentrations enables determination of both the reaction mechanism and the associated rate law in an automated fashion, without the need for either presupposing a mechanism or making steady-state approximations in kinetic analysis. Most importantly, we find that the reaction mechanism which emerges from these simulations is exactly that originally proposed by Heck and Breslow; furthermore, the simulated rate law is also consistent with previous experimental and computational studies, exhibiting a complex dependence on carbon monoxide pressure. While the inherent errors of using DFT simulations to model chemical reactivity limit the quantitative accuracy of our calculated rates, this work confirms that our automated simulation strategy enables direct analysis of catalytic mechanisms from first principles. PMID:26938837

  7. Mixing effects on apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionation during denitrification in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C.T.; Böhlke, J.K.; Bekins, B.A.; Phillips, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients in contaminant concentrations and isotopic compositions commonly are used to derive reaction parameters for natural attenuation in aquifers. Differences between field-scale (apparent) estimated reaction rates and isotopic fractionations and local-scale (intrinsic) effects are poorly understood for complex natural systems. For a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer, numerical models and field observations were used to study the effects of physical heterogeneity on reaction parameter estimates. Field measurements included major ions, age tracers, stable isotopes, and dissolved gases. Parameters were estimated for the O2 reduction rate, denitrification rate, O 2 threshold for denitrification, and stable N isotope fractionation during denitrification. For multiple geostatistical realizations of the aquifer, inverse modeling was used to establish reactive transport simulations that were consistent with field observations and served as a basis for numerical experiments to compare sample-based estimates of "apparent" parameters with "true" (intrinsic) values. For this aquifer, non-Gaussian dispersion reduced the magnitudes of apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionations to a greater extent than Gaussian mixing alone. Apparent and true rate constants and fractionation parameters can differ by an order of magnitude or more, especially for samples subject to slow transport, long travel times, or rapid reactions. The effect of mixing on apparent N isotope fractionation potentially explains differences between previous laboratory and field estimates. Similarly, predicted effects on apparent O2 threshold values for denitrification are consistent with previous reports of higher values in aquifers than in the laboratory. These results show that hydrogeological complexity substantially influences the interpretation and prediction of reactive transport. ?? 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Astrophysical Hydrodynamics An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, Steven N

    2007-01-01

    This latest edition of the proven and comprehensive treatment on the topic -- from the bestselling author of ""Tapestry of Modern Astrophysics"" -- has been updated and revised to reflect the newest research results. Suitable for AS0000 and AS0200 courses, as well as advanced astrophysics and astronomy lectures, this is an indispensable theoretical backup for studies on celestial body formation and astrophysics. Includes exercises with solutions.

  9. A randomised controlled trial of two infusion rates to decrease reactions to antivenom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey K Isbister

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Snake envenoming is a major clinical problem in Sri Lanka, with an estimated 40,000 bites annually. Antivenom is only available from India and there is a high rate of systemic hypersensitivity reactions. This study aimed to investigate whether the rate of infusion of antivenom reduced the frequency of severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This was a randomized comparison trial of two infusion rates of antivenom for treatment of non-pregnant adult patients (>14 y with snake envenoming in Sri Lanka. Snake identification was by patient or hospital examination of dead snakes when available and confirmed by enzyme-immunoassay for Russell's viper envenoming. Patients were blindly allocated in a 11 randomisation schedule to receive antivenom either as a 20 minute infusion (rapid or a two hour infusion (slow. The primary outcome was the proportion with severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions (grade 3 by Brown grading system within 4 hours of commencement of antivenom. Secondary outcomes included the proportion with mild/moderate hypersensitivity reactions and repeat antivenom doses. Of 1004 patients with suspected snakebites, 247 patients received antivenom. 49 patients were excluded or not recruited leaving 104 patients allocated to the rapid antivenom infusion and 94 to the slow antivenom infusion. The median actual duration of antivenom infusion in the rapid group was 20 min (Interquartile range[IQR]:20-25 min versus 120 min (IQR:75-120 min in the slow group. There was no difference in severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions between those given rapid and slow infusions (32% vs. 35%; difference 3%; 95%CI:-10% to +17%;p = 0.65. The frequency of mild/moderate reactions was also similar. Similar numbers of patients in each arm received further doses of antivenom (30/104 vs. 23/94. CONCLUSIONS: A slower infusion rate would not reduce the rate of severe systemic hypersensitivity reactions from current high

  10. Reaction and internal energy relaxation rates in viscous thermochemically non-equilibrium gas flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present paper, reaction and energy relaxation rates as well as the normal stress are studied for viscous gas flows with vibrational and chemical non-equilibrium. Using the modified Chapman-Enskog method, multi-temperature models based on the Treanor and Boltzmann vibrational distributions are developed for the general case taking into account all kinds of vibrational energy transitions, exchange reactions, dissociation, and recombination. Integral equations specifying the first-order corrections to the normal mean stress and reaction rates are derived, as well as approximate systems of linear equations for their numerical computation. Generalized thermodynamic driving forces associated with all non-equilibrium processes are introduced. It is shown that normal stresses and rates of non-equilibrium processes can be expressed in terms of the same driving forces; the symmetry of kinetic coefficients in these expressions is proven. The developed general model is applied to a particular case of a pure N2 viscous flow with slow VT relaxation. Normal stress and rates of vibrational relaxation are studied for various ratios of vibrational and translational temperatures. The cross effects between different vibrational transitions in viscous flows are evaluated, along with the influence of anharmonicity and flow compressibility on the first-order corrections to the relaxation rate. Limits of validity for the widely used Landau–Teller model of vibrational relaxation are indicated

  11. Correcting reaction rates measured by saturation-transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabr, Refaat E.; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2008-04-01

    Off-resonance or spillover irradiation and incomplete saturation can introduce significant errors in the estimates of chemical rate constants measured by saturation-transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Existing methods of correction are effective only over a limited parameter range. Here, a general approach of numerically solving the Bloch-McConnell equations to calculate exchange rates, relaxation times and concentrations for the saturation-transfer experiment is investigated, but found to require more measurements and higher signal-to-noise ratios than in vivo studies can practically afford. As an alternative, correction formulae for the reaction rate are provided which account for the expected parameter ranges and limited measurements available in vivo. The correction term is a quadratic function of experimental measurements. In computer simulations, the new formulae showed negligible bias and reduced the maximum error in the rate constants by about 3-fold compared to traditional formulae, and the error scatter by about 4-fold, over a wide range of parameters for conventional saturation transfer employing progressive saturation, and for the four-angle saturation-transfer method applied to the creatine kinase (CK) reaction in the human heart at 1.5 T. In normal in vivo spectra affected by spillover, the correction increases the mean calculated forward CK reaction rate by 6-16% over traditional and prior correction formulae.

  12. Experimental validation of reaction rate distributions in an SCWR-Like fuel lattice at Proteus - 049

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments were performed on 61 pins of an SCWR-like fuel lattice at the PROTEUS zero-power research reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. The derived reaction rates were compared to calculated results from full-core Monte Carlo simulations with MCNPX. Reaction rates (captures in 238U and total fissions in 235U and 238U) were measured and mapped pin-wise on the lattice. Ratios of calculated to experimental values (C/E's) were assessed for both reaction rates. These C/E's show excellent agreement between the calculations and the measurements. In the case of neutron captures in 238U all experimental results agree within 2σ while for the total fissions only 5 (out of 61) values are outside the 2σ confidence interval. For the 238U capture rate, the 1σ level in the comparisons corresponds to an uncertainty of ±2.5%, while for the total fission rate the 1s level is below ±1%. To determine the reproducibility of these results, the measurements were performed twice, once in 2006 and again in 2009. The agreement between these two measurement sets is better than 1%. (authors)

  13. Estimating Reaction Rate Coefficients Within a Travel-Time Modeling Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, R [Georgia Institute of Technology; Lu, C [Georgia Institute of Technology; Luo, Jian [Georgia Institute of Technology; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Cheng, H. [Stanford University; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

    2011-03-01

    A generalized, efficient, and practical approach based on the travel-time modeling framework is developed to estimate in situ reaction rate coefficients for groundwater remediation in heterogeneous aquifers. The required information for this approach can be obtained by conducting tracer tests with injection of a mixture of conservative and reactive tracers and measurements of both breakthrough curves (BTCs). The conservative BTC is used to infer the travel-time distribution from the injection point to the observation point. For advection-dominant reactive transport with well-mixed reactive species and a constant travel-time distribution, the reactive BTC is obtained by integrating the solutions to advective-reactive transport over the entire travel-time distribution, and then is used in optimization to determine the in situ reaction rate coefficients. By directly working on the conservative and reactive BTCs, this approach avoids costly aquifer characterization and improves the estimation for transport in heterogeneous aquifers which may not be sufficiently described by traditional mechanistic transport models with constant transport parameters. Simplified schemes are proposed for reactive transport with zero-, first-, nth-order, and Michaelis-Menten reactions. The proposed approach is validated by a reactive transport case in a two-dimensional synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and a field-scale bioremediation experiment conducted at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field application indicates that ethanol degradation for U(VI)-bioremediation is better approximated by zero-order reaction kinetics than first-order reaction kinetics.

  14. KeV astrophysics with GeV beams; Blazing a new trail on the summit of nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GeV beams of light ions and electrons are used for creating a high flux of real and virtual photons, with which some problems in Nuclear Astrophysics are studied. GeV 8B beams are used to study the Coulomb dissociation of 8B and thus the 7Be(p,γ)8B reaction. This reaction is one of the major source of uncertainties in estimating the 8B solar neutrino flux and a critical input for calculating the 8B solar neutrino flux. The Coulomb dissociation of 8B appears to provide a viable method for measuring the 7Be(p,γ)8B reaction rate, with a weighted average of the RIKEN1, RIKEN2, GSI1 and MSU published results of S17(0) = 18.9 ± 1.0 eV-b. This result, however, does not include a theoretical error estimated to be ± 10%. GeV electron beams on the other hand, are used to create a high flux of real and virtual photons at TUNL-HIGS and MIT-Bates, respectively, and we discuss two new proposals to study the 12C(α,γ)16O reaction with real and virtual photons. The 12C(α,γ)16O reaction is essential for understanding Type II and Type Ia supernova. It is concluded that virtual and real photons produced by GeV light ions and electron beams are useful for studying some problems in Nuclear Astrophysics. (author)

  15. Astrophysics and Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Jeremy; Brinks, Elias; Khanna, Ramon

    2015-08-01

    Astrophysics and Space Science publishes original contributions and invited reviews covering the entire range of astronomy, astrophysics, astrophysical cosmology, planetary and space science, and the astrophysical aspects of astrobiology. This includes both observational and theoretical research, the techniques of astronomical instrumentation and data analysis, and astronomical space instrumentation. We particularly welcome papers in the general fields of high-energy astrophysics, astrophysical and astrochemical studies of the interstellar medium including star formation, planetary astrophysics, the formation and evolution of galaxies and the evolution of large scale structure in the Universe. Papers in mathematical physics or in general relativity which do not establish clear astrophysical applications will not longer be considered.The journal also publishes topical collections consisting of invited reviews and original research papers selected special issues in research fields of particular scientific interest. These consist of both invited reviews and original research papers.Conference proceedings will not be considered. All papers published in the journal are subject to thorough and strict peer-reviewing.Astrophysics and Space Science has an Impact Factor of 2.4 and features short editorial turnaround times as well as short publication times after acceptance, and colour printing free of charge. Published by Springer the journal has a very wide online dissemination and can be accessed by researchers at a very large number of institutes worldwide.

