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Sample records for astatine 209

  1. Radiochemistry of astatine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, T J; Dombsky, M; D' Auria, J M; Ward, T E

    1988-01-01

    This monograph is a review of the literature through 1987 and covers the methods of producing the radioisotopes of astatine and the inorganic, nuclear, and organic chemistry of astatine. The discussion is limited to chemical and physical chemical properties of astatine. The monograph, after the introduction, is divided into chapters titled: production methods, nuclear spectroscopy, chemistry of astatine, separation and isolation (dry and wet), and selected procedures. 209 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs. (DLC)

  2. An attempt to explore the production routes of Astatine radionuclides: Theoretical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Maiti, Moumita; Lahiri, Susanta

    2008-01-01

    In order to fulfil the recent thrust of Astatine radionuclides in the field of nuclear medicine various production routes have been explored in the present work. The possible production routes of $^{209-211}$At comprise both light and heavy ion induced reactions at the bombarding energy range starting from threshold to maximum 100 MeV energy. For this purpose, we have used the nuclear reaction model codes TALYS, ALICE91 and PACE-II. Excitation functions of those radionuclides, produced throug...

  3. Discovery of the astatine, radon, francium, and radium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M., E-mail: thoennessen@nscl.msu.edu

    2013-09-15

    Thirty-nine astatine, thirty-nine radon, thirty-five francium, and thirty-four radium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is described. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  4. Discovery of the astatine, radon, francium, and radium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, C

    2012-01-01

    Currently, thirty-nine astatine, thirty-nine radon, thirty-five francium, and thirty-four radium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  5. Discovery of the astatine, radon, francium, and radium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-09-01

    Thirty-nine astatine, thirty-nine radon, thirty-five francium, and thirty-four radium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is described. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  6. Delayed and In-beam Spectroscopy on Francium and Astatine Nuclei at the Proton Drip Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uusitalo, J.; Jakobsson, U. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Collaboration: RITU-Gamma Gollaboration

    2011-11-30

    Delayed and in-beam spectroscopy on francium and astatine nuclei at and beyond the proton drip line has been performed. In neutron deficient astatine nuclei a shift to deformed shapes as a function of decreasing neutron has been obtained. In neutron deficient francium isotope the same shift is evident.

  7. Delayed and In-beam Spectroscopy on Francium and Astatine Nuclei at the Proton Drip Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusitalo, J.; Jakobsson, U.

    2011-11-01

    Delayed and in-beam spectroscopy on francium and astatine nuclei at and beyond the proton drip line has been performed. In neutron deficient astatine nuclei a shift to deformed shapes as a function of decreasing neutron has been obtained. In neutron deficient francium isotope the same shift is evident.

  8. Measurement of the first ionization potential of astatine by laser ionization spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Rothe, S; Antalic, S; Borschevsky, A; Capponi, L; Cocolios, T E; De Witte, H; Eliav, E; Fedorov, D V; Fedosseev, V N; Fink, D A; Fritzsche, S; Ghys, L; Huyse, M; Imai, N; Kaldor, U; Kudryavtsev, Yu; Köster, U; Lane, J; Lassen, J; Liberati, V; Lynch, K M; Marsh, B A; Nishio, K; Pauwels, D; Pershina, V; Popescu, L; Procter, T J; Radulov, D; Raeder, S; Rajabali, M M; Rapisarda, E; Rossel, R E; Sandhu, K; Seliverstov, M D; Sjödin, A M; Van den Bergh, P; Van Duppen, P; Venhart, M; Wakabayashi, Y; Wendt K D A

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive element astatine exists only in trace amounts in nature. Its properties can therefore only be explored by study of smallest quantities of artificially produced isotopes or by performing theoretical calculations. One of the most important properties influencing the chemical behaviour is the energy required to remove one electron from the valence shell, referred to as the ionization potential. Here we use laser spectroscopy to probe the optical spectrum of astatine near the ionization threshold. The observed series of Rydberg states enabled the first determination of the ionization potential of the astatine atom, 9.317510(8) eV. New ab initio calculations were performed to support the experimental result. The measured value serves as a benchmark for quantum chemistry calculations of the properties of astatine as well as for the theoretical prediction of the ionization potential of super-heavy element 117, the heaviest homologue of astatine.

  9. Measurement of the first ionization potential of astatine by laser ionization spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, S; Andreyev, A N; Antalic, S; Borschevsky, A; Capponi, L; Cocolios, T E; De Witte, H; Eliav, E; Fedorov, D V; Fedosseev, V N; Fink, D A; Fritzsche, S; Ghys, L; Huyse, M; Imai, N; Kaldor, U; Kudryavtsev, Yuri; Köster, U; Lane, J F W; Lassen, J; Liberati, V; Lynch, K M; Marsh, B A; Nishio, K; Pauwels, D; Pershina, V; Popescu, L; Procter, T J; Radulov, D; Raeder, S; Rajabali, M M; Rapisarda, E; Rossel, R E; Sandhu, K; Seliverstov, M D; Sjödin, A M; Van den Bergh, P; Van Duppen, P; Venhart, M; Wakabayashi, Y; Wendt, K D A

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive element astatine exists only in trace amounts in nature. Its properties can therefore only be explored by study of the minute quantities of artificially produced isotopes or by performing theoretical calculations. One of the most important properties influencing the chemical behaviour is the energy required to remove one electron from the valence shell, referred to as the ionization potential. Here we use laser spectroscopy to probe the optical spectrum of astatine near the ionization threshold. The observed series of Rydberg states enabled the first determination of the ionization potential of the astatine atom, 9.31751(8) eV. New ab initio calculations are performed to support the experimental result. The measured value serves as a benchmark for quantum chemistry calculations of the properties of astatine as well as for the theoretical prediction of the ionization potential of superheavy element 117, the heaviest homologue of astatine.

  10. Spectroscopy of low-lying states in neutron-deficient astatine and francium nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobsson, U., E-mail: ulrjak@kth.se; Cederwall, B. [KTH, The Division of Nuclear Physics, AlbaNova University Center, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Uusitalo, J.; Auranen, K.; Badran, H.; Cox, D. M.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Herzáň, A.; Konki, J.; Leino, M.; Mallaburn, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Partanen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyvaskyla (Finland); and others

    2015-10-15

    Low-lying states in neutron-deficient astatine and francium nuclei have been studied by means of in-beam and delayed spectroscopy. The 13/2{sup +} state has been observed in francium nuclei with a similar down-sloping trend as in neighbouring astatine and bismuth isotopes, as a function of decreasing neutron number. A systematic trend can also now be seen for the 1/2{sup +} state both in astatine and francium nuclei, where the level energy decreases steeply as a function of neutron number when moving further away from the neutron shell closure. This trend is very similar between astatine nuclei and their francium isotones. Moreover, shape coexistence has been observed between the 13/2{sup +} state and the spherical 9/2{sup −} ground state in {sup 203}Fr and {sup 205}Fr.

  11. Spectroscopy of low-lying states in neutron-deficient astatine and francium nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, U.; Uusitalo, J.; Auranen, K.; Badran, H.; Cederwall, B.; Cox, D. M.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; HerzáÅ, A.; Konki, J.; Leino, M.; Mallaburn, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Papadakis, P.; Partanen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarén, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Stolze, S.

    2015-10-01

    Low-lying states in neutron-deficient astatine and francium nuclei have been studied by means of in-beam and delayed spectroscopy. The 13/2+ state has been observed in francium nuclei with a similar down-sloping trend as in neighbouring astatine and bismuth isotopes, as a function of decreasing neutron number. A systematic trend can also now be seen for the 1/2+ state both in astatine and francium nuclei, where the level energy decreases steeply as a function of neutron number when moving further away from the neutron shell closure. This trend is very similar between astatine nuclei and their francium isotones. Moreover, shape coexistence has been observed between the 13/2+ state and the spherical 9/2- ground state in 203Fr and 205Fr.

  12. 49 CFR 209.209 - Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing. 209.209 Section 209.209 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Compliance Orders § 209.209 Hearing. (a) When a respondent... and the respondent fail to agree upon an acceptable consent order, the hearing officer designated by...

  13. Automated astatination of biomolecules - a stepping stone towards multicenter clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aneheim, Emma; Albertsson, Per; Bäck, Tom

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate multicentre clinical studies on targeted alpha therapy, it is necessary to develop an automated, on-site procedure for conjugating rare, short-lived, alpha-emitting radionuclides to biomolecules. Astatine-211 is one of the few alpha-emitting nuclides with appropriate chemical...

  14. Measurement of the first ionization potential of astatine by laser ionization spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rothe, S.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Borschevsky, A.; Capponi, L.; Cocolios, T. E.; De Witte, H.; Eliav, E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fink, D. A.; Fritzsche, S.; Ghys, L.; Huyse, M.; Imai, N.; Kaldor, U.; Kudryavtsev, Yuri; Koester, U.; Lane, J. F. W.; Lassen, J.; Liberati, V.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Nishio, K.; Pauwels, D.; Pershina, V.; Popescu, L.; Procter, T. J.; Radulov, D.; Raeder, S.; Rajabali, M. M.; Rapisarda, E.; Rossel, R. E.; Sandhu, K.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sjoedin, A. M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    The radioactive element astatine exists only in trace amounts in nature. Its properties can therefore only be explored by study of the minute quantities of artificially produced isotopes or by performing theoretical calculations. One of the most important properties influencing the chemical

  15. Synthesis and Evaluation of Astatinated N-[2-(Maleimido)ethyl]-3-(trimethylstannyl)benzamide Immunoconjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aneheim, Emma; Gustafsson, Anna; Albertsson, Per

    2016-01-01

    Effective treatment of metastasis is a great challenge in the treatment of different types of cancers. Targeted alpha therapy utilizes the short tissue range (50-100 μm) of α particles, making the method suitable for treatment of disseminated occult cancers in the form of microtumors or even sing...... of the in vivo distribution of the new immunoconjugate with other tin-based immunoconjugates in tumor-bearing mice, the MSB conjugation method was found to be a viable option for successful astatine labeling of different monoclonal antibodies....

  16. Laser photodetachment of radioactive ions: towards the determination of the electronegativity of astatine

    CERN Multimedia

    Rothe, Sebastian; Welander, Jakob Emanuel; Chrysalidis, Katerina; Day Goodacre, Thomas; Fedosseev, Valentine; Fiotakis, Spyridon; Forstner, Oliver; Heinke, Reinhard Matthias; Johnston, Karl; Kron, Tobias; Koester, Ulli; Liu, Yuan; Marsh, Bruce; Ringvall Moberg, Annie; Rossel, Ralf Erik; Seiffert, Christoph; Studer, Dominik; Wendt, Klaus; Hanstorp, Dag

    2017-01-01

    Negatively charged ions are mainly stabilized through the electron correlation effect. A measure of the stability of a negative ion is the electron affinity, which the energy gain by attaching an electron to a neutral atom. This fundamental quantity is, due to the almost general lack of bound excited states, the only atomic property that can be determined with high accuracy for negative ions. We will present the results of the first laser photodetachment studies of radioactive negative ions at CERN-ISOLDE. The photodetachment threshold for the radiogenic iodine isotope 128I was measured successfully, demonstrating the performance of the upgraded GANDALPH experimental beam line. The first detection of photo-detached astatine atoms marks a milestone towards the determination of the EA of this radioactive element.

  17. Complexation study on no-carrier-added astatine with insulin: A candidate radiopharmaceutical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahiri, Susanta [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)], E-mail: susanta.lahiri@saha.ac.in; Roy, Kamalika [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Sen, Souvik [Berhampur Sadar Hospital, Berhampur, Murshidabad 742 101 (India)

    2008-12-15

    No-carrier-added astatine radionuclides produced in the {sup 7}Li-irradiated lead matrix were separated from bulk lead nitrate target by complexing At with insulin, followed by dialysis. The method offers simultaneous separation of At from lead as well as its complexation with insulin. The At-insulin complex might be a potential radiopharmaceutical in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of At-insulin complex was checked by dialysis against deionized water and Ringer lactate (RL) solution. It has been found that the half-life of At-insulin complex is about {approx}12 h, when dialyzed against deionized water and is only 6 h, when dialyzed against RL solution having the same composition as blood serum. The 6 h half-life of this Insulin-At complex is perfect for killing cancer cells from external cell surfaces as the half-life of internalization of insulin molecule inside the cell is 7-12 h.

  18. Determination of the electron affinity of astatine and polonium by laser photodetachment

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to conduct the first electron affinity (EA) measurements of the two elements astatine (At) and polonium (Po). Collinear photo-detachment spectroscopy will allow us to measure these quantities with an uncertainty limited only by the spectral line width of the laser. We plan to use negative ion beams of the two radioactive elements At and Po, which are only accessible on-line and at ISOLDE. The feasibility of our proposed method and the functionality of the experimental setup have been demonstrated at ISOLDE in off-line tests by the clear observation of the photo-detachment threshold for stable iodine. This proposal is based on our Letter of Intent I-148.

  19. Comment: 209 [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Anopheles stephensi Anopheles stephensi Anopheles_stephensi_L.png 209.png Public Do...main CDC(Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)のimage libraryから(Public Domain) http://phil.cdc.gov/phil/home.asp bando 2010/02/15 14:46:05 2010/02/15 14:49:04 ...

  20. Adsorption of the astatine species on a gold surface: A relativistic density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, Yuriy; Zaitsevskii, Andréi

    2018-01-01

    We report first-principle based studies of the adsorption interaction of astatine species on a gold surface. These studies are aimed primarily at the support and interpretation of gas chromatographic experiments with superheavy elements, tennessine (Ts, Z = 117), a heavier homologue of At, and possibly its pseudo-homologue nihonium (Nh, Z = 113). We use gold clusters with up to 69 atoms to simulate the adsorption sites and estimate the desorption energies of At & AtOH from a stable gold (1 1 1) surface. To describe the electronic structure of At -Aun and AtOH -Aun complexes, we combine accurate shape-consistent relativistic pseudopotentials and non-collinear two-component relativistic density functional theory. The predicted desorption energies of At and AtOH on gold are 130 ± 10 kJ/mol and 90 ± 10 kJ/mol, respectively. These results confirm the validity of the estimates derived from chromatographic data (147 ± 15 kJ/mol for At, and 100-10+20 kJ/mol for AtOH).

  1. ASTATINE-211 RADIOCHEMISTRY: THE DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGIES FOR HIGH ACTIVITY LEVEL RADIOSYNTHESIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MICHAEL R. ZALUTSKY

    2012-08-08

    Targeted radionuclide therapy is emerging as a viable approach for cancer treatment because of its potential for delivering curative doses of radiation to malignant cell populations while sparing normal tissues. Alpha particles such as those emitted by 211At are particularly attractive for this purpose because of their short path length in tissue and high energy, making them highly effective in killing cancer cells. The current impact of targeted radiotherapy in the clinical domain remains limited despite the fact that in many cases, potentially useful molecular targets and labeled compounds have already been identified. Unfortunately, putting these concepts into practice has been impeded by limitations in radiochemistry methodologies. A critical problem is that the synthesis of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals provides additional challenges in comparison to diagnostic reagents because of the need to perform radio-synthesis at high levels of radioactivity. This is particularly important for {alpha}-particle emitters such as 211At because they deposit large amounts of energy in a highly focal manner. The overall objective of this project is to develop convenient and reproducible radiochemical methodologies for the radiohalogenation of molecules with the {alpha}-particle emitter 211At at the radioactivity levels needed for clinical studies. Our goal is to address two problems in astatine radiochemistry: First, a well known characteristic of 211At chemistry is that yields for electrophilic astatination reactions decline as the time interval after radionuclide isolation from the cyclotron target increases. This is a critical problem that must be addressed if cyclotrons are to be able to efficiently supply 211At to remote users. And second, when the preparation of high levels of 211At-labeled compounds is attempted, the radiochemical yields can be considerably lower than those encountered at tracer dose. For these reasons, clinical evaluation of promising 211At

  2. An all-solid state laser system for the laser ion sources RILIS and in-source laser spectroscopy of astatine at ISOLDE/CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, Sebastian

    2012-09-24

    This doctoral thesis describes the extension of the resonance ionization laser ion source RILIS at CERN/ISOLDE by the addition of an all-solid state tunable titanium:sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser system to complement the well-established system of dye lasers. Synchronous operation of the so called Dual RILIS system of Ti:Sa and dye lasers was investigated and the potential for increased ion beam intensity, reliability, and reduced setup time has been demonstrated. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy was performed at ISOLDE/CERN and at ISAC/TRIUMF radioactive ion beam facilities to develop an efficient and selective three-colour ionization scheme for the purely radioactive element astatine. A LabVIEW based monitoring, control and measurement system was conceived which enabled, in conjunction with Dual RILIS operation, the spectroscopy of high lying Rydberg states, from which the ionization potential of the astatine atom was determined for the first time experimentally.

  3. An all-solid state laser system for the laser ion source RILIS and in-source laser spectroscopy of astatine at ISOLDE, CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rothe, Sebastian; Nörtershäuser, W

    This doctoral thesis describes the extension of the resonance ionization laser ion source RILIS at ISOLDE, CERN, by the addition of an all-solid state tuneable titanium: sapphire (Ti:Sa) laser system to complement the well-established system of dye lasers. Synchronous operation of the so called Dual RILIS system of Ti:Sa and dye lasers was investigated and the potential for increased ion beam intensity, reliability, and reduced setup time has been demonstrated. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy was performed at ISOLDE, CERN, and at ISAC, TRIUMF, radioactive ion beam facilities to develop an efficient and selective three-colour ionization scheme for the purely radioactive element astatine. A LabVIEW based monitoring, control and measurement system was conceived which enabled, in conjunction with Dual RILIS operation, the spectroscopy of high lying Rydberg states, from which the ionization potential of the astatine atom was determined for the first time experimentally.

  4. 49 CFR 209.321 - Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing. 209.321 Section 209.321 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Disqualification Procedures § 209.321 Hearing. (a) Upon receipt of a hearing request complying with § 209.311, an administrative hearing for review of a notice of...

  5. Setting-up R209

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1976-01-01

    The experiment was designed by the Frascati, Genoa, Harward, MIT, Naples, Pisa Collaboration to study high mass muon pairs and associated hadrons. Here, the completed muon magnet of R209 in the ISR intersection 2 before installation of the drift chambers and scintillation hodoscopes. (see Annual Report 1976) Top, left: J. Bouad, J.-P. Leonard

  6. 48 CFR 209.407 - Suspension.

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    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Suspension. 209.407... OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Debarment, Suspension, and Ineligibility 209.407 Suspension. ...

  7. 14 CFR 91.209 - Aircraft lights.

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    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aircraft lights. 91.209 Section 91.209... Requirements § 91.209 Aircraft lights. No person may: (a) During the period from sunset to sunrise (or, in... or the sun is more than 6 degrees below the horizon)— (1) Operate an aircraft unless it has lighted...

  8. 7 CFR 868.209 - Information.

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    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information. 868.209 Section 868.209 Agriculture... Application of Standards § 868.209 Information. Requests for the Rice Inspection Handbook, Equipment Handbook, or for information concerning approved devices and procedures, criteria for approved devices, and...

  9. 7 CFR 3560.209 - Rent collection.

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    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rent collection. 3560.209 Section 3560.209... AGRICULTURE DIRECT MULTI-FAMILY HOUSING LOANS AND GRANTS Rents § 3560.209 Rent collection. (a) General. Borrowers must collect rents on a monthly basis and maintain a system for collecting and tracking rents. (b...

  10. 40 CFR 89.209 - Certification.

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    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification. 89.209 Section 89.209... Provisions § 89.209 Certification. (a) In the application for certification a manufacturer must: (1) Declare...) Submit a statement that the engines for which certification is requested will not, to the best of the...

  11. 40 CFR 209.15 - Intervention.

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    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intervention. 209.15 Section 209.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS RULES OF... Orders Issued Under Section 11(d) of the Noise Control Act § 209.15 Intervention. (a) Persons desiring to...

  12. 40 CFR 209.16 - Late intervention.

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    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Late intervention. 209.16 Section 209.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS... Hearings for Orders Issued Under Section 11(d) of the Noise Control Act § 209.16 Late intervention...

  13. 40 CFR 209.12 - Time.

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    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Time. 209.12 Section 209.12 Protection... Issued Under Section 11(d) of the Noise Control Act § 209.12 Time. (a) In computing any period of time... period of time begins to run shall not be included, except as otherwise provided. Saturdays, Sundays, and...

  14. 49 CFR 209.115 - Hearing.

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    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing. 209.115 Section 209.115 Transportation... Hearing. (a) When a hearing is requested and scheduled under § 209.113, a hearing officer designated by the Chief Counsel convenes and presides over the hearing. If requested by respondent and if...

  15. 29 CFR 2200.209 - Hearing.

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    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hearing. 2200.209 Section 2200.209 Labor Regulations... Simplified Proceedings § 2200.209 Hearing. (a) Procedures. As soon as practicable after the conclusion of the pre-hearing conference, the Judge will hold a hearing on any issue that remains in dispute. The...

  16. 22 CFR 209.6 - Compliance information.

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    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compliance information. 209.6 Section 209.6... § 209.6 Compliance information. (a) Cooperation and assistance. The Administrator shall to the fullest... and accurate compliance reports at such times, and in such form and containing such information, as...

  17. 49 CFR 209.5 - Service.

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    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service. 209.5 Section 209.5 Transportation Other... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES General § 209.5 Service. (a) Each order, notice, or other... mail, except as otherwise provided herein. (b) Service upon a person's duly authorized representative...

  18. 40 CFR 240.209 - Safety.

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    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety. 240.209 Section 240.209 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR THE THERMAL PROCESSING OF SOLID WASTES Requirements and Recommended Procedures § 240.209 Safety. ...

  19. 37 CFR 2.209 - Refunds.

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    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Refunds. 2.209 Section 2.209 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Fees and Payment of Money in Trademark Cases § 2.209 Refunds. (a...

  20. 49 CFR 397.209 - Preemption processing.

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    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preemption processing. 397.209 Section 397.209 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY... MATERIALS; DRIVING AND PARKING RULES Preemption Procedures § 397.209 Preemption processing. (a) The...

  1. 23 CFR 650.209 - Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Construction. 650.209 Section 650.209 Highways FEDERAL..., STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Erosion and Sediment Control on Highway Construction Projects § 650.209 Construction. (a) Permanent erosion and sediment control measures and practices shall be established and...

  2. Final Report for research grant "Development of Methods for High Specific Activity Labeling of Biomolecules Using Astatine-211 in Different Oxidation States"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, D. Scott [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-12-14

    The overall objective of this research effort was to develop methods for labeling biomolecules with higher oxidation state species of At-211. This was to be done in an effort to develop reagents that had higher in vivo stability than the present carbon-bonded At-211-labeled compounds. We were unsuccessful in that effort, as none of the approaches studied provided reagents that were stable to in vivo deastatination. However, we gained a lot of information about At-211 in higher oxidation states. The studies proved to be very difficult as small changes in pH and other conditions appeared to change the nature of the species that obtained (by HPLC retention time analyses), with many of the species being unidentifiable. The fact that there are no stable isotopes of astatine, and the chemistry of the nearest halogen iodine is quite different, made it very difficult to interpret results of some experiments. With that said, we believe that a lot of valuable information was obtained from the studies. The research effort evaluated: (1) methods for chemical oxidation of At-211, (2) approaches to chelation of oxidized At-211, and (3) approaches to oxidation of astatophenyl compounds. A major hurdle that had to be surmounted to conduct the research was the development of HPLC conditions to separate and identify the various oxidized species formed. Attempts to develop conditions for separation of iodine and astatine species by normal and reversed-phase TLC and ITLC were not successful. However, we were successful in developing conditions (from a large number of attempts) to separate oxidized forms of iodine ([I-125]iodide, [I-125]iodate and [I-125]periodate) and astatine ([At-211]astatide, [At-211]astatate, [At-211]perastatate, and several unidentified At-211 species). Information on the basic oxidation and characterization of At-211 species is provided under Objective 1. Conditions were developed to obtain new At-211 labeling method where At-211 is chelated with the DOTA and

  3. 31 CFR 800.209 - Critical technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Critical technologies. 800.209 Section 800.209 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF INVESTMENT SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO MERGERS, ACQUISITIONS...

  4. 7 CFR 955.209 - Assessment rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assessment rate. 955.209 Section 955.209 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIDALIA ONIONS GROWN IN GEORGIA Rules and Regulations Assessment Rates § 95...

  5. 24 CFR 3280.209 - Fire testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fire testing. 3280.209 Section 3280... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Fire Safety § 3280.209 Fire testing. All fire testing conducted in accordance with this subpart shall be performed by nationally recognized testing...

  6. 33 CFR 209.335 - Publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Publication. 209.335 Section 209.335 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE... thereto are named and either personally served or otherwise have actual notice thereof in accordance with...

  7. Dicty_cDB: CHF209 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CH (Link to library) CHF209 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16471-1 - (Link to Original site) - - CHF...209Z 818 - - - - Show CHF209 Library CH (Link to library) Clone ID CHF209 (Link to dicty...iol.tsukuba.ac.jp/CSM/CH/CHF2-A/CHF209Q.Seq.d/ Representative seq. ID - (Link to ...Original site) Representative DNA sequence >CHF209 (CHF209Q) /CSM/CH/CHF2-A/CHF209Q.Seq.d/ XXXXXXXXXXTTCAAGA...ant alignments: (bits) Value CHR581 (CHR581Q) /CSM/CH/CHR5-D/CHR581Q.Seq.d/ 807 0.0 CHF209 (CHF

  8. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 209

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Present address: National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Kondev, F.G. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The experimental data are evaluated for known nuclides of mass number A = 209 (Au,Hg,Tl,Pb,Bi,Po,At,Rn, Fr,Ra,Ac,Th). Detailed evaluated level properties and related nuclear structure information are presented, with the best values recommended for level energies, half-lives, γ–ray energies and intensities, decay data (energies, intensities and placement of radiations), and other spectroscopic data. This work supersedes the earlier full evaluation of A = 209 by M.J. Martin (1991Ma16)

  9. 5 CFR 430.209 - Agency responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT Performance Appraisal for General Schedule, Prevailing Rate, and Certain Other Employees § 430.209... supervisors and employees (e.g., through formal training) about relevant parts of its performance appraisal... the employee's most recent ratings of record, and any subsequent performance ratings, when an employee...

  10. 48 CFR 209.405-2 - Restrictions on subcontracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on subcontracting. 209.405-2 Section 209.405-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION..., and Ineligibility 209.405-2 Restrictions on subcontracting. (a) The contracting officer shall not...

  11. 49 CFR 209.6 - Requests for admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requests for admission. 209.6 Section 209.6..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES General § 209.6 Requests for admission... written requests for the admission of the genuineness of any relevant documents identified within the...

  12. 44 CFR 209.3 - Roles and responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Roles and responsibilities. 209.3 Section 209.3 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... ASSISTANCE § 209.3 Roles and responsibilities. The following describes the general roles of FEMA, the State...

  13. 49 CFR 393.209 - Steering wheel systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steering wheel systems. 393.209 Section 393.209... NECESSARY FOR SAFE OPERATION Frames, Cab and Body Components, Wheels, Steering, and Suspension Systems § 393.209 Steering wheel systems. (a) The steering wheel shall be secured and must not have any spokes...

  14. 49 CFR 209.111 - Informal response and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Informal response and assessment. 209.111 Section 209.111 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Penalties Civil Penalties § 209.111 Informal...

  15. 48 CFR 1552.209-71 - Organizational conflicts of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Organizational conflicts of interest. 1552.209-71 Section 1552.209-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... 1552.209-71 Organizational conflicts of interest. As prescribed in 1509.507-2, insert the following...

  16. 40 CFR 2.209 - Disclosure in special circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disclosure in special circumstances. 2.209 Section 2.209 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Confidentiality of Business Information § 2.209 Disclosure in special circumstances. (a) General. Information...

  17. 30 CFR 77.209 - Surge and storage piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surge and storage piles. 77.209 Section 77.209... Installations § 77.209 Surge and storage piles. No person shall be permitted to walk or stand immediately above a reclaiming area or in any other area at or near a surge or storage pile where the reclaiming...

  18. 29 CFR 20.9 - Waiver of credit reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Waiver of credit reporting. 20.9 Section 20.9 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION Disclosure of Information to Credit Reporting Agencies § 20.9 Waiver of credit reporting. The agency head (or designee) may waive reporting a commercial...

  19. An automated flow system incorporating in-line acid dissolution of bismuth metal from a cyclotron irradiated target assembly for use in the isolation of astatine-211

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Hara, Matthew J.; Krzysko, Anthony J.; Niver, Cynthia M.; Morrison, Samuel S.; Owsley, Stanley L.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Dorman, Eric F.; Scott Wilbur, D.

    2017-04-01

    Astatine-211 (211At) is a promising cyclotron-produced radionuclide being investigated for use in targeted alpha therapy of blood borne and metastatic cancers, as well as treatment of tumor remnants after surgical resections. The isolation of trace quantities of 211At, produced within several grams of a Bi metal cyclotron target, involves a complex, multi-step procedure: (1) Bi metal dissolution in strong HNO3, (2) distillation of the HNO3 to yield Bi salts containing 211At, (3) dissolution of the salts in strong HCl, (4) solvent extraction of 211At from bismuth salts with diisopropyl ether (DIPE), and (5) back-extraction of 211At from DIPE into NaOH, leading to a purified 211At product. Step (1) has been addressed first to begin the process of automating the onerous 211At isolation process. A computer-controlled Bi target dissolution system has been designed. The system performs in-line dissolution of Bi metal from the target assembly using an enclosed target dissolution block, routing the resulting solubilized 211At/Bi mixture to the subsequent process step. The primary parameters involved in Bi metal solubilization (HNO3 concentration and influent flow rate) were optimized prior to evaluation of the system performance on replicate cyclotron irradiated targets. The results indicate that the system performs reproducibly, having nearly quantitative release of 211At from irradiated targets, with cumulative 211At recoveries that follow a sigmoidal function. The predictable nature of the 211At release profile allows the user to tune the system to meet target processing requirements.

  20. Reagents for astatination of biomolecules. 2. Conjugation of anionic boron cage pendant groups to a protein provides a method for direct labeling that is stable to in vivo deastatination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, D Scott; Chyan, Ming-Kuan; Hamlin, Donald K; Vessella, Robert L; Wedge, Timothy J; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2007-01-01

    Cancer-targeting biomolecules labeled with 211At must be stable to in vivo deastatination, as control of the 211At distribution is critical due to the highly toxic nature of alpha-particle emission. Unfortunately, no astatinated aryl conjugates have shown in vivo stability toward deastatination when (relatively) rapidly metabolized proteins, such as monoclonal antibody Fab' fragments, are labeled. As a means of increasing the in vivo stability of 211At-labeled proteins, we have been investigating antibody conjugates of boron cage moieties. In this investigation, protein-reactive derivatives containing a nido-carborane (2), a bis-nido-carborane derivative (Venus Flytrap Complex, 3), and four 2-nonahydro-closo-decaborate(2-) derivatives (4-7) were prepared and conjugated with an antibody Fab' fragment such that subsequent astatination and in vivo tissue distributions could be obtained. To aid in determination of stability toward in vivo deastatination, the Fab'-borane conjugates were also labeled with 125I, and that material was coinjected with the 211At-labeled Fab'. For comparison, direct labeling of the Fab' with 125I and 211At was conducted. Direct labeling with Na[125I]I and Chloramine-T gave an 89% radiochemical yield. However, direct labeling of the Fab' with Na[211At]At and Chloramine-T resulted in a yield of Studies to optimize the closo-decaborate(2-) conjugates for protein labeling are underway.

  1. 9 CFR 205.209 - Amendment or continuation of EFS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Amendment or continuation of EFS. 205.209 Section 205.209 Animals and Animal Products GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARDS... the security interest in question. That will vary from case to case. The basis for this is the purpose...

  2. 29 CFR 825.209 - Maintenance of employee benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maintenance of employee benefits. 825.209 Section 825.209 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS..., hospital care, dental care, eye care, mental health counseling, substance abuse treatment, etc., must be...

  3. 34 CFR 685.209 - Income contingent repayment plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Income contingent repayment plan. 685.209 Section 685.209 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION WILLIAM D. FORD FEDERAL DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM Borrower Provisions...

  4. 22 CFR 209.8 - Procedure for effecting compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure for effecting compliance. 209.8 Section 209.8 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NON-DISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY-ASSISTED PROGRAMS OF THE AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS...

  5. 47 CFR 20.9 - Commercial mobile radio service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... service under examination, or for the comparable commercial mobile radio service would prompt customers to... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Commercial mobile radio service. 20.9 Section... COMMERCIAL MOBILE RADIO SERVICES § 20.9 Commercial mobile radio service. (a) The following mobile services...

  6. 9 CFR 113.209 - Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.209... Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.209 Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus. Rabies Vaccine (Killed Virus) shall be... shall be prepared using methods prescribed in the Outline of Production. If Rabies Vaccine is to be in...

  7. 28 CFR 36.209 - Illegal use of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Illegal use of drugs. 36.209 Section 36... PUBLIC ACCOMMODATIONS AND IN COMMERCIAL FACILITIES General Requirements § 36.209 Illegal use of drugs. (a... discrimination against an individual based on that individual's current illegal use of drugs. (2) A public...

  8. 20 CFR 209.3 - Social security number required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Social security number required. 209.3... RAILROAD EMPLOYERS' REPORTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES § 209.3 Social security number required. Each employer shall furnish to the Board a social security number for each employee for whom any report is submitted...

  9. 40 CFR 761.209 - Retention of manifest records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROHIBITIONS PCB Waste Disposal Records and Reports § 761.209 Retention of manifest records. (a) A generator of... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Retention of manifest records. 761.209... generator receives a signed copy from the designated commercial storage or disposal facility which received...

  10. 20 CFR 209.16 - Disposal of payroll records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disposal of payroll records. 209.16 Section... RAILROAD EMPLOYERS' REPORTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES § 209.16 Disposal of payroll records. Employers may dispose of payroll records for periods subsequent to 1936, provided that the payroll records are more than...

  11. 33 CFR 209.220 - Flood control regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flood control regulations. 209..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.220 Flood control regulations. (a) Local protection.... Regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the Army for the maintenance and operation of local flood...

  12. 33 CFR 209.300 - Flood control regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flood control regulations. 209..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.300 Flood control regulations. (a) Regulations for the operation and maintenance of local flood protection works approved by the Secretary of the Army under the...

  13. Integral Experiment Request 209 CED-3a Summary Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Gary A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zerkle, Michael L. [Naval Nuclear Lab., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Miller, Thomas M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Heinrichs, David P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Under IER-209, critical experiments like those done under IER-208 will be performed. The difference between the two sets of experiments is that, while the IER-208 experiments were done in the 0.800 cm pitch 7uPCX hardware, the IER-209 experiments will be done in the 0.855 cm pitch 7uPCX hardware.

  14. 48 CFR 1552.209-75 - Annual certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....209-75 Section 1552.209-75 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... (MAY 1994) The Contractor shall submit an annual conflict of interest certification to the Contracting...'s knowledge and belief, all actual or potential organizational conflicts of interest have been...

  15. 8 CFR 209.1 - Adjustment of status of refugees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adjustment of status of refugees. 209.1... STATUS OF REFUGEES AND ALIENS GRANTED ASYLUM § 209.1 Adjustment of status of refugees. The provisions of this section shall provide the sole and exclusive procedure for adjustment of status by a refugee...

  16. Dicty_cDB: SFJ209 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SF (Link to library) SFJ209 (Link to dictyBase) - - - Contig-U16281-1 SFJ209F (Link to Original site)...SFJ209F 228 - - - - - - Show SFJ209 Library SF (Link to library) Clone ID SFJ209 (Link to dictyBase)...|BI513349.1 BB160012B10E07 Bee Brain Normalized Library, BB16 Apis mellifera cDNA clone BB160012B10E07...1 WHABB19TR Human MCF7 breast cancer cell line library (MCF7_1) Homo sapiens genomic clone MCF7_1-7C14...|AQ744490.1 HS_5508_A1_A12_T7A RPCI-11 Human Male BAC Library Homo sapiens genomic clone Plate=1084 Col=23 Row=A

  17. A biokinetic study of {sup 209}Po in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henricsson, C.F.; Ranebo, Y. [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Clinical Sciences in Lund, Lund University, Skane University Hospital in Lund (Sweden); Hansson, M. [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmoe, Lund University, Skane University Hospital in Malmoe (Sweden); Raeaef, C.L., E-mail: Christopher.Raaf@med.lu.se [Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmoe, Lund University, Skane University Hospital in Malmoe (Sweden); Holm, E. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Osteras (Norway)

    2012-10-15

    Five adult volunteers participated in a biokinetic study of radioactive polonium. Portions of about 10 Bq of {sup 209}Po were orally administrated to four of the volunteers in a single ingestion. The fifth volunteer ingested a daily amount of 53 mBq of 209Po for 243 d to study the time to achieve equilibrium between intake and excretion for protracted intakes. For the subjects ingesting single intakes of {sup 209}Po complete sampling of urine and feces was subsequently collected the first few days upon the ingestion. The samples were processed with radiochemical extraction and analyzed with alpha spectrometry. In the study, the maximum daily excretion rates in feces were 18-50% of the ingested activity, observed within 3 d after intake. Regarding the urine excretion, the daily excretion peaked, on average, at 0.15-1% of the ingested activity within two days upon intake. These results indicate an average gastro-intestinal uptake fraction of 0.46 {+-} 0.08, which agrees well with earlier biokinetic studies of polonium in man. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human metabolism of an oral intake of polonium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 4 individuals were administrated about 10 Bq polonium-209. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gastro-intestinal uptake fraction, if orally administrated polonium-209 was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biological half-time of polonium in human body was studied.

  18. Dicty_cDB: VSG209 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VS (Link to library) VSG209 (Link to dictyBase) - G21421 DDB0185383 Contig-U12508-1...ary VS (Link to library) Clone ID VSG209 (Link to dictyBase) Atlas ID - NBRP ID G21421 dictyBase ID DDB01853...83 Link to Contig Contig-U12508-1 | Contig-U15943-1 Original site URL http://dict...Frames) Frame A: VDSNLSISQILKQICTKYKIEGSERFSIITTEEFPLILNENSTLGHYGLGNKFQTLELSI VFTELIPPYSLKNNNVPTFGAFQVGSVDPV...ces producing significant alignments: (bits) Value N AC114263 |AC114263.2 Dictyostelium discoideum chromosom

  19. 50 CFR 216.209 - Renewal of Letters of Authorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Construction and Operation of Offshore Oil and Gas Facilities in the U.S. Beaufort Sea § 216.209 Renewal of Letters of Authorization. (a) A...

  20. 24 CFR 1710.209 - Title and land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... § 1710.209 Title and land use. (a) General information. (1) State whether the developer has reserved the... specifically cover the areas of environmental protection; environmental impact statements; and construction... a material portion of the recorded instruments sufficient to determine the nature and effect of such...

  1. 27 CFR 555.209 - Construction of type 3 magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Storage § 555.209 Construction of type 3 magazines. A type 3 magazine is a “day-box” or other portable magazine. It must be fire... sufficient for locking purposes. Explosive materials are not to be left unattended in type 3 magazines and...

  2. 40 CFR 209.2 - Use of number and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of number and gender. 209.2... gender. In these rules of practice, words in the singular number apply to the plural and words in the masculine gender apply to the feminine and vice versa. ...

  3. BDE-209 in the Australian Environment: Desktop review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, Karin, E-mail: k.english@uq.edu.au [School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Children’s Health and Environment Program, Child Health Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia); Queensland Children’s Medical Research Institute, Children’s Health Research Centre, Brisbane (Australia); Toms, Leisa-Maree L. [School of Public Health and Social Work, and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Gallen, Christie; Mueller, Jochen F. [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), Brisbane (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    The commercial polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardant mixture c-decaBDE is now being considered for listing on the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants. The aim of our study was to review the literature regarding the use and detection of BDE-209, a major component of c-decaBDE, in consumer products and provide a best estimate of goods that are likely to contain BDE-209 in Australia. This review is part of a larger study, which will include quantitative testing of items to assess for BDE-209. The findings of this desktop review will be used to determine which items should be prioritized for quantitative testing. We identified that electronics, particularly televisions, computers, small household appliances and power boards, were the items that were most likely to contain BDE-209 in Australia. Further testing of these items should include items of various ages. Several other items were identified as high priority for future testing, including transport vehicles, building materials and textiles in non-domestic settings. The findings from this study will aid in the development of appropriate policies, should listing of c-decaBDE on the Stockholm Convention and Australia’s ratification of that listing proceed.

  4. 20 CFR 209.5 - Information regarding change in status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Act and the Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act; (b) Any change in the ownership or control by the... and Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act. The notice must fully advise the Board of the type of change... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information regarding change in status. 209.5...

  5. 48 CFR 3052.209-72 - Organizational conflict of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Organizational conflict of... CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 3052.209-72 Organizational conflict of interest. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48 CFR 3009.507-1, insert the following provision: Organizational Conflict of Interest...

  6. 48 CFR 952.209-72 - Organizational conflicts of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Organizational conflicts....209-72 Organizational conflicts of interest. As prescribed at 48 CFR 909.507-2, insert the following clause: Organizational Conflicts of Interest (AUG 2009) (a) Purpose. The purpose of this clause is to...

  7. 48 CFR 3452.209-70 - Organizational conflict of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Organizational conflict of... Clauses 3452.209-70 Organizational conflict of interest. As prescribed in 3409.570, insert the following provision in all certifications: Organizational Conflict of Interest (OCT 1987) The offeror certifies that...

  8. 48 CFR 2452.209-72 - Organizational conflicts of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Organizational conflicts of... Clauses 2452.209-72 Organizational conflicts of interest. As prescribed in 2409.508-2, insert the following contract clause in all contracts. Organizational Conflicts of Interest (APR 1984) (a) The...

  9. 48 CFR 852.209-70 - Organizational conflicts of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Organizational conflicts... Clauses 852.209-70 Organizational conflicts of interest. As prescribed in 809.507-1(b), insert the following provision: Organizational Conflicts of Interest (JAN 2008) (a) It is in the best interest of the...

  10. 20 CFR 725.209 - Determination of dependency; child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of dependency; child. 725.209... Determination of dependency; child. (a) For purposes of augmenting the benefits of a miner or surviving spouse... benefits (see § 725.202 and § 725.212). An individual who is the beneficiary's child (§ 725.208) will be...

  11. 7 CFR 1430.209 - Proof of market loss production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Contract Program § 1430.209 Proof of market loss production. (a) A dairy operation entering into a MILC... operation's eligible production during the months of each fiscal year designated in the MILC. The dairy... available to confirm the production and production history of the dairy operation. Producers may also be...

  12. 48 CFR 52.209-5 - Certification Regarding Responsibility Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... agency. (2) Principal, for the purposes of this certification, means an officer, director, owner, partner... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification Regarding... Clauses 52.209-5 Certification Regarding Responsibility Matters. As prescribed in 9.104-7(a), insert the...

  13. 18 CFR 706.209 - Gambling, betting, and lotteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gambling, betting, and... EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Conduct and Responsibilities of Employees § 706.209 Gambling, betting... while on duty for the Government, in any gambling activity, including the operation of a gambling device...

  14. 33 CFR 209.345 - Water resource policies and authorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water resource policies and... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.345 Water resource policies and authorities... other Non-Federal Entities on Authorized Water Resources Projects.” (3) Section 221, FCA of 1970 (Pub. L...

  15. 27 CFR 46.209 - Articles in vending machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Cigarette Tubes Held for Sale on April 1, 2009 Inventories § 46.209 Articles in vending machines. There is no exemption for articles in vending machines. They are subject to the floor stocks tax and must be... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles in vending...

  16. 24 CFR 570.209 - Guidelines for evaluating and selecting economic development projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... selecting economic development projects. 570.209 Section 570.209 Housing and Urban Development Regulations... DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS Eligible Activities § 570.209 Guidelines for evaluating and selecting economic... activities to be carried out for economic development purposes. Specifically, these guidelines are applicable...

  17. 48 CFR 1414.209-70 - Examination of records by the Department of the Interior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the Department of the Interior. 1414.209-70 Section 1414.209-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Solicitation and Receipt of Proposals and Information 1414.209-70 Examination of records by the Department of the Interior...

  18. 48 CFR 1436.209 - Construction contracts with architect-engineer firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with architect-engineer firms. 1436.209 Section 1436.209 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Special Aspects of Contracting for Construction 1436.209 Construction contracts with architect-engineer...

  19. 48 CFR 636.209 - Construction contracts with architect-engineer firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with architect-engineer firms. 636.209 Section 636.209 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Special Aspects of Contracting for Construction 636.209 Construction contracts with architect-engineer firms. The...

  20. 48 CFR 2936.209 - Construction contracts with architect-engineer firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with architect-engineer firms. 2936.209 Section 2936.209 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Special Aspects of Contracting for Construction 2936.209 Construction contracts with architect-engineer firms. As...

  1. 48 CFR 1536.209 - Construction contracts with architect-engineer firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... architect-engineer firms. 1536.209 Section 1536.209 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Special Aspects of Contracting for Construction 1536.209 Construction contracts with architect-engineer firms. (a...

  2. 48 CFR 436.209 - Construction contracts with architect-engineer firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with architect-engineer firms. 436.209 Section 436.209 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Special Aspects of Contracting for Construction 436.209 Construction contracts with architect-engineer...

  3. 48 CFR 36.209 - Construction contracts with architect-engineer firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with architect-engineer firms. 36.209 Section 36.209 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Special Aspects of Contracting for Construction 36.209 Construction contracts with architect-engineer firms. No...

  4. 45 CFR 150.209 - Verification of exhaustion of remedies and contact with State officials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Verification of exhaustion of remedies and contact with State officials. 150.209 Section 150.209 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 150.209 Verification of exhaustion of remedies and contact with State officials. If CMS receives a...

  5. 31 CFR 538.209 - Prohibited transportation-related transactions involving Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... transactions involving Sudan. 538.209 Section 538.209 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Prohibitions § 538.209 Prohibited transportation-related transactions involving Sudan... relating to transportation of cargo to or from Sudan; (b) The provision of transportation of cargo to or...

  6. 12 CFR 209.2 - Banks desiring to become member banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Banks desiring to become member banks. 209.2 Section 209.2 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM ISSUE AND CANCELLATION OF FEDERAL RESERVE BANK CAPITAL STOCK (REGULATION I) § 209.2 Banks desiring to...

  7. 47 CFR 54.209 - Annual reporting requirements for designated eligible telecommunications carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Annual reporting requirements for designated eligible telecommunications carriers. 54.209 Section 54.209 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS... Service Support § 54.209 Annual reporting requirements for designated eligible telecommunications carriers...

  8. 33 CFR 209.230 - Use of reservoir areas for recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... recreation. 209.230 Section 209.230 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE § 209.230 Use of reservoir areas for recreation... control for recreation and other related purposes, when such use is consistent with the operation and...

  9. Partial photoneutron cross section measurements on 209Bi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Ioana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New data of total and partial (γ,xn cross sections with x = 1–3 are proposed to be measured by direct neutron multiplicity sorting using Laser Compton scattering (LCS gamma ray beams at the ELI-NP to solve long standing discrepancies between existing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (USA and France Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay photonuclear data. Pioneering experiments are currently performed at the NewSUBARU facility. We present here preliminary results on 209Bi(g,xn cross section measurements.

  10. New measurement of neutron capture resonances of 209Bi

    CERN Document Server

    Domingo-Pardo, C.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrillode Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillman, I.; Dolfini, R.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Kappeler, F.; Karamanis, D.; Karadimos, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; Oshima, M.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, Alberto; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2006-01-01

    The neutron capture cross section of Bi209 has been measured at the CERN n TOF facility by employing the pulse-height-weighting technique. Improvements over previous measurements are mainly because of an optimized detection system, which led to a practically negligible neutron sensitivity. Additional experimental sources of systematic error, such as the electronic threshold in the detectors, summing of gamma-rays, internal electron conversion, and the isomeric state in bismuth, have been taken into account. Gamma-ray absorption effects inside the sample have been corrected by employing a nonpolynomial weighting function. Because Bi209 is the last stable isotope in the reaction path of the stellar s-process, the Maxwellian averaged capture cross section is important for the recycling of the reaction flow by alpha-decays. In the relevant stellar range of thermal energies between kT=5 and 8 keV our new capture rate is about 16% higher than the presently accepted value used for nucleosynthesis calculations. At th...