  16. Underground nuclear astrophysics studies with CASPAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Daniel; Couder, Manoel; Greife, Uwe; Strieder, Frank; Wiescher, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The drive of low-energy nuclear astrophysics laboratories is to study the reactions of importance to stellar burning processes and elemental production through stellar nucleosynthesis, over the energy range of astrophysical interest. As laboratory measurements approach the stellar burning window, the rapid drop off of cross-sections is a significant barrier and drives the need to lower background interference. The natural background suppression of underground accelerator facilities enables the extension of current experimental data to lower energies. An example of such reactions of interest are those thought to be sources of neutrons for the s-process, the major production mechanism for elements above the iron peak. The reactions 13C(α,n)16O and 22Ne(α,n)25Mg are the proposed initial focus of the new nuclear astrophysics accelerator laboratory (CASPAR) currently under construction at the Sanford Underground Research Facility, Lead, South Dakota

  17. Rate constants for the slow Mu + propane abstraction reaction at 300 K by diamagnetic RF resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Donald G; Cottrell, Stephen P; McKenzie, Iain; Ghandi, Khashayar

    2015-08-14

    The study of kinetic isotope effects for H-atom abstraction rates by incident H-atoms from the homologous series of lower mass alkanes (CH4, C2H6 and, here, C3H8) provides important tests of reaction rate theory on polyatomic systems. With a mass of only 0.114 amu, the most sensitive test is provided by the rates of the Mu atom. Abstraction of H by Mu can be highly endoergic, due to the large zero-point energy shift in the MuH bond formed, which also gives rise to high activation energies from similar zero-point energy corrections at the transition state. Rates are then far too slow near 300 K to be measured by conventional TF-μSR techniques that follow the disappearance of the spin-polarised Mu atom with time. Reported here is the first measurement of a slow Mu reaction rate in the gas phase by the technique of diamagnetic radio frequency (RF) resonance, where the amplitude of the MuH product formed in the Mu + C3H8 reaction is followed with time. The measured rate constant, kMu = (6.8 ± 0.5) × 10(-16) cm(3) s(-1) at 300 K, is surprisingly only about a factor of three slower than that expected for H + C3H8, indicating a dominant contribution from quantum tunneling in the Mu reaction, consistent with elementary transition state theory calculations of the kMu/kH kinetic isotope effect. PMID:26165545

  18. Reaction rates for the s-process neutron source 22Ne+{\\alpha}

    CERN Document Server

    Longland, Richard; Karakas, Amanda I

    2012-01-01

    The 22Ne({\\alpha},n)25Mg reaction is an important source of neutrons for the s-process. In massive stars responsible for the weak component of the s-process, 22Ne({\\alpha},n)25Mg is the dominant source of neutrons, both during core helium burning and in shell carbon burning. For the main s-process component produced in Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, the 13C({\\alpha},n)16O reaction is the dominant source of neutrons operating during the interpulse period, with the 22Ne+{\\alpha} source affecting mainly the s-process branchings during a thermal pulse. Rate uncertainties in the competing 22Ne({\\alpha},n)25Mg and 22Ne({\\alpha},{\\gamma})26Mg reactions result in large variations of s-process nucleosynthesis. Here, we present up-to-date and statistically rigorous 22Ne+{\\alpha} reaction rates using recent experimental results and Monte Carlo sampling. Our new rates are used in post-processing nucleosynthesis calculations both for massive stars and AGB stars. We demonstrate that the nucleosynthesis uncertainties ...

  19. Theoretical investigation on H abstraction reaction mechanisms and rate constants of Isoflurane with the OH radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongjiang; Li, Xiaojun

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism of H abstraction reactions for Isoflurane with the OH radical was investigated using density functional theory and G3(MP2) duel theory methods. The geometrical structures of all the species were fully optimised at B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. Thermochemistry data were obtained by utilising the high accurate model chemistry method G3(MP2) combined with the standard statistical thermodynamic calculations. Gibbs free energies were used for the reaction channels analysis. All the reaction channels were confirmed throughout the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis. The results show that two channels were obtained, which correspond to P(1) and P(2) with the respective activation barriers of 63.03 and 54.82 kJ/mol. The rate constants for the two channels over a wide temperature range of 298.15-2000 K were predicted and the calculated data are in agreement with the experimental one. The results show that P(2) is the dominant reaction channel under 800 K and above 800 K, it can be found that P(1) will be more preferable reaction channel.

  20. Monte Carlo simulation in the reaction rate's calculation with neutron-activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With MCNP/4B code, the influence of cut-off energy, flux tallies, nuclear databases and perturbation on the reaction rate's calculation with neutron-activation method are analysed. When the effective reaction threshold is chosen as the cut-off energy, calculation time is considerably reduced and yet the results are not changed. Comparing calculations with cell tallies (F4) with those performed with detector tallies (F5), the counting efficiency of cell tallies is higher and the results are slightly higher, but still credible. With different nuclear databases, calculated results can be different. The perturbation among the detectors doesn't effect on the calculated results. (authors)

  1. Structure dependence of the rate coefficients of hydroxyl radical+aromatic molecule reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate coefficients of hydroxyl radical addition to the rings of simple aromatic molecules (kOH) were evaluated based on the literature data. By analyzing the methods of kOH determination and the data obtained the most probable values were selected for the kOH's of individual compounds and thereby the most reliable dataset was created for monosubstituted aromatics and p-substituted phenols. For these compounds the rate coefficients fall in a narrow range between 2×109 mol−1 dm3 s−1 and 1×1010 mol−1 dm3 s−1. Although the values show some regular trend with the electron donating/withdrawing nature of the substituent, the log kOH−σp Hammett substituent constant plots do not give straight lines because these high kOH's are controlled by both, the chemical reactivity and the diffusion. However, the logarithms of the rate coefficients of the chemical reactivity controlled reactions (kchem), are calculated by the equation 1/kOH=1/kchem+1/kdiff, and accepting for the diffusion controlled rate coefficient kdiff=1.1×1010 mol−1 dm3 s−1, show good linear correlation with σp. - Highlights: ► OH·+aromatic molecule rate coefficients are in the range 2×109–1×1010 mol−1 dm3 s−1. ► The logarithms of rate coefficients as a function of Hammett constants do not give straight lines. ► Logarithms rate coefficients of chemically activated reaction linearly depend on Hammett constants. ► Liquid phase chemically activated reaction rate coefficients and gas phase values are correlated

  2. Advances in instrumentation for nuclear astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Pain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The study of the nuclear physics properties which govern energy generation and nucleosynthesis in the astrophysical phenomena we observe in the universe is crucial to understanding how these objects behave and how the chemical history of the universe evolved to its present state. The low cross sections and short nuclear lifetimes involved in many of these reactions make their experimental determination challenging, requiring developments in beams and instrumentation. A selection of developments in nuclear astrophysics instrumentation is discussed, using as examples projects involving the nuclear astrophysics group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These developments will be key to the instrumentation necessary to fully exploit nuclear astrophysics opportunities at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams which is currently under construction.

  3. On the Temperature Dependence of the Rate Constant of the Bimolecular Reaction of two Hydrated Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Butarbutar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been a longstanding issue in the radiation chemistry of water that, even though H2 is a molecular product, its “escape” yield g(H2 increases with increasing temperature. A main source of H2 is the bimolecular reaction of two hydrated electrons (eaq. The temperature dependence of the rate constant of this reaction (k1, measured under alkaline conditions, reveals that the rate constant drops abruptly above ~150°C. Recently, it has been suggested that this temperature dependence should be regarded as being independent of pH and used in high-temperature modeling of near-neutral water radiolysis. However, when this drop in the eaq self-reaction rate constant is included in low (isolated spurs and high (cylindrical tracks linear energy transfer (LET modeling calculations, g(H2 shows a marked downward discontinuity at ~150°C which is not observed experimentally. The consequences of the presence of this discontinuity in g(H2 for both low and high LET radiation are briefly discussed in this communication. It is concluded that the applicability of the sudden drop in k1 observed at ~150°C in alkaline water to near-neutral water is questionable and that further measurements of the rate constant in pure water are highly desirable.

  4. Measurement of high-threshold-energy activation reaction rates in combined materials with 14 MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-threshold-energy activation reaction rates were measured in cylindric combined materials bombarded by D-T neutrons with 6 threshold-energy detectors Fe, Al, Nb, F, Zr and Cu. The experimental results are discussed. MCNP/4B code was used to calculate the activation reaction rates on the experimental device. The calculated results are compared with the experimental ones. It shows that the discrepancies are 10%-30% except for the F activation reaction rate. (authors)

  5. Mathematical Formalism of Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics for Nonlinear Chemical Reaction Systems with General Rate Law

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Hao

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a mathematical formalism of nonequilibrium thermodynamics for chemical reaction models with $N$ species, $M$ reactions, and general rate law. We establish a mathematical basis for J. W. Gibbs' macroscopic chemical thermodynamics under G. N. Lewis' kinetic law of entire equilibrium (detailed balance in nonlinear chemistry kinetics). In doing so, the equilibrium thermodynamics is then naturally generalized to nonequilibrium settings without detailed balance. The kinetic models are represented by a Markovian jumping process. A generalized macroscopic chemical free energy function and its associated balance equation with nonnegative source and sink are the major discoveries. The proof is based on the large deviation principle of this type of Markov processes. A general fluctuation dissipation theorem for stochastic reaction kinetics is also proved. The mathematical theory illustrates how a novel macroscopic dynamic law can emerges from the mesoscopic kinetics in a multi-scale system.