  11. Toxic effects of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209 on human embryonic kidney cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min eLi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs are widely used as flame-retardant additives in consumer and household products and can escape into the environment over time. PBDEs have become a global environmental organic pollutant due to the properties of persistence, toxicity, and bioaccumulation. The well-studied toxic effects of PBDEs mainly include thyroid hormone disruption and neurotoxicity. There is no consistent conclusions on the carcinogenic potential of PBDEs to date. Here, we explored the toxic effects of BDE-209 on human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293T. The comparison of the gene expression profiles of HEK293T cells with BDE-209 treatment and the negative control found that BDE-209 exposure may alter nucleosome organization through significantly changing the expression of histone gene clusters. The remodeled chromatin structure could further disturb systemic lupus erythematosus as one of the toxic effects of BDE-209. Additionally, gene sets of different cancer modules are positively correlated with BDE-209 exposure. This suggests that BDE-209 has carcinogenic potential for a variety of tumors. Collectively, BDE-209 has a broader toxicity not limited to disruption of thyroid hormone-related biological processes. Notably, the toxic effects of BDE-209 dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO is not the simply additive effects of BDE-209 and DMSO alone.

  12. Effects of BDE-209 contaminated sediments on zebrafish development and potential implications to human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Escalon, B Lynn; Prats, Eva; Stanley, Jacob K; Thienpont, Benedicte; Melby, Nicolas L; Barón, Enrique; Eljarrat, Ethel; Barceló, Damià; Mestres, Jordi; Babin, Patrick J; Perkins, Edward J; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2014-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers are compounds widely used as flame-retardants, which are of increasing environmental concern due to their persistence, and potential adverse effects. This study had two objectives. First, we assessed if BDE-209 in sediment was bioavailable and bioaccumulated into zebrafish embryos. Secondly, we assessed the potential impact on human and environmental health of bioavailable BDE-209 using human in vitro cell assays and zebrafish embryos. Zebrafish were exposed from 4h to 8days post-fertilization to sediments spiked with 12.5mg/kg of BDE-209. Zebrafish larvae accumulated ten fold more BDE-209 than controls in unspiked sediment after 8days. BDE-209 impacted expression of neurological pathways and altered behavior of larvae, although BDE-209 had no visible affect on thyroid function or motoneuron and neuromast development. Zebrafish data and in silico predictions suggested that BDE-209 would also interact with key human transcription factors and receptors. We therefore tested these predictions using mammalian in vitro assays. BDE-209 activated human aryl hydrocarbon receptor, peroxisome proliferator activating receptors, CF/b-cat, activator protein 1, Oct-MLP, and the estrogen receptor-related alpha (ERRα) receptor in cell-based assays. BDE-209 also inhibited human acetylcholinesterase activity. The observation that BDE-209 can be bioaccumulated from contaminated sediment highlights the need to consider this as a potential environmental exposure route. Once accumulated, our data also show that BDE-209 has the potential to cause impacts on both human and environmental health. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 49 CFR 240.209 - Procedures for making the determination on knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... knowledge. 240.209 Section 240.209 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... determination on knowledge. (a) Each railroad, prior to initially certifying or recertifying any person as an... with the requirements of § 240.125 of this part, demonstrated sufficient knowledge of the railroad's...

  14. 20 CFR 209.14 - Report of separation allowances subject to tier II taxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Report of separation allowances subject to tier II taxation. 209.14 Section 209.14 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER... separation allowances subject to tier II taxation. For any employee who is paid a separation payment, the...

  15. 48 CFR 836.209 - Construction contracts with architect-engineer firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... with architect-engineer firms. 836.209 Section 836.209 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER...-engineer firms. (a) When the contracting officer considers it necessary or advantageous to award a contract...

  16. 30 CFR 90.209 - Respirable dust samples; transmission by operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... operator. 90.209 Section 90.209 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-COAL MINERS WHO HAVE EVIDENCE OF THE... Mill Road, Building 38, P.O. Box 18179, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15236-0179, or to any other address...

  17. 30 CFR 70.209 - Respirable dust samples; transmission by operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... operator. 70.209 Section 70.209 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Sampling Procedures... Laboratory, Pittsburgh Safety and Health Technology Center, Cochran Mill Road, Building 38, P.O. Box 18179...

  18. 47 CFR 76.209 - Fairness doctrine; personal attacks; political editorials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fairness doctrine; personal attacks; political... RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cablecasting § 76.209 Fairness doctrine... importance. Note to § 76.209: See public notice, “Applicability of the Fairness Doctrine in the Handling of...

  19. 33 CFR 209.320 - Policy on release of commercial statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... statistics. 209.320 Section 209.320 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... statistics. The collection of commercial statistics pertaining to rivers, harbors, and waterways, and annual... waterway statistics. In case Federal or State agencies or local interests request other than general...

  20. 48 CFR 1815.209 - Solicitation provisions and contract clauses. (NASA supplements paragraph (a))

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Solicitation provisions and contract clauses. (NASA supplements paragraph (a)) 1815.209 Section 1815.209 Federal Acquisition... provisions and contract clauses. (NASA supplements paragraph (a)) (a) The contracting officer shall insert...

  1. 33 CFR 209.141 - Coordination of hydroelectric power operations with power marketing agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... power operations with power marketing agencies. 209.141 Section 209.141 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coordination of hydroelectric power operations with power marketing agencies. (a) Purpose. This regulation... generating facilities with the power marketing agencies. (b) Applicability. This regulation applies to all...

  2. Laboratory study of the particle-size distribution of Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in ambient air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Peng-hao; Hou, Chun-yan; Sun, Dan; Feng, Dao-lun; Halldorson, Thor; Ding, Yong-sheng; Li, Yi-fan; Tomy, Gregg T

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory measurements for particle-size distribution of Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) were performed in a 0.5 m(3) sealed room at 25 °C. BDE-209 was manually bounded to ambient particles. An electrostatic field-sampler was employed to collect particles. The number of collected particles (n(i,j), i and j was the class of particle diameter and applied voltage on electrostatic field-sampler sampler, respectively) and the corresponding mass of BDE-209 in collected particles (m(∑i,j)) were determined in a series of 6 experiments. The particle-size distribution coefficient (ki) was calculated through equations related to n(i,j) and m(∑i,j), and the particle-size distribution of BDE-209 was determined by ki·n(i,j). Results revealed that BDE-209 distributed in particles of all size and were not affiliated with fine particles as in field measurements. The particle size-fraction should be taken into account when discussing the particle-size distribution of BDE-209 in ambient air due to the normalized coefficients (normalized to k1) and were approximately in the same order of magnitude for each diameter class. The method described in the present study was deemed feasible in determining the particle-size distribution of BDE-209 from vaporization sources and helpful to understanding the instinct rule of particle-size distribution of BDE-209, and potentially feasible for other SVOCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Behavior of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in soil: Effects of rhizosphere and mycorrhizal colonization of ryegrass roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Sen [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhang Shuzhen, E-mail: szzhang@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Huang, Honglin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Christie, Peter [Agri-Environment Branch, Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Newforge Lane, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    A rhizobox experiment was conducted to investigate degradation of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in the rhizosphere of ryegrass and the influence of root colonization with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus. BDE-209 dissipation in soil varied with its proximity to the roots and was enhanced by AM inoculation. A negative correlation (P < 0.001, R{sup 2} = 0.66) was found between the residual BDE-209 concentration in soil and soil microbial biomass estimated as the total phospholipid fatty acids, suggesting a contribution of microbial degradation to BDE-209 dissipation. Twelve and twenty-four lower brominated PBDEs were detected in soil and plant samples, respectively, with a higher proportion of di- through hepta-BDE congeners in the plant tissues than in the soils, indicating the occurrence of BDE-209 debromination in the soil-plant system. AM inoculation increased the levels of lower brominated PBDEs in ryegrass. These results provide important information about the behavior of BDE-209 in the soil-plant system. - Research highlights: > BDE-209 dissipation in soil was affected by the proximity to the roots. > Microbial degradation contributes greatly to BDE-209 dissipation in the soil. > Twelve and twenty-four lower brominated PBDEs were detected in soil and plant samples. > AM inoculation increased root uptake and accumulation of BDE-209. - BDE-209 dissipation and degradation in soil were affected by both its proximity to ryegrass roots and inoculation with an AM fungus.

  4. Experimental study of the cross-sections of alpha-particle induced reactions on $^{209}$Bi

    CERN Document Server

    Hermanne, A; Shubin, Yu N; Szucs, Z; Takács, S; Tarkanyi, F; 10.1016/j.apradiso.2005.01.015

    2005-01-01

    alpha -particle-induced nuclear reactions for generation of /sup 211 /At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E/sub alpha /=39 MeV. Excitation functions are reported for the reactions /sup 209/Bi( alpha ,2n)/sup 211/At, /sup 209/Bi( alpha ,3n)/sup 210/At and /sup 209/Bi( alpha , x)/sup 210/Po. Results obtained from direct alpha -emission measurements and gamma -spectra from decay products are compared and correspond well with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross-sections and optimised production pathways for minimal contamination are presented. A comparison with the results of the theoretical model code ALICE-IPPE is discussed.

  5. Camelopardalids in 2019 (meteor shower of the comet 209P/LINEAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, Mikhail

    2017-03-01

    After an outburst of Camelopardalids shower in 2014, the next interesting year is 2019, when two small outbursts are possible. The first one with ZHR up to 10 is expected from the 1939 trail of the comet 209P/LINEAR at 7h44m UT on 24 May, the second with ZHR up to 5 could be produced by the 1994-2009 trails around 11h UT on 24 May. Details are here: http://feraj.ru/Radiants/Predictions/209p-ids2019eng.html

  6. 25 CFR 900.209 - What should a self-determination contractor or contractor's employee do on receiving a non...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES CONTRACTS UNDER THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Federal Tort... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What should a self-determination contractor or contractor's employee do on receiving a non-medical related tort claim? 900.209 Section 900.209 Indians BUREAU...

  7. Impact of co-exposure with lead and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) on thyroid function in zebrafish larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Biran; Wang, Qiangwei; Wang, Xianfeng [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, Bingsheng, E-mail: bszhou@ihb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • PBDEs and metals are the main contaminants at e-waste recycling sites. • Combined effects of Pb/BDE-209 on thyroid function in zebrafish larvae were studied. • Co-exposure of Pb and BDE-209 elicited synergistic effects on T{sub 3} and T{sub 4} levels. • BDE-209 enhanced Pb uptake, and Pb decreased bioconcentration/metabolism of BDE-209. • Mixtures of Pb and BDE-209 probably result in an increase in toxicological effects. - Abstract: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and metals are the main contaminants at waste electrical and electronic equipment (“e-waste”) recycling sites. However, the potential environmental health effects of mixtures of PBDEs and metals are not known. We investigated co-exposure of lead (Pb) with decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) on thyroid function in zebrafish larvae. Seven groups of embryos/larvae of zebrafish were treated with Pb (0, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 μg/L), six groups were exposed to BDE-209 (0, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 μg/L), and nine groups of zebrafish larvae were treated with Pb and BDE-209 (5, 10, and 20 μg/L Pb; 50, 100, and 200 μg/L BDE-209). Embryos/larvae were exposed from 2 h post-fertilization (hpf) until 144 hpf, and thyroid hormone (TH) content measured. Pb exposure significantly decreased whole-body TH contents (triiodothyroxine (T{sub 3}) and thyroxine (T{sub 4})) but BDE-209 exposure significantly increased T{sub 3} and T{sub 4} levels. Pb or BDE-209 treatment alone caused a predicted downregulation of TH transport (i.e., expression of the mRNA or proteins of transthyretin). Chemical analyses showed Pb uptake to be increased by BDE-209, but BDE-209 bioconcentration was decreased and the ability to metabolize BDE-209 was reduced in the presence of Pb. We also found that a mixture of the two chemicals had a synergistic effect on TH levels in zebrafish.

  8. Impacts of BDE209 addition on Pb uptake, subcellular partitioning and gene toxicity in earthworm (Eisenia fetida)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei, E-mail: wzhang@ecust.edu.cn [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, Shanghai 200237 (China); School of Resource and Environmental Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Liu, Kou; Li, Jing; Liang, Jun; Lin, Kuangfei [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, Shanghai 200237 (China); School of Resource and Environmental Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • 10 or 100 μg g{sup −1} BDE209 addition caused histological changes in Pb-exposed earthworms’ body wall. • Strong histopathological effects with BDE209 addition confirmed the enhanced Pb bioavailability. • The presence of higher levels of BDE209 altered subcellular partitioning of Pb in earthworm. • Co-exposure to Pb and BDE209 declined SOD and CAT gene transcripts synergistically. • BDE209 addition elicited up-regulation of Hsp90 gene expression compared to Pb exposure alone. - Abstract: Lead (Pb) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) are the mainly co-existed contaminants at e-waste recycling sites. The potential toxicity of Pb (250 μg g{sup −1}) to earthworm Eisenia fetida in the presence of BDE209 (1, 10 and 100 μg g{sup −1}) was determined during 14-d incubation period. Compared to Pb treatment alone, the co-exposure with 1 μg g{sup −1} BDE209 barely affected Pb uptake, subcellular partitioning and gene expression; however, histopathological changes in earthworms’ body wall (epidermal, circular and longitudinal muscles) demonstrated that 10 and 100 μg g{sup −1} BDE209 additions enhanced Pb uptake and altered its subcellular partitioning, indicating that Pb redistributed from fractions E (cell debris) and D (metal-rich granules) to fraction C (cytosols); Additionally, BDE209 supply significantly inhibited (p < 0.05) the induction of SOD (superoxide dismutase) and CAT (catalase) gene expressions (maximum down-regulation 59% for SOD gene at Pb + 100 μg g{sup −1} BDE209 and 89% for CAT gene at Pb + 10 μg g{sup −1} BDE209), while facilitated (p < 0.05) Hsp90 (heat shock protein 90) gene expression with maximum induction rate of 120% after exposure to Pb + 10 μg g{sup −1} BDE209. These findings illustrate the importance of considering environmental BDE209 co-exposure when assessing Pb bioaccumulation and toxicity in multi-contaminated soil ecosystems.

  9. 49 CFR 209.501 - Review of rail transportation safety and security route analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....820 § 209.501 Review of rail transportation safety and security route analysis. (a) Review of route... analysis does not support the railroad carrier's original selected route, that safety and security... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Review of rail transportation safety and security...

  10. 48 CFR 2452.209-70 - Potential organizational conflicts of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and/or management systems limit its knowledge of possible organizational conflicts of interest... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Potential organizational... Provisions and Clauses 2452.209-70 Potential organizational conflicts of interest. As prescribed in 2409.507...

  11. 7 CFR 1710.209 - Approval requirements for load forecast work plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Approval requirements for load forecast work plans... LOANS AND GUARANTEES Load Forecasts § 1710.209 Approval requirements for load forecast work plans. (a) In addition to the approved load forecast required under §§ 1710.202 and 1710.203, any power supply...

  12. 48 CFR 52.209-3 - First Article Approval-Contractor Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false First Article Approval... Clauses 52.209-3 First Article Approval—Contractor Testing. As prescribed in 9.308-1 (a) and (b), insert the following clause: First Article Approval—Contractor Testing (SEP 1989) (a) The Contractor shall...

  13. 48 CFR 52.209-4 - First Article Approval-Government Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false First Article Approval... Clauses 52.209-4 First Article Approval—Government Testing. As prescribed in 9.308-2 (a) and (b), insert the following clause: First Article Approval—Government Testing (SEP 1989) (a) The Contractor shall...

  14. 48 CFR 1552.209-70 - Organizational conflict of interest notification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Organizational conflict of... Clauses 1552.209-70 Organizational conflict of interest notification. As prescribed in 1509.507-1(b) insert the following solicitation provision in all solicitations. Organizational Conflict of Interest...

  15. 48 CFR 1552.209-72 - Organizational conflict of interest certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Organizational conflict of... Provisions and Clauses 1552.209-72 Organizational conflict of interest certification. As prescribed in 1509.507-1(b), insert the following provision in all solicitation documents when applicable. Organizational...

  16. 48 CFR 752.209-71 - Organizational conflicts of interest discovered after award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Organizational conflicts... CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 752.209-71 Organizational conflicts of interest discovered after..., establishing a restraint on the contractor's eligibility for future contracts. Organizational Conflicts of...

  17. 29 CFR 780.209 - Packing, storage, warehousing, and sale of nursery products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Packing, storage, warehousing, and sale of nursery products... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Agriculture as It Relates to Specific Situations Nursery and Landscaping Operations § 780.209 Packing, storage, warehousing, and sale of nursery products. Employees of a grower of...

  18. Equal Opportunity in Higher Education: The Past and Future of California's Proposition 209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodsky, Eric, Ed.; Kurlaender, Michal, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This timely book examines issues pertaining to equal opportunity--affirmative action, challenges to it, and alternatives for improving opportunities for underrepresented groups--in higher education today. Its starting point is California's Proposition 209, which ended race-based affirmative action in public education and the workplace in 1996. The…

  19. 77 FR 16319 - Amtrak's Petition for Determination of PRIIA Section 209 Cost Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... Amtrak's Petition for Determination of PRIIA Section 209 Cost Methodology AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Adoption of methodology to establish and allocate costs for state-supported Amtrak routes. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the adoption of a methodology to establish and allocate costs for state...

  20. 48 CFR 1552.209-73 - Notification of conflicts of interest regarding personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Notification of conflicts... System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.209-73 Notification of conflicts of interest regarding personnel...

  1. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 209 - Federal Railroad Administration Guidelines for Initial Hazardous Materials Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... were International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) labels instead of 10″ placards. (Unit of violation... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal Railroad Administration Guidelines for Initial Hazardous Materials Assessments B Appendix B to Part 209 Transportation Other Regulations Relating...

  2. 48 CFR 2152.209-70 - Certification regarding debarment, suspension, proposed debarment and other responsibility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... terminated for default by any Federal agency. (2) “Principals,” for the purposes of this certification, means... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Certification regarding... CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 2152.209-70 Certification regarding debarment, suspension...

  3. 48 CFR 2152.209-71 - Certification regarding debarment, suspension, proposed debarment, and other responsibility matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... purposes of this certification, means officers; directors; owners; partners; and persons having primary... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Certification regarding... of Provisions and Clauses 2152.209-71 Certification regarding debarment, suspension, proposed...

  4. The LEP 2 machine : pushing to the limits 209 GeV! Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    By installing 288 new superconducting accelerating cavities after 1995,and thanks to the excellent work of the CERN teams,energies up to 209 GeV -well beyond LEP 's original design energy -have been achieved.Significant experi- mental data have been collected at energies in excess of 206 GeV.

  5. PBDE-209 exposure damages learning and memory ability in rats potentially through increased autophagy and apoptosis in the hippocampus neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen; Du, Lili; Tang, Wenting; Kuang, Liyun; Du, Peili; Chen, Jingsi; Chen, Dunjin

    2017-03-01

    This study is to investigate the neurotoxicity of PBDE-209 during pregnancy through autophagy and apoptosis in the fetal hippocampus neuron. The autophagy protein levels of LC3-II and Beclin-1 were significantly higher in hippocampus tissue and neuron, while P62 protein were lower. Apoptosis protein Cleaved Caspase-3 and Cleaved PARP was significantly higher in PBDE dose groups and BCL-2 levels in high PBDE dose groups were significantly lower. During the Morris water maze task, the escape latency times of high PBDE dose groups were significantly longer. PBDE-209-induced autophagy leads to neurons death and inhibition of autophagy reduce PBDE-209-induced apoptotic cell death. These results suggest that exposure of the PBDE-209 during pregnancy increases hippocampal autophagy, decrease neuron viability, and it partly effect apoptosis induced by PBDE-209. All that may contribute to the decline of learning and memory ability in the offspring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Treatment of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) contaminated soil by solubilizer-enhanced electrokinetics coupled with ZVI-PRB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rongbing; Wen, Dongdong; Chen, Xing; Gu, Yingying; Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Wei

    2017-05-01

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) is a typical soil contaminant released from e-waste recycling sites (EWRSs). Electrokinetics (EK) has been considered as an excellent treatment technology with a promising potential to effectively remove organic pollutants in soil. In this study, the treatment of BDE209-polluted soil by EK was explored. All the EK experiments were conducted under a constant voltage gradient (2 V cm(-1)) for 14 days. Deionized water (DI water), hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPCD), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and humic acid (HA) were applied as the processing fluid. The experimental results showed that all the solubilizers could effectively promote the mobility and transport of BDE209 in the soil via the electro-osmotic flow (EOF) or electromigration. The removal efficiencies achieved in S1 section were 24, 22, and 26% using HPCD, SDS, and HA as the processing fluid. However, the removal of BDE209 for the entire soil cell was not achieved until zero valence iron (ZVI) was inserted at the center of soil column as a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) or (ZVI-PRB), which enhanced the degradation of BDE209. As ZVI-PRB was installed in EK5 and EK6 experiments, the corresponding average removal efficiencies increased to 16 and 13%, respectively. Additionally, the degradation products of BDE209 analyzed by GC-MS suggested that debromination of BDE209 was the main potential degradation mechanism in the EK treatment in the presence of ZVI-PRB.

  7. High-energy Neutron-induced Fission Cross Sections of Natural Lead and Bismuth-209

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrio, D; Carrapico, C; Eleftheriadis, C; Leeb, H; Calvino, F; Herrera-Martinez, A; Savvidis, I; Vlachoudis, V; Haas, B; Koehler, P; Vannini, G; Oshima, M; Le Naour, C; Gramegna, F; Wiescher, M; Pigni, M T; Audouin, L; Mengoni, A; Quesada, J; Becvar, F; Plag, R; Cennini, P; Mosconi, M; Rauscher, T; Couture, A; Capote, R; Sarchiapone, L; Vlastou, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dillmann, I; Pavlopoulos, P; Karamanis, D; Krticka, M; Jericha, E; Ferrari, A; Martinez, T; Trubert, D; Oberhummer, H; Karadimos, D; Plompen, A; Isaev, S; Terlizzi, R; Cortes, G; Cox, J; Cano-Ott, D; Pretel, C; Colonna, N; Berthoumieux, E; Vaz, P; Heil, M; Lopes, I; Lampoudis, C; Walter, S; Calviani, M; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Embid-Segura, M; Stephan, C; Igashira, M; Papachristodoulou, C; Aerts, G; Tavora, L; Berthier, B; Rudolf, G; Andrzejewski, J; Villamarin, D; Ferreira-Marques, R; Tain, J L; O'Brien, S; Reifarth, R; Kadi, Y; Neves, F; Poch, A; Kerveno, M; Rubbia, C; Lazano, M; Dahlfors, M; Wisshak, K; Salgado, J; Dridi, W; Ventura, A; Andriamonje, S; Assimakopoulos, P; Santos, C; Voss, F; Ferrant, L; Patronis, N; Chiaveri, E; Guerrero, C; Perrot, L; Vicente, M C; Lindote, A; Praena, J; Baumann, P; Kappeler, F; Rullhusen, P; Furman, W; David, S; Marrone, S; Tassan-Got, L; Gunsig, F; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Pancin, J; Papadopoulos, C; Tagliente, G; Haight, R; Chepel, V; Kossionides, E; Badurek, G; Marganiec, J; Lukic, S; Pavlik, A; Goncalves, I; Duran, I; Alvarez, H; Abbondanno, U; Fujii, K; Milazzo, P M; Moreau, C

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Neutron Time-Of-Flight (n\\_TOF) facility is well suited to measure small neutron-induced fission cross sections, as those of subactinides. The cross section ratios of (nat)Pb and (209)Bi relative to (235)U and (238)U were measured using PPAC detectors. The fragment coincidence method allows to unambiguously identify the fission events. The present experiment provides the first results for neutron-induced fission up to 1 GeV for (nat)Pb and (209)Bi. A good agreement with previous experimental data below 200 MeV is shown. The comparison with proton-induced fission indicates that the limiting regime where neutron-induced and proton-induced fission reach equal cross section is close to 1 GeV.

  8. Enhanced Atomic Desorption of 209 and 210 Francium from Organic Coating

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Controlled atomic desorption from organic Poly-DiMethylSiloxane coating is demonstrated for improving the loading efficiency of 209,210Fr magneto-optical traps. A three times increase in the cold atoms population is obtained with contact-less pulsed light-induced desorption, applied to different isotopes, either bosonic or fermionic, of Francium. A six times increase of 210Fr population is obtained with a desorption mechanism based on direct charge transfer from a triboelectric probe to the a...

  9. Metabolic and Pharmacokinetic Differentiation of STX209 and Racemic Baclofen in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymundo Sanchez-Ponce

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available STX209 is an exploratory drug comprising the single, active R-enantiomer of baclofen which is in later stage clinical trials for the treatment of fragile x syndrome (FXS and autism spectrum disorders (ASD. New clinical data in this article on the metabolism and pharmacokinetics of the R- and S-enantiomers of baclofen presents scientific evidence for stereoselective metabolism of only S-baclofen to an abundant oxidative deamination metabolite that is sterically resolved as the S-enantiomeric configuration. This metabolite undergoes some further metabolism by glucuronide conjugation. Consequences of this metabolic difference are a lower Cmax and lower early plasma exposure of S-baclofen compared to R-baclofen and marginally lower urinary excretion of S-baclofen after racemic baclofen administration. These differences introduce compound-related exposure variances in humans in which subjects dosed with racemic baclofen are exposed to a prominent metabolite of baclofen whilst subjects dosed with STX209 are not. For potential clinical use, our findings suggest that STX209 has the advantage of being a biologically defined and active enantiomer.

  10. 48 CFR 52.209-6 - Protecting the Government's Interest When Subcontracting With Contractors Debarred, Suspended, or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...'s Interest When Subcontracting With Contractors Debarred, Suspended, or Proposed for Debarment. 52....209-6 Protecting the Government's Interest When Subcontracting With Contractors Debarred, Suspended... Government's Interest When Subcontracting With Contractors Debarred, Suspended, or Proposed for Debarment...

  11. Interethnic diversity of the CD209 (rs4804803 gene promoter polymorphism in African but not American sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenelle A. Noble

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the genomic diversity of CD209 gene promoter polymorphism could assist in clarifying disease pathophysiology as well as contribution to co-morbidities. CD209 gene promoter polymorphism has been shown to be associated with susceptibility to infection. We hypothesize that CD209 mutant variants occur at a higher frequency among Africans and in sickle cell disease. We analyzed the frequency of the CD209 gene (rs4804803 in healthy control and sickle cell disease (SCD populations and determined association with disease. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples collected from 145 SCD and 231 control Africans (from Mali, 331 SCD and 379 control African Americans and 159 Caucasians. Comparative analysis among and between groups was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. Per ethnic diversification, we found significant disparity in genotypic (23.4% versus 16.9% versus 3.2% and allelic frequencies (48.7% versus 42.1% versus 19.8% of the homozygote mutant variant of the CD209 (snp 309A/G gene promoter between Africans, African Americans and Caucasians respectively. Comparative evaluation between disease and control groups reveal a significant difference in genotypic (10.4% versus 23.4%; p = 0.002 and allelic frequencies (39.7% versus 48.7%; p = 0.02 of the homozygote mutant variant in African SCD and healthy controls respectively, an observation that is completely absent among Americans. Comparing disease groups, we found no difference in the genotypic (p = 0.19 or allelic (p = 0.72 frequencies of CD209 homozygote mutant variant between Africans and Americans with sickle cell disease. The higher frequency of CD209 homozygote mutant variants in the African control group reveals a potential impairment of the capacity to mount an immune response to infectious diseases, and possibly delineate susceptibility to or severity of infectious co-morbidities within and between groups.

  12. Measurement of $R_b$ in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at 182 - 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of Rb, the ratio of the bbbar cross-section to the qqbar cross- section in e+e- collisions, are presented. The data were collected by the OPAL experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 182 GeV and 209 GeV. Lepton, lifetime and event shape information is used to tag events containing b quarks with high efficiency. The data are compatible with the Standard Model expectation. The mean ratio of the eight measurements reported here to the Standard Model prediction is 1.055+-0.031+-0.037, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  13. CT in ureterolithiasis with a radiation dose equal to intravenous urography: results in 209 patients; CT der Ureterolithiasis mit der Strahlendosis einer Ausscheidungsurographie: Ergebnisse bei 209 Patienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoepfle, E.; Bohndorf, K. [Klinikum Augsburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Hamm, M.; Wartenberg, S. [Klinikum Augsburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Urologie

    2003-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a low-dose, nonenhanced helical CT protocol for the diagnosis of renal colic using an effective dose equivalent of radiation not higher than that of intravenous urography. Materials and Methods: A new low-dose helical-CT protocol (120 kV; 70 mA; rotation time 0.75 s; collimation 5 mm, pitch=2) was used to examine 209 consecutive patients with symptoms of renal colic. The initial CT reports were compared with retrograde ureterography, ureteral endoscopy, stone retrieval, surgical or clinical findings. The effective radiation dose was calculated by the method published by Nagel. The prevalence of ureterolithiasis was 70%. Results: Sensitivity and specificity of the low-dose-helical CT in detecting ureteral calculi were 97.7% and 96.8%, respectively. The positive predictive value was 99.3% and negative predictive value 92.4%. The mean effective radiation dose equivalent was 0.97 mSv in male and 1.35 mSv in female patients. Conclusions: the diagnostic value of the reported CT protocol does no differ from previously published protocols. However, the effective radiation dose equivalent is at least 50% lower than stated in the published protocols. We recommend the low-dose helical CT protocol as the method of choice. (orig.) [German] Fragestellung: Pruefung der diagnostischen Aussagekraft eines nativen Spiral-CT-Protokolls mit einer niedrigen, einer Ausscheidungsurographie aequivalenten Strahlendosis bei der Abklaerung einer Harnleiterkolik. Methode: 209 konsekutive Patienten mit der klinischen Verdachtsdiagnose einer Harnleiterkolik wurden mit einem neuen CT-Protokoll untersucht (120 kV; 70 mA; Rotationszeit 0,75 s; Kollimation 5 mm; Pitch=2). Die prospektiv erhobenen CT-Befunde wurden mittels retrograder Ureterdarstellung, Ureterendoskopie, Steinasservierung, operativ oder im klinischen Verlauf validiert. Die effektive Dosis der CT-Untersuchung wurde nach Nagel berechnet. Die Praevalenz der Ureterolithiasis betrug 70%. Ergebnisse: Die Niedrig

  14. Effect of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209) and dibromodiphenyl ether (BDE 15) on soil microbial activity and bacterial community composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Lu, E-mail: liulu519@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Zhu Wei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Xiao Lin, E-mail: xiaolin@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Yang Liuyan, E-mail: yangly@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2011-02-15

    There is now increasing concern regarding the effect of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) on the environment. These compounds are widely used as fire retardants and by the electronic industry. Our study examined the effects of adding different doses of BDE 15 and BDE 209 on the soil microbial activities and function by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and soil enzymatic activity analyses. Soils were spiked with 1, 10, and 100 mg kg{sup -1} BDE 209 and BDE 15, respectively, and incubated for up to 180 days. No degradation of BDE 209 was observed; however, about 40% of the added BDE 15 underwent declining extractable concentration. Bacterial counts were significantly higher in the microcosms amended with BDE 15, while the suppression effect increased as the BDE 209 concentration increased. Pseudomonas, Bacillus and uncultured bacteria dominated the bacterial communities in all soil treatments, and PCA analysis showed that high doses of BDE 209 and BDE 15 altered the soil microbial community structure. This study provides new information on the effect of higher and lower PBDEs on the soil microbial community in an aerobic environment.

  15. Effect of three kinds of surfactants and β-cyclodextrin on the phytoremediation of BDE-209 contaminated sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liangyuan; Guo, Weijie; Zhao, Weihua; Long, Meng; Li, Huan

    2017-05-01

    Plant-accelerated removal of BDE-209 from sediment by aquatic macrophyte Scirpus validus Vahl in the presence of a cationic-surfactant (CTAB), an anionic-surfactant (SDS), a nonionic-surfactant (Tween 80) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) at the concentrations ranged from 300 mg/kg to 1000 mg/kg were investigated. Significantly negative effect were not observed for the growth of S. validus in terms of plant height and stem diatemeter, which indicated that it is preferable for CTAB, SDS, Tween 80 and β-cyclodextrin to be utilized as the BDE-209 phytoremediation amendment. Furthermore, CTAB, SDS and Tween 80 in the certain concentrations significantly enhanced the phytoremediation efficiencies and 11.78-19.33% of increase in BDE-209 removal rates was obtained. Significantly enhance of BDE-209 phytoremediation efficiency was not observed in the added β-CD concentration ranges. Results obtained from this study provided some insight with regard to the feasibility of phytoremediation for BDE-209 contaminated sediments with addition of suitable solubilizers, especially Tween 80.

  16. CDRI-08 Attenuates REST/NRSF-Mediated Expression of NMDAR1 Gene in PBDE-209-Exposed Mice Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CDRI-08 is a standardized bacoside enriched ethanolic extract of Bacopa monnieri, a nootropic plant. We reported that CDRI-08 attenuated oxidative stress and memory impairment in mice, induced by a flame retardant, PBDE-209. In order to explore the mechanism, present study was designed to examine the role of CDRI-08 on the expression of NMDAR1 (NR1 and the binding of REST/NRSF to NR1 promoter against postnatal exposure of PBDE-209. Male mice pups were orally supplemented with CDRI-08 at the doses of 40, 80, or 120 mg/kg along with PBDE-209 (20 mg/kg during PND 3–10 and frontal cortex and hippocampus were collected at PND 11 and 60 to study the expression and regulation of NR1 by RT-PCR and electrophoretic mobility shift assay, respectively. The findings showed upregulated expression of NR1 and decreased binding of REST/NRSF to NR1 promoter after postnatal exposure of PBDE-209. Interestingly, supplementation with CDRI-08 significantly restored the expression of NR1 and binding of REST/NRSF to NR1 promoter near to the control value at the dose of 120 mg/kg. In conclusion, the results suggest that CDRI-08 possibly acts on glutamatergic system through expression and regulation of NR1 and may restore memory, impaired by PBDE-209 as reported in our previous study.

  17. Using extrathermodynamic relationships to model the temperature dependence of Henry's law constants of 209 PCB congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Holly A; Poster, Dianne L; Huie, Robert E; Baker, Joel E

    2002-10-15

    Our previous measurements of the temperature dependencies of Henry's law constants of 26 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) showed a well-defined linear relationship between the enthalpy and the entropy of phase change. Within a homologue group, the Henry's law constants converged to a common value at a specific isoequilibrium temperature. We use this relationship to model the temperature dependencies of the Henry's law constants of the remaining PCB congeners. By using experimentally measured Henry's law constants at 11 degrees C for 61 PCB congeners described in this paper combined with the isoequilibrium temperatures from our previous measurements of Henry's law constants of 26 PCB congeners, we have derived an empirical relationship between the enthalpies and the entropies of phase change for these additional PCB congeners. A systematic variation in the enthalpies and entropies of phase change was found to be partially dependent on the chlorine number and substitution patterns on the biphenyl rings, allowing further estimation of the temperature dependence of Henry's law constants for the remaining 122 PCB congeners. The enthalpies of phase change for all 209 PCB congeners ranged between 10 and 169 kJ mol(-1), where the enthalpies of phase change decreased as the number of ortho chlorine substitutions on the biphenyl rings increased within homologue groups. These data are used to predict the temperature dependence of Henry's law constants for all 209 PCB congeners.

  18. Abnormal behavior of the optical potential for the halo nuclear system 6He+209Bi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L.; Lin, C. J.; Jia, H. M.; Wang, D. X.; Ma, N. R.; Sun, L. J.; Yang, F.; Xu, X. X.; Wu, Z. D.; Zhang, H. Q.; Liu, Z. H.

    2017-10-01

    In a recent transfer reaction measurement of 208Pb(7Li,6He )209Bi at energies around and below the Coulomb barrier, the optical model potentials of the halo nuclear system 6He+209Bi were extracted by fitting the experimental data with the theoretical frameworks of the distorted-wave Born approximation and coupled reaction channels, respectively. With the high-precision result, a complete picture of the behavior of the optical potential for this halo system is clearly derived for the first time. The real potential presents a bell-like shape around the barrier as a normal threshold anomaly. However, for the imaginary part, it first increases with the energy decreasing below the barrier and then falls quickly to 0, hence the threshold energy can be determined by fitting the variation trend. Moreover, the result also provides some evidence that the dispersion relation does not hold for this halo nuclear system, which calls for further investigation of the underlying physics.

  19. Final Demolition and Disposition of 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory - 12267

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolery, Wade [US Department of Energy, Richland WA (United States); Dodd, Edwin III [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland WA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory was constructed in 1960 to provide a heavy shielded reactor room where quantities of plutonium or uranium in solution could be brought to near-critical configurations under carefully controlled and monitored conditions. In the late 1980's, the responsible contractor, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), was directed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare the facility for unoccupied status. The facility was demolished under a Removal Action Work Plan pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The funding for this project was provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The primary rooms of concern with regards to contamination in 209-E facility, which is over 9,000 square feet, are the criticality assembly room (CAR), the mix room, and the change room. The CAR contained two reactor hoods (HO-140 and HO-170), which each had a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system. The CAR contained 13 tanks ranging from 38 L (10 gal) to 401 L (106 gal). Tanks TK-109 and TK-110 are below grade, and were removed as part of this demolition and disposition remedy. Nonradiological and radiological hazardous substances were removed, decontaminated, or fixed in place, prior to demolition. Except for the removal of below grade tanks TK-109 and TK-110, the facility was demolished to slab-on-grade. PNNL performed stabilization and deactivation activities that included removal of bulk fissile material and chemicals, flushing tanks, stabilizing contamination within gloveboxes and hoods, and packaging and removing waste. The removal of the contaminated plutonium equipment and materials from the 209E facility presented a number of challenges similar in nature to those associated with the inventory reduction and cleanup activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Although there were no bulk fissile materials or chemicals within the facility, there

  20. Interaction between FOXO1A-209 Genotype and Tea Drinking is Significantly Associated with Reduced Mortality at Advanced Ages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yi; Chen, Huashuai; Ni, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Based on the genotypic/phenotypic data from Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS) and Cox proportional hazard model, the present study demonstrates that interactions between carrying FOXO1A-209 genotypes and tea drinking are significantly associated with lower risk of mortality...... at advanced ages. Such significant association is replicated in two independent Han Chinese CLHLS cohorts (p =0.028-0.048 in the discovery and replication cohorts, and p =0.003-0.016 in the combined dataset). We found the associations between tea drinking and reduced mortality are much stronger among carriers...... of the FOXO1A-209 genotype compared to non-carriers, and drinking tea is associated with a reversal of the negative effects of carrying FOXO1A-209 minor alleles, that is, from a substantially increased mortality risk to substantially reduced mortality risk at advanced ages. The impacts are considerably...

  1. Direct and resonant breakup of {sup 6}He on {sup 209}Bi near the Coulomb barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolata, J.J. [Physics Department, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana, 46556-5670 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    As part of a program to study reactions induced by the two-neutron halo nucleus {sup 6}He on high-Z targets, a neutron-{alpha} particle coincidence experiment was performed for {sup 6}He incident on a {sup 209}Bi target at an energy just above the Coulomb barrier. The experimental setup was optimized for the measurement of projectile breakup. Direct breakup, as well as breakup through the 2{sup +} excited state of {sup 6}He and also the {sup 5}He+n channel, could be distinguished. The total breakup cross section measured in this work compares well with a continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculation that assumes a 50% reduction in the B(E1) computed from a pure {sup 4}He+2n cluster configuration. The B(E2{up_arrow}) for Coulomb excitation of the 2{sup +} state in {sup 6}He was also determined. (Author)

  2. New radiative neutron capture measurement of 207Pb and 209Bi

    CERN Document Server

    Domingo-Pardo, Cesar

    This new measurement of the (n, ) capture cross sections of 207Pb and 209Bi has been motivated by i) the aim to achieve a better understanding of the s-process stellar nucleosynthesis in its termination region and ii) the design of accelerator driven systems (ADS) based on a lead-bismuth eutectic spallation core. The measurement has been performed using the total energy detector technique, since the lower neutron sensitivity achievable with such a detection system represents a clear advantage versus the alternative total absorption method. However, the former technique has been a source of controversy between experimentalists and therefore, an important part of the present work has been dedicated rst to the review and further development of the so called Pulse Height Weighting Technique (PHWT). Performing dedicated measurements at the CERN n TOF installation we have experimentally validated this technique, determining that a systematic uncertainty better than 2% can be achieved. Once the measuring technique h...

  3. Enhanced Atomic Desorption of 209 and 210 Francium from Organic Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustsson, Steinn; Bianchi, Giovanni; Calabrese, Roberto; Corradi, Lorenzo; Dainelli, Antonio; Khanbekyan, Alen; Marinelli, Carmela; Mariotti, Emilio; Marmugi, Luca; Ricci, Leonardo; Stiaccini, Leonardo; Tomassetti, Luca; Vanella, Andrea

    2017-06-23

    Controlled atomic desorption from organic Poly-DiMethylSiloxane coating is demonstrated for improving the loading efficiency of (209,210)Fr magneto-optical traps. A three times increase in the cold atoms population is obtained with contact-less pulsed light-induced desorption, applied to different isotopes, either bosonic or fermionic, of Francium. A six times increase of (210)Fr population is obtained with a desorption mechanism based on direct charge transfer from a triboelectric probe to the adatom-organic coating complex. Our findings provide new insight on the microscopic mechanisms of atomic desorption from organic coatings. Our results, obtained at room temperature so as to preserve ideal vacuum conditions, represent concrete alternatives, independent from the atomic species in use, for high-efficiency laser cooling in critical conditions.

  4. Evaluation at the medium energy region for Pb-208 and Bi-209

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukahori, Tokio; Pearlstein, S.

    1991-01-01

    Medium energy nuclear data in the 1--1000 MeV range is necessary to accelerator applications which include spallation neutron sources for radioactive waste treatment and accelerator shielding design, medical applications which include isotopes production and radiation therapy, and space applications. For the design of fission and fusion reactors, the nuclear data file for neutrons below 20 MeV is available and well evaluated. Evaluated nuclear data for protons and data in the medium energy region, however, have not been prepared completely. Evaluation in the medium energy region was performed using the theoretical calculation code ALICE-P or experimental data. In this paper, the evaluation of neutron and proton induced nuclear data for Pb-208 and Bi-209 has been performed using ALICE-P, empirical calculations and new systematics for the fission cross section. The evaluated data are compiled for possible inclusion in the ENDF/B-VI High Energy File. 204 refs., 51 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Measurements of high-energy neutron-induced fission ofnatPb and 209Bi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couture A.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The CERN Neutron Time-Of-Flight (n_TOF facility is well suited to measure low cross sections as those of neutron-induced fission in subactinides. The cross section ratios of natPb and 209Bi relative to 235U and 238U were measured using PPAC detectors and a fragment coincidence method that allows us to identify the fission events. The present experiment provides first results for neutron-induced fission up to 1 GeV. Good agreement is found with previous experimental data below 200 MeV. The comparison with proton-induced fission indicates that the limiting regime where neutron-induced and proton-induced fission reach equal cross sections is close to 1 GeV.

  6. Thermal Neutron Capture Branching Ratio of 209BI Using a Gamma-Ray Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letourneau, A.; Berthoumieux, E.; Deruelle, O.; Fadil, M.; Fioni, G.; Gunsing, F.; Marie, F.; Perrot, L.; Ridikas, D.; Boerner, H.; Faust, H.; Mutti, P.; Simpson, G.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2003-06-01

    A new experimental program concerning the measurement of the neutron capture branching ratio of 209Bi as a function of neutron energy has been proposed recently. The preliminary results obtained at the high neutron flux reactor of ILL with a thermal neutron flux are presented in this paper. The neutron capture cross section and the corresponding branching ratio are measured with an on-line gamma-ray spectroscopy method. We find for the capture cross section 35±1.75 mb, what is in a good agreement with existing results. For the partial cross sections we get σ210gs = 17.9±2 mb and σ210m =17.1±2 mb giving a branching ratio of 51%±5%. This value is by 25% smaller than values from evaluated libraries.

  7. ZZ production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 183 - 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crawley, B; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Hansen, J; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, Borut P; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Rames, J; Ramler, L; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zinchenko, A I; Zupan, M

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of on-shell ZZ production are described, using data from the DELPHI experiment at LEP in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies between 183 and 209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 665 pb^{-1}. Results obtained in each of the final states q anti-q q anti-q, nu anti-nu q anti-q, mu+ mu- q anti-q, e+ e- q anti-q, tau+ tau- q anti-q, l+ l- l+ l-, and nu anti-nu l+ l- (with l=e,mu) are presented. The measured production cross-sections are consistent with the Standard Model expectations. These results update and supersede those already published at 183 and 189 GeV.

  8. 48 CFR 252.209-7004 - Subcontracting with firms that are owned or controlled by the government of a terrorist country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Subcontracting with firms....209-7004 Subcontracting with firms that are owned or controlled by the government of a terrorist country. As prescribed in 209.409, use the following clause: Subcontracting with Firms that are Owned or...

  9. 45 CFR 400.209 - Claims involving family units which include refugees who have been in the United States more than...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... refugees who have been in the United States more than 36 months. 400.209 Section 400.209 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT, ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT PROGRAM Federal Funding Federal...

  10. Single- and multi-photon production in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A; Affholderbach, K; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Armstrong, S R; Awunor, O; Azzurri, P; Badaud, F; Bagliesi, G; Barate, R; Barklow, Timothy L; Bencivenni, C; Berkelman, K; Beuselinck, R; Blair, G A; Bloch-Devaux, B; Blondel, A; Blumenschein, U; Boccali, T; Böhrer, A; Boix, G; Bonissent, A; Booth, C N; Borean, C; Bossi, F; Boucrot, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Boumediene, D E; Bowdery, C K; Brandt, S; Bravo, S; Brient, J C; Brunelière, R; Buchmüller, O L; Callot, O; Cameron, W; Capon, G; Cartwright, S; Casado, M P; Cattaneo, M; Cavanaugh, R J; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Chmeissani, M; Ciulli, V; Clarke, D P; Clerbaux, B; Clifft, R W; Colaleo, A; Colas, P; Combley, F; Cowan, G; Coy, C; Coyle, P; Cranmer, K; Creanza, D; Crespo, J M; Curtil, C; David, A; Davier, M; Davies, G; De Bonis, I; De Filippis, N; Décamp, D; Delaere, C; Dessagne, S; Dhamotharan, S; Dietl, H; Dissertori, G; Dornan, P J; Drevermann, H; Duflot, L; Ealet, A; Edgecock, T R; Ellis, G; Fabbro, B; Falvard, A; Fayolle, D; Ferguson, D P S; Fernández-Bosman, M; Fernández, E; Finch, A J; Foà, L; Focardi, E; Forty, R W; Foster, F; Fouchez, D; Frank, M; Ganis, G; Gao, Y; García-Bellido, A; Garrido, L; Gay, P; Geweniger, C; Ghete, V M; Giammanco, A; Giannini, G; Gianotti, F; Giassi, A; Girone, M; Girtler, P; González, S; Graugès-Pous, E; Green, M G; Greening, T C; Grivaz, J F; Grupen, C; Hanke, P; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Harvey, J; Hayes, O J; He, H; Hepp, V; Hess, J; Heusse, P; Hill, R D; Hodgson, P N; Hölldorfer, F; Hu, H; Huang, X; Hughes, G; Hutchcroft, D E; Hüttmann, K; Iaselli, G; Jacholkowska, A; Jakobs, K; Janot, P; Jézéquel, S; Jin, S; Jones, L T; Jones, R W L; Jost, B; Jousset, J; Kado, M; Kayser, F; Kennedy, J; Kile, J; Kleinknecht, K; Kluge, E E; Kneringer, E; Konstantinidis, N P; Kuhn, D; Kyriakis, A; Lançon, E; Laurelli, P; Lees, J P; Lehto, M H; Leibenguth, G; Lemaire, M C; Lemaître, V; Ligabue, F; Lin, J; Litke, A M; Locci, E; Loomis, C; López, J; Lütjens, G; Lynch, J G; McNamara, P A; Machefert, F P; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Männer, W; Mannocchi, G; Marinelli, N; Markou, C; Martin, F; Martínez, M; Mato, P; Medcalf, T; Merino, G; Merle, E; Messineo, A; Michel, B; Minard, M N; Mir, L M; Misiejuk, A; Monteil, S; Moser, H G; Moutoussi, A; Müller, A S; Murtas, G P; Negus, P; Ngac, A; Nielsen, J; Nilsson, B S; Norton, P R; Nowell, J; Nuzzo, S; O'Shea, V; Ouyang, Q; Pacheco, A; Palla, F; Pallin, D; Pan, Y B; Paneque, D; Parrini, G; Pascolo, J M; Passalacqua, L; Payre, P; Pearson, M R; Pérez, P; Perret, P; Pietrzyk, B; Prange, G; Pütz, J; Putzer, A; Quast, G; Ragusa, F; Rander, J; Ranieri, A; Ranjard, F; Raso, G; Renk, B; Robertson, N A; Rolandi, Luigi; Rothberg, J E; Rougé, A; Rudolph, G; Ruggieri, F; Ruiz, H; Rutherford, S A; Sander, H G; Sanguinetti, G; Wu Sau Lan; Schael, S; Schlatter, W D; Schmeling, S; Sciabà, A; Sedgbeer, J K; Selvaggi, G; Serin, L; Settles, Ronald; Sguazzoni, G; Sieler, U; Silvestris, L; Simopoulou, Errietta; Smizanska, M; Stenzel, H; Strong, J A; Swynghedauw, M; Tanaka, R; Taylor, G; Teixeira-Dias, P; Tejessy, W; Tempesta, P; Tenchini, R; Teubert, F; Thompson, A S; Thompson, J C; Thompson, L F; Tilquin, A; Tittel, K; Tomalin, I R; Tricomi, A; Trocmé, B; Tuchming, B; Valassi, Andrea; Vallage, B; Vayaki, Anna; Veillet, J J; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Videau, H L; Videau, I; Wachsmuth, H W; Wang, T; Ward, J J; Wasserbaech, S R; White, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Wu, J; Wu, X; Wunsch, M; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Yuan, C; Zachariadou, K; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Ziegler, T; Zito, G; Zobernig, G; De Palma, M; De Vivie de Régie, J B; van der Aa, O; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H

    2003-01-01

    Events containing only energetic photons are analysed in a sample of 628 pb -1 of data recorded from e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209 GeV by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The $e^{+}e^{-} \\rightarrow \

  11. 40 CFR 94.209 - Special provisions for post-manufacture marinizers and small-volume manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... name and trademark. (iii) Engine displacement (in liters), rated power, and model year of the engine or... COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certification Provisions § 94.209 Special provisions for post-manufacture... engines, but not for Category 3 engines. (a) Broader engine families. Instead of the requirements of § 94...