  6. Rate coefficients for the reactions of ions with polar molecules at interstellar temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theory has been developed recently which predicts that the rate coefficients, k, for the reactions of ions with polar molecules at low temperatures will be much greater than the canonical value of 10-9 cm3 s-1. The new theory indicates that k is greatest for low-lying rotational sates and increases rapidly with decreasing temperature. We refer to recent laboratory measurements which validate the theory, present calculated values of k for the reactions of H+3 ions with several polar molecules, and discuss their significance to interstellar chemistry. For the reactions of ions with molecules having large dipole moments, we recommend that k values as large as 10-7 cm3 s-1 should be used in ion-chemical models of low-temperature interstellar clouds

  7. Reaction Rate Distributions and Ratios in FR0 Assemblies 1, 2 and 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial distribution of different reaction rates and reaction ratios in Assemblies 1, 2 and 3 of the fast reactor FR0 was measured by fission chamber scans and foil activation technique. Assemblies 1 and 2 had cores of undiluted fuel (uranium metal enriched to 20 % U235) while the core of Assembly 3 was diluted with about 30 vol. % graphite. All the systems had a thick copper reflector, The experimental results were compared with calculated values obtained from DSN and TDC multigroup spectra and group cross-section sets for the reactions. Good agreement between experiment and calculations is generally obtained in the core region but in the reflector the neutron spectrum is calculated too hard

  8. Reaction rate model for Diethyl Ether from Etano l using heterogeneous catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production of diethyl ether from ethanol was carried out by a heterogeneous catalytic reaction in the gas phase. Several types of catalysts were examined in a tubular reactor. Among different catalysts γ-aluminum oxide was selected as the most effective and suitable catalyst. Based on high conversion rate, the optimum temperature for the reaction was determined at 285 deg C. The experiments were carried out in a differential (plug) reactor to obtain rate equation. The parameters affecting the rate equation are listed as: flow rate of feed stream, composition of feed stream, concentration of ethanol and adsorption coefficients. An optimum flow rate of 1 ml/min of ethanol was defined as desired operating condition. Langmuir-Henshelwood model was chosen for the determination of adsorption coefficient. The Langmuir equation was transformed into linear equation and the relevant coefficients were calculated by least square method. A computer program was used to solve the system of simultaneous linear equations. The experimental results were then compared with the rate equation proposed by using Langmuir-Henshelwood adsorption model. The experimental data obtained in the dehydration of ethanol to diethyl ether, show good agreement with proposed model

  9. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: Measurements and site-specific rate rules

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2014-01-01

    Reaction rate constants of the reaction of four large ketones with hydroxyl (OH) are investigated behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The studied ketones are isomers of hexanone and include 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct measurements for these ketones under combustion-relevant conditions. The effects of the position of the carbonyl group (CO) and methyl (CH3) branching on the overall rate constant with OH are examined. Using previously published data, rate constant expressions covering, low-to-high temperatures, are developed for acetone, 2-butanone, 3-pentanone, and the hexanone isomers studied here. These Arrhenius expressions are used to devise rate rules for H-abstraction from various sites. Specifically, the current scheme is applied with good success to H-abstraction by OH from a series of n-ketones. Finally, general expressions for primary and secondary site-specific H-abstraction by OH from ketones are proposed as follows (the subscript numbers indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon atom, the subscript CO indicates that the abstraction is from a site next to the carbonyl group (CO), and the prime is used to differentiate different neighboring environments of a methylene group):P1,CO = 7.38 × 10-14 exp(-274 K/T) + 9.17 × 10-12 exp(-2499 K/T) (285-1355 K)S10,CO = 1.20 × 10-11 exp(-2046 K/T) + 2.20 × 10-13 exp(160 K/T) (222-1464 K)S11,CO = 4.50 × 10-11 exp(-3000 K/T) + 8.50 × 10-15 exp(1440 K/T) (248-1302 K)S11′,CO = 3.80 × 10-11 exp(-2500 K/T) + 8.50 × 10-15 exp(1550 K/T) (263-1370 K)S 21,CO = 5.00 × 10-11 exp(-2500 K/T) + 4.00 × 10-13 exp(775 K/T) (297-1376 K) © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  10. Resonance strength measurement at astrophysical energies: The {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction studied via Trojan Horse Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergi, M. L., E-mail: sergi@lns.infn.it; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Spitaleri, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L.; Rapisarda, G. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli studi di Catania, Catania (Italy); Mukhamedzhanov, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Irgaziev, B. [GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi, Districti Swabi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Pakistan); Tang, X. D.; Wiescher, M. [Department of Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame 46556, Indiana (United States); Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute of ASCR, Rez (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on {sup 17}O nuclei, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. We will report on the indirect study of the {sup 17}O(p,α){sup 14}N reaction via the THM by applying the approach developed for extracting the resonance strength of narrow resonance in the ultralow energy region. Two measurements will be described and the experimental THM cross sections will be shown for both experiments.

  11. The effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on hydro-geochemical transport and effective reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, Adam L.; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-09-01

    The role of coupled physical and geochemical heterogeneities in hydro-geochemical transport is investigated by simulating three-dimensional transport in a heterogeneous system with kinetic mineral reactions. Ensembles of 100 physically heterogeneous realizations were simulated for three geochemical conditions: 1) spatially homogeneous reactive mineral surface area, 2) reactive surface area positively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity, and 3) reactive surface area negatively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity. Groundwater chemistry and the corresponding effective reaction rates were calculated at three transverse planes to quantify differences in plume evolution due to heterogeneity in mineral reaction rates and solute residence time (τ). The model is based on a hypothetical CO2 intrusion into groundwater from a carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) operation where CO2 dissolution and formation of carbonic acid created geochemical dis-equilibrium between fluids and the mineral galena that resulted in increased aqueous lead (Pb2 +) concentrations. Calcite dissolution buffered the pH change and created conditions of galena oversaturation, which then reduced lead concentrations along the flow path. Near the leak kinetic geochemical reactions control the release of solutes into the fluid, but further along the flow path mineral solubility controls solute concentrations. Simulation results demonstrate the impact of heterogeneous distribution of geochemical reactive surface area in coordination with physical heterogeneity on the effective reaction rate (Krxn,eff) and Pb2 + concentrations within the plume. Dissimilarities between ensemble Pb2 + concentration and Krxn,eff are attributed to how geochemical heterogeneity affects the time (τeq) and therefore advection distance (Leq) required for the system to re-establish geochemical equilibrium. Only after geochemical equilibrium is re-established, Krxn,eff and Pb2 + concentrations are the same for all three

  12. Relativistic Astrophysics; Astrofisica Relativista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Font, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    The relativistic astrophysics is the field of astrophysics employing the theory of relativity Einstein as physical-mathematical model is to study the universe. This discipline analyzes astronomical contexts in which the laws of classical mechanics of Newton's law of gravitation are not valid. (Author)

  13. Astrophysical Quark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, R. X.

    2004-01-01

    The quark matter may have great implications in astrophysical studies, which could appear in the early Universe, in compact stars, and/or as cosmic rays. After a general review of astrophysical quark matter, the density-dominated quark matter is focused.

  14. Rate constants of chemical reactions from semiclassical transition state theory in full and one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Samuel M.; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C.

    2016-06-01

    Semiclassical Transition State Theory (SCTST), a method for calculating rate constants of chemical reactions, offers gains in computational efficiency relative to more accurate quantum scattering methods. In full-dimensional (FD) SCTST, reaction probabilities are calculated from third and fourth potential derivatives along all vibrational degrees of freedom. However, the computational cost of FD SCTST scales unfavorably with system size, which prohibits its application to larger systems. In this study, the accuracy and efficiency of 1-D SCTST, in which only third and fourth derivatives along the reaction mode are used, are investigated in comparison to those of FD SCTST. Potential derivatives are obtained from numerical ab initio Hessian matrix calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory, and Richardson extrapolation is applied to improve the accuracy of these derivatives. Reaction barriers are calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level. Results from FD SCTST agree with results from previous theoretical and experimental studies when Richardson extrapolation is applied. Results from our implementation of 1-D SCTST, which uses only 4 single-point MP2/cc-pVTZ energy calculations in addition to those for conventional TST, agree with FD results to within a factor of 5 at 250 K. This degree of agreement and the efficiency of the 1-D method suggest its potential as a means of approximating rate constants for systems too large for existing quantum scattering methods.

  15. Rate constants of chemical reactions from semiclassical transition state theory in full and one dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2016-06-28

    Semiclassical Transition State Theory (SCTST), a method for calculating rate constants of chemical reactions, offers gains in computational efficiency relative to more accurate quantum scattering methods. In full-dimensional (FD) SCTST, reaction probabilities are calculated from third and fourth potential derivatives along all vibrational degrees of freedom. However, the computational cost of FD SCTST scales unfavorably with system size, which prohibits its application to larger systems. In this study, the accuracy and efficiency of 1-D SCTST, in which only third and fourth derivatives along the reaction mode are used, are investigated in comparison to those of FD SCTST. Potential derivatives are obtained from numerical ab initio Hessian matrix calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory, and Richardson extrapolation is applied to improve the accuracy of these derivatives. Reaction barriers are calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level. Results from FD SCTST agree with results from previous theoretical and experimental studies when Richardson extrapolation is applied. Results from our implementation of 1-D SCTST, which uses only 4 single-point MP2/cc-pVTZ energy calculations in addition to those for conventional TST, agree with FD results to within a factor of 5 at 250 K. This degree of agreement and the efficiency of the 1-D method suggest its potential as a means of approximating rate constants for systems too large for existing quantum scattering methods. PMID:27369506

  16. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Catherine A

    2013-02-28

    Geochemical reactions in deep subsurface environments are complicated by the consolidated nature and mineralogical complexity of sedimentary rocks. Understanding the kinetics of these reactions is critical to our ability to make long-term predictions about subsurface processes such as pH buffering, alteration in rock structure, permeability changes, and formation of secondary precipitates. In this project, we used a combination of experiments and numerical simulation to bridge the gap between our knowledge of these reactions at the lab scale and rates that are meaningful for modeling reactive transport at core scales. The focus is on acid-driven mineral dissolution, which is specifically relevant in the context of CO2-water-rock interactions in geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The project led to major findings in three areas. First, we modeled reactive transport in pore-network systems to investigate scaling effects in geochemical reaction rates. We found significant scaling effects when CO2 concentrations are high and reaction rates are fast. These findings indicate that the increased acidity associated with geological sequestration can generate conditions for which proper scaling tools are yet to be developed. Second, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the extent to which SO2, if co-injected with CO2, would acidify formation brines. We found that there exist realistic conditions in which the impact on brine acidity will be limited due to diffusion rate-limited SO2 dissolution from the CO2 phase, and the subsequent pH shift may also be limited by the lack of availability of oxidants to produce sulfuric acid. Third, for three Viking sandstones (Alberta sedimentary basin, Canada), we employed backscattered electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to statistically characterize mineral contact with pore space. We determined that for reactive minerals in sedimentary consolidated rocks, abundance alone is not a good predictor of

  17. Temperature dependence of rate constants of the reactions Br(Br*)+IBr → Br2+I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rate constant and their temperature dependence in the range from -25 to +50 deg C for reactions Br(2P3/2)+IBr → Br2+I(2P2/3) and Br*(2P1/2)+IBr → Br2+I(2P3/2) have been measured by the method of laser atomic-resonance spectroscopy using radiation of iodine and bromine lasers. It has been detected that at 300 K the values of k1 and k2 agree with the known ones, meanwhile with the temperature growth both constants increase, moreover, for k2 the temperature dependence is much stronger. It is shown that the value of deceleration of the rate of reaction between Br atom and IBr in case of its spin-orbital excitation is the function of the temperature, decreasing with the temperature increase. 14 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  18. Reaction rate distribution measurement and the core performance evaluation in the prototype FBR Monju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monju is a prototype fast breeder reactor designed to have an output of 280 MW (714 MWt), fueled with mixed oxides of plutonium and uranium and cooled by liquid sodium. The principal data on plant design and performance are shown in Table 1. Monju attained initial criticality in April 1994 and the reactor physics tests were carried out from May through November 1994. The reaction rate distribution measurement by the foil activation method was one of these tests and was carried out in order to verify the core performance and to contribute to the development of the core design methods. On the basis of the reaction rate measurement data, the Monju initial core breeding ratio and the power distribution were evaluated. (author)

  19. Solute transport predicts scaling of surface reaction rates in porous media: Applications to silicate weathering

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Allen G; Ghanbarian, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    We apply our theory of conservative solute transport, based on concepts from percolation theory, directly and without modification to reactive solute transport. This theory has previously been shown to predict the observed range of dispersivity values for conservative solute transport over ten orders of magnitude of length scale. We now show that the temporal dependence derived for the solute velocity accurately predicts the time-dependence for the weathering of silicate minerals over nine orders of magnitude of time scale, while its predicted length dependence agrees with data obtained for reaction rates over five orders of magnitude of length scale. In both cases, it is possible to unify lab and field results. Thus, net reaction rates appear to be limited by solute transport velocities. We suggest the possible relevance of our results to landscape evolution of the earth's terrestrial surface.