  12. Search for scalar leptons in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; Bruneliere, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, J.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Paneque, D.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Barklow, T.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.J.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Kyriakis, A.; Waananen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Smith, D.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R.D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Muller, A.S.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Kachelhoffer, T.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Loomis, C.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; de Vivie de Regie, J.B.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Seager, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2002-01-01

    A search for selectron, smuon and stau pair production is performed with the data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV. The numbers of candidate events are consistent with the background predicted by the Standard Model. Final mass limits from ALEPH are reported.

  13. When comets get old: A synthesis of comet and meteor observations of the low activity comet 209P/LINEAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi; Hui, Man-To; Brown, Peter G.; Campbell-Brown, Margaret D.; Pokorný, Petr; Wiegert, Paul A.; Gao, Xing

    2016-01-01

    It is speculated that some weakly active comets may be transitional objects between active and dormant comets. These objects are at a unique stage of the evolution of cometary nuclei, as they are still identifiable as active comets, in contrast to inactive comets that are observationally indistinguishable from low albedo asteroids. In this paper, we present a synthesis of comet and meteor observations of Jupiter-family Comet 209P/LINEAR, one of the most weakly active comets recorded to-date. Images taken by the Xingming 0.35-m telescope and the Gemini Flamingo-2 camera are modeled by a Monte Carlo dust model, which yields a low dust ejection speed (1/10 of that of moderately active comets), dominance of large dust grains, and a low dust production of 0.4kgs-1 at 19 d after the 2014 perihelion passage. We also find a reddish nucleus of 209P/LINEAR that is similar to D-type asteroids and most Trojan asteroids. Meteor observations with the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR), coupled with meteoroid stream modeling, suggest a low dust production of the parent over the past few hundred orbits, although there are hints of a some temporary increase in activity in the 18th century. Dynamical simulations indicate 209P/LINEAR may have resided in a stable near-Earth orbit for ∼104 yr, which is significantly longer than typical JFCs. All these lines of evidence imply that 209P/LINEAR as an aging comet quietly exhausting its remaining near surface volatiles. We also compare 209P/LINEAR to other low activity comets, where evidence for a diversity of the origin of low activity is seen.

  14. Emissions of two phthalate esters and BDE 209 to indoor air and their impact on urban air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Anna Palm; Holmgren, Tomas; Remberger, Mikael

    2014-02-01

    Estimated emissions of decabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE 209) and the two phthalate esters diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and diisononyl phthalate (DINP) to indoor air in the Stockholm conurbation, Sweden were used to assess the contribution of chemical outflows from the indoor environment to urban outdoor air pollution for these substances, by applying the recently developed Stockholm MUltimedia URban fate (SMURF) model. Emission rates of DINP from PVC materials were measured and published emission rates of DEHP were adapted to Swedish conditions. These were used as input to the model, as well as recently reported estimates of BDE 209 emissions to indoor air in Stockholm. Model predicted concentrations were compared to empirical monitoring data obtained from the literature and from additional measurements of phthalates in ventilation outlets and urban air performed in the current study. The predicted concentrations of the phthalates DINP and DEHP in indoor air and dust were within a factor of 1.5-10 of the measured concentrations. For BDE 209, predicted indoor concentrations were within the measured ranges, but measured concentrations showed a much larger variability. An adjusted emission scenario to better fit observed concentrations indoors was employed for DEHP and final outcomes resulted in estimated indoor emissions of 250 (50-1250), 2.9 (0.58-15), and 0.068 (0.014-0.34) kg year(-1) for DEHP, DINP and BDE 209. These emissions could not explain the observed concentrations in urban air of the phthalates, suggesting an underestimation of background inflow or existence of additional sources in the outdoor environment. For BDE 209, the assessment indicates that the Stockholm indoor environment contributes about 25% to the air pollution load in inflowing background air, but additional monitoring data in urban air are needed to confirm this conclusion. © 2013.

  15. Transference of particles in the fusion process of {sup 6}He + {sup 209}Bi; Transferencia de particulas en el proceso de fusion de {sup 6}He + {sup 209}Bi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizcano, D.; Aguilera, E.F.; Martinez Q, E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    In a recent work were reported measurements done to energy which was to the Coulomb barrier for the {sup 6} He + {sup 209} Bi system. The fusion excitation function measured for this system shows a strong enhancement with respect to the predictions of the penetration model of unidimensional barrier at minor energies to the Coulombian barrier. In basis with the results obtained for different degrees of freedom it was determined with the CCDEF code, that the transfer of 2 neutrons of {sup 6} He to binding states to {sup 209} Bi, producing {sup 211} Bi, is the mechanism looked as the best candidate for explain the great enhancement in the fusion excitation function of this system at energies under Coulomb barrier. It is corroborated what was affirmed by others authors about the strength value at 1.5 MeV as a typical value for the transference of two particles between the projectile and the target. (Author)

  16. Bioconcentration and metabolism of BDE-209 in the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles and impact on the thyroid endocrine system and neuronal development in zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiangwei; Chen, Qi; Zhou, Peng; Li, Wenwen; Wang, Junxia; Huang, Changjiang; Wang, Xianfeng; Lin, Kuangfei; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2014-08-01

    Interactions between organic toxicants and nanoparticles (NPs) in the aquatic environment may modify toxicant bioavailability and consequently the toxicant's environmental fate and toxicity. Therefore, we investigated the influence of titanium dioxide NPs (nano-TiO2) on deca-BDE (BDE-209; a polybrominated diphenyl ether congener) bioconcentration, metabolism and its effects on the thyroid endocrine system in zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to various concentrations of BDE-209 alone or in combination with nano-TiO2 (0.1 mg/L) until 7-day post-fertilization. Nano-TiO2 can adsorb BDE-209 and nano-TiO2 is taken up into developing zebrafish larvae. Chemical measurements showed that BDE-209 was bioconcentrated and metabolized in zebrafish larvae, and BDE-209 uptake was enhanced by nano-TiO2. Furthermore, increased BDE-209 metabolites were detected in larvae co-exposed with nano-TiO2. BDE-209 exposure significantly increased whole-body thyroid hormone contents (T3 and T4); T4 content significantly increased in the larvae co-exposed with nano-TiO2. Nano-TiO2 exposure alone did not induce generation of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidative oxidation, gene transcription or thyroid hormone levels. Upregulation of several gene transcriptions (tshβ, tg, dio2) in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis was also observed. Furthermore, co-exposure of nano-TiO2 and BDE-209 caused a decrease in locomotion activity and downregulation of specific genes and proteins involved in the central nervous system of developing zebrafish larvae (e.g. myelin basic protein and α1-tubulin). These results indicate nano-TiO2 enhances BDE-209 bioavailability and metabolism, leading to thyroid endocrine disruption and developmental neurotoxicity in zebrafish.

  17. Constraints on anomalous QGC's in $e^{+}e^{-}$ interactions from 183 to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A; Barate, R; Brunelière, R; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Trocmé, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Pacheco, A; Ruiz, H; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Barklow, T; Buchmüller, O L; Cattaneo, M; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kado, M; Mato, P; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Sguazzoni, G; Teubert, F; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, I; Badaud, F; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Kraan, A C; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Videau, H L; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bossi, F; Capon, G; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Kennedy, J; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Thompson, A S; Wasserbaech, S R; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Girone, M; Hill, R D; Marinelli, N; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Smizanska, M; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Leibenguth, G; Lemaître, V; Blumenschein, U; Hölldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kayser, F; Kleinknecht, K; Müller, A S; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Bonissent, A; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Payre, P; Tilquin, A; Ragusa, F; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Settles, Ronald; Villegas, M; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Boccali, T; Foà, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Ligabue, F; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; García-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Misiejuk, A; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Ward, J J; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D E; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Litke, A M; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S; Combley, F; Hodgson, P N; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Grupen, C; Hess, J; Ngac, A; Prange, G; Borean, C; Giannini, G; He, H; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Armstrong, S R; Berkelman, K; Cranmer, K; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y B; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wiedenmann, W; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G; Dissertori, G

    2004-01-01

    The acoplanar photon pairs produced in the reaction e+ e- --> nu nubar gamma gamma are analysed in the 700 inverse nanobarns of data collected by the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies between 183 and 209 GeV. No deviation from the Standard Model predictions is seen in any of the distributions examined. The resulting 95% C.L. limits set on the anomalous QGC's, az_0, az_c, aw_0 and aw_c, are -0.012 GeV**-2 < az_0/Lambda**2 < +0.019 GeV**-2, -0.041 GeV**-2 < az_c/Lambda**2 < +0.044 GeV**-2, -0.060 GeV**-2 < aw_0/Lambda**2 < +0.055 GeV**-2, -0.099 GeV**-2 < aw_c/Lambda**2 < +0.093 GeV**-2, where Lambda is the energy scale of the new Physics responsible for the anomalous couplings.

  18. Constraints on anomalous QGCs in $e^{+}e^{-}$ interactions from 183 to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Armstrong, S R; Awunor, O; Azzurri, P; Badaud, F; Bagliesi, G; Barate, R; Barklow, T; Bencivenni, G; Berkelman, K; Beuselinck, R; Blair, G A; Bloch-Devaux, B; Blondel, A; Blumenschein, U; Boccali, T; Böhrer, A; Bonissent, A; Booth, C N; Borean, C; Bossi, F; Boucrot, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Boumediene, D E; Bowdery, C K; Brandt, S; Bravo, S; Brient, J C; Brunelière, R; Buchmüller, O L; Callot, O; Cameron, W; Capon, G; Cartwright, S; Casado, M P; Cattaneo, M; Cavanaugh, R J; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Chmeissani, M; Ciulli, V; Clarke, D P; Clerbaux, B; Clifft, R W; Colaleo, A; Colas, P; Combley, F; Cowan, G; Coyle, P; Cranmer, K; Creanza, D; Crespo, J M; Curtil, C; David, A; Davier, M; Davies, G; De Bonis, I; De Filippis, N; Décamp, D; Delaere, C; Dessagne, S; Dhamotharan, S; Dietl, H; Dissertori, G; Dornan, P J; Drevermann, H; Duflot, L; Ealet, A; Edgecock, T R; Ellis, G; Fabbro, B; Falvard, A; Fayolle, D; Ferguson, D P S; Fernández-Bosman, M; Fernández, E; Finch, A J; Foà, L; Focardi, E; Forty, R W; Foster, F; Fouchez, D; Frank, M; Ganis, G; Gao, Y; García-Bellido, A; Garrido, L; Gay, P; Geweniger, C; Ghete, V M; Giammanco, A; Giannini, G; Gianotti, F; Giassi, A; Girone, M; Girtler, P; González, S; Goy, C; Green, M G; Grivaz, J F; Grupen, C; Hanke, P; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Harvey, J; Hayes, O J; He, H; Hepp, V; Hess, J; Heusse, P; Hill, R D; Hodgson, P N; Hölldorfer, F; Hu, H; Huang, X; Hughes, G; Hutchcroft, D E; Hüttmann, K; Iaselli, G; Jacholkowska, A; Jakobs, K; Janot, P; Jézéquel, S; Jin, S; Jones, R W L; Jost, B; Jousset, J; Kado, M; Kayser, F; Kennedy, J; Kile, J; Kleinknecht, K; Kluge, E E; Kneringer, E; Kraan, A C; Kuhn, D; Kyriakis, A; Langon, E; Laurelli, P; Lees, J P; Lehto, M H; Leibenguth, G; Lemaire, M C; Lemaître, V; Ligabue, F; Lin, J; Litke, A M; Locci, E; Lütjens, G; Lynch, J G; Machefert, F; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Männer, W; Mannocchi, G; Marinelli, N; Markou, C; Martin, F; Martínez, M; Mato, P; McNamara, P A; Medcalf, T; Merle, E; Messineo, A; Michel, B; Miiller, A S; Minard, M N; Misiejuk, A; Monteil, S; Moser, H G; Moutoussi, A; Murtas, G P; Negus, P; Ngac, A; Nielsen, J; Nilsson, B S; Norton, P R; Nowell, J; Nuzzo, S; O'Shea, V; Ouyang, Q; Pacheco, A; Palla, F; Pallin, D; Pan, Y B; Parrini, G; Pascolo, J M; Passalacqua, L; Payre, P; Pearson, M R; Pérez, P; Perret, P; Pietrzyk, B; Prange, G; Pütz, J; Putzer, A; Ragusa, F; Rander, J; Ranieri, A; Ranjard, F; Raso, G; Renk, B; Robertson, N A; Rolandi, Luigi; Rothberg, J E; Rougé, A; Rudolph, G; Ruggieri, F; Ruiz, H; Rutherford, S A; Sander, H G; Sanguinetti, G; Schael, S; Schlatter, W D; Schmeling, S; Sciabà, A; Sedgbeer, J K; Selvaggi, G; Serin, L; Settles, R; Sguazzoni, G; Silvestris, L; Simopoulou, E; Smizanska, M; Spagnolo, P; Stenzel, H; Strong, J A; Taylor, G; Teixeira-Dias, P; Tempesta, P; Tenchini, R; Teubert, F; Thompson, A S; Thompson, J C; Thompson, L F; Tilquin, A; Tittel, K; Tomalin, I R; Tricomi, A; Trocmé, B; Tuchming, B; Valassi, A; Vallage, B; Vayaki, A; Veillet, J J; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Videau, H L; Videau, I; Villegas, M; Wachsmuth, H W; Wang, T; Ward, J J; Wasserbaech, S R; White, R; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wunsch, M; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zachariadou, K; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Ziegler, T; Zito, G; Zobernig, G; De Palma, M; van der Aa, O; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H

    2004-01-01

    The acoplanar photon pairs produced in the reaction e/sup +/e/sup to / nu nu gamma gamma are analysed in the 700 pb/sup -1/ of data collected by the ALEPH detector at centre-of-mass energies between 183 and 209 GeV. No deviation from the standard model predictions is seen in any of the distributions examined. The resulting 95% C.L. limits set on the anomalous QGCs, a/sub 0//sup Z/, a/sub c//sup Z/, a /sub 0//sup W/ a/sub c//sup W/, are -0.012

  19. Jet physics in e+e- annihilation from 14 to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Kluth, S

    2004-01-01

    Results from the study of jets in hadronic final states produced in e+e- annihilation at sqrt(s)=14 to 209 GeV are discussed. Precise measurements of the strong coupling alpha_S at many points of sqrt(s) provide convincing evidence for the running of alpha_S as expected by QCD. Several measurements of the running b-quark mass m_b(M_Z) are combined yielding m_b(M_Z)=(2.92+-0.03(stat.)+-0.31(syst.)) GeV and compared with low energy results. Strong evidence for the running of the b-quark mass is found. Experimental investigations of the gauge structure of QCD are reviewed and then combined with the results for the colour factors C_A=2.89+-0.01(stat.)+- 0.21(syst.) and C_F=1.30+-0.01(stat.)+-0.09(syst.) and correlation coefficient rho=0.82. The uncertainties on the colour factors are below 10% and the agreement with the QCD expectation C_A=3 and C_F=4/3 is excellent.

  20. Bacterial Infection and Implant Loosening in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty: Evaluation of 209 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Dapunt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate bacteria species detected in a large number of patients treated for prosthetic joint infection of the hip and knee at a single specialized center. Furthermore, the rate of implant loosening was investigated in a time-dependent manner for the most frequently detected bacteria species. A retrospective analysis of patients (n = 209 treated for prosthetic joint infection of the hip and knee was performed. The following parameters were evaluated: C-Reactive Protein (CRP concentration, microbiological evaluation of tissue samples, loosening of the implant, the time that had elapsed since the primary prosthetic joint replacement, and the duration since the last surgical intervention. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. were most frequently detected, followed by Staphylococcus aureus. Differences in CRP concentration were detected among various bacteria species. Osteolysis was not associated with one causative agent in particular. Patients who had undergone previous revision surgery had a higher probability of implant loosening. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. are the most common causative agents of prosthetic joint infection and show no significant differences with regard to implant loosening or the time-course when compared to S. aureus. Infections with Enterococcus spp. seem to develop faster than with other bacteria species. The risk of implant loosening increases with revision surgery, in particular in the hip joint.

  1. Etanercept, adalimumab, and ustekinumab in psoriasis: analysis of 209 treatment series in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Leo; Vujic, Igor; Sesti, Alma; Monshi, Babak; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Posch, Christian; Rappersberger, Klemens

    2017-03-01

    Widely used in the treatment of psoriasis, biologics have been tested in numerous clinical trials. However, drug efficacies and adverse events (AEs) may differ in 'real-world' patients as they do not undergo as rigorous selection and monitoring. Our objective was to examine drug survival, efficacy, and AEs (quality, time of onset) in 'real-world' psoriasis patients treated with etanercept, adalimumab, and ustekinumab. Retrospective data analysis (Jan 1, 2004 to Jun 30, 2015) of patients treated at a psoriasis clinic in an Austrian hospital. All patients who had received at least one dose of etanercept, adalimumab, or ustekinumab were included in the analysis. We analyzed: demographics, drug survival, Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), as well as quality and time of onset of AEs. In 209 treatment series, the estimated median drug survival varied among the various treatments: 21 months (SE: 6.9) for etanercept, 61 months (SE: 9.4) for adalimumab, and 65 months (SE 1.4) for ustekinumab. Male gender and pretreatment with a biologic were positive predictors of longer drug survival in adalimumab. We found no significant difference in drug efficacy as determined by PASI. Most AEs occur during the first year of treatment. Adalimumab and ustekinumab are marked by longer drug survival compared to etanercept. © 2017 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. (211)Rn/(211)At and (209)At production with intense mass separated Fr ion beams for preclinical (211)At-based α-therapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jason R; Kunz, Peter; Yang, Hua; Schaffer, Paul; Ruth, Thomas J

    2017-04-01

    Mass-separated francium beams ((211)Fr or (213)Fr) were implanted into solid targets for producing (211)Rn (14.6h half-life) or (209)At (5.41h), in situ. (211)Rn was transferred to dodecane and isolated from contaminants, providing sources for (211)At (7.21h) production by (211)Rn decay (73%). (209)At was recovered with high radionuclidic purity in aqueous solutions, directly. These experiments demonstrated Fr beam implantations as a novel method for producing preclinical quantities of (211)Rn/(211)At (for therapy) and (209)At (for imaging). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Single intermediate vector boson production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 183 - 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sisakian, A; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2006-01-01

    The production of single charged and neutral intermediate vector bosons in e+e- collisions has been studied in the data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 183 and 209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 640 pb^{-1}. The measured cross-sections for the reactions, determined in limited kinematic regions, are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions.

  4. When Comets Get Old: A Synthesis of Comet and Meteor Observations of the Low Activity Comet 209P/LINEAR

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Quan-Zhi; Hui, Man-To; Brown, Peter G.; Campbell-Brown, Margaret D.; Pokorný, Petr; Wiegert, Paul A.; Gao, Xing

    2015-01-01

    It is speculated that some weakly active comets may be transitional objects between active and dormant comets. These objects are at a unique stage of the evolution of cometary nuclei, as they are still identifiable as active comets, in contrast to inactive comets that are observationally indistinguishable from low albedo asteroids. In this paper, we present a synthesis of comet and meteor observations of Jupiter-family comet 209P/LINEAR, one of the most weakly active comets recorded to-date. ...

  5. Removal of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) using a combined system involving TiO2photocatalysis and wetland plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ka Lai; Man, Yu Bon; Tam, Nora Fung Yee; Liang, Yan; Wong, Ming Hung

    2017-01-15

    There is a rising concern about the capability of sewage treatment works in treating emerging chemicals, such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). A combined photocatalysis (TiO 2 and visible light) and constructed wetland system (planted with Oryza sativa (rice cultivar: Hefengzhan) and Phragmites australis (common reed)) was designed to study PBDEs removal efficiencies. After the pre-treatment in TiO 2 suspension, the artificially BDE-209 spiked sewage (78.2 and 782nmol/L) was discharged into the sub-surface flow constructed wetland tanks planted with rice and common reed, respectively. The treated sewage, soil, plant roots, shoots, rice grains and hulls were collected and analyzed for PBDEs by GC-MS. The removals of BDE-209 in the combined systems (93.6±2.19% (78.2nmol/L) and 92.1±1.11% (782nmol/L)) were significantly higher than those in the photocatalytic systems (56.3±5.78% (78.2nmol/L) and 54.7±9.47% (782nmol/L)), which could be explained by the enhanced biodegradability of PBDEs in photocatalysis, led to its better dissipation by rice plants. Therefore, this combined system might help to degrade BDE-209 in the wastewater effluent, reducing its potential entry into aquatic food chains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes of lead speciation and microbial toxicity in soil treated with repeated Pb exposure in the presence of BDE209.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Gao; Lin, Kuangfei; Fu, Rongbing

    2016-03-01

    Lead (Pb) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) are main pollutants at electric waste (e-waste) recycling sites (EWRSs), and their joint toxicological effects have received extensive attention. Frequently, soil pollution at EWRSs usually results from the occurrence of repeated single or multiple pollution events, with continuous impacts on soil microorganisms. Therefore, a laboratory incubation study was conducted to determine Pb bioavailability and microbial toxicity in repeated Pb-polluted soil in the presence of BDE209 for the first time. We evaluated the impacts of repetitive exposure trials on chemical fractions of Pb, and the results showed that repeated single Pb pollution event resulted in an increase of carbonates fraction of Pb, which was different from one-off single Pb exposure. Moreover, one-off Pb-treated groups exhibited higher I R (reduced partition index) values on day 30 and all treatments remained the same I R level at the end of incubation period. The parameters of microbial toxicity were well reflected by soil enzymes. During the entire incubation, the dehydrogenase and urease activities were significantly inhibited by Pb (P soil enzymes were clearly observed (P < 0.05 or 0.01). Such observations would provide useful information for ecological effects of Pb and BDE209 at EWRSs.

  7. The Correlation of CD206, CD209, and Disease Severity in Behçet’s Disease with Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunsoon Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of pattern recognition receptors in Behçet’s disease (BD. The frequencies of several pattern recognition receptors (CD11b, CD11c, CD32, CD206, CD209, and dectin-1 were analyzed in patients with BD by flow cytometry, and cytokine levels, interleukin- (IL- 18, IL-23, and IL-17A, were compared in plasma. The analysis was performed in active (n=13 and inactive (n=13 stages of BD patients. Rheumatoid arthritis patients (n=19, as a disease control, and healthy control (HC (n=19 were enrolled. The frequencies of CD11b+ and CD32+ cells were significantly increased in active BD patients compared to HC. Disease severity score was correlated to CD11c+, CD206+, and CD209+ in whole leukocytes and CD11b+, CD11c+, CD206+, CD209+, and Dectin-1+ in granulocytes. The plasma levels of IL-17A were significantly different between HC and active BD. IL-18 showed significant difference between active and inactive BD patients. From this study, we concluded the expressions of several pattern recognition receptors were correlated to the joint symptoms of BD.

  8. Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO, Personality Traits, and Iterative Decompression Sickness. Retrospective Analysis of 209 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Lafère

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a need to evaluate the influence of risk factors such as patency of foramen ovale (PFO or “daredevil” psychological profile on contra-indication policy after a decompression sickness (DCS.Methods: By crossing information obtained from Belgian Hyperbaric Centers, DAN Emergency Hotline, the press, and Internet diving forums, it was possible to be accountable for the majority if not all DCS, which have occurred in Belgium from January 1993 to June 2013. From the available 594 records we excluded all cases with tentative diagnosis, medullary DCS or unreliability of reported dive profile, leaving 209 divers records with cerebral DCS for analysis. Demographics, dive parameters, and PFO grading were recorded. Twenty-three injured divers were tested using the Zuckerman's Sensation Seeking Scale V and compared to a matched group not involved in risky activities.Results: 41.2% of all injured came for iterative DCS. The average depth significantly increases with previous occurrences of DCS (1st DCS: 31.8 ± 7.9 mfw; 2nd DCS: 35.5 ± 9.8 mfw; 3rd DCS: 43.4 ± 6.1 mfw. There is also an increase of PFO prevalence among multiple injured divers (1st DCS: 66.4% 2nd & 3rd DCS: 100% with a significant increase in PFO grade. Multiple-times injured significantly scored higher than control group on thrill and adventure seeking (TAS, experience seeking, boredom susceptibility and total score.Conclusion: There is an inability of injured diver to adopt conservative dive profile after a DCS. Further work is needed to ascertain whether selected personality characteristics or PFO should be taken into account in the clearance decision to resume diving.

  9. Characterizing liability for cranial nerve injuries: a detailed analysis of 209 malpractice trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svider, Peter F; Sunaryo, Peter L; Keeley, Brieze R; Kovalerchik, Olga; Mauro, Andrew C; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2013-05-01

    The potential for adverse events with lasting functional effects makes cranial nerve (CN) injury a target for litigation. Our objective was to comprehensively examine records of malpractice trials and detail issues influencing outcomes. Retrospective analysis. The Westlaw database (Thomson Reuters, New York, NY) was searched for jury verdict reports related to medical malpractice and CN injury. After excluding nonrelevant cases, we examined 209 trials for characteristics including nerve(s) injured, alleged causes of malpractice, demographic information, specialty, and outcome. The most commonly litigated CNs were VII (24.4%) and II (19.6%). Sixty-nine (33.0%) trials resulted in damages awarded. Outcomes varied, ranging from a 29.2% plaintiff success rate for CN XI injury to 48.4% for CN II injury. Plaintiffs had less success with increasing age. Average damages awarded were $1.7 million. The most commonly named defendants were otolaryngologists and general surgeons. Individual considerations varied but commonly included alleged deficits in informed consent (25.4%), unnecessary procedures (14.8%), undergoing additional surgery (25.8%), and untimely recognition of complications (23.9%). Malpractice trials were resolved in the defendant's favor the majority of the time. In cases where plaintiffs were successful, however, awards were considerable, averaging nearly $2 million. Factors influencing case outcome included age, location, perceived deficits in informed consent, allegedly unnecessary surgery, requiring additional surgery to repair a complication, and untimely recognition of complications. Although specific factors should be taken into consideration with each procedure, providing detailed informed consent and communicating with patients regarding expectations may minimize liability. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Polymorphisms in the feline TNFA and CD209 genes are associated with the outcome of feline coronavirus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ying-Ting; Hsieh, Li-En; Dai, Yu-Rou; Chueh, Ling-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), caused by feline coronavirus (FCoV) infection, is a highly lethal disease without effective therapy and prevention. With an immune-mediated disease entity, host genetic variant was suggested to influence the occurrence of FIP. This study aimed at evaluating cytokine-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), i.e., tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), receptor-associated SNPs, i.e., C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209), and the five FIP-associated SNPs ide...

  11. Inclusive Jet Production in Photon-Photon Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{ee}}$ from 189 to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, R.M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, M.; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A., Jr.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, P.; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D.E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, D.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive jet production (e+e- -> e+e- +jet+X) is studied in collisions of quasi-real photons radiated by the LEP beams at e+e- centre-of-mass energies sqrt see from 189 to 209 GeV. Jets are reconstructed using the kp jet algorithm. The inclusive differential cross-section is measured as a function of the jet transverse momentum, ptjet, in the range 5

  12. Search for excited leptons in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=189-209 GeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sisakian, A; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M; al, et

    2006-01-01

    A search for excited lepton production in e+e- collisions was performed using the data collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 189 GeV to 209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 600 pb^{-1}. No evidence for excited lepton production was found. In searches for pair-produced excited leptons, lower mass limits were established in the range 94 - 103 GeV/c^2, depending on the channel and model assumptions. In searches for singly-produced excited leptons, upper limits on the parameter f/Lambda were established as a function of the mass.

  13. Search for Single Top Production in $e^{+} e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A; Barate, R; Brunelière, R; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Trocmé, B; Boix, G; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; López, J; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Pacheco, A; Paneque, D; Ruiz, H; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Barklow, Timothy L; Buchmüller, O L; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Greening, T C; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kado, M; Mato, P; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Sguazzoni, G; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, I; Ward, J J; Badaud, F; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Swynghedauw, M; Tanaka, R; Videau, H L; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bossi, F; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Kennedy, J; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Thompson, A S; Wasserbaech, S R; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Leibenguth, G; Putzer, A; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Hill, R D; Marinelli, N; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Smizanska, M; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Lemaître, V; Blumenschein, U; Hölldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kayser, F J; Kleinknecht, K; Müller, A S; Quast, G; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Bonissent, A; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Payre, P; Tilquin, A; Ragusa, F; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Settles, Ronald; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; De Vivie de Régie, J B; Yuan, C; Bagliesi, G; Boccali, T; Foà, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Ligabue, F; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Tenchini, Roberto; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; García-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Jones, L T; Medcalf, T; Misiejuk, A; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D E; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Hodgson, P N; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Grupen, Claus; Hess, J; Ngac, A; Prange, G; Sieler, U; Borean, C; Giannini, G; He, H; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Armstrong, S R; Berkelman, K; Cranmer, K; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y B; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wiedenmann, W; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G; Dissertori, G

    2002-01-01

    Single top production via the flavour changing neutral current reactions e+e- -> \\bar{t}c , \\bar{t}u is searched for within the 214~pb-1 of data collected by ALEPH at centre-of-mass energies between 204 and 209~GeV. No deviation from the Standard Model expectation is observed and upper limits on the single top production cross sections are derived. The combination with data collected at lower centre-of-mass energies yields an upper limit on the branching ratio BR(t -> Zc)+BR(t -> Zu) \\gamma c)+BR(t -> \\gamma u)= 0 and mt=174 GeV/c2$.

  14. The Correlation of CD206, CD209, and Disease Severity in Behçet’s Disease with Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Bunsoon Choi; Chang-Hee Suh; Hyoun-Ah Kim; Sayeed, Hasan M.; Seonghyang Sohn

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of pattern recognition receptors in Beh?et's disease (BD). The frequencies of several pattern recognition receptors (CD11b, CD11c, CD32, CD206, CD209, and dectin-1) were analyzed in patients with BD by flow cytometry, and cytokine levels, interleukin- (IL-) 18, IL-23, and IL-17A, were compared in plasma. The analysis was performed in active (n = 13) and inactive (n = 13) stages of BD patients. Rheumatoid arthritis patients (n = 19), as a disea...

  15. Dynamics of complete and incomplete fusion of {sup 6,7}Li, {sup 15}N and {sup 16}O with a {sup 209}Bi target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautam, Manjeet Singh; Vinod, K. [Indus Degree College, Department of Physics, Kinana, Jind, Haryana (India); Khatri, Hitender [Dr. B.R. Ambedekar Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Port Blair, Andaman and Nicobar (India)

    2017-10-15

    The dynamics of complete and incomplete fusion of {sup 6,7}Li, {sup 15}N and {sup 16}O with a common target ({sup 209}Bi) around the Coulomb barrier are analyzed within the context of the coupled channel formulation and the energy dependent Woods-Saxon potential (EDWSP) model. The calculated results are compared with experimental fusion cross-sections and it has been shown that complete fusion (CF) data of weakly bound projectile with a heavy target ({sup 209}Bi) gets suppressed at above barrier energies. In the case of the {sup 6}Li + {sup 209}Bi ({sup 7}Li + {sup 209}Bi) reaction, the CF data at above barrier energies is reduced by 34% (26%) with reference to the expectations of the coupled channel approach. However, the theoretical estimations due to the EDWSP model can minimize the suppression factor by 9% with respect to the reported value and consequently the portion of above barrier CF cross-section data of {sup 6}Li + {sup 209}Bi ({sup 7}Li + {sup 209}Bi) reaction is suppressed by 25% (17%) when compared with the present model calculations. This fusion inhibition can be correlated with the low breakup threshold of projectile which in turn breaks up into two fragments in the entrance channel prior to fusion barrier. The total fusion (TF) data, which is sum of complete fusion (CF) data and incomplete fusion (ICF) data, is not suppressed when compared with the predictions of the theoretical approaches and thus breakup channel has very little influence on the total fusion cross-sections. Although the breakup fragments appeared in both reactions, the enhanced suppression effects observed for the lighter projectile can be correlated with its low binding energy associated with the α-breakup channel. Further the outcomes of the EDWSP model reasonably explained the ICF contribution appeared in the fusion of {sup 6,7}Li + {sup 209}Bi reactions. In contrast to this, the observed fusion dynamics of {sup 15}N + {sup 209}Bi and {sup 16}O + {sup 209}Bi reactions, wherein

  16. CD209a Synergizes with Dectin-2 and Mincle to Drive Severe Th17 Cell-Mediated Schistosome Egg-Induced Immunopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Kalantari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The immunopathology caused by schistosome helminths varies greatly in humans and among mouse strains. A severe form of parasite egg-induced hepatic granulomatous inflammation, seen in CBA mice, is driven by Th17 cells stimulated by IL-1β and IL-23 produced by dendritic cells that express CD209a (SIGNR5, a C-type lectin receptor (CLR related to human DC-SIGN. Here, we show that CD209a-deficient CBA mice display decreased Th17 responses and are protected from severe immunopathology. In vitro, CD209a augments the egg-induced IL-1β and IL-23 production initiated by the related CLRs Dectin-2 and Mincle. While Dectin-2 and Mincle trigger an FcRγ-dependent signaling cascade that involves the tyrosine kinase Syk and the trimolecular Card9-Bcl10-Malt1 complex, CD209a promotes the sustained activation of Raf-1. Our findings demonstrate that CD209a drives severe Th17 cell-mediated immunopathology in a helminthic disease based on synergy between DC-SIGN- and Dectin-2-related CLRs.

  17. DC-SIGN (CD209) Carbohydrate Recognition Domain Is Not Polymorphic in Dengue Virus-Infected Indonesian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibawa, Tri; Wijayanti, Nastiti; Arguni, Eggi; Laksono, Ida Safitri

    2015-06-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a significant burden in Indonesia and other tropical countries. DENV infection has a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, i.e. asymptomatic, dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The variety of clinical manifestations may be due to the diversity of genetic constitution of the host. The C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209) has been identified as the major dengue receptor on human dendritic cells. There are at least five polymorphisms in exon 5 and 6 of the DC-SIGN encoded gene which have been identified and recorded in dbSNP. The aim of this work is to measure the frequency of these polymorphisms among asymptomatic and hospitalized DENV-infected patients. We enrolled 23 hospitalized and 73 asymptomatic DENV-infected patients. Among the subjects, we performed PCR amplification and DNA direct seqencing for 23 hospitalized DENV-infected patients and 24 asymptomatic DENV-infected patients. The result showed that there were no polymorphic nucleotides in the CD209 encoded gene among the patients.

  18. Quantification of all 209 PCB congeners in blood-Can indicators be used to calculate the total PCB blood load?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, M; Rauchfuss, K; Sievering, S; Wöckner, M; Neugebauer, F; Fromme, H

    2017-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a substance group of 209 theoretically possible compounds. The human body burden of PCBs is commonly calculated based on so-called indicator congeners such as PCB 138, PCB 153 and PCB 180, which are analyzed in human blood. The German "Human Biomonitoring (HBM) Commission" assumes that the sum of these indicator congeners multiplied by a factor of 2 represents the total PCB burden. This norm is based on data obtained from exposure studies after dietary intake. Data from indoor air shows a different congener pattern, which might lead to a relatively higher intake of lower chlorinated PCBs by inhalation. In two independent studies with adult participants from two regions in Germany, we measured all 209 PCB congeners in 44 whole blood and 42 plasma samples. Participants from the whole blood study group had additional exposure to PCBs via indoor air. With our analytical method, 141 individual PCB congeners, 27 coeluted pairs of PCB congeners and 2 records of 3 and 4 coeluted PCBs could be determined. Thus, 172 analysis results were reported per sample. In the whole blood samples, 50 congeners showed values below the limit of quantification (LOQ), whereas 94 congeners could not be detected in any of plasma samples. Total PCB concentrations (Σ 209 PCB congeners, incl. ½ LOQ) in the whole blood samples ranged from 99 to 2152ng PCB/g lipid (Median: 454ng/g lipid; 95th Percentile: 1404ng/g lipid). The sum of all 209 measured PCB (incl. ½ LOQ) in plasma samples showed levels between 52 and 933ng PCB/g lipid (Median: 226ng/g lipid; 95th Percentile: 642ng/g lipid). Our results show that the burden of PCBs on the human body is caused mainly by the three highly chlorinated indicator congeners PCB 138, PCB 153 and PCB 180. In median approximately 50% of the total PCB content in human whole blood or plasma samples can be attributed to these congeners. Total PCB, calculated by multiplying the sum of the three indicator congeners by 2, showed

  19. Long term effects of murine postnatal exposure to decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) on learning and memory are dependent upon APOE polymorphism and age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reverte, Ingrid; Klein, Anders Bue; Domingo, José L

    2014-01-01

    exposure to BDE-209 induced long term effects in spatial learning, which were dependent upon age, sex and apoE genotype; these effects were more evident in apoE3 mice. BDNF levels were lower in the frontal cortex of apoE4 mice and higher in the hippocampus of exposed mice, independent of the genotype....... The results of the present study provide evidence of long-lasting effects in spatial learning and memory after early exposure to BDE-209. Developmental exposure to this neurotoxicant may contribute to cognitive decline and abnormal aging....... and persistent effects are subject to debate. Of special concern are developmental exposures that can disrupt later-in-life adult health or aging. In this study, we investigated the effects of postnatal exposure to BDE-209 in combination with apolipoprotein E (apoE) genotype, a genetic factor that is associated...

  20. $Z\\gamma*$ production in $e^+ e^-$ interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 183 - 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, P; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Buschbeck, B; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Kokkinias, P; Leinonen, L; Katsoufis, E; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Krumshtein, Z; Lesiak, T; Kerzel, U; Liebig, W; King, B T; Lamsa, J; Liko, D; Kjaer, N J; Leder, G; Kluit, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Leitner, R; Kuznetsov, O; Kucharczyk, M; Ledroit, F; Lopes, J H; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lipniacka, A; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou12, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Paganoni, M; Nassiakou, M; Paiano, S; Navarria, F; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Ouraou, A; Parkes, C; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Oyanguren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Palacios, J P; Onofre, A; Palka, H; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pape, L; Papadopoulou, T D; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Sekulin, R; Siebel, M; Sisakian, A; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of Zgamma* production are presented using data collected by the DELPHI detector at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 183 to 209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 667 pb^{-1}. The measurements cover a wide range of the possible final state four-fermion configurations: hadronic and leptonic (e+ e- q qbar, mu+ mu- q qbar, q qbar nu nubar), fully leptonic (l+ l- l'+ l'-) and fully hadronic final states (q qbar q qbar, with a low mass q qbar pair). Measurements of the Zgamma* cross-section for the various final states have been compared with the Standard Model expectations and found to be consistent within the errors. In addition, a total cross-section measurement of the l+ l- l'+ l'- cross-section is reported, and found to be in agreement with the prediction of the Standard Model.

  1. Photon Events with Missing Energy in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S.U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M.J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Houlden, M.A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Johansson, P.D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Kerzel, U.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.T.; Kjaer, N.J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McNulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monig, Klaus; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J.P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, Jan; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Van Dam, Piet; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2005-01-01

    The production of single- and multi-photon events has been studied in the reaction e+e- -> gamma (gamma) + invisible particles. The data collected with the DELPHI detector during the years 1999 and 2000 at centre-of-mass energies between 191 GeV and 209 GeV was combined with earlier data to search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model. The measured number of light neutrino families was consistent with three and the absence of an excess of events beyond that predicted by the Standard Model processes was used to set limits on new physics. Both model-independent searches and searches for new processes predicted by supersymmetric and extra-dimensional models have been made. Limits on new non-standard model interactions between neutrinos and electrons were also determined.

  2. Single- and multi-photon production in ee collisions at sq root(s) up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A; Barate, R

    2003-01-01

    Events containing only energetic photons are analysed in a sample of 628 pb sup - sup 1 of data recorded from e sup + e sup - collisions at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209 GeV by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The e sup + e sup --> nu anti nu gamma(gamma) and e sup + e sup --> gamma gamma(gamma) cross sections are measured and found to be in agreement with the standard model predictions. The number of light neutrino generations is determined to be N subnu = 2.86 +-0.09. Upper limits are derived on the cross sections for photon production in the context of several supersymmetric models. Limits are also set on the parameters of models with extra spatial dimensions, with contact interactions and with excited electrons. (orig.)

  3. 7P1/2 hyperfine splitting in 206 , 207 , 209 , 213Fr and the hyperfine anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Orozco, L. A.; Collister, R.; Gwinner, G.; Tandecki, M.; Behr, J. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Gomez, E.; Aubin, S.

    2013-05-01

    We perform precision measurements on francium, the heaviest alkali with no stable isotopes, at the recently commissioned Francium Trapping Facility at TRIUMF. A combination of RF and optical spectroscopy allows better than 10 ppm (statistical) measurements of the 7P1 / 2 state hyperfine splitting for the isotopes 206 , 207 , 209 , 213Fr, in preparation for weak interaction studies. Together with previous measurements of the ground state hyperfine structure, it is possible to extract the hyperfine anomaly. This is a correction to the point interaction of the nuclear magnetic moment and the electron wavefunction, known as the Bohr Weisskopf effect. Our measurements extend previous measurements to the neutron closed shell isotope (213) as well as further in the neutron deficient isotopes (206, 207). Work supported by NSERC and NRC from Canada, NSF and DOE from USA, CONYACT from Mexico.

  4. Studies of QCD at $e^{+}e^{-}$ Centre-of-Mass Energies between 91 and 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A; Barate, R; Brunelière, R; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Trocmé, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Pacheco, A; Ruiz, H; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Barklow, T; Buchmüller, O L; Cattaneo, M; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kado, M; Mato, P; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Sguazzoni, G; Teubert, F; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, I; Badaud, F; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Kraan, A C; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Videau, H L; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bossi, F; Capon, G; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Kennedy, J; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Thompson, A S; Wasserbaech, S R; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Girone, M; Hill, R D; Marinelli, N; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Smizanska, M; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Leibenguth, G; Lemaître, V; Blumenschein, U; Hölldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kayser, F; Kleinknecht, K; Müller, A S; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Bonissent, A; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Payre, P; Tilquin, A; Ragusa, F; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Settles, Ronald; Villegas, M; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Boccali, T; Foà, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Ligabue, F; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; García-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Misiejuk, A; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Ward, J J; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D E; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Litke, A M; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S; Combley, F; Hodgson, P N; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Grupen, C; Hess, J; Ngac, A; Prange, G; Borean, C; Giannini, G; He, H; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Armstrong, S R; Berkelman, K; Cranmer, K; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y B; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wiedenmann, W; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G; Dissertori, G

    2004-01-01

    The hadronic final states observed with the ALEPH detector at LEP in e+e- annihilation are analysed using 730 pb-1 of data collected between 91 and 209 GeV in the framework of QCD. In particular event-shape variables and inclusive charged particle spectra are measured. The energy evolution of quantities derived from these measurements is compared to analytic QCD predictions. The mean charged particle multiplicity, the charged particle momentum spectrum and its peak position are compared to predictions of the modified-leading-logarithmic approximation. The strong coupling constant alpha_s is determined from a fit of the QCD prediction to distributions of six event-shape variables at eight centre-of-mass energies. A study of non-perturbative power law corrections is presented

  5. Search for charged Higgs bosons in $e^{+} e^{-}$ collisions at energies up to $\\sqrt{s}$ = 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; Bruneliere, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, J.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Pacheco, A.; Paneque, D.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Barklow, T.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.J.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R.D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; White, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Muller, A.S.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; de Vivie de Regie, J.B.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-01-01

    A search for charged Higgs bosons produced in pairs is performed with data collected at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 189 to 209 GeV by ALEPH at LEP, corresponding to a total luminosity of 629 invpb. The three final states taunutaunu, taunucs and cscs are considered. No evidence for a signal is found and lower limits are set on the mass M_H+ as a function of the branching fraction B(H to taunu). In the framework of a two-Higgs-doublet model, and assuming B(H+ to taunu + B(H+ to cs) = 1 charged Higgs bosons with masses below 79.3 Gev/c2 are excluded at 95% confidence level independently of the branching ratios.

  6. Search for Charged Excited Leptons in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 183-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Cohen, I.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2002-01-01

    A search for charged excited leptons decaying into a lepton and photon has been performed using approximately 680 pb-1 of e+e- collision data collected by the OPAL detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 183 GeV and 209 GeV. No evidence for their existence was found. Upper limits on the product of the cross-section and the branching fraction are inferred. Using results from the search for singly produced excited leptons, upper limits on the ratio of the excited lepton coupling constant to the compositeness scale are calculated. From pair production searches, 95% confidence level lower limits on the masses of excited electrons, muons and taus are determined to be 103.2 GeV.

  7. Charged Particle Momentum Spectra in $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 192-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    Charged particle momentum distributions are studied in the reaction e+e- -> hadrons, using data collected with the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies from 192 GeV to 209 GeV. The data correspond to an average centre-of- mass energy of 201.7 GeV and a total integrated luminosity of 433 pb-1. The measured distributions and derived quantities, in combination with corresponding results obtained at lower centre-of-mass energies, are compared to QCD predictions in various theoretical approaches to study the energy dependence of the strong interaction and to test QCD as the theory describing it. In general, a good agreement is found between the measurements and the corresponding QCD predictions.

  8. Multi-Photon Production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 181 - 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    The process e+e- -> gamma gamma (gamma) is studied using data collected by the OPAL detector at LEP between the years 1997 and 2000. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 672.3pb-1 at centre-of-mass energies lying between 181 GeV and 209 GeV. Total and differential cross- sections are determined and found to be good agreement with the predictions of QED. Fits to the observed angular distributions are used to set limits on parameters from several models of physics beyond the Standard Model such as cut-off parameters, contact interactions of the type e+e-gamma gamma, gravity in extra spatial dimensions and excited electrons. In events with three photons in the final state the mass spectrum of photon pairs is investigated. No narrow resonance X-> gamma gamma is found and limits are placed on the product of the Xgamma production cross-section and branching ratio.

  9. Lightest Isotope of Bh Produced Via the 209Bi(52Cr,n)260BhReaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Sarah L.; Gregorich, Kenneth E.; Dragojevic, Irena; Garcia, Mitch A.; Gates, Jacklyn M.; Sudowe, Ralf; Nitsche, Heino

    2007-05-07

    The lightest isotope of Bh known was produced in the new {sup 209}Bi({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 260}Bh reaction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. Positive identification was made by observation of eight correlated alpha particle decay chains in the focal plane detector of the Berkeley Gas-Filled Separator. {sup 260}Bh decays with a 35{sub -9}{sup +19} ms half-life by alpha particle emission mainly by a group at 10.16 MeV. The measured cross section of 59{sub -20}{sup +29} pb is approximately a factor of four larger than compared to recent model predictions. The influences of the N = 152 and Z = 108 shells on alpha decay properties are discussed.