  20. Resonance strength measurements and thermonuclear reaction rates for 25Mg(p,γ)26Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strengths of resonances in 25Mg(p,γ)26Al have been measured in the energy range Esub(p) = 600 - 1730 keV. Several serious disagreements with previously published results are reported. Thermonuclear reaction rates are calculated for the temperature range (0.5-10) x 109K for production of 26Al in its ground state and in its isomeric first excited state. Total thermonuclear reaction rates are compared with those calculated from statistical-model cross sections and, even in energy ranges where the experimental cross section derives from widely spaced resonances, the agreement is very good. The establishment of a thermal population of 26Al excited states in a stellar environment is discussed, with both electromagnetic transitions and proton inelastic and superelastic scattering as the thermalising processes

  1. Effect of Reaction Rate and Calcination Time on CaNb2O6 Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The properties of CaNb2O6 nanoparticles synthesized by coprecipitation method under controlled reaction rate and extended calcination time were studied. Analysis of the X-ray diffraction pattern shows single orthorhombic phase of the material with lattice parameters: a=15.0147Å, b =5.74148 Å, and c=5.30296 Å. The morphology and size of particles was found to be improved due to the controlled reaction rate and extended calcination time. The average sizes of the particles were estimated as 40 nm and 90 nm for sintering temperatures 650°C and 800°C, respectively. The material was found to possess dielectric constant which is inversely proportional to the frequency. Surprisingly, the material shows ferroelectric behavior, the possible origin of which is discussed here.

  2. Effects of network dissolution changes on pore-to-core upscaled reaction rates for kaolinite and anorthite reactions under acidic conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Daesang

    2013-11-01

    We have extended reactive flow simulation in pore-network models to include geometric changes in the medium from dissolution effects. These effects include changes in pore volume and reactive surface area, as well as topological changes that open new connections. The computed changes were based upon a mineral map from an X-ray computed tomography image of a sandstone core. We studied the effect of these changes on upscaled (pore-scale to core-scale) reaction rates and compared against the predictions of a continuum model. Specifically, we modeled anorthite and kaolinite reactions under acidic flow conditions during which the anorthite reactions remain far from equilibrium (dissolution only), while the kaolinite reactions can be near-equilibrium. Under dissolution changes, core-scale reaction rates continuously and nonlinearly evolved in time. At higher injection rates, agreement with predictions of the continuum model degraded significantly. For the far-from-equilibrium reaction, our results indicate that the ability to correctly capture the heterogeneity in dissolution changes in the reactive mineral surface area is critical to accurately predict upscaled reaction rates. For the near-equilibrium reaction, the ability to correctly capture the heterogeneity in the saturation state remains critical. Inclusion of a Nernst-Planck term to ensure neutral ionic currents under differential diffusion resulted in at most a 9% correction in upscaled rates.

  3. Actinide complexation kinetics: rate and mechanism of dioxoneptunium (V) reaction with chlorophosphonazo III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rates of complex formation and dissociation in NpO2+- Chlorophosphonazo III (2,7-bis(4-chloro-2-phosphonobenzeneazo)-1,8- dihydroxynapthalene-3,6-disulfonic acid)(CLIII) were investigated by stopped-flow spectrophotometry. Also, limited studies were made of the rates of reaction of La3+, Eu3+, Dy3+, and Fe3+ with CLIII. Rate determining step in each system is an intramolecular process, the NpO2+-CLIII reaction proceeding by a first order approach to equilibrium in the acid range from 0.1 to 1.0 M. Complex formation occurs independent of acidity, while both acid dependent and independent dissociation pathways are observed. Activation parameters for the complex formation reaction are ΔH=46.2±0.3 kJ/m and ΔS=7± J/mK (I=1.0 M); these for the acid dependent and independent dissociation pathways are ΔH=38.8±0.6 kJ/m, ΔS=-96±18 J/mK, ΔH=70.0± kJ/m, and ΔS=17±1 J/mK, respectively. An isokinetic relationship is observed between the activation parameters for CLIII complex formation with NpO2+, UO22+, Th4+, and Zr4+. Rates of CLIII complex formation reactions for Fe3+, Zr4+, NpO2+, UO22+, Th4+, La3+, Eu3+, and Dy3+ correlate with cation radius rather than charge/radius ratio

  4. Ground Reaction Forces and Loading Rates Associated with Parkour and Traditional Drop Landing Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Damien L. Puddle; Maulder, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the relative infancy of Parkour there is currently a lack of empirical evidence on which to base specific technique instruction upon. The purpose of this study was to compare the ground reaction forces and loading rates involved in two Parkour landing techniques encouraged by local Parkour instructors and a traditional landing technique recommended in the literature. Ten male participants performed three different drop landing techniques (Parkour precision, Parkour roll, and traditiona...

  5. Measuring the Electrode Kinetics of Surface Confined Electrode Reactions at a Constant Scan Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Guziejewski, Dariusz; Mirceski, Valentin; Jadresko, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: The kinetics of surface confined electrode reactions of alizarin, vitamin B12, and vitamin K2 is measured with square-wave voltammetry over a wide pH interval, by applying the recent methodology for kinetic analysis at a constant scan rate [V. Mirceski, D. Guziejewski, K. Lisichkov, Electrochim. Acta 2013, 114, 667–673]. The reliability and the simplicity of the recent methodology is confirmed. The methodology requires analysis of the peak potential separation o...

  6. Sensitivity study of explosive nucleosynthesis in Type Ia supernovae: I. Modification of individual thermonuclear reaction rates

    OpenAIRE

    Bravo Guil, Eduardo; Martínez Pinedo, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Type Ia supernovae contribute significantly to the nucleosynthesis of many Fe-group and intermediate-mass elements. However, the robustness of nucleosynthesis obtained via models of this class of explosions has not been studied in depth until now. Purpose: We explore the sensitivity of the nucleosynthesis resulting from thermonuclear explosions of massive white dwarfs with respect to uncertainties in nuclear reaction rates. We put particular emphasis on indentifying ...

  7. Dependence of X-Ray Burst Models on Nuclear Reaction Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Cyburt, R. H.; Amthor, A. M.; Heger, A.; Johnson, E.; Keek, L.; Meisel, Z.; Schatz, H.; Smith, K

    2016-01-01

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear flashes on the surface of accreting neutron stars and reliable burst models are needed to interpret observations in terms of properties of the neutron star and the binary system. We investigate the dependence of X-ray burst models on uncertainties in (p,$\\gamma$), ($\\alpha$,$\\gamma$), and ($\\alpha$,p) nuclear reaction rates using fully self-consistent burst models that account for the feedbacks between changes in nuclear energy generation and changes in astrophy...

  8. Path-integral virial estimator for reaction rate calculation based on the quantum instanton approximation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Sandy; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Miller, William H.

    2005-01-01

    The quantum instanton approximation is a type of quantum transition state theory that calculates the chemical reaction rate using the reactive flux correlation function and its low order derivatives at time zero. Here we present several path-integral estimators for the latter quantities, which characterize the initial decay profile of the flux correlation function. As with the internal energy or heat capacity calculation, different estimators yield different variances (and therefore different...

  9. Reactivity and reaction rate studies on the fourth loading of ZENITH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of the excess reactivity, control rod worths, prompt neutron lifetime, flux fine structure, and reaction rates of various nuclides for the fourth loading of the heated zero energy reactor ZENITH is described. The core contains 7.76 kg of U235, giving a carbon/U235 atom ratio of 7578, and forms the most dilute of the range studied. Comparisons of the experimental results with calculations using multigroup diffusion codes are presented. (author)

  10. Pyrite oxidation in unsaturated aquifer sediments. Reaction stoichiometry and rate of oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Søgaard; Larsen, Flemming; Postma, Diederik Jan

    2001-01-01

    The oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) contained in unsaturated aquifer sediment was studied by sediment incubation in gas impermeable polymer laminate bags. Reaction progress was followed over a period of nearly 2 months by monitoring the gas composition within the laminate bag. The gas phase in the...... incubation bags became depleted in O2 and enriched in CO2 and N2 and was interpreted as due to pyrite oxidation in combination with calcite dissolution. Sediment incubation provides a new method to estimate low rates of pyrite oxidation in unsaturated zone aquifer sediments. Oxidation rates of up to 9.4â10...

  11. Calculus of variations in rate of reactions tax using the general pertubation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A perturbation expression to calculate the variations in the rates of integral parameters (such as reaction rates) of a reactor using a Time-Independent Generalized Perturbation Theory, was developed. This theory makes use of the concepts of neutron generation and neutron importance with respect to a given process occurring in a system. The application of Time-Dependent Generalized Perturbation Theory to the calculation of Burnup, by using the expressions derived by A. Gandini, along with the perturbation expression derived in the Time Independent Generalized Perturbation Theory, is done. (Author)

  12. Modification of reaction rates under irradiation of crystalline solids: Contribution from intrinsic localized modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent experimental and molecular dynamics results give evidence for the existence of the discrete solitons (DS’s), a.k.a. intrinsic localized modes (ILM’s), discrete breathers (DB’s) and quodons, which are stable, highly localized lattice excitations that can transfer energy along close-packed crystal directions. The DS interaction with crystal defects results in the amplification of the reaction rates, such as atom ejection and diffusion. In this paper, recent results on the DS detecting in three-dimensional crystal structures by means of molecular dynamics are discussed, and a new method of the rate theory modification in solids under irradiation is presented

  13. Intercomparison of reaction rate and gamma scan measurements and calculation analyses in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements made during cycle 1 operation of Commonwealth Edison Company's Zion Unit 2 pressurized water reactor core were used to validate the Electric Power Research Institute Advanced Recycle Methodology Program. In addition to the usual reaction rate and axial trace measurements for determining power distributions, gamma scan measurements were available to provide additional data to validate the calculated power shapes. The parallel occurrence of gamma scan measurements and standard nuclear instrumentation measurements provided a unique opportunity to intercompare the results of these measurement methods. The calculated X-Y gamma scan behavior supported the behavior of the calculated X-Y reaction rates. The measured X-Y gamma scans were found to be more accurate than the measured X-Y reaction rates, with the latter showing significant differences among some symmetrically located assemblies. For both types of measurement, however, the modeling of the asymmetrically loaded assembly located furthest in the core periphery produced the poorest results. The axial gamma scan calculation proved very accurate except at the inlet and outlet regions

  14. A Simple Formula for Local Burnup and Isotope Distributions Based on Approximately Constant Relative Reaction Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenxi Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and analytical formula is suggested to solve the problems of the local burnup and the isotope distributions. The present method considers two extreme conditions of neutrons penetrating the fuel rod. Based on these considerations, the formula is obtained to calculate the reaction rates of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu and straightforward the local burnup and the isotope distributions. Starting from an initial burnup level, the parameters of the formula are fitted to the reaction rates given by a Monte Carlo (MC calculation. Then the present formula independently gives very similar results to the MC calculation from the starting to high burnup level but takes just a few minutes. The relative reaction rates are found to be almost independent of the radius (except (n,γ of  238U and the burnup, providing a solid background for the present formula. A more realistic examination is also performed when the fuel rods locate in an assembly. A combination of the present formula and the MC calculation is expected to have a nice balance between the numerical accuracy and time consumption.

  15. Determination of the rate constant of hydroperoxyl radical reaction with phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate constant of HO2· reaction with phenol (kHO2·+phenol) was investigated. The primary radical set produced in water γ radiolysis (·OH, eaq− and H·) was transformed to HO2·/O2·− by using dissolved oxygen and formate anion (in the form of either formic acid or sodium formate). The concentration ratio of HO2·/O2·− was affected by the pH value of the solution: under acidic conditions (using HCOOH) almost all radicals were converted to HO2·, while under alkaline conditions (using HCOONa) to O2·−. The degradation rate of phenol was significantly higher using HCOOH. From the ratio of reaction rates under the two reaction conditions kHO2·+phenol was estimated to be (2.7±1.2)×103 L mol−1 s−1. - Highlights: • Using formic acid and dissolved O2 almost all radicals are converted to HO2·. • Using sodium formate and dissolved O2 almost all radicals are converted to O2·−. • The kHO2·+phenol was estimated to be (2.7±1.2)×103 L mol−1 s−1. • HO2· is suggested to contribute significantly to the degradation of phenol

  16. High-precision 28Si(p,t)26Si reaction to determine 22Mg(α,p)25Al reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rise time of stellar x-ray bursts is a signature of thermonuclear runaway processes in the atmosphere of neutron stars and is highly sensitive to a series of (α,p) reactions via high-lying resonances in sd-shell nuclei. Lacking data for the relevant resonance levels, the stellar reaction rates have been calculated using statistical, Hauser-Feshbach models, assuming a high-level density. This assumption may not be correct in view of the selectivity of the (α,p) reaction to natural parity states. We measured the 28Si(p,t)26Si reaction with a high-resolution spectrometer to identify resonance levels in 26Si above the α-emission threshold at 9.164 MeV excitation energy. These resonance levels are used to calculate the stellar reaction rate of the 22Mg(α,p)25Al reaction and to test the validity of the statistical assumption.

  17. Dielectronic recombination data for astrophysical applications: Plasma rate-coefficients for Fe^q+ (q=7-10, 13-22) and Ni^25+ ions from storage-ring experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Schippers, S; Müller, A; Savin, D W; Schmidt, E W; Wolf, A

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes the present status of an ongoing experimental effort to provide reliable rate coefficients for dielectronic recombination of highly charged iron ions for the modeling of astrophysical and other plasmas. The experimental work has been carried out over more than a decade at the heavy-ion storage-ring TSR of the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. The experimental and data reduction procedures are outlined. The role of previously disregarded processes such as fine-structure core excitations and trielectronic recombination is highlighted. Plasma rate coefficients for dielectronic recombination of Fe^q+ ions (q=7-10, 13-22) and Ni^25+ are presented graphically and in a simple parameterized form allowing for easy use in plasma modeling codes. It is concluded that storage-ring experiments are presently the only source for reliable low-temperature dielectronic recombination rate-coefficients of complex ions.

  18. Development of a high-density gas-jet target for nuclear astrophysics and reaction studies with rare isotope beams. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uwe, Greife [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-08-12

    The purpose of this project was to develop a high-density gas jet target that will enable a new program of transfer reaction studies with rare isotope beams and targets of hydrogen and helium that is not currently possible and will have an important impact on our understanding of stellar explosions and of the evolution of nuclear shell structure away from stability. This is the final closeout report for the project.

  19. Upscaling of reaction rates in reactive transport using pore-scale reactive transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.; Arnold, B. W.; Major, J. R.; Eichhubl, P.; Srinivasan, S.

    2013-12-01

    Dissolved CO2 during geological CO2 storage may react with minerals in fractured rocks, confined aquifers, or faults, resulting in mineral precipitation and dissolution. The overall rate of reaction can be affected by coupled processes among hydrodynamics, transport, and reactions at the (sub) pore-scale. In this research pore-scale modeling of coupled fluid flow, reactive transport, and heterogeneous reaction at the mineral surface is applied to account for permeability alterations caused by precipitation-induced pore-blocking. This work is motivated by the observed CO2 seeps from a natural analog to geologic CO2 sequestration at Crystal Geyser, Utah. A key observation is the lateral migration of CO2 seep sites at a scale of ~ 100 meters over time. A pore-scale model provides fundamental mechanistic explanations of how calcite precipitation alters flow paths by pore plugging under different geochemical compositions and pore configurations. In addition, response function of reaction rates will be constructed from pore-scale simulations which account for a range of reaction regimes characterized by the Damkohler and Peclet numbers. Newly developed response functions will be used in a continuum scale model that may account for large-scale phenomena mimicking lateral migration of surface CO2 seeps. Comparison of field observations and simulations results will provide mechanistic explanations of the lateral migration and enhance our understanding of subsurface processes associated with the CO2 injection. This work is supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-SC0001114. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security

  20. Improvement of the high-accuracy 17O(p ,α )14N reaction-rate measurement via the Trojan Horse method for application to 17O nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, R. G.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Tang, X. D.; Bucher, B.; Couder, M.; Davies, P.; deBoer, R.; Fang, X.; Lamm, L.; Ma, C.; Notani, M.; O'Brien, S.; Roberson, D.; Tan, W.; Wiescher, M.; Irgaziev, B.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Mrazek, J.; Kroha, V.

    2015-06-01

    The 17O(p ,α )14N and 17O(p ,γ )18F reactions are of paramount importance for the nucleosynthesis in a number of stellar sites, including red giants (RGs), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, massive stars, and classical novae. In particular, they govern the destruction of 17O and the formation of the short-lived radioisotope 18F, which is of special interest for γ -ray astronomy. At temperatures typical of the above-mentioned astrophysical scenario, T =0.01 -0.1 GK for RG, AGB, and massive stars and T =0.1 -0.4 GK for a classical nova explosion, the 17O(p ,α )14N reaction cross section is dominated by two resonances: one at about ERc m=65 keV above the 18F proton threshold energy, corresponding to the EX=5.673 MeV level in 18F, and another one at ERc m=183 keV (EX=5.786 MeV). We report on the indirect study of the 17O(p ,α )14N reaction via the Trojan Horse method by applying the approach recently developed for extracting the strength of narrow resonance at ultralow energies. The mean value of the strengths obtained in the two measurements was calculated and compared with the direct data available in literature. This value was used as input parameter for reaction-rate determination and its comparison with the result of the direct measurement is also discussed in the light of the electron screening effect.

  1. Rate coefficients of hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticide molecules and related compounds: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rate coefficients published in the literature on hydroxyl radical reactions with pesticides and related compounds are discussed together with the experimental methods and the basic reaction mechanisms. Recommendations are made for the most probable values. Most of the molecules whose rate coefficients are discussed have aromatic ring: their rate coefficients are in the range of 2×109–1×1010 mol–1 dm3 s–1. The rate coefficients show some variation with the electron withdrawing–donating nature of the substituent on the ring. The rate coefficients for triazine pesticides (simazine, atrazine, prometon) are all around 2.5×109 mol–1 dm3 s–1. The values do not show variation with the substituent on the s-triazine ring. The rate coefficients for the non-aromatic molecules which have C=C double bonds or several C–H bonds may also be above 1×109 mol–1 dm3 s–1. However, the values for molecules without C=C double bonds or several C–H bonds are in the 1×107–1×109 mol–1 dm3 s–1 range. - Highlights: • The ∙OH rate coefficients with aromatic pesticides are (2–10)×109 mol−1 dm3 s−1. • For triazine type pesticides the values are around 2.5×109 mol−1 dm3 s−1. • For non-aromatics with double bond or several C–H they are ∼1×109 mol−1 dm3 s−1. • For aromatics kOH’s are determined by diffusion; for triazines by chemical activation. • They are activation controlled when molecule does not have double or C–H bonds

  2. Reaction rate of a composite core-shell nanoreactor with multiple nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanti, Marta; Fanelli, Duccio; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Ballauff, Matthias; Dzubiella, Joachim; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-07-27

    We present a detailed theory for the total reaction rate constant of a composite core-shell nanoreactor, consisting of a central solid core surrounded by a hydrogel layer of variable thickness, where a given number of small catalytic nanoparticles are embedded at prescribed positions and are endowed with a prescribed surface reaction rate constant. Besides the precise geometry of the assembly, our theory accounts explicitly for the diffusion coefficients of the reactants in the hydrogel and in the bulk as well as for their transfer free energy jump upon entering the hydrogel shell. Moreover, we work out an approximate analytical formula for the overall rate constant, which is valid in the physically relevant range of geometrical and chemical parameters. We discuss in depth how the diffusion-controlled part of the rate depends on the essential variables, including the size of the central core. In particular, we derive some simple rules for estimating the number of nanocatalysts per nanoreactor for an efficient catalytic performance in the case of small to intermediate core sizes. Our theoretical treatment promises to provide a very useful and flexible tool for the design of superior performing nanoreactor geometries with optimized nanoparticle load. PMID:27411947

  3. Indirect study of {sup 11}B(p,alpha{sub 0}){sup 8}Be and {sup 10}B(p,alpha){sup 7}Be reactions at astrophysical energies by means of the Trojan Horse Method: recent results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamia, L.; Puglia, S.M.R.; Spitaleri, C.; Romano, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Del Santo, M. Gimenez; Carlin, N.; Munhoz, M. Gameiro [Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Universitade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cherubini, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Kiss, G.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Atomki, Debrecen (Hungary); Kroha, V. [Institute for Nuclear Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Kubono, S. [CNS, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); La Cognata, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Li Chengbo [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Department of Physics, Beijing (China); Pizzone, R.G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Wen Qungang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Department of Physics, Beijing (China); Sergi, M.L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per l' Ingegneria, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Centro Siciliano di Fisica Nucleare e Struttura della Materia, Catania (Italy); Szanto de Toledo, A. [Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Universitade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Wakabayashi, Y. [CNS, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center - JAEA - Ibaraki (Japan); Yamaguchi, H. [CNS, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Zhou Shuhua [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Department of Physics, Beijing (China)