  10. Searches for Invisible Higgs bosons Preliminary combined results using LEP data collected at energies up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    In the year 2000 the four LEP experiments have collected data at energies between 200 and 209 GeV, for approximately 868 pb-1 integrated luminosity. The LEP working group for Higgs boson searches has combined these data with earlier data sets collected at lower centre-of-mass energies to search for a neutral CP-even Higgs boson, produced at the Standard Model rate, decaying into "invisible" particles. No statistically significant excess has been observed when compared to the Standard Model background prediction, and assuming that the Higgs boson decays only into such states a lower bound has been set on its mass at 95% confidence level of 114.4 GeV.

  11. High resolution measurement of neutron inelastic scattering and (n,2n) cross-sections for {sup 209}Bi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, L.C.; Borcea, C. [European Commission, Joint Research Center, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); ' Horia Hulubei' National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, PO Box MG-6, 76900 Bucharest (Romania); Koning, A.J. [Nuclear Research Group Petten, Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Pavlik, A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 17, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Plompen, A.J.M. [European Commission, Joint Research Center, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, B-2440 Geel (Belgium)], E-mail: arjan.plompen@ec.europa.eu

    2008-02-01

    Gamma production cross-sections were measured for the neutron inelastic scattering and (n,2n{gamma}) reactions on {sup 209}Bi using the white neutron spectrum of GELINA with the time-of-flight technique at the 200 m flight-path station. The full energy range, from the inelastic threshold up to 20 MeV was covered in one experiment with an unprecedented energy resolution of 1.1 keV at 1 MeV and 35 keV at 10 MeV. The gamma-rays were detected with large volume HPGe detectors. The flux was determined with a {sup 235}U fission chamber based on the {sup 235}U(n,f) standard cross-section. A metallic Bi sample was used. Inelastic gamma production cross-sections were measured for 39 transitions up to an excitation energy of 3.8 MeV. Based on the adopted level scheme of {sup 209}Bi, the total inelastic and the level cross-sections were constructed. A total uncertainty smaller than 5% was obtained for the total inelastic cross-section up to 10 MeV. The (n,2n) gamma production cross-section was measured for the 8 transitions from {sup 208}Bi nucleus up to 1.09 MeV excitation energy. The results are compared with earlier experimental works and with model calculations performed with the TALYS code, version 0.72. Calculations with the TALYS model code show good agreement with the deduced total inelastic cross-section in the entire incident energy range and for deduced level cross-sections below 3 MeV. Discrepancies between calculation and experiment that occur for gamma production cross-sections above 3 MeV are discussed.

  12. Familial breast cancer: collaborative reanalysis of individual data from 52 epidemiological studies including 58,209 women with breast cancer and 101,986 women without the disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaborative Group on Hormona, l Factors; van den Brandt, P.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Familial breast cancer: collaborative reanalysis of individual data from 52 epidemiological studies including 58,209 women with breast cancer and 101,986 women without the disease. Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer. BACKGROUND: Women with a family history of breast cancer are

  13. CD209 promoter -336 A/G (rs4804803) polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis in Zahedan, southeast Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Mohammad; Hashemi, Mohammad; Taheri, Mohsen; Pesarakli, Hossein; Eskandari-Nasab, Ebrahim; Bahari, Gholamreza

    2014-06-01

    The association between -336 A/G polymorphism of CD209 and susceptibility to/protection from tuberculosis is inconsistent. The present study aimed at evaluating the possible association between CD209 rs4804803 (-336 A/G) gene polymorphism and pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in a sample of Iranian population. This case-control study was performed on 156 PTB patients and 154 healthy individuals. Tetra-amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the polymorphisms. Our findings revealed that the CD209 rs4804803 increased the risk of PTB in codominant [odds ratio (OR) = 5.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.60-16.59, p = 0.006, GG vs. AA], dominant (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.07-2.66, p = 0.024, AG + GG vs. AA), and recessive (OR = 4.20, 95% CI = 1.34-13.16, p = 0.014, GG vs. AA + AG) tested inheritance models. Furthermore, the rs4804803 G allele increased the risk of PTB (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.12-2.23, p = 0.011) as compared to the A allele. Our data suggest that CD209 rs4804803 polymorphism increased the risk of PTB in a sample of Iranian population. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. High-throughput transcriptome sequencing reveals the combined effects of key e-waste contaminants, decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) and lead, in zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lianguo; Zhu, Biran; Guo, Yongyong; Xu, Tao; Lee, Jae-Seong; Qian, Pei-Yuan; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2016-07-01

    PBDEs and heavy metals are two major contaminants at e-waste disposal sites, but their combined effects remain largely unexplored. In the present study, the transcriptomic profiles of zebrafish larvae were examined after acute exposure of embryos to 200 μg/L BDE-209, 20 μg/L lead (Pb) or their mixture (Mix). Stimulation of steroidogenic pathway and vitellogenesis in the BDE-209 and Mix treatments indicated the estrogenic activities of BDE-209, while Pb antagonized those estrogenic effects in the Mix treatment. Increased heart rates were observed in zebrafish exposed to the Pb and Mix treatments. The cardiac dysfunction probably resulted from the promotion of angiogenesis, increased adrenergic drive and induction of the formation of blood clot. Furthermore, the Pb and Mix treatments activated neuroendocrine regulation of the pituitary in a positive feedback loop, via the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor, thus increasing thyroid hormone production self-adaptively. Overall, the interaction between BDE-209 and Pb led to synergistic and antagonistic effects on gene transcriptions, with concerted contribution from their individual toxicological properties. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. In vitro biotransformation of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) and Dechlorane Plus flame retardants: a case study of ring-billed gull breeding in a pollution hotspot in the St. Lawrence River, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot-Giguère, Bernice; Letcher, Robert J; Verreault, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (deca-BDE) mixture (~97% of BDE-209) is now facing usage restrictions worldwide, which is leading to increased utilization of a series of alternative, replacement flame retardant (FR) products. Among these, Dechlorane Plus (DP) is receiving growing attention as this FR is increasingly being detected in wildlife samples, including birds from North America, Europe and Asia. Recent survey conducted in a known FR hotspot in the St. Lawrence River basin near Montreal (QC, Canada) revealed unexpectedly high detection frequencies and concentrations of BDE-209 and DP isomers (syn- and anti-DP) in the liver of breeding ring-billed gulls (Larus delawarensis) (RBGUs). Despite the global distribution of these current-use FRs, there is to our knowledge no study that has addressed the in vitro biotransformation of BDE-209 and DP isomers in birds. This study aimed at understanding the in vitro metabolism of BDE-209 and syn- and anti-DP using liver microsomes of Montreal-breeding RBGUs. Although BDE-15 (positive assay control) was consistently and positively depleted over the 90-min time frame of the in vitro assay, no depletion was observed for BDE-209 and DP isomers. These results suggest that CYP isoenzyme-mediated reductive dehalogenation of BDE-209 and DP is not likely to be a substantial metabolic pathway in RBGUs. However, investigations on deiodinases (expression, activity) should be considered in future studies as these enzymes have been suggested to be involved in the sequential debromination of BDE-209 in fish and human studies. High levels of BDE-209 determined in liver of RBGUs that strongly correlated with those of known or suggested BDE-209 debromination products (hepta- through nona-BDEs) may thus be indicative of concomitant dietary (e.g., fish consumption) and environmental exposure in the greater Montreal area, combined with poor or lack of metabolic capability toward these FRs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Colour reconnection in $e^{+}e^{-} \\rightarrow W^{+}W^{-}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=189-209 GeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the final state interaction phenomenon known as colour reconnection are investigated at centre-of-mass energies in the range $\\sqrt{s}~ 189-209 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. Colour reconnection is expected to affect observables based on charged particles in hadronic decays of W+W-. Measurements of inclusive charged particle multiplicities, and of their angular distribution with respect to the four jet axes of the events, are used to test models of colour reconnection. The data are found to exclude extreme scenarios of the Sjostrand-Khoze Type I (SK-I) model and are compatible with other models, both with and without colour reconnection effects. In the context of the SK-I model, the best agreement with data is obtained for a reconnection probability of 37%. Assuming no colour reconnection, the charged particle multiplicity in hadronically decaying W bosons is measured to be (nqqch) = 19.38+-0.05(stat.)+-0.08 (syst.).

  17. Search for stable hadronizing squarks and gluinos in $e^{+} e^{-}$ collisions up to $\\sqrt{s}$ = 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; Bruneliere, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Kraan, A.C.; Nilsson, B.S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R.D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; White, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Muller, A.S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Ward, J.J.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2003-01-01

    Searches for stable, hadronizing scalar quarks and gluinos are performed using the data collected with the ALEPH detector at LEP. Gluon splitting into a gluino or a squark pair is searched for at centre-of-mass energies around the Z resonance, in the e+e- -> q qbar gluino gluino and q qbar squark antisquark processes. Stable squark pair production, and stop pair production with subsequent decays into a stable gluino, stop -> c gluino, are also directly searched for at centre-of-mass energies from 183 to 209 GeV. Altogether, stable hadronizing stop (sbottom) quarks are excluded up to masses of 95 (92) GeV/c2, and stable hadronizing gluinos are excluded up to 26.9 GeV/c2, at 95% confidence level. In the framework of R-parity-conserving supersymmetric models in which the gluino and the stop quark are the two lightest supersymmetric particles, a 95% C.L. lower limit of 80 GeV/c2 is set on the stop quark mass.

  18. Search for Chargino and Neutralino Production at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 192-209 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Couchman, J.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 438 pb-1 of e+e- data from the OPAL detector, taken with the LEP collider running at centre-of-mass energies of 192-209 Gev, are analyzed to search for evidence of chargino pair production, e+e- -> tilde chi^+_1 tilde chi^-_1, or neutralino associated production, e+e- -> tilde chi^0_2 tilde chi^0_1. Limits are set at the 95% confidence level on the product of the cross-section for the process e+e- -> tilde chi^+_1 tilde chi^-_1 and its branching ratios to topologies containing jets and missing energy, of jest with a lepton and missing energy, and on the product of the cross-section for e+e- -> tilde chi^0_2 tilde chi^0_1 and its branching ratio to jets. R-parity conservation is assumed throughout this paper. When these results are interpreted in the context of the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, limits are also set on the masses of the tilde chi^+-_1, tilde chi^0_1 and tilde chi^0_2, and regions of the parameter space of the model are ruled out. Nearly model-independent limits...

  19. Search for Charged Higgs Bosos in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 189-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A., Jr.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, P.; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D.E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, D.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2012-01-01

    A search is made for charged Higgs bosons predicted by Two-Higgs-Doublet extensions of the Standard Model (2HDM) using electron-positron collision data collected by the OPAL experiment at sqrts=189-209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 600pb-1. Charged Higgs bosons are assumed to be pair-produced and to decay into qq, tnt or AWpm. No signal is observed. Model-independent limits on the charged Higgs-boson production cross section are derived by combining these results with previous searches at lower energies. Excluded areas on the [mHpm, BR(Hpm->TV)] plane are presented assuming BR(Hpm->tnt)+BR(Hpm->qq)=1. Under the above assumption, motivated by general 2HDM type II models, charged Higgs bosons are excluded up to a mass of 76.6GeV at 95% confidence level, independent of the branching ratio BR(Hpm->tnt). A scan of the 2HDM type I model parameter space is performed and limits on the Higgs-boson masses mHpm and mA are presented for different choices of tanb.

  20. DC-SIGN (CD209) Promoter −336 A/G (rs4804803) Polymorphism Associated with Susceptibility of Kawasaki Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-Ren; Chang, Wei-Pin; Wang, Lin; Lin, Ying-Jui; Liang, Chi-Di; Yang, Kuender D.; Kuo, Chiu-Ming; Huang, Yi-Chuan; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Kuo, Ho-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is characterized by systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is the most effective therapy for KD to reduce the prevalence of coronary artery lesion (CAL) formation. Recently, the α2, 6 sialylated IgG was reported to interact with a lectin receptor, specific intracellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing nonintegrin homolog-related 1 (SIGN-R1) in mice and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in human, and to trigger an anti-inflammatory cascade. This study was conducted to investigate whether the polymorphism of DC-SIGN (CD209) promoter −336 A/G (rs4804803) is responsible for susceptibility and CAL formation in KD patients using Custom TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. A total of 521 subjects (278 KD patients and 243 controls) were investigated to identify an SNP of rs4804803, and they were studied and showed a significant association between the genotypes and allele frequency of rs4804803 in control subjects and KD patients (P = 0.004 under the dominant model). However, the promoter variant of DC-SIGN gene was not associated with the occurrence of IVIG resistance, CAL formation in KD. The G allele of DC-SIGN promoter −336 (rs4804803) is a risk allele in the development of KD. PMID:22629172

  1. DC-SIGN (CD209) promoter -336 A/G (rs4804803) polymorphism associated with susceptibility of Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-Ren; Chang, Wei-Pin; Wang, Lin; Lin, Ying-Jui; Liang, Chi-Di; Yang, Kuender D; Kuo, Chiu-Ming; Huang, Yi-Chuan; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Kuo, Ho-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is characterized by systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. High-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is the most effective therapy for KD to reduce the prevalence of coronary artery lesion (CAL) formation. Recently, the α2, 6 sialylated IgG was reported to interact with a lectin receptor, specific intracellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing nonintegrin homolog-related 1 (SIGN-R1) in mice and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) in human, and to trigger an anti-inflammatory cascade. This study was conducted to investigate whether the polymorphism of DC-SIGN (CD209) promoter -336 A/G (rs4804803) is responsible for susceptibility and CAL formation in KD patients using Custom TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. A total of 521 subjects (278 KD patients and 243 controls) were investigated to identify an SNP of rs4804803, and they were studied and showed a significant association between the genotypes and allele frequency of rs4804803 in control subjects and KD patients (P = 0.004 under the dominant model). However, the promoter variant of DC-SIGN gene was not associated with the occurrence of IVIG resistance, CAL formation in KD. The G allele of DC-SIGN promoter -336 (rs4804803) is a risk allele in the development of KD.

  2. Fission cross section calculations for 209Bi target nucleus based on fission reaction models in high energy regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of projects of new generation nuclear power plants requires the solving of material science and technological issues in developing of reactor materials. Melts of heavy metals (Pb, Bi and Pb-Bi due to their nuclear and thermophysical properties, are the candidate coolants for fast reactors and accelerator-driven systems (ADS. In this study, α, γ, p, n and 3He induced fission cross section calculations for 209Bi target nucleus at high-energy regions for (α,f, (γ,f, (p,f, (n,f and (3He,f reactions have been investigated using different fission reaction models. Mamdouh Table, Sierk, Rotating Liquid Drop and Fission Path models of theoretical fission barriers of TALYS 1.6 code have been used for the fission cross section calculations. The calculated results have been compared with the experimental data taken from the EXFOR database. TALYS 1.6 Sierk model calculations exhibit generally good agreement with the experimental measurements for all reactions used in this study.

  3. Quantum mechanical predictions of the Henry's law constants and their temperature dependence for the 209 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kathy L; Sandler, Stanley I; Greene, Richard W; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2008-11-15

    The Henry's law constants (HLCs) for all 209 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were predicted at 25 degrees C using the quantum mechanical (QM) continuum solvation models COSMO-SAC and SM6, and trends were examined. COSMO-SAC HLCs were also predicted for all congeners at 4, 11, 18, and 31 degrees C. The temperature dependences of the HLCs were used to calculate enthalpy of solvation (deltaHs) values. At 25 degrees C, COSMO-SAC and SM6 predicted similar values of the HLC, which are consistent with all but one of the available sets of measurements, and have smaller root-mean-square prediction errors than other models tested. This supports the validity of the QM values, and the recommendation of their use in environmental transport and fate models. Intercongener trends in the HLCs appear to be dominated by the strength of PCB-water polar interactions. The COSMO-SAC predictions between 4 and 31 degrees C indicate that the temperature dependence of the HLC is similar for all congeners. At low temperatures, the HLC predictions for several heavy congeners are substantially higher than recently reported measurements, supporting claims in the literature that these low-temperature data are inaccurate.

  4. Study of the di-nuclear system $^{A}$Rb + $^{209}$Bi (Z$_{1}$ + Z$_{2}$ = 120)

    CERN Multimedia

    The exact location of the next spherical shell closures beyond Z = 82, N = 126 is still an open question. According to model predictions shell closures are expected at Z = 114 or 120 or 126 and N = 184. Also experimental data cannot yet give a definite answer. Known nuclei with Z = 114 are too neutron‐deficient with respect to the N = 184 shell and nuclei with Z = 120 and beyond are still unknown. An option for studying reactions of super-heavy systems at Z = 120 and neutron numbers up to 184 becomes possible with the use of $^{209}$Bi targets and neutron‐rich beams. By studying quasi-fission and fusion‐fission reactions, which have significantly larger production cross‐sections than the evaporation residues, a possible influence of shell closures at Z = 120, N = 184 can be explored. Well suitable for such studies will be neutron‐rich rubidium beams at energies of about 5 MeV/u delivered by the HIE‐ISOLDE facility.

  5. Influence of highly-charged 209Bi33+ irradiation on structure and optoelectric characteristics of GaN epilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L. Q.; Zhang, C. H.; Xu, C. L.; Li, J. J.; Yang, Y. T.; Ma, Y. Z.; Li, J. Y.; Liu, H. P.; Ding, Z. N.; Yan, T. X.; Song, Y.

    2017-09-01

    The microstructure and optoelectric properties of GaN epilayer irradiated by highly-charged 209Bi33+ to different fluences are investigated by means of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. After Bi33+ irradiation, AFM observation shows the irradiated GaN surface is a swelling and swelling rate nonlinearly increases with increasing ions fluence. XPS analysis reveals the relative content of Ga-N bond reduces and Ga-O, Ga-Ga bonds have been produced as the fluence increases. Raman scattering spectra display the thickness of surface depletion layer increases, free carrier concentration and its mobility decrease generally with an increase in ions fluence. Furthermore, the length of Ga-N bond shortens and lattices experience compressive stress with increasing ions fluence are observed from Raman spectra. Room temperature PL spectra reflect the intensity of yellow luminescence (YL) emission increases and its peak has a blueshift after 1.061 × 1012 Bi33+/cm2 irradiation. Moreover, as the temperature rises, the thermal quenching of YL occurs and its peak position first exhibits a blueshift and then a redshift. Results may be served as a useful reference for HCI to be used in semiconductor fields.

  6. Neuromodulatory role of Bacopa monnieri on oxidative stress induced by postnatal exposure to decabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE -209 in neonate and young female mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Verma

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Bacopa monnieri (BM,a traditional ayurvedic medicine,is a well-known memory enhancer. We have explored the role of BM against decabrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE-209-induced alterations in neonate and young female mice. Materials and Methods: Mice were orally administered with B. monnieri at the doses of 40, 80 or 120 mg/kg body weight along with PBDE-209 (20 mg/kg body weight from postnatal day (PND 3-10. Levels of malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl and activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were measured at both ages. The correct choices and reference/working memory errors of young mice were evaluated by Morris water and radial arm maze. Results: The results showed that BM at the dose of 120 mg/kg significantly (P

  7. Analysis of {sup 209} Bi and {sup 238} U photofission cross section in the quasi-deuteron region of photonuclear absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, O.A.P. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Terranova, M.L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy)

    1992-12-31

    An analysis of the photofission reactions in the quasi-deuteron energy range of photonuclear absorption ({approx} 30-140 MeV) has been performed for {sup 209} Bi and {sup 238} U nuclei. Experimental cross section data available in the literature have been compared with calculated values obtained from a model in which the incoming photon is assumed to be absorbed by a neutron-proton pair (Levinger`s quasi-deuteron photoabsorption), followed by a mechanism of evaporation-fission competition for the excited residual nuclei. The model has been shown to reproduce the main experimental features of {sup 209} Bi and {sup 238} U photofission cross section, although unexplained differences still remain in the case of {sup 238} U-fission by 30-50 MeV incident photons. (author). 49 refs, 10 figs, 2 tabs.

  8. Measurement of the W-pair Production Cross-section and W Branching Ratios in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S.U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M.J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Houlden, M.A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Johansson, P.D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Kerzel, U.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.T.; Kjaer, N.J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McNulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monig, Klaus; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J.P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, Jan; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Van Dam, Piet; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.; Zinchenko, A.

    2004-01-01

    These final results on e+e- -> W+W- production cross-section measurements at LEP2 use data collected by the DELPHI detector at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV. Measurements of total cross-sections, W angular differential distributions and decay branching fractions, and the value of the CKM element |V_{cs}| are compared to the expectations of the Standard Model. These results supersede all values previously published by DELPHI.

  9. Fission of Weakly Prolate 119Sn and Weakly Oblate 209Bi Nuclei Induced by 500 and 672 MeV Negative Pions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Ahmed Rana; Gul, Sher; Shahid, Manzoor; I. Shahzad, M.

    2011-09-01

    Fission cross-sections of 119Sn and 209Bi induced by negative pions of two energies 500 and 672 MeV were measured using a CR-39 nuclear track detector. Target-detector stacks were exposed to pion beams at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA). Measurement results are compared with the corresponding calculations using the computer code CEM95. Agreement between measurements and calculations is fairly good for the 209Bi target nuclei whereas it is poor for 119Sn at both investigated energies of 500 and 672 MeV. Fission cross-section results of 119Sn and 209Bi are explained using the equilibrium properties of these nuclides including nuclear electric quadrupole moments which determine the shapes of nuclei. A logarithmic dependence of fission cross-section on Z2/A is observed for the above-mentioned reactions and a critical limit of Z2/A is identified with the value of 30 which divides the curve of σf versus Z2/A into two regimes, one with weak dependence and the other with strong dependence.

  10. Toxic effects of the joint exposure of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) on soil microorganism and enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Lei; An, Shuai; Liu, Kou; Lin, Kuangfei; Zhao, Li

    2014-09-01

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) are the main contaminants at e-waste recycling sites, and their potential toxicological effects have received extensive attention. However, the impact on soil culturable microbial population and enzyme activity of joint exposure to the two chemicals remains almost unknown. Therefore, indoor incubation tests were performed on control and contaminated soil samples to determine the eco-toxicological response in the joint presence of BDE209 and TBBPA for the first time. The results have demonstrated some notable toxic effects due to long-term exposure to either or both contaminants. The inhibition ratios of microbial populations increased with incubation time and increasing concentrations of BDE209 or TBBPA following certain dose-response relationships and time-effect trends. The response sensitivity sequence was fungi>bacteria>actinomycete. The influence of the two chemicals on soil enzymes reached peak values on day 7, and highly significant differences (Psoil microbes, catalase or saccharase activities indicated antagonistic effects, while, as for urease activity, addition role was dominant. Such observations have provided the useful information of potential ecological effects of brominated flame retardants contamination in the environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic surgery (PTES) for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation: a surgical technique, outcome, and complications in 209 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yu-Tong; Cui, Zhan; Shao, Hong-Wei; Ye, Yun; Gu, Ai-Qun

    2017-02-08

    We designed an easy posterolateral transforaminal endoscopic decompression technique, termed PTES, for radiculopathy secondary to lumbar disc herniation. The purpose of the study is to describe the technique of PTES and evaluate the efficacy and safety for treatment of lumbar disc herniation including primary herniation, reherniation, intracanal herniation, and extracanal herniation and to report outcome and complications. PTES was performed to treat 209 cases of intracanal or extracanal herniations with or without extruding or sequestrated fragment, high iliac crest, scoliosis, calcification, or cauda equina syndrome including recurrent herniation after previous surgical intervention at the index level or adjacent disc herniation after decompression and fusion. Preoperative and postoperative leg pain was evaluated using the 10-point visual analog scale (VAS) and the results were determined to be excellent, good, fair, or poor according to the MacNab classification at 2-year follow-up. The patients were followed for an average of 26.3 ± 2.3 months. The VAS score of leg pain significantly dropped from 9 (6-10) before operation to 1 (0-3) (P PTES for lumbar disc herniation is an effective and safe method with simple orientation, easy puncture, reduced steps, and little X-ray exposure, which can be applied in almost all kinds of lumbar disc herniation, including L5/S1 level with high iliac crest, herniation with scoliosis or calcification, recurrent herniation, and adjacent disc herniation after decompression and fusion. The learning curve is no longer steep for surgeons.

  12. At R209

    CERN Document Server

    1977-01-01

    Large concrete wall, shielding the ouside muon chambers from background particles coming from the ISR tunnel. One sees at work Lars Leistam, a crane driver, Harvey Newman, Min Chen, Ingrid ?, ??. Gunter Feilhauer is on top of the magnet.

  13. Placental transfer of the polybrominated diphenyl ethers BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209 in a human placenta perfusion system: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederiksen Marie

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs have been widely used as flame retardants in consumer products. PBDEs may affect thyroid hormone homeostasis, which can result in irreversible damage of cognitive performance, motor skills and altered behaviour. Thus, in utero exposure is of very high concern due to critical windows in fetal development. Methods A human ex vivo placenta perfusion system was used to study the kinetics and extent of the placental transfer of BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209 during four-hour perfusions. The PBDEs were added to the maternal circulation and monitored in the maternal and fetal compartments. In addition, the perfused cotyledon, the surrounding placental tissue as well as pre-perfusion placental tissue and umbilical cord plasma were also analysed. The PBDE analysis included Soxhlet extraction, clean-up by adsorption chromatography and GC-MS analysis. Results and Discussion Placental transfer of BDE-47 was faster and more extensive than for BDE-99. The fetal-maternal ratios (FM-ratio after four hours of perfusion were 0.47 and 0.25 for BDE-47 and BDE-99, respectively, while the indicative permeability coefficient (IPC measured after 60 minutes of perfusion was 0.26 h-1 and 0.10 h-1, respectively. The transport of BDE-209 seemed to be limited. These differences between the congeners may be related to the degree of bromination. Significant accumulation was observed for all congeners in the perfused cotyledon as well as in the surrounding placental tissue. Conclusion The transport of BDE-47 and BDE-99 indicates in utero exposure to these congeners. Although the transport of BDE-209 was limited, however, possible metabolic debromination may lead to products which are both more toxic and transportable. Our study demonstrates fetal exposure to PBDEs, which should be included in risk assessment of PBDE exposure of women of child-bearing age.

  14. The cross sections and energy spectra of the particle emission in proton induced reaction on 204,206,207,208Pb and 209Bi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhengjun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available All cross sections of proton induced reactions, angular distributions, energy spectra and double differential cross sections of neutron, proton, deuteron, triton, helium and alpha-particle emissions for p+ 204,206,207,208Pb, 209Bi reactions are consistently calculated and analyzed at incident proton energies below 200 MeV. The optical model, the distorted wave Born approximation theory, the unified Hauser-Feshbach and exciton model which includes the improved Iwamoto-Harada model are used. Theoretically calculated results are compared with the existing experimental data.

  15. Studies of Hadronic Event Structure in $e^+ e^-$ Annihilation from 30 GeV to 209 GeV with the L3 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Romeo, G.Cara; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this Report, QCD results obtained from a study of hadronic event structure in high energy e^+e^- interactions with the L3 detector are presented. The operation of the LEP collider at many different collision energies from 91 GeV to 209 GeV offers a unique opportunity to test QCD by measuring the energy dependence of different observables. The main results concern the measurement of the strong coupling constant, \\alpha_s, from hadronic event shapes and the study of effects of soft gluon coherence through charged particle multiplicity and momentum distributions.

  16. Search for Supersymmetric Particles with R-Parity Violating Decays in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; Bruneliere, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Barklow, T.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.J.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R.D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; White, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Muller, A.S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2003-01-01

    Searches for the pair production of supersymmetric particles under the assumption that R-parity is violated via a single dominant LLEbar, LQDbar or UbarDbarDbar coupling are performed using the data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies from 189 to 209Gev. The numbers of observed candidate events in the data are in agreement with the Standard Model expectation, and limits on the production cross sections and on the masses of charginos, sleptons, squarks and sneutrinos are derived.

  17. Single vector boson production in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies from 183 to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Schael, S; Brunelière, R; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Trocmé, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Pacheco, A; Ruiz, H; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Barklow, T; Buchmüller, O L; Cattaneo, M; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kado, M; Mato, P; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Sguazzoni, G; Teubert, F; Valassi, A; Videau, I; Badaud, F; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Kraan, A C; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, E; Vayaki, A; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Videau, H L; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bossi, F; Capon, G; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Kennedy, J; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Thompson, A S; Wasserbaech, S R; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Girone, M; Marinelli, N; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Smizanska, M; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Leibenguth, G; Lemaître, V; Blumenschein, U; Hölldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kayser, F; Kleinknecht, K; Müller, A S; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Bonissent, A; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Payre, P; Tilquin, A; Ragusa, F; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Settles, R; Villegas, M; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Boccali, T; Foà, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Ligabue, F; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; García-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Misiejuk, A; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Ward, J J; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D E; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Litke, A M; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S; Combley, F; Hodgson, P N; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Grupen, C; Hess, J; Ngac, A; Prange, G; Borean, C; Giannini, G; He, H; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Armstrong, S R; Berkelman, K; Cranmer, K; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Pan Yi Bin; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wiedenmann, W; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G; Dissertori, G

    2005-01-01

    The cross sections for single vector boson production in the Wenu and Zee channels are measured from the data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP for centre-of-mass energies between 183 and 209 GeV. These data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 683 pb-1. Single-W production is studied in both hadronic and leptonic decay channels. Hadronic and dimuon decays are used for single-Z production. The measured cross sections agree with the Standard Model predictions.

  18. Fermion pair production in $e^+e^-$ collisions at 189-209 GeV and constraints on physics beyond the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Schael, S.; Bruneliere, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Kraan, A.C.; Nilsson, B.S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; White, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Leibenguth, G.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Muller, A.-S.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Ward, J.J.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Bohrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; USA; Dissertori, G.

    2007-01-01

    Cross sections, angular distributions and forward-backward asymmetries are presented, of two-fermion events produced in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies from 189 to 209 GeV at LEP, measured with the ALEPH detector. Results for e+e-, mu+mu-, tau+tau-, qq, bb and cc production are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions. Constraints are set on scenarios of new physics such as four-fermion contact interactions, leptoquarks, Z' bosons, TeV-scale quantum gravity and R-parity violating squarks and sneutrinos.

  19. Measurement of Isolated Prompt Photon Production in Photon-Photon Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{ee}}$=183-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    For the first time at LEP the production of prompt photons is studied in the collisions of quasi-real photons using the OPAL data taken at e+e- centre-of-mass energies between 183 GeV and 209 GeV. The total inclusive production cross-section for isolated prompt photons in the kinematic range of photon transverse momentum larger than 3.0 GeV and absolute photon pseudorapidity less than 1 is determined to be 0.32 +- 0.04 (stat) +- 0.04 (sys) pb. Differential cross-sections are compared to the predictions of a next-to-leading-order (NLO) calculation.

  20. Placental transfer of the polybrominated diphenyl ethers BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209 in a human placenta perfusion system: an experimental study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Marie; Vorkamp, Katrin; Mathiesen, Line

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been widely used as flame retardants in consumer products. PBDEs may affect thyroid hormone homeostasis, which can result in irreversible damage of cognitive performance, motor skills and altered behaviour. Thus, in utero exposure is of very...... high concern due to critical windows in fetal development. METHODS: A human ex vivo placenta perfusion system was used to study the kinetics and extent of the placental transfer of BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209 during four-hour perfusions. The PBDEs were added to the maternal circulation and monitored...... should be included in risk assessment of PBDE exposure of women of child-bearing age....

  1. Search for Leptoquarks in Electron-Photon Scattering at $\\sqrt{s_{ee}}$ up to 209 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Couchman, J.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, G.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2002-01-01

    Searches for first generation scalar and vector leptoquarks, and for squarks in R-parity violating SUSY models with the direct decay of the squark into Standard Model particles, have been performed using e+e- collisions collected with the OPAL detector at LEP at e+e- centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209 GeV. No excess of events is found over the expectation from Standard Model background processes. Limits are computed on the leptoquark couplings for different values of the branching ratio to electron-quark final states.

  2. Excitation functions of product nuclei from 40 to 2600 MeV proton-irradiated {sup 206,207,208,nat}Pb and {sup 209}Bi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titarenko, Yury E. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physcis, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: yury.titarenko@itep.ru; Batyaev, Viacheslav F. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physcis, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Mulambetov, Ruslan D. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physcis, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhivun, Valery M. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physcis, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Barashenkov, Vladilen S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Mashnik, Stepan G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Shubin, Yury N. [Institute for Physics and Power Engineering, 249020 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Ignatyuk, Anatoly V. [Institute for Physics and Power Engineering, 249020 Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2006-06-23

    5972 nuclide yields from proton-irradiated {sup 206,207,208,nat}Pb and {sup 209}Bi thin targets have been measured for 11 proton energies within the range 0.04-2.6 GeV. The measured data have been compared with data obtained at other laboratories as well as with theoretical simulations by seven codes. We found that the predictive power of the tested codes is different but is satisfactory for most of the nuclides in the spallation region, though none of the codes agree well with the data in the whole mass region of product nuclides and all should be improved further.

  3. Isotope Shifts of the $6d\\,^2$D$_{3/2}\\,$ - $7p\\,^2$P$_{1/2}\\,$ Transition in Trapped Short-Lived $^{209-214}$Ra$^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Giri, G S; Berg, J E van den; Böll, O; Dammalapati, U; van der Hoek, D J; Jungmann, K; Kruithof, W L; Müller, S; Portela, M Nuñez; Onderwater, C J G; Santra, B; Timmermans, R G E; Wansbeek, L W; Willmann, L; Wilschut, H W

    2011-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy of short-lived radium isotopes in a linear Paul trap has been performed. The isotope shifts of the $6d\\,^2$D$_{3/2}\\,$ - $7p\\,^2$P$_{1/2}\\,$ transition in $^{209-214}$Ra$^+$ were measured, which are sensitive to the short range part of the atomic wavefunctions. The results are essential experimental input for improving the precision of atomic structure calculation. This is indispensable for parity violation in Ra$^+$ aiming at the determination of the weak mixing angle.

  4. TAK1 Lys-158 but not Lys-209 is required for IL-1β-induced Lys63-linked TAK1 polyubiquitination and IKK/NF-κB activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yihui; Yu, Yang; Mao, Renfang; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factors-mediated transcription is the endpoint of a series of signal transduction events that are initiated by a vast array of stimuli. Both the proteolytic and non-proteolytic functions of ubiquitination are critically important for the regulation of NF-κB activation. Lys63-linked polyubiqutination of TAK1 is required for IL-1β-induced IKK/NF-κB activation. However, the lysine site that mediates Lys63-linked TAK1 polyubiquitination in IL-1β signaling is still controversial. Here we report that TAK1 lysine 158 but not lysine 209 is required for IL-1β-induced Lys63-linked TAK1 polyubiquitination and TAK1-mediated IKK, JNK, and p38 activation. Co-overexpression of TAK1 wild-type and K209R mutant with TAB1 induced Lys63-linked TAK1 polyubiquitination and NF-κB activation whereas TAK1 K158R mutant failed to do so. Furthermore, IL-1β induces polyubiqutination of TAK1 wild-type and K209R mutant but not K158R mutant. Reconstitution of TAK1-deficient mouse embryo fibroblast cells with wild-type, K158R mutant, or K209R mutant TAK1 reveals that TAK1 Lys-158 but not Lys-209 is required for IL-1β-induced IKK, p38 and JNK activation. PMID:21130870

  5. In vitro screening of reversible and time-dependent inhibition on CYP3A by TM208 and TM209 in rat liver microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miaoran Ning

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available TM208 and TM209, dithiocarbamate derivatives with potential anti-cancer effects, were evaluated in reversible and time-dependent cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A inhibition assays in rat liver microsomes using testosterone as probe substrate. Both compounds were found to be weak reversible inhibitors and moderate mechanism-based inhibitors of rat CYP3A. For reversible inhibition on rat CYP3A, the Ki values of competitive inhibition model were 12.10±1.75 and 13.94±1.31 μM, respectively. For time-dependent inhibition, the inactivation constants (Kl were 31.93±12.64 and 32.91±15.58 μM, respectively, and the maximum inactivation rates (kinact were 0.03497±0.0069 and 0.07259±0.0172 min−1 respectively. These findings would provide useful in vitro information for future in vivo DDI studies on TM208 or TM209.

  6. Observation of 7pP23/2→7dD2 optical transitions in 209 and 210 francium isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustsson, S; Bianchi, G; Calabrese, R; Corradi, L; Dainelli, A; Khanbekyan, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Marmugi, L; Mazzocca, G; Moi, L; Ricci, L; Stiaccini, L; Tomassetti, L

    2017-09-15

    We report on the direct experimental observation of the 7pP23/2→7dD2 optical transitions in 209 and 210 francium isotopes. By continuously monitoring the fluorescence emitted by the isotopes collected in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), the electric dipole transitions 7pP23/2→7dD25/2 of Fr209, not yet experimentally observed, and 7pP23/2→7dD25/2, 7pP23/2→7dD25/2 of Fr210 were detected as sub-Doppler depletion dips of the cold atom population. This approach allowed unambiguous identification of the excited state hyperfine structures, even in the absence of a large stable vapor. Our findings demonstrate the effectiveness and the flexibility of fluorescence monitoring of trap depletion upon laser excitation, and broaden the experimental knowledge of francium isotopes and their electronic and nuclear properties. These results will have a relevant impact on ongoing researches for low-energy testing of fundamental symmetries with francium, from atomic parity non-conservation to the electron dipole moment.

  7. Antioxidative response of Kandelia obovata, a true mangrove species, to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDE-99 and BDE-209) during germination and early growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzana, Shazia; Chen, Juan; Pan, Ying; Wong, Yuk-Shan; Tam, Nora Fung Yee

    2017-11-30

    A 3-months microcosm experiment with mangrove sediment spiked with PBDEs and planted with propagules of Kandelia obovata was conducted to investigate PBDE toxicity and antioxidative responses of the germinated seedlings. BDE-99 suppressed germination rate, leaves formation and growth of mangrove seedlings. The leaves and roots of BDE-99 treated seedlings had significantly higher superoxide (O2-) release, malondialdehyde (MDA) and total polyphenol (TP) content, and peroxidase (POD) activity than the control. BDE-209 increased activities of all three antioxidative enzymes, catalase (CAT), POD and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in roots, but in leaves, only CAT activity was stimulated. The MDA content of BDE-209 treated seedlings was less than the control. PBDEs were found in plant tissues of the treated seedlings. These results indicated that even though PBDEs were taken up in tissues, K. obovata, due to its antioxidative defense enzymes, could tolerate PBDEs and could be used for the bioremediation of PBDE-contaminated environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Measurements of cross sections for the 209Bi(n, 4n) reaction by using high energy neutrons with continuous energy spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyung Joo; Bak, Sang-In; Ham, Cheolmin; In, Eun Jin; Kim, Do Yoon; Myung, Hyunjeong; Shim, Chungbo; Shin, Jae Won; Zhou, Yujie; Park, Tae-Sun; Hong, Seung-Woo; Bhoraskar, V. N.

    2017-09-01

    We measured 209Bi(n, 4n) cross sections at neutron energies En = 29.8 ± 1.8 MeV and En = 34.8 ± 1.8 MeV. Bismuth oxide samples were irradiated with the neutrons produced by impinging 30, 35 and 40 MeV proton beams on a 1.05 cm thick beryllium target, where the proton beams were from the MC-50 Cyclotron of Korea Institute of Radiological Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). The neutron flux for each proton beam energy Ep, ΦEp(En), has a broad spectrum with respect to En. By taking the difference in the neutron fluxes, the difference spectra, Φ40(En) -Φ35(En) and Φ35(En) -Φ30(En), are obatined and found to be peaked at En = 29.8 and 34.8 MeV, respectively, with a width of about 3.6 MeV. By making use of this observation and employing the TENDL-2009 library we could extract the 209Bi(n, 4n)206Bi cross sections at the aforementioned neutron energies.

  9. DC-SIGN (CD209) Promoter −336 A/G Polymorphism Is Associated with Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever and Correlated to DC-SIGN Expression and Immune Augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jien-Wei; Lee, Ing-Kit; Lee, Chiu-Ping; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Shau-Ku; Yang, Kuender D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209) is known to be the major dengue receptor on human dendritic cells, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the promoter region of CD209 (−336 A/G; rs4804803) is susceptible to many infectious diseases. We reason that variations in the DC-SIGN gene might have a broad influence on viral replication and host immune responses. Methods and Findings We studied whether the rs4804803 SNP was associated with a susceptibility to dengue fever (DF) and/or dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) through genotyping analysis in a Taiwanese cohort. We generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) from individuals with AA or AG genotype of rs4804803 to study the viral replication and immune responses for functional validation. A total of 574 DNA samples were genotyped, including 176 DF, 135 DHF, 143 other non-dengue febrile illnesses (OFI) and 120 population controls. A strong association between GG/AG genotypes of rs4804803 and risk of DHF was found when compared among DF, OFI and controls (p = 0.004, 3×10−5 and 0.001, respectively). The AA genotype was associated with protection against dengue infection compared with OFI and controls (p = 0.002 and 0.020, respectively). Moreover, MDDCs from individuals with AG genotype with a higher cell surface DC-SIGN expression had a significantly higher TNFα, IL-12p40, and IP-10 production than those with AA genotype in response to dengue infection. However, the viral replication in MDDCs with AG genotype was significantly lower than those with AA genotype. With both genotypes, MDDCs revealed an increase in viral replication following the addition of anti-IP-10 neutralizing antibody. Conclusions/Significance The rs4804803 SNP in the CD209 promoter contributed to susceptibility to dengue infection and complication of DHF. This SNP with AG genotype affects the cell surface DC-SIGN expression related to immune augmentation and less viral replication. PMID:21245921

  10. DC-SIGN (CD209) Promoter -336 A/G polymorphism is associated with dengue hemorrhagic fever and correlated to DC-SIGN expression and immune augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Chen, Rong-Fu; Liu, Jien-Wei; Lee, Ing-Kit; Lee, Chiu-Ping; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Shau-Ku; Yang, Kuender D

    2011-01-04

    the C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209) is known to be the major dengue receptor on human dendritic cells, and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the promoter region of CD209 (-336 A/G; rs4804803) is susceptible to many infectious diseases. We reason that variations in the DC-SIGN gene might have a broad influence on viral replication and host immune responses. we studied whether the rs4804803 SNP was associated with a susceptibility to dengue fever (DF) and/or dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) through genotyping analysis in a Taiwanese cohort. We generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) from individuals with AA or AG genotype of rs4804803 to study the viral replication and immune responses for functional validation. A total of 574 DNA samples were genotyped, including 176 DF, 135 DHF, 143 other non-dengue febrile illnesses (OFI) and 120 population controls. A strong association between GG/AG genotypes of rs4804803 and risk of DHF was found when compared among DF, OFI and controls (p = 0.004, 3×10(-5) and 0.001, respectively). The AA genotype was associated with protection against dengue infection compared with OFI and controls (p = 0.002 and 0.020, respectively). Moreover, MDDCs from individuals with AG genotype with a higher cell surface DC-SIGN expression had a significantly higher TNFα, IL-12p40, and IP-10 production than those with AA genotype in response to dengue infection. However, the viral replication in MDDCs with AG genotype was significantly lower than those with AA genotype. With both genotypes, MDDCs revealed an increase in viral replication following the addition of anti-IP-10 neutralizing antibody. the rs4804803 SNP in the CD209 promoter contributed to susceptibility to dengue infection and complication of DHF. This SNP with AG genotype affects the cell surface DC-SIGN expression related to immune augmentation and less viral replication.

  11. Production cross section of At radionuclides from $^{7}$Li+$^{\\textrm{nat}}$Pb and $^{9}$Be+$^{\\textrm{nat}}$Tl reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Maiti, Moumita

    2011-01-01

    Earlier we reported theoretical studies on the probable production of astatine radionuclides from $^{6,7}$Li and $^{9}$Be-induced reactions on natural lead and thalliun targets, respectively. For the first time, in this report, production of astatine radionuclides has been investigated experimentally with two heavy ion induced reactions: $^{9}$Be+$^{\\textrm{nat}}$Tl and $^{7}$Li+$^{\\textrm{nat}}$Pb. Formation cross sections of the evaporation residues, $^{207,208,209,210}$At, produced in (HI, xn) channel, have been measured by the stacked-foil technique followed by the off-line $\\gamma$-spectrometry at the low incident energies ($<$50 MeV). Measured excitation functions have been explained in terms of compound nuclear reaction mechanism using Weisskopf-Ewing and Hauser-Feshbach model. Absolute cross section values are lower than the respective theoretical predictions.

  12. Production cross section of At radionuclides from 7Li+natPb and 9Be+natTl reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Moumita; Lahiri, Susanta

    2011-12-01

    Earlier we reported theoretical studies on the probable production of astatine radionuclides from 6,7Li- and 9Be-induced reactions on natural lead and thallium targets, respectively. The production of astatine radionuclides were investigated experimentally with two heavy-ion-induced reactions: 9Be + natTl and 7Li + natPb. Formation cross sections of the evaporation residues, 207,208,209,210At, produced in the (HI,xn) channel, were measured by the stacked-foil technique followed by off-line γ spectrometry at low incident energies (<50 MeV). Measured excitation functions were interpreted in terms of a compound nuclear reaction mechanism using Weisskopf-Ewing and Hauser-Feshbach models. Measured cross-section values are lower than the respective theoretical predictions.

  13. Tests of the Standard Model and Constraints on New Physics from Measurements of Fermion-Pair Production at 189-209 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    Cross-section and angular distributions for hadronic and lepton-pair final states in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies between 189 GeV and 209 GeV, measured with the OPAL detector at LEP, are presented and compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. The measurements are used to determine the electromagnetic coupling constant alphaem at LEP2 energies. In addition, the results are used together with OPAL measurements at 91-183 GeV within the S-matrix formalism to determine the gamma-Z interference term and to make an almost model-independent measurement of the Z mass. Limits on extensions to the Standard Model described by effective four-fermion contact interactions or the addition of a heavy Z boson are also presented.

  14. Search for a fourth generation b'-quark at LEP-II at sqrt{s}=196-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chudoba, J.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S.U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M.J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Santo, M.C.Espirito; Fanourakis, G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S-O.; Holt, P.J.; Houlden, M.A.; Jackson, John Neil; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Johansson, P.D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kerzel, U.; King, B.T.; Kjaer, N.J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Nulty, R.Mc; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Oliveira, O.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oliveira, O.; Oliveira, S.M.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J.P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Sadovsky, A.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Santos, R.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sopczak, A.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, Jan; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Valenti, G.; Turluer, M-L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Van Dam, Piet; Van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Zalewska, A.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, A.

    2007-01-01

    A search for the pair production of fourth generation b'-quarks was performed using data taken by the DELPHI detector at LEP-II. The analysed data were collected at centre-of-mass energies ranging from 196 to 209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 420 pb^{-1}. No evidence for a signal was found. Upper limits on BR(b' -> bZ) and BR(b' -> cW) were obtained for b' masses ranging from 96 to 103 GeV/c^2. These limits, together with the theoretical branching ratios predicted by a sequential four generations model, were used to constrain the value of R_{CKM}=|V_{cb'}/V_{tb'}V_{tb}|, where V_{cb'}, V_{tb'} and V_{tb} are elements of the extended CKM matrix.

  15. Neutron-induced fission cross section of (nat)Pb and (209)Bi from threshold to 1 GeV: An improved parametrization

    CERN Document Server

    Tarrio, D; Audouin, L; Berthier, B; Duran, I; Ferrant, L; Isaev, S; Le Naour, C; Paradela, C; Stephan, C; Trubert, D; Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Assimakopoulos, P; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvar, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Calvino, F; Calviani, M; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Carrapico, C; Carrillo de Albornoz, A; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dillmann, I; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Dridi, W; Eleftheriadis, C; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Fitzpatrick, L; Frais-Koelbl, H; Fujii, K; Furman, W; Goncalves, I; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Igashira, M; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Kappeler, F; Karadimos, D; Karamanis, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Koehler, P; Konovalov, V; Kossionides, E; Krticka, M; Lampoudis, C; Leeb, H; Lederer, C; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Losito, R; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marques, L; Marrone, S; Martinez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P.M; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Oshima, M; Pancin, J; Papachristodoulou, C; Papadopoulos, C; Patronis, N; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perrot, L; Pigni, M.T; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Praena, J; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Santos, C; Sarchiapone, L; Sarmento, R; Savvidis, I; Tagliente, G; Tain, J.L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Voss, F; Walter, S; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2011-01-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections for (nat)Pb and (209)Bi were measured with a white-spectrum neutron source at the CERN Neutron Time-of-Flight (n\\_TOF) facility. The experiment, using neutrons from threshold up to 1 GeV, provides the first results for these nuclei above 200 MeV. The cross sections were measured relative to (235)U and (238)U in a dedicated fission chamber with parallel plate avalanche counter detectors. Results are compared with previous experimental data. Upgraded parametrizations of the cross sections are presented, from threshold energy up to 1 GeV. The proposed new sets of fitting parameters improve former results along the whole energy range.