    2010-03-01

    Nuclear (p,alpha) reactions destroying the so-called 'light-elements' lithium, beryllium and boron have been largely studied in the past mainly because their role in understanding some astrophysical phenomena, i.e. mixing-phenomena occurring in young F-G stars [A.M. Boesgaard et al., Astr. Phys. J, 991, 2005, 621]. Such mechanisms transport the surface material down to the region close to the nuclear destruction zone, where typical temperatures of the order of approx10{sup 6} K are reached. The corresponding Gamow energy E{sub 0}=1.22(Z{sub x}{sup 2}Z{sub X}{sup 2}T{sub 6}{sup 2}){sup 1/3} keV [C. Rolfs and W. Rodney, 'Cauldrons in the Cosmos', The Univ. of Chicago press, 1988] is about approx10 keV if one considers the 'boron-case' and replaces in the previous formula Z{sub x}=1, Z{sub X}=5 and T{sub 6}=5. Direct measurements of the two {sup 11}B(p,alpha{sub 0}){sup 8}Be and {sup 10}B(p,alpha){sup 7}Be reactions in correspondence of this energy region are difficult to perform mainly because the combined effects of Coulomb barrier penetrability and electron screening [H.J. Assenbaum, K. Langanke and C. Rolfs, Z. Phys., 327, 1987, 461]. The indirect method of the Trojan Horse (THM) [G. Baur et al., Phys. Lett. B, 178, 1986, 135; G. Calvi et al., Nucl. Phys. A, 621, 1997, 139; C. Spitaleri et al., Phys. Rev. C, 493, 1999, 206] allows one to extract the two-body reaction cross section of interest for astrophysics without the extrapolation-procedures. Due to the THM formalism, the extracted indirect data have to be normalized to the available direct ones at higher energies thus implying that the method is a complementary tool in solving some still open questions for both nuclear and astrophysical issues [S. Cherubini et al., Astr. Phys. J, 457, 1996, 855; C. Spitaleri et al., Phys. Rev. C, 63, 2001, 005801; C. Spitaleri et al., Phys. Rev. C, 63, 2004, 055806; A. Tumino et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 98, 2007, 252502; M. La Cognata et al., Phys

  4. Measuring OH Reaction Rate Constants and Estimating the Atmospheric Lifetimes of Trace Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkin, Vladimir; Kurylo, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Reactions with hydroxyl radicals and photolysis are the main processes dictating a compound's residence time in the atmosphere for a majority of trace gases. In case of very short-lived halocarbons their reaction with OH dictates both the atmospheric lifetime and active halogen release. Therefore, the accuracy of OH kinetic data is of primary importance for the comprehensive modeling of a compound's impact on the atmosphere, such as in ozone depletion (i.e., the Ozone Depletion Potential, ODP) and climate change (i.e., the Global Warming Potential, GWP), each of which are dependent on the atmospheric lifetime of the compound. We have demonstrated the ability to conduct very high accuracy determinations of OH reaction rate constants over the temperature range of atmospheric interest, thereby decreasing the uncertainty of kinetic data to 2-3%. The atmospheric lifetime of a well-mixed compound due to its reaction with tropospheric hydroxyl radicals can be estimated by using a simple scaling procedure that is based on the results of field observations of methyl chloroform concentrations and detailed modeling of the OH distribution in the atmosphere. The currently available modeling results of the atmospheric fate of various trace gases allow for an improved understanding of the ability and accuracy of simplified semi-empirical estimations of atmospheric lifetimes. These aspects will be illustrated in this presentation for a variety of atmospheric trace gases.

  5. Absolute rate constants of alkoxyl radical reactions in aqueous solution. [Tert-butyl hydroperoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erben-Russ, M.; Michel, C.; Bors, W.; Saran, M.

    1987-04-23

    The pulse radiolysis technique was used to generate the alkoxyl radical derived from tert-butyl hydroperoxide (/sup t/BuOOH) in aqueous solution. The reactions of this radical with 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethyl-6-benzothiazolinesulfonate) (ABTS) and promethazine were monitored by kinetic spectroscopy. The unimolecular decay rate constant of the tert-butoxyl radical (/sup t/BuO) was determined to be 1.4 x 10/sup 6/ s/sup -1/. On the basis of this value, the rate constants for /sup t/BuO attack on quercetin, crocin, crocetin, ascorbate, isoascorbate, trolox c, glutathione, thymidine, adenosine, guanosine, and unsaturated fatty acids were determined. In addition, the reaction of /sup t/BuO with the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was observed by directly monitoring the formation of the fatty acid pentadienyl radicals. Interestingly, the attack of /sup t/BuO on PUFA was found to be faster by about one order of magnitude as compared to the same reaction in a nonpolar solvent.

  6. Effective reaction rate for porous surfaces under strong shear: Beyond Damkohler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.; Shah, Preyas

    2014-11-01

    Traditonally, surface reactive porous media are modeled via an effective reaction/mass transfer rate based on the original ansatz of Damkohler, i.e, reaction limited transport at the microscale in the absence of flow. We are interested in modeling the microscale mass transfer to porous surfaces occuring in leaky tumor vasculature, where the Damkohler number can be O(1) and the Peclet number may be large. We model it as a uniform bath of a species in unbound shear flow over a wall with first order reactive circular patches (pores). We analyze the flux through a single pore using both analytic and boundary element simulations and observe the formation of a 3-D depletion region (wake) downstream of the pore. Wake sharing between adjacent pores in a multibody setting such as 2 pores aligned in the shear direction leads to a smaller flux per pore. Obtaining this interaction length scale and using the renormalized periodic Green's function, we study the flux through a periodic and disordered distribution of pores. This flux appears as the reaction rate in an effective boundary condition, valid up to non-dilute pore area fractions, and applicable at a wall-normal effective slip distance. It replaces the details of the surface and can be used directly in large scale physics simulations.

  7. Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Neptunium-237

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by assaying a fission product (F.P.) from the fission reaction 237Np(n,f)F.P. 1.2 The reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies from approximately 0.7 to 6 MeV and for irradiation times up to 30 to 40 years. 1.3 Equivalent fission neutron fluence rates as defined in Practice E 261 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  8. Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Uranium-238

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by assaying a fission product (F.P.) from the fission reaction 238U(n,f)F.P. 1.2 The reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies from approximately 1.5 to 7 MeV and for irradiation times up to 30 to 40 years. 1.3 Equivalent fission neutron fluence rates as defined in Practice E 261 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other unites of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  9. Overall reaction rate analysis of ion-exchange resins incineration by fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A kinetic study on the incineration of ion-exchange resins was conducted using fluidized bed. In the experiment, cation or anion exchange resins with known quantities were fed into the fluidized bed maintained at a constant temperature from 550 to 750degC. The apparent reaction rate constants kap could be evaluated by the time for completion of combustion derived from the continuous measurement of CO2 concentration in the off-gas. It was confirmed that the reaction of the ion-exchange resins proceeded with the shrinking particle model forming no solid product layer and the rate of disappearance of the resins could be expressed by the surface chemical reaction. Most preferable conditions for incinerating the ion-exchange resins were found to be about 650degC for temperature and more than 4.91 x 10-2m·s-1 for the air velocities at fluidized bed uB. Also, kap for cation and anion exchange resins were found to be 1.25 x 10-2 and 1.51 x 10-2s-1, respectively, at 650degC and uB of 5.45 x 10-2m·s-1. (author)

  10. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Iron

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    DESIG: E 263 09 ^TITLE: Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Iron ^SIGNUSE: Refer to Guide E 844 for guidance on the selection, irradiation, and quality control of neutron dosimeters. Refer to Practice E 261 for a general discussion of the determination of fast-neutron fluence rate with threshold detectors. Pure iron in the form of foil or wire is readily available and easily handled. Fig. 1 shows a plot of cross section as a function of neutron energy for the fast-neutron reaction 54Fe(n,p)54Mn (1). This figure is for illustrative purposes only to indicate the range of response of the 54Fe(n,p)54Mn reaction. Refer to Guide E 1018 for descriptions of recommended tabulated dosimetry cross sections. 54Mn has a half-life of 312.13 days (3) (2) and emits a gamma ray with an energy of 834.845 keV (5). (2) Interfering activities generated by neutron activation arising from thermal or fast neutron interactions are 2.57878 (46)-h 56Mn, 44.95-d (8) 59Fe, and 5.27...

  11. An invitation to astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Padmanabhan, Thanu

    2006-01-01

    This unique book provides a clear and lucid description of several aspects of astrophysics and cosmology in a language understandable to a physicist or beginner in astrophysics. It presents the key topics in all branches of astrophysics and cosmology in a simple and concise language. The emphasis is on currently active research areas and exciting new frontiers rather than on more pedantic topics. Many complicated results are introduced with simple, novel derivations which strengthen the conceptual understanding of the subject. The book also contains over one hundred exercises which will help s

  12. Astrophysics in a nutshell

    CERN Document Server

    Maoz, Dan

    2007-01-01

    A concise but thorough introduction to the observational data and theoretical concepts underlying modern astronomy, Astrophysics in a Nutshell is designed for advanced undergraduate science majors taking a one-semester course. This well-balanced and up-to-date textbook covers the essentials of modern astrophysics--from stars to cosmology--emphasizing the common, familiar physical principles that govern astronomical phenomena, and the interplay between theory and observation. In addition to traditional topics such as stellar remnants, galaxies, and the interstellar medium, Astrophysics in a N

  13. THE IMPACT OF HELIUM-BURNING REACTION RATES ON MASSIVE STAR EVOLUTION AND NUCLEOSYNTHESIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the sensitivity of presupernova evolution and supernova nucleosynthesis yields of massive stars to variations of the helium-burning reaction rates within the range of their uncertainties. The current solar abundances from Lodders are used for the initial stellar composition. We compute a grid of 12 initial stellar masses and 176 models per stellar mass to explore the effects of independently varying the 12C(α, γ)16O and 3α reaction rates, denoted Rα,12 and R3α, respectively. The production factors of both the intermediate-mass elements (A = 16-40) and the s-only isotopes along the weak s-process path (70Ge, 76Se, 80Kr, 82Kr, 86Sr, and 87Sr) were found to be in reasonable agreement with predictions for variations of R3α and Rα,12 of ±25%; the s-only isotopes, however, tend to favor higher values of R3α than the intermediate-mass isotopes. The experimental uncertainty (one standard deviation) in R3α(Rα,12) is approximately ±10%(±25%). The results show that a more accurate measurement of one of these rates would decrease the uncertainty in the other as inferred from the present calculations. We also observe sharp changes in production factors and standard deviations for small changes in the reaction rates, due to differences in the convection structure of the star. The compactness parameter was used to assess which models would likely explode as successful supernovae, and hence contribute explosive nucleosynthesis yields. We also provide the approximate remnant masses for each model and the carbon mass fractions at the end of core-helium burning as a key parameter for later evolution stages.

  14. Sputtered metal source for rate coefficient measurements of asymmetric charge transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Asymmetric charge transfer (ACT) reactions between noble gas ions and metal atoms play an important role in numerous glow discharge applications. Due to the sputtering effect of ions impinging on the cathode surface significant metal density can be created in the cathode area of dc noble gas discharges. These metal atoms are then ionized and excited in the negative glow region, which is utilized in glow discharge spectroscopy (GDS) applications. ACT represents an important source of excited metal ions in the negative glow. Numerical modeling of the cathode region of a sputtering discharge requires rate coefficient values of ACT reactions as input data [Bogaerts et al. J. Anal. Atom. Spectrom. 11 (1996) 841]. There are rate coefficient values available in the literature only for volatile metals - in combination with different noble gas ions - that can be evaporated at relatively low temperatures (e.g. Hg, Zn, Cd etc.). However, data for other metals (Cu, Fe, Ag, etc.) have not been measured yet. The aim of this work is to build a metal source that can be applied for rate coefficient measurements of ACT reactions. The new sputtered metal source operates at room temperature creating homogeneous spatial distribution of metal atoms in a 9 cm3 region. Four hollow-cathode discharges - placed symmetrically around the central region - provide the needed metal density in the order of 5 x 1011 cm-3 as determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The future work focuses on the ACT rate coefficient measurements. The authors kindly acknowledge the support by the MRTN-CT-035459.

  15. Linear free energy relationships between aqueous phase hydroxyl radical reaction rate constants and free energy of activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Daisuke; Crittenden, John

    2011-04-15

    The hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) is a strong oxidant that reacts with electron-rich sites on organic compounds and initiates complex radical chain reactions in aqueous phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Computer based kinetic modeling requires a reaction pathway generator and predictions of associated reaction rate constants. Previously, we reported a reaction pathway generator that can enumerate the most important elementary reactions for aliphatic compounds. For the reaction rate constant predictor, we develop linear free energy relationships (LFERs) between aqueous phase literature-reported HO(•) reaction rate constants and theoretically calculated free energies of activation for H-atom abstraction from a C-H bond and HO(•) addition to alkenes. The theoretical method uses ab initio quantum mechanical calculations, Gaussian 1-3, for gas phase reactions and a solvation method, COSMO-RS theory, to estimate the impact of water. Theoretically calculated free energies of activation are found to be within approximately ±3 kcal/mol of experimental values. Considering errors that arise from quantum mechanical calculations and experiments, this should be within the acceptable errors. The established LFERs are used to predict the HO(•) reaction rate constants within a factor of 5 from the experimental values. This approach may be applied to other reaction mechanisms to establish a library of rate constant predictions for kinetic modeling of AOPs. PMID:21410278

  16. Ab initio Quantum Chemical Studies of Reactions in Astrophysical Ices. Reactions Involving CH3OH, CO2, CO, HNCO in H2CO/NH3/H2O Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, David E.

    2006-01-01

    While reactions between closed shell molecules generally involve prohibitive barriers in the gas phase, prior experimental and theoretical studies have demonstrated that some of these reactions are significantly enhanced when confined within an icy grain mantle and can occur efficiently at temperatures below 100 K with no additional energy processing. The archetypal case is the reaction of formaldehyde (H2CO) and ammonia (NH3) to yield hydroxymethylamine (NH2CH2OH). In the present work we have characterized reactions involving methanol (CH3OH), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and isocyanic acid (HNCO) in search of other favorable cases. Most of the emphasis is on CH3OH, which was investigated in the two-body reaction with one H2CO and the three-body reaction with two H2CO molecules. The addition of a second H2CO to the product of the reaction between CH3OH and H2CO was also considered as an alternative route to longer polyoxymethylene polymers of the -CH2O- form. The reaction between HNCO and NH3 was studied to determine if it can compete against the barrierless charge transfer process that yields OCN(-) and NH4(+). Finally, the H2CO + NH3 reaction was revisited with additional benchmark calculations that confirm that little or no barrier is present when it occurs in ice.

  17. The temperature dependence of the three-body reaction rate coefficient for some rare-gas atomic ion-atom reactions in the range 100-300K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence of some three-body association reaction rate coefficients for some rare-gas atomic ion-rare-gas atom reactions of the type A+ + 2B → AB+ + B have been investigated in the temperature range 100-300 K using a selected ion flow tube technique. The experimental method consists of injecting the ion A+ into the flowing carrier gas B and monitoring the ratio of the concentrations of AB+ to A+ as a function of carrier gas pressure. The three-body association rate coefficients are obtained from an analysis which allows for differential diffusive losses and reaction with impurities in a limited manner. (author)

  18. The 17O(p,α)14N reaction measurement via the Trojan horse method and its application to 17O nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergi, M. L.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; Burjan, S. V.; Cherubini, S.; Coc, A.; Gulino, M.; Hammache, F.; Hons, Z.; Irgaziev, B.; Kiss, G. G.; Kroha, V.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; de Séréville, N.; Somorjai, E.; Tumino, A.

    2014-05-01

    The role of oxygen in astrophysics is related to different problems as novae nucleosynthesis and gamma-ray astronomy. In particular, owing to the still present uncertainties on its rate, the 17O(p,α)14N is one of the most important reaction to be studied in order to get more information about the fate of oxygen in different astrophysical scenarios.

  19. Measurement of absolute reaction rates in Be,Pb and Fe spherical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuRong; ChenYuan; 等

    1998-01-01

    The absolute reaction rates in Be,Pb and Fe have been measured by using the activation foil technique with different reaction energy thresholds.Thicknesses of Be,Pb and Fe spheres were 5.3,19.1 and 31.9cm.respectively,Eight kinds of activation folis were used for Fe,and four kinds each for Be and Pb,The total experimental er5ror was about 5-7%.The measured results were compared to the values calculated with the 1-D ANISN code and the ENDF/B-VI library data.The average ratio of the experimental to the calculational is less than 7% for Be and Pb,about 5-30% for Fe.

  20. Rate of reaction of the hydrogen atom with nitrous oxide in ambient water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, Lukasz; Swiatla-Wojcik, Dorota; Szala-Bilnik, Joanna; Wolszczak, Marian

    2016-08-01

    The reaction of the hydrogen atom with nitrous oxide has been investigated by pulse radiolysis of N2O-saturated 0.1 M HCl solution at room temperature (24±1 °C). The value of (9±2)×104 M-1 s-1 obtained for the reaction rate constant is between the early estimates 1×104 M-1 s-1 by Czapski and Jortner (1960) and 4.3×105 M-1 s-1 by Thomas (1969), and is much lower than 2×106 M-1 s-1 used recently (Janik et al., 2007; Ismail et al., 2013; Liu et al., 2015; Meesungnoen et al., 2015).

  1. Sodium aerosol release rate and nonvolatile fission product retention factor during a sodium-concrete reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a series of tests conducted to study the mechanical release behavior of sodium aerosols containing nonvolatile fission products during a sodium-concrete reaction in which release behavior due to hydrodynamic breakup of the hydrogen bubble is predominant at the sodium pool surface. In the tests, nonradioactive materials, namely, strontium oxide, europium oxide, and ruthenium particles, whose sizes range from a few microns to several tens of microns, are used as nonvolatile fission product stimulants. The following results are obtained: The sodium aerosol release rate during the sodium-concrete reaction is larger than that of natural evaporation. The difference, however, becomes smaller with increasing sodium temperature: nearly ten times smaller at 400 degrees C and three times at 700 degrees C. The retention factors for the nonvolatile materials in the sodium pool increase to the range of 0.5 to 104 with an increase in the sodium temperature from 400 to 700 degrees C

  2. Interconnection between critical flow rate and reaction force at discharge of boiling liquid coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical relationship enabling to determine reaction force at discharge of boiling liquid coolant by known critical flow rate and deceleration parameters is derived on the basis of the system of integral conservation equations. The formula is applicable both to critical and subcritical conditions of the discharge of dropping liquids, gases and two-phase mixtures through cylindrical flanges of different inlet geometry. Comparison with experimental data (deceleration pressure of 0.1-15 MPa, channel diameter of 0.82-97.1 mm, initial underheating of 0-100K, initial mass steam content of 0-1, reaction force of 2.5-5x104 N) shows good agreement. A conclusion is made that the derived dependences correctly account for the effect of scale factor and can be used for calculating emergency and transient conditions in nuclear power plants

  3. Temperature dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction of ozone with dimethyl sulfide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-tao; ZHANG Yu-jie; MU Yu-jing

    2007-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction of ozone with dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured in a 200-L Teflon chamber over the temperature range of 283-353 K. Measurements were carried out using DMS in large excess over ozone of 10 to 1 or greater. Over the indicated temperature range,the data could be fit to the simple Arrhenius expression as KDMS = (9.96±3.61)×10-11exp(-(7309.7±1098.2)/T)cm3/(molecule·s). A compared investigation of the reaction between ozone and ethene had a kc2H4 value of(1.35±0.11)×10-18 cm3/(molecule·s) at room temperature.

  4. Quantum chemical and conventional TST calculations of rate constants for the OH + alkane reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactions of OH with methane, ethane, propane, i-butane, and n-butane have been modeled using ab initio (MP2) and hybrid DFT (BHandHLYP) methods, and the 6-311G(d,p) basis set. Furthermore, single-point calculations at the CCSD(T) level were carried out at the optimized geometries. The rate constants have been calculated using the conventional transition-state theory (CTST). Arrhenius equations are proposed in the temperature range of 250-650 K. Hindered Internal Rotation partition functions calculations were explicitly carried out and included in the total partition functions. These corrections showed to be relevant in the determination of the pre-exponential parameters, although not so important as in the NO3 + alkane reactions [G. Bravo-Perez, J.R. Alvarez-Idaboy, A. Cruz-Torres, M.E. Ruiz, J. Phys. Chem. A 106 (2002) 4645]. The explicit participation of the tunnel effect has been taken into account. The calculated rate coefficients provide a very good agreement with the experimental data. The best agreement for the overall alkane + OH reactions seemed to occur when the BHandHLYP geometries and partition functions are used. For propane and i-butane, in addition to the respective secondary and tertiary H-abstraction channels, the primary one has been considered. These pathways are confirmed to be significant in spite of the large differences in activation energies between primary and secondary or primary and tertiary channels, respectively of propane and i-butane reactions and should not be disregarded

  5. Nuclear astrophysics experiments with radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Nuclear Astrophysics, experiments with radioactive beams present particular problems (e.g. low beam intensity, large background) to which specific solutions (i.e. non-standard detection setup) can be brought. Selected reactions measured in Louvain-la-Neuve are treated as practical examples. (author)

  6. Spectroscopy of neon19 by inelastic scattering: astrophysical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma observation of novae explosions is a one of the objectives of space telescopes like INTEGRAL. According to astrophysical models, the most intense ray of the gamma spectra of these phenomena has an energy of 511 keV. This ray is mainly due to the annihilation of β+ coming from 18F decay. The astrophysical interpretation of the gamma observations can be done only if the nucleosynthesis of 18F is well understood. Actually, poor knowledge of the rate of the 18F(p,α)15O reaction, linked to the structure of the compound nucleus 19Ne, creates an uncertainty factor of 300 on the abundance of 18F in novae. In order to reduce these uncertainties, an inelastic scattering experiment 19Ne(p,p')19Ne* was performed to the Louvain la Neuve laboratory. It allowed us to study excited states of 19Ne above alpha (3.55 MeV) and proton (6.42 MeV) thresholds. The study of angular correlation of particles decay (proton or alpha) was used to assign for the first time the spin of many known levels. In addition, a new large 1/2+ state, which could influence strongly the astrophysical factor, was observed for the first time at an energy of about 7.8 MeV. (author)

  7. Nuclear reaction rates and their influence on nucleosynthesis in the neutrino-p-process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Daniel; Frohlich, Carla; Perdikakis, Georgios

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of elements heavier than iron in the early stages of galactic evolution is commonly attributed to Type II (core collapse) supernova explosions. However, the currently accepted mechanisms of heavy element synthesis through neutron capture processes (r-process and s-process) cannot explain the abundance patterns seen in very old galactic halo stars. A proposed solution to this problem is the neutrino-p-process, which takes place in the strong neutrino winds of core-collapse supernovae. In the neutrino-p-process, antineutrinos absorbed by protons yield neutrons that are quickly captured by the surrounding, proton-rich nuclei through (n,p) reactions. Such interactions allow for the nucleosynthesis of elements with atomic mass numbers greater than 64 (this includes Sr, Y, Zr and others possibly up to Sn). We study the sensitivity of the νp-process abundance pattern to (n,p), (p, γ), and (n, γ) rates for nuclei between Ni and Sn. We illustrate our findings for three different initial electron fractions and two representative trajectories. We discuss how these rates influence the abundance pattern and the nuclear flow. We observe the effects of predicted reaction rates on the abundance pattern and nuclear flow.