  16. Search for Neutral Higgs Bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Ewers, A; Extermann, Pierre; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hakobyan, R S; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Käfer, D; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S A; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofiev, D O; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rosenbleck, C; Roux, B; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S V; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R P; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2002-01-01

    A search for the lightest neutral CP-even and neutral CP-odd Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model is performed using 216.6 pb-1 of data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 203 and 209 GeV. No indication of a signal is found. Including our results from lower centre-of-mass energies, lower limits on the Higgs boson masses are set as a function of tan(beta) for several scenarios. For tan(beta) greater than 0.7 they are mh > 84.5 GeV and mA > 86.3 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  17. Final results of the searches for neutral Higgs bosons in e+e- collisions at /sqrt(s) up to 209 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Heister, A.; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugés, E.; Lopez, J.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Pacheco, A.; Paneque, D.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Quyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T. C.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J. J.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Smith, D.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R. D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Müller, A.-S.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Kachelhoffer, T.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Loomis, C.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; de Vivie de Régie, J.-B.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Jones, L. T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Seager, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-02-01

    The final results of the ALEPH search for the Standart Model Higgs boson at LEP, with data collected in the year 2000 at center-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV, are presented. The changes with respect to the preceding publication are described and a complete study of systematic effects is reported. The findings of this final analysis confirm the preliminary results published in November 2000 shortly after the closing down of the LEP collider: a significant excess of events is observed, consistent with the production of a 115 GeV/c2 Standard Model Higgs boson. The final results of the searches for the neutral Higgs bosons od the MSSM are also reported, in terms of limits on mh, mA and /tanβ. Limits are also set on mh in the case of invisible decays.

  18. Measurement of W-pair production in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies from 183 to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A; Barate, R; Brunelière, R; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Trocmé, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Pacheco, A; Ruiz, H; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Barklow, T; Buchmüller, O L; Cattaneo, M; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kado, M; Mato, P; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Sguazzoni, G; Teubert, F; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, I; Badaud, F; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Kraan, A C; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Videau, H L; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bossi, F; Capon, G; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Kennedy, J; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Thompson, A S; Wasserbaech, S R; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Girone, M; Hill, R D; Marinelli, N; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Smizanska, M; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Leibenguth, G; Lemaître, V; Blumenschein, U; Hölldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kayser, F; Kleinknecht, K; Müller, A S; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Bonissent, A; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Payre, P; Tilquin, A; Ragusa, F; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Settles, Ronald; Villegas, M; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Boccali, T; Foà, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Ligabue, F; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; García-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Misiejuk, A; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Ward, J J; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D E; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Litke, A M; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S; Combley, F; Hodgson, P N; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Grupen, C; Hess, J; Ngac, A; Prange, G; Borean, C; Giannini, G; He, H; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Armstrong, S R; Berkelman, K; Cranmer, K; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y B; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wiedenmann, W; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G; Dissertori, G

    2004-01-01

    The W+W- production cross section is measured from a data sample corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 683 pb-1, collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP at centre-of-mass energies from 183 to 209 GeV.Individual cross sections for the different topologies arising from W decays into leptons or hadrons, as well as the total W-pair cross section are given at eight centre-of-mass energies. The results are found to be in agreement with recently developed Standard Model calculations at the one percent level. The hadronic branching fraction of the W boson is measured to be B (W--> hadrons) = (67.13+- 0.37(stat) +- 0.15(syst))%, from which the CKM matrix element |Vcs| is determined to be 0.958 +- 0.017(stat) +- 0.008(syst).

  19. Search for $\\gamma\\gamma$ decays of a Higgs boson in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A; Barate, R; Brunelière, R; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Trocmé, B; Boix, G; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; López, J; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Pacheco, A; Paneque, D; Ruiz, H; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Barklow, Timothy L; Buchmüller, O L; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Greening, T C; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kado, M; Mato, P; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Sguazzoni, G; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, I; Ward, J J; Badaud, F; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Swynghedauw, M; Tanaka, R; Videau, H L; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bossi, F; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Kennedy, J; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Thompson, A S; Wasserbaech, S R; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Leibenguth, G; Putzer, A; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Girone, M; Hill, R D; Marinelli, N; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Smizanska, M; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Lemaître, V; Blumenschein, U; Hölldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kayser, F J; Kleinknecht, K; Müller, A S; Quast, G; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Bonissent, A; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Payre, P; Tilquin, A; Ragusa, F; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Settles, Ronald; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; De Vivie de Régie, J B; Yuan, C; Bagliesi, G; Boccali, T; Foà, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Ligabue, F; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Tenchini, Roberto; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; García-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Jones, L T; Medcalf, T; Misiejuk, A; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D E; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Hodgson, P N; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Grupen, Claus; Hess, J; Ngac, A; Prange, G; Sieler, U; Borean, C; Giannini, G; He, H; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Armstrong, S R; Berkelman, K; Cranmer, K; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Pan, Y B; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wiedenmann, W; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G; Dissertori, G

    2002-01-01

    A search for events with a photon pair arising from the decay of a Higgs boson produced in association with a fermion pair, is performed in 893pb^-1 of data recorded by the ALEPH detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies up to 209GeV. No excess of such events is found over the expected background. An upper limit is derived on the product of the e^+e^- -> HZ cross section and the H -> gamma gamma branching fraction as a function of the Higgs boson mass. A fermiophobic Higgs boson produced with the Standard Model cross section is excluded at 95\\% confidence level for all masses below 105.4GeV/c2

  20. Absolute mass lower limit for the lightest neutralino of the MSSM from $e^{+}e^{-}$ data at $\\sqrt{s}$ up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A; Barate, R; Brunelière, R; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Trocmé, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Pacheco, A; Ruiz, H; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Barklow, T; Buchmüller, O L; Cattaneo, M; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Gianotti, F; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kado, M; Mato, P; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Sguazzoni, G; Teubert, F; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, I; Badaud, F; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Kraan, A C; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Videau, H L; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bossi, F; Capon, G; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Kennedy, J; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Thompson, A S; Wasserbaech, S R; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Girone, M; Hill, R D; Marinelli, N; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Smizanska, M; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Leibenguth, G; Lemaître, V; Blumenschein, U; Hölldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kayser, F; Kleinknecht, K; Müller, A S; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Bonissent, A; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Payre, P; Tilquin, A; Ragusa, F; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Settles, Ronald; Villegas, M; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; De Vivie de Régie, J B; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Boccali, T; Foà, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Ligabue, F; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; García-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Misiejuk, A; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Ward, J J; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D E; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Litke, A M; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S; Combley, F; Hodgson, P N; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Grupen, C; Hess, J; Ngac, A; Prange, G; Borean, C; Giannini, G; He, H; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Armstrong, S R; Berkelman, K; Cranmer, K; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Pan Yi Bin; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wiedenmann, W; Wu, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G; Dissertori, G

    2004-01-01

    Charginos and neutralinos are searched for in the data collected by the ALEPH experiment at LEP for centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV. The negative result of these searches is combined with those from searches for sleptons and Higgs bosons to derive an absolute lower limit of 43.1 GeV/c2 on the mass of the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), assumed to be the lightest neutralino. This limit is obtained in the framework of the MSSM with R-parity conservation and with gaugino and sfermion mass unification at the GUT scale and assuming no mixing in the stau sector. The LSP limit degrades only slightly to 42.4 GeV/c2 if stau mixing is considered. Within the more constrained framework of minimal supergravity, the limit is 50 GeV/c2.

  1. Measurement of event shape distributions and moments in $e^{+}e^{-} \\to$ hadrons at 91-209 GeV and a determination of $\\alpha_{s}$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Roeck, A.De; Wolf, E.A.De; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; Krogh, J.von; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija; CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    We have studied hadronic events from e+e- annihilation data at centre-of-mass energies from 91 to 209 GeV. We present distributions of event shape observables and their moments at each energy and compare with QCD Monte Carlo models. From the event shape distributions we extract the strong coupling alpha_s and test its evolution with energy scale. The results are consistent with the running of alpha_s expected from QCD. Combining all data, the value of alpha_s (M_z) is determined to be alpha_s(Mz)=0.1191+-0.0005(stat.)+-0.0010 (expt.)+-0.0011(hadr.)+-0.0044(theo.) The energy evolution of the moments is also used to determine a value of alpha_ with slightly larger errors: alpha_s(Mz)=0.1223+-0.0005(stat.) +-0.0014(expt.) +-0.0016(hadr.) +0.0054 -0.0036 (theo).

  2. Search for pair-produced leptoquarks in $e^{+}e^{-}$ interactions at $\\sqrt{s}\\simeq$ 189 -209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    A search for pair-produced leptoquarks is performed using e+e- collision events collected by the OPAL detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209 GeV. The data sample corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 596 pb^-1. The leptoquarks are assumed to be produced via couplings to the photon and the Z0. For a given search channel only leptoquark decays involving a single lepton generation are considered. No evidence for leptoquark pair production is observed. Lower limits on masses for scalar and vector leptoquarks are calculated. The results improve most of the LEP limits derived from previous searches for the pair production process by 10-25 GeV, depending on the leptoquark quantum numbers.

  3. Study of Z Pair Production and Anomalous Couplings in $e^+ e^-$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ between 190 GeV and 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Warsinsky, M.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    A study of Z-boson pair production in e+e- annihilation at center-of-mass energies between 190 GeV and 209 GeV is reported. Final states containing only leptons, (l+l-l+l- and l+l-nn), quark and lepton pairs, (qql+l-, qqnn) and only hadrons (qqqq) are considered. In all states with at least one Z boson decaying hadronically, lifetime, lepton and event-shape tags are used to separate bb pairs from qq final state. Limits on anomalous ZZgamma and ZZZ couplings are derived from the measured cross sections and from event kinematics using an optimal observable method. Limits on low scale gravity with large dimensions are derived from the cross sections and their dependence on polar angle.

  4. DC-SIGN (CD209), pentraxin 3 and vitamin D receptor gene variants associate with pulmonary tuberculosis risk in West Africans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, R; Wejse, C; Velez, D R

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the role of DC-SIGN (CD209), long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) and vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in 321 TB cases and 347 healthy controls from Guinea-Bissau. Five additional, functionally relevant SNPs...... in a nonadditive model with disease risk when analyzed in combination with ethnicity (P=0.03 for DC-SIGN and P=0.003 for VDR). In addition, PTX3 haplotype frequencies significantly differed in cases compared to controls and a protective effect was found in association with a specific haplotype (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.......63-0.98). Our findings support previous data showing that VDR SNPs modulate the risk for TB in West Africans and suggest that variation within DC-SIGN and PTX3 also affect the disease outcome. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Sep...

  5. Search for charginos nearly mass degenerate with the lightest neutralino in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; Bruneliere, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, J.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Paneque, D.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Barklow, T.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.J.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Halley, A.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R.D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; White, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Muller, A.S.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Loomis, C.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; de Vivie de Regie, J.B.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Seager, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-01-01

    A search for charginos nearly mass degenerate with the lightest neutralino is performed with the data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies between 189 and 209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 628 pb-1. The analysis is based on the detection of isolated and energetic initial state radiation photons, produced in association with chargino pairs whose decay products have little visible energy. The number of candidate events observed is in agreement with that expected from Standard Model background sources. These results are combined with those of other direct searches for charginos, and a lower limit of 88 GeV/c2 at 95 % confidence level is derived for the chargino mass in the case of heavy sfermions, irrespective of the chargino-neutralino mass difference.

  6. Final results of the searches for neutral Higgs bosons in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; Bruneliere, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, J.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Paneque, D.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Barklow, T.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.J.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Waananen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Smith, D.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R.D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; White, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecgt, K.; Muller, A.S.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Kachelhoffer, T.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Loomis, C.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; de Vivie de Regie, J.B.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Rosowsky, A.; Seager, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2002-01-01

    The final results of the ALEPH search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at LEP, with data collected in the year 2000 at centre-of-mass energies up to 209,GeV, are presented. The changes with respect to the preceding publication are described and a complete study of systematic effects is reported. The findings of this final analysis confirm the preliminary results published in November 2000 shortly after the closing down of the LEP collider: a significant excess of events is observed, consistent with the production of a $115, Gcs$ Standard Model Higgs boson.% The final results of the searches for the neutral Higgs bosons of the MSSM are also reported, in terms of limits on $mh$, $mA$ and $anb$.% Limits are also set on $mh$ in the case of invisible decays.

  7. Search for associated production of massive states decaying into two photons in $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilations at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 88 - 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Cohen, I.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2002-01-01

    A search is performed for production of short-lived particles in e+e- -> XY, with X -> gamma gamma and Y -> ffbar, for scalar X and scalar or vector Y. Model-independent limits in the range of 25-60 femtobarns are presented on sigma (e+e- -> XY) x B(X -> ffbar) for centre-of-mass energies in the range 205-207 GeV. The data from all LEP centre-of-mass energies 88-209 GeV are also interpreted in the context of fermiophobic Higgs boson models, for which a lower mass limit of 105.5 GeV is obtained for a "benchmark" fermiophobic Higgs boson.

  8. Dynamical decay process of {sup 219,} {sup 220}Ra{sup *} formed in {sup 10,} {sup 11}B+{sup 209}Bi reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawhney, G.; Sharma, M.K. [Thapar University, School of Physics and Materials Science, Punjab (India)

    2012-05-15

    The excitation functions for both the evaporation residue and fission have been calculated for {sup 10}B +{sup 209}Bi and {sup 11}B+{sup 209}Bi reactions forming compound systems {sup 219,220}Ra{sup *}, using the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) with effects of deformations and orientations of the nuclei included in it. In addition to this, the excitation functions for complete fusion (CF) are obtained by summing the fission cross-sections, neutron evaporation and charged particle evaporation residue cross-sections produced through the {alpha}xn and pxn (x = 2, 3, 4) emission channels for the {sup 219}Ra system at various incident centre-of-mass energies. Experimentally the CF cross-sections are suppressed and the observed suppression is attributed to the low binding energy of {sup 10,11}B which breaks up into charged fragments. The reported complete fusion (CF) and incomplete fusion (ICF) excitation functions for the {sup 219}Ra system are found to be nicely fitted by the calculations performed in the framework of DCM, without invoking a significant contribution from quasi-fission. Although DCM has been applied for a number of compound nucleus decay studies in the recent past, the same is being used here in reference to ICF and subsequent decay processes along with the CF process. Interestingly the main contribution to complete fusion cross-section comes from the fission cross-section at higher incident energies, which in DCM is found to consist of an asymmetric fission window, shown to arise due to the deformation and orientation effects of formation and decay fragments. (orig.)

  9. Final Report for grant entitled "Production of Astatine-211 for U.S. Investigators"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, Daniel Scott

    2012-12-12

    Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides hold great promise in the therapy of cancer, but few alpha-emitters are available to investigators to evaluate. Of the alpha-emitters that have properties amenable for use in humans, 211At is of particular interest as it does not have alpha-emitting daughter radionuclides. Thus, there is a high interest in having a source of 211At for sale to investigators in the US. Production of 211At is accomplished on a cyclotron using an alpha-particle beam irradiation of bismuth metal. Unfortunately, there are few cyclotrons available that can produce an alpha particle beam for that production. The University of Washington has a cyclotron, one of three in the U.S., that is currently producing 211At. In the proposed studies, the things necessary for production and shipment of 211At to other investigators will be put into place at UW. Of major importance is the efficient production and isolation of 211At in a form that can be readily used by other investigators. In the studies, production of 211At on the UW cyclotron will be optimized by determining the best beam energy and the highest beam current to maximize 211At production. As it would be very difficult for most investigators to isolate the 211At from the irradiated target, the 211At-isolation process will be optimized and automated to more safely and efficiently obtain the 211At for shipment. Additional tasks to make the 211At available for distribution include obtaining appropriate shipping vials and containers, putting into place the requisite standard operating procedures for Radiation Safety compliance at the levels of 211At activity to be produced / shipped, and working with the Department of Energy, Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program, to take orders, make shipments and be reimbursed for costs of production and shipment.

  10. Production of Astatine-211 at the Duke University Medical Center for its regional distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalutsky, Michael [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Systemic targeted radiation therapy and radioimmunotherapy continue to be important tools in the treatment of certain cancers. Because of their high energy and short path length, alpha particle emitters such as 211At are more effective than either external beam x- ray or in vivo beta radiation in delivering potentially curative doses of radiation. The limited clinical trials that have been conducted to date have yielded encouraging responses in some patients, e.g., malignant brain tumors. In order to escalate the additional necessary research and development in radiochemistry, radiobiology and efficacy evaluation of alpha particle radiotherapeutics, it is universally agreed that access to an affordable, reliable supply of 211At is warranted. In conjunction with the Department of Energy's intent to enhance stable and radioactive isotope availability for research applications, it is the primary objective of this project to improve 211At production and purification capabilities at Duke so that this radionuclide can be supplied to researchers at other institutions throughout the US.The most widely used 211At production method involves the α,2n reaction on Bismuth using a cyclotron with beams ≤ 28 MeV. Yields can be enhanced with use of an internal target that allows for a higher alpha fluence plus efficient heat dissipation in the target. Both of these items are in place at Duke; however, in order to support production for multi-institutional use, irradiation campaigns in excess of 50 µAp and four hours duration will be needed. Further, post-irradiation processing equipment is lacking that will enable the distribution process. Financial support is sought for i) a shielded, ventilated processing/containment hood; ii) development of a post-irradiation target retrieval system; iii) fabrication of a 211At distillation and recovery module and iv) a performance review and, where needed, an enhancement of seven major subsystems that comprise the CS-30 Cyclotron. With these modifications in place, routine production of ≥200 mCi of At-211 should be readily achievable, given our methodological development of At-211 target preparation, internal target irradiation and dry distillation to recover the radionuclide.

  11. Di-Jet Production in Photon-Photon colisions at $\\sqrt{s_{ee}}$ from 189 to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Bloodworth, Ian J; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Caron, B; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Csilling, Akos; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallison, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Elfgren, E; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Fürtjes, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harin-Dirac, M; Hauschild, M; Hauschildt, J; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Hensel, C; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Horváth, D; Howard, R; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karapetian, G V; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klein, K; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kormos, L L; Krämer, T; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Krop, D; Krüger, K; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Leins, A; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, J; MacPherson, A; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Marchant, T E; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Méndez-Lorenzo, P; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Okpara, A N; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Polok, J; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Rick, Hartmut; Roney, J M; Rosati, S; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Taylor, R J; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trefzger, T M; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vachon, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2003-01-01

    Di-jet producion is studied in collisions of quasi-real photons at e+e- centre- of-mass energies sqrt(s)ee from 189 to 209 GeV at LEP. The data were collected with the OPAL detector. Jets are reconstructed using an inclusive k_t clustering algorithm for all cross-section measurements presented. A cone jet algorithm is used in addition to study the different structure of the jets resulting from either of the algorithms. The inclusive di-jet cross-section is measured as a function of the mean transverse energy Etm(jet) of the two leading jets, and as a functiuon of the estimated fraction of the photon momentum carried by the parton entering the hard sub-process, xg, for different regions of Etm (jet). Angular distribution in di-jet events are measured and used to demonstrate the dominance of quark and gluon initiated processes in different regions of phase space. Furthermore the inclusive di-jet cross-section as a function of |eta(jet)| and |delta eta (jet)| is presented where eta(jet) is the jet pseudo-rapidit...

  12. Measurement of the Mass and Width of the W Boson in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 - 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, Sandra F.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, Sofia; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, Pierre; Apel, W-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, Jean-Eudes; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, Antonio; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, Eli; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, Mikael; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, Marc; Besson, N.; Bloch, Daniel; Blom, M.; Bluj, Michal; Bonesini, Maurizio; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, PSL; Borisov, G.; Botner, Olga; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, Marko; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, Tiziano; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, Paolo; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, Roberto; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, Fabio; Costa, M.J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, Javier; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Alessandro; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, Barbara; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Duperrin, A.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, Tord; Ellert, Mattias; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, Maria Catarina; Fanourakis, George K.; Feindt, Michael; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, Miriam; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Philippe; Gazis, Evangelos; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, Vincent; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S-O.; Holt, P.J.; Houlden, M.A.; Jackson, John Neil; Jarlskog, Goran; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, Gabrijel; Kerzel, U.; King, B.T.; Kjaer, N.J.; Kluit, Peter; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, Jacques; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, Pierre; Lyons, Louis; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Nulty, R.Mc; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Muller, Ulrich; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim Filho, Luiz Martins; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J.P.; Palka, Henryk; Papadopoulou, Th.D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, Andrea; Petrolini, Alessandro; Piedra, Jonatan; Pieri, L.; Pierre, Francois; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, Peter; Richard, F.; Ridky, Jan; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, Paolo; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann, Vanina; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, Martin; Simard, L.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, Andrei Valerevich; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Taffard, A.C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, Jan; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, Petr; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, Clara; Turluer, M-L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, Giovanni; Van Dam, P.; Van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, Filipe; Venus, W.; Verdier, Patrice; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, Lorenzo; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, Danilo; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimine, N.I.; Zintchenko, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of the W boson mass and width has been performed by the DELPHI collaboration using the data collected during the full LEP2 programme (1996-2000). The data sample has an integrated luminosity of 660 pb^-1 and was collected over a range of centre-of-mass energies from 161 to 209 GeV. Results are obtained by applying the method of direct reconstruction of the mass of the W from its decay products in both the W+W- -> lvqq and W+W- -> qqqq channels. The W mass result for the combined data set is M_W = 80.336 +/- 0.055 (Stat.) +/- 0.028 (Syst.) +/- 0.025 (FSI) +/- 0.009 (LEP) GeV/c^2, where FSI represents the uncertainty due to final state interaction effects in the qqqq channel, and LEP represents that arising from the knowledge of the collision energy of the accelerator. The combined value for the W width is Gamma_W = 2.404 +/- 0.140 (Stat.) +/- 0.077 (Syst.) +/- 0.065 (FSI) GeV/c^2. These results supersede all values previously published by the DELPHI collaboration. This paper is dedicated to the m...

  13. Recrystallization effects of swift heavy {sup 209}Bi ions irradiation on electrical degradation in 4H-SiC Schottky barrier diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhimei; Ma, Yao; Gong, Min [Key Laboratory for Microelectronics, College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Li, Yun [Key Laboratory for Microelectronics, College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Huang, Mingmin [Key Laboratory for Microelectronics, College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Key Laboratory of Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Gao, Bo [Key Laboratory for Microelectronics, College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Zhao, Xin, E-mail: zhaoxin1234@scu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Microelectronics, College of Physical Science and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2017-06-15

    In this paper, the phenomenon that the recrystallization effects of swift heavy {sup 209}Bi ions irradiation can partially recovery damage with more than 1 × 10{sup 10} ions/cm{sup 2} is investigated by the degradation of the electrical characteristics of 4H-SiC Schottky barrier diode (SBD) with swift heavy ion irradiation. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and Current-Voltage (I-V) measurements clearly indicated that E{sub 0.62} defect induced by swift heavy ion irradiation, which was a recombination center, could result in the increase of reverse leakage current (I{sub R}) at fluence less than 1 × 10{sup 9} ions/cm{sup 2} and the recovery of I{sub R} at fluence more than 1 × 10{sup 10} ions/cm{sup 2} in 4H-SiC SBD. The variation tendency of I{sub R} is consisted with the change of E{sub 0.62} defect. Furthermore, it is reasonable explanation that the damage or defect formed at low fluence in SiC may be recovered by further swift heavy ion irradiation with high fluence, which is due to the melting with the ion tracks of the amorphous zones through a thermal spike and subsequent epitaxial recrystallization initiated from the neighboring crystalline regions.

  14. Scaling violations of quark and gluon jet fragmentation functions in $e^{+}e{-}$ annihilations at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 91.2 and 183-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    Flavour inclusive, udsc and b fragmentation functions in unbiased jets, and flavour inclusive, udsc, b and gluon fragmentation functions in biased jets are measured in e+e- annihilations from data collected at centre-of-mass energies of 91.2, and 183-209 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The unbiased jets are defined by hemispheres of inclusive hadronic events, while the biased jet measurements are based on three-jet events selected with jet algorithms. Several methods are employed to extract the fragmentation functions over a wide range of scales. Possible biases are studied in the results are obtained. The fragmentation functions are compared to results from lower energy e+e- experiments and with earlier LEP measurements and are found to be consistent. Scaling violations are observed and are found to be stronger for the fragmentation functions of gluon jets than for those of quarks. The measured fragmentation functions are compared to three recent theoretical next-to-leading order calculations and to the p...

  15. Cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins, proliferative markers, cell signaling molecules, CD209, and decorin immunoreactivity in low-grade myxofibrosarcoma and myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Justin M M; Memoli, Vincent A; Gonzalez, Raul S

    2015-08-01

    The histologic differential diagnosis between intramuscular myxoma and low-grade myxofibrosarcoma can be quite difficult in some cases. To identify a diagnostic immunohistochemical marker, we compared the staining profiles of 19 different antigens, including cell cycle proteins, apoptosis proteins, and proliferative markers, and selected other signaling and structural proteins in these two tumors. Ten cases each of intramuscular myxoma and low-grade myxofibrosarcoma were stained with antibodies directed against apoptosis regulatory proteins (Bcl2, activated caspase-3, phospho-H2A.X, and cleaved PARP), cell cycle regulatory proteins (Rb1, Cyclin-A, CDKN1B, and Cdt1), proliferative markers (KI67, MCM2, phospho-histone H3, and geminin), cell signalling molecules (c-Myc, EGF, EGFR, PLA2G4A, and HSP90), a dendritic cell marker (CD209), and the extracellular matrix proteoglycan decorin. Staining patterns of myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma were compared using Fisher's exact test and the Mann-Whitney test. For each potential diagnostic marker studied, the proportions of cases scored as positive on both dichotomous or ordinal scales were not significantly different between myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma. Myxoma and myxofibrosarcoma share a common immunophenotype for each of the markers studied. Distinction between these tumors is still predominantly based on morphologic criteria.

  16. Multiphoton events with large missing energy in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=192-209 GeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Bock, P; Boeriu, O; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F L; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Krüger, K; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Vollmer, C F; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L; Von Krogh, J

    2004-01-01

    Events with a final state consisting of two or more photons and large missing transverse energy have been observed in e^{+}e^{-} collisions at centre-of-mass energies in the range 192-209 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. Cross-section measurements are performed within the kinematic acceptance of the selection and compared with the expectations from the standard model process e^{+}e^{-} to nu nu gamma gamma ( gamma ). No evidence for new physics contributions to this final state is observed. Upper limits on sigma (e^{+}e^{-} to XX).BR/sup 2/(X to Y gamma ) are derived for the case of stable and invisible Y. In the case of massive Y the combined limits obtained from all the data range from 10 to 60 fb, while for the special case of massless Y the range is 20 to 40 fb. The limits apply to pair production of excited neutrinos (X= nu *, Y= nu ), to neutralino production (X= chi /sub 2//sup 0/, Y= chi /sub 1//sup 0/ and to supersymmetric models in which X= chi /sub 1//sup 0/ and Y=G is a light gravitino.

  17. Multi-Photon Events with Large Missing Energy in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=192-209 GeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Krüger, K; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J A; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2004-01-01

    Events with a final state consisting of two or more photons and large missing transverse energy have been observed in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies in the range 192 - 209 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. Cross-section measurements are performed within the kinematic acceptance of the selection and compared with the expectation from the Standard Model process e+e- -> nu nu gamma gamma(gamma). No evidence for new physics contributions to this final state is observed. Upper limits on sigma (e+e- -> XX) BR^2(X -> Ygamma) are derived for the case of stable and invisible Y. In the case of massive Y the combined limits obtained from all the data range from 10 fb to 60 fb, while for the special case of massless Y the range is 20 fb to 40 fb. The limits apply to pair production of excited neutrions (X=nu^*,Y=nu), to neutralino production (X=~chi^0_2, Y=~chi^0_1) and to supersymmetric models in which X=~chi^0_1 and Y=~G is a light gravitino.

  18. Search for invisibly decaying Higgs bosons in $e^{+}e^{-} \\rightarrow Z^{0}h^{0}$ production at $\\sqrt{s} = 183 - 209 GeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, R.M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, M.; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A., Jr.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, P.; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D.E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, D.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2010-01-01

    A search is performed for Higgs bosons decaying into invisible final states, produced in association with a Zo boson in e+e- collisions at energies between 183 and 209 GeV. The search is based on data samples collected by the OPAL detector at LEP corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 660 pb-1. The analysis aims to select events containing the hadronic decay products of the Zo boson and large missing momentum, as expected from Higgs boson decay into a pair of stable weakly interacting neutral particles, such as the lightest neutralino in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. The same analysis is applied to a search for nearly invisible Higgs boson cascade decays into stable weakly interacting neutral particles. No excess over the expected background from Standard Model processes is observed. Limits on the production of invisibly decaying Higgs bosons produced in association with a Zo boson are derived. Assuming a branching ratio BR(ho->invisible)=1, a lower limit of 108.2 GeV is placed on the...

  19. Search for Stable and Long-Lived Massive Charged Particles in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    A search for stable and long-lived massive particles of electric charge |Q/e|=1 or fractional charges of 2/3, 4/3, and 5/3 is reported using data collected by the OPAL detector at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies from 130 to 209 GeV. These particles are assumed to be pair-produced in e+e- collisions and not to interact strongly. No evidence for the production of these particles was observed. Model-independent upper limits on the production cross-section between 0.005 and 0.028 pb have been derived for scalar and spin-1/2 particles with charge +-1. Within the framework of the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM), this implies a lower limit of 98.0 (98.5) GeV on the mass of long-lived right (left)- handed scalar muons and scalar taus. Long-lived charged heavy leptons and charginos are excluded for masses below 102.0 GeV. For particles with fractional charge +-2/3, +-4/3, and +-5/3, the upper limit on the production cross-section varies between 0.005 and 0.020 pb. All mass and cross-section l...

  20. Determination of $\\alpha_S$ using OPAL hadronic event shapes at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 91 − 209 GeV and resummed NNLO calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Akesson, P F; Alexander, G; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, R J; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, S; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, M; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, K; Dienes, B; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, J; Gruwe, M; Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Horvath, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krasznahorkay, Jr A; Krieger, P; von Krogh, J; Kuhl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lu, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Mashimo, T; Mattig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; O’Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pasztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan, E K G; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schorner-Sadenius, T; Schroder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R; Soldner-Rembold, S; Spano, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Strohmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Trigger, I; Trocsanyi, Z; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvari, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, J; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2011-01-01

    Hadronic event shape distributions from e+e− annihilation measured by the OPAL experiment at centre-of-mass energies between 91 GeV and 209 GeV are used to determine the strong coupling αS. The results are based on QCD predictions complete to the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO), and on NNLO calculations matched to the resummed next-to-leading-log-approximation terms (NNLO+NLLA). The combined NNLO result from all variables and centre-of-mass energies is αS(mZ0) = 0.1201 ± 0.0008(stat.) ± 0.0013(exp.) ± 0.0010(had.) ± 0.0024(theo.). while the combined NNLO+NLLA result is αS(mZ0) = 0.1189 ± 0.0008(stat.) ± 0.0016(exp.) ± 0.0010(had.) ± 0.0036(theo.). The completeness of the NNLO and NNLO+NLLA results with respect to missing higher order contributions, studied by varying the renormalization scale, is improved compared to previous results based on NLO or NLO+NLLA predictions only. The observed energy dependence of αS agrees with the QCD prediction of asymptotic freedom and excludes the absence o...

  1. Evaluation of the toxic effects of brominated compounds (BDE-47, 99, 209, TBBPA) and bisphenol A (BPA) using a zebrafish liver cell line, ZFL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jie; Chan, King Ming, E-mail: kingchan@cuhk.edu.hk

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • A homologous zebrafish thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR) reporter gene system was developed in a zebrafish liver cell-line (ZFL) to study the possible effects of chemicals on TR activities. • BPA was found to have antagonistic effects on T3 induced TR activity, BDE-47, BDE-99, and TBBPA did not show any interference of TR activity. • Down regulation of deiodinases and some sulfation enzymes or phase II enzymes by the tested chemicals indicated their impacts on TH eleiminations. • The up-regulation of tranthyretin by BDE-47 at 96 h long-term exposure gave a link to the CYP family for its role in producing a more toxic and oxidized form. - Abstract: The toxic effects of three polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners (BDE-47, -99, and -209), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and bisphenol A (BPA), were evaluated by determining their 24 h and 96 h median lethal concentrations using a zebrafish liver cell line, ZFL. It was found that BDE-47, BDE-99 and TBBPA showed comparative cytotoxicity within the range of 1.2–4.2 μM, and were more toxic than BPA (367.1 μM at 24 h and 357.6 μM at 96 h). However, BDE-209 induced only 15% lethality with exposures up to 25 μM. The molecular stresses of BDE-47, -99, TBBPA and BPA involved in thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis and hepatic metabolism were also investigated. Using a reporter gene system to detect zebrafish thyroid hormone receptor β (zfTRβ) transcriptional activity, the median effective concentration of triiodothyronine (T3) was determined to be 9.2 × 10{sup −11} M. BDE-47, BDE-99, TBBPA and BPA alone, however, did not exhibit zfTRβ agonistic activity. BPA displayed T3 (0.1 nM) induced zfTRβ antagonistic activity with a median inhibitory concentration of 19.3 μM. BDE-47, BDE-99 and TBBPA displayed no antagonistic effects of T3-induced zfTRβ activity. Target gene expressions were also examined under acute exposures. The significant inhibition of different types of deiodinases by all of

  2. The course of inflammatory bowel disease during pregnancy and postpartum: a prospective European ECCO-EpiCom Study of 209 pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, N; Bortoli, A; Duricova, D; D Inca, R; Panelli, M R; Gisbert, J P; Zoli, G; López-Sanromán, A; Castiglione, F; Riegler, G; Annese, V; Gionchetti, P; Prada, A; Pont, E D; Timmer, A; Felley, C; Shuhaibar, M; Tsianos, E V; Dejaco, C; Baert, F J; Jess, T; Lebech, M; Hommes, D W; Munkholm, P

    2013-09-01

    The impact of pregnancy on the course of IBD is still controversial. To investigate the impact of pregnancy on IBD and to search for factors with potential impact on remission. Pregnant IBD women from 12 European countries were enrolled between January 2003 and December 2006 and compared at conception (1:1) with nonpregnant IBD women. Data on disease course were prospectively collected at each trimester during pregnancy and in the postpartum (6 months) using a standardised questionnaire. A total of 209 pregnant IBD women were included: 92 with Crohn's disease (CD; median age 31 years, range 17-40) and 117 with ulcerative colitis (UC; median age 32 years, range 19-42). No statistically significant difference in disease course during pregnancy and postpartum was observed between pregnant and nonpregnant CD women. Longer disease duration in CD and immunosuppressive therapy were found to be risk factors for activity during pregnancy. Pregnant UC women were more likely than nonpregnant UC women to relapse both during pregnancy (RR 2.19; 95% CI: 1.25-3.97, 0.004) and postpartum (RR 6.22; 95% CI: 2.05-79.3, P = 0.0004). During pregnancy, relapse was mainly observed in the first (RR 8.80; 95% CI 2.05-79.3, P disease had a similar disease course both during pregnancy and after delivery as the nonpregnant women. In contrast, pregnant women with ulcerative colitis were at higher risk of relapse during pregnancy and in the postpartum than nonpregnant ulcerative colitis women. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. QSPR models for prediction of the soil sorption coefficient (log KOC) values of 209 polychlorinated trans-azobenzenes (PCt-ABs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyńska-Piliszek, Agata J; Piliszek, Sławomir; Falandysz, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    The values of the soil sorption coefficient (K(OC)) have been computed for 209 environmentally relevant trans polychlorinated azobenzenes (PCABs) lacking experimental partitioning data. The quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) approach and artificial neural networks (ANN) predictive ability used in models based on geometry optimalization and quantum-chemical structural descriptors, which were computed on the level of density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP functional and 6-311++G** basis set and of the semi-empirical quantum chemistry method for property parameterization (PM6) of the molecular orbital package (MOPAC). An experimentally available data on physical and chemical properties of PCDD/Fs and PCBs were used as reference data for the QSPR models and ANNs predictions in this study. Both calculation methods gave similar results in term of absolute log K(OC) values, while the PM6 model generated in the MOPAC was a much more efficient compared to the DFT model in GAUSSIAN. The estimated values of log K(OC) varied between 4.93 and 5.62 for mono-, 5.27 and 7.46 for di-, 6.46 and 8.09 for tri-, 6.65 and 9.11 for tetra-, 6.75 and 9.68 for penta-, 6.44 and 10.24 for hexa-, 7.00 and 10.36 for hepta-, 7.09 and 9.82 octa-, 8.94 and 9.71 for nona-Ct-ABs, and 9.26 and 9.34 for deca-Ct-AB. Because of high log K(OC) values PCt-ABs could be classified as compounds with high affinity to the particles of soil, sediments and organic matter.

  4. Study of single Z-boson production and Compton scattering in electron-positron collisions at LEP at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    This thesis discusses two main topics. First, the cross section of the process e + e - [arrow right]Ze + e - is measured with 0.7 ph - of data collected with the L3 detector at LEP. Decays of the Z boson into quarks and muons are considered at center-of-mass energies ranging frond 183 GeV up to 209 GeV. The measurements are found to agree with Standard Model predictions, achieving a precision of about 10% for the hadronic channel. Second, Compton scattering of quasi-real virtual photons, γe ± [arrow right]γe ± , is studied with 0.6 fb - 1 of data collected by the L3 detector at LEP at center-of-mass energies [Special characters omitted.] = 189--209GeV. About 4500 events produced by the interaction of virtual photons emitted by particles of one beam with particles of the opposite beam are collected for effective center-of-mass energies of photon-electron and photon-positron systems in the range [Special characters omitted.] = 35 GeV up to [Special characters omitted.] = 175 GeV, the highest energy at which...

  5. Modes of transference and rupture of the nucleus with neutron halos {sup 6} He on {sup 209} Bi near of the Coulomb barrier; Modos de transferencia y rompimiento del nucleo con halo neutronico {sup 6} He sobre {sup 209} Bi cerca de la barrera de Coulomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizcano C, D

    2003-07-01

    In recent experiments, the fusion of the exotic radioactive nucleus {sup 6} He with {sup 209} Bi has been studied for the first time at energies above and below the Coulomb barrier. A considerable enhancement in the fusion was observed, which implies a reduction of about 25% in the nominal fusion barrier. Some previous theoretical works suggest that this striking effect may be caused by the coupling to neutron transfer channels with a positive Q-value which would lead to a neutron flow and the consequent formation of a neck between the projectile and the target. Later, in the current work, we ran two new experiments on the same reaction using the FN Tandem Van de Graaff (10 MV) accelerator and the dual superconducting TwinSol system, both of them belonging to the University of Notre Dame, USA. This time, the purpose was to study one- and two-neutron transfer and the {sup 6} He projectile breakup at laboratory energies of 14.7, 16.2, 17.9, 19.0 and 22.5 MeV. A strong group of {sup 4} He was observed (with an effective Q-value about .5 MeV) whose integrated cross section results exceptionally high, exceeding the fusion cross section both above and below the barrier. The simultaneously measured elastic scattering angular distribution required high total cross sections so that this yield is confirmed. Preliminary coupled channels calculations sing the computer program called Fresco developed at the University of Surrey (England) suggested that the reaction mechanisms may be better described as a direct nuclear breakup and two-neutron transfer to unbound states in {sup 211} Bi. These calculations predicted also an enhancement in the fusion cross section below the barrier due to the transfer and breakup channel coupling, which strongly suggests that this channel is the 'doorway state' that explains the fusion barrier reduction observed in previous experiments. It was found that the {sup 4} He group fully dominates the total reaction cross section at the

  6. β-Thalassemia major resulting from compound heterozygosity for HBB: c.92+2T>C [formerly known as IVS-I-2 (T>C)] and a novel β(0)-thalassemia frameshift mutation: HBB: c.209delG; p.Gly70Valfs*20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Michelle L; Hoyer, James D; Swanson, Kenneth C; Oliveira, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    A novel β(0)-thalassemia (β-thal) frameshift mutation, HBB: c.209delG; p.Gly70Valfs*20, is described in a 21-year-old African American female with β-thalassemia major (β-TM) due to compound heterozygosity for the β(0)-thal mutation HBB: c.92+2T>C [formerly known as IVS-I-2 (T>C)] and HBB: c.209delG. The combination of these mutations demonstrates a complete lack of β-globin chain synthesis, evidenced by the proband having no Hb A present.

  7. Evaluation of Novel Wet Chemistry Separation and Purification Methods to Facilitate Automation of Astatine-­211 Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, Daniel Scott [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-07-19

    This research is a collaborative effort between the research groups of the PIs, Dr. D. Scott Wilbur in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Washington (UW) and Matthew O’Hara at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In this report only those studies conducted at UW and the budget information from UW will be reported. A separate progress and financial report will be provided by PNNL. This final report outlines the experiments (Tasks) conducted and results obtained at UW from July 1, 2013 thru June 30, 2016 (2-­year project with 1 year no-­cost extension). The report divides the information on the experiments and results obtained into the 5 specific objectives of the research efforts and the Tasks within those objectives. This format is used so that it is easy to see what has been accomplished in each area. A brief summary of the major findings from the studies is provided below. Summary of Major Findings from Research/Training Activities at UW: Anion and cation exchange columns did not provide adequate 211At capture and/or extraction results under conditions studied to warrant further evaluation; PEG-­Merrifield resins containing mPEG350, mPEG750, mPEG2000 and mPEG5000 were synthesized and evaluated; All of the mPEG resins with different sized mPEG moieties conjugated gave similar 211At capture (>95%) from 8M HCl solutions and release with conc. NH4OH (~50-­80%), but very low quantities were released when NaOH was used as an eluent; Capture and release of 211At when loading [211At]astatate appeared to be similar to that of [211At]astatide on PEG columns, but further studies need to be conducted to confirm that; Capture of 211At on PEG columns was lower (e.g. 80-­90%) from solutions of 8M HNO3, but higher capture rates (e.g. 99%) can be obtained when 10M HNO3 is mixed with an equal quantity of 8M HCl; Addition of reductants to the 211At solutions did not appear to change the percent capture, but may have an effect on the % extracted; There was some indication that the PEG-­Merrifield resins could be saturated (perhaps with Bi) resulting in lower capture percentages, but more studies need to be done to confirm that; A target dissolution chamber, designed and built at PNNL, works well with syringe pumps so it can be used in an automated system; Preliminary semi-­automated 211At isolation studies have been conducted with full-scale target dissolution and 211At isolation using a PEG column on the Hamilton automated system gave low overall recoveries, but HNO3 was used (rather than HCl) for loading the 211At and flow rates were not optimized; Results obtained using PEG columns are high enough to warrant further development on a fully automated system; Results obtained also indicate that additional studies are warranted to evaluate other types of columns for 211At separation from bismuth, which allow use of HNO3/HCl mixtures for loading and NaOH for eluting 211At. Such a column could greatly simplify the overall isolation process and make it easier to automate.

  8. High resolution neutron (n,xn) cross-section measurements for {sup 206,207,208}Pb and {sup 209}Bi from threshold up to 20 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, L.C.; Borcea, C.; Plompen, A.J.M. [European Commission, Joint Research Center, Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Geel (Belgium); Baumann, P.; Dessagne, P.; Kerveno, M.; Lukic, S.; Rudolf, G. [IReS, IN2P3, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Jericha, E.; Pavlik, A. [Wien Technische Univ. (Austria); Koning, A.J. [Nuclear Research Group Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    Gamma production cross sections for neutron inelastic scattering reactions (n,xn) (x = 1, 2, 3) were measured for three different highly enriched targets of {sup 206}Pb, {sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb and for {sup 209}Bi. Using the known decay schemes of these isotopes, the total inelastic cross sections and level inelastic cross sections were determined. The measurements are continuous in neutron energy and cover a wide interval (from threshold energy up to about 20 MeV). The experiments were performed at the GELINA white neutron source, at the 200 m flight path station with a time resolution of 8 ns, resulting in an unprecedented neutron energy resolution of 1.1 keV at 1 MeV (36 keV at 10 MeV). (authors)

  9. Preparing a journey to the east of {sup 208}Pb with ISOLTRAP: Isobaric purification at A = 209 and new masses for {sup 211-213}Fr and {sup 211}Ra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalska, M.; Herlert, A. [CERN, Physics Department, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Naimi, S.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Minaya-Ramirez, E. [Universite de Paris Sud, CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, Orsay (France); Agramunt, J.; Estevez, E.; Rubio, B. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, IFIC, Valencia (Spain); Algora, A. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, IFIC, Valencia (Spain); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary); Beck, D.; Herfurth, F. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Blank, B. [Universite Bordeaux 1/CNRS/IN2P3, CENBG, Gradignan Cedex (France); Blaum, K.; Boehm, C.; Kellerbauer, A.; Neidherr, D.; Warring, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Breitenfeldt, M.; Rosenbusch, M.; Schweikhard, L. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, Greifswald (Germany); Fraile, L.M.; Olaizola, B. [Universidad Complutense, Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Madrid (Spain); George, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, Mainz (Germany); Riisager, K. [University of Aarhus, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus (Denmark); Schwarz, S. [Michigan State University, NSCL, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2009-12-15

    With the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP, located at ISOLDE/CERN, preparatory work has been performed towards mass and decay studies on neutron-rich Hg and Tl isotopes beyond N=126. The properties of these isotopes are not well known because of large isobaric contamination coming mainly from surface-ionised Fr. Within the studies, production tests using several target-ion source combinations were performed. It was furthermore demonstrated around mass number A=209 that the resolving power required to purify Fr is achievable with ISOLTRAP. In addition, masses of several isobaric contaminants, {sup 211-213}Fr and {sup 211}Ra, were determined with a three-fold improved precision. The results influence masses of more than 20 other nuclides in the {sup 208}Pb region. (orig.)

  10. Experimental Cross Sections for Reactions of Heavy Ions and 208Pb, 209Bi, 238U, and 248Cm Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patin, Joshua Barnes [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The study of the reactions between heavy ions and 208Pb, 209Bi, 238U, and 248Cm Cm targets was performed to look at the differences between the cross sections of hot and cold fusion reactions. Experimental cross sections were compared with predictions from statistical computer codes to evaluate the effectiveness of the computer code in predicting production cross sections. Hot fusion reactions were studied with the MG system, catcher foil techniques and the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS). 3n- and 4n-exit channel production cross sections were obtained for the 238U(18O,xn)256-xFm, 238U(22Ne,xn)260-xNo, and 248Cm(15N,xn)263-xLr reactions and are similar to previous experimental results. The experimental cross sections were accurately modeled by the predictions of the HIVAP code using the Reisdorf and Schaedel parameters and are consistent with the existing systematics of 4n exit channel reaction products. Cold fusion reactions were examined using the BGS. The 48Pb(238Ca,xn)256-xNo, 208Pb(50Ti,xn)258-xRf, 208Pb(51V,xn)259-xDb, 50Bi(238Ti,xn)259-xDb, and 209Bi(51V,xn)260-xSg reactions were studied. The experimental production cross sections are in agreement with the results observed in previous experiments. It was necessary to slightly alter the Reisdorf and Schaedel parameters for use in the HIVAP code in order to more accurately model the experimental data. The cold fusion experimental results are in agreement with current 1n- and 2n-exit channel systematics.

  11. Mice with an N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU Induced Tyr209Asn Mutation in Natriuretic Peptide Receptor 3 (NPR3 Provide a Model for Kyphosis Associated with Activation of the MAPK Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T Esapa

    Full Text Available Non-syndromic kyphosis is a common disorder that is associated with significant morbidity and has a strong genetic involvement; however, the causative genes remain to be identified, as such studies are hampered by genetic heterogeneity, small families and various modes of inheritance. To overcome these limitations, we investigated 12 week old progeny of mice treated with the chemical mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU using phenotypic assessments including dysmorphology, radiography, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. This identified a mouse with autosomal recessive kyphosis (KYLB. KYLB mice, when compared to unaffected littermates, had: thoraco-lumbar kyphosis, larger vertebrae, and increased body length and increased bone area. In addition, female KYLB mice had increases in bone mineral content and plasma alkaline phosphatase activity. Recombination mapping localized the Kylb locus to a 5.5Mb region on chromosome 15A1, which contained 51 genes, including the natriuretic peptide receptor 3 (Npr3 gene. DNA sequence analysis of Npr3 identified a missense mutation, Tyr209Asn, which introduced an N-linked glycosylation consensus sequence. Expression of wild-type NPR3 and the KYLB-associated Tyr209Asn NPR3 mutant in COS-7 cells demonstrated the mutant to be associated with abnormal N-linked glycosylation and retention in the endoplasmic reticulum that resulted in its absence from the plasma membrane. NPR3 is a decoy receptor for C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP, which also binds to NPR2 and stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling, thereby increasing the number and size of hypertrophic chondrocytes. Histomorphometric analysis of KYLB vertebrae and tibiae showed delayed endochondral ossification and expansion of the hypertrophic zones of the growth plates, and immunohistochemistry revealed increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation throughout the growth plates of KYLB vertebrae. Thus, we established a model of kyphosis due to a novel NPR

  12. Use of quantitative-structure property relationship (QSPR) and artificial neural network (ANN) based approaches for estimating the octanol-water partition coefficients of the 209 chlorinated trans-azobenzene congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczyńska-Piliszek, Agata J; Piliszek, Sławomir; Falandysz, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    Polychlorinated azobenzenes (PCABs) can be found as contaminant by products in 3,4-dichloroaniline and its derivatives and in the herbicides Diuron, Linuron, Methazole, Neburon, Propanil and SWEP. Trans congeners of PCABs are physically and chemically more stable and so are environmentally relevant, when compared to unstable cis congeners. In this study, to fulfill gaps on environmentally relevant partitioning properties of PCABs, the values of n-octanol/water partition coefficients (log K(OW)) have been determined for 209 congeners of chloro-trans-azobenzene (Ct-AB) by means of quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) approach and artificial neural networks (ANN) predictive ability. The QSPR methods used based on geometry optimalization and quantum-chemical structural descriptors, which were computed on the level of density functional theory (DFT) using B3LYP functional and 6-311++G basis set in Gaussian 03 and of the semi-empirical quantum chemistry method (PM6) of the molecular orbital package (MOPAC). Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), -furans (PCDFs) and -biphenyls (PCBs), to which PCABs are related, were reference compounds in this study. An experimentally obtained data on physical and chemical properties of PCDD/Fs and PCBs were reference data for ANN predictions of log K(OW) values of Ct-ABs in this study. Both calculation methods gave similar results in term of absolute log K(OW) values, while the models generated by PM6 are considered highly efficient in time spent, when compared to these by DFT. The estimated log K(OW) values of 209 Ct-ABs varied between 5.22-5.57 and 5.45-5.60 for Mono-, 5.56-6.00 and 5.59-6.07 for Di-, 5.89-6.56 and 5.91-6.46 for Tri-, 6.10-7.05 and 6.13-6.80 for Tetra-, 6.43-7.39 and 6.48-7.14 for Penta-, 6.61-7.78 and 6.98-7.42 for Hexa-, 7.41-7.94 and 7.34-7.86 for Hepta-, 7.99-8.17 and 7.72-8.20 for Octa-, 8.35-8.42 and 8.10-8.62 for NonaCt-ABs, and 8.52-8.60 and 8.81-8.83 for DecaCt-AB. These log K(OW) values

  13. Identification of the Peptide PyroQ-βCasein194-209as a Highly Specific and Sensitive Marker to Differentiate between Ultrahigh-Temperature Processed (UHT) Milk and Mildly Heated Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalabasmaz, Sevim; Ebner, Jennifer; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2017-12-13

    In this study, a new approach was introduced to identify marker peptides that reflect the thermal treatment of commercial milk samples and differentiate ultrahigh-temperature processed (UHT) milk from mildly heated milk. Peptide profiles of training set samples, pasteurized (n = 20), extended shelf life (n = 29), and UHT (n = 29) milk, were recorded by MALDI-TOF-MS after StageTip microextraction. As marker candidates, 13 peptides were selected, and their cutoff levels were defined. The quality of the cutoff levels was then tested with a blind test set. Thus, the peptide m/z 1701.0, which was identified as pyroQ-βcasein 194-209 , could ideally differentiate UHT milk from mildly heated milk with an accuracy of 100%. Due to its high reliability and sensitivity, this peptide may be applied in routine analysis to monitor thermal processing of milk. An additional heating experiment showed that the marker peptide candidates are formed during milk processing by endogenous enzymes and selective thermal cleavage.

  14. Absolute photofission cross section of sup 197 Au, @Pb, sup 209 Bi, sup 232 Th, sup 238 U, and sup 235 U nuclei by 69-MeV monochromatic and polarized photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, J.B.; Moreira, E.L.; Tavares, O.A.P.; Vieira, J.L. (Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico-CNPq (BR) Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290 Rio de Janeiro-RJ, (Brazil)); Casano, L.; D' Angelo, A.; Schaerf, C. (Dipartimento di Fisica, II Universita' degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata' ' , Via E. Carnevale, 00173 Roma, (Italy) Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-INFN, Sezione di Roma 2, Roma, (Italy)); Terranova, M.L. (Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, II Universita' degli Studi di Rom Torr Vergata' ' , Via E. Carnevale, 00173 Roma, (Italy) Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-INFN, Sezione di Roma 2, Roma, Italy); Babusci, D. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare-INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati-LNF, Casella Postale 13, 00044 Frascati, (Italy)); Girolami, B. (Laboratorio di Fisica dell' Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Roma, (Italy) Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nuclea

    1991-07-01

    Absolute cross-section measurements for the photofission reactions of {sup 197}Au, {sup nat}Pb, {sup 209}Bi, {sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U, and {sup 235}U nuclei have been performed at an incident photon energy of 69 MeV using monochromatic and polarized photon beams and dielectric fission-track detectors. Nuclear fissility values have been obtained and results are in agreement with those from other laboratories, although in some cases discrepancies are observed between one other. For nuclei in the region of the actinides the fissility result is {approx gt}0.4, while for Au, Pb, and Bi nuclei it only is {similar to}10{sup {minus}3}--10{sup {minus}2}. Results have been interpreted in terms of the primary Levinger's quasideuteron nuclear photoabsorption followed by a mechanism of evaporation-fission competition for the excited nuclei. Shell effects have been taken into account, and they are clearly manifested when fissility is evaluated. The influence of photon polarization on photofission of {sup 238}U also has been investigated, and results have shown isotropy in the fragment azimuthal distribution.

  15. Analogues of amphibian alkaloids: total synthesis of (5R,8S,8aS)-(-)-8-methyl-5-pentyloctahydroindolizine (8-epi-indolizidine 209B) and [(1S,4R,9aS)-(-)-4-pentyloctahydro-2H-quinolizin-1-yl]methanol

    OpenAIRE

    de Koning Charles B; Accone Claudia; Michael Joseph P; van der Westhuyzen Christiaan W

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Prior work from these laboratories has centred on the development of enaminones as versatile intermediates for the synthesis of alkaloids and other nitrogen-containing heterocycles. In this paper we describe the enantioselective synthesis of indolizidine and quinolizidine analogues of bicyclic amphibian alkaloids via pyrrolidinylidene- and piperidinylidene-containing enaminones. Results Our previously reported synthesis of racemic 8-epi-indolizidine 209B has been extended ...

  16. 9 CFR 93.209 - Quarantine requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTAIN ANIMALS, BIRDS, FISH, AND POULTRY, AND CERTAIN ANIMAL, BIRD, AND POULTRY PRODUCTS; REQUIREMENTS... in § 94.6(a)(2) of this chapter as free of exotic Newcastle disease, shall be quarantined from time...

  17. 23 CFR 645.209 - General requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... enhancement and natural beauty. Such areas include public park and recreational lands, wildlife and waterfowl... standards set forth in the current edition of the “Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices” (MUTCD) and 23...

  18. GPCR Interaction: 209 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available about hetero oligomer between growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) and secretin receptor (SecR), and...and interfaces of GNRH B Growth hormone releasing hormone ... GHRH C Secretin ... SecR Experiment SecR does

  19. Publications | Page 209 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... umum dan dokter gigi berdasarkan beban kerja di kabupaten Alor tahun 2011 : time dan motion study (restricted access). Background: The scarcity problem of general physicians and dentist in Alor District treated by the government by providing Rp. 6.500.000,- monthly payment for the general physicians and the dentists.

  20. 49 CFR 209.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 App. U.S.C. 1801 et seq.); (iii) the Sanitary Food Transportation Act of 1990 (SFTA) (49 U.S.C... surveillance activities under part 212 of this chapter, or any other official duly authorized by FRA. Motion...

  1. 44 CFR 209.2 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: Parks for outdoor recreational activities; nature reserves; cultivation; grazing; camping (except where... negative impacts to the area if future disasters were to occur. Both costs and benefits will be computed on... the State's systematic evaluation of the nature and extent of vulnerability to the effects of natural...

  2. Library Photocopy Operations. SPEC Kit 209.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almony, Robert A., Jr., Comp.; O'Brien, Francis, Comp.

    The kit and flyer examine library photocopy operations, including services, personnel, equipment, and financial management practices by member institutions of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). To find out about these operations, ARL surveyed its 112 members, and received 93 replies. Forty-nine academic libraries (58%) described their…

  3. Reference: 209 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available as been implicated in both mRNA and 23S rRNA 3' processing. However, the observed...fected in such mutants, suggesting that RNR1 activity is either unnecessary or redundant for their processing and turnover. However,

  4. Publications | Page 209 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Reconstruction of Haiti : Strengthening Argentina's Capacity for Effective Cooperation (Phase II); final technical report, May 2009 - April 2012 (open access) ... We draw on empirical results from three case studies of property rights change across forest and fisheries ecosystems in central Vietnam to investigate the ...

  5. 14 CFR 67.209 - Neurologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... standards for a second-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or clinical diagnosis of any of the following: (1) Epilepsy; (2) A disturbance of consciousness without satisfactory... neurologic condition that the Federal Air Surgeon, based on the case history and appropriate, qualified...

  6. 49 CFR 209.329 - Assessment considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... disqualification. (b) In determining respondent's lack of fitness to perform safety-sensitive functions and the... railroad industry; (5) The consistency of the conditions of the proposed disqualification with...

  7. 48 CFR 209.403 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Defense Information Systems Agency—The General Counsel Defense Intelligence Agency—The Senior Procurement...—Intelligence Agency—The General Counsel Defense Threat Reduction Agency—The Director National Security Agency... determines that a contractor has engaged in bid-rigging, price-fixing, or other anti-competitive behavior; or...

  8. 49 CFR 107.209 - Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the public docket. The Chief Counsel will publish the determination or notice of the determination in... requirement of a State or political subdivision or Indian tribe is preempted under the Federal hazardous... respect to a particular requirement of a State or political subdivision or Indian tribe carries no...

  9. 40 CFR 61.209 - Required records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... used to determine average radium-226 concentration pursuant to § 61.207, including all measurements... sufficient to allow an independent auditor to verify the accuracy of the radium-226 concentration. (c) Each... phosphogypsum. (2) A description of each use of phosphogypsum, including the handling and processing that the...

  10. 22 CFR 209.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...)(i) A college, university, or other postsecondary institution, or a public system of higher education; or (ii) A local educational agency (as defined in 20 U.S.C. 7801), system of vocational education, or...) The term United States means the States of the United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico...

  11. 27 CFR 9.209 - Calistoga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...-southeast (after crossing Cyrus Creek) along the 400-foot contour line to its intersection with Ritchey Creek in section 16, T8N/R6W; (3) Follows Ritchey Creek northeast approximately 0.3 mile to its...

  12. 48 CFR 209.570-2 - Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... DEFENSE ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Organizational and Consultant Conflicts of Interest... from having any direct financial interest in the development or construction of any individual system... appropriate steps to prevent any organizational conflict of interest in the selection process; or (2) The...

  13. 22 CFR 20.9 - Application procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... by June 22, 1990 or, if an exception is made for compelling cause to this deadline, within 60 days... divorce or annulment that establish eligibility and fully identify the Foreign Service employee or former...

  14. Optimal cutoff values of allergen-specific immunoglobulin E to house dust mites and animal dander based on skin-prick test results: Analysis in 16,209 patients with allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-25

    The most common tests for allergen sensitization in patients with allergic rhinitis are the skin-prick test(SPT) and an in vitro test to detect serum specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE). However, in vitro allergen test results were interpreted dichotomically as positive or negative at a threshold of 0.35kU/L of sIgE, regardless of the patient characteristics or antigen types. The purpose of this study was to determine the cutoff value for sIgE in house-dust mites and animal dander, and to analyze differences in cutoff value according to age and gender. A total of 16,209 patients with more than one allergic rhinitis symptom who underwent both SPT and serum sIgE testing were retrospectively evaluated between March 2008 and May 2012. There were 9374 male (57.8%) and 6835 female (42.2%) patients. The mean age was 31.8 years (range, 2-89 years). The criterion standard for allergen sensitization was defined as a wheal of > 3 mm or an allergen-to-histamine ratio of greater than or equal to 1 in SPT results. The Youden index was used to calculate the cutoff value of sIgE. Cutoff values of sIgE for Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, cat, and dog were 0.69, 1.16, 0.13, and 0.45 kU/L, respectively. The cutoff value of sIgE changed according to age for D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae but not for cat and dog allergens. When categorizingaccording to age group, the cutoff values of sIgE for D. pteronyssinus and D. farinae had a tendency to decrease with age. There was no significant difference in cutoff value according to gender. The cutoff value for sIgE differed for each antigen and changed with age. Physicians should select the proper cutoff value for sIgE for appropriate criteria according to antigen and patient age rather than using a uniform cutoff value.

  15. 49 CFR 571.209 - Standard No. 209; Seat belt assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... accident, including all necessary buckles and other fasteners, and all hardware designed for installing... drum (D) which has a stroke of 330 mm. Suitable guides shall be used to prevent movement of the webbing along the axis of hexagonal bar C. Drum D shall be oscillated for 5,000 strokes or 2,500 cycles at a...

  16. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Damian J.; Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C.; Frayo, Shani; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Hylarides, Mark; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Balkan, Ethan R.; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W.; Frost, Sophia; Gopal, Ajay K.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Gooley, Ted; Laird, Kelley L.; Till, B. G.; Back, Tom; Sandmaier, B. M.; Pagel, John M.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-03-26

    Alpha emitting radionuclides release a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD) conditions in which micrometastatic disease satellites are broadly distributed. To evaluate this hypothesis, 211At conjugated 1F5 mAb (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to 211At conjugated 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48µCi of anti-CD20 211At-decaborate [211At-B10-1F5] experienced modest responses (0% cures but 2-3-fold prolongation of survival compared to negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with 211At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity is observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of 211At-B10-1F5. These findings suggest that in a MRD lymphoma model, where isolated cells and tumor microclusters prevail, α-emitters may be uniquely efficacious.

  17. LaNi5-Assisted Hydrogenation of MgNi2 in the Hybrid Structures of La1.09Mg1.91Ni9D9.5 and La0.91Mg2.09Ni9D9.4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman V. Denys

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This work focused on the high pressure PCT and in situ neutron powder diffraction studies of the LaMg2Ni9-H2 (D2 system at pressures up to 1,000 bar. LaMg2Ni9 alloy was prepared by a powder metallurgy route from the LaNi9 alloy precursor and Mg powder. Two La3−xMgxNi9 samples with slightly different La/Mg ratios were studied, La1.1Mg1.9Ni9 (sample 1 and La0.9Mg2.1Ni9 (sample 2. In situ neutron powder diffraction studies of the La1.09Mg1.91Ni9D9.5 (1 and La0.91Mg2.09Ni9D9.4 (2 deuterides were performed at 25 bar D2 (1 and 918 bar D2 (2. The hydrogenation properties of the (1 and (2 are dramatically different from those for LaNi3. The Mg-containing intermetallics reversibly form hydrides with DHdes = 24.0 kJ/molH2 and an equilibrium pressure of H2 desorption of 18 bar at 20 °C (La1.09Mg1.91Ni9. A pronounced hysteresis of H2 absorption and desorption, ~100 bar, is observed. The studies showed that LaNi5-assisted hydrogenation of MgNi2 in the LaMg2Ni9 hybrid structure takes place. In the La1.09Mg1.91Ni9D9.5 (1 and La0.91Mg2.09Ni9D9.4 (2 (a = 5.263/5.212; c = 25.803/25.71 Å D atoms are accommodated in both Laves and CaCu5-type slabs. In the LaNi5 CaCu5-type layer, D atoms fill three types of interstices; a deformed octahedron [La2Ni4], and [La(Mg2Ni2] and [Ni4] tetrahedra. The overall chemical compositions can be presented as LaNi5H5.6/5.0 + 2*MgNi2H1.95/2.2 showing that the hydrogenation of the MgNi2 slab proceeds at mild H2/D2 pressure of just 20 bar. A partial filling by D of the four types of the tetrahedral interstices in the MgNi2 slab takes place, including [MgNi3] and [Mg2Ni2] tetrahedra.

  18. Analogues of amphibian alkaloids: total synthesis of (5R,8S,8aS)-(-)-8-methyl-5-pentyloctahydroindolizine (8-epi-indolizidine 209B) and [(1S,4R,9aS)-(-)-4-pentyloctahydro-2H-quinolizin-1-yl]methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Joseph P; Accone, Claudia; de Koning, Charles B; van der Westhuyzen, Christiaan W

    2008-01-18

    Prior work from these laboratories has centred on the development of enaminones as versatile intermediates for the synthesis of alkaloids and other nitrogen-containing heterocycles. In this paper we describe the enantioselective synthesis of indolizidine and quinolizidine analogues of bicyclic amphibian alkaloids via pyrrolidinylidene- and piperidinylidene-containing enaminones. Our previously reported synthesis of racemic 8-epi-indolizidine 209B has been extended to the laevorotatory enantiomer, (-)-9. Attempts to adapt the synthetic route in order to obtain quinolizidine analogues revealed that a key piperidinylidene-containing enaminone intermediate (+)-28 was less tractable than its pyrrolidinylidene counterpart, thereby necessitating modifications that included timing changes and additional protection-deprotection steps. A successful synthesis of [(1S,4R,9aS)-4-pentyloctahydro-2H-quinolizin-1-yl]methanol (-)-41 from the chiral amine tert-butyl (3R)-3-{benzyl [(1R)-1-phenylethyl]amino}octanoate (+)-14 was achieved in 14 steps and an overall yield of 20.4%. The methodology reported in this article was successfully applied to the enantioselective synthesis of the title compounds. It paves the way for the total synthesis of a range of cis-5,8-disubstituted indolizidines and cis-1,4-disubstituted quinolizidines, as well as the naturally occurring trans-disubstituted alkaloids.

  19. Analogues of amphibian alkaloids: total synthesis of (5R,8S,8aS-(--8-methyl-5-pentyloctahydroindolizine (8-epi-indolizidine 209B and [(1S,4R,9aS-(--4-pentyloctahydro-2H-quinolizin-1-yl]methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Koning Charles B

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prior work from these laboratories has centred on the development of enaminones as versatile intermediates for the synthesis of alkaloids and other nitrogen-containing heterocycles. In this paper we describe the enantioselective synthesis of indolizidine and quinolizidine analogues of bicyclic amphibian alkaloids via pyrrolidinylidene- and piperidinylidene-containing enaminones. Results Our previously reported synthesis of racemic 8-epi-indolizidine 209B has been extended to the laevorotatory enantiomer, (--9. Attempts to adapt the synthetic route in order to obtain quinolizidine analogues revealed that a key piperidinylidene-containing enaminone intermediate (+-28 was less tractable than its pyrrolidinylidene counterpart, thereby necessitating modifications that included timing changes and additional protection-deprotection steps. A successful synthesis of [(1S,4R,9aS-4-pentyloctahydro-2H-quinolizin-1-yl]methanol (--41 from the chiral amine tert-butyl (3R-3-{benzyl [(1R-1-phenylethyl]amino}octanoate (+-14 was achieved in 14 steps and an overall yield of 20.4%. Conclusion The methodology reported in this article was successfully applied to the enantioselective synthesis of the title compounds. It paves the way for the total synthesis of a range of cis-5,8-disubstituted indolizidines and cis-1,4-disubstituted quinolizidines, as well as the naturally occurring trans-disubstituted alkaloids.

  20. Dicty_cDB: VSC209 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NNELPLIEENKKEFRKYLSERSFG NFKRCLDLTSILYQLDLSTIKSNFENGLLIITINKKSDLSNSSFKININ*yp*f*iiiki ilkktck*ykknfi...NNELPLIEENKKEFRKYLSERSFG NFKRCLDLTSILYQLDLSTIKSNFENGLLIITINKKSDLSNSSFKININ*yp*f*iiiki ilkktck*ykknfi

  1. 48 CFR 1552.209-74 - Limitation of future contracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... or engineering services, including treatability studies, well drilling, fence erecting, plumbing... clause a particular subcontract or consultant agreement for nondiscretionary technical or engineering... CERCLA administrative order, a CERCLA or RCRA consent decree or a court order. (e) The Contractor and any...

  2. 49 CFR 1540.209 - Fees for security threat assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY... accepted accounting principles and practices, and calculated in accordance with the provisions of 31 U.S.C. 9701 and other applicable Federal law. (2) TSA will publish fee amounts and any revisions to the fee...

  3. Dicty_cDB: SSE209 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TDLGAGLTVGLCGLAAGMAIGIVGDS GVRAFGQQPKLYVIMMLILIFSEALGLYGLIIGILLSSVSDTYCPGQALVPLNSGNVIGK N*ial*knnk*y*nk*ikinkkkisk*...TDLGAGLTVGLCGLAAGMAIGIVGDS GVRAFGQQPKLYVIMMLILIFSEALGLYGLIIGILLSSVSDTYCPGQALVPLNSGNVIGK N*ial*knnk*y*nk*ikinkkkisk*

  4. 5 CFR 575.209 - Payment of relocation incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION INCENTIVES; SUPERVISORY DIFFERENTIALS; AND EXTENDED ASSIGNMENT...) by 365 and round the result to two decimal places. For example, a service period covering 39 biweekly... employee based on a critical agency need. The authorized agency official must determine that the...

  5. Dicty_cDB: AFJ209 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GXYDSMKLVLKXKSXDXKFD--- Translated Amino Acid sequence (All Frames) Frame A: ikxnifxlkikekxxlxdsxvxlvxl*sh*iinxyglmvvx...gxklkknxnqigk**kixl lxxxqfkxgxyli*ikkiklvlivd*fqkvxmiv*n*x*kxnqxxlnlm--- Frame B: skxiylx*r*kkrxx*...xiqx*xwlxcnxir*sixmx*wsxlvxs*krixiklennersxc wxxxnsrxvxi*fk*rk*swy***infkrxl**yeisxkrxinxx*i*--- Frame C: QX

  6. All projects related to | Page 209 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Known for its dense human population, diverse wild animal species, and large population of domestic animals, Sri Lanka derives both risks and benefits from its wildlife. Topic: Disease control, PUBLIC HEALTH, ANIMAL HEALTH, ANIMAL PROTECTION, RESEARCH NETWORKS, INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH, ...

  7. 44 CFR 209.8 - Application and review process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... establish. We will verify project eligibility estimates provided by States in order to assure that all projects meet the criteria for the supplemental grant awards. We will perform an independent verification... Form (SF) 424, Application for Federal Assistance; FEMA form 20-15, Budget Information—Construction...

  8. 44 CFR 209.12 - Oversight and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Oversight and results. (a) FEMA oversight. Our Regional Administrators are responsible for overseeing this... projects after each future flood event in the affected area to monitor whether projects are resulting in expected savings. The State will report to us on program effectiveness after project completion and after...

  9. 49 CFR 1544.209 - Use of metal detection devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRCRAFT OPERATOR SECURITY... under a security program under this part. No aircraft operator may use such a device contrary to its security program. (b) Metal detection devices must meet the calibration standards established by TSA. ...

  10. 22 CFR 209.10 - Decisions and notices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT NON-DISCRIMINATION IN FEDERALLY-ASSISTED PROGRAMS OF THE AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT-EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964... given an expeditious hearing, with a decision on the record, in accordance with rules of procedure...

  11. Odontogenic tumors in Western India (Gujarat): analysis of 209 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Sharanjeet; Chawda, Jyoti; Jani, Dhaval

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Odontogenic tumors show a distinct geographic variation. In 2005 a new WHO classification was published which included odontogenic keratocyst as one of the odontogenic tumors, renaming it as a keratocystic odontogenic tumor. To our knowledge there are only few studies based on 2005 classification in Asian subcontinent. This study was done to determine the relative frequency of odontogenic tumors in Gujarat and compare it with reports from other parts of the world. St...

  12. Phenotype-gene: 209 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available in organ named hypocotyl in environment of blue light regimen for AT4G25350 Kang Xiaojun et al. 2006 Apr. P...n organ named hypocotyl in environment of blue light regimen http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u1ria224u728i AT4G25350

  13. n-Alcohol/Water Partition Coefficients for Decachlorobiphenyl (PCB 209)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements of n-octanol/water partition coefficients (Kow) for highly hydrophobic chemicals are extremely difficult and are rarely made, in part due to the large volumes of water typically needed to quantify these compounds in the aqueous phase. An extrapolation approach using ...

  14. 7 CFR 1160.209 - Duties of the Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... advertising coverage in each of the regions defined in § 1160.200 is proportionate to funds collected from...) To maintain minutes, books and records that accurately reflect all of the acts and transactions of... advertising using third parties only through contracts which shall prohibit the third party from selling...

  15. Dicty_cDB: VSA209 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ed Amino Acid sequence ---GDDKWEDYPQDDNVEGNEANLKVGEAIKNIGNDYFKQGKSLEAIAKYNKALRYLDCC SNIDGLKNVQTICYNNMSQCYLKEKKVPMLWWLQKKH*nyhqmilk...IAKYNKALRYLDCC SNIDGLKNVQTICYNNMSQCYLKEKKVPMLWWLQKKH*nyhqmilkhsleklklyl*wrn mmklskiskkslkpiprikmqnln*kelklqk

  16. Dicty_cDB: SHK209 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available KEIDEM NKAFEEITSYFGEPKSTQPDVFFSTINNFLEDLEKAYGEYQAMIRKAELENSKMEDPEKG GLQDLSSQIRSGQLFKDRRVGDSVIAQMQNVD...KEIDEM NKAFEEITSYFGEPKSTQPDVFFSTINNFLEDLEKAYGEYQAMIRKAELENSKMEDPEKG GLQDLSSQIRSGQLFKDRRVGDSVIAQMQNVD

  17. Dicty_cDB: SSK209 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d Amino Acid sequence nqyh*nn*NMMMMMKMMKTKMIKRKRKHLVNMVINVIVNQLITLKNFHIHS*likfnfrf *k*nkik*nkik*nknkksndclil...RKHLVNMVINVIVNQLITLKNFHIHS*likfnfrf *k*nkik*nkik*nknkksndclilkn Frame B: tntirtiri*****r**rrr*lkekestl*iw**m

  18. 40 CFR 59.209 - Recordkeeping and reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... submitted to the Administrator a written certification that the manufacturer or importer will maintain the... and review. (1) Records or formulations being manufactured or imported on or after December 10, 1998..., 1998 for all consumer products subject to § 59.203(a) or December 10, 1999 for all consumer products...

  19. 44 CFR 209.10 - Project implementation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE SUPPLEMENTAL PROPERTY ACQUISITION AND ELEVATION... (except mobile homes), unimproved, permeable parking lots and buffer zones. Allowable uses generally do... application for future disaster assistance will be made for any purpose with respect to the property to any...

  20. 42 CFR 402.209 - Scope and effect of exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... items or services, specifying the nature of the emergency and the reason that the items or services were... otherwise payable claim for items or services furnished by an excluded person, or under the medical... furnished by, or under, the medical direction of an excluded person more than 15 days after the date on the...

  1. 48 CFR 1352.209-74 - Organizational conflict of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Organizational conflict of... Organizational conflict of interest. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1309.507-2(d), insert the following clause: Organizational Conflict of Interest (APR 2010) (a) Purpose. The purpose of this clause is to ensure that the...

  2. 29 CFR 1603.209 - Filing and service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EXEMPT STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE COMPLAINTS OF EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION UNDER SECTION 304 OF... has been sent to all other parties, and the date and manner of service. All documents shall be on..., limit the number of pages that may be filed or served by facsimile. Service shall be made on a party's...

  3. MO-DE-209-03: Assessing Image Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, W. [Stony Brook Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly replacing mammography as the standard of care in breast cancer screening and diagnosis. DBT is a form of computed tomography, in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into tomographic data. The angular range varies from 15° to 50° and the number of projections varies between 9 and 25 projections, as determined by the equipment manufacturer. It is equally valid to treat DBT as the digital analog of classical tomography – that is, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” stands for “synthetic tomography.” DBT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DBT systems is a hybrid between computed tomography and classical tomographic methods. In this lecture, we will explore the continuum from radiography to computed tomography to illustrate the characteristics of DBT. This lecture will consist of four presentations that will provide a complete overview of DBT, including a review of the fundamentals of DBT acquisition, a discussion of DBT reconstruction methods, an overview of dosimetry for DBT systems, and summary of the underlying image theory of DBT thereby relating image quality and dose. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis image acquisition. To understand the fundamentals of tomosynthesis image reconstruction. To learn the determinants of image quality and dose in DBT, including measurement techniques. To learn the image theory underlying tomosynthesis, and the relationship between dose and image quality. ADM is a consultant to, and holds stock in, Real Time Tomography, LLC. ADM receives research support from Hologic Inc., Analogic Inc., and Barco NV.; ADM is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Gamma Medica Inc.; A. Maidment, Research Support, Hologic, Inc.; Research Support, Barco, Inc.; Scientific Advisory Board, Gamma Medica, Inc.; Scientific Advisory Board, Real-Time Tomography, LLC.; Shareholder, Real-Time Tomography, LLC; J. Mainprize, Our lab has a research agreement with GE Healthcare on various topics in digital mammography and digital tomosynthesis; W. Zhao, Research grant from Siemens Health Care.

  4. MO-DE-209-01: Primer On Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maidment, A. [Univ Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly replacing mammography as the standard of care in breast cancer screening and diagnosis. DBT is a form of computed tomography, in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into tomographic data. The angular range varies from 15° to 50° and the number of projections varies between 9 and 25 projections, as determined by the equipment manufacturer. It is equally valid to treat DBT as the digital analog of classical tomography – that is, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” stands for “synthetic tomography.” DBT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DBT systems is a hybrid between computed tomography and classical tomographic methods. In this lecture, we will explore the continuum from radiography to computed tomography to illustrate the characteristics of DBT. This lecture will consist of four presentations that will provide a complete overview of DBT, including a review of the fundamentals of DBT acquisition, a discussion of DBT reconstruction methods, an overview of dosimetry for DBT systems, and summary of the underlying image theory of DBT thereby relating image quality and dose. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis image acquisition. To understand the fundamentals of tomosynthesis image reconstruction. To learn the determinants of image quality and dose in DBT, including measurement techniques. To learn the image theory underlying tomosynthesis, and the relationship between dose and image quality. ADM is a consultant to, and holds stock in, Real Time Tomography, LLC. ADM receives research support from Hologic Inc., Analogic Inc., and Barco NV.; ADM is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Gamma Medica Inc.; A. Maidment, Research Support, Hologic, Inc.; Research Support, Barco, Inc.; Scientific Advisory Board, Gamma Medica, Inc.; Scientific Advisory Board, Real-Time Tomography, LLC.; Shareholder, Real-Time Tomography, LLC; J. Mainprize, Our lab has a research agreement with GE Healthcare on various topics in digital mammography and digital tomosynthesis; W. Zhao, Research grant from Siemens Health Care.

  5. MO-DE-209-02: Tomosynthesis Reconstruction Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainprize, J. [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly replacing mammography as the standard of care in breast cancer screening and diagnosis. DBT is a form of computed tomography, in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into tomographic data. The angular range varies from 15° to 50° and the number of projections varies between 9 and 25 projections, as determined by the equipment manufacturer. It is equally valid to treat DBT as the digital analog of classical tomography – that is, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” stands for “synthetic tomography.” DBT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DBT systems is a hybrid between computed tomography and classical tomographic methods. In this lecture, we will explore the continuum from radiography to computed tomography to illustrate the characteristics of DBT. This lecture will consist of four presentations that will provide a complete overview of DBT, including a review of the fundamentals of DBT acquisition, a discussion of DBT reconstruction methods, an overview of dosimetry for DBT systems, and summary of the underlying image theory of DBT thereby relating image quality and dose. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis image acquisition. To understand the fundamentals of tomosynthesis image reconstruction. To learn the determinants of image quality and dose in DBT, including measurement techniques. To learn the image theory underlying tomosynthesis, and the relationship between dose and image quality. ADM is a consultant to, and holds stock in, Real Time Tomography, LLC. ADM receives research support from Hologic Inc., Analogic Inc., and Barco NV.; ADM is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Gamma Medica Inc.; A. Maidment, Research Support, Hologic, Inc.; Research Support, Barco, Inc.; Scientific Advisory Board, Gamma Medica, Inc.; Scientific Advisory Board, Real-Time Tomography, LLC.; Shareholder, Real-Time Tomography, LLC; J. Mainprize, Our lab has a research agreement with GE Healthcare on various topics in digital mammography and digital tomosynthesis; W. Zhao, Research grant from Siemens Health Care.

  6. Dicty_cDB: SLD209 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GLSSSLFTNNQK NIFKWLGPTGSDCGIVNVNVATNGAEIGGAFGGEKETGGGRESGSDSWKQYCRRSTNTIN YGNTMPLSQGINFN*nyqkkktkcnlhninkrill...GLSSSLFTNNQK NIFKWLGPTGSDCGIVNVNVATNGAEIGGAFGGEKETGGGRESGSDSWKQYCRRSTNTIN YGNTMPL...SQGINFN*nyqkkktkcnlhninkrillifvhn Frame B: ---fveptvvaiehdapivktelfvpilyimnskiltmllpgimkshkvshlpssqtikr issn

  7. 12 CFR 347.209 - Pledge of assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Development Bank, Asian Development Bank, Inter-American Development Bank, and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development; (7) Notes issued by bank and thrift holding companies, banks, or savings... foreign bank shall provide to the appropriate regional director a written report certified as correct by...

  8. 23 CFR 668.209 - Eligibility of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... practical and economically feasible to repair or restore a damaged element to its preexisting condition... channels restored. (3) Betterments where clearly economically justified to prevent future recurring damage... repair costs when proposed projects contain betterments or other work not eligible for emergency funds...

  9. 48 CFR 209.104-1 - General standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Acquisition Policy, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics), and... technical expertise to satisfy defense acquisition, technology base, or industrial base requirements; and (5... products or technology or alternate approaches to accomplish the program objectives. (D) In accordance with...

  10. 14 CFR 1274.209 - Evaluation and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., this type of competitive environment is very different from an environment where competitive proposals... cooperative agreement. (b) Communications during non-competitive awards. For cooperative agreements awarded... evaluation or source selection criteria. (c) Communications during competitive awards. As discussed in § 1274...

  11. 48 CFR 1352.209-71 - Limitation of future contracting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... distribution. Examples include limited or restricted data, trade secrets, sensitive financial information, and computer software; and may appear in cost and pricing data or involve classified information. (iv) “System... supervising design. (vii) “Technical Direction” means developing work statements, determining parameters...

  12. Dicty_cDB: VHC209 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |DY889811.1 CeleSEQ6761 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY889772.1 CeleSEQ11980 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY890935.1 CeleSEQ7425 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY887441.1 CeleSEQ3766 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone...|DY888936.1 CeleSEQ6366 Cunninghamella elegans pBluescript (EcoRI-XhoI) Cunninghamella elegans cDNA clone

  13. 48 CFR 1552.209-76 - Contractor performance evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) business days after the last 12 months (or less) of contract performance by requesting the project officer... months (or less) of contract performance. Within thirty (30) business days after the project officer... following clause in all applicable solicitations and contracts. Contractor Performance Evaluations (OCT 2002...

  14. 48 CFR 52.209-7 - Information Regarding Responsibility Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (including task and delivery and multiple-award Schedules). (b) The offeror has does not have current active... responsibilities within a business entity (e.g., general manager; plant manager; head of a division or business...

  15. 33 CFR 209.340 - Laboratory investigations and materials testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ordinary business channels. (3) Performance of the work will not interfere with provisions of services... permanent staff of the facility. (5) Performance of the work will not require expansion of normal facilities... principal support from Federal funds in the form of a grant or otherwise. (ii) Where an exception is granted...

  16. Dicty_cDB: AFK209 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BF200236.1 WHE2254_E08_J16ZE Triticum monococcum vegetative apex cDNA library Triticum monococcum cDNA clone... |BQ800711.1 WHE2801_H04_O07ZS Triticum monococcum vernalized apex cDNA library Triticum monococcum cDNA clo

  17. Dicty_cDB: CHR209 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l02, 5' end. 44 7.6 1 CA929806 |CA929806.1 MTU2CA.P3.A01 Aspen apex cDNA Library ...Populus tremuloides cDNA, mRNA sequence. 44 7.6 1 CA929196 |CA929196.1 MTU2CA.P10.C05 Aspen apex cDNA Librar

  18. Contribution to construction and setup of a detection system for the focal plan of the BBS spectrometer. Application to study of the neutron emission decay of the resonant states populated by the reaction ({sup 4}He,{sup 3}He) at 42 MeV/u in nuclei {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Pb; Contribution a la construction et a la mise au point d'un systeme de detection pour le plan focal du spectrometre BBS. Application a l'etude de la decroissance par emission de neutrons d'etats resonants peuples par la reaction ({sup 4}He,{sup 3}He) a 42 MeV/u dans les noyaux {sup 208}Pb et {sup 209}Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plankl-Chabib, Elke [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-06-11

    In order to realizean experimental program dedicated to nuclear structure studies we have conceived and constructed at IPN Orsay a detection system for the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer BBS, installed at the cryogenic cyclotron AGOR of the laboratory KVI (The Netherlands). Two detection units, consisting each of two localization plans of the Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) type, measure the position and angle of particle trajectory. This information is used for the determination of the reaction parameters at the target by a backtracking procedure. The identification of the reaction products is done by the measurement of their time-of-flight and energy loss. For light ions this task is assumed by plastic scintillators, and for heavy ions by a parallel plan detector (PPAC) and an ionization chamber. This detection system is well adapted to the requirements given by the detection of a large range of ions (protons to {sup 36}Ar at energies of several tenths of MeV/nucleon) as well as the big acceptance, the small dispersion and the aberration of the BBS. The results of the test show the good performances of the detection system. In a first experiment the focal plane detection system was coupled to the neutron multidetector EVEN in order to study the decay of resonant high spin states at high excitation energies by the ({sup 4}He, {sup 3}He) reaction on {sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb targets. The transfer spectra, inclusive and in coincidence, of the nuclei {sup 208}Pb and {sup 209}Pb show a striking resemblance except for an excitation energy shift which is due to the hole in the last neutron shell of {sup 207}Pb. The resonances at l 8 and l = 9 are clearly populated, in agreement with the predictions of the Bonaccorso-Brink model. A sizeable fraction of the decay of the l = 8 resonance is direct, but at excitation energies higher than 15 MeV (in {sup 208}Pb) the decay is mostly statistical.

  19. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YGR209C, YDL081C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1p, required for ER-Golgi transport and vacuole inheritance Rows with this bait as bait (1) Rows with this b...cofactor for Tsa1p, required for ER-Golgi transport and vacuole inheritance Rows

  20. Acta Theologica 2015: 2 209 J.H. Van Wyk, Teologie van die ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Die afgelope tyd het verskeie Suid-Afrikaanse teoloë bundels met versamelde werk of oorsigte van hul skryfwerk en lewe die lig laat sien. Mens dink hier aan die vyf-volume Collected Essays/Versamelde Opstelle van D.J. Smit;1 A Theological Odyssey: My life in writing en die outobiografie. I have come a long way van J.W. ...

  1. 49 CFR 1546.209 - Use of X-ray systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... items are being inspected by an X-ray and advise them to remove all X-ray, scientific, and high-speed... training of operators of the system is established, which includes training in radiation safety, the...

  2. Uptake, translocation and metabolism of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in seven aquatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Daiyong; Liu, Jin; Xu, Meiying; Zheng, Guolu; Guo, Jun; Sun, Guoping

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial plant uptake of PBDEs from contaminated soils has been widely reported recently. In this study the fate of deca-BDE within a plant/PBDEs/aquatic environment system was investigated through simulated pot experiments. Accumulations of the total PBDEs and deca-BDE were observed in tissues of seven test aquatic plant species, namely Phragmites australis, Cyperus papyrus, Alternanthera philoxeroides, Colocasia esculenta, Scirpus validus, Acorus calamus and Oryza sativa. In all seven plants, O. sativa leads the uptake and accumulation both in the total PBDEs (444.8 ng g(-1)) and deca-BDE (368.0 ng g(-1)) in roots. Among the six common phytoremediation aquatic plants, A. calamus leads the uptake (236.2 ng g(-1)), and P. australis leads the translocation (Cshoot/Croot = 0.35), while A. philoxeroides (43.4%) and P. australis (80.0%) lead in the metabolism efficiencies in the root and shoot, respectively. The detection of seventeen lesser brominated PBDE congeners provided the debromination evidence, and the specific PBDEs profiles in test plant species indicated there is no common metabolic pattern. Furthermore, a relative high proportion of lesser brominated PBDE congeners in shoots suggested the possible metabolic difference between roots and shoots. Finally, a noticeable percentage of penta- and octa-BDE derived from deca-BDE also hint the ecological risk in deca-BDE use. This comparative research on the aquatic plants provide a broad vision on the understanding of plant/PBDEs/aquatic environment interaction system, and may be applied to remediate PBDEs in contaminated waters and sediments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. 24 CFR 92.209 - Tenant-based rental assistance: Eligible costs and requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Security deposits. (1) A participating jurisdiction may use HOME funds provided for tenant-based rental... the amount of HOME funds that may be provided for a security deposit may not exceed the equivalent of two month's rent for the unit. (3) Only the prospective tenant may apply for HOME security deposit...

  4. African Crop Science Journal, Vol. 13. No. 3, pp. 209-214, 2005 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was observed at all concentrations of copper oxycloride. However, they were not significantly different from each other. The pathogen produced highest number ofpycnidia in medium amended with copper oxycloride, showing its ineffectiveness in reducing inoculum of the disease. These findings suggest that copper.

  5. SU-C-209-07: Phantoms for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Imaging System Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, D; Liu, Y [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is gaining importance in breast imaging. There is a need for phantoms that can be used for image evaluation and comparison. Existing commercially available phantoms for DBT are expensive and may lack clinically relevant test objects. The purpose of this study is to develop phantoms for DBT evaluation. Methods Four phantoms have been designed and constructed to assess the image quality (IQ) of two DBT systems. The first contains a spiral of 0.3 mm SiC beads in gelatin to measure the tomographic slice thickness profile and uniformity of coverage in a series of tomographic planes. The second contains simulated tumors inclined with respect to the phantom base to assess tomographic image quality. The third has a tilted array of discs with varying contrast and diameter. This phantom was imaged alone and in a stack of TE slabs giving 2 to 10 cm thickness. The fourth has a dual wedge of glandular and adipose simulating materials. One wedge contains discs with varying diameter and thickness; the other supports a mass with six simulated spicules of varying size and a cluster of simulated calcifications. The simulated glandular tissue material varies between 35 and 100% of the total thickness (5.5 cm). Results: All phantoms were scanned successfully. The best IQ comparison was achieved with the dual wedge phantom as demonstrated by the spiculated mass and calcifications. Images were evaluated by two radiologists and one physicist. The projection images and corresponding set of tomographic planes were comparable and the synthesized projection images were inferior to the projection images for both systems. Conclusion: Four phantoms were designed, constructed and imaged on two DBT systems. They successfully demonstrated performance differences between two systems, and between true and synthesized projection images. Future work will incorporate these designs into a single phantom.

  6. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 209 - FRA's Policy Statement Concerning Small Entities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... new regulations, persistent safety concerns, emerging technology, and compliance issues. Also, FRA... required by the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996 (Pub. L. 104-121) (SBREFA... operations of small businesses in the administration of the national railroad safety program, and will...

  7. : tous les projets | Page 209 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    End Date: 12 mars 2013. Sujet: Disease control, TOBACCO, SMOKING, TAXATION, PUBLIC HEALTH, Fiscal policy. Région: Belarus, Europe, Russia, Ukraine. Programme: Alimentation, environnement et santé. Financement total : CA$ 57,300.00. Incidence de la hausse des taxes sur le tabac et du prix des produits du ...

  8. 7 CFR 1486.209 - How are program applications evaluated and approved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... foreign governments collect and use market information and develop free trade policies that benefit... maintain U.S. market share; (ii) Marketing and distribution of value-added products, including new products... systems, to reduce trade barriers, to increase prospects for U.S. trade and investment in emerging markets...

  9. Tank 241-AP-105, cores 208, 209 and 210, analytical results for the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-10-24

    This document is the final laboratory report for Tank 241-AP-105. Push mode core segments were removed from Risers 24 and 28 between July 2, 1997, and July 14, 1997. Segments were received and extruded at 222-S Laboratory. Analyses were performed in accordance with Tank 241-AP-105 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Hu, 1997) and Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). None of the subsamples submitted for total alpha activity (AT), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, or total organic carbon (TOC) analysis exceeded the notification limits as stated in TSAP and DQO. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group, and are not considered in this report. Appearance and Sample Handling Two cores, each consisting of four segments, were expected from Tank 241-AP-105. Three cores were sampled, and complete cores were not obtained. TSAP states core samples should be transported to the laboratory within three calendar days from the time each segment is removed from the tank. This requirement was not met for all cores. Attachment 1 illustrates subsamples generated in the laboratory for analysis and identifies their sources. This reference also relates tank farm identification numbers to their corresponding 222-S Laboratory sample numbers.

  10. 29 CFR 779.209 - Vertical activities which are “related activities.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... part for the purpose of distributing the goods through the retail stores, or the retail outlet serves.... Thus, where a manufacturing business is carried on separately from and wholly independently of a retail...

  11. 48 CFR 252.209-7007 - Prohibited Financial Interests for Lead System Integrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... contractor for the development or production of a major system, if the prime contractor is not expected at the time of award to perform a substantial portion of the work on the system and the major subsystems... while performing lead system integrator functions in the acquisition of a major system by the Department...

  12. Addressing spin transitions on 209Bi donors in silicon using circularly polarized microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, T.; Sigillito, A. J.; Rose, B. C.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Lyon, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Over the past decade, donor spin qubits in isotopically enriched 28Si have been intensely studied due to their exceptionally long coherence times. More recently, bismuth donor electron spins have become popular because Bi has a large nuclear spin which gives rise to clock transitions (first-order insensitive to magnetic field noise). At every clock transition there are two nearly degenerate transitions between four distinct states which can be used as a pair of qubits. Here it is experimentally demonstrated that these transitions are excited by microwaves of opposite helicity such that they can be selectively driven by varying microwave polarization. This work uses a combination of a superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) microresonator and a dielectric resonator to flexibly generate arbitrary elliptical polarizations while retaining the high sensitivity of the CPW.

  13. 23 CFR 637.209 - Laboratory and sampling and testing personnel qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS CONSTRUCTION INSPECTION AND APPROVAL Quality Assurance Procedures for... accredited by the AASHTO Accreditation Program or a comparable laboratory accreditation program approved by... testing shall be accredited in the testing to be performed by the AASHTO Accreditation Program or a...

  14. 18 CFR 1304.209 - Land-based structures/alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., poles, electrical panel, and wiring must be installed: (i) In a way that would not be hazardous to the public or interfere with TVA operations; (ii) Solely to serve water-use facilities, and (iii) In... easy pedestrian passage by the public and they must be clearly marked. ...