  8. Rate Equations and Kinetic Parameters of the Reactions Involved in Pyrite Oxidation by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizama, H M; Suzuki, I

    1989-11-01

    Rate equations and kinetic parameters were obtained for various reactions involved in the bacterial oxidation of pyrite. The rate constants were 3.5 muM Fe per min per FeS(2) percent pulp density for the spontaneous pyrite dissolution, 10 muM Fe per min per mM Fe for the indirect leaching with Fe, 90 muM O(2) per min per mg of wet cells per ml for the Thiobacillus ferrooxidans oxidation of washed pyrite, and 250 muM O(2) per min per mg of wet cells per ml for the T. ferrooxidans oxidation of unwashed pyrite. The K(m) values for pyrite concentration were similar and were 1.9, 2.5, and 2.75% pulp density for indirect leaching, washed pyrite oxidation by T. ferrooxidans, and unwashed pyrite oxidation by T. ferrooxidans, respectively. The last reaction was competitively inhibited by increasing concentrations of cells, with a K(i) value of 0.13 mg of wet cells per ml. T. ferrooxidans cells also increased the rate of Fe production from Fe plus pyrite. PMID:16348054

  9. New reaction rates for improved primordial D /H calculation and the cosmic evolution of deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coc, Alain; Petitjean, Patrick; Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth; Descouvemont, Pierre; Iliadis, Christian; Longland, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Primordial or big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) is one of the three historically strong evidences for the big bang model. Standard BBN is now a parameter-free theory, since the baryonic density of the Universe has been deduced with an unprecedented precision from observations of the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation. There is a good agreement between the primordial abundances of 4He, D, 3He, and 7Li deduced from observations and from primordial nucleosynthesis calculations. However, the 7Li calculated abundance is significantly higher than the one deduced from spectroscopic observations and remains an open problem. In addition, recent deuterium observations have drastically reduced the uncertainty on D /H , to reach a value of 1.6%. It needs to be matched by BBN predictions whose precision is now limited by thermonuclear reaction rate uncertainties. This is especially important as many attempts to reconcile Li observations with models lead to an increased D prediction. Here, we reevaluate the d (p ,γ )3He, d (d ,n ) 3H3, and d (d ,p ) 3H reaction rates that govern deuterium destruction, incorporating new experimental data and carefully accounting for systematic uncertainties. Contrary to previous evaluations, we use theoretical ab initio models for the energy dependence of the S factors. As a result, these rates increase at BBN temperatures, leading to a reduced value of D /H =(2.45 ±0.10 )×10-5 (2 σ ), in agreement with observations.

  10. 31Cl beta decay and the 30P31S reaction rate in nova nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Michael; Wrede, C.; Brown, B. A.; Liddick, S. N.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; NSCL e12028 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The 30P31S reaction rate is critical for modeling the final isotopic abundances of ONe nova nucleosynthesis, identifying the origin of presolar nova grains, and calibrating proposed nova thermometers. Unfortunately, this rate is essentially experimentally unconstrained because the strengths of key 31S proton capture resonances are not known, due to uncertainties in their spins and parities. Using a 31Cl beam produced at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, we have populated several 31S states for study via beta decay and devised a new decay scheme which includes updated beta feedings and gamma branchings as well as multiple states previously unobserved in 31Cl beta decay. Results of this study, including the unambiguous identification due to isospin mixing of a new l = 0 , Jπ = 3 /2+ 31S resonance directly in the middle of the Gamow Window, will be presented, and significance to the evaluation of the 30P31S reaction rate will be discussed. Work supported by U.S. Natl. Sci. Foundation (Grants No. PHY-1102511, PHY-1404442, PHY-1419765, and PHY-1431052); U.S. Dept. of Energy, Natl. Nucl. Security Administration (Award No. DE-NA0000979); Nat. Sci. and Eng. Research Council of Canada.

  11. Neutrino physics and astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plenary reports of Neutrino '80 are presented by experts in neutrino physics and astrophysics. Their International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics was held in Erice (Italy), June 23 through 28, 1980. The proceedings include reviews of part research, the history of neutrino research and coverage of recent results and theoretical speculations. Topics include high- and low-energy neutrino astrophysics, weak charged and neutral currents, low and intermediate weak interactions, neutrino oscillations, and parity violation in atoms and nuclei conservation laws. Weak interactions in lepton-lepton and lepton-nucleon collisions, beam dump experiments, new theoretical ideas, and future developments in accelerators and detectors are also included. The topics are introduced by a historical perspective section and then grouped under the headings of neutrino astrophysics, weak charged currents, weak neutral currents, low and intermediate energy interactions, conservation laws, weak interactions in electron and hadron experiments, and a final section on future accelerator, new neutrino detection technology and concluding remarks

  12. Astrophysics Decoding the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, Judith A

    2007-01-01

    Astrophysics: Decoding the Cosmos is an accessible introduction to the key principles and theories underlying astrophysics. This text takes a close look at the radiation and particles that we receive from astronomical objects, providing a thorough understanding of what this tells us, drawing the information together using examples to illustrate the process of astrophysics. Chapters dedicated to objects showing complex processes are written in an accessible manner and pull relevant background information together to put the subject firmly into context. The intention of the author is that the book will be a 'tool chest' for undergraduate astronomers wanting to know the how of astrophysics. Students will gain a thorough grasp of the key principles, ensuring that this often-difficult subject becomes more accessible.

  13. Topics in Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some topics in nuclear astrophysics are discussed, e.g.: highly evolved stellar cores, stellar evolution (through the temperature analysis of stellar surface), nucleosynthesis and finally the solar neutrino problem. (L.C.)

  14. APPLE, Plot of 1-D Multigroup Neutron Flux and Gamma Flux and Reaction Rates from ANISN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A - Description of problem or function: The APPLE-2 code has the following functions: (1) It plots multi-group energy spectra of neutron and/or gamma ray fluxes calculated by ANISN, DOT-3.5, and MORSE. (2) It gives an overview plot of multi-group neutron fluxes calculated by ANISN and DOT-3.5. The scalar neutron flux phi(r,E) is plotted with the spatial parameter r linear along the Y-axis, logE along the X-axis and log phi(r,E) in the Z direction. (3) It calculates the spatial distribution and region volume integrated values of reaction rates using the scalar flux calculated with ANISN and DOT-3.5. (4) Reaction rate distribution along the R or Z direction may be plotted. (5) An overview plot of reaction rates or scalar fluxes summed over specified groups may be plotted. R(ri,zi) or phi(ri,zi) is plotted with spatial parameters r and z along the X- and Y-axes in an orthogonal coordinate system. (6) Angular flux calculated by ANISN is rearranged and a shell source at any specified spatial mesh point may be punched out in FIDO format. The shell source obtained may be employed in solving deep penetration problems with ANISN, when the entire reactor system is divided into two or more parts and the neutron fluxes in two adjoining parts are connected by using the shell source. B - Method of solution: (a) The input data specification is made as simple as possible by making use of the input data required in the radiation transport code. For example, geometry related data in ANISN and DOT are transmitted to APPLE-2 along with scalar flux data so as to reduce duplicity and errors in reproducing these data. (b) Most the input data follow the free form FIDO format developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and used in the ANISN code. Furthermore, the mixture specifying method used in ANISN is also employed by APPLE-2. (c) Libraries for some standard response functions required in fusion reactor design have been prepared and are made available to users of the 42-group neutron

  15. Accelerator Experiments for Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Johnny S. T.

    2003-01-01

    Many recent discoveries in astrophysics involve phenomena that are highly complex. Carefully designed experiments, together with sophisticated computer simulations, are required to gain insights into the underlying physics. We show that particle accelerators are unique tools in this area of research, by providing precision calibration data and by creating extreme experimental conditions relevant for astrophysics. In this paper we discuss laboratory experiments that can be carried out at the S...

  16. Collisionless plasmas in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Belmont, Gerard; Mottez, Fabrice; Pantellini, Filippo; Pelletier, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Collisionless Plasmas in Astrophysics examines the unique properties of media without collisions in plasma physics. Experts in this field, the authors present the first book to concentrate on collisionless conditions in plasmas, whether close or not to thermal equilibrium. Filling a void in scientific literature, Collisionless Plasmas in Astrophysics explains the possibilities of modeling such plasmas, using a fluid or a kinetic framework. It also addresses common misconceptions that even professionals may possess, on phenomena such as "collisionless (Landau) damping". Abundant illustrations

  17. Theoretical physics and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, VL

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present, on the one hand various topics in theoretical physics in depth - especially topics related to electrodynamics - and on the other hand to show how these topics find applications in various aspects of astrophysics. The first text on theoretical physics and astrophysical applications, it covers many recent advances including those in X-ray, &ggr;-ray and radio-astronomy, with comprehensive coverage of the literature

  18. Suppression of the stellar enhancement factor and the reaction 85Rb(p,n)85Sr

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, T; Gyürky, Gy; Simon, A; Fülöp, Z; Somorjai, E

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that a Coulomb suppression of the stellar enhancement factor occurs in many endothermic reactions at and far from stability. Contrary to common assumptions, reaction measurements for astrophysics with minimal impact of stellar enhancement should be preferably performed for those reactions instead of their reverses, despite of their negative reaction Q-value. As a demonstration, the cross section of the astrophysically relevant 85Rb(p,n)85Sr reaction has been measured by activation between 2.16<=E_{c.m.}<= 3.96 MeV and the astrophysical reaction rates at p-process temperatures for (p,n) as well as (n,p) are directly inferred from the data. Additionally, our results confirm a previously derived modification of a global optical proton potential. The presented arguments are also relevant for other alpha- and proton-induced reactions in the p-, rp-, and nu-p-processes.

  19. Reduction in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] fusion reaction rate by unbalanced beam injection and rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In TFTR plasmas at low to moderate density, the highest fusion energy gain Q/sub dd/ (D-D fusion power/injected power P/sub b/) is obtained with nearly balanced co- and counter-injection of neutral beams. For a given beam power, significantly unbalanced injection reduces Q/sub dd/ because the accompanying plasma rotation reduces the beam-target fusion reactivity, the fast-ion slowing-down time, and the beam-beam reaction rate, while and decrease from their maximum values. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. Etching rate control by MeV O+ implantation for laser-chemical reaction of ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control of etching rate in laser-induced chemical reaction of Mn-Zn ferrite in H3PO4 solution by MeV O+ implantation has been investigated. The etching induced by Ar+-ion laser irradiation in a H3PO4 solution was suppressed by implantating 3 MeV O+ to a dose of 1 x 1017 cm-2 when the laser power was low. The etching suppression disappeared when the O+-implanted sample was thermally annealed at 850degC for 30 min. The suppression is found to be related to the crystallinity change induced by ion implantation instead of surface reflectivity change. (author)