  15. MO-DE-209-04: Radiation Dosimetry in Breast Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sechopoulos, I. [Radboud University Medical Centre (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly replacing mammography as the standard of care in breast cancer screening and diagnosis. DBT is a form of computed tomography, in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into tomographic data. The angular range varies from 15° to 50° and the number of projections varies between 9 and 25 projections, as determined by the equipment manufacturer. It is equally valid to treat DBT as the digital analog of classical tomography – that is, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” stands for “synthetic tomography.” DBT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DBT systems is a hybrid between computed tomography and classical tomographic methods. In this lecture, we will explore the continuum from radiography to computed tomography to illustrate the characteristics of DBT. This lecture will consist of four presentations that will provide a complete overview of DBT, including a review of the fundamentals of DBT acquisition, a discussion of DBT reconstruction methods, an overview of dosimetry for DBT systems, and summary of the underlying image theory of DBT thereby relating image quality and dose. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis image acquisition. To understand the fundamentals of tomosynthesis image reconstruction. To learn the determinants of image quality and dose in DBT, including measurement techniques. To learn the image theory underlying tomosynthesis, and the relationship between dose and image quality. ADM is a consultant to, and holds stock in, Real Time Tomography, LLC. ADM receives research support from Hologic Inc., Analogic Inc., and Barco NV.; ADM is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Gamma Medica Inc.; A. Maidment, Research Support, Hologic, Inc.; Research Support, Barco, Inc.; Scientific Advisory Board, Gamma Medica, Inc.; Scientific Advisory Board, Real-Time Tomography, LLC.; Shareholder, Real-Time Tomography, LLC; J. Mainprize, Our lab has a research agreement with GE Healthcare on various topics in digital mammography and digital tomosynthesis; W. Zhao, Research grant from Siemens Health Care.

  16. MO-DE-209-00: DBT Physics Basic to Advanced

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly replacing mammography as the standard of care in breast cancer screening and diagnosis. DBT is a form of computed tomography, in which a limited set of projection images are acquired over a small angular range and reconstructed into tomographic data. The angular range varies from 15° to 50° and the number of projections varies between 9 and 25 projections, as determined by the equipment manufacturer. It is equally valid to treat DBT as the digital analog of classical tomography – that is, linear tomography. In fact, the name “tomosynthesis” stands for “synthetic tomography.” DBT shares many common features with classical tomography, including the radiographic appearance, dose, and image quality considerations. As such, both the science and practical physics of DBT systems is a hybrid between computed tomography and classical tomographic methods. In this lecture, we will explore the continuum from radiography to computed tomography to illustrate the characteristics of DBT. This lecture will consist of four presentations that will provide a complete overview of DBT, including a review of the fundamentals of DBT acquisition, a discussion of DBT reconstruction methods, an overview of dosimetry for DBT systems, and summary of the underlying image theory of DBT thereby relating image quality and dose. Learning Objectives: To understand the fundamental principles behind tomosynthesis image acquisition. To understand the fundamentals of tomosynthesis image reconstruction. To learn the determinants of image quality and dose in DBT, including measurement techniques. To learn the image theory underlying tomosynthesis, and the relationship between dose and image quality. ADM is a consultant to, and holds stock in, Real Time Tomography, LLC. ADM receives research support from Hologic Inc., Analogic Inc., and Barco NV.; ADM is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Gamma Medica Inc.; A. Maidment, Research Support, Hologic, Inc.; Research Support, Barco, Inc.; Scientific Advisory Board, Gamma Medica, Inc.; Scientific Advisory Board, Real-Time Tomography, LLC.; Shareholder, Real-Time Tomography, LLC; J. Mainprize, Our lab has a research agreement with GE Healthcare on various topics in digital mammography and digital tomosynthesis; W. Zhao, Research grant from Siemens Health Care.

  17. MO-FG-209-05: Towards a Feature-Based Anthropomorphic Model Observer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avanaki, A.

    2016-06-15

    This symposium will review recent advances in the simulation methods for evaluation of novel breast imaging systems – the subject of AAPM Task Group TG234. Our focus will be on the various approaches to development and validation of software anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in the statistical assessment of novel imaging systems using such phantoms along with computational models for the x-ray image formation process. Due to the dynamic development and complex design of modern medical imaging systems, the simulation of anatomical structures, image acquisition modalities, and the image perception and analysis offers substantial benefits of reduced cost, duration, and radiation exposure, as well as the known ground-truth and wide variability in simulated anatomies. For these reasons, Virtual Clinical Trials (VCTs) have been increasingly accepted as a viable tool for preclinical assessment of x-ray and other breast imaging methods. Activities of TG234 have encompassed the optimization of protocols for simulation studies, including phantom specifications, the simulated data representation, models of the imaging process, and statistical assessment of simulated images. The symposium will discuss the state-of-the-science of VCTs for novel breast imaging systems, emphasizing recent developments and future directions. Presentations will discuss virtual phantoms for intermodality breast imaging performance comparisons, extension of the breast anatomy simulation to the cellular level, optimized integration of the simulated imaging chain, and the novel directions in the observer models design. Learning Objectives: Review novel results in developing and applying virtual phantoms for inter-modality breast imaging performance comparisons; Discuss the efforts to extend the computer simulation of breast anatomy and pathology to the cellular level; Summarize the state of the science in optimized integration of modules in the simulated imaging chain; Compare novel directions in the design of observer models for task based validation of imaging systems. PB: Research funding support from the NIH, NSF, and Komen for the Cure; NIH funded collaboration with Barco, Inc. and Hologic, Inc.; Consultant to Delaware State Univ. and NCCPM, UK. AA: Employed at Barco Healthcare.; P. Bakic, NIH: (NIGMS P20 #GM103446, NCI R01 #CA154444); M. Das, NIH Research grants.

  18. 209 Effect of Cooperatives on the Savings Behaviour of Members in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    2013-01-28

    Jan 28, 2013 ... aside for investment purposes and not for luxury. What people save ... consumption, and income is the key determinant of the amount of personal savings. ... consumption. Therefore credit cooperative by its nature especially through the practices of obligatory savings contributions, teaches the member to be.

  19. 49 CFR 232.209 - Class II brake tests-intermediate inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRAKE SYSTEM SAFETY STANDARDS FOR FREIGHT AND OTHER... the requirements contained in § 232.205(c)(1); (2) The air brake system shall be charged to the... accurate gauge or end-of-train device at the rear end of train; (3) The brakes on each car added to the...

  20. Optimal dietary energy and protein for the development of gilts - NPB #12-209

    Science.gov (United States)

    The main objective of this study was to determine three diets for use in a National Pork Board primary trial of dietary effects on gilt development and retention of sows in the breeding herd to fourth parity. A second objective was to examine the influence of litter of origin traits on gilt developm...

  1. Page 1 The 7%eory of Coronae and of Iridescent Clouds 209 paper ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    droplet is the same as that for an opaque disk of the same size. Thus, for large droplets, the total energy in the corona must be equal to 2na”, or double the amount in the corona due to an opaque disk. However, the expression (14) shows that the corona is identical with that given by an opaque disk of the same size.

  2. Page 1 Bull. Mater, Sci, Vol. 14, No. 2, April 1991, pp. 207-209. (C ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    initial compounds Bi, Os, SrCOs, CaCO, CuO and PbO were weighed in a certain ratio, mixed, annealed in air at 815-830C for 12-24 hr, pressed into pellets and sintered in air at room temperatures from 845 C to premelting ones for 12-360 hr. The samples were either quenched in air or cooled together in the furnace.

  3. SU-E-J-209: Verification of 3D Surface Registration Between Stereograms and CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, T; Gifford, K [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Smith, B [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Salehpour, M [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereography can provide a visualization of the skin surface for radiation therapy patients. The aim of this study was to verify the registration algorithm in a commercial image analysis software, 3dMDVultus, for the fusion of stereograms and CT images. Methods: CT and stereographic scans were acquired of a head phantom and a deformable phantom. CT images were imported in 3dMDVultus and the surface contours were generated by threshold segmentation. Stereograms were reconstructed in 3dMDVultus. The resulting surfaces were registered with Vultus algorithm and then exported to in-house registration software and compared with four algorithms: rigid, affine, non-rigid iterative closest point (ICP) and b-spline algorithm. RMS (root-mean-square residuals of the surface point distances) error between the registered CT and stereogram surfaces was calculated and analyzed. Results: For the head phantom, the maximum RMS error between registered CT surfaces to stereogram was 6.6 mm for Vultus algorithm, whereas the mean RMS error was 0.7 mm. For the deformable phantom, the maximum RMS error was 16.2 mm for Vultus algorithm, whereas the mean RMS error was 4.4 mm. Non-rigid ICP demonstrated the best registration accuracy, as the mean of RMS errors were both within 1 mm. Conclusion: The accuracy of registration algorithm in 3dMDVultus was verified and exceeded RMS of 2 mm for deformable cases. Non-rigid ICP and b-spline algorithms improve the registration accuracy for both phantoms, especially in deformable one. For those patients whose body habitus deforms during radiation therapy, more advanced nonrigid algorithms need to be used.

  4. 33 CFR 209.170 - Violations of laws protecting navigable waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... floods, or as boundary marks, tide gauges, surveying stations, buoys, or other established marks, nor... deposit, or cause, suffer, or procure to be thrown, discharged, or deposited either from or out of any... to deposit or cause, suffer, or procure to be deposited material of any kind in any place on the bank...

  5. 24 CFR 3286.209 - Denial, suspension, or revocation of installation license.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: (1) Providing false records or information to any party; (2) Refusing to submit information that the... license, the Secretary will consider the impact of the suspension or revocation on other affected parties...

  6. China Report: Science and Technology, No. 209. China Addresses Environmental Issues -- 1/83

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-12

    ability to resist leakage. This not only prevented the pollution of water, soil and grain, it also improved the soil texture of desert land and...forests can be planted in front of houses, behind houses, and on road sides. In the south, we can plant eucalyptus, cassava , rose of Sharon, and

  7. 209 Effect of Cooperatives on the Savings Behaviour of Members in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    2013-01-28

    Jan 28, 2013 ... behaviour. Results from the study show that cooperative membership impacted positively on the savings behavior of members. Findings show that ... Problem statement. Lack of capital is already known as one of primary constraint of rural producers in Nigeria. Efforts at ameliorating this through ...

  8. African Crop Science Journal, Vol. 13. No. 3, pp. 209-214, 2005 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    10, 25,50, 100 ppm de chacun, et les extraits liquide de feuille (10% w/v) de quatre plantes indigènes, sauge de broussaille (Lippia ... L'extrait de liquide de feuille de W. ugandensis était le plus effectif et avait complètement inhibé la croissance de mycélien ... agitated thoroughly and 20 ml of thc mixture dispenscdinto cach ...

  9. 48 CFR 3052.209-75 - Prohibited financial interests for lead system integrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... performance on this contract. If an organizational conflict of interest in the performance of this contract... agrees that during performance of this contract it will not acquire any direct financial interest as... default or may take other remedial measures as appropriate in the Contracting Officer's sole discretion...

  10. 49 CFR 180.209 - Requirements for requalification of specification cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... protected externally by a suitable corrosion-resistant coating (such as galvanizing or painting) may be... galvanizing or painting) and internally by a suitable corrosion resistant lining (such as galvanizing) may be...

  11. 24 CFR 1003.209 - Prohibition on use of assistance for employment relocation activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... employment relocation activities. (a) Prohibition. ICDBG funds may not be used to directly assist a business, including a business expansion, in the relocation of a plant, facility, or operation from one Identified... INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS FOR INDIAN...

  12. 48 CFR 952.209-8 - Organizational conflicts of interest-disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... otherwise impaired, or a person has an unfair competitive advantage. (b) An offeror notified that it is the... or potential conflict of interest or unfair competitive advantage exists with respect to the advisory... potential conflict of interest or unfair competitive advantage that does or may exist with respect to the...

  13. The Mass Spectrometric Ortho Effect Studied for All 209 PCB Congeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    A method for the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in caulk was developed; with application to a set of caulk and window glazing material samples. This method was evaluated by analyzing a combination of 47 samples of caulk, glazing materials, and including quality...

  14. 49 CFR 1542.209 - Fingerprint-based criminal history records checks (CHRC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... individual currently having unescorted access to a SIDA, and each individual with authority to authorize others to have unescorted access to a SIDA (referred to as unescorted access authority). (3) Each..., must, by January 7, 2002, report the conviction to the airport operator and surrender the SIDA access...

  15. 8 CFR 209.2 - Adjustment of status of alien granted asylum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of any alien who has been granted asylum in the United States may be adjusted by USCIS to that of an...; (ii) Has been physically present in the United States for at least one year after having been granted... admissible to the United States as an immigrant under the Act at the time of examination for adjustment...

  16. Page 1 X-ray Study of fatigue-cycled aluminium 209 of cases, the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the single line method, it is assumed that the Cauchy and the Gaussian components represent respectively the contribution from crystallite size and the microstrains. The f profile which only includes the effect of fatigue cycling was calculated from the profile obtained on fatigue-cycled specimens by removing the contribution ...

  17. Measurement of the Bi209(n,4n)Bi206 and Tm169(n,3n)Tm167 cross sections between 23.5 and 30.5 MeV relevant to reaction-in-flight neutron studies at the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gooden, M. E.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Champine, B.; Combs, D. C.; Finch, S.; Hayes-Sterbenz, A.; Henry, E.; Krishichayan,; Rundberg, R.; Tornow, W.; Wilhelmy, J.; Yeamans, C.

    2017-08-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, experiments are being performed to measure charged-particle stopping powers in the previously unexplored warm dense plasma regime. These measurements are done using reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons from an inertial confinement fusion system. RIF neutrons are produced with a continuum of energies up to 30 MeV. By making activation measurements utilizing threshold reactions for neutrons in the energy range of 15 < E n < 30 MeV , the number of RIF neutrons can be determined and from this the stopping power of the deuterium and tritium ions that produced the RIF neutrons can be inferred. Currently, the 169 Tm ( n , 3 n ) 167 Tm reaction has been used. However, in an effort to provide a secondary complimentary measurement, efforts are underway to make use of the 209 Bi ( n , 4 n ) 206 Bi reaction, with a threshold of 22.5 MeV. The cross sections were measured at the 10 MV tandem Van De Graaff accelerator at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory with quasimonoenergetic neutrons between 23.5 and 30.5 MeV, where few previous measurements have been made. Cross-section data are compared to calculations and other available measurements.

  18. SU-G-IeP2-09: Iodine Imaging at Spectral CT with a Dual-Layer Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozguner, O [Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Dhanantwari, A; Halliburton, S; Utrup, S [Philips Healthcare, Highland Heights, OH (United States); Wen, G [The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States); Jordan, D [University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the attenuation response of iodine and the accuracy of iodine quantification on a detector-based spectral CT scanner. Methods: A Gammex 461A phantom was scanned using a dual-layer detector (IQon, Philips) at 120 kVp using helical acquisition with a CDTIvol of 15 mGy to approximate the hospital’s clinical body protocol. No modifications to the standard protocol were necessary to enable spectral imaging. Iodine inserts at 6 concentrations (2, 5, 7.5, 10, 15, 20 mg/ml) were scanned individually at the center of the phantom and the 20 mg/ml insert was additionally scanned at the 3, 6, and 12 o’clock positions. Scans were repeated 10 times. Conventional, virtual monoenergetic (40–200 keV) and iodine-no-water images (with pixel values equal to iodine concentration of corresponding tissue) were reconstructed from acquired data. A circular ROI (diameter=30 pixels) was used in each conventional and monoenergetic image to measure the mean and standard deviation of the CT number in HU and in each iodine-no-water image to measure iodine concentration in mg/ml. Results: Mean CT number and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) measured from monoenergetic images increased with decreasing keV for all iodine concentrations and matched measurements from conventional images at 75 keV. Measurements from the 20 ml insert showed the CT number is independent of location and CNR is a function only of noise, which was higher in the center. Measured concentration from iodine-no-water images matched phantom manufacturer suggested concentration to within 6% on average for inserts at the center of the phantom. Measured concentrations were systematically higher due to optimization of iodine quantification parameters for clinical mixtures of iodine and blood/tissue. Conclusion: Spectral acquisition and reconstruction with a dual-layer detector represents the physical behavior of iodine as expected and accurately quantifies the material concentration. This should permit a variety of clinical applications including lesion characterization, vessel patency, and myocardial perfusion. This study was performed as part of a research agreement among Philips Healthcare, University Hospitals of Cleveland, and Case Western Reserve University.

  19. SU-F-T-209: Multicriteria Optimization Algorithm for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Using Pencil Proton Beam Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, C; Kamal, H [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a multicriteria optimization algorithm for intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning. Methods: Intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning requires efficient optimization algorithms to overcome the uncertainties in the Bragg peaks locations. This work is focused on optimization algorithms that are based on Monte Carlo simulation of the treatment planning and use the weights and the dose volume histogram (DVH) control points to steer toward desired plans. The proton beam treatment planning process based on single objective optimization (representing a weighted sum of multiple objectives) usually leads to time-consuming iterations involving treatment planning team members. We proved a time efficient multicriteria optimization algorithm that is developed to run on NVIDIA GPU (Graphical Processing Units) cluster. The multicriteria optimization algorithm running time benefits from up-sampling of the CT voxel size of the calculations without loss of fidelity. Results: We will present preliminary results of Multicriteria optimization for intensity modulated proton therapy based on DVH control points. The results will show optimization results of a phantom case and a brain tumor case. Conclusion: The multicriteria optimization of the intensity modulated radiation therapy using pencil proton beam scanning provides a novel tool for treatment planning. Work support by a grant from Varian Inc.

  20. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 209 - Statement of Agency Policy Concerning Enforcement of the Federal Railroad Safety Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... liability, 49 U.S.C. 1809(a)) would subject individuals to civil penalties in more situations than the... special standard, the principles of strict liability and presumed knowledge of the law will continue to...-342, enacted June 22, 1988) (“RSIA”) raised the maximum civil penalties available under the railroad...

  1. 49 CFR 350.211 - What is the format of the certification required by § 350.209?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., information on best practices for safe driving in the vicinity of noncommercial and commercial motor vehicles... motor carrier and highway hazardous materials safety rules and regulations that are compatible with the... each Government fiscal year. These expenditures must cover at least the following four program areas...

  2. SU-D-209-03: Radiation Dose Reduction Using Real-Time Image Processing in Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanal, K; Moirano, J; Zamora, D; Stewart, B [University Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize changes in radiation dose after introducing a new real-time image processing technology in interventional radiology systems. Methods: Interventional radiology (IR) procedures are increasingly complex, at times requiring substantial time and radiation dose. The risk of inducing tissue reactions as well as long-term stochastic effects such as radiation-induced cancer is not trivial. To reduce this risk, IR systems are increasingly equipped with dose reduction technologies.Recently, ClarityIQ (Philips Healthcare) technology was installed in our existing neuroradiology IR (NIR) and vascular IR (VIR) suites respectively. ClarityIQ includes real-time image processing that reduces noise/artifacts, enhances images, and sharpens edges while also reducing radiation dose rates. We reviewed 412 NIR (175 pre- and 237 post-ClarityIQ) procedures and 329 VIR (156 preand 173 post-ClarityIQ) procedures performed at our institution pre- and post-ClarityIQ implementation. NIR procedures were primarily classified as interventional or diagnostic. VIR procedures included drain port, drain placement, tube change, mesenteric, and implanted venous procedures. Air Kerma (AK in units of mGy) was documented for all the cases using a commercial radiation exposure management system. Results: When considering all NIR procedures, median AK decreased from 1194 mGy to 561 mGy. When considering all VIR procedures, median AK decreased from 49 to 14 mGy. Both NIR and VIR exhibited a decrease in AK exceeding 50% after ClarityIQ implementation, a statistically significant (p<0.05) difference. Of the 5 most common VIR procedures, all median AK values decreased, but significance (p<0.05) was only reached in venous access (N=53), angio mesenteric (N=41), and drain placement procedures (N=31). Conclusion: ClarityIQ can reduce dose significantly for both NIR and VIR procedures. Image quality was not assessed in conjunction with the dose reduction.

  3. TU-FG-209-08: Distribution of the Deviation Index (DI) in Digital Radiography Practices Across the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A; Shepard, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dave, J [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Fisher, R [The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hulme, K [The Cleveland Clinic, Beachwood, OH (United States); Rill, L [University Florida, Jacksonville Beach, FL (United States); Zamora, D [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Woodward, A [The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Brady, S [St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); MacDougall, R [Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Goldman, L [Hartford Hospital, Hartford, CT (United States); Lang, S; Peck, D [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Apgar, B [AGFA HealthCare, Greenville, SC (United States); Uzenoff, R [FUJIFILM Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc., Weston, CT (United States); Willis, C [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Bellaire, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the distribution of the deviation index (DI) in digital radiography practices across the United States. Methods: DI data was obtained from 10 collaborating institutions in the United States between 2012 and 2015. Each institution complied with the requirements of the Institutional Review Board at their site. DI data from radiographs of the body parts chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremity were analyzed for anteroposterior, posteroanterior, lateral, and decubitus views. The DI data was analyzed both in aggregate and stratified by exposure control method, image receptor technology, patient age, and participating site for each body part and view. The number of exposures with DI falling within previously published control limits for DI and descriptive statistics were calculated. Results: DI data from 505,930 radiographic exposures was analyzed. The number of exposures with DI falling within published control limits for DI varied from 10 to 20% for adult patients and 10 to 23% for pediatric patients for different body parts and views. Mean DI values averaged over other parameters for radiographs of the abdomen, chest, pelvis, and extremities ranged from 0.3 to 1.0, −0.6 to 0.5, 0.8, and −0.9 to 0.5 for the different adult views and ranged from −1.6 to −0.1, −0.3 to 0.5, −0.1, −0.2 to 1.4 for the different pediatric views, respectively (DI data was solicited only for anteroposterior view of pelvis). Standard deviation values of DI from individual sites ranged from 1.3 to 3.6 and 1.3 to 3.0 for the different adult and pediatric views, respectively. Also of interest was that target exposure indicators varied by up to a factor of 6 between sites for certain body parts and views. Conclusion: Previously published DI control limits do not reflect the state of clinical practice in digital radiography. Mean DI and target exposure indicators are targets for quality improvement efforts in radiography.

  4. SU-E-T-209: Independent Dose Calculation in FFF Modulated Fields with Pencil Beam Kernels Obtained by Deconvolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azcona, J [Department of Radiation Physics, Clinica Universidad de Navarra (Spain); Burguete, J [Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To obtain the pencil beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a FFF linac by experimental measurements, and to apply them for dose calculation in modulated fields. Methods: Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from a Varian True Beam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) linac, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50 mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. Measured dose leads to the kernel characterization, assuming that the energy fluence exiting the linac head and further collimated is originated on a point source. The three-dimensional kernel was obtained by deconvolution at each depth using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. The kernels were used to calculate modulated dose distributions in six modulated fields and compared through the gamma index to their absolute dose measured by film in the RW3 phantom. Results: The resulting kernels properly characterize the global beam penumbra. The output factor-based correction was carried out adding the amount of signal necessary to reproduce the experimental output factor in steps of 2mm, starting at a radius of 4mm. There the kernel signal was in all cases below 10% of its maximum value. With this correction, the number of points that pass the gamma index criteria (3%, 3mm) in the modulated fields for all cases are at least 99.6% of the total number of points. Conclusion: A system for independent dose calculations in modulated fields from FFF beams has been developed. Pencil beam kernels were obtained and their ability to accurately calculate dose in homogeneous media was demonstrated.

  5. 33 CFR 209.325 - Navigation lights, aids to navigation, navigation charts, and related data policy, practices and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... outside quarter feet Mid-channel for half project width feet Right outside quarter feet Kings Island... permit the fixed plane or reference, bench marks, base lines, etc., to be determined and located. The...

  6. Where Have All the Menhaden Gone? A Learning Experience for Coastal and Oceanic Awareness Studies, No. 209. [Project COAST].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaware Univ., Newark. Coll. of Education.

    This unit focuses on the concept that populations of marine organisms are unevenly distributed. It is designed for upper elementary and secondary school students and will take 6-10 class periods. Students become involved in identifying various causes of the uneven distribution of marine populations, especially that of the menhaden population.…

  7. Oahu Photomosaic 2000 (208-209-0516) - Orthorectification and Mosaicing of Color Aerial Photography Main Eight Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Habitat maps of the main Hawaiian Islands were created by visual interpretation of aerial photos and hyperspectral imagery using the Habitat Digitizer extension....

  8. 76 FR 16526 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney JT8D-209, -217, -217A, -217C, and -219 Series Turbofan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... within 500 hours TIS since (1.130 N.m). last inspection. Less than 10 LB-IN (1.130 N.m) but One to six... TIS since (1.130 N.m). last inspection. Less than 10 LB-IN (1.130 N.m) but One to six Repeat torque... This AD (n) Whenever a refurbished or used blade is intermixed with new blades in a rotor, use the...

  9. 75 FR 38052 - Airworthiness Directives; Pratt & Whitney JT8D-209, -217, -217A, -217C, and -219 Series Turbofan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (1.130 N.m) One to six....... Repeat torque but greater than or equal to inspection within 5 LB-IN (0... TIS since last inspection. Less than 10 LB-IN (1.130 N.m) One to six....... Repeat torque but greater... This AD (n) Whenever a refurbished or used blade is intermixed with new blades in a rotor, use the...

  10. Phenotype and function of CD209+ bovine blood dendritic cells, monocyte-derived-dendritic cells and monocyte-derived macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phylogenic comparisons of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) of humans and mice demonstrate phenotypic divergence of dendritic cell (DC) subsets that play similar roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Although differing in phenotype, DC can be classified into four groups according to ontogeny a...

  11. TU-D-209-03: Alignment of the Patient Graphic Model Using Fluoroscopic Images for Skin Dose Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oines, A; Oines, A; Kilian-Meneghin, J; Karthikeyan, B; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D [University at Buffalo (SUNY) School of Med., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The Dose Tracking System (DTS) was developed to provide realtime feedback of skin dose and dose rate during interventional fluoroscopic procedures. A color map on a 3D graphic of the patient represents the cumulative dose distribution on the skin. Automated image correlation algorithms are described which use the fluoroscopic procedure images to align and scale the patient graphic for more accurate dose mapping. Methods: Currently, the DTS employs manual patient graphic selection and alignment. To improve the accuracy of dose mapping and automate the software, various methods are explored to extract information about the beam location and patient morphology from the procedure images. To match patient anatomy with a reference projection image, preprocessing is first used, including edge enhancement, edge detection, and contour detection. Template matching algorithms from OpenCV are then employed to find the location of the beam. Once a match is found, the reference graphic is scaled and rotated to fit the patient, using image registration correlation functions in Matlab. The algorithm runs correlation functions for all points and maps all correlation confidences to a surface map. The highest point of correlation is used for alignment and scaling. The transformation data is saved for later model scaling. Results: Anatomic recognition is used to find matching features between model and image and image registration correlation provides for alignment and scaling at any rotation angle with less than onesecond runtime, and at noise levels in excess of 150% of those found in normal procedures. Conclusion: The algorithm provides the necessary scaling and alignment tools to improve the accuracy of dose distribution mapping on the patient graphic with the DTS. Partial support from NIH Grant R01-EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.

  12. MO-FG-209-02: Development of a Virtual Breast Phantom From a Multi-Modality Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graff, C.

    2016-06-15

    This symposium will review recent advances in the simulation methods for evaluation of novel breast imaging systems – the subject of AAPM Task Group TG234. Our focus will be on the various approaches to development and validation of software anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in the statistical assessment of novel imaging systems using such phantoms along with computational models for the x-ray image formation process. Due to the dynamic development and complex design of modern medical imaging systems, the simulation of anatomical structures, image acquisition modalities, and the image perception and analysis offers substantial benefits of reduced cost, duration, and radiation exposure, as well as the known ground-truth and wide variability in simulated anatomies. For these reasons, Virtual Clinical Trials (VCTs) have been increasingly accepted as a viable tool for preclinical assessment of x-ray and other breast imaging methods. Activities of TG234 have encompassed the optimization of protocols for simulation studies, including phantom specifications, the simulated data representation, models of the imaging process, and statistical assessment of simulated images. The symposium will discuss the state-of-the-science of VCTs for novel breast imaging systems, emphasizing recent developments and future directions. Presentations will discuss virtual phantoms for intermodality breast imaging performance comparisons, extension of the breast anatomy simulation to the cellular level, optimized integration of the simulated imaging chain, and the novel directions in the observer models design. Learning Objectives: Review novel results in developing and applying virtual phantoms for inter-modality breast imaging performance comparisons; Discuss the efforts to extend the computer simulation of breast anatomy and pathology to the cellular level; Summarize the state of the science in optimized integration of modules in the simulated imaging chain; Compare novel directions in the design of observer models for task based validation of imaging systems. PB: Research funding support from the NIH, NSF, and Komen for the Cure; NIH funded collaboration with Barco, Inc. and Hologic, Inc.; Consultant to Delaware State Univ. and NCCPM, UK. AA: Employed at Barco Healthcare.; P. Bakic, NIH: (NIGMS P20 #GM103446, NCI R01 #CA154444); M. Das, NIH Research grants.

  13. 48 CFR 3052.209-76 - Prohibition on Federal Protective Service guard services contracts with business concerns owned...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... or business ethics and that an award would be consistent with the mission of FPS. The business... longer calls into question the individual or business concern's integrity or business ethics and that an... Protective Service guard services contracts with business concerns owned, controlled, or operated by an...

  14. 40 CFR 600.209-08 - Calculation of vehicle-specific 5-cycle fuel economy values for a model type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... configuration 5-cycle fuel economy values as determined in § 600.207-08 for low-altitude tests. (1) If the... from the tests performed using gasoline or diesel test fuel. (ii) If 5-cycle testing was performed on... gas test fuel, if 5-cycle testing was performed on the alcohol or natural gas test fuel. Otherwise...

  15. SU-C-209-06: Improving X-Ray Imaging with Computer Vision and Augmented Reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDougall, R.D.; Scherrer, B [Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Don, S [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of using a computer vision algorithm and augmented reality interface to reduce repeat rates and improve consistency of image quality and patient exposure in general radiography. Methods: A prototype device, designed for use with commercially available hardware (Microsoft Kinect 2.0) capable of depth sensing and high resolution/frame rate video, was mounted to the x-ray tube housing as part of a Philips DigitalDiagnost digital radiography room. Depth data and video was streamed to a Windows 10 PC. Proprietary software created an augmented reality interface where overlays displayed selectable information projected over real-time video of the patient. The information displayed prior to and during x-ray acquisition included: recognition and position of ordered body part, position of image receptor, thickness of anatomy, location of AEC cells, collimated x-ray field, degree of patient motion and suggested x-ray technique. Pre-clinical data was collected in a volunteer study to validate patient thickness measurements and x-ray images were not acquired. Results: Proprietary software correctly identified ordered body part, measured patient motion, and calculated thickness of anatomy. Pre-clinical data demonstrated accuracy and precision of body part thickness measurement when compared with other methods (e.g. laser measurement tool). Thickness measurements provided the basis for developing a database of thickness-based technique charts that can be automatically displayed to the technologist. Conclusion: The utilization of computer vision and commercial hardware to create an augmented reality view of the patient and imaging equipment has the potential to drastically improve the quality and safety of x-ray imaging by reducing repeats and optimizing technique based on patient thickness. Society of Pediatric Radiology Pilot Grant; Washington University Bear Cub Fund.

  16. 44 CFR 206.209 - Arbitration for Public Assistance determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Arbitration for Public Assistance determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major disaster declarations DR-1603, DR... determinations related to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Major disaster declarations DR-1603, DR-1604, DR-1605, DR...

  17. TU-FG-209-07: Medical Physics 1.0 Versus Medical Physics 2.0: A Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carver, D; Willis, C; Stauduhar, P; Nishino, T [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wells, J; Samei, E [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To illustrate how performance analytics can identify performance decrement in digital radiography systems. Methods: Subsequent to a radiologist’s image quality complaint, four different advanced methods contributed to root cause analysis. Our system was a GE Revolution XQi digital radiography unit. Initially, we reviewed weekly GE Quality Assurance Procedures (QAP) results in a database dating from 2001. Next, we evaluated objective image quality metrics of individual PA Chest radiographs acquired. These images were anonymized, securely transferred, and analyzed by the Duke University Clinical Imaging Physics Group with software previously described{sup 1} and validated{sup 2}. Third, we compared the exposure-dependent SNR{sup 2} (NEQ) of the unit with previously established confidence limits{sup 3}. Finally, we explored our service database to reveal events that might affect detector performance. Results: QAP reported a decrease in CNR reflected in a significant increase in lung noise(Ln), mediastinum noise(Mn), and subdiaphragm-lung contrast(Slc) with a significant decrease in lung grey level(Lgl) after detector replacement. Most change occurred during week 1, before the QAP indicated one-half the ultimate decrease in CNR. After detector recalibration, QAP CNR improved, but was not restored to previous levels. Lgl and Slc were no longer significantly different from before, however Ln and Mn remained significantly different. Exposure-dependent SNR2 show the detector to be operating within limits in October 2006 but subsequently became miscalibrated sometime before acquisition of the 2011–2014 data. Service records revealed catastrophic failure of the Image Detection Controller that contained the 2007 calibration. Traditional metrics did not indicate that the system was performing outside of normal limits. Conclusion: Performance analytics are powerful tools whose proper application could allow early intervention in degraded system performance. The image-quality metrics appear to be highly sensitive to system performance and are reported with every acquisition rather than at arbitrary intervals. Confidence intervals may require customization for individual systems or detectors.

  18. The Salience of Racial Isolation: African Americans' and Latinos' Perceptions of Climate and Enrollment Choices with and without Proposition 209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder, William C.

    2012-01-01

    One of the important arguments by critics of affirmative action is that it actually hurts the students it is supposed to help by subjecting them to the "stigma" of being admitted under policies explicitly seeking campus diversity. Such students, this theory argues, must feel embarrassed and uncomfortable as a result and would prefer to…

  19. SU-D-209-01: Can Fluoroscopic Air-Kerma Rates Be Reliably Measured with Solid-State Meters?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, C; Thai, L; Wagner, L [The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Ozus, B [CHI St Luke’s Health, Baylor St Luke’s Medical Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Ionization chambers remain the standard for calibration of air-kerma rate measuring devices. Despite their strong energy-dependent response, solid state radiation detectors are increasingly used, primarily due to their efficiency in making standardized measurements. To test the reliability of these devices in measuring air-kerma rates, we compared ion chambers measurements with solid-state measurements for various mobile fluoroscopes operated at different beam qualities and air-kerma rates. Methods: Six mobile fluoroscopes (GE OEC models 9800 and 9900) were used to generate test beams. Using various field sizes and dose rate controls, copper attenuators and a lead attenuator were placed at the image receptor in varying combinations to generate a range of air-kerma rates. Air-kerma rates at 30 centimeters from the image receptors were measured using two 6-cm{sup 3} ion chambers with electrometers (Radcal, models 1015 and 9015) and two with solid state detectors (Unfors Xi and Raysafe X2). No error messages occurred during measurements. However, about two months later, one solid-state device stopped working and was replaced by the manufacturer. Two out of six mobile fluoroscopic units were retested with the replacement unit. Results: Generally, solid state and ionization chambers agreed favorably well, with two exceptions. Before replacement of the detector, the Xi meter when set in the “RF High” mode deviated from ion chamber readings by factors of 2 and 10 with no message indicating error in measurement. When set in the “RF Low” mode, readings were within −4% to +3%. The replacement Xi detector displayed messages alerting the user when settings were not compatible with air-kerma rates. Conclusion: Air-kerma rates can be measured favorably well using solid-state devices, but users must be aware of the possibility that readings can be grossly in error with no discernible indication for the deviation.

  20. SU-D-209-04: Raise Your Table: An Effective Way to Reduce Radiation Dose for Fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, D; Hoerner, M; Toskich, B; Rill, L [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Patient table height plays an important role in estimating patient skin dose for interventional radiology (IR) procedures, because the patient’s skin location is dependent on the height of table. Variation in table height can lead to as much as 150% difference in skin dose for patient exams with similar air kerma meter readings. In our facility, IR procedural workflow was recently changed to require the IR physicians to confirm the patient table height before the procedure. The patient table height data was collected before and after this workflow change to validate the implementation of this practice. Methods: Table height information was analyzed for all procedures performed in three IR rooms, which were impacted by the workflow change, covering three months before and after the change (Aug 2015 to Jan 2016). In total, 442, 425, and 390 procedures were performed in these three rooms over this time period. There were no personnel or procedure assignment changes during the six-month period of time. Statistical analysis was performed for the average table height changes before and after the workflow change. Results: For the three IR rooms investigated, after the workflow change, the average table heights were increased by 1.43 cm (p=0.004084), 0.66 cm (p=0.187089), and 1.59 cm (p=0.002193), providing a corresponding estimated skin dose savings of 6.76%, 2.94% and 7.62%, respectively. After the workflow change, the average table height was increased by 0.95 cm, 0.63 cm, 0.55 cm, 1.07 cm, 1.12 cm, and 3.36 cm for the six physicians who routinely work in these three rooms. Conclusion: Consistent improvement in table height settings has been observed for all IR rooms and all physicians following a simple workflow change. This change has led to significant patient dose savings by making physicians aware of the pre-procedure table position.

  1. ARRA FEMP Technical Assistance -- Federal Aviation Administration Project 209 -- Control Tower and Support Building, Palm Springs, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-03-31

    This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 100% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be built in Palm Springs, California by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specifications that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  2. 48 CFR 1553.209-71 - EPA Form 1900-27, Project Officer's Evaluation of Contractor Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... EPA Form 1900-27, Project Officer's Evaluation of Contractor Performance. As prescribed in 1509.170-4(a), EPA Form 1900-27 shall be used by the Project Officer to record his/her evaluation of Contractor... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true EPA Form 1900-27, Project...

  3. FCJ-209 Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Pattern Thinking: An Expanded Analysis of the First Indigenous Robotics Prototype Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angie Abdilla

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In November 2014, the lead researcher’s interest in the conceptual development of digital technology and her cultural connection to Indigenous Knowledge Systems created an opportunity to explore a culturally relevant use of technology with urban Indigenous youth: the Indigenous Robotics Prototype Workshop. The workshop achieved a sense of cultural pride and confidence in Indigenous traditional knowledge while inspiring the youth to continue with their engagement in coding and programming through building robots. Yet, the outcomes from the prototype workshop further revealed a need to investigate how Indigenous Knowledge Systems, and particularly Pattern Thinking, might hint toward a possible paradigm shift for the ethical and advanced design of new technologies. This article examines the implications of such a hypothetical shift in autonomous systems in robotics and artificial intelligence (AI, using the Indigenous Robotics Prototype Workshop as a case study and springboard.

  4. Orthorectification and Mosaicing of Color Aerial Photographyfor the Main Eight Hawaiian Islands: Oahu (208-209-0516)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project is a cooperative effort among the National Ocean Service, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science, Center for Coastal Monitoring and Assessment; the...

  5. SU-D-209-05: Sensitivity of the Diagnostic Radiological Index of Protection (DRIP) to Procedural Factors in Fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, A [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Pasciak, A [University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wagner, L [UT Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the sensitivity of the Diagnostic Radiological Index of Protection (DRIP) to procedural factors in fluoroscopy in an effort to determine an appropriate set of scatter-mimicking primary beams (SMPB) to be used in measuring the DRIP. Methods: A series of clinical and factorial Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to determine the shape of the scattered X-ray spectra incident on the operator in different clinical fluoroscopy scenarios. Two clinical evaluations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle and patient size while technical factors were varied according to measured automatic dose rate control (ADRC) data. Factorial evaluations studied the sensitivity of the scattered spectrum to gantry angle, field of view, patient size and beam quality for constant technical factors. Average energy was the figure of merit used to condense fluence in each energy bin to a single numerical index. Results: Beam quality had the strongest influence on the scattered spectrum in fluoroscopy. Many procedural factors affected the scattered spectrum indirectly through their effects on primary beam quality through ADRC, e.g., gantry angle and patient size. Lateral C-arm rotation, common in interventional cardiology, increased the energy of the scattered spectrum, regardless of the direction of rotation. The effect of patient size on scattered radiation depended on ADRC characteristics, patient size, and procedure type. Conclusion: The scattered spectrum striking the operator in fluoroscopy, and therefore the DRIP, is most strongly influenced by primary beam quality, particularly kV. Use cases for protective garments should be classified by typical procedural primary beam qualities, which are governed by the ADRC according to the impacts of patient size, anatomical location, and gantry angle. These results will help determine an appropriate set of SMPB to be used for measuring the DRIP.

  6. Derivation of Soil Screening Guidelines for Gross Alpha/Beta Radioactivity for United States Air Force Deployment Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-19

    the emission of 7 alpha particles and 4 beta particles. Three radionuclides ( francium -223, astatine-215, and polonium-211) are not listed below...no no Uranium-233 159,200 y alpha yes no Thorium-229 7,300 y alpha yes no Radium-225 14.9 d beta no no Actinium-225 10.0 d alpha no no Francium

  7. δ37Cl : the geochemistry of chlorine isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggenkamp, H.G.M.

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis the geochemistry of the stable isotopes of chlorine will be examined. Chlorine is one of the halogens, the seventh group in the periodic system of elements. This group consists of five elements, fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, and astatine.

  8. δ³⁷Cl : the geochemistry of chlorine isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggenkamp, H.G.M.

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis the geochemistry of the stable isotopes of chlorine will be examined. Chlorine is one of the halogens, the seventh group in the periodic system of elements. This group consists of five elements, fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, and astatine. This thesis presents the first chlorine

  9. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Final performance report, March 1992--November 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research is described in the following areas: development and evaluation quantitatively of reconstruction algorithms with improved compensations for attenuation, scatter, and geometric collimator response; evaluation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) quantification of iodine 123 and astatine 211; and the development and evaluation of SPECT pinhole imaging for low and medium energy photons.

  10. $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with radioactive At beams

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and radioactive decay of the newly available pure beams of neutron-deficient and neutron-rich astatine (Z=85) isotopes. The fission probability and the fission fragment distribution of the even-even isotopes $^{194,196}$Po following the $\\beta$-decay of the isotopes $^{194,196}$At will be studied with the Windmill setup. In-source laser spectroscopy will be performed on the entire astatine isotopic chain, using a combination of the Windmill setup, ISOLTRAP MR-ToF and ISOLDE Faraday. Radioactive decay data will be acquired at the Windmill setup throughout those studies and contribute to the global understanding of the phenomenon of shape coexistence in the neutron-deficient lead region.

  11. Correlations between Polarisation States of W Particles in the Reaction $e^- e^+\\to W^- W^+$ at LEP2 Energies 189-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, U; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W-D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, P; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K-H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Buschbeck, B; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, Ph; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, Ph; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S-O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J-C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, F; Nawrocki, K; Némécek, S; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevski, A; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, Th D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Radojicic, D; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Sekulin, R; Siebel, M; Sisakian, A; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M-L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2009-01-01

    In a study of the reaction e-e+ -> W-W+ with the DELPHI detector, the probabilities of the two W particles occurring in the joint polarisation states transverse-transverse (TT), longitudinal-transverse plus transverse-longitudinal (LT) and longitudinal-longitudinal (LL) have been determined using the final states WW -> l nu q qbar (l = e, mu). The two-particle joint polarisation probabilities, i.e. the spin density matrix elements rho_TT, rho_LT, rho_LL, are measured as functions of the W- production angle, theta_W-, at an average reaction energy of 198.2 GeV. Averaged over all cos(theta_W-), the following joint probabilities are obtained: rho_TT = (67 +/- 8)%, rho_LT = (30 +/- 8)%, rho_LL = (3 +/- 7)% . These results are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions of 63.0%, 28.9% and 8.1%, respectively. The related polarisation cross-sections sigma_TT, sigma_LT and sigma_LL are also presented.

  12. TU-D-209-06: Head and Neck Tissue Dose From X-Ray Scatter to Physicians Performing Cardiovascular Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterly, K; Schueler, B; Grams, M [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Sturchio, G [Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to characterize the spatial distribution of scatter radiation to the head and neck of a physician performing an x-ray interventional procedure and assess brain, eye lens, and carotid artery dose. Methods: Radiographic x-ray beams were tuned to match the peak energy (56 to 106 keV) and HVL (3.5 to 6.5 mm Al) of x-ray scatter originating from a patient during a fluoroscopic procedure. The radiographic beam was directed upon a Rando phantom from an inferior-left location to mimic a typical patient-operator geometric relationship. A lead-equivalent protective garment was secured to the phantom. Direct exposure Gafchromic film (XRQA2) was placed between the transverse plane layers of the head and neck region of the phantom and exposed with 4 scatter-equivalent radiographic beams. A 3×3 cm{sup 2} film placed at the left collar of the phantom was used to monitor incident dose in the position of a radiation monitoring badge. The films were converted to 2D dose distribution maps using FilmQA Pro software and an Epson 11000-XL scanner. The 2D dose distributions maps were normalized by the left collar dose and the percent of left collar dose (%LCD) was calculated for select tissues. Results: The dose maps had high dynamic range (10{sub 4}) and spatial detail. Considering all transverse planes and 4 scatter beam qualities, the median %LCD values were: whole brain 8.5%, left brain 13%, right brain 5.4%, left eye lens 67%, right eye lens 25%, left carotid artery 72%, and right carotid artery 28%. Conclusion: Scatter radiation dose to an operator can be simulated using a tuned radiographic beam and used to expose a phantom and Gafchromic film, thereby creating detailed 2D dose distribution maps. This work facilitates individualized estimation of dose to select head and neck tissues based on an operator’s radiation monitoring badge value.

  13. Study of Multiphoton Final States and Tests of QED in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Ewers, A.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofiev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Roux, B.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2002-01-01

    The process e+ e- -> n gamma with n>=2 is studied at centre-of-mass energies ranging from \\root(s)=192 to 208 GeV. The data sample corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 427 1/pb. The total and differential cross sections are found to be in agreement with the QED expectations. Using all the data collected with the L3 detector above the Z pole, limits on deviations from QED, excited electrons, contact interactions, extra space dimensions and excited spin-3/2 leptons are set.

  14. Sexual Activity, Contraceptive Use, and Childbearing of Teenagers Aged 15-19 in the United States. NCHS Data Brief. Number 209

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Gladys M.; Abma, Joyce C.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring sexual activity and contraceptive use among U.S. adolescents is important for understanding differences in their risk of pregnancy. In 2013, the U.S. birth rate for teenagers aged 15-19 dropped 57% from its peak in 1991, paralleling a decline in the teen "pregnancy" rate. But these rates are still higher than those in other…

  15. SU-C-209-05: Monte Carlo Model of a Prototype Backscatter X-Ray (BSX) Imager for Projective and Selective Object-Plane Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolison, L; Samant, S; Baciak, J; Jordan, K [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) model for the validation of a prototype backscatter x-ray (BSX) imager, and optimization of BSX technology for medical applications, including selective object-plane imaging. Methods: BSX is an emerging technology that represents an alternative to conventional computed tomography (CT) and projective digital radiography (DR). It employs detectors located on the same side as the incident x-ray source, making use of backscatter and avoiding ring geometry to enclose the imaging object. Current BSX imagers suffer from low spatial resolution. A MCNP model was designed to replicate a BSX prototype used for flaw detection in industrial materials. This prototype consisted of a 1.5mm diameter 60kVp pencil beam surrounded by a ring of four 5.0cm diameter NaI scintillation detectors. The imaging phantom consisted of a 2.9cm thick aluminum plate with five 0.6cm diameter holes drilled halfway. The experimental image was created using a raster scanning motion (in 1.5mm increments). Results: A qualitative comparison between the physical and simulated images showed very good agreement with 1.5mm spatial resolution in plane perpendicular to incident x-ray beam. The MCNP model developed the concept of radiography by selective plane detection (RSPD) for BSX, whereby specific object planes can be imaged by varying kVp. 10keV increments in mean x-ray energy yielded 4mm thick slice resolution in the phantom. Image resolution in the MCNP model can be further increased by increasing the number of detectors, and decreasing raster step size. Conclusion: MCNP modelling was used to validate a prototype BSX imager and introduce the RSPD concept, allowing for selective object-plane imaging. There was very good visual agreement between the experimental and MCNP imaging. Beyond optimizing system parameters for the existing prototype, new geometries can be investigated for volumetric image acquisition in medical applications. This material is based upon work supported under an Integrated University Program Graduate Fellowship sponsored by the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy.

  16. Deficits of hot executive function in 0 crossmark developmental coordination disorder: Sensitivity to positive social cues (Reprinted from Human Movement Science, vol 38, pg 209-224)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimi-Golkhandan, S.; Steenbergen, B.; Piek, J.P.; Wilson, P.H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent research shows that children with motor coordination problems (or developmental coordination disorder – DCD) show deficits in not only cool executive function (EF), but also hot EF. We aimed to determine whether this deficit of hot EF is due to heightened sensitivity to rewarding stimuli,

  17. SU-D-209-06: Study On the Dose Conversion Coefficients in Pediatric Radiography with the Development of Children Voxel Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Q [Institute of Radiation Medicine Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai, Shanghai (China); Zhuo, W; Liu, H [Institute of Radiation Medicine Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Liu, Y; Chen, T [Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Conversion coefficients of organ dose normalized to entrance skin dose (ESD) are widely used to evaluate the organ doses directly using ESD without time-consuming dose measurement, this work aims to investigate the dose conversion coefficients in pediatric chest and abdomen radiography with the development of 5 years and 10 years old children voxel phantoms. Methods: After segmentation of organs and tissues from CT slice images of ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms, a 5-year-old and a 10-year-old children computational voxel phantoms were developed for Monte Carlo simulation. The organ doses and the entrance skin dose for pediatric chest postero-anterior projection and abdominal antero-posterior projection were simulated at the same time, and then the organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated.To verify the simulated results, dose measurement was carried out with ATOM tissue-equivalent phantoms for 5 year chest radiography. Results: Simulated results and experimental results matched very well with each other, the result differences of all the organs covered in radiation field were below 16% for 5-year-old child in chest projection. I showed that the conversion coefficients of organs covered in the radiation field were much larger than organs out of the field for all the study cases, for example, the conversion coefficients of stomach, liver intestines, and pancreas are larger for abdomen radiography while conversion coefficients of lungs are larger for chest radiography. Conclusion: The voxel children phantoms were helpful to evaluate the radiation doses more accurately and efficiently. Radiation field was the essential factor that affects the organ dose, use reasonably small field should be encouraged for radiation protection. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China(11475047)

  18. Prevalence of chronic diseases and practice of physical activity among adults and elderly - doi: 10.5020/18061230.2012.p209

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Marinho da Silveira

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate correlation between the prevalence of chronic diseases, diabetes mellitus and hypertension, and physical activity. Methods: A cross-sectional study, regarding descriptive variables and association, in which took part 53 adult and elderly subjects attending computer workshops offered by the Regional Center of Studies and Activities for the Third Age, managed by University of Passo Fundo. To analyze association between outcome variables, Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher’s exact test were used, for a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Results: Practice of physical activity was high and presented little difference between the sexes. With respect to diseases, hypertension was prevalent in both sexes, whereas diabetes mellitus was more prevalent among males. Conclusions: The practice of regular physical activity is part of daily life for the subjects studied, but even so, chronic diseases occur, especially hypertension, for men and women, and diabetes mellitus, among men.

  19. Petrology of podiform chromitite from the ocean floor at the 15°20'N FZ in the MAR, Site 1271, ODP Leg 209

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ABE, Natsue

    2011-01-01

    ...# value of the chromitite "minipod" sampled from Hess Deep (Arai and Matsukage, 1996). Samples associated with chromitites consist of mainly dunite, some amphibole-bearing gabbros and troctolite, and a very small amount of harzburgite...

  20. Ethical Decision-Making in College: Choosing between Right, Wrong, and the Space in between. Research & Occasional Paper Series. CSHE.2.09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Fanny P. F.; Keup, Jennifer R.

    2009-01-01

    It is important to understand how students' changing belief structures influence their values and behaviors, including their ethical beliefs and decision-making patterns. As such, this study will address the following research questions: (1) what are students' ethical beliefs and their perceptions of students' ethical behaviors; and (2) how do…

  1. Ethical Decision-Making in College: Choosing between Right, Wrong, and the Space in between. A SERU Project Research Paper. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.2.09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Fanny P.F.; Keup, Jennifer R.

    2009-01-01

    It is important to understand how students' changing belief structures influence their values and behaviors, including their ethical beliefs and decision-making patterns. As such, this study will address the following research questions: 1) what are students' ethical beliefs and their perceptions of students' ethical behaviors; and 2) how do…

  2. Optimized evaluation of a pulsed 2.09 microns holmium:YAG laser impact on the rat brain and 3 D-histomorphometry of the collateral damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, H C; Bauer, C; Fuhrberg, P; Teichmann, H H; Birbilis, T; Markakis, E

    1998-12-01

    Since more than 20 years CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers are established in the microsurgery of the nervous system. CO2 lasers can be used handheld, but may be focused on the target area by mirror optics and sideports of the operating microscope's micromanipulator. Nd:YAG lasers have the disadvantage of deep penetration into the brain and provocation of a large collateral damage. The need is for a fibre conducted solid system for surgery in delicate areas as for brain stem surgery. Fibre conduction of near infrared lasers allows better exposure of the target area compared to hollow wave guides or mirror equipment. Fibres can be tapered and modified according to the purpose. The holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser has acquired interest by introducing the system into microsurgery of parenchymal tissue. They have not been proven yet sufficiently for neurosurgical tasks. The effort to minimalize the collateral tissue damage has to be maximalized in the surgery of nervous tissue and functional low redundant brain stem or spinal cord tissue. Volumetric data may be more precise in comparison to depth and width data of the laser lesion even when the different levels of the tissue interaction have to be analyzed for estimation of the real side effects in nervous tissue. We have used 50-800 ml delivered Ho:YAG single pulses in cortical areas of Sprague-Dawley rats and investigated the different lesion zones by volumetric data. The functional lesion zone was detected and measured by immunohistological staining of the heat shock protein HSP 72. For further reduction of the focus area, we have used tapered 400 to 200 microns fibres.

  3. Search for R-Parity Violating Production of Single Sneutrinos in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 189-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; Bruneliere, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, J.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Paneque, D.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Barklow, T.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.J.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Waananen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Smith, D.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R.D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; White, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecgt, K.; Muller, A.S.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Leroy, O.; Kachelhoffer, T.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Loomis, C.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; de Vivie de Regie, J.B.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Seager, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-01-01

    A search for single sneutrino production under the assumption that $R$-parity is violated via a single dominant $LL\\bar{E}$ coupling is presented. This search considers the process ${\\rm e} \\gamma \\;{\\smash{\\mathop{\\rightarrow}}}\\;\\tilde{\

  4. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - FEMP Technical Assistance - Federal Aviation Administration - Project 209 - Control Tower and Support Building, Boise, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-06-28

    This report documents an energy audit performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Redhorse Corporation (Redhorse) conducted on the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) control tower and base building in Boise, Idaho. This report presents findings of the energy audit team that evaluated construction documents and operating specifications (at the 100% level) followed by a site visit of the facility under construction. The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specifications that would result in additional energy savings for FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  5. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance Federal Aviation Administration – Project 209 Control Tower and Support Building Oakland, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-03-01

    This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 70% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be build at Oakland, California by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specification that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  6. TU-FG-209-09: Mathematical Estimation and Experimental Measurement of Patient Free-In-Air Skin Entrance Exposure During a Panoramic Dental X-Ray Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errico, A; Behrman, R; Li, B [Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a simple mathematical model for estimating the patient free-in-air skin entrance exposure (SEE) during a panoramic dental x-ray that does not require the use of a head phantom. This eliminates issues associated with phantom centering and the mounting of a detector on the phantom for routine QC testing. Methods: We used a Sirona Orthophos XG panoramic radiographic unit and a Radcal Accu-Gold system for this study. A solid state detector was attached over the slit of the Orthophos’ sensor with the help of a custom-built jig. A single measurement of the free-in-air exposure at this position was taken over a full panoramic scan. A mathematical model for estimating the SEE was developed based upon this measurement, the system geometry, x-ray field beam width, and x-ray sweep angle. To validate the model, patient geometry was simulated by a 16 cm diameter PMMA CTDI phantom centered at the machine’s isocenter. Measurements taken on the phantom’s surface were made using a solid state detector with lead backing, an ion chamber, and the ion chamber with the phantom wrapped in lead to mitigate backscatter. Measurements were taken near the start position of the tube and at 90 degrees from the start position. Results: Using the solid state detector, the average SEE was 23.5+/−0.02 mR and 55.5+/−0.08 mR at 64 kVp and 73 kVp, respectively. With the lead-wrapping, the measurements from the ion chamber matched those of the solid state detector to within 0.1%. Preliminary results gave the difference between the mathematical model and the phantom measurements to be approximately 5% at both kVps. Conclusion: Reasonable estimates of patient SEE for panoramic dental radiography can be made using a simple mathematical model without the need for a head phantom.

  7. 76 FR 2759 - Proposed Information Collection (VAAR Sections 809.106-1, 809.504(d), and Clause 852.209-70...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... Tillman, Office of Acquisition and Logistics (049P1), Department of Veterans Affairs, 810 Vermont Avenue... information will have practical utility; (2) the accuracy of OM's estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information; (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be...

  8. Unique appearance of proliferating antigen-presenting cells expressing DC-SIGN (CD209) in the decidua of early human pregnancy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammerer, U; Eggert, AO; Kapp, M; McLellan, AD; Geijtenbeek, T.B.H.; Dietl, J; Kooijk, van Y.; Kampgen, E

    2003-01-01

    Intact human pregnancy can be regarded as an immunological paradox in that the maternal immune system accepts the allogeneic embryo without general immunosuppression. Because dendritic cell (DC) subsets could be involved in peripheral tolerance, the uterine mucosa (decidua) was investigated for DC

  9. Evidence of social and environmental vulnerability in Sepetiba Bay: an analysis of risk situations - doi:10.5020/18061230.2009.p209

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Pacheco Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify, among the population of Sepetiba Bay, risk situations of environmental vulnerability. Methods: Data collection was performed through a self-administered questionnaire with open and closed questions in a determined population of 895 subjects, between 2007 and 2009. The techniques used consisted of semi-structured interviews, structured questionnaires and participant observation (triangulation of methods. After the validation of the instrument by stages (face validity, content validity and construct validity,the main risks reported by the subjects were determined. Results: A total of 675 environmental risk situations was detected, especially the contamination of the water, soil and air; the waste; the impact on flora and social demands. It was observed that the same risk may simultaneously affect more than one location, emphasizing that one same problem was mentioned in more than one location of the bay. Conclusions: The results support the hypothesis guiding the research that the environment is part of the culture of a particular community or group as a process of interaction between cultural and natural environment.

  10. Radiohalogenation of biomolecules. An experimental study on radiohalogen preparation, precursor synthesis, radiolabeling and biodistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koziorowski, J

    1998-10-01

    Radiohalogens are widely used in nuclear medicine, both as tool for diagnostic in vivo imaging, and in radionuclide therapy. This study deals with the use of radiohalogens; separation, precursor synthesis, labeling and biological behavior. The focus is on {sup 211}At and {sup 124}I, the former being a candidate for nuclide therapy and the latter potentially useful for diagnostic imaging and Auger-electron based radiotherapy. For astatine the separation, labeling and some biological behavior is described, and for iodine the latter two. Astatine was separated from an irradiated bismuth target by dry distillation. A novel cryotrap was developed for the isolation of astatine and subsequent synthesis of radiolabeled compounds. 5-[{sup 211}At]astato-2`-deoxyuridine (AUdR) and N-succinimidyl-4-[{sup 211}At]astatobenzoate (SAB) were synthesized in 95% respectively 90% radiochemical yields. The former is incorporated into DNA of proliferating cells and can therefore be used as an endoradiotherapeutic agent. The latter is a conjugate for the astatination of proteins. Human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) was tagged with astatine using three approaches: a) direct labeling of native hEGF, b) conjugation with SAB, and c) direct labeling of an hEGF - 7-(3-aminopropyl)-7,8-dicarba-nido-undecaborate(1-) conjugate. The overall labeling yields were 3.5% for direct labeling, 44% for SAB and 70% for the hEGF-nido-carborane conjugate. A new route to N-succinimidyl 3- and 4- [{sup 124}I]iodobenzoate, two reagents for radioiodination of proteins is described affording 90% radiochemical yield. Three radioiodinated analogs of PK11195, 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)isoquinoline-3-carboxyam ide, a peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, were synthesized. All three analogs were obtained in >90% radiochemical yield. Synthesis and application of 5-[{sup 124}I]iodo-2`-deoxyuridine (IUdR) is presented. The closo-dodecaborate anion was evaluated as prosthetic group for

  11. Rendimento de óleo essencial de Salvia officinalis L. sob ação de reguladores vegetais - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v28i3.209 Essential oil yield in Salvia officinallis L. under the action of plant growth regulators - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v28i3.209

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Orika Ono

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de diferentes reguladores vegetais no rendimento do óleo essencial de plantas de Salvia officinalis L. O experimento foi conduzido em casa de vegetação e o delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, consistindo em cinco tratamentos com três repetições cada. Os tratamentos consistiram na aplicação de ácido giberélico (GA3, benzilaminopurina (BAP e ácido 2- cloroetil-fosfônico (ethephon e Stimulate a 2%, comparados com plantas controle (água. A pulverização, via foliar, dos reguladores vegetais foram realizadas em três épocas, aos 15, 25 e 35 dias após o transplante de plântulas previamente germinadas em câmaras de germinação a 25ºC e luz constante. A produção de massa seca da parte aérea e rendimento do óleo essencial foi avaliada aos 131 dias após o transplante. A parte aérea das plantas foi seca em estufa a 35ºC determinando a massa seca e a extração do óleo foi realizada pelo método de hidrodestilação, determinando o volume de óleo. Plantas tratadas com GA3 e Stimulate apresentaram incrementos no teor de óleo essencial, enquanto que as plantas tratadas com BAP e ethephon apresentaram diminuição no volume de óleo essencial comparado às plantas controle.This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different plant growth regulators on essential oil yield in Salvia officinalis L. plants. The experiment was held in a greenhouse and the experimental design was completely randomized, with 5 treatments and three replications. The Treatments consisted in the application of gibberellic acid (GA3, benzylaminopurine (BAP, 2-chloroethyl phosphonic acid (ethephon, and Stimulate at 2%, compared with control plants (water. Applications of plant growth regulators were performed in three consecutive periods, in turn, 15, 25 and 35 days after transplanting of seeding germinating in the light at 25ºC. The dry mass yield of the aerial part and the oil essential content were determined 131 days after the transplant. The aerial part of the plants was dried in an oven at 35ºC; after dry mass determination, the oil was extracted by hydrodistillation and its volume was determined. Plants treated with GA3 and Stimulate showed increase in essential oil content, while plants treated with BAP and ethephon showed decrease in essential oil volume when compared with the control plants.

  12. Protein (Viridiplantae): 397075 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :1013 3700:1013 ... 980083:1163 ... 3718:209 ... 81985:209 ... hypothetical protein CARUB_v10021895mg Capsella rubel...la MAKQDGKKIVWVIKNFSSLQSEECIYSDPVLIGDCKWRLCACPKGDGNIDNYFYLFVEVADDESLPSGWKRFVKFQLN

  13. Alpha particle induced DNA damage and repair in normal cultured thyrocytes of different proliferation status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckesvärd, Madeleine Nordén; Delle, Ulla; Kahu, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of developing thyroid cancer later in life and this is suggested to be due to higher proliferation of the young thyroid. The interest of using high-LET alpha particles from Astatine-211 ((211)At), concentrated in the thyroid by the same...... mechanism as (131)I [1], in cancer treatment has increased during recent years because of its high efficiency in inducing biological damage and beneficial dose distribution when compared to low-LET radiation. Most knowledge of the DNA damage response in thyroid is from studies using low-LET irradiation...

  14. Iceland and mid-ocean ridges : S. Björnsson (editor). Vísindafélag Islendinga, Reykjavik, 1967, 209 pp., 65 illus., U.S. $8.50

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.G.

    Although the quality of the papers is high and the insights obtained are rewarding and modern, I should have still preferred the inclusion of some more factual data. For instance, in Gudmundur Sigwaldason’s paper on the chemistry of basalts, the 43 analyses known are promised, but not

  15. Multibeam collection for KN209-02: Multibeam data collected aboard Knorr from 2012-10-16 to 2012-11-09, departing from Ponta Delgada, Azores and returning to Charleston, SC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is part of a larger set of data called the Multibeam Bathymetry Database (MBBDB) where other similar data can be found at...

  16. SU-C-209-03: Anti-Scatter Grid-Line Artifact Minimization for Removing the Grid Lines for Three Different Grids Used with a High Resolution CMOS Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, R; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Demonstrate the effectiveness of an anti-scatter grid artifact minimization method by removing the grid-line artifacts for three different grids when used with a high resolution CMOS detector. Method: Three different stationary x-ray grids were used with a high resolution CMOS x-ray detector (Dexela 1207, 75 µm pixels, sensitivity area 11.5cm × 6.5cm) to image a simulated artery block phantom (Nuclear Associates, Stenosis/Aneurysm Artery Block 76–705) combined with a frontal head phantom used as the scattering source. The x-ray parameters were 98kVp, 200mA, and 16ms for all grids. With all the three grids, two images were acquired: the first for a scatter-less flat field including the grid and the second of the object with the grid which may still have some scatter transmission. Because scatter has a low spatial frequency distribution, it was represented by an estimated constant value as an initial approximation and subtracted from the image of the object with grid before dividing by an average frame of the grid flat-field with no scatter. The constant value was iteratively changed to minimize residual grid-line artifact. This artifact minimization process was used for all the three grids. Results: Anti-scatter grid lines artifacts were successfully eliminated in all the three final images taken with the three different grids. The image contrast and CNR were also compared before and after the correction, and also compared with those from the image of the object when no grid was used. The corrected images showed an increase in CNR of approximately 28%, 33% and 25% for the three grids, as compared to the images when no grid at all was used. Conclusion: Anti-scatter grid-artifact minimization works effectively irrespective of the specifications of the grid when it is used with a high spatial resolution detector. Partial support from NIH Grant R01-EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corp.

  17. Maternal glycated haemoglobin, pre-gestational weight, pregnancy weight gain and risk of large-for-gestational-age babies: a Danish cohort study of 209 singleton Type 1 diabetic pregnacies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, G.L.; Dethlefsen, Claus; Møller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims To examine the association between maternal glycated haemoglobin in the second half of diabetic pregnancies and the relative risk of delivering large-for-gestational-age (LGA) babies, controlling for maternal body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy, weight gain, age, White class and smoking...... habits. Methods We identified all pregnant diabetic women in North Jutland County, Denmark from 1985 to 2003. Data on HbA1c values from the 20th gestational week to term were collected from medical records and the babies were classified as large, normal or small for gestational age. The association...

  18. SU-E-T-209: Comparison of Plan Quality Between Arm Avoidance (AA) Vs. Non Arm Avoidance VMAT Planning Techniques for Breast Cancer Patients with Bilateral Implant Reconstructions Receiving Postmastectomy Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, L; Ballangrud, A; Ho, A; Mechalakos, J; Li, G; Hong, L [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Breast cancer patients with bilateral implant reconstructions who require postmastectomy radiotherapy can pose unique treatment planning challenges. The use of VMAT may provide advantages over conventional tangent or multi-beam IMRT techniques. Moreover, daily setup uncertainly of the arm position, however, could have significant impact on accurate dose delivery. This study compares the plan qualities between non-AA and AA VMAT techniques. Methods: Three breast cancer patients receiving left chest wall and regional nodal irradiation with bilateral implant reconstructions were studied. PTV included chest wall and IMNs (PTV-CW), and supraclavicular and axillary lymph nodes (PTV-SCV). For each patient, one non-AA VMAT plan (VMAT-S) with 4 partial arcs encompassing the ipsilateral arm and three AA VMAT plans where no arcs were entering or existing through the ipsilateral arm were generated. VMAT-AA1 uses 2 arcs for PTV-CW and 2 arcs for PTV-SCV. VMAT-AA2 used two static fields for PTV-SCV with 2 arcs for PTV-CW. VMAT-AA3 used 2 narrow arcs for PTV-CW and 2 long arcs for all PTVs. Prescription dose (PD) was 50 Gy (25 fractions). All plans were normalized to have 95% of PD to 95 % of PTV. PTV dose inhomogeneity and dose to the heart, left lung, right thyroid dose and left humerus were evaluated. Results: For VMAT-S, VMAT-AA1, VMAT-AA2 and VMAT-AA3, respectively, the average and standard deviation (in Gy unless specified otherwise) of PTV D05 are 54.7±0.9, 55.9±0.4, 56.7±0.7 and 55.7±0.4; mean Heart dose: 7.1±0.7, 7.2±0.8, 7.3±0.9 and 6.9±1.0; left lung V20Gy (in %): 28.1±1.0, 28.8+2.2, 32.2±4.1 and 27.8±2.0; mean right thyroid dose: 8.1±0.6, 5.1±2.1, 2.1±0.4 and 5.0±2.0; mean left humerus dose: 20.0±4.4,15.6±4.4, 15.2±8.2 and 15.3±4.6. Conclusion: AA VMAT can produce acceptable clinical plans while eliminating dosimetric impact related to arm setup uncertainty. These data require validation in larger planning studies prior to routine clinical implantation.

  19. Safety and immunogenicity of vaccination with MART-1 (26-35, 27L), gp100 (209-217, 210M), and tyrosinase (368-376, 370D) in adjuvant with PF-3512676 and GM-CSF in metastatic melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhini, Ahmad A; Leng, Siyang; Moschos, Stergios J; Yin, Yan; Sander, Cindy; Lin, Yan; Gooding, William E; Kirkwood, John M

    2012-05-01

    The effectivenes of cancer vaccines in inducing CD8(+) T-cell responses remains a challenge, resulting in a need for testing more potent adjuvants. Our objective was to determine the safety and immunogenicity of vaccination against melanoma-related antigens employing MART-1, gp100, and tysosinase paptides combined with the TLR9 agonist PF-3512676 and local granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor in oil emulsion. Using continuous monitoring of safety and a 2-stage design for immunologic efficacy, 20 immune response evaluable patients were targetted. Vaccinations were given subcutaneously on days 1 and 15 per cycle (1cycle=28 d) for up to 13 cycles. Interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot was used as the primary assay measuring the frequency of peripheral antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells at days 50 and 90 compared with baseline (target ≥ 9/20 immunologic responses). Clinical responses were measured by Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors every 8 weeks. Twenty-two (including 20 immune response evaluable) melanoma patients were enrolled. All had American Joint Committe on Cancer stage IV (5M1a, 6M1b, 11M1c) and most had previously received therapy. Eight had previously treated brain metastases. An average of 3.5 cycles of vaccination per patient was administered. Clinical response data were available for 21 patients. There were 2 partial response and 8 stable disease lasting 2-7 months. One patient with ongoing partial response continued on treatment. At a median follow-up of 7.39 months (range, 3.22-20.47 mo), median progression-free survival was 1.9 months (90% confidence interval, 1.84-3.68) and median overall survival was 13.4 months (90% confidence interval,11.3-∞). No regimen-related grade 3/4/5 toxicities were observed. There were 9/20 patients with positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot at day 50 and/or day 90. Our adjuvant regimen combining PF-3512676 and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor was safe and is worthy of further testing with these or alternative peptides, potentially in combination with antibodies that target immunoregulatory checkpoints.

  20. Second Annual Clinical Diabetes Technology Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    an ABG "* Check BUN/Cr. Check U/A to look for proteinuria "* Best test for proteinuria is urine microalbumin "* Clinical estimation of left ventricular... 150 -179 1.5 150 -179 2 150 -179 4 150 -179 7 180-209 2 180-209 3 180-209 5 180-209 9 210-239 2 210-239 4 210-239 6 210-239 12 240-269 3 240-269 5 240-269 8...120-149 1.5 120-149 3 120-149 5 150 -179 1.9 150 -179 2 150 -179 4 150 -179 7 180-209 2 180-209 3 180-209 5 180-209 9 210-239 2 210-239 4 210-239 6 210

  1. DMPD: Heterogeneity of TLR-induced responses in dendritic cells: from innate toadaptive immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available daptive immunity. Re F, Strominger JL. Immunobiology. 2004;209(1-2):191-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Sho...toadaptive immunity. Authors Re F, Strominger JL. Publication Immunobiology. 2004;209(1-2):191-8. Pathway -

  2. 78 FR 36819 - Notice of Applications for Modification of Special Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ...), and ultrasonic equipment 180.209(a). with a five sensor head with sensors positioned to perform all...) ultrasonic equipment and (g), and with a five sensor 180.209(a) and head with sensors (b)(1)(iv). positioned...

  3. Cataract Surgical Outreach in a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Odarosa M Uhumwangho

    an eye care specialist. Forty-four out of 209 (21.1%) patients had bilateral mature cataract while 33/209(15.8%) patients were pseudophakic in one eye. The visual acuity in the operated eyes was hand movement (HM) in 109/209(52.2%) patients while. 4/209(1.9%) patients had no light perception (NLP). This is presented in ...

  4. Dicty_cDB: VSE435 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available . 209 4e-53 S26582( S26582 ) chaperonin hsp60 - maize &Z12114_1(Z12114|pid:no... 209 4e-53 S20875( S20875...S20875 ;S34488;S19844) chaperonin hsp60 precursor - maize ... 209 4e-53 L21007_1( L21007 |pid:none) Corn

  5. EFFECT OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MARTENSITE AND LOADING RATE ON DUAL PHASE STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali BAYRAM

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, steel sheet materials were used in order to obtain dual-phase steel. Specimens for this purpose have been annealed in ferrite + astatine regions at the temperatures of 740, 760, 800 and 820 °C. The specimens were annealed at the different temperatures with corresponding times 20, 40 and 60 minutes and quenched into water. As a result of this dual-phase steels at different ferrite + martensite ratio were produced. Sheet specimens were tested at the range of loading rates of 10, 50 and 259 mm/min. Strength properties of dual-phase steels were investigated depending on annealing temperature, ratio of martensite and loading rate.

  6. New developments of the in-source spectroscopy method at RILIS/ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, B A; Imai, N; Seliverstov, M D; Rothe, S; Sels, S; Capponi, L; Rossel, R E; Franchoo, S; Wendt, K; Focker, G J; Kalaninova, Z; Sjoedin, A M; Popescu, L; Nicol, T; Huyse, M; Radulov, D; Atanasov, D; Kesteloot, N; Borgmann, Ch; Cocolios, T E; Lecesne, N; Ghys, L; Pauwels, D; Rapisarda, E; Kreim, S; Liberati, V; Wolf, R N; Andel, B; Schweikhard, L; Lane, J; Derkx, X; Kudryavtsev, Yu; Zemlyanoy, S G; Fedosseev, V N; Lynch, K M; Rosenbusch, M; Van Duppen, P; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Barzakh, A E; Andreyev, A N; Truesdale, V; Flanagan, K T; Molkanov, P L; Koester, U; Van Beveren, C; Wienholtz, F; Goodacre, T Day; Antalic, S; Bastin, B; De Witte, H; Fink, D A; Fedorov, D V

    2013-01-01

    At the CERN ISOLDE facility, long isotope chains of many elements are produced by proton-induced reactions in target materials such as uranium carbide. The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is an efficient and selective means of ionizing the reaction products to produce an ion beam of a chosen isotope. Coupling the RILIS with modern ion detection techniques enables highly sensitive studies of nuclear properties (spins, electromagnetic moments and charge radii) along an isotope chain, provided that the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure splitting of the atomic transitions can be resolved. At ISOLDE the campaign to measure the systematics of isotopes in the lead region (Pb, Bi, Tl and Po) has been extended to include the gold and astatine isotope chains. Several developments were specifically required for the feasibility of the most recent measurements: new ionization schemes (Po, At); a remote controlled narrow line-width mode of operation for the RILIS Ti:sapphire laser (At, Au, Po); isobar fr...

  7. Nuclear and in-source laser spectroscopy with the ISAC yield station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Peter, E-mail: pkunz@triumf.ca; Bricault, Pierre; Dombsky, Marik; Lassen, Jens; Teigelhöfer, Andrea; Heggen, Henning [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Andreoiu, Corina; Wong, Fiona [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    A new decay station has been built for the ISAC facility at TRIUMF for the rapid and reliable characterization of radioactive ion beam (RIB) compositions and intensities with the capability of simultaneously collecting α, β, and γ decay data from RIB with intensities between a few and ≈10{sup 11} ions per second. It features user-friendly control, data acquisition, and analysis software. The analysis of individual decay time structures allows the unambiguous assignment of α and γ lines even with substantial isobaric contamination present. The capability for accurate half-life measurements is demonstrated with the example of {sup 46}K. The coupling of the yield station to the laser ion source, TRILIS, allows the correlation of radiometric data with automated laser frequency scans. First results of in-source laser spectroscopy measurements on astatine are discussed.

  8. Nuclear and in-source laser spectroscopy with the ISAC yield station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Peter; Andreoiu, Corina; Bricault, Pierre; Dombsky, Marik; Lassen, Jens; Teigelhöfer, Andrea; Heggen, Henning; Wong, Fiona

    2014-05-01

    A new decay station has been built for the ISAC facility at TRIUMF for the rapid and reliable characterization of radioactive ion beam (RIB) compositions and intensities with the capability of simultaneously collecting α, β, and γ decay data from RIB with intensities between a few and ≈10(11) ions per second. It features user-friendly control, data acquisition, and analysis software. The analysis of individual decay time structures allows the unambiguous assignment of α and γ lines even with substantial isobaric contamination present. The capability for accurate half-life measurements is demonstrated with the example of (46)K. The coupling of the yield station to the laser ion source, TRILIS, allows the correlation of radiometric data with automated laser frequency scans. First results of in-source laser spectroscopy measurements on astatine are discussed.

  9. Radiopharmaceutical chemistry of targeted radiotherapeutics, part 4: Strategies for211At labeling at high activities and radiation doses of211At α-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Oscar R; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2017-03-01

    Alpha particles are radiation of high energy and short range, properties that can lead to radiolysis-mediated complications in labeling chemistry at the high radioactivity levels required for clinical application. In previous papers in this series, we have shown that radiation dose has a profound effect on the astatine species that are present in the labeling reaction and their suitability for the synthesis of N-succinimidyl 3-[ 211 At]astatobenzoate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of adding N-chlorosuccinimide (NCS) to the methanol solution used for initial isolation of 211 At after distillation, a process referred to as 211 At stabilization, on 211 At chemistry after exposure to high radiation doses. High performance liquid chromatography was used to evaluate the distribution of 211 At species present in methanol in the 500-65,000Gy radiation dose range and the synthesis of SAB from N-succinimidyl 3-(tri-n-butylstannyl)benzoate in the 500-120,000Gy radiation dose range using different 211 At timeactivity combinations under conditions with/without 211 At stabilization. In the absence of NCS stabilization, a reduced form of astatine, At(2), increased with increasing radiation dose, accounting for about half the total activity by about 15,000Gy, while with stabilization, At(2) accounted for 60,000Gy. SAB yields without stabilization rapidly declined with increasing dose, falling to ~20% at about 5000Gy while with stabilization, yields >80% were obtained with 211 At solutions stored for more than 23h and receiving radiation doses >100,000Gy. Adding NCS to the methanol solution used for initial isolation of 211 At is a promising strategy for countering the deleterious effects of radiolysis on 211 At chemistry. This strategy could facilitate the ability to perform 211 At labeling at sites remote from its production and at the high activity levels required for clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular and Biological Characterization of an Isolate of Cucumber mosaic virus from Glycine soja by Generating its Infectious Full-genome cDNA Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Sa Vo Phan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and biological characteristics of an isolate of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV from Glycine soja (wild soybean, named as CMV-209, was examined in this study. Comparison of nucleotide sequences and phylogenetic analyses of CMV-209 with the other CMV strains revealed that CMV-209 belonged to CMV subgroup I. However, CMV-209 showed some genetic distance from the CMV strains assigned to subgroup IA or subgroup IB. Infectious full-genome cDNA clones of CMV-209 were generated under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. Infectivity of the CMV-209 clones was evaluated in Nicotiana benthamiana and various legume species. Our assays revealed that CMV-209 could systemically infect Glycine soja (wild soybean and Pisum sativum (pea as well as N. benthamiana, but not the other legume species.

  11. Communication Breakdown: Librarian and Student Approaches to Virtual Reference Differ. A review of: Walter, Virginia A. and Cindy Mediavilla. “Teens Are from Neptune, Librarians Are from Pluto: An Analysis of Online Reference Transactions.” Library Trends 54.2 (2005: 209-227.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Hall

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To evaluate the effectiveness of an online reference and referral service for students (primarily those in middle school and high school seeking homework help. Design – Analysis of 114 transcripts of reference transactions. Setting – A centralized homework reference and tutor referral service provided on behalf of the California State Library by the Metropolitan Cooperative Library System. Subjects – Virtual reference librarians at a large urban library system and middle and high school students in California. Methods – One hundred fourteen virtual reference transactions recorded between October 12 and November 8, 2003 were evaluated against the Reference and User Services Association’s (RUSA “Guidelines for Behavioral Performance of Reference and Information Service Providers.” Secondly, the transcripts were subjected to discourse analysis. Main results Performance of virtual reference librarians vis‐àvis RUSA guidelines In the majority of cases, there was some evidence that librarians communicated clearly (110 out of 114 transactions. In 78 cases, it appeared that a librarian was available quickly, and in 92 of the transactions a friendly greeting was given. What was striking, however, was that in a clear majority of cases, some of the classic reference interview strategies were not employed. In 100 or more cases each, the following strategies were not observed: repeating or paraphrasing the question; helping to interpret the question; verifying mutual understanding; asking if the question has been answered; asking if the student needs more information. Furthermore, in 75 cases librarians did not probe for further information to clarify the question, while in 87 cases they did not check that information had been clearly understood. Possibly related to these findings, the researchers felt that the transcripts revealed “a conviction that homework questions are not the proper content for reference transactions” (222. In addition, librarians were found to be frequently too quick to refer students to a tutor, when a query might have been better answered as a reference question. Findings of discourse analysis In general, the virtual reference librarians used impersonal, formal language to “reinforce the professional’s superior position vis‐à‐vis the help‐seeker” (217. There were repeated attempts by the students to interject a lighter or warmer tone (using humour, emoticons, informal language, introducing a personal note, etc.. These attempts were rarely reciprocated, with librarians continuing to use impersonal language, including stock messages such as: “we are experiencing a very busy time right now,” (217; or, “I am going to send you a page which will give you some help with your homework. After we disconnect this session, click on this link and follow the instructions to be connected with a tutor. Please do not click on any links on this page until after we have disconnected” (217. In several cases librarians were preoccupied with defining their roles—for example, specifying that they could give reference help but not advice. In all, the distancing mechanisms used by librarians, combined with occasional inaccurate referrals and technical problems with the software, were seen to create an enormous potential forfrustration on the part of the student. Conclusions – The most important implication of the study was that librarians and students were worlds (or planets apart in their approach to the reference interaction. While “teens attempted to create meaningby recreating the chat discourse environment in which they were most at home”, librarians “tried to create meaning in a parallel discourse environment that duplicated as much as possible the standard impersonal protocols of a face‐to‐face reference counter” (223. One suggested way to alleviate the disconnect between librarians and students was to involve students in the planning of the services. For now, however, the authors conclude that “teens are from Neptune, librarians are from Pluto. Better services would result if they could meet somewhere closer together” (224.

  12. 76 FR 58283 - Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development Notice of Closed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... Development Special Emphasis Panel; Transition to Fatherhood: Fatherhood Trajectories and Consequences for Men..., Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research; 93.209, Contraception and Infertility Loan Repayment Program...

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_005363 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... protein [Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100] ... Length = 209 ... Query: 489 LNEVASRLYGLENLQNNFEGFQEGVKQVMLWQKTRTQEMMAD...GSVVSHFQPXXXXXXXXX 548 ... LNEVASRLYGLENLQNNFEGFQEGVKQVMLWQKTRTQEMMAD...GSVVSHFQP ... Sbjct: 1 ... LNEVASRLYGLENLQNNFEGFQEGVKQVMLWQKTRTQEMMADGSVVSHFQPVSEVVEV

  14. Nanoscale materials in chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klabunde, Kenneth J; Richards, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    ...: Disordered, Porous Nanostructures Stephanie L. Brock 209 9 Ordered Microporous and Mesoporous Materials Freddy Kleitz 243 10 Applications of Microporous and Mesoporous Materials Anirban Ghosh,...

  15. Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer Spirally Fluted Tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    8217- ...................................................................................................................................... 209J N 0 00 S FULLY FULLY ELPI TUBLN rREATMENT REGION 0 0 I 0 - - VISCOSITY A FFECIW SUB LAYER FIG 4.10

  16. Unigene BLAST: CBRC-CELE-05-0905 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CELE-05-0905 gnl|UG|Cel#S5710093 Caenorhabditis elegans Serpentine Receptor, c...lass H family member (srh-209) (srh-209) mRNA, complete cds /cds=p(1,1017) /gb=NM_075199 /gi=72001619 /ug=Cel.31675 /len=1017 0.0 94% ...

  17. Indian national information programme for marine science

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tapaswi, M.P.

    stream_size 11 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Natl_Inf_Policies_Program_1991_209.pdf.txt stream_source_info Natl_Inf_Policies_Program_1991_209.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset...

  18. Structural relaxation monitored by instantaneous shear modulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe; Christensen, Tage Emil

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports on aging of the silicone oil MS704 for sudden changes of temperature from 210.5 to 209.0 K and from 207.5 to 209.0 K studied by continuously monitoring the instantaneous shear modulus G [infinity]. The results are interpreted within the Tool-Narayanaswamy formalism with a reduced...

  19. Dicty_cDB: FC-AO06 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available . 211 3e-53 S26583( S26583 ) chaperonin hsp60 - maize &Z12115_1(Z12115|pid:no... 211 3e-53 ( P29185 ).... 209 8e-53 S26582( S26582 ) chaperonin hsp60 - maize &Z12114_1(Z12114|pid:no... 209 8e-53 AC161864_25(

  20. AcEST: DK957838 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |Q4GXG7|RL18_TIMBA 60S ribosomal protein L18 OS=Timarcha balea... 209 7e-54 sp|P12001|RL18_RAT 60S ribosomal...bosomal protein L18 OS=Timarcha balearica GN=RpL18 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 188 Score = 209 bits (532), Expect = 7

  1. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 42; Issue 2. Issue front cover thumbnail. Volume 42, Issue 2. June 2017, pages 209-353. pp 209-218 Article. Genetic diagnosis of a Chinese multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A family through whole genome sequencing · ZHEN-FANG DU PENG-FEI LI JIAN-QIANG ZHAO ...

  2. Drug: D03690 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D03690 Drug Desciclovir (USAN/INN) C8H11N5O2 209.0913 209.2052 D03690.gif Antiviral...08307] Antivirals Anti-HSV agent DNA polymerase inhibitor Purine analogue Desciclovir D03690 Desciclovir (US

  3. The spectrum of non- neoplastic skin lesions in Ibadan, Nigeria: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The other common specific skin lesions were lichen planus/lichenoid dermatitis 27(12.9% of 209 cases), verruca vulgaris 25 (12% of 209 cases). Conclusion: The number of histologically diagnosed non-neoplastic skin lesions is relatively small. There is a very wide spectrum of non-neoplastic skin lesions diagnosed within ...

  4. Drug: D08558 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D08558 Drug Talipexole (INN) C10H15N3S 209.0987 209.3112 D08558.gif Antiparkinsonia...ceptor interaction hsa04728(1813) Dopaminergic synapse map07057 Antiparkinsonian agents map07213 Dopamine re

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-0078 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-0078 ref|ZP_01753894.1| cobalt transport protein CbiM [Roseobacter sp.... SK209-2-6] gb|EBA17375.1| cobalt transport protein CbiM [Roseobacter sp. SK209-2-6] ZP_01753894.1 3e-62 62% ...

  6. 77 FR 58213 - Actions on Special Permit Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ...--Cargo aircraft only, 5--Passenger-carrying aircraft. Application numbers prefixed by the letters EE..., PA. additional Division 2.1 hazardous material, to increase maximum acceptance flaw size used on UE............ WavesinSolids 49 CFR 180.209, To authorize the LLC, State 180.209(a), transportation in College, PA. 180...

  7. A standard test for filter media cleanliness | Van Staden | Water SA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SS) analysis performed on the filter media residue, with the total mass of solids removed from the media quantitatively separated on the grounds of acid solubility and volatility at 550oC. Standard Methods (1985) 209C and 209D were applied to ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-01-0280 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-01-0280 ref|ZP_01754765.1| sodium:galactoside symporter family protein [Rose...obacter sp. SK209-2-6] gb|EBA16396.1| sodium:galactoside symporter family protein [Roseobacter sp. SK209-2-6] ZP_01754765.1 1.3 26% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-1256 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-1256 ref|ZP_01754413.1| cobalamin 5'-phosphate synthase [Roseobacter s...p. SK209-2-6] gb|EBA16605.1| cobalamin 5'-phosphate synthase [Roseobacter sp. SK209-2-6] ZP_01754413.1 2.2 36% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0167 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0167 ref|ZP_01754031.1| oligopeptide ABC transporter permease protein [Rose...obacter sp. SK209-2-6] gb|EBA17512.1| oligopeptide ABC transporter permease protein [Roseobacter sp. SK209-2-6] ZP_01754031.1 2.2 34% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0224 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0224 ref|ZP_01753627.1| cytochrome c-type biogenesis protein CcmF [Rose...obacter sp. SK209-2-6] gb|EBA17994.1| cytochrome c-type biogenesis protein CcmF [Roseobacter sp. SK209-2-6] ZP_01753627.1 0.033 24% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-1577 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-1577 ref|ZP_01754031.1| oligopeptide ABC transporter permease protein [Rose...obacter sp. SK209-2-6] gb|EBA17512.1| oligopeptide ABC transporter permease protein [Roseobacter sp. SK209-2-6] ZP_01754031.1 0.50 31% ...

  13. 77 FR 9239 - California State Motor Vehicle and Nonroad Engine Pollution Control Standards; Truck Idling...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-16

    ... Truck Idling Requirements By letter dated May 9, 2008, CARB informed EPA that it had adopted its Truck...-use performance standards for HDDV operators who use alternative technologies to supply power for... the section 209(e) rule, EPA has historically interpreted the section 209(e)(2)(iii) ``consistency...

  14. Characterization of Leishmania spp. causing cutaneous leishmaniasis in Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara Coelho, Leila Ines; Paes, Marcilene; Guerra, Jorge Augusto; Barbosa, Maria das Graças; Coelho, Candisse; Lima, Bruna; Brito, Maria Edileuza; Brandão Filho, Sinval Pinto

    2011-03-01

    In the State of Amazonas, American tegumentary leishmaniasis is endemic and presents a wide spectrum of clinical variability due to the large diversity of circulating species in the region. Isolates from patients in Manaus and its metropolitan region were characterized using monoclonal antibodies and isoenzymes belonging to four species of the parasite: Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis, 73% (153/209); Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, 14% (30/209); Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, 8% (17/209); and Leishmania (Viannia) naiffii, 4% (9/209). The most prevalent species was L. (V.) guyanensis. The principal finding of this study was the important quantity of infections involving more than one parasite species, representing 14% (29/209) of the total. The findings obtained in this work regarding the parasite are further highlighted by the fact that these isolates were obtained from clinical samples collected from single lesions.

  15. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  16. α decay of the very neutron-deficient isotopes 197-199Fr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaninová, Z.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Heßberger, F. P.; Ackermann, D.; Andel, B.; Drummond, M. C.; Hofmann, S.; Huyse, M.; Kindler, B.; Lane, J. F. W.; Liberati, V.; Lommel, B.; Page, R. D.; Rapisarda, E.; Sandhu, K.; Šáro, Š.; Thornthwaite, A.; Van Duppen, P.

    2013-04-01

    Decay properties of the very neutron-deficient isotopes 197-199Fr were studied at the velocity filter Separator for Heavy Ion reaction Products (SHIP) at GSI in Darmstadt. The isotopes were produced in the 2n-4n evaporation channels of the fusion-evaporation reaction 60Ni+141Pr → 201Fr*. Improved α-decay properties of 199Fr were determined and the possible existence of two α-decaying states in this nucleus is discussed. For the isotope 198Fr a broad α-decay energy distribution was detected in the range of (7470-7930) keV and two α-decaying states were observed with half-lives of 1.1(7) and 15(3) ms. The new isotope 197Fr was identified based on the observation of one α-decay chain yielding Eα=7728(15) keV and T1/2=0.6-0.3+3.0 ms. The systematics of reduced α-decay widths are presented for neutron-deficient francium, radon, and astatine isotopes.

  17. Nuclear Data Evaluation for Mass Chain A=217:Odd-Proton Nuclei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif S Nafee

    Full Text Available Thallium (81(217Tl, Bismuth (83(217Bi, Astatine (85(217At, Francium (87(217Fr, Actinium (89(217Ac and Protactinium (91(217Pa are of odd-proton numbers among the mass chain A = 217. In the present work, the half-lives and gamma transitions for the six nuclei have been studied and adopted based on the recently published interactions or unevaluated nuclear data sets XUNDL. The Q (α has been updated based on the recent published work of the Atomic Mass Evaluation AME2012 as well. Moreover, the total conversion electrons as well as the K-Shell to L-Shell, L-Shell to M-Shell and L-Shell to N-Shell Conversion Electron Ratios have been calculated using BrIcc code v2.3. An updated skeleton decay scheme for each of the above nuclei has been presented here. The decay hindrance factors (HF calculated using the ALPHAD program, which is available from Brookhaven National Laboratory's website, have been calculated for the α- decay data sets for (221Fr-, (221Ac- and (221Pa-α-decays.

  18. Nuclear Data Evaluation for Mass Chain A=217:Odd-Proton Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafee, Sherif S; Shaheen, Salem A; Al-Ramady, Amir M

    2016-01-01

    Thallium (81(217)Tl, Bismuth (83(217)Bi), Astatine (85(217)At), Francium (87(217)Fr), Actinium (89(217)Ac) and Protactinium (91(217)Pa) are of odd-proton numbers among the mass chain A = 217. In the present work, the half-lives and gamma transitions for the six nuclei have been studied and adopted based on the recently published interactions or unevaluated nuclear data sets XUNDL. The Q (α) has been updated based on the recent published work of the Atomic Mass Evaluation AME2012 as well. Moreover, the total conversion electrons as well as the K-Shell to L-Shell, L-Shell to M-Shell and L-Shell to N-Shell Conversion Electron Ratios have been calculated using BrIcc code v2.3. An updated skeleton decay scheme for each of the above nuclei has been presented here. The decay hindrance factors (HF) calculated using the ALPHAD program, which is available from Brookhaven National Laboratory's website, have been calculated for the α- decay data sets for (221)Fr-, (221)Ac- and (221)Pa-α-decays.

  19. On the theory of time dilation in chemical kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Mirza Wasif

    2017-10-01

    The rates of chemical reactions are not absolute but their magnitude depends upon the relative speeds of the moving observers. This has been proved by unifying basic theories of chemical kinetics, which are transition state theory, collision theory, RRKM and Marcus theory, with the special theory of relativity. Boltzmann constant and energy spacing between permitted quantum levels of molecules are quantum mechanically proved to be Lorentz variant. The relativistic statistical thermodynamics has been developed to explain quasi-equilibrium existing between reactants and activated complex. The newly formulated Lorentz transformation of the rate constant from Arrhenius equation, of the collision frequency and of the Eyring and Marcus equations renders the rate of reaction to be Lorentz variant. For a moving observer moving at fractions of the speed of light along the reaction coordinate, the transition state possess less kinetic energy to sweep translation over it. This results in the slower transformation of reactants into products and in a stretched time frame for the chemical reaction to complete. Lorentz transformation of the half-life equation explains time dilation of the half-life period of chemical reactions and proves special theory of relativity and presents theory in accord with each other. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the present theory, the enzymatic reaction of methylamine dehydrogenase and radioactive disintegration of Astatine into Bismuth are considered as numerical examples.

  20. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Progress report, September 1, 1992--August 24, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1993-08-20

    The overall goal of this project is to improve the effectiveness of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) to image and quantify radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. During the past year, we have made significant progress toward this goal, and this report summarizes that work. Our efforts have been mainly directed along three fronts. First, we have developed and tested new reconstruction methods including three-dimensional iterative algorithms that model non-uniform attenuation and distance-dependent detector response. Both fan beam and parallel beam collimator geometries have been modeled and novel ways of improving the efficiency of the computationally intensive methods have been introduced. Second, an ultra-high resolution, small field-of-view pinhole collimator has been constructed and evaluated. Reconstructed spatial resolution of 1 to 3 mm (FWHM) has been achieved in phantom scans with a useful field-of-view of 9 to 10 cm. Finally, we have investigated the ability of SPECT to image and quantify astatine-211 distributions. Reconstructed images of phantom data demonstrated quantitative accuracy to within 10% with proper attenuation and scatter compensation